5AAEB036 First World War Literature

Level/Semester taught Convenor/Teacher Credit Value Teaching Arrangements Assessment 2nd Year Module Band 2, taught semester 2 Max Saunders 15 credits 1 hour seminar & 1 hour lecture weekly One 3-hour prior disclosure examination (100% of final mark)

MODULE OUTLINE: General aims The module introduces students to First World War poetry, fiction, memoirs and drama, including texts by non-combatants, and also men and women born after 1918. The primary emphasis will be on British authors, but attention will also be paid to the European context. Whilst its emphasis is on close-readings of the primary material, students are encouraged to engage with more recent literary and cultural-historical scholarship. Learning outcomes • Knowledge of a range of key First World War texts by men and women in three different genres; of the historical and social circumstances, and also of contemporary debates about gender, class, and psychology; an understanding of how the War transformed them. • Awareness of the hostilities between combatants and non-combatants, and of how this affected writers’ senses of their readerships. • Attention to form: a consideration of why writers might have chosen particular literary and generic forms for representing War, and what these forms enable or inhibit; ability to critique these forms, using a variety of different methodologies and theoretical perspectives. • An appreciation of the aesthetic and psychological difficulties involved in representing War, and a critical engagement with how different writers grappled with them. • An awareness of the power of the War to generate different myths at different times, and attention to how literature contributed to this process. Note to students about texts/course packs: Before each seminar, students will be required to read all of the set primary material (marked ‘Seminar Reading’) and, where possible, the recommended ‘Additional Prose’ and ‘Criticism’. Most of the set reading (apart from whole books) will be included within the course pack distributed by the department at the beginning of term. The books students are advised to buy or borrow from libraries are starred (*) in the module guidelines below. Students are also encouraged to read widely from the ‘Further Reading’ and ‘Bibliography’ sections. Lecture/Seminar Program (indicating texts studied): Week 1: Critical and Theoretical Approaches to First World War Literature Seminar Reading: Fussell, Paul, ‘A Satire of Circumstance’ in The Great War and Modern Memory (1975). Further reading: Bond, Brian, The Unquiet Western Front: Britain’s Role in Literature and History (2002); Campbell, James, ‘Interpreting the War’ in The Cambridge Companion to the Literature of the First World War (2005); Campbell, James, ‘Combat Gnosticism: The Ideology of First World War Poetry Criticism’ in New Literary History (1999); Hynes, Samuel, ‘The War Becomes Myth’ in A War Imagined: The First World War and English Culture (1990). Weeks 2-4 Poetry of the First World War. Most of the poems discussed in seminars can be found in George Walter ed. The Penguin Book of First World War Poetry (2006)*.

Freud. ‘Suicide in the Trenches’. Intimate History of Killing: Face-to-Face Killing in Twentieth-Century Warfare (1999). Criticism: Kendal. Week 4: The Ordinary and the Everyday Seminar Reading: Edward Thomas. Madness and English Culture. ‘Introduction: A different kind of War’ in Fallen Soldiers: Reshaping the Memory of the World Wars (1990). Wilfred Owen. chap 3. Ted Hughes. John Middleton. ‘Anthem for Doomed Youth’. Julian Bell (1935) Criticism: Ramazani. in The Cambridge Companion to the Literature of the First World War (2005). Booth. Rupert Brooke. Hill. Siegfried Sassoon. ‘Introduction’ and ‘Forgetful Objects’ in Postcards from the Trenches: negotiating the space between modernism and the First World War (1996). ‘The Wound and the Voice’ in Unclaimed Experience: Trauma. in We did not Fight: 1914-18 Experiences of War Resisters. Geoffrey. [popular song]. Lewis. Edward Thomas. Charles Sorely ‘Two Sonnets’. Sites of Mourning (1996) Week 3: Pleasure and Pain Seminar Reading: Wilfred Owen. 'Gurney's Hobby' in Essays in Criticism.7: First World War Fiction Week 5: Modernism and Shellshock Seminar reading: Rebecca West. Further reading: Bond. ‘As the Team’s Head Brass’. Bourke. ‘Break of Day in the Trenches’. Modernism. Winter. ‘Returning We Hear the Larks’. Wyndham.H. Cathy. ‘The General’. ‘War Poetry and the Realm of the Senses’ in Tim Kendal ed. ‘Wilfred Owen’ in Poetry of Mourning: The Modern Elegy from Hardy to Heaney (1994). Santanu. Further Reading: Showalter. Criticism: Trotter. 34:2 (1984). David Jones. ‘Male Hysteria: W. Joanna. Touch and Intimacy in First World War Literature (2005). Jay. ‘British War Memoirs. Narrative and History (1996). 1830-1980 (1985). ‘The Cherry Trees’. ‘Two Wise Generals’. Further reading: Mosse. ‘Out’. Jahan. ‘Introduction’ and Das. George. The Penguin Book of First World War Prose (1990). Mrs Dalloway (1925)*. ‘Mr Sassoon’s War Verses’ (1918) in Glover and Silkin ed. Sites of Memory. Isaac Rosenberg. ‘To His Love’. Weeks 5. excerpts from In Parenthesis (1937). David. The Return of the Soldier (1918)*. Additional Prose: Murray. ‘Donkeys and Flandres Mud’. Santanu. . Smile’. Criticism: Caruth. Additional prose: John Rodker. Tate. Siegfried Sassoon.Week 2: Mourning and Protest Seminar Reading: Ivor Gurney. Allyson. ‘The Romance of War’ in Blasting and Bombadiering: An Autobiography (1914-1926) (1937). excerpts from Virginia Woolf. ‘The Soldier’ and ‘Fragment’. Oxford Handbook of British and Irish War Poetry (2007) Further reading: Das. Ivor Gurney. ‘Mourning and Melancholia’ in Standard Edition 14 (1953 [1917]). introduction. Brian. ‘Apologia Pro Poemate Meo’. ‘Louse Hunting’. ‘A Private’. ‘The Kiss’ and ‘Blighters’. Ted Hughes. ‘Hanging on the Auld Barbed Wire’. ‘Twenty Years After’. The Unquiet Western Front (2002). Tim. Elaine. History and the First World War (1998). Rivers and the Lessons of Shell Shock’ in The Female Malady: Women. Anon. ‘Siegfried Sassoon. ‘Dulce et Decorum Est’ and ‘Smile. Smile. ‘The Silent One’ and ‘Strange Hells’. Sigmund. Trudi.R. ed.

Wilfred Owen. Further reading: Saunders. ‘The Storyteller’ [1937] in Illuminations (1999 [1955]). The Letters of Charles Sorley (1919). Sondra J. ed Berel Lang (1988). Week 6: Reading Week Week 7: The Indescribable Seminar reading: excerpts from Ford Madox Ford. W. Parade’s End (1924-28)*. Siegfried Sassoon. Elaine. Sigmund. War. Allan. 2 (2003). extracts from Vera Brittain. Testament of Youth (1933). Wyndham Lewis. Stephen. vol. Criticism: Des Pres. Representing War: Form and Ideology in First World War Narratives (1998). The Good Soldier Svejk (1921-23). and chap 6 of part 2. book 2: chap 1 of part 1. Stang (1986). Robert. ‘The Process of Trivialization’ (1990). Fallen Soldiers: Reshaping the Memory of the World Wars. Undertones of War (1928). (September. 2 (1996). Mosse. chap 1 of part 2. ‘War and Humour’. no. George. H. Ford Madox Ford: a dual life. Vincent. Week 9: The Autobiographical I Seminar reading: Robert Graves. Weeks 8-9: First World War Life Writing Week 8: Anecdotes and Episodic Histories Seminar reading: Students will be asked to compare Siegfried Sassoon’s poem ‘Lamentations’ and an excerpt from Memoirs of an Infantry Officer. ‘Holocaust Laughter?’ in Writing and the Holocaust. Max. Freud. Additional Prose: excerpt from Graves. Terrance. Goodbye to All That (1929)*. excerpts from Jaroslav Hasek. books 2 and 3 (esp. But it Still Goes On: An Accumulation (1930). Catherine and Greenblatt. Further reading: Special edition of European Studies. Edmund Blunden. They will also be asked to write a short commentary on an anecdote selected from one of the following texts (which should be borrowed or bought and which they will be required to read in full) to present to the seminar group.. 'Introduction to Psycho-Analysis and the War Neuroses' in Standard Edition 17 (1955 [1919]). and the Politics of humour: The Canard Enchaine and World War I (2002). Blasting and Bombadiering (1937). Lionel.Sherry. Benjamin. Criticism: Evelyn Cobley. Book 3: chap 1 of part 1. vol 31. Criticism: Scarry. Music. Criticism: Barthes. Text (1977). Further reading: Cobley. Selected Letters (1985). Memoirs of an Infantry Officer (1930). .) (1924-8) Additional Prose: Ford Madox Ford. Leed. 2001). The Great War and the Language of Modernism (2004). ‘The Death of the Author’ Image. ‘A Day of Battle’ in The Ford Madox Ford Reader. Rivers. ‘Introduction’ and ‘The Structure of War’ in The Body in Pain: The Making and Unmaking of the World (1985). Memory. Charles Sorley. vol. chap. ed. No Man’s Land: Combat & Identity in World War I (1979) Week 10: Humour and Laughter Seminar reading: Joan Littlewood and the Theatre Workshop Oh! What a Lovely War! (1963)*. 42. Gossman. Ivor Gurney. Evelyn. Further Reading: Gallagher. Douglas. Conflict and Dream (1923). Walter. Roland. R. ’The Logic of Episodic Contingency’ in Representing War: Form and Ideology in First World War Narratives (1993). ‘The Touch of the Real’ and ‘Counter History and the Anecdote’ in Practicing New Historicism (2000). Eric J. War Letters (1983). ‘Anecdote and History’ in History and Theory.

Philip Larkin. Andrew Motion.. The Penguin Book of First World War Prose (London: Penguin Books.. 1983) Owen. Jaroslav. Thornton (Northumberland. ed. Ivor. Frederic. 1930) Cecil. The Best of Fragments from France. Blasting and Bombardiering (1937) Madox. Jon. Ford. Farewell to Arms (1929) Jones. John Bell (Oxford: Oxford University Press. 1919) West. Julian ed. Robert. ‘Carrickfergus’. eds.1985) The Letters of Charles Sorley (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Ford Madox. Roger McGough ‘Square Dance’. Tim. and Liddle. R. Men and the Great War: An Anthology of Stories (Manchester University Press. Ted Hughes ‘Sex Young Men’. In Parenthesis (1937) Junger. Henri. 1996) Glover. Kendal. 1995) Walter. Facing Armageddon: The First World War Experienced (Barnsley: Pen and Sword. Bruce. Under Fire (1916) Ford. Paul Muldoon. Ernst. 1935) Brophy John. Yeats to Michael Longley (2003). Women. ‘The Five Acts of Harry Patch’. ‘A Day of Battle’ in The Ford Madox Ford Reader. George ed.Week 11: The Literary Legacy of the War For the seminar: Louis MacNeice. R. ‘Truce’. Robert. Storm of Steel (1920) Lewis. Wilfred.. ‘MCMXIV’. Jon. and Manchester: Ashington. Songs and Slang of the British Soldier. Parade’s End (1924-8) Manning. The Good Soldier Svejk (1921-23) Hemmingway. 1978) Barbusse. Max ed. eds. Michael Longley. Testament of Youth (1933) Dos Passos. Undertones of War (1928) Brittain. Wyndham. ed. But it Still Goes On: An Accumulation (1930) Hasek. Rebecca. The Oxford Book of Military Anecdotes (Oxford: Oxford University Press. The Middle Parts of Fortune: Somme and Ancre (1929) . 1986 [1916]) Gurney. Death of a Hero (1929) Blunden. 1987) Tate. Ernest. 2006) 1914-1918: Bairnsfather. Edmund. extract from The Ghost Road.B. Peter H. Modern English War Poetry (2006). The Penguin Book of First World War Poetry (London: Penguin Books. ed. Further reading: Brearton. Trudi. John. Stang (Manchester: Carcanet. Pat Barker . Fran.. 1914-1918 (London: Scholartis Press. and Partridge Eric ed. Goodbye to All That (1929) Graves. ‘In Memoriam Francis Ledwidge’. W. Seamus Heaney. David. We did not Fight: 1914-18 Experiences of War Resisters (Gloucester: Cobden-Sanderson. The Great War in Irish Poetry. (Horndean: Milestone Publications.The Return of the Soldier (1918) 1920s/30s Aldington. Hugh. K. Three Soldiers (1921) Graves. Week 12: To be advised Bibliography Anthologies: Bell. eds Tonie & Valmai Holt. ed. Sondra J. Vera. Ford. Richard. 1990) Hastings. Selected Letters. and Silkin. ‘Wounds’ and ‘In Memoriam’. War Letters.

Yeats to Michael Longley (Oxford: Oxford University Press. R. Modern English War Poetry (Oxford: Oxford University Press. vol. Evelyn. Yuval Noah. Joanna. Pat. Mrs Dalloway (1925) Woolf. 2003) Bond. The Ghost Road (1995) Charles Carrington. pp. Fran. To The Lighthouse (1927) Post WW2: Barker. 40. 2 (May 2001). Virginia. Victoria. Modernism. ed Jay Winter and Emmanuel Sivan (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Cenotaph of Snow: Sixty Poems about War (2003) McGuinness. Maria. vol. 2002) Smith. Touch and Intimacy in First World War Literature (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. and the Great War (Chicago: University of Chicago Press. 1996) Cobley. Oh What a Lovely War (1963) Longley. W. 241-260 Bourke. Trudi. The Pity of War (London. James Scott. Dismembering the Male: Men’s Bodies. no. Memoirs of an Infantry Officer (1930) Sheriff. Postcards from the Trenches: negotiating the Space between modernism and the first World War (New York. An Intimate History of Killing: Face-to-Face Killing in 20th century warfare (London: Grata Books. 2006) Winter. Jay. 203-215 Hynes. Ford Madox Ford: a dual life (Oxford: Oxford University Press. Siegfried. ‘Combat Gnosticism: The Ideology of First World War Poetry Criticism’ in New Literary History. Ted. 205-220 Ferguson. Allyson. Women’s Autobiography: War and Trauma (London: Palgrave Macmillan. 43-72 Sherry. 2003) Stewart. David Jones: A Fusilier at the Front (Bridgend: Seren. Max. 1996) Saunders. 2005) Todman. Dan. 1998) Booth. 1996) Hyne. no. Tim ed. Samuel.C.. Remembering War: The Great War Between Memory and History in the Twentieth Century (New Haven.Mottram. (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Sebastian. Oxford: Oxford University Press.. 1 (January 2005). vol. Allen Lane. 2006) Das. Oxford Handbook of British and Irish War Poetry (Oxford: Oxford University Press. Observe the Sons of Ulster Marching Towards the Somme (1986) Criticism (most recent first) Kendall. The Great War in Irish Poetry. ‘Martial Illusions: War and Disillusionment in Twentieth-Century and Renaissance Military Memoirs’ in The Journal of Military History. The Cambridge Companion to the Literature of the First World War (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Joanna. 2004) Brearton. no. The Unquiet Western Front: Britain’s Role in Literature and History. 1998) Tate.. The Great War and the Language of Modernism (Oxford: Oxford University Press. ‘Personal Narratives and Commemoration’ in War and Remembrance in the 20th century. Brian. Anthony. R. Journey’s End (1928) Woolf.. 30. ed. 1999) pp. 69.B. H. All Quiet on the Western Front (1930) Sassoon. Erich. 1996) Bourke. Birdsong (1993) Hughes. 2007) Kendall. Tim. 1996) . Virginia. Vincent ed. 1999) Campbell. History and the First World War (Manchester: Manchester University Press. Britain. The Great War: Myth and Memory (London: New York. ‘Paul Fussell’s The Great War and Modern Memory: Twenty-Five Years Later’ in History and Theory. Vincent. 2005) Sherry. Soldier from a War Returning (1965) Faulkes. 2005) Harari. London: Yale University Press. The Eye in the Door (1993). The Hawk in the Rain (1957) Littlewood. 1 (Winter 1999) pp. Nial. Leonard V. Representing War: Form and Ideology in First World War Narratives (Toronto: University of Toronto Press. pp. The Spanish Farm Trilogy (1924-26) Remarque. Joan and Theatre Workshop. Santanu. Michael. Regeneration (1991).

1914-1964. Arthur E. 1996) Goldman. Paul. 2 (April 1984). vol. Oxford: Oxford University Press 1990) Tylee. Modris. The Great War and Women’s Consciousness: Images of Militarism and Womanhood in Women’s Writings.art-ww1.oucs.. Madness and English Culture. W.com/gb/index2. Fallen Soldiers: Reshaping the Memory of the World Wars (New York. 1995 [1965]). 97-128 Fussell. Rites of Spring: The Great War and the Birth of the Modern Age (London: Papermac. Harvester. Somme (London: Joseph. Oxford Clarendon Press. 1914 (London: Joseph. Spring 1918 (London: Viking. Robert. 1994) Ouditt. Adrian. 1830-1980. 1919-1946 (Oxford: Berg. John. To the last man. 1978). Dorothy. Bernard. 1915: the Death of Innocence (London: Headline. 'Gurney's Hobby'. 1994) Gregory.R. 1892-1935 (Oxford. 1998).ac. No Man’s Land: Combat & Identity in World War I (CambrIdge: CambrIdge University Press. Taking it Like a Man: Suffering. 1972) Bergonzi. Nosheen. ‘Male Hysteria: W. Fighting Forces: Writing Women: Identity and Ideology in the First World War (London: Routledge.1985) Terraine. 1988) Buitenhuis. with Jane Gledhill and Judith Hattaway.T. Jahan. Showalter. An Adequate Response: The War Poetry of Wilfred Owe & Siegfried Sassoon (Michegan: State University Press 1972) Silkin..firstworldwar. Sites of Memory. The Great War of Words: Literature as Propaganda 1914-18 and After. Sites of Mourning (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.1947 [1936]) Useful websites: For original manuscripts of WW1 poetry: http://www.ox. (London: B. Women Writers and the Great War (New York: Twayne. 1989) Khan. 1979) Hill. They called it Passchendaele: the story of the Third Battle of Ypres and of the men who fought in it (London: Joseph.uk/ww1lit/ WW1 Art: http://www. no.Winter. The Oxford Book of Modern Verse. Eksteins. pp. Jarring Witnesses: Modern Fiction and the Representation of History (Hertfordshire: Harvester Wheatshead. 1993) Pick. Jay.htm Other helpful texts (not specifically focused on WW1 Literature): . (Hampshire and London: Macmillan. 1983). London: University of Chicago Press. ‘National Ghost’ in Winter Pollen: Occasional Prose. Essays in Criticism. Lyn.H. The Silence of Memory: Armistice Day.B. The Smoke and the Fire: myths and Anti-Myths of War 1861-1945 (London: Sidgwick and Jackson. Daniel. 1993).. Jon. 1993) Hynes. William Scammel ed (New York: Picador. Peter. Rivers and the Lessons of Shell Shock’ in The Female Malady: Women. Claire. 34. Out of Battle: The Poetry of the Great War (Oxford: OUP. 1990) Mosse. The Great War and Modern Memory (New York and London: Oxford University Press.com/posters/uk. Manchester University Press. (London: Virago. 70-2 Yeats. A War Imagined: The First World War and English Culture (London: The Bodley Head. Eric J. Women’s Poetry of the First World War. 1994) Holton. 1995) Cork. 1980) Leed. Batsforth Ltd. L. 1989 [1987]) Macdonald. War Machine: The Rationalisation of Slaughter in the Modern Age (New Haven and London: Yale University Press. George. Elaine. Richard. Poetry of Mourning: The Modern Elegy from Hardy to Heaney (Chicago. Sexuality and the War Poets (Manchester. Sharon. A Bitter Truth: Avant-Garde Art and the Great War (New Haven: Yale University Press. Adrian. Heroes’ Twilight: A Study of Literature of the Great War (Manchester: Carcanet. Wheatsheaf. 1975) Lane. 1994) Caesar. 1987). (Hemmel Hampstead. Ted.html WW1 Posters: http://www. 1996 [1965]) Hughes. 1990). 1994) Ramazan. Geoffrey. Samuel.

‘Thoughts for the Times of War and Death’. ed Berel Lang. London: University of Nebraska Press. Sigmund. Sigmund. Hannah Arendt. ‘Holocaust Laughter?’ in Writing and the Holocaust. and History (Baltimore and London: John Hopkins University Press. 14. 2003) . Hannah Arendt (London: Pimlico. 'Introduction to Psycho-Analysis and the War Neuroses' (1919). Margaretta. 1999 [1955]) Cathy Caruth. 1955) pp. 2005) Rivers. Unclaimed Experience: Trauma. (London: Hogarth Press. Walter. Standard Edition. Sigmund. R. Alex Vernon (Kent and London: Kent State University Press. Standard Edition. and Autobiographical Writing. trans. Oxford: Oxford University. 17 (London: The Hogarth Press. 1955). the Military. introd. H. 243-248 Freud. 1988). W. Glenn. ‘The Storyteller’ [1937] in Illuminations. ‘Mourning and Melancholia’ Standard Edition. ed. 1970 [1959]) Jolly. Regarding the Pain of Others (New York: Picador. 1953 [1917]) pp. 205-10 Gray. ‘Myths of Unity – Remembering the 2nd WW through letters and their editing’. 17 (London: The Hogarth Press. 1923) Scarry. Terrance. 1996) Des Pres. pp. (New York: Holmes & Meier. J. Elaine. Conflict and Dream (London: Kegan Paul.Benjamin. (Lincoln. 1985) Sontag. The Warriors: Reflections of Men in Battle. in Arms and the Self: War. Narrative. 205-10 Freud.. Susan. 216-233 Freud. The Body in Pain: The Making and Unmaking of the World (New York.

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