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Republic of the Philippines

Polytechnic University of the Philippine’s


Quezon City

Student Teaching Portfolio

Of

Liza B. Batonghinog

Bachelor in Business Teacher Education


(BBTE)

Assigned to:

LAGRO HIGH SCHOOL


Greater Lagro, Quezon City
SY: 2010-2011

Submitted to:

Prof. Sheryl R. Morales


Coordinator Adviser

April 2011
TABLE OF CONTENTS

Dedication

Acknowledgement

Prayer for Teachers

Introduction

 PUP- Philosophy

 Goals

 Vision/ Mission

Designated School

-LAGRO HIGH SCHOOL

 History

 Mission/ Vision

 Map

 Organizational Structure

 Final Demo Plan (Learning Module)

 Brief Synopsis of Professionals readings (research)

o Guidelines, Policies and references of Student Teachings

o Student teaching guidelines, memo, journal, ICT Memo, learning


Approaches
 Bibliography

Professional Development Plan/ Career Plan

Narrative Report (weekly)

Current Issues in Education (Foreign and Local)

Curriculum Vitae

Attachment

 Photos

 Lesson Plan

 Certificate / DTR
Dedication

I’ll dedicate

this manual to our Lord God for his guidance,

protection, strength and enlightenment

as I go through my study.

To my beloved parents who are willing

to give their entirely support and

deepest understanding

through this project.

Also to my dearly students

at Lagro high School, who inspires me a lot

and to those people

who are willing to learn about

my experience while I’m having

this OJT

(Practice Teaching).
ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

This manual project would not have been possible without the support of many
people. As the author I’m wishing to express my appreciation to my supervisors; Prof.
Sheryl R. Morales and Prof. Marilyn Isip who are abundantly helpful and offered
invaluable assistance, support and guidance. To my deepest thankfulness are also due to
the faculties of Lagro High School in T.L.E. Department. Mrs. Carina Ortiz- Luiz and Sir
Norwin Millares without them knowledge and assistance this would not have been
successful.

Special thanks also to all my graduating friends, especially group members;


EINJHELZ- Annalyn Bruzon, Teresa Comendador, Jenelyn Paris, Jasmine Taylor, all ST
in Lagro High and most especially to the library of P.U.P.Q.C. for sharing the literature
and invaluable assistance. Not forgetting to my students who always been there to inspire
a lot.

I am wishing to express my love and gratitude to my beloved families; for their


understanding & endless love, through the duration of my studies.

And most especially to our Almighty Lord God, for his untiring effort in giving
strength and love to come up with my study
Prayer for Teachers

Lord Jesus, when you lived and worked and


Talked amongst men in Palestine, they called you Teacher.

Help me to remember the greatness of the work


which has been given to me to do;
That I work with the most precious material in the world,
the mind of youth. Help me always to remember
that I am making marks upon
that mind which time will never rub out.

Give me patience with those who are slow to learn,


and even with those who refuse to learn.
When I have to exercise discipline,
help me to do so in sternness and yet in love.
Keep me from the sarcastic and the biting tongue,
and help me always to encourage those who
are doing their best, even if that best
is not very good.

Help me to help my students, not only to store


things in their memories, but to be able
to use their minds, and to think for themselves.
And amidst all the worries
and the frustrations of my job,
help me to remember that the future of the nation
and of the world is in my hands.
Amen.
INTRODUCTION TO STUDENT TEACHING

Student Teaching in a College- supervised instructional experience; usually the


culminating course in a University/ College undergraduate education or graduate school
programs leading to teacher education and certification. Examples of programs include
early childhood (Birth – Grade 2) childhood (Grade 1-6) and adolescence (Grade 7-12).
It is required by those earning either a Bachelor of Education or Master of Education
degree.

Student Teaching is required for students who not yet certified to teach. It is
different from a Practicum, which is required when a student already holds certificate
extension to teach another area of specialization, they are both college- supervised field-
based experiences.

The Student Teaching experience lasts about the length of a semester; long
enough to fulfill the college’s assigned task. This experience given the prospective
teaching professional an opportunity to teach under the supervision of a permanently
certified master teacher (see school master).

The Student Teacher is usually placed in neighboring or participating school


district. The student teacher is monitored by the cooperating teacher from the district as
well as supervisor through the college. The supervisor acts as a decision between the
cooperating, teacher and the head of the college’s student teaching department.

The Student teacher essentially shadows the cooperating teacher for about one
week, eventually gaining more responsibility in teaching the class as the days progress.
The supervisor, as well as cooperating teacher, are to monitor the progress of the student
teacher throughout the experience, ensuring it’s satisfactory. A grade of pass or fail in
POLYTECHNIC UNIVERSITY OF THE PHILIPPINES

student teaching, as well as satisfactory completion of a school’s education program, is


an indication as to whether the college recommends the student for certification to teach.

Philosophy

As a state university, the Polytechnic University of the Philippines believes that:

 Education is an instrument for the development of the citizenry and for the
enhancement of nation building;
 Meaningful growth and transformation of the country are best achieved in an
atmosphere of brotherhood, peace, freedom, justice and a nationalist-oriented
education imbued with the spirit of humanist internationalism.

PUP Goals

Reflective of the great emphasis being given by the country's leadership aimed at
providing appropriate attention to the alleviation of the plight of the poor, the
development of the citizens and of the national economy to become globally
competitive, the University shall commit its academic resources and manpower to
achieve its goals through:

1. Provision of undergraduate and graduate education which meet international


standards of quality and excellence;
2. Generation and transmission of knowledge in the broad range of disciplines
relevant and responsive to the dynamically changing domestic and international
environment;
3. Provision of more equitable access to higher education opportunities to deserving
and qualified Filipinos; and
4. Optimization, through efficiency and effectiveness, of social, institutional, and
individual returns and benefits derived from the utilization of higher education
resources.

Vision
In consonance with the vision of PUP, Towards a Total University, the CEFP
envisions itself as an engine of change that will propel the University into the ranks of
internationally recognized institutions of higher learning in the ASEAN region, and
deliver quality and socially responsive education in the fields of Economics, Banking and
Finance, Political Science, Public Administration and Governance.

Mission

The mission of PUP in the 21st Century is to provide the highest quality of
comprehensive and global education and community services accessible to all students,
Filipinos and foreigners alike.

It shall offer high quality undergraduate and graduate programs that are responsive to the
changing needs of the students to enable them to lead productive and meaningful lives.

PUP commits itself to:

1. Democratize access to educational opportunities;

2. Promote science and technology consciousness and develop relevant expertise and
competence among all members of the academe, stressing their importance in building a
truly independent and sovereign Philippines;

3. Emphasize the unrestrained and unremitting search for truth and its defense, as well as
the advancement of moral and spiritual values;

4. Promote awareness of our beneficial and relevant cultural heritage;

5. Develop in the students and faculty the values of self-discipline, love of country and
social consciousness and the need to defend human rights;

6. Provide its students and faculty with a liberal arts-based education essential to a broader
understanding and appreciation of life and to the total development of the individual;

7. Make the students and faculty aware of technological, social as well as political and
economic problems and encourage them to contribute to the realization of nationalist
industrialization and economic development of the country;

8. Use and propagate the national language and other Philippine languages and develop
proficiency in English and other foreign languages required by the students’ fields of
specialization;

9. Promote intellectual leadership and sustain a humane and technologically advanced


academic community where people of diverse ideologies work and learn together to
attain academic, research and service excellence in a continually changing world; and

10. Build a learning community in touch with the main currents of political, economic and
cultural life throughout the world; a community enriched by the presence of a significant
number of international students; and a community supported by new technologies that
facilitate active participation in the creation and use of information and knowledge on a
global scale.
LAGRO HIGH SCHOOL

HISTORY

In the early seventies, the growing number of people in the GSIS La Mesa Homeowners
Association (GLAMEHA) triggered the need for a high school in Lagro Subdivision. The
officers of GLAMEHA requested fervently for an establishment of a high school next to
Lagro Elementary School. With the aid of the city government and the education bureau,
Novaliches High School with Mr. Florencio Dumlao as principal started accepting
students. This high school annex started on June 13, 1974 with 87 students and a facility,
which were humbly two housing units in Block 59 and chairs the students provided
themselves.

On August 26 of the same year, Lagro Annex was transferred to the Lagro Elementary
School compound and occupied the sawali-walled makeshift building. The high school
was then headed by Mr. Crispulo A. Pilar with Mr. Narciso M. Caingat, Mrs. Nilfa C.
Caingat and Mrs. Greta Manlapig as pioneer teachers.

Two years after, the enrolment rose to 249 from the former 87 with three sections in first
year, two in second year, and one in third year. They were all managed to stay in just four
classrooms guided by nine teachers.

The first graduation from this high school happened two years after with an increased
enrolment of 461 with Mrs. Josefa Q. Maglipon, head of the Home Economics
Department in Novaliches High School, who replaced Mr. Pilar(who left for the United
States).

The School Year 1977-1978 reached 774 with 15 sections occupying seven classrooms.
With this problem on accommodation, Mr. Florencio Dumlao appealed to the national
government for a Lagro Annex Building. Through the unrelenting efforts of the
department head-in-charge and with the PTA lobbying behind, the 1.3 hectare present
school site, and building became a reality.

At the opening of classes on June 11, 1978, 923 students flocked the newly constructed
building which was a two-story 18-room structure standing proudly with Mrs. Maglipon
as head of the school. She was replaced with Mr. Silverio Reinoso. Mr. Reinoso had to
continue with the challenge to manage 19 sections of students with just 32 teachers.

It was the significant day of September 1, 1978 that Lagro High School was inaugurated
by Mrs. Commemoracion M. Concepcion, the former schools division superintendent.
Thus, it has become its foundation day.

Hand in hand with the influx of residents in Lagro Subdivision is the continuous increase
of student population. And to accommodate this increasing population, a six-room
building on the southern site of the campus was constructed. The school then also
improved with the completion of concrete fences surrounding the campus, construction of
the stage and the new steel flagpole, all to house and educate the community.

Mr. Reinoso was replaced by Mrs. Virginia H. Cerrudo on September of 1981.

Mrs. Cerrudo was replaced with Ms. Felicidad C. Gutierrez in 1987 bringing another
building funded by the city government. The same year created the Lagro High School-
Payatas Annex with 257 students. This annex was assigned to Mrs. Sheridan Evangelista,
who was then the Social Studies Department Head of the Main School.

Promoted as Principal IV, Ms. Gutierres was transferred to E. Rodriguez Jr. High School.
Mr. William S. Barcena took her place as the principal of Lagro High School on June
1991. Three years after, Mr. Barcena was replaced by Mrs. Cristina C. Monis, the
General Education Supervisor I-English, as Officer-In-Charge on January 8, 1993.

Mr. Gil T. Magbanua replaced Mrs. Monis on June 13, 1993


To accommodate the continuous increasing enrollees, the three-story building funded by
the Quezon City Government was constructed. The third Annex in Fairview was finally
opened with Mrs. Justina A. Farolan as the Teacher-In-Charge.

Dr. Consolacion C. Montano replaced Dr. Gil Magbanua later on with more
improvements.

Mrs. Sheridan Evangelista made her comeback as the principal of Lagro High School in
1998 with improved facilities and technology advancements for the school.

The dawn of more improvements was realized when Dr. Fernando C. Javier became the
principal in April 2003. The construction of the new building previously applied by Mrs.
Sheridan Evangelista was built and inaugurated by the successor, Dr. Javier. The SB
Building and the full renovation of the formerly called Social Hall was transformed into a
multi-purpose conference room conveniently equipped with multimedia projectors and
modern sound technology now being utilized for events, seminars, workshops by the
whole division. The construction of the new gate, renovations of all facilities and the
covered court; Lagro High School now boasts of not only its talents but it’s conducive
learning ambience sure to provide every learner more motivation to pursue his dreams.
Lagro High School reaped achievements in the district, division, regional and national
competition under Dr. Javier. The Bureau of Alternative Learning System was
established and soon after the Open High School. The Special Education Program was
established accepting deaf and blind students. The Guidance Program was also enhanced
and improved with the administration of Dr. Javier. International competitions, speech
and debate contests sponsored by the government and private companies, Palarong
Pambansa, National Schools Press Conference and the creation of the Special Program in
the Arts which annually showcases talents in its culminating activities.
Today, as we speak, Lagro High School does not only have a growing number of
enrollees but also consistently develops as a community that consists of highly
competitive and productive members.
Lagro High School Vision and Mission

PHILOSOPHY:
The development of the young into an intelligent, morally upright, responsible and
productive member of the society is the main focus of education. For this reason, Lagro
High School believes that every Filipino high school age youth must be given the right to
quality instruction in a compassionate and caring environment.

VISION:
Lagro High School is an educational institution that produces academically competent,
morally upright and vocationally prepared citizens of the society.

MISSION:
To ensure the maximum intellectual, social, emotional and physical growth of the child
and strengthen moral foundations through relevant and adequate learning experiences in a
nurturing and caring school environment.
PROGRAMS OF LAGRO HIGH SCHOOL
ORGANIZATIONAL CHART OF LAGRO HIGH SCHOOL

MAP FOR LAGRO HIGH SCHOOL


FINAL DEMO PLAN

ORGAZANIZATIONAL CHART
IN TLE DEPARTMENT
Lagro High School
District II- Quezon City Metro Manila

Name: Batonghinog, Liza B. Date: February 24, 2011


School: Polytechnic University of the Philippine’s Time: 1:00-2:00
Cooperating Teacher: Mr. Norwin Millares Year & Section:
II- Walnut

LEARNING COMPONENT: T.L.E. II


SUB-LEARNING COMPONENT: Entrepreneurial Activities

I. OBJECTIVES:
At the end of the lesson the students should be able to
1. identify what retailing is;
2. classify the retail stores according to Merchandise Line;
3. discuss the role of retailing in the community; and
4. show awareness of the importance of retailing business in the community.

II. CONTENT:
A. Topic: Retailing
B. Materials: LCD, Visual Aids, Chalk and Board
C. Reference: T.L.E. (Second Year- Textbook)
By: Villaflor Padullo and Rocena Viernes pp. 277-279
Module in Entrepreneurial Retail Operation
By: Lorenzo Carriedo Jr. Merla Villanueva and Erlinda Garcia
pp.7-38

III. PROCEDURE:
A. PREPARATORY ACTIVITIES:
1. Routine Activities
∗ Prayer
∗ Greeting
∗ Checking of attendance

2. Review of the Past Lesson


-Effective Management- (4) Managerial Functions in a
business
3. Motivation
-Showing up some pictures about Retailing

4. Unlocking of Difficulties

MATCHING TYPE GAME: “I’m yours- My word”

Direction: Selected groups will be given placards having


different meanings, students will have to find out and match the
corresponding meaning of the following words that are posted on the
board.
1. Wholesale- The sale of goods in large quantities
2. Bulk- in volume.
3. Market- A public place where buyers and sellers make
transactions, directly or via intermediaries.
4. Credit- A contractual agreement in which the trust is given to a
costumer for future payment.
5. Inventory- is the total amount of goods and/or materials contained
in a store or factory at any given time.

B. LESSON PROPER

LEARNING TASK STRATEGIES


EVALUATION

1. Definition of retailing -Brainstorming -oral


response
2. Classification of retail stores
according to Merchandise line -Discussion -oral
response
3. The role of retailing in the
Community -Buzz Session -oral
response
4. Appreciation of the value of
Retailing to our community -Open-ended sentence -oral
response

C. CLOSING ACTIVITIES:
1. Generalization
It is easier to get employed or start a career in retailing than in any
other field.

2. Values Integration
The students will show awareness about the importance of retailing
business in the community.

3. Evaluation

SHORT QUIZ: (TRUE OR FALSE)


Direction: Write TRUE, if the statement is correct and FALSE,
if it is wrong.

_____1. Retailing is refers to all forms of selling in small quantity


directly to consumer.
_____2. It is easier to get employed or start a career in retailing than in
any other field.
_____3. An individual engaged in the activity of retailing is called
suppliers.
_____4. The retailer provides place, time, possessions and sometimes
utility for their suppliers and their consumers.
_____5. For end-users/ consumers, the retailer not provides goods and
service information.

ANSWER KEY

1. TRUE
2. TRUE
3. FALSE
4. TRUE
5. FALSE

IV. ASSIGNMENT:
1. Topic: Importance of Production Plan
2. Words to study:
a. Manufacturing
b. Equipments
c. Hospitalization
d. Capital

Guide Questions:
1. What is Production Plan?
2. Why do we need Production Plan for a Manufacturing Business?
3. How can we design a well production plan to ensure the productivity of
a business?

Reference:
T.L.E. II- (Textbook) By: Villaflor Padullo and Rocena Viernes pp. 281

Prepared by: Checked by:


_________________
Liza Batonghinog Mr. Norwin
Millares
Student Teacher Cooperating Teacher

Brief Synopsis of Professionals readings (research)


Increasing visibility for LGBTQ students: What schools can do to create
inclusive classroom communities.

Derry L. Stufft

Abstract

The number of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and questioning students is increasing in
schools. School districts, administrators and teachers need to increase awareness of these students
and work to make them feel included and welcomed in a safe school environment, one free from
offensive languages and practices.
This article discusses some of the problems that these students face and some strategies that
educators can use to help them be a valuable part of a learning community

Exploring Mathematics College Readiness in the United States

Nancy J. McCormick, Marva S. Lucas

Abstract

Large numbers of students graduate high school unprepared for post-secondary education and ill-
equipped for the labor force of the 21st century. Research on college readiness reveals the
prominent role that mathematics preparedness plays in the fulfillment of hopes and dreams for a
college degree. As requirements for post-secondary education and qualifications for the
workforce merge, college readiness in mathematics is a significant factor in job opportunities and
career choices. This report provides an in-depth exploration in mathematics college readiness in
the United States and offers a compilation of recommendations from many significant
constituents who have made notable advances in mathematics preparedness in the education of
today’s high school students.
Conclusion
The literature reveals the significant role that mathematics readiness plays in admission to
higher education. Mathematics readiness merits special attention because a deficit in a
student’s preparation in mathematics limits choices of college majors and careers. There
is also a strong correlation between preparedness for college mathematics and the
prospect of earning a college degree (Ali & Jenkins, 2002). This review provides a broad
examination of college readiness in mathematics. Many studies have established that the
lack of college readiness is a long-standing and prevalent problem, affecting greater and
greater numbers of U. S. high school graduates. Overall, nearly 33% of students admitted
to post-secondary institutions are not prepared for college-level
mathematics (Long, Iatarola, & Conger, 2009). The SREB reports the number of students
requiring remediation in mathematics exceeds numbers for remediation in either reading
or English (Kaye,

Lord, & Bottoms, 2006).

The mathematics readiness problem significantly impacts college success, workforce


eligibility, and U. S. competitiveness in a global economy. This study presents various
factors
influencing college readiness and reveals a serious disconnect between a high school
diploma and a student’s preparedness for post-secondary education. Historically,
secondary and post-secondary institutions have functioned as separate entities. The goal
of formulating realistic and effective college readiness standards obligates these two
groups to collaborate in identifying skills and content
knowledge that students will require to be successful in entry-level college courses. The
elements for a strong mathematics program as indicated from the examination of
literature should be implemented within an emerging culture focused on intellectual
development and high expectations for all students. Only then will real value be restored
to a high school diploma enabling graduates to reach their highest potential in post-
secondary education and in a labor force geared to a global economy.
Recommendations
A review of college readiness in general suggests that all high schools should foster a
climate
of academic challenge necessitating continuous intellectual development on the part of
students and
teachers alike. Specifically, the literature indicates the following elements of a strong
mathematics
program:
1. A common college preparatory core of rigorous courses for all students;
2. An offering of advanced courses beyond Algebra II;
3. A continual emphasis on teacher professional development to improve content
knowledge and pedagogical skills;
4. A culture of high expectations and intellectual development for all students;
5. Student support services;
6. Formative assessments utilizing student data to modify instruction as needed;
and

EXPLORING MATHEMATICS COLLEGE READINESS


21
7. Standards developed by secondary and post-secondary educators with exit
exams reflecting agreed-upon standards for college readiness.
Taking higher-level mathematics courses in high school relates positively to student
success
in initial post-secondary coursework (Russell, 2008). A high school curriculum consisting
of more rigorous coursework is needed for all students. Tracking all students to a college
preparatory curriculum has been shown to be particularly effective for minority students
and for students formerly classified as low-achievers. In fact, a rigorous course selection
has been shown to be more important in student success than either income or education
level of parents (ACT, 2005, 2007; Ali
& Jenkins, 2002; Boser & Burd, 2009; Huebner & Corbett, 2008; Olson, 2006). A
curriculum of demanding courses needs to go beyond the traditional core to span four
years of mathematics including courses beyond Algebra II. Students taking more
advanced courses are the ones who are most likely to be ready for college. Advanced
mathematics courses are a part of the Courses for Success that ACT recommends for all
students going into college or the workplace (ACT, 2004).

Increasing student requirements to include more advanced mathematics courses


necessitates
teacher development in content knowledge and pedagogical skills to address new
standards
(Achieve, 2009; Conley, 2007). Strategies for teaching should include ways to serve a
diverse student population and multiple learning styles. Support for students in
challenging college preparatory courses might be provided in the forms of double class
periods for some subjects and through afterschool
and summer programs that target those students needing extra help. Additionally,
customized learning plans based on formative evaluations and individual needs could be
generated for at-risk

students (Achieve, 2005).


States are recommended to reevaluate and change teacher licensure requirements to
correspond to the more rigorous curriculum that is being promoted. Concurrently, post-
secondary education needs to make adjustments in teacher preparation programs to
produce qualified teachers for effective instruction in more advanced course offerings
(Achieve, 2005; Chait & Venezia, 2009;
Spence, 2007).
The elements of a strong mathematics program reflect a school culture of high
expectations an environment where all students are given the opportunity to reach their
potential. Such an
environment promotes the success of individual students and serves to narrow
achievement gaps among ethnicities and socio-economic groups within the student
population (Achieve, 2005). A demanding school curriculum immersed in a culture that
not only emphasizes content knowledge, but also recognizes the importance of
developing key cognitive strategies such as analysis, interpretation, precision, accuracy,
problem solving, and reasoning prepares students for success both in post-secondary
education and in the workplace

(Conley, 2007).
Contact CIE at cie@asu.edu
Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College
PO Box 37100
Phoenix, AZ 85069
My teaching experiences

Friday, January 7, 2011

A REFLECTIVE PAPER

As everybody says that life of a teacher is never that easy, he should be a role
model and a good example to everyone. As an individual engaged to this kind of
profession, he must first possess all the traits that will make him to be a stronger and a
better person. Most especially on dealing with students of different personalities.
All children misbehave at some time; it is part of finding out what appropriate behavior is
and where the limits are. Children may throw tantrums, test the rules, start fights, refuse
to cooperate with the teacher’s house rules and routines, use bad language—the list goes
on. As the teacher teachesstudents appropriate behavior, what the expected rules and
boundaries are all about, it's important to remember the goals of discipline. Discipline
means helping a child develop self-control and a sense of limits, experience the
consequences of his/her behavior, and learn from his/her mistakes. Discipline does not
mean punishment or conflict between the teacher and students. All of them need the
security of knowing the rules and boundaries of behavior; without them they feel at a
loss, and later on they become abusive.
Positive reinforcement is the best technique for encouraging wanted behavior. Most
students crave attention and acceptance from the teacher and will work to get it. Rewards
are not bribes; they are ways to show to student that she is doing a good job.But in the
end, the teacher must be clear, firm and specific about what you mean, be respectful.
Don't resort to name-calling or yelling. And the consequence should follow the behavior
immediately. The consequence should be fair in relation to the behavior.
TITLE AND BRIEF SYNOPSIS OF PROFESSIONAL READING AND REFERENCES

How to Discipline Children and Help Them Develop Self-Control


The foundations for discipline are laid down in the early years. Flexibility is the
key to discipline as children grow. Parents must be prepared to modify their discipline
approach over time, using different strategies as their child develops greater
independence and capacity for self-regulation and responsibility. During adolescence, the
individuals become responsible for their own behavior. Establishing self-control is a
process which develops slowly, and the ultimate goal of discipline is to help children
build their own self-control, not to have them merely obey adult commands.
How do children raised by these types of parents grow up? Follow-up studies
show that the moderate way, between extreme permissiveness and extreme strictness, is
the most effective of the three styles. Children raised by authoritative/moderate parents
tended to have a good self-concept and to be responsible, cooperative, self-reliant and
intellectually curious. Children raised by authoritarian/strict parents tended to be timid
and withdrawn, less intellectually curious and dependent on the voice of authority.
Children raised by permissive parents tended to be immature, reluctant to accept
responsibility or to show independence.

Following are some helpful discipline techniques:


· Use language to help solve problems
· Ignoring
· Rewards
· Natural consequences
· No more no – keep it positive
· Don't dictate: negotiate
· Pick your battles
· Prevention
· Dealing with unacceptable behavior
· What doesn't work
· When to seek help
Guidelines, Policies
and references of Student Teachings

Student Teaching

The first major step in moving from amateur status toward gaining the
competencies that mark the real professional is the student-teaching opportunity to put
educational theory and methods into practice. Student teaching is first and foremost a
learning situation. This is the craft before he has to put his skills on the line in his own
classroom. This is the student teacher’s chance to learn from his mistakes without
causing harm to students. This is the time for him to find out the strategies, tactics, and
teaching styles that best suit him. It is a time of trial and error and for growing
confidence and beginning expertise. It is not a time of perfection but of striving for
competence.

The Student Teacher’s Code


(From Rivera and Sambrano)

A. Responsibility to the student


1. The student teacher is a professional practitioner in his relationships with his
students. All data concerning the school and the students must be kept
confidential.
2. The student teacher refrains from imposing his religion or political views
upon his students.
3. The student teacher recognizes his continuing need for understanding student
growth and development.
One the basis of understanding, he develops:
a. A learning program oriented to the individual capacities of his
students.
b. A social climate which encourages personal integrity and social
responsibility.
B. Responsibility to the Host School
1. The student teacher acts only through accepted channels of
communication and authority in the school system.
2. The student teacher recognizes his duties, responsibilities, and
privileges.
3. The supervising teacher assumes only the authority which has been
delegated to him.
4. The student teacher respects the professional right and personal dignity
for the supervising teacher, regular teacher (critic or cooperating
teacher) and other staff members, the college supervisor and student
observers in the classroom situation.
5. The student teacher who encounters difficulty in a professional
situation first consults the supervising teacher. If he desires additional
aid, he will take the matter to the Department Head or Dean.

C. Responsibility to the Teacher- Education Institution

1. The student teacher recognizes that any misconduct is a reflection


upon the teacher-education is a reflection upon the teacher-education
institution. He upholds the standards of the institution in his
professional right.
2. The student teacher approaches his own learning institution with a
positive attitude.
3. The student teacher appreciates and makes constructive use of the
assistance of the student teaching or college supervisor in adjusting to
professional practice.

D. Responsibility to the Profession


1. The student teacher shows pride in and considers himself a member of the
profession. He acts according to the established ethics in all matters.
2. The student teacher maintains membership in and supports professional
organization.
3. The student teacher is reader, he keeps up-to-date on professional matters and
current affairs.
4. It is the student teacher’s responsibility to obtain information about the legal
aspects of his professional practice and certification.
5. Placement
a. The student teacher, looking forward to placement, establishes a file in
the professional placement office.
b. Prior permission is obtained from people whose names are used as
professional references.
c. Applicants use only professional channels and do not employ political
pressure in obtaining a position.
d. The student teacher does not apply or underbid for a position held by a
qualified teacher.
e. In order that the administrator may best utilize the prospective
teacher’s ability, the student teacher will be candid in the statement of
his competencies.
f. Upon acceptance of a contract, the student teacher withdraws all other
applications immediately.

Characteristics of Successful Teachers

1. Are good managers


2. Are well organized
3. Encourage time on task
4. Focus their class activities
5. Teach imaginatively
6. Know their subject
7. Know their students
8. Hold high expectations
9. Are supportive
10. Adapt
11. Use intrinsic control
12. Match objectives, teaching method, content and test

References:
By: manual for observation, participation and community immersion
Avelina C. Bucao M.A.T.
pp.3-5

Top 10 Tips for Student Teachers


By Melissa Kelly, About.com Guide

Student teachers are often placed into an awkward and stressful situation,
not really sure of their authority and sometimes not even placed with veteran
teachers who are much help. These tips can aid student teachers as they
begin their first teaching assignments. Please note: these are not suggestions
for how to approach the students but instead for how to most effectively
succeed in your new teaching environment.

1. Be On Time

Punctuality is very important in the 'real world'. If you are late, you will
definitely NOT start out on the right foot with your cooperating teacher. Even
worse, if you arrive after a class has begun which you are supposed to be
teaching, you are placing that teacher and yourself in an awkward situation.

2. Dress Appropriately

As a teacher, you are a professional and you are supposed to dress accordingly. There is
nothing wrong with over dressing during your student teaching assignments. The clothes
do help lend you an air of authority, especially if you look awfully young. Further, your
dress lets the coordinating teacher know of your professionalism and dedication to your
assignment.
3. Be Flexible

Remember that the coordinating teacher has pressures placed upon them just as you have
your own pressures to deal with. If you normally teach only 3 classes and the
coordinating teacher asks that you take on extra classes one day because he has an
important meeting to attend, look at this as your chance to get even further experience
while impressing your dedication to your coordinating teacher.

Flexibility is the one the top six keys to being a successful teacher.

4. Follow the School Rules

This might seem obvious to some but it is important that you do not break school rules.
For example, if it is against the rules to chew gum in class, then do not chew it yourself.
If the campus is 'smoke-free', do not light up during your lunch period. This is definitely
not professional and would be a mark against you when it comes time for your
coordinating teacher and school to report on your abilities and actions.

In addition, follow your own classroom rules.

5. Plan Ahead

If you know you will need copies for a lesson, do not wait until the morning of
the lesson to get them completed. Many schools have procedures that MUST
be followed for copying to occur. If you fail to follow these procedures you will
be stuck without copies and will probably look unprofessional at the same
time.

6. Befriend the Office Staff

This is especially important if you believe that you will be staying in the area and
possibly trying for a job at the school where you are teaching. These people's opinions of
you will have an impact on whether or not you are hired. They can also make your time
during student teaching much easier to handle. Don't underestimate their worth.

• Coworkers and Teaching

7. Maintain Confidentiality

Remember that if you are taking notes about students or classroom


experiences to turn in for grades, you should either not use their names or
change them to protect their identities. You never know who you are
teaching or what their relationship might be to your instructors and
coordinators.
8. Don't Gossip

It might be tempting to hang out in the teacher lounge and indulge in gossip
about fellow teachers. However, as a student teacher this would be a very
risky choice. You might say something you could regret later. You might find
out information that is untrue and clouds your judgement. You might even
offend someone without realizing it. Remember, these are teachers you could
be working with again some day in the future.

9. Be Professional With Fellow Teachers

Do not interrupt other teachers' classes without an absolutely good reason.


When you are speaking with your coordinating teacher or other teachers on
campus, treat them with respect. You can learn a lot from these teachers,
and they will be much more likely to share with you if they feel that you are
genuinely interested in them and their experiences.

10. Don't Wait to the Last Minute to Call in Sick

You will probably get sick at some point during your student teaching and will need stay
home for the day. You must remember that the regular teacher will have to take over the
class during your absence. If you wait until the last minute to call in, this could leave
them in an awkward bind making them look bad to the students. Call as soon as you
believe you will not be able to make it to class.

ICT

Education
Wednesday, 09 March 2011

FORGING AHEAD AT SHEBBEAR COLLEGE

Shebbear College continues in its belief that it is the ‘Best Small School in the South
West’ and is continuing to build on its already impressive infrastructure. ? Recent years
have seen improvements right across the school. Not only have all of our teaching areas
been subject to considerable investment but the addition of a full size all- weather- pitch
as well as a professional standard Cardio-Vascular suite; dance studio and weights room,
have ensured that our sporting facilities are exceptional.
Work has started on the new build onto the existing Junior School with the addition of an
assembly hall, and three new classrooms are due to open in September 2011.

The Kindergarten has been redeveloped and now boasts one of the best facilities in the
South West. On the music front a new Recital Room will complement our already
successful choir and the music technology lab is benefiting from the addition of 22 new
Apple -Mac computers for state of the art composing.

The school currently has its highest number of pupils in 18 years and still has waiting
lists for some year groups. Sixth Form Scholarships and Bursaries are available for
consideration.

Contact Mrs Jacky Rowe on 01409 282001 or registrar@shebbearcollege.co.uk

COURTLANDS PRESCHOOL

Courtlands Preschool is an established preschool offering morning, afternoon and all days
sessions for all children; opening from 9.30am to 2.30pm Monday to Friday.

We offer quality care and education, helping the transition to primary education. The
children are supported in developing as individuals both socially and emotionally though
fun and play. All our staff are fully trained in Early Years Education, hold a CRB and are
first aid trained.

There are spaces still available so why not give us a call or drop in to see a session in
action.

KELLY COLLEGE PREPARATORY SCHOOL

Kelly College Preparatory School are holding their Open Morning on Friday 11th March
2011 From 10am – 12noon. Do come along to meet our staff and pupils and see our
vibrant and exciting school, located in a stunning setting.

Kelly College is a co-educational day and boarding school for children aged 3-18 years of
age (Preparatory School 3-11 and Senior School 11-18). Boarding at Kelly College is
also available for pupils in Years 4, 5 and 6 of the Prep School. The schools are on
separate sites, less than a mile apart and the Prep School pupils are able to take full
advantage of the facilities at Kelly College Senior School.

The Prep School has impressive facilities. There is a very well equipped laboratory for
Science, a studio for Art and Design Technology, two libraries, a music room with
additional instrumental teaching rooms, an ICT suite and a Learning Development Unit.
The school also has a ‘Family Lounge’ where parents are very welcome to come in for a
coffee at drop off and pick up time. Sports facilities at the Prep School are excellent, with
pupils also having access to the swimming pool, Astroturf and gymnasium at the Senior
School, as well as the Kelly Adventure Centre.
The first few years of a child’s education are hugely important and should be a time of
encouragement, excitement, stimulation and enrichment. At Kelly College Prep School
our principal aim is to encourage the pursuit of excellence and the development of the
whole person in a caring and supportive environment. We seek to instil in the children a
sense of curiosity and confidence so that they can drive their own learning and make the
most of their ability wherever it lies.

The school’s ethos is to seek high academic standards whilst giving children a caring,
happy and adventurous start to their education. We pride ourselves on having a
welcoming family environment – our strong pastoral care is key

For further information regarding their Open Morning or you would like to arrange a visit
please contact the School Administrator Mrs Sarah Kinsey.
admin@kellycollegeprep.com, 01822 612919, www.kellycollegeprep.com

ST JOSEPH Pastoral Care – Why is it so important?

There is no doubt that all parents want their children to enjoy their years at school, to
have great fun and at the same time reach their full academic potential. Finding the right
school environment with excellent academic results is always a high priority but what of
the listening, supporting, encouraging and befriending, that is, the pastoral care – is that
not more important ? As children grow so do the decisions they need to make
independently and this is just one of the reasons why pastoral care is important. It helps
every child develop their personal, social, moral, emotional and intellectual skills. At St
Joseph’s School in Launceston we work hard to ensure that our pastoral care is
outstanding. Tutors guide children through their school years and they are always there to
offer help, encouragement and support. The tutors meet with their pupils every morning
and afternoon which helps to build strong relationships. Each week they set aside time for
group discussions while one to one sessions give everyone an open and trusting
environment. Senior pupils at St Joseph’s also act as peer listeners, getting to know other
pupils extremely well through Extra-Curricular, full school and sporting activities. As we
all know, sometimes the best help can be offered by a sympathetic ear from someone who
understands teenage life! Pastoral care helps children to gain the necessary life skills to
deal with the rising pressures of today’s society. When pastoral care is good pupils feel
content and empowered to deal with their school workload; pupils know they can talk to
tutors about their concerns and feel confident in doing so; pupils can deal with more
challenging situations and the tutors and pupils gain a mutual trust and respect. Our
school always endeavours to raise pupil’s social awareness, promote positive attitudes,
build self-esteem and create an environment in which each individual child feels secure.
Make sure that Pastoral Care is at the top of your list when searching for the right school
for your children.

For further information or to arrange a visit to St Joseph’s School, Launceston, please


contact the Registrar, Miss Rebecca Walker on 01566 772580 or
registrar@stjosephscornwall.co.uk Or visit www.stjosephscornwall.co.uk
opyright Tindle Newspapers Ltd Wednesday, 30 March
2011

BIBLIOGRAPY

Manual for observation, participation and community immersion


Avelina C. Bucao M.A.T.
pp.3-5

Increasing visibility for LGBTQ students: What schools can do to create


inclusive classroom communities.
Derry L. Stufft (Conley, 2007).
Contact CIE at cie@asu.edu
Mary Lou Fulton Teachers CollegePO Box 37100 Phoenix, AZ 85069

Education
http://www.squidoo.com/educ8
http://www.tavistock-today.co.uk/featuresdetail.cfm?id=3579
http://www.deped.gov.ph/deped.asp?i=M&s=2006

EDITORIAL INTRODUCTION
Introduction to the Special Issue
Andrew K. Shiotani

http://www.google.com.ph/search?
hl=tl&noj=1&q=foreign+current+issues+about+education+&aq=f&aqi
=&aql=&oq=
http://712educators.about.com/od/teachingstrategies/tp/studentteaching.
htm

http://josephthedreamer-myteachingexperinces.blogspot.com/
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT PLAN

If you’re planning for a year so nice:

If your are planning for a decade plant trees;

If you are planning for a life time EDUCATE people.

This Chinese proverb inspired me to be an educator someday. I want to plan a


life time career that contributes to my professional development. Honestly, there are
times at this moment of my life that I felt pressure around me. Pressure of looking
forward for a job that can support my family in financial needs and for the medical
assistance of my father in his respiratory complication, as well as the inner pressure in me
keeps me motivated to plan my future after my four year course.

Hopefully our Almighty Lord God blesses and guides me to the right path and to
the journey I am looking forward. I am planning to have an earning job so that like what
I have said before I want to help my whole family in such financial crisis. I want also to
take a review and wishing that I may pass the Civil Service exam and the Licensure
Examination for Teachers- the coming board exam. After passing any of the two
examinations or even both of them I want to continue my teaching profession. If I failed
to these trials I would even better to teach in any private school because I knew that they
can allow applicant teacher to teach even they are not yet passed the civil service or in the
LET exam. I will pursue my noble profession as what I’ve started.
NARRATIVE REPORT

December 6-10, 2010

It was my first week here in Lagro High. I went room to room. For a while I
observe my CT on how he will enter and handle the class. There are four (4) sections we
visited. Some students get confusing, analyzing and interrogating your personal outlook
and at the same time your action.

I was able to face them to introduce their activity for another day activity. But
before I started it my CT (Sir Millares) taught me on how their activities would be work
out. As I enter the last three (3) classes for the day I was able to introduce my self and
what am I doing here in Lagro High.

I felt glad that this school has their systematic management in the school campus.
They have their seminars, programs and the motivation for all students needed for their
lives. Also I felt happy because they have all classrooms- a place where students could
comfortably learned as you teach.

Although there are some lack of facilities such as good condition for comfort
rooms, damaged electric fans, armed chairs swaying without arms etc. but it doesn’t
matter as the teachers has the highly heart to teach-everybody will be learned and as the
students determined to learned new ideas typically they’re just ignoring the problems for
them to achieve their dreams.
December 13-17, 2010

I worked with my lesson plan and I was able to execute it to the class. My lesson
is all about “Parallel Circuit”. The classes are always over at 8:00 P.M. except Monday.
As I concluded you should not get to memorize the topic, all you have to do is to
understand the lesson all by your heart. Coz if you may know the sequence and the
content itself, you may now get easy to explain it to the class.

I gave them some exercises and drills about Parallel Connection so that they may
get ready to take an exam for any time. I also gave them assignments for them to prepare
their selves to the next activity of the class.

January 3-7, 2011

This week is the first week in the month of January under the year of 2011.
Before I gave the Unit Test in 3rd grading, my CT asks me to do a long Test regarding to
what I’ve discussed. Then when he saw the kind of test that I have he simply told me that
my long test for them will serve as their last Unit Test in 3 rd grading. That’s why he did
not give any Unit Test to the students instead of my mine type of question. The reason
why my CT (Cooperating Teacher) did this decision for allowing me to repel the test
because were having the same concept in making the kind of test for students. To know
the great news after the Unit Test almost of my students got higher score than before and
somebody got the perfect score in the said test. And I’m so proud and glad because
they’ve understand the lessons I’ve tackled.
January 10-14, 2011

This time we continue the lesson were now in Electronics. I gave some exercise,
drills and assignments to become familiar with the electronic components, symbols and
what are these functions in the advance technology. After these again we have to review
the lessons under the 3rd grading for the preparation to the 3rd periodical test.

January 17-21, 2011

We finally through it were now in the week in having the Periodical Test in 3 rd
grading. Students are taking their exams in the designated classrooms having their proper
seats. Everybody was so very tires and extremely want to go home to take a rest then
review again for the next subjects. After they’ve finished all the exams in all subjects,
others are immediately gone and went to their homes to relax but others are having their
hang-outs to find their enjoyment victory and leisure after a long tire week for exams.

January 23-28, 2011

This was the cramming week for me because we have our final presentation for
Case Study under the subject of Guidance and Principles’ headed by our professor Prof.
Artemus Cruz.

Although it was so nice because students are your medium in the CS (Case Study)
there is only limited time for it to cover. Knowing their problems which is not easy to
imagine but it happens in the reality. We have to find out and figure out what approaches
could be suited to each problem that might be able to overcome and face it to have a
better life. But in the end those who haven’t accept the reality it ends with the continuous
support, advice and guidance. Our professor in the said activity is not so satisfied with the
task done. He suggests another idea that could repel and supplement the not enough
activity.

Jan. 31-Feb. 4, 2011

During this week we are so very happy because were done our task in Guidance
and Principles headed by our great professor Prof. Artemus Cruz. But we have to do
another task to become more aware to the people who are suffering with these mental
disturbances as a saying goes we have to go to the National Center of Mental Hospital
(NCMH) and Elsie Gatches to observe and give a reaction to these. What learning’s we
might encounter while having this activity? What are the lives of people suffering with
this kind of illness? Do they have the chance to become well? Any kind of questions that
we might want to ask for they simply answered it to the best of their abilities.

Feb. 7-Feb. 11, 2011

During this week I continued the lesson regarding Management. I gave some
exercises, activities after the discussion. When they made some physical participation
such as role playing they become more creative and active. Their hidden skills open and
from it they could show the awareness to what might application of the lesson in the daily
lives of people in the community.

I’m giving also solo participation so that everyone could share their ideas
throughout the lessons. From it also, everyone could boost their self-confidence. How is
it doing that? The students acted by giving and insisting their selves about their point of
view to the said questions that may apply in real situation today.

Feb. 14 -Feb. 18, 2011

This week the students could show their love to another persons by giving
flowers, chocolates etc. Then unexpectedly someone gave these to me. My heart was
overwhelmed and felt happy because they appreciated my self.

During this week also they took their 50 items Unit Test II in T.L.E. of course, I
made it for them. This kind of test is an average test, not so very difficult, not so very
easy. We’ve checked it then finally somebody got the highest score and that is a perfect
score. I felt happy when I heard this news. I told them to keep up their good work!

Feb. 21 -Feb. 25, 2011

This was the week of preparing for my demo teaching. It was very tiring because
everything must in prepare. I keep practicing myself for not be ashamed in front of my
CT’s (Cooperating Teachers) and could take the good grades with them.

After my demo the evaluation was given. And got the open forum, but of course
I’ll take it all by my self. They gave the bad and the good points from me that could
enhance more my capability in my teaching profession.
From this time I’ve learned. I’ve got my strength and at the same time my
weaknesses. Knowing my weaknesses I could replenish and cherish it by then.

Feb. 28-March 4, 2011

This was the week of recovering after the untiring demo last week. Even though
the demo teaching was done, the life of a teacher continues. For my students to be not
interrupted with the cut lessons I must follow them immediately.

But this time, nobody knows that I’ve passed the demo teaching. Someone asked
to it, and then unexpectedly they’re rejoicing, clapping their hands because I’ve done it
greatly together with them.

March 7-March 11, 2011

It was my last week before I leave the in touched school of Lagro High. I can’t believe
that I my self together with the CO-ST will come to this end of farewell. My feelings
have the mix of sadness and rejoice. Why it is sadness because I will very missed them,
especially the memories together with my students. And rejoice because I’ve done and
completed the task even though it was hard as long as you enjoy it, every thing will come
to easy.

I’m so very proud and very thankful to God because he gave me this opportunity to be
here in Lagro High and to be together with them.

While I’m having this Practicum everything was developed-they boost my attitudes,
personality and of course my skills in teaching profession. Even though I’m not there
around I’ll always remember those photographs’- the memories on my mind, I’ll always
keep them in my heart and to have that very classic brilliant experience in teaching I’ll
continue to immobilize my self into become great teacher someday that could inspires
may future professional people.

CURRENT ISSUES

LOCAL

11 Ways to Teach Your Kindergartener Financial Literacy


By Samantha Cleaver

Kindergarten is the perfect time to start building financial literacy skills, as kids learn
about coins, wants and needs, and how to spend money. However, teaching money to
kids can be tricky. Today’s kids don’t have as much exposure to cash as before, which
can make money a more intangible and difficult concept.

At first, says Laura Levine, executive director of the Jump$tart Coalition for Financial
Literacy, your child should understand what money is and that is has value. Then, as he
starts exploring what it means to spend and save, here are 11 ways to reinforce financial
literacy.

Money Basics
• Introduce Coins and Bills. Introduce coins and bills one at a time, starting with
the penny. When you have spare change, let your child sort and count the coins.
Or, let her organize your wallet, putting the bills in order from least to greatest.
• Let Him Pay. As your child gets to know money amounts, let him pay for small
purchases. When you’re paying with cash at the grocery store, ice cream parlor, or
coffee shop, let him pay the cashier and accept the change.
• Visit the Bank. Levine recommends taking your child to the bank every so often.
While you’re making a withdrawal or deposit, they’re learning who works at a
bank and where money is “stored.”

Making Money

• Start an Allowance. Kindergarten is a good year for kids to start getting an


allowance. Set your kids’ allowance depending on your own finances. Rule of
thumb is $1 per year of age, so a five-year-old would get $5. You don’t have to
give them allowance every week, however. They could receive it every two
weeks, or on the first and fifteenth of the month.
• Solicit Their Services. Capitalize on your child’s interests to “employ” them.
Can you pay them to take the dog out in the backyard? Or, does your child like to
help out and want to fold laundry for a fee? Be sure to separate “fee for service”
activities from general family expectations (making your bed or cleaning up) that
everyone is expected to do.
• Start a Microbusiness. Whether it’s a lemonade stand, a hot apple cider stop
(with adult supervision), or a snack table at the neighborhood block party, having
the experience of selling will teach your child to value the money they receive.
Once they have cash in their pocket, its time to start managing it.

Money Management: Spend, Save, Share

• Comparison Shopping 101. When Levine’s five-year-old son was shopping with
his own money, he quickly noticed the small price difference between a Hot
Wheels and Matchbox car. As your child learns how to shop, the supermarket or
toy store aisle is the ideal time to talk about prices. Choose two items that your
child wants and compare the prices. Which is more? Which one would he buy and
why? Is it worth the extra cost to buy the package with the character on the front?
• Set a Saving Goal. Your child’s first saving goal should be for a fun game or toy.
Post a picture of her goal on a piece of paper and draw stepping stones with
money amounts that add up to her goal (stones of 5 cents or $1 depending on the
ultimate goal). Then, as she saves those money amounts, color in the stepping
stones. When she’s filled in all the stones, go shopping!
• Start the Habit of Sharing. An important part of having money is sharing. For
your family, it may be dropping a few coins in the collection plate, or letting your
child donate to a favorite charity. To add to the experience, attend a charity event
so they can see where their money went. If your child donated to a local pet
shelter, attend an adopt-a-pet day.

Financial Responsibility

• Teach Choices. Money is all about making choices, says Julie Felshaw, financial
and economic education specialist with the Utah State Office of Education. Start
the conversation about choices when the issue has nothing to do with money. For
example, what do we do when we have five cookies and six kids? Then, introduce
the same idea later when money is involved—we have $10 and want to buy three
things that add up to $11, what do we do?
• Be Honest about Your Finances. When you have to make a difficult financial
decision, be honest with your child. You don’t have to tell him everything, but do
discuss how it will affect him. While you’re having that discussion, says Levine,
be sure to stress that while money is valuable, it’s not love, and it’s not safety.
That what you are there for.

As your child develops an awareness of money, it will be exciting to save, spend, and
share his earnings, no matter what amount he’s working with!
Key Issues in Philippine Education

Literacy rate in the Philippines has improved a lot over the last few years-
from 72 percent in 1960 to 94 percent in 1990. This is attributed to the
increase in both the number of schools built and the level of enrollment in
these schools.

The number of schools grew rapidly in all three levels - elementary,


secondary, and tertiary. From the mid-1960s up to the early 1990, there was
an increase of 58 percent in the elementary schools and 362 percent in the
tertiary schools. For the same period, enrollment in all three levels also rose
by 120 percent. More than 90 percent of the elementary schools and 60
percent of the secondary schools are publicly owned. However, only 28
percent of the tertiary schools are publicly owned.

A big percentage of tertiary-level students enroll in and finish commerce and


business management courses. Table 1 shows the distribution of courses
taken, based on School Year 1990-1991. Note that the difference between
the number of enrollees in the commerce and business courses and in the
engineering and technology courses may be small - 29.2 percent for
commerce and business and 20.3 percent for engineering and technology.
However, the gap widens in terms of the number of graduates for the said
courses.

On gender distribution, female students have very high representation in all


three levels. At the elementary level, male and female students are almost
equally represented. But female enrollment exceeds that of the male at the
secondary and tertiary levels . Also, boys have higher rates of failures,
dropouts, and repetition in both elementary and secondary levels.

Aside from the numbers presented above, which are impressive, there is also
a need to look closely and resolve the following important issues: 1) quality of
education 2) affordability of education 3) goverment budget for education;
and 4) education mismatch.

1. Quality - There was a decline in the quality of the Philippine education,


especially at the elementary and secondary levels. For example, the results
of standard tests conducted among elementary and high school students, as
well as in the National College of Entrance Examination for college students,
were way below the target mean score.

2. Affordability - There is also a big disparity in educational achievements


across social groups. For example, the socioeconomically disadvantaged
students have higher dropout rates, especially in the elementary level. And
most of the freshmen students at the tertiary level come from relatively well-
off families.

3. Budget - The Philippine Constitution has mandated the goverment to


allocate the highest proportion of its budget to education. However, the
Philippines still has one of the lowest budget allocations to education among
the ASEAN countries.

4. Mismatch - There is a large proportion of "mismatch" between training and


actual jobs. This is the major problem at the tertiary level and it is also the
cause of the existence of a large group of educated unemployed or
underemployed.

The following are some of the reforms proposed:

1. Upgrade the teachers' salary scale. Teachers have been underpaid; thus
there is very little incentive for most of them to take up advanced trainings.

2. Amend the current system of budgeting for education across regions,


which is based on participation rates and units costs. This clearly favors the
more developed regions. There is a need to provide more allocation to
lagging regions to narrow the disparity across regions.

3. Stop the current practice of subsidizing state universities and colleges to


enhance access. This may not be the best way to promote equity. An
expanded scholarship program, giving more focus and priority to the poor,
maybe more equitable.

4. Get all the leaders in business and industry to become actively involved in
higher education; this is aimed at addressing the mismatch problem. In
addition, carry out a selective admission policy, i.e., installing mechanisms to
reduce enrollment in oversubscribed courses and promoting enrollment in
undersubscribed ones.

5. Develop a rationalized apprenticeship program with heavy inputs from the


private sector. Furthermore, transfer the control of technical training to
industry groups which are more attuned to the needs of business and
industry.

Read more: http://www.ph.net/htdocs/education/issue.htm


How Do We Develop Values?
By T.N. Turner

Pearson Allyn Bacon Prentice Hall

You want your kids to be grateful, but they don’t consistently thank others when the
kindness is warranted. Experts name at least five ways to teach kids values.

What You Need To Know

Often, adults think of character building as going through difficult circumstances and
coming out stronger. But teaching kids about developing good character traits can be
done in less painful and more supportive ways, especially during difficult times like the
adjustment to middle school. Beyond lectures, kids learn from witnessing, examining,
and problem solving.

How You Can Help

Many experts name five to six methods for teaching kids about values. A couple
examples are below.

1. Role Models. Often parents point to an admirable person in the media or


community and assign character traits that they want their children to
emulate. The benefit is that kids realize that the values are real and not just
ideals. The disadvantage is that no one is perfect and often the hero falls off the
pedestal. Be precise about the attribution of qualities and discuss flaws.
2. Examining Actions. By mapping the steps in a decision process and following up
with the consequences of the action, kids learn to be analytic. They can speculate
about alternative actions and the results of those choices. Kids can analyze
characters from stories, media events, community actions, and most importantly,
their own behavior.
3. Moral Reasoning. When kids address “no win” situations and must make
decisions, they learn to weigh circumstances and effects. This approach offers
opportunities for discussion and collaboration. Many social studies classes use
scenarios from history and ask kids to allocate resources, assign manpower, and
choose courses before they discover what the real people did. You can use
incidents from the news, school, or your work.

Those who attempt to develop and/or alter values and beliefs including character
educators use a number of different approaches. Some of these approaches utilize
questionable propaganda techniques, even to the point that they appear to be nothing less
than types of indoctrination. A teacher should have ethical concerns about such
approaches even when motivated by unselfish caring and concern. Other approaches, at
first glance, seem unlikely to have any influence at all. However, the teacher should
realize that any single approach can be used ineffectively as well as effectively. Ryan
(2000) has pointed out that talk about character education is easier than doing it. He
outlines six methods which he calls the six "E's" of character education: example,
explanation, exhortation (praise and pep talks), ethos (ethical environment), experience,
and expectation of excellence. The six "E's" are one way of conceptualizing how we go
about teaching value-laden material. However, I have found the following five basic
categories of methodology to be more useful.

FOREIGN

Special Symposium Issue (Vol. 13, Issue 1, Fall 2010) on Aid,


Development, and Education
This issue of Current Issues in Comparative Education is a symposium organized around
a special featured article by Steven J. Klees on "Aid, Development, and Education."
Klees' essay is followed by four responses by William C. Brehm and Iveta Silova, Mark
Ginsburg, Sangeeta Kamat, and Karen Mundy. The final essay contains Klees' reply to
his critics.

CALL FOR PAPERS

Volume 13, Issue 2 ( 2011):

Evaluation, Assessment, and Testing

For its Spring 2011 issue (Volume 13, Issue 2), the editors of Current Issues in
Comparative Education are soliciting submissions on evaluation and assessment in
schooling.

Evaluation, assessment, and testing have been an important, not to say, controversial, part
of education for as long as educators have attempted to find out if their students have
learned what they intended to teach them. Beyond their everyday, situational use in
verbal question-and-answer sessions within the course of a class exercise, most attention
has been concentrated on the efficacy of the more formal, usually written form of state or
national testing used as a benchmark within individual school systems. Further, the
growth of internationally comparative tests such as TIMMS and PISA have been fueled
by an increasingly globalized world in education, one in which teachers, systems, and
countries borrow and attempt to learn from each other in the hope of finding better ways
to determine if students have actually learned. CICE is interested to find out the state of
evaluation, assessment, and testing around the world.

Some possible topics might include the various uses of evaluation, assessment, and/or
testing in student populations; testing for teacher effectiveness; use in ‘high stakes’
environments which could include high stakes for students, teachers, or administrators; or
global analyses of testing. Other topics might include analyses of cross-national
comparisons or the ‘portability’ of scores from one system to another. The growth in
international schools over the last twenty years may have produced research on the
different perspectives held by national/public schools and international/private
institutions. Is testing utilized or valued differently in different contexts and what are the
results of these different perspectives? Are there different applications of evaluation,
assessment, and testing in developed nations as compared to the practices in developing
nations? What forms do these practices take when instituted by foreign educational
development as a result of global initiatives such as the Millennium Development Goals
(MDGs) or Education for All (EFA)?

While most submissions are likely to be quantitative or data-driven, we also welcome


conceptual analyses of evaluation, assessment, and testing, particularly as they are seen in
different contexts – such as the different forms (oral, written, visual) they may take
within/at the end of individual lessons or learning situations, as well as in the more
obvious form of whole-school and nationwide exercises – as representative or adequate
measurements of learning. Such articles could question the efficacy of cross-national
comparisons of testing data (i.e. PISA, TIMMS, etc.), or question their use in high stakes,
summative judgments of learning or teaching (as opposed to instructional practice aids as
formative judgments). Others might examine how evaluation, assessment, and testing are
conceived; where some systems might see synonyms, others might see three different
processes with different purposes and applications. Additionally, submissions are not
restricted only to scholars in the field of comparative and international education, but
those from other disciplines (i.e. Anthropology, History, Philosophy, Sociology, to name
only a few) conducting research in the field are welcome to submit as well.

CICE cautions authors of strictly reportorial or single-purpose research, such as the


analysis of test results; this call is more suited for research that examines the nature and
uses of evaluation, assessment, and testing rather than the results of evaluations,
assessment, and tests. Ideal contributions will address the topic of evaluation, assessment,
and testing, but the editors are pleased to accept any article or manuscript of interest
covering topics in the areas of comparative education, international education, and
educational development. Submissions will be considered for inclusion in the Spring
2011 issue, or for future issues. The deadline for submissions is March 1, 2011.

IQ Testing: What's it All About?


By Rebecca VanderMeulen

Your child breezes through books normally preferred by kids a few years older. She's a
fast learner and the most common word out of her mouth is "Why?" You clearly have a
smart kid. Should she take an IQ test?

What does IQ mean?

Dr. Paula Olszewski-Kubilius, incoming president of the National Association for Gifted
Children, says the IQ score is one way to measure a child's intelligence, but not the only
indicator. (A score of 100 is average. Those with scores of at least 130 are generally
considered gifted). The number could even change a few points from one day to the next.
She says you may want to have your child tested if his intellectual development is out of
sync with other kids his age or if he doesn't seem to be working up to his ability in
school. A high IQ score might explain why a student is curious at home but would rather
talk in class than listen to his teacher. Test results might explain why your math whiz
struggles with reading. The bottom line is an IQ test can potentially answer a lot of
unanswered questions.

Should your child be tested?

"The parents have to ask, how are they going to use this information?" Olszewski-
Kubilius says. Dr. Linda Kreger Silverman, director of the Gifted Development Center,
says IQ scores are essential to have. "I consider it as vital as any other information you
have about a child," she says. Children with special needs require a personalized learning
plan to maximize their potential, and so do gifted children. Silverman recommends IQ
testing for kids who develop intellectually at a faster rate than other children or show
other signs of giftedness, like a phenomenal memory. Gifted parents also tend to have
gifted children, so testing is a good idea if you were a bright child.

She also suggests testing if your child has a family history of a learning disability or
shows subtle signs of one, like squinting in bright light. Some gifted children are called
"twice-exceptional" because they also have learning difficulties. "Gifted kids cover up all
kids of learning disabilities because of their high intelligence," Silverman notes. It's
important to make sure that all of your child's learning needs are addressed.

But for other kids the drawbacks of an IQ test might not justify the benefits, says Dr.
Richard Courtright, gifted education specialist at the Duke University Talent
Identification Program. If children's scores are higher than expected, parents might give
them books and puzzles that are too difficult for them. And when children's scores are
lower than parents expect, they might be less likely to nurture learning. IQ testing
shouldn't be thought of the be-all and end-all of intelligence indicators. IQ testing is most
appropriate, Courtright says, when the results could mean different opportunities for your
child, like the chance to attend a school for gifted kids.

When to test?
Many parents think their kids are smart. But if you think your child is especially bright,
you're probably correct. "Parents are very good, the research shows, at identifying when
they think their child is advanced," Olszewski-Kubilius says.

Dr. Rosina Gallagher, a psychologist and president of Supporting Emotional Needs of the
Gifted, says it's best to test kids around kindergarten. Have the assessment done by
someone who has worked with children and will tell you more than the IQ score. The
number isn't as important as what the test results mean. "I think the purpose of the
evaluation should be to really understand how the child learns," Gallagher says, not just
their level of intelligence.

Ask what the results show about your child's strengths and weaknesses and how best to
address them. A tester might recommend that your child skip a grade in school or take
some advanced classes, for example.

Silverman says she doesn't recommend IQ tests for children older than 9. That's because
highly gifted kids perform so well that the tests won't completely show their abilities.

A better way to assess older kids is to give them tests that are meant for children in higher
grades—which Courtright says gives a more accurate picture anyway.

Some colleges run talent searches aimed at assessing bright kids' abilities by giving them
advanced tests. Talent searches run by Duke and Northwestern Universities give middle-
schoolers the chance to take the ACT and SAT college entrance exams. Olszewski-
Kubilius, director of the Center for Talent Development at Northwestern, says this
approach works because older kids have developed aptitudes in specific subjects like
math or reading.

How much should you share?

Knowing your child's IQ score might help you, but experts say you shouldn't share it with
your child, at least until she's old enough to understand what it does—and doesn't mean.
It's better to give your child a general idea of what the test showed. "It helps you
understand where you fit in," Silverman says. Talk to her about her way of learning and
ability to learn in relation to other kids her age. That will mean more to her than a
number.

Kids who know their IQ scores might think they're so smart they don't have to work hard
in school—or that there's a limit to how much they can learn. Courtright notes that most
people think IQ can't change, while there's always room to improve on a math or history
test. "Most people see achievement as an alterable variable," he says. "If you get an IQ
score of 112, it becomes an excuse to not even try."

The bottom line is that IQ tests aren't for everyone, and you should use the information
gained from the test wisely and thoughtfully. No matter what the result, be supportive of
your child's learning needs and she'll go far.

Rebecca VanderMeulen is a freelance writer with a bachelor's degree from American University.
She has covered education for more than five years.

CURRICULUM VITAE

Batonghinog,Liza B.
116 Diamond St. Brgy. Commonwealth Q.C
Lizabatonghinog@gmail.com

Age: 20
Sex: Female
Birthdate: June 22, 1990
Place of Birth: Calinan Davao City
Educational Attainment:

Polytechnic University of the


Philippines A
Quezon City Campus
T
Commonwealth High School

City
Ecols St. Brgy. Comm. Quezon
T
Commonwealth Elementary
A
School
MRB Compound Brgy. Comm. C
Quezon City

H
M
E
N
T
S
PHOTOS

WITH COOPERATING TEACHERS

\
WITH MY STUDENTS
II- WALNUT
MY SELF
XD
WITH LETTERS
WITH EVALUATION

With Sir Esguerra


With
Sir Millares
With Ma\am De Paz
PHOTOS
LESSON PLAN WITH MY STUDENTS- DAP-DAP

Date: January 17, 2011


Learning Component: T.L.E. II
Sub-Learning Component: ENTREPRENEURSHIP

I. OBJECTIVES:
At the end of the lesson the student should be able to:
1. define what entrepreneurship is
2. discuss the Personal Competencies of an entrepreneur,
3. assess their selves as a potential entrepreneur,
4. And value the qualities of a good entrepreneur.

II. CONTENT

A. Topic: Personal Competencies of an Entrepreneur


B. Materials: Visual Aids, Pictures, chalk and board
C. Reference: T.L.E. (Second Year)- Home Economics,
Agricultural Arts, Industrial Arts, Entrepreneurship
BY: Villaflor Padullo, Rocena Viernes- pp. 255-257
T.L.E. ( Second Year) Textbook pp. 207-209

III. PROCEDURE
A. PREPARATORY ACTIVITIES
1. Routine Activities
Prayer, Greeting, Checking of attendance and assignment
2. Drill
Words relate with Business- WORD HUNT
3. Motivation
Pictures of a business man and some establishment
4. Unlocking of Difficulties
• Entrepreneur
• PEC’s
• persistent
• Goal
• traits

B. LESSON PROPER
LEARNING TASK STRATEGIES EVALUATION
1. Defining the word entre- -brainstorming -oral response
preneurship.
2. Personal Competencies
of an entrepreneur -discussion -Q and A
3. Assessing the students as a
potential entrepreneur -brainstorming -oral response
4. what they’ve learned from -open ended sentence -oral response
the lesson.

C. CLOSING ACTIVITIES
A. GENERALIZATION
1. What are the Personal Competencies of an entrepreneur?
2. Why are entrepreneurs considered risk-takers?
3. Why is the best time for entrepreneurial activity?

B. VALUES INTEGRATION
The students will show awareness on how to develop their personal
competencies as they go on through the field of business.

C. EVALUATION
Identification
Direction: Identify what quality of an entrepreneur that the question
asking for. Write your answer on a ¼ sheet of paper.

_______1. People who are willing to take risks in order to build a


business
_______2. Defined as the process by which an individual produces
goods and services to improve man’s quality of life.
_______3. The seek opportunities to respond to the needs consumers
_______4. They set short and long term goals, which are specific,
measurable, attainable, result-based and time bound (SMART)
_______5. They personally seek important data on clients and supplies
as well as competencies

IV. ASSIGNMENT
Bring ½ index card from each group
Give some Filipino entrepreneurs who are been successful in their business.
What are the strength and weaknesses of Filipino Entrepreneur?

Reference:
T.L.E. (Text book) Second Year
HE, AA and IA by Villaflor Padullo and Rocena Viernes
pp. 209-210

Date: January 21, 2011


Learning Component: T.L.E. II
Sub-Learning Component: ENTREPRENEURSHIP

V. OBJECTIVES:
At the end of the lesson the student should be able to:
1. differentiate the effectiveness to efficiency of an entrepreneur with
regards to business
2. state how effectiveness and efficiency goes hand on hand and
3. show awareness how effective and efficient entrepreneur differ and
relate each other

VI. CONTENT

A. Topic: Effectiveness and Efficiency of an Entrepreneur


B. Materials: Visual Aids, chalk and board
C. Reference: T.L.E. (Second Year)- Home Economics,
Agricultural Arts, Industrial Arts, Entrepreneurship
BY: Villaflor Padullo, Rocena Viernes- pp. 258-259

VII. PROCEDURE
A. PREPARATORY ACTIVITIES
1. Routine Activities
Prayer, Greeting, Checking of attendance and assignment
2. Drill
Review of the past lesson
3. Motivation
Telling a short story
4. Unlocking of Difficulties
• effectiveness
• efficiency

B. LESSON PROPER
LEARNING TASK STRATEGIES EVALUATION
1. Differentiate effectiveness
to effeciency -brainstorming -oral response
2. State how effective and
efficient entrepreneur goes hand
and hand -discussion -Q and A
3. Show of awareness how
effective and efficient entrepre-
neur differ and relate each other. -role playing -coordination

C. CLOSING ACTIVITIES
A. GENERALIZATION
How effective and efficient entrepreneur goes hand and hand?

B. VALUES INTEGRATION
The students will show awareness on how to be an effective and at the
same time efficient entrepreneur.
C. EVALUATION
Identification
Direction: Fill the blanks with the correct answer. Write your answer in
a ¼ sheet of paper.

_______1. Describes as “doing the right thing”


_______2. Describes as “doing things right”
_______3 and 4 – Give the 2 persons who brought the meaning for
effectiveness and efficiency
_______5-10 distinguish effective effective to efficient entrepreneur

VIII. ASSIGNMENT
Study their lesson and be ready for long test.
Give some possible risk of an entrepreneur

Reference:
T.L.E. (Text book) Second Year
HE, AA and IA by Villaflor Padullo and Rocena Viernes
pp. 261

Date: February 7, 2011


Learning Component: T.L.E. II
Sub-Learning Component: ENTREPRENEURSHIP

IX. OBJECTIVES:
At the end of the lesson the student should be able to:
1. Identify the possible risk of an entrepreneur
2. discuss how natural calamities, peso devaluation and other
economic dislocation, out of datedness and unpredictable nature of
human behavior may give possible risk of an entrepreneur, and
3. show awareness of the importance of identifying possible risks of
an entrepreneur.

X. CONTENT

A. Topic: Some Possible risks of an Entrepreneur


B. Materials: Visual Aids, chalk and board
C. Reference: T.L.E. (Second Year)- Home Economics,
Agricultural Arts, Industrial Arts, Entrepreneurship
BY: Villaflor Padullo, Rocena Viernes- pp. 261-262

XI. PROCEDURE
A. PREPARATORY ACTIVITIES
1. Routine Activities
Prayer, Greeting, Checking of attendance and assignment
2. Drill
-Brainstorming- Q and A portion
3. Motivation
Showing of some pictures
4. Unlocking of Difficulties
• calamities
• devaluation
• risk
• fortuitous
• obsolete

B. LESSON PROPER
LEARNING TASK STRATEGIES EVALUATION
1. Define the word risk -brainstorming -oral response
2. Enumerate what are these
possible risks of an entrepreneur -discussion -Q and A
3. Discuss how natural calamities,
peso devaluation and unpredictable
nature of human behavior may give
possible risk of an entrepreneur.. -discussion - Q and A
4.show awareness of the possible
risk of an entrepreneur -role playing -coordination

C. CLOSING ACTIVITIES
A. GENERALIZATION
How the reward for taking risk in a business is profit.
Successful entrepreneurs are moderate risk takers

B. VALUES INTEGRATION
The students will show awareness about the possible risk of an
entrepreneur and how to be a moderate risk taker.

C. EVALUATION
Identification
Direction: Fill the blanks with the correct answer. Write your answer in
a ¼ sheet of paper.

_______1. An entrepreneur may lose fortune because of typhoons, fires,


earthquakes, floods and other fortuitous events.
_______2. The higher cost of imported goods may not easily to be
passed on the consumer, either because of the insufficient demand for the
goods or because of government regulation.
_______3. Nobody can never be sure of the actions of people.
_______4. Entrepreneur may anytime find their products or method of
production obsolete because of the constant stream of new products.
_______5. Successful entrepreneurs are___risk takers.

XII. ASSIGNMENT
What is Management?
Give the four managerial functions of a business
and explain each

Reference:
T.L.E. (Text book) Second Year
HE, AA and IA by Villaflor Padullo and Rocena Viernes
pp. 268-269

Date: February 17, 2011


Learning Component: T.L.E. II
Sub-Learning Component: ENTREPRENEURIAL MANAGEMENT

XIII. OBJECTIVES:
At the end of the lesson the student should be able to:
1. Identify the four aspects that need to be managed in a small
business.
2. discuss the four aspects that need to be managed in a small
business and
3. show awareness of the importance in identifying the four aspects
that need to be managed in a small business.

XIV. CONTENT

A. Topic: Management in a Small Business


B. Materials: Visual Aids
C. Reference: T.L.E. (Second Year)- Home Economics,
Agricultural Arts, Industrial Arts, Entrepreneurship
BY: Villaflor Padullo, Rocena Viernes- pp. 269-270

XV. PROCEDURE
A. PREPARATORY ACTIVITIES
1. Routine Activities
Prayer, Greeting, Checking of attendance and assignment
2. Drill
-words relate with Management
3. Motivation
showing up some pictures
4. Unlocking of Difficulties
• entrepreneur
• organization
• cash budgets
• long-run
• attribute

B. LESSON PROPER
LEARNING TASK STRATEGIES EVALUATION
1. identify the four managerial
functions of an effective
management -brainstorming -oral response
2. Discuss the four aspects that
need to be managed in a small
business - discussion -Q and A
3. show awareness of the im-
portance in identifying the 4
aspects that need to be managed
in a small business - -evaluation -written exam

C. CLOSING ACTIVITIES
A. GENERALIZATION
A small businessman is a well- rounded manager, purchases,
controller and sales person

B. VALUES INTEGRATION
The students will show awareness about the importance in
identifying the four aspects that need to be managed in a small business.

C. EVALUATION
Identification
Direction: Fill the blanks with the correct answer. Write your answer in
a ¼ sheet of paper.

_______1. These are the workers employed in a company and the most
important resources in a business
_______2. Before any other operation can take place, the product or
services in a business
_______3. A good entrepreneur must look into different factors that can
affect consumer satisfaction in terms of quality and quantity of the
product
_______

XVI. ASSIGNMENT
1. What are the four aspects that need to be managed in a small business
2. What are the types of business organizations
3. Give samples of stores from each type of business organization

Reference:
T.L.E. (Text book) Second Year
HE, AA and IA by Villaflor Padullo and Rocena Viernes
pp. 269-270
.
Date: February 14, 2011
Learning Component: T.L.E. II
Sub-Learning Component: ENTREPRENEURIAL MANAGEMENT

XVII. OBJECTIVES:
At the end of the lesson the student should be able to:
1. Identify the four (4) managerial functions of an effective
Management
2. discuss how the four (4) managerial functions (planning,
organizing, directing and controlling) can lead to have an effective
management and
3. show awareness of the importance of identifying the (4)
managerial functions of an effective management.

XVIII. CONTENT

A. Topic: Effective Management


B. Materials: Visual Aids
C. Reference: T.L.E. (Second Year)- Home Economics,
Agricultural Arts, Industrial Arts, Entrepreneurship
BY: Villaflor Padullo, Rocena Viernes- pp. 265-267

XIX. PROCEDURE
A. PREPARATORY ACTIVITIES
1. Routine Activities
Prayer, Greeting, Checking of attendance and assignment
2. Drill
-words relate with Management
3. Motivation
Picture Puzzle
4. Unlocking of Difficulties
• management
• managers
• explicit
• human resource
• capital

B. LESSON PROPER
LEARNING TASK STRATEGIES EVALUATION
1. identify the four managerial
functions of an effective
management -brainstorming -oral response
2. Discuss how the four
managerial functions can lead to
have an effective management -discussion -Q and A
3. show awareness of the importance
of identifying the four managerial
functions of an effective management- -discussion -Q and A
C. CLOSING ACTIVITIES
A. GENERALIZATION
An effective Management having the four managerial function
is in the process of having wise decision making- a timing decision and
a sharing decision.

B. VALUES INTEGRATION
The students will show awareness about the importance of
identifying the four managerial functions to have that effective
management or having the insurance of the success of the enterprise.

C. EVALUATION
Identification
Direction: Fill the blanks with the correct answer. Write your answer in
a ¼ sheet of paper.

_______1. Is based on short-term and long term goals.


_______2. is concerned with explicit instructions together to meet the
goals that have been planned
_______3. Involves bringing the human resources, the raw materials and
the capital resources together to meet the goals that have been planned
_______4. Refers to the process of planning, organizing, directing and
controlling in order to ensure success
_______5. Measures how well the company is doing by standards,
checking performance and company performance

XX. ASSIGNMENT
1. What are the four aspects that need to be managed in a small business
2. What are the types of business organizations
3. Give samples of stores from each type of business organization

Reference:
T.L.E. (Text book) Second Year
HE, AA and IA by Villaflor Padullo and Rocena Viernes
pp. 269-270
Lagro High School
District II- Quezon City Metro Manila

Name: Batonghinog, Liza B. Date: February 24, 2011


School: Polytechnic University of the Philippine’s Time: 1:00-2:00
Cooperating Teacher: Mr. Norwin Millares Year & Section: II-
Walnut

LEARNING COMPONENT: T.L.E. II


SUB-LEARNING COMPONENT: Entrepreneurial Activities

V. OBJECTIVES:
At the end of the lesson the students should be able to
5. identify what retailing is;
6. classify the retail stores according to Merchandise Line;
7. discuss the role of retailing in the community; and
8. show awareness of the importance of retailing business in the community.

VI. CONTENT:
D. Topic: Retailing
E. Materials: LCD, Visual Aids, Chalk and Board
F. Reference: T.L.E. (Second Year- Textbook)
By: Villaflor Padullo and Rocena Viernes pp. 277-279
Module in Entrepreneurial Retail Operation
By: Lorenzo Carriedo Jr. Merla Villanueva and Erlinda Garcia
pp.7-38

VII.PROCEDURE:
D. PREPARATORY ACTIVITIES:
5. Routine Activities
∗ Prayer
∗ Greeting
∗ Checking of attendance

6. Review of the Past Lesson


-Effective Management- (4) Managerial Functions in a
business
7. Motivation
-Showing up some pictures about Retailing

8. Unlocking of Difficulties

MATCHING TYPE GAME: “I’m yours- My word”

Direction: Selected groups will be given placards having


different meanings, students will have to find out and match the
corresponding meaning of the following words that are posted on the
board.

6. Wholesale- The sale of goods in large quantities


7. Bulk- in volume.
8. Market- A public place where buyers and sellers make
transactions, directly or via intermediaries.
9. Credit- A contractual agreement in which the trust is given to a
costumer for future payment.
10. Inventory- is the total amount of goods and/or materials contained
in a store or factory at any given time.

E. LESSON PROPER

LEARNING TASK STRATEGIES


EVALUATION

5. Definition of retailing -Brainstorming -oral


response
6. Classification of retail stores
according to Merchandise line -Discussion -oral
response
7. The role of retailing in the
Community -Buzz Session -oral
response
8. Appreciation of the value of
Retailing to our community -Open-ended sentence -oral
response

F. CLOSING ACTIVITIES:
4. Generalization
It is easier to get employed or start a career in retailing than in any
other field.

5. Values Integration
The students will show awareness about the importance of retailing
business in the community.

6. Evaluation

SHORT QUIZ: (TRUE OR FALSE)


Direction: Write TRUE, if the statement is correct and FALSE,
if it is wrong.

_____1. Retailing is refers to all forms of selling in small quantity


directly to consumer.
_____2. It is easier to get employed or start a career in retailing than in
any other field.
_____3. An individual engaged in the activity of retailing is called
suppliers.
_____4. The retailer provides place, time, possessions and sometimes
utility for their suppliers and their consumers.
_____5. For end-users/ consumers, the retailer not provides goods and
service information.

ANSWER KEY

6. TRUE
7. TRUE
8. FALSE
9. TRUE
10. FALSE

VIII. ASSIGNMENT:
3. Topic: Importance of Production Plan
4. Words to study:
e. Manufacturing
f. Equipments
g. Hospitalization
h. Capital

Guide Questions:
4. What is Production Plan?
5. Why do we need Production Plan for a Manufacturing Business?
6. How can we design a well production plan to ensure the productivity of
a business?

Reference:
T.L.E. II- (Textbook) By: Villaflor Padullo and Rocena Viernes pp. 281

Prepared by: Checked by:


_________________
Liza Batonghinog Mr. Norwin Millares
Student Teacher Cooperating Teacher
CERTIFICATE & DTR
CLEARANCE FORM