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Polytechnic University of the Philippines

Commonwealth Campus
Quezon City

Student Teaching Portfolio


of

Ma. Eliza E. Cagomoc


Bachelor in Business Teacher Education

Assigned to

Sauyo High School


Novaliches, Quezon City

Submitted to

Marilyn Isip
Coordinator

March 2011
Table of Contents

Dedication

Acknowledgement

Prayers of Teachers

Introduction

PUP Philosophy

Goals

Vison/Mission

School Context (Profile, Location, Plans, and Programs)

History

Map

Ogranizational Chart

Final Demo Plan (Learning Module)

Brief Synopsis

Professional Development Plan/ Career Plan


Narrative Report (weekly)
Current Issues in Education (Foreign and Local)
Curriculum Vitae
Attachment
• Photos

• Lesson Plan

• Certificate / DTR
DEDICATION
I want to dedicate this to my parents who always support me financially and also
emotionally. One who always encourage me to continue and not to give in. For
the Professors who always their to guide us in our works and make us feel good
everytime we feel bad. Lastly is to our God who always there to support me and
guide me on my path. Thank you so much!!!!!!

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
First of all, I would like to say thanks God, for giving me the strength and health to do
this project work until it done Not forgotten to my family for providing everything,
such as money, to buy anything that are related to this project work and their advise,
which is the most needed for this project. Internet, books, computers and all that as
my source to complete this project. They also supported me and encouraged me to
complete this task so that I will not procrastinate in doing it.

Then I would like to thank my cooperating teacher, Ms. Ailyn Gaspar for guiding me
and teaching me the right things to do as a teacher. I had some difficulties in doing
this task, but she taught me patiently until I knew what to do. She tried and tried to
teach me until we understand what we supposed to do with my class.

Last but not least, my friends who help me in doing this kind of works and of course,
to our loving advicer of Practicum II Professor Sheryl Morales and Professor Marilyn
Isip for giving this opportunities to have this kind of activities. Supporting us
especially for the major things in our practicum.
Prayer of a Teacher
I want to teach my students how
To live this life on earth
To face its struggles and its strife
And to improve their worth
Not just the lesson in a book
Or how the rivers flow
But how to choose the proper path
Wherever they may go
To understand eternal truth And know
The right from wrong
And gather all the beauty of a Flower
And a song for if
I help the world to grow In wisdom
And in grace
Then I shall feel that I have won
And I have filled my place
And so I ask Your guidance, God
That I may do my part
For character and confidence
And happiness of Heart
INTRODUCTION

On the job training or OJT is one method by which students is given a chance

to apply the theories and computations that they have learned from the school. It also

helps the students to acquire relevant knowledge and skills by performing in actual

work setting. Colleges and universities require their students to undergo such training

within a specific number of hours as part of the curriculum.

For the students, practicum or internship program provides opportunities to go

through the actual methodologies of a specific job using the real tools, equipments

and documents. In effect, the workplace becomes a development venue for a student

trainee to learn more about his chosen field and practice what he has learn from

academy.

On the other hand, an effective student teaching program also benefits the

schools who accept student teachers. First they provides additional manpower for a

lesser labor cost than a regular teacher. Most of them are all eager to learn the ropes

so chances are high that they will cooperate.

Practicum can bring fresh ideas into the organization. Given the opportunity to

speak their minds freely and without fear, they maybe able to contribute significantly in

brainstorming sessions or research and eventually help improve the organizations

productivity. While training the interns, teachers are in fact also teaching their

practicumers to process of guiding the trainees stretches their patience, develops

teaching skills and makes them more sensitive to the needs and mind set of the younger

generation. The course of supervision also teaches them how to share what they know
and be receptive to questions. Hence, the internship also becomes an avenue in training

for future teachers.


Pup Vision
Towards a Total University

Mission

The mission of PUP in the 21st Century is to provide the highest quality of

comprehensive and global education and community services accessible to all

students, Filipinos and foreigners alike.

It shall offer high quality undergraduate and graduate programs that are responsive to

the changing needs of the students to enable them to lead productive and meaningful

lives.

PUP commits itself to:

1. Democratize access to educational opportunities;

2. Promote science and technology consciousness and develop relevant expertise

and competence among all members of the academe, stressing their

importance in building a truly independent and sovereign Philippines;

3. Emphasize the unrestrained and unremitting search for truth and its defense, as

well as the advancement of moral and spiritual values;

4. Promote awareness of our beneficial and relevant cultural heritage;


5. country and social consciousness and the need to defend human rights;

6. Provide its students and faculty with a liberal arts-based education essential to

a broader understanding and appreciation of life and to the total development

of the individual;

7. Make the students and faculty aware of technological, social as well as

political and economic problems and encourage them to contribute to the

realization of nationalist industrialization and economic development of the

country;

8. Use and propagate the national language and other Philippine languages and

develop proficiency in English and other foreign languages required by the

students’ fields of specialization;

9. Promote intellectual leadership and sustain a humane and technologically

advanced academic community where people of diverse ideologies work and

learn together to attain academic, research and service excellence in a

continually changing world; and

10. Build a learning community in touch with the main currents of political,

economic and cultural life throughout the world; a community enriched by the

presence of a significant number of international students; and a community

supported by new technologies that facilitate active participation in the

creation and use of information and knowledge on a global scale.


Sauyo High School

Mission

The school exists to provide quality education through


competent teachers with
supportive community in a conductive learning
environment.

Vision

The Sauyo High School envision to produce quality students who are
Maka-

Diyos, Maka-tao, Maka-kalikasan at Makabayan.


History

Looking back at the history of Sauyo High School, one could not imagine that it

would metamorphose into a beautiful school as it is now, far from the Pasong Tamo

High School (its former name) which was regarded then as a “deprived, depressed,

and under served” school in the Division of Quezon City.

Sauyo High School formerly Pasong Tamo High School started as an Annex of

Novaliches High School in 1969, with one section of thirty students in the first year

level on a pre-fab building at the back of Pasong Tamo Elementary School. This was

in answer to a felt need in Barangay Pasong Tamo (where it got its name) through

representations by barangay leaders led by Mr. Conrado Panlaque, Sr., to the City

Mayor and City Superintendent of Schools. In 1972 to August 1978, it was made an

Annex of Culiat High School. It became independent on September 1, 1978. Yet it

had to live with a small campus that got muddy during rainy season inadequate

classrooms and school facilities and a number of squatters that dwelt in the vicinity.

After twenty-one years at the back of Pasong Tamo Elementary School, the school

moved to its new campus On October 26, 1989. This is on a 4,747 sq. meters lot

donated by the National Irrigation Administration at the NIA Village, a middle-class

subdivision in Sauyo , Novaliches. At present, the school has two sites. Site 1 situates

the two-storey 12 classroom Gavaldon building built in school year 1988 – 1989

which was funded by the City Government, the two storey 4-classroom NCR building

constructed in 1989 and rehabilitated last school year, and the two-room DPWH

building. This site houses the Principal’s and Administrative Office, the school clinic,

the Reading Center, a computer room and a mini-library.


Site 2 situates the three-storey 12 room Mathay Building, the two-storey 9

room SEDP building which houses the Technology & Livelihood building, the school

library, the Registrar’s Office, and two-storey Liban building.

Both sites have guidance offices, airconditioned faculty rooms, and school

canteens operated by the Sauyo High School Multi-Purpose Cooperative.

Classes are held in morning and afternoon shifts. The third year and fourth

year students hold classes in Site 1; the first year and second year students in site 2.

The school caters to students from its catchment areas – Bagbag and Sauyo – as well

as those coming from adjoining subdivisions.

Since its establishment, the school had been headed by the following

administrators, namely: Mr. Jose Aguilar (1969 – 1971); Mr. Ricardo Reyes (1971 –

1972, one month); Mrs. Basilia Jimenez (1972 – one month); Mrs. Elizabeth Olbina

(Oct. 1972 – 1975); Mrs. Virginia Cerrudo (1975 – 1976); Mrs. Perla Verso (1976 –

1978); Mrs. Purificacion Cruz (1978 – August 14, 1984); Mrs. Elisa Lorenzana

(August 15, 1984 – August 30 1989); Ms. Flor Sandoval (September 1, 1989 – June

18, 1990); Mr. Exequiel Calixtro (June 19, 1990 – January 1993); Mrs. Sheridan

Evangelista (January 1993 – May 1993); Mr. Stevenson Damo (June 1993 – April

1994); Mr. Alfredo Dela Cruz (may 1994 – 1998); and Ms. Ofelia Millete (November

1998 – October 16, 2002); Dr. Josefina M. Pamplina (October 17, 2002 – August 10,

2004); Mrs. Erlinda M. Barreras (August 11, 2004 – October 28, 2005); Mrs.

ANGELITA G. REGIS (November 8, 2005 – December 11, 2006); The present

school head is Dr. MODESTO G. VILLARIN (December 12, 2006 to 2008) and DR.

CORAZON LOMIBAO at the present.


The new principal is much concerned on the improvement of the school

buildings and its facilities to make the school conducive to learning. He also zeroes in

on instructional competence among teachers and academic achievement among

students. He hopes that with the concerted efforts of the school, the teachers and the

students. Sauyo High School will become a better performing school in the Division

of Quezon City. His vision is to make Sauyo High School become the most improved

school in terms of school achievement mean and special program for the arts, such as

creative writing, choral group, dance troupe, theater arts, visual arts and drums and

lyre.
SAUYO HIGH SCHOOL
Lesson Plan No. Date:
Learning Component: Entrepreneurship
Sub-Learning Component: Mark up and Mark down Price

I. Objectives
At the end of the lesson, the students are expected to:

1. define what is mark up and mark down


2. give the formula of mark up and mark down
3. solve the mark up and mark down problems
4. appreciate the importance of knowing the mark up and mark down in their life.

II. Content
A. Topic: Mark up and Mark down
B. Materials: Visual aids
C. Reference: Effective Technology and Home Economics II textbook, Luz
Villanueva-Rojo et.al, pp. 201-202

III. Procedure

A. Preparatory

a.1 Daily Routine


a.2 Drill: Word Hunt
a.3 Review: Service Type Business
a.4 Unlocking Difficulties: mark down, discounts, mark up, profit
a.5 Motivation: solving mathematical equation

B. Development/ Presentation of the lesson


1. Discuss mark up and mark down
2. Tell the formula of finding mark up and mark down
3. Show how to solve for the mark up and mark down
4. Ask the students the importance of mark up and mark down

C. Closing Activity

Generalization
Mark up is amount added to cost price to arrive at retail price. It is also called as
difference between cost price and retail price. Mark down is reduction in original
price, or previous retail price of an item.
Valuing
The students will able to answer mathematical equation
Application
The students will solve the given problems.
IV. Evaluation

Solve the following problems

1) Mark up % = 40%
Purchase Price = 850
What is the selling price?
2) Purchase Price = 400
Selling Price = 450
What is the mark up percentage?
3) Mark up % = 40%
Selling Price = 630
What is purchase price?
4) Purchase Price = 550
Mark down % = 20%
What is selling price?
5) Purchase Price = 425
Selling Price = 318
What is the mark down%?

V. Assignment

A. CONTENT
Sales Promotion

B. WORD STUDY
Promotion
Posters
Advertising

C. GUIDE QUESTION
What is promotion?
What is price tag? What is Posters?
What are ways of sales promotion?
Give the importance of sale promotion?

D. REFERENCE

Effective Technology and Home Economics II textbook, Luz Villanueva-Rojo et.al,


pp. 201-202

Prepared by:

Ma. Eliza E. Cagomoc


BRIEF
SYNOPSIS
The Crisis of Public Education in the Philippines
May 16, 2009

According to the human capital theory, the economic development of a nation


is a function of the quality of its education. In other words: the more and better
educated a people, the greater the chances of economic development.

The modern world in which we live is often termed a “knowledge society”;


education and information have become production factors potentially more
valuable than labor and capital. Thus, in a globalized setting, investment in
human capital has become a condition for international competitiveness.

In the Philippines, I often hear harsh criticism against the politics of


globalization. At the same time, regarding the labor markets, I can hardly think
of another nation that is so much a part of a globalized economy than the
Philippines with nearly ten per cent of the overall population working beyond
the shores of the native land.

Brain drain. Apart from the much debated political, social and psychological
aspects, this ongoing mass emigration constitutes an unparalleled brain drain
with serious economic implications.

Arguably, the phenomenon also has an educational dimension, as the


Philippine society is footing the bill for the education of millions of people,
who then spend the better part of their productive years abroad. In effect, the
poor Philippine educational system is indirectly subsidizing the affluent
economies hosting the OFWs.

With 95 per cent of all elementary students attending public schools, the
educational crisis in the Philippines is basically a crisis of public education.
The wealthy can easily send their offspring to private schools, many of which
offer first-class education to the privileged class of pupils.

Social divide. Still, the distinct social cleavage regarding educational


opportunities remains problematic for more than one reason. Historically, in
most modern societies, education has had an equalizing effect. In Germany, for
instance, the educational system has helped overcome the gender gap, and later
also the social divide. Today, the major challenge confronting the educational
system in the country, in most cases Muslim, immigrants. Importantly, this
leveling out in the context of schooling has not occurred in this part of the
world. On the contrary, as one Filipino columnist wrote, “Education has
become part of the institutional mechanism that divides the poor and the rich.”

Let me add an ideological note to the educational debate: Liberals are often
accused of standing in the way of reforms that help overcome social
inequalities. While, indeed, liberals value personal freedom higher than social
equality, they actively promote equality of opportunities in two distinct policy
areas: education and basic heath care.

For this reason, educational reform tends to have a high ranking on the agenda
of most liberal political parties in many parts of the world.

Although I live to this country for over 30 years now, I am still astonished
again and again by the frankness and directness with which people here address
problems in public debates. “The quality of Philippine education has been
declining continuously for roughly 25 years,” said the Undersecretary — and
no one in the audience disagreed. This, I may add, is a devastating report card
for the politicians who governed this nation in the said period. From a liberal
and democratic angle, it is particularly depressing as this has been the period
that coincides with democratic rule that was so triumphantly and impressively
reinstalled after the dark years of dictatorship in 1986! Describing the quality
of Philippine school education today, the senior DepEd official stated the
following: “Our schools are failing to teach the competence the average citizen
needs to become responsible, productive and self-fulfilling. We are graduating
people who are learning less and less.”

Let me highlight two figures: Reportedly, at last count more than 17 million
students are enrolled in this country’s public schools.

At an annual population growth rate of 2.3 per cent, some 1.7 million babies
are born every year. In a short time, these individuals will claim their share of
the limited educational provisions.

“We can’t build classrooms fast enough to accommodate” statement from a


DepEd Undersecretary, who also recalled the much lamented lack of teachers,
furniture and teaching materials.

In short, there are too little resources for too many students.

Two alternatives. In this situation, logically, there exist only two strategic
alternatives: either, one increases the resources, which is easier said than done
considering the dramatic state of public finances, or one reduces the number of
students.

This second alternative presupposes a systematic population policy, aimed at


reducing the number of births considerably.

But this, too, is easier said than done, considering the politics in this country —
or to quote Congressman Reyes: “Given the very aggressive and active
intervention of the Church addressing the population problem is very hard to
tackle.”
a time when a college education is vital to an individual's future
and our nation's economic standing in the world, "Declining By
Degrees: Higher Education at Risk," a two-hour documentary
airing on PBS, explores the simple yet significant question: What
happens between admission and graduation? The answer: often not
enough.

With more than 14 million students at 4,200 colleges, serious


questions are being raised about the quality of teaching and
learning, retention and graduation rates and the skills of those
students who earn their diploma. As Lara Couturier, a higher
education consultant explains, "There's been report after report and
commission after commission formed of business leaders who are
calling out to higher education and saying 'We need to change the
system. We are not satisfied with the level of skills that our
employees are showing up with.'"

"Declining by Degrees" takes viewers to college campuses around


the country to hear firsthand from students, teachers and
administrators who provide candid insights of the national
problems and challenges facing higher education in America. It's a
topic too important to ignore. As Richard Hersh, former president
of Trinity College and Hobart and William Smith College says,
"Higher education is about the future. And it is about the way in
which we travel to the future in terms of being prepared, or it's the
way in which we fail the future."

Being prepared is one of the first and biggest challenges freshman


college students encounter. As Matt Morris, a freshman at a
regional university in Kentucky, was moving in he was already
aware he was not ready for the academic demands of college. "I
could have been a straight 'A' student in high school," says Matt, "I
was 'A-B', without bringing a book home, so I don't have very good
study skills."

Hersh says Matt represents an increasing problem. "I think we're


taking many, many more students who are not prepared for college.
I think that's true. I think we have to ask questions about who
should we be admitting, and how should they be better prepared
before."
Another obstacle to learning has to do with size. Across the
country, students and professors cited large lectures on large
campuses as an easy way to get lost. As Keith Caywood, a student
at a public research university with more than 37,000 students, put
it, "I got swallowed up. I didn't know where any of my classes
were. It was such a large campus." He says he had classes of 200
people and, "no one knew if I was there or not." Caywood dropped
out after his freshman year, as did 22% of the other freshman
students that year.

Other students felt college was not demanding enough. Robin


Bhalla, a senior at the same large university, recalls his years of
getting by without much effort, "Teachers always say, you know,
'read this and this and this'," says Robin. "'For every class, you
should have a certain amount of readings done.' I never did that. At
the beginning of each class, I just start scanning the reading or
looking at my notes to see what the teacher said was important, and
I usually do fine." Despite frequent nights of drinking, Robin made
the Dean's List and ultimately graduated.

George Kuh, the director of a national survey for college students,


estimates about 20% of college students drift through their college
years. "A sizable number of students are enrolled, stay enrolled and
graduate from college having been required to put forth little effort
into their studies. A substantial number of people kind of
sleepwalk, if you will, through college."

Teachers have different challenges that can compromise the quality


of teaching and learning. One problem often reported is that
rewards aren't given out based on teaching.

Brian Strow, an economics professor who hopes to get tenure, says


there is a lot of pressure from his college administration to engage
in more research. "Clearly if I want a raise, it's going to be through
research," he says. "I'm not going to get raises based on quality of
teaching, no matter how good that teaching is."

"Declining by Degrees" also highlights the impact of market forces


in higher education today. The reality of the college experience
today often depends on the bottom line: money. As one university
president described it, "The state taxpayer support for public
universities is eroding. That creates financial stress that we all
understand and we just manage it. We just deal with it the best we
can."

The two-hour documentary examines the public and government's


decreasing financial commitment to higher education. Sixty years
ago our country entered into what amounted to a social contract to
ensure access to college for all despite family income. States
supported public colleges and the federal government helped with
money for the poor. Today, the funds and the support for the social
contract are diminishing.

As Pat Callan, President of the National Center for Public Policy


and Higher Education, explains, "The federal Pell Grant program is
the nation's largest program that focuses on the lowest income
students who actually get to go to college. In the early 80's, that
program had about 3 or 4 billion dollars in it, and it covered over
95 percent of the average tuition at a 4-year public college or
university." Today it's about 57%.

The impact on students is a decrease in access to higher education.


Ceylon Hollis, a student at a midwest regional college, illustrates
the reality of how hard it is for many to afford college. By day,
Ceylon is a full-time student. At night, she is a full-time factory
worker on an assembly line. "When I first started college, I used to
have credit cards, and that's what I used to pay my classes off
with... classes and books," says Ceylon. "I thought that I was going
to be able to get those credit cards paid off, but the ... it just got
bigger and bigger and, the next thing you know, that card was
maxed out and I got another one in the mail." Ceylon expects to
owe about $26,000 when she graduates.

Ceylon is not alone. One in five college students works full-time


while pursuing a full-time degree plan.

In an effort to balance budgets, colleges and universities are


increasingly depending on part-time teachers. Bob Gibson, a
philosophy professor, teaches 280 students in nine classes at three
colleges in the Denver area. "I wish I could tailor-make my
delivery and my tools for each class for each student," Gibson says,
"Can't do it. Too many kids. Too many students. Too many
classes."

Nationally, nearly half of all college faculty are part-timers, up


from only 22% in 1970.
Other market influences impacting higher education today that are
explored in the program include the "arms race" in building and
creating campus amenities to attract students, increasing
importance of college rankings by the media, and big-time college
sports.

The news is not all grim. In our reporting, we encountered people


and programs aimed at making higher education in America better.
We met dedicated teachers using technology to more effectively
engage and educate students in large lecture classes. We observed
learning communities where students are grouped to facilitate
learning as well as students who illustrate the power of higher
education in opening doors of opportunity and deepening learning.

Educators and experts across the country say the time for reform is
now. "The system is at great risk. And we don't have the liberty of
waiting to see what happens," says Couturier. "We have to stop
now. We have to have this conversation now... about what does
society need from higher education? We're going to look back in
10 years and see how much we've lost."

Learning Matters Inc., a New York City based non-profit company,


spent two years on college campuses around the country. We
visited an elite private school in Massachusetts, a large public
research university in Arizona, a community college in Colorado
and a midsize regional university in Kentucky. The challenges
facing teaching and learning at our country's institutions came alive
through the students, teachers and administrators we met.
John Dewey, Experience and Education (1938)

Chapter 1 – Traditional vs. Progressive Education

Summary: Traditional education has been criticized as one that imposes on


students from the outside and from above (by teachers, etc.). Students’ limited
experiences make the adult nature of the imposed material irrelevant and hard
to understand. Progressive education has arisen, in part, because of
dissatisfaction with traditional education. It offers freedom from the static
nature of traditional education and growth through students’ present
experience.

Chapter 2 – The Need of a Theory of Experience

Summary: All experience is not educative. Experiences, as in the traditional


schools, can be mis-educative if they are static, don’t contribute to students’
growth, or don’t lead students to understand or appreciate later experience.
The primary justification of progressive schools is that, by providing better
experience, they provide students with better preparation for lifetime
appreciation, independence, and development. However, progressive
education, when it is done right, is not simple.

Chapter 3 – Criteria of Experience

Summary: If we believe in the democratic ideal, why wouldn’t we want


children to have experience with democratic social arrangements and positive
interactions, as in progressive schools? The manner in which students learn is
as important as what subject-matter they learn; they should be taught in a
manner consistent with their becoming positively interactive, democratic, and
dynamic learners.

Chapter 4 – Social Control

Summary: Everyone experiences social control in life, but this does not have
to represent autocratic rule. Social control of individual actions, by agreement
and by the members of a group for the benefit of the members of the group,
are common and accepted. Teachers should act or speak firmly, when (rarely)
needed, in behalf of the group. Students should be participants in group
planning as well as activities. The teacher should be a member of the group –
the most mature and experienced member. Children should learn manners and
should use them when participating, planning, and interacting with others.
Chapter 5 – The Nature of Freedom
Summary: The most important freedom is freedom of intelligence.
Freedom of movement does not automatically create freedom of
intelligence, but it can be a means to that end, since it can allow the
teacher to know the child better and the child to know himself better.
Freedom should be of a type that helps students learn to control their
impulses and desires. The ideal aim of education is to create intelligent
self-control.
Chapter 6 – The Meaning of Purpose
Summary: Individual freedom is achieved with the ability to identify
desires and create a plan that makes those desires or ideas into realities.
It is a teacher’s obligation to provide students with the opportunity to
participate actively in the process of creating such a plan of action.
Chapter 7 – Progressive Organization of Subject Matter
Summary: Traditional education has been criticized as failing to teach
critical discrimination and the ability to reason. The scientific method
should be used to derive the significance of everyday experience and
subject matter as well as discovery of the potentialities inherent in
experience. Any study must fall within the scope of ordinary, everyday
experience.
Chapter 8 – The Means and Goal of Education
Summary: Progressive education, to accomplish its goals, must be
based on intelligently directed development of the possibilities inherent
in ordinary experience. Those who think progressive education is not
successful or valuable are doing it wrong. Progressive education can
only succeed when certain conditions apply: Primarily, this involves
use of sound standards and methods to achieving its goals, which are
based on providing the best educational experience possible to create
confident, self-controlled, and capable citizens. Experience is the
means as well as the goal.
1st week

On my first week I really don’t know what to do and I am really shy and can’t talk
with anybody. first my cooperating teacher introduce me with her class and as my
first impression they are good and can help me enough to improve myself.
But as the days goes by they become wild and cannot control anymore.

2nd week

On my second week I am become strict and does not joke anymore and I really
enjoy the 3rd quarter because of the lesson about the electricity. and I feel good that
they listen to me unlike before. and we ask the student to make their own electric
circuit and have their grades and more creative in doing their works.

3rd week

In my third week I enjoy also because of the electronics I’ve learned a lot about the
electronics and its component and of course I become more comfortable to work
with my cooperating teachers. But still I’m still afraid on her.

4th week

Our lesson was about the Metal works and honestly it is hard to me because I cannot
express myself on that topic. but thanks god I have my cooperating teacher who
help me to explain the lesson well. and of course we ask the student to make their
own dustpan by the use of the metal as their activity

5th week

Its about the Christmas Party and honestly I just get inside the room and sleep all
day long. I really don’t know but I don’t enjoy the christmas party of the class.

6th week

It is the comeback on the school and of course as usual the student doesnt listen and
they are more prepared on having laughs and jokes with their friends. but of course
as part of my obligation I still try to communicate on them and teach them.
The Basic Concept of Division and its Function

In learning how to find the quotient of a division word problem, it’s important for the
learner to have a thorough understanding of the basic concept and components of a
division equation.

Division is the mathematical operation used if an object or a set of objects described


in a word problem has to be distributed or allocated into equal portions.

What is a quotient, a dividend and a divisor? They are the basic components of a
division equation, which needs to be identified in a word problem.

The Basic Components of a Division Equation

The Dividend – In every division process, there is always the “whole.” In a division
equation, this is called the dividend and is always the first number in the order of
appearance in a division equation.

Example: The librarian is about to donate 175 books to five charitable institutions,
how many books will each institute receive if the books are to be distributed equally?

The dividend in this word problem is 175 being the number that represents the entire
batch of books to be donated. Hence, you now have the first number of the division
equation for this word problem.

The Divisor – In order to divide the whole, you will need a divisor or the number that
tells into how many portions the whole will be divided. This is the second number
appearing in a division equation and it’s called the divisor.

Using the same word problem above, we can easily identify that the divisor is five, as
it denotes the number of recipient organizations. The word problem can be translated
into a mathematical sentence using this equation: 175 ÷ 5 =_?_

The Quotient – This is the resulting number after dividing the whole into several
parts. In a division equation, quotient is the answer derived after dividing the dividend
by the divisor.

To continue with our sample word problem, all we need to do to find the quotient of
the division word problem, is to divide the dividend by the divisor. This solution is
mathematically expressed as: 175 ÷ 5 = 35. The number 35 is the quotient, being the
answer to the mathematical equation.

However, the answer to the word problem should be aptly stated as: "The five
charitable institutions are to each receive 35 books" as answer to the question "How
many books will each institute receive if the books are to be distributed equally?"
Tips and Techniques for Solving Division Word Problems

The following are some tips and techniques to take note of when solving division
word problems:

1. Look for word clues like:

• Per
• Each
• Distribute
• Allocate
• Apportion
• Share
• Into how many
• Divide into two (three, four, five, six and so forth)
• Split between the two (three, four, five, six and so forth)

2. Take note of divisors that are expressed through the use of a collective form of
word, this denotes that they represent a constant value .

• Per day in a week (divisor = seven days)


• Per day in a month (divisor = 30 days or 31 days)
• Per day in a year (divisor = 365 days)
• Per week in a month (divisor = four weeks)
• Per month in a year (divisor =12 months)
• Per hour in a day (divisor = 24 hours)
• Per minute in an hour (divisor = 60 minutes)
• Halved (divisor = two)
• A third (divisor = three)
• A quarter (divisor = four)
• A fifth, (sixth, seventh, eighth, ninth, tenth)
• A dozen (divisor = 12)

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Read more: http://www.brighthub.com/education/homework-


tips/articles/112419.aspx#ixzz1I9KT3sHx
Explore Early Childhood Education in the Blogosphere: 10 Top Early Childhood
Education

Parents, preschool teachers and even expectant mothers can all benefit from the
wealth of information in the blogosphere about early childhood education. These 10
useful blogs teach classroom (and life) learning tips, explore the philosophy of early
childhood education (ECE) and even consider how you can start educating your child
before birth.

1. Topics in Early Childhood Education

John Funk, former Utah Teacher of the Year, offers in-depth analysis of trends,
techniques and philosophies in ECE.

2. ICT in Early Education

This kindergarten teacher from New Zealand takes an in-depth look at how
information and communication technology (ICT) can help and hinder early
childhood education. In addition to her own analysis, the blogger includes links to
TED talks and other video lectures that are highly educational for adults.

3. Art Lessons for Kids

Art projects are a great way to engage young children in active learning, and this blog
is bursting with ideas, demonstrations and lesson plans for color mixing, painting and
much more.

4. NSTA Blog

Science projects offer another great way to tap into kids' creativity. The blog from the
National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) offers tips, tricks and classroom
resources for science teachers in prekindergarten through second grade.

5. Classroom Book of the Week

Need some reading ideas for your young students or children? This author and teacher
offers weekly reviews of new children's literature aimed at the ECE crowd.

6. Reality 101

Updated by the Council for Exceptional Children (CEC), Reality 101 offers
experiences and insightful lessons learned from new teachers in the world of special
education for young children. This is a great blog for ECE instructors who are
entering the world of special education and need some guidance - and commiseration
- from their fellow professionals.
7. Preschool Daze

Get a glimpse into the remarkable world of preschool with this classroom blog by the
director of (and teacher in) a nonprofit preschool. Her words summarize the blog
beautifully: 'I remain inspired and humbled by the energy that young children bring.'

8. Teach Preschool

If Preschool Daze inspires you to get into the pre-K classroom, then you'll definitely
need to head over to Teach Preschool. This dedicated instructor seeks to 'promote
excellence in early childhood education' by providing everything from lesson plans
for craft projects to advice for setting up a child-centered classroom.

9. Little Gems

Most people think of preschool and kindergarten when they hear 'early childhood
education,' but children actually start learning before they're even born. Little Gems
offers insight on the very earliest of education: Prenatal and infant.

10. Language Castle

All preschoolers are engaged in intensive language learning, but that process is more
difficult for children who speak a foreign language at home. The Language Castle is
written by a teacher who completed graduate studies in language acquisition and has
over 25 years of classroom experience. She offers insights, resources, teaching
strategies and more to help children - particularly English language learners - develop
strong language skills in the classroom.
Curriculum Vitae

Personal Profile

Name:
Ma. Eliza E. Cagomoc
Address:
Pingkian 3 Zone 3 Quezon City
Tel. No.:
935-05-08
Cell No.:
09302382235
Email Address:
eriza_cagomoc@yahoo.com
Nationality:
Filipino
Civil Status:
Single
Date of Birth:
July 28, 1989
Place of Birth:
Manila
Religion:
Baptist
Father’s Name:
Renato Cagomoc
Mother’s Name :
Elisa Cagomoc
Language:
English / Filipino

Educational Background
Collegiate/University :
Polytechnic University of the Philippines Quezon City Campus
Address:
Quezon City
Course:
Bachelor of Business Teacher Education
Years of Residence :
2007 - Present
Secondary/ High School :
Sauyo High School
Address :
2nd Laguna St. NIA Village, Sauyo Novaliches Quezon City
Years of Residence:
2006 - 2002
Primary/ Elementary:
Sauyo Elementary School
Address:
Sauyo Novaliches Quezon City
Year of REsidence:
1996-2002
ATTACHMENT

 PHOTOS

 LESSON
PLAN

 DTR
Lesson Plan No. Date:
Learning Components: Electronics
Sub-Learning Component:Recitation

I. Objectives
At the end of the lesson, the students are expected to:

1. list the parts of printed circuit board


2. give the functions of every parts of printed circuit board
3. realize the importance of every components of electronics

II. Content
A. Topic: Electronics
B. Materials: Visual aids, chalk, board
C. Reference: Technology and Livelihood Education II Workbook, Villaflor,
Padullo, Rocena, Viernes

III. Procedure

A. Preparatory

a.1 Daily Routine


a.2 Review: Electronic Symbols
a.3 Unlocking Difficulties: component, part
a.4 Motivation: show a PCB

B. Development/ Presentation of the lesson


1. Discuss the components of printed circuit board
2. Give the functions of every component

C. Closing Activity

Generalization
PCB is used to mechanically support and electrically connect electronic
components using conductive pathways, tracks or signal traces etched from copper
sheets laminated onto a non-conductive substrate.
Valuing
The students will know the different components of electronics
Application
Ask the students to describe the different components of electronics

IV. Assignment

A. CONTENT
Metal Works
B. WORD STUDY
Metal
Ferrous Metal
Non-Ferrous Metal

C. GUIDE QUESTION
What are the kinds of metals and their descriptions?

D. REFERENCE

Technology and Livelihood Education II textbook, Lee Estifania Gloria

Prepared by:

Ma. Eliza E.Cagomoc


Lesson Plan No. Date:
Learning Components: Metal Works
Sub-Learning Component: Tools and Equipments in Metal Works
I. Objectives
At the end of the lesson, the students are expected to:

1. know the different metal works


2. use the different tools and equipments in metal works
3. understand the importance of the tools and equipment in metal works

II. Content
A. Topic: metal works
B. Materials: Visual aids, chalk, board
C. Reference: Technology and Livelihood Education II Workbook, Villaflor,
Padullo, Rocena, Viernes

III. Procedure

A. Preparatory

a.1 Daily Routine


a.2 Drill: Rain Drops
a.3 Review: Types of Metals
a.4 Unlocking Difficulties: cold chisels, for cold metals, and hot chisels for
metals on fire
a.5 Motivation: Show the picture of tools and equipments in metal works

B. Development/ Presentation of the lesson


1. Discuss the different tools and equipment in metal works
2. Give the use of the different tools and equipments
3. Ask the importance of tools and equipments in their lives

C. Closing Activity
Generalization
VOM is commonly known as multi-tester.
Valuing
The students will know the used of the different tools and equipments in metal
works.
Application
Ask the student to used the different tools and equipments in metal works

IV. Evaluation

Enumeration

1.Give the uses of a divider?


2.Give the types of chisels?\
3.Give the parts of a drill press and its uses?
4.Give the use of tools and equipments in soldering?
5.Give the uses of the metal fasteners?

V. Assignment

A. CONTENT
Entrepreneurship
B. WORD STUDY
Entrepreneur
Entrepreneurship
Business

C. GUIDE QUESTION
Give the behaviors of good entrepreneurs and explain each?

D. REFERENCE

Technology and Livelihood Education II textbook, Lee Estifania Gloria

Prepared by:

Ma. Eliza E. Cagomoc


My
Students
lESSON
PLAN
Lesson Plan No. Date:
Learning Components: Electronics
Sub-Learning Component: Electronic Diagram

I. Objectives
At the end of the lesson, the students are expected to:
1. differentiate the Schematic Diagram from Pictorial Diagram
2. give the different electronic symbols use in electricity
3. appreciate the importance of electronic symbols

II. Content
A. Topic: Electonic Diagram
B. Materials: Visual aids, chalk, board
C. Reference: Technology and Livelihood Education II Workbook, Villaflor,
Padullo, Rocena, Viernes

III. Procedure

A. Preparatory
a.1 Daily Routine
a.2 Drill: Games
a.3 Review: Ohms Law
a.4 Unlocking Difficulties: schematic, symbols, pictorial, actual
a.5 Motivation: Show an examples of electric symbols

B. Development/ Presentation of the lesson


1. Discuss the Schematic and Pictorial Diagram
2. Give the different electrical symbols
3. Give the importance of electrical symbols

C. Closing Activity
Generalization
Electronic Diagram plays an important role in an electrical circuit. It can be
schematic or pictorial diagram.
Valuing
The students will make an essay of the importance of electronic symbols
Application
Ask the student to make an illustration of different electronic symbols
IV. Evaluation
Direction: Identify the following symbols.

1. 2. 3. 4.

5.
V. Assignment

A. CONTENT
Electronics

B. WORD STUDY
Soldering
Pliers
Screwdrivers
Miscellaneous Tools

C. GUIDE QUESTION

1. Give the different electronics


2. What comes into your mind when performing electronics?
3. Why tools should be treated with care?

D. REFERENCE

Technology and Livelihood Education II textbook, Lee Estifania Gloria

Prepared by:

Ma. Eliza E. Cagomoc


Lesson Plan No. Date:
Learning Components: Metalworks
Sub-Learning Component: Safety Precautions

I. Objectives
At the end of the lesson, the students are expected to:
1. know what is metalworks
2. write the different safety precautions
3. understand the importance of safety precautions

II. Content
A. Topic: Metalworks
B. Materials: Visual aids, chalk, board
C. Reference: Technology and Livelihood Education II Workbook, Villaflor,
Padullo, Rocena, Viernes

III. Procedure

A. Preparatory
a.1 Daily Routine
a.2 Drill: Games
a.3 Review: Electronic Symbols
a.4 Unlocking Difficulties: prevent, cure
a.5 Motivation: Show a picture of safety precautions

B. Development/ Presentation of the lesson


1. Discuss Metal Works
2. Give the safety precautions of metal works
3. Ask the students to make an act to prevent metal accident

C. Closing Activity
Generalization
Metalwoks is one of the popular industries in the country today. To avoid an
accident we should know and apply the safety precautions while working.
Valuing
The students will explain the importance of safety precautions
Application
Ask the student to make a presentation about the safety precaution
IV. Evaluation
Write true, if the statement is true. If false identify the word or phrase which makes
the statement false and write the correct answer.

1. Working clothes should be long sleeved shirts to protect your skin.


2. Handtools such as scribers, screwdrivers, files and dividers may be kept in your
pockets, while hammers, and steel rules should kept in the cabinet.
3. Remove all jewelry before starting to work.
4. Keep flammable materials away from the working area.
5. Pick up immediately tools and materials dropped on the floor to prevent accidents.

V. Assignment

A. CONTENT
Metalworks

B. WORD STUDY
Ferrous metal
Non-Ferrous metal

C. GUIDE QUESTION

1. What is Ferrous metal? Non-Ferrous Metal?


2. What are examples of Non-Ferrous Metal, Ferrous Metal?
3. What are the properties of Metals?

D. REFERENCE

Technology and Livelihood Education II textbook, Lee Estifania Gloria

Prepared by:

Ma. Eliza E. Cagomoc


Lesson Plan No. Date:
Learning Components: Metalworks
Sub-Learning Component: Types of Metalworks

I. Objectives
At the end of the lesson, the students are expected to:
1. know the types of metals
2. give the properties of metals
3. Identify and classify the metals

II. Content
A. Topic: Metalworks
B. Materials: Visual aids, chalk, board
C. Reference: Technology and Livelihood Education II Workbook, Villaflor,
Padullo, Rocena, Viernes

III. Procedure

A. Preparatory
a.1 Daily Routine
a.2 Drill: Puzzle
a.3 Review: Metalworks Safety Precaution
a.4 Unlocking Difficulties: ferrous, iron, non-ferrous, without iron
a.5 Motivation: Show the pictures of metals

B. Development/ Presentation of the lesson


1. Discuss the types of metalworks
2. Give the properties of metals
3. Ask to classify the metals

C. Closing Activity
Generalization
Metal has two types the ferrous and non-ferrous metals. It has its own properties.
Valuing
The students will able to classify the examples metals
Application
Ask the student to cite examples of metals and its properties
IV. Evaluation
Direction: Match the descriptions under column A with the correct answer under
column B. Write the letter of the correct answers.

A. B.
1. It is a type of metal which does not contain iron a. hardness
2. A property of metal which causes it to break easily b. non-ferrous
3. It is considered as the best conductor of heat and c. silver
electricity d. ferrous
4. A quality of metal which enables it to resist force e. gold
without changing its shape f. brittleness
5. A type of metal which contain iron

V. Assignment

A. CONTENT
Metalworks

B. WORD STUDY
Cold chisel
Hot chisel
Metal gauge

C. GUIDE QUESTION

1. What are the different metal equipment and tools?


2. Draw the different metal tools

D. REFERENCE

Technology and Livelihood Education II textbook, Lee Estifania Gloria

Prepared by:

Ma. Eliza E. Cagomoc


Lesson Plan No. Date:
Learning Components: Electronics
Sub-Learning Component:Recitation

I. Objectives
At the end of the lesson, the students are expected to:

1. list the parts of printed circuit board


2. give the functions of every parts of printed circuit board
3. realize the importance of every components of electronics

II. Content
A. Topic: Electronics
B. Materials: Visual aids, chalk, board
C. Reference: Technology and Livelihood Education II Workbook, Villaflor,
Padullo, Rocena, Viernes

III. Procedure

A. Preparatory

a.1 Daily Routine


a.2 Review: Electronic Symbols
a.3 Unlocking Difficulties: component, part
a.4 Motivation: show a PCB

B. Development/ Presentation of the lesson


1. Discuss the components of printed circuit board
2. Give the functions of every component
3. Ask the student to make an essay about the importance of electronic
components
C. Closing Activity

Generalization
PCB is used to mechanically support and electrically connect electronic
components using conductive pathways, tracks or signal traces etched from
copper sheets laminated onto a non-conductive substrate.
Valuing
The students will know the different components of electronics
Application
Ask the students to describe the different components of electronics
IV. Assignment

A. CONTENT
Metal Works
B. WORD STUDY
Metal
Ferrous Metal
Non-Ferrous Metal

C. GUIDE QUESTION
What are the kinds of metals and their descriptions?

D. REFERENCE

Technology and Livelihood Education II textbook, Lee Estifania Gloria

Prepared by:

Ma. Eliza E.Cagomoc


Lesson Plan No. Date:
Learning Components: Metal Works
Sub-Learning Component: Tools and Equipments in Metal Works
I. Objectives
At the end of the lesson, the students are expected to:

1. know the different metal works


2. use the different tools and equipments in metal works
3. understand the importance of the tools and equipment in metal works

II. Content
A. Topic: metal works
B. Materials: Visual aids, chalk, board
C. Reference: Technology and Livelihood Education II Workbook, Villaflor,
Padullo, Rocena, Viernes

III. Procedure

A. Preparatory

a.1 Daily Routine


a.2 Drill: Rain Drops
a.3 Review: Types of Metals
a.4 Unlocking Difficulties: cold chisels, for cold metals, and hot chisels for
metals on fire
a.5 Motivation: Show the picture of tools and equipments in metal works

B. Development/ Presentation of the lesson


1. Discuss the different tools and equipment in metal works
2. Give the use of the different tools and equipments
3. Ask the importance of tools and equipments in their lives

C. Closing Activity
Generalization
Knowing the basic tools and equipment will enable one to make quality projects.
Valuing
The students will know the used of the different tools and equipments in metal
works.
Application
Ask the student to used the different tools and equipments in metal works
IV. Evaluation
Enumeration

6.Give the uses of a divider?


7.Give the types of chisels?
8.Give the parts of a drill press and its uses?
9.Give the use of tools and equipments in soldering?
10. Give the uses of the metal fasteners?

V. Assignment

A. CONTENT
Entrepreneurship
B. WORD STUDY
Entrepreneur
Entrepreneurship
Business

C. GUIDE QUESTION
Give the behaviors of good entrepreneurs and explain each?

D. REFERENCE

Technology and Livelihood Education II textbook, Lee Estifania Gloria

Prepared by:

Ma. Eliza E. Cagomoc


Lesson Plan No. Date:
Learning Components: Electronics
Sub-Learning Component: Resistor
I. Objectives
At the end of the lesson, the students are expected to:

1. know what is resistor


2. solve for the value of resistance
3. give the purpose of the resistor in electronics

II. Content
A. Topic: electronics
B. Materials: Visual aids, chalk, board
C. Reference: Technology and Livelihood Education II Workbook, Villaflor,
Padullo, Rocena, Viernes

III. Procedure

A. Preparatory

a.1 Daily Routine


a.2 Drill: Electronic Components
a.3 Review: Types of Metals
a.4 Unlocking Difficulties: Rain Drops cold chisels, for cold metals, and hot
chisels for metals on fire
a.5 Motivation: Show the picture of tools and equipments in metal works

B. Development/ Presentation of the lesson


1. Discuss the different tools and equipment in metal works
2. Give the use of the different tools and equipments
3. Ask the importance of tools and equipments in their lives

C. Closing Activity
Generalization
Knowing the basic tools and equipment will enable one to make quality projects.
Valuing
The students will know the used of the different tools and equipments in metal
works.
Application
Ask the student to used the different tools and equipments in metal works
IV. Evaluation

Solve the following

1st stripe 2nd stripe 3rd stripe 4th stripe


1. Red yellow green silver
2. Green Blue Black yellow
3. Violet Black Silver Gold
4. Blue Brown Yellow Orange
5. Brown Red Brown Black

V. Assignment

A. CONTENT
VOM
B. WORD STUDY
Voltmeter
Ohmmeter
Milliameter

C. GUIDE QUESTION
What is the formula for VOM, and what are the steps of knowing the value of
resistance, current voltage?

D. REFERENCE

Technology and Livelihood Education II textbook, Lee Estifania Gloria

Prepared by:

Ma. Eliza E. Cagomoc


Lesson Plan No. Date:
Learning Components: Electronics
Sub-Learning Component: VOM

I. Objectives
At the end of the lesson, the students are expected to:

1. define the Volt-Ohm-Milliammeter (VOM)


2. solve the formulas of VOM
3. improve their mathematical ability
I. Content
A. Topic: Electronics
B. Materials: Visual aids, chalk, board
C. Reference: Technology and Livelihood Education II Workbook, Villaflor,
Padullo, Rocena, Viernes

III. Procedure

A. Preparatory

a.1 Daily Routine


a.2 Drill: Puzzle
a.3 Review: Resistor
a.4 Unlocking Difficulties: current, AC and DC
a.5 Motivation: Show the picture of VOM

B. Development/ Presentation of the lesson


1. Discuss the VOM
2. Give the formulas of Ohmeter scale
3. Solve the formulas of Ohmeter scale

C. Closing Activity

Generalization
VOM is commonly known as multi-tester.
Valuing
The students will solve for the formula using Ohmeter scale.
Application
Ask the student to solve for the value in the Ohmeter scale.
IV. Evaluation

Compute for the value of the following using the Ohmeter scale
1. 0-5 =
2. 50-100=
3. 200-500=
4. 2-5=
5. 10-20=
V. Assignment

A. CONTENT
Metal Works

B. WORD STUDY
Ferrous Metal
Non Ferrous Metal

C. GUIDE QUESTION
What are the safety precautions in Metalworks?

D. REFERENCE

Technology and Livelihood Education II textbook, Lee Estifania Gloria

Prepared by:

___________________

Ma. Eliza E. Cagomoc


Lesson Plan No. Date:
Learning Components: Entrepreneurship
Sub-Learning Component: Personal Entrepreneurial Competencies

I. Objectives
At the end of the lesson, the students are expected to:

1. differentiate entrepreneur and entrepreneurship


2. give the 10 behaviors of an entrepreneurs
3. apply the PEC in their life

II. Content
A. Topic: Entrepreneurship
B. Materials: Visual aids, chalk, board
C. Reference: Technology and Livelihood Education II Workbook, Villaflor,
Padullo, Rocena, Viernes

III. Procedure

A. Preparatory

a.1 Daily Routine


a.2 Drill: Question and Answer
a.3 Review: VOM
a.4 Unlocking Difficulties: entrepreneur, businessman, entrepreneurship,
business
a.5 Motivation: Picture of an business activities

B. Development/ Presentation of the lesson


1. Discuss entrepreneurship
2. Give the 10 behavior that entrepreneur should possess
3. Ask them to apply the 10 behaviors in their life
C. Closing Activity

Generalization
Entrepreneurship is a business that is establishes to provide the needs of the end
users. And the 10 behavior is important to become successful entrepreneur.
Valuing
The students will able to realize the importance of PEC in their daily life.
Application
Ask the students to make an essay on how they will apply the PEC in their life.

IV. Evaluation
Essay
• Make an essay on how does the 10 behaviors help the entrepreneurs
V. Assignment
A. CONTENT
Entrepreneurship
B. WORD STUDY
risk
Innovation
Creativeness

C. GUIDE QUESTION
What are the risks faced by the entrepreneurs
D. REFERENCE

Technology and Livelihood Education II textbook, Lee Estifania Gloria

Prepared by:

___________________

Ma. Eliza E. Cagomoc


Lesson Plan No. Date:
Learning Components: Entrepreneurship
Sub-Learning Component: Risk faced by an Entrepreneur

Objectives
At the end of the lesson, the students are expected to:

1. define what is risk


2. give the different risks encountered by an entrepreneur
3. realize the attitude that needed to face the risks
II. Content
A. Topic: Entrepreneurship
B. Materials: Visual aids, chalk, board
C. Reference: Technology and Livelihood Education II Workbook, Villaflor,
Padullo, Rocena, Viernes

III. Procedure

A. Preparatory

a.1 Daily Routine


a.2 Drill: Brainstorming
a.3 Review: PEC
a.4 Unlocking Difficulties: risk, problems
a.5 Motivation: Picture of an business activities

B. Development/ Presentation of the lesson


1. Discuss what is risks
2. Give the risks of an entrepreneur
3. Ask give the attitude towards that risks

C. Closing Activity

Generalization
Entrepreneurs face different business problems and more important is they
know how to handle that kinds of problems.
Valuing
The students will able to realize the importance taking a risks towards the
business.
Application
Ask the students to make an essay on how they will manage the business
even in time of risk.
IV. Evaluation
Direction: Explain the following terms
1. Peso Devaluation
2. Natural Calamities
3. Marketing Problems

V. Assignment

A. CONTENT
Entrepreneurship
B. WORD STUDY
Planning
Organizing
Directing
Controlling

C. GUIDE QUESTION

1. What are the basic Managerial Tasks of an Entrepreneur

D. REFERENCE

Technology and Livelihood Education II textbook, Lee Estifania Gloria

Prepared by:

___________________

Ma. Eliza E. Cagomoc


Lesson Plan No. Date:
Learning Components: Entrepreneurship
Sub-Learning Component: Risk faced by an Entrepreneur

Objectives
At the end of the lesson, the students are expected to:

1. define what is management


2. give the four managerial tasks
3. realize the importance of managerial activities in their lives
II. Content
A. Topic: Entrepreneurship
B. Materials: Visual aids, chalk, board
C. Reference: Technology and Livelihood Education II Workbook, Villaflor,
Padullo, Rocena, Viernes

III. Procedure

A. Preparatory

a.1 Daily Routine


a.2 Drill: Word Hunt
a.3 Review: Risk of an Entrepreneur
a.4 Unlocking Difficulties: controlling, assessment, evaluation
a.5 Motivation: Question and Answer

B. Development/ Presentation of the lesson


1. Discuss what is management
2. Tell the four basic managerial tasks
3. Ask the students to apply the managerial tasks in their daily routine

C. Closing Activity

Generalization
Management has four basic functions that we can apply in our daily life.
Valuing
The students will able to apply the managerial function in their life.
Application
Ask the students to apply the four managerial task in their daily routine.
IV. Evaluation
Direction: Fill in the blanks with the word or group of words to complete the
statements below.

1. The assigning of tasks and function to individuals, units or department is


called__________.
2. _______________ is the evaluation aspect of entrepreneurship
3. The process of Acquiring and using human, fiscal, and material resources
effectively is ___________.
4. The entrepreneur lays out short and long range _______________.
5. objective of the plan should be specific, measurable ___________, results based,
and time bound.

V. Assignment

A. CONTENT
Entrepreneurship
B. WORD STUDY
Management Theories

C. GUIDE QUESTION
What are the Management theories in Business?

D. REFERENCE

Technology and Livelihood Education II textbook, Lee Estifania Gloria

Prepared by:

___________________

Ma. Eliza E. Cagomoc


Lesson Plan No. Date:
Learning Components: Entrepreneurship
Sub-Learning Component: Applied Management Theories

Objectives
At the end of the lesson, the students are expected to:

1. list the management theories


2. give the purpose of management theories
3. realize the importance of management theories in business
II. Content
A. Topic: Entrepreneurship
B. Materials: Visual aids, chalk, board
C. Reference: Technology and Livelihood Education II Workbook, Villaflor,
Padullo, Rocena, Viernes

III. Procedure

A. Preparatory

a.1 Daily Routine


a.2 Drill: Puzzle
a.3 Review: Managerial Functions
a.4 Unlocking Difficulties: scientific, systematic
a.5 Motivation: Question and Answer

B. Development/ Presentation of the lesson


1. Discuss the Management Theories
2. Give the importance of Management Theories
3. Ask the students the importance of Management theories in their work

C. Closing Activity

Generalization
Management theories helps the business to progress. And solve the problems of
the company.
Valuing
The students will able to know the importance of the management theories
especially in the business.
Application
Ask the students to apply the management theories with their problems.
IV. Evaluation
ESSAY
1. Recall the various management theories which explain the phenomenon of
economic growth
2. Cite examples on how these management theories were applied to practical life
situations.

V. Assignment

A. CONTENT
Entrepreneurship

B. WORD STUDY
Four Basic Business Ownership

C. GUIDE QUESTION
What are the four Business Ownership? What are the factors affect the business
ownership?

D. REFERENCE

Technology and Livelihood Education II textbook, Lee Estifania Gloria

Prepared by:

___________________

Ma. Eliza E. Cagomoc


Lesson Plan No. Date:
Learning Components: Entrepreneurship
Sub-Learning Component: Four Basic Business Ownership

Objectives
At the end of the lesson, the students are expected to:

1. know the four basic business ownership


2. give the factors affects business ownership
3. choose the business they want to start
II. Content
A. Topic: Entrepreneurship
B. Materials: Visual aids, chalk, board
C. Reference: Technology and Livelihood Education II Workbook, Villaflor,
Padullo, Rocena, Viernes

III. Procedure

A. Preparatory

a.1 Daily Routine


a.2 Drill: Puzzle
a.3 Review: Management Theories
a.4 Unlocking Difficulties: sole, one, cooperative, united
a.5 Motivation: Show picture of Business Company

B. Development/ Presentation of the lesson


1. Discuss the four Business Ownership
2. Tell factors that may affect the business ownership
3. Ask the students to choose the business they want to start

C. Closing Activity

Generalization
Business Ownership has four types and affects by the different factors; capital,
owners, nature of the business.
Valuing
The students will able to decide what kind of ownership they would like to
start.
Application
Ask the students to select the business they desire to raise and the
purpose .
IV. Evaluation
Direction: Match Column A with Column B. Write the letter of the correct answer.
Column A Column B
1. owned by one individual a. partnership
2. co-owners b. corporation
3. initiated by incorporators c. sole proprietorship
4. owned by 24 individual who d. cooperative
buy shares on voluntary basis e. giving proprietorship
5. stockholders f. elect the board of
directors

V. Assignment

A. CONTENT
Entrepreneurship
B. WORD STUDY
Retailing

C. GUIDE QUESTION
1. What is Retailing? Retailer?
2. What are the classification of Retail Store?

D. REFERENCE

Technology and Livelihood Education II textbook, Lee Estifania Gloria

Prepared by:

___________________

Ma. Eliza E. Cagomoc

Lesson Plan No. Date:


Learning Components: Entrepreneurship
Sub-Learning Component: Retailing

Objectives
At the end of the lesson, the students are expected to:

1. differentiate retailing and retailer


2. give the classification of retail store
3. acknowledge the different retail outlet
II. Content
A. Topic: Entrepreneurship
B. Materials: Visual aids, chalk, board
C. Reference: Technology and Livelihood Education II Workbook, Villaflor,
Padullo, Rocena, Viernes

III. Procedure

A. Preparatory

a.1 Daily Routine


a.2 Drill: Fish Bowl
a.3 Review: Business Ownership
a.4 Unlocking Difficulties: retail, owner, retailing, selling
a.5 Motivation: Question and Answer

B. Development/ Presentation of the lesson


1. Discuss the retailing
2. converse the types of retail outlet
3. Ask the students to opt the type of retail store they are more preferred.

C. Closing Activity

Generalization
Retailing is the selling of goods and services in small quantity. It has different
classification.
Valuing
The students will able to classify the different business stores.
Application
Ask the students to select the type of retail store they like.

IV. Evaluation
Essay
1. Give the classification of retail stores.
2. Give the functions of retailing.
3. Explain the life cycle of a retail store.
V. Assignment

A. CONTENT
Entrepreneurship
B. WORD STUDY
Manufacturing as an Entrepreneurial Activity

C. GUIDE QUESTION
1. What is Production?
2. Give the importance of production Planning

D. REFERENCE

Technology and Livelihood Education II textbook, Villanueva-Rojo, Luz,


Cruz-Garcia, Julia, Villanueva, Cristina

Prepared by:

___________________

Ma. Eliza E. Cagomoc


Lesson Plan No. Date:
Learning Components: Entrepreneurship
Sub-Learning Component: Manufacturing as an Entrepreneurial Activity

Objectives
At the end of the lesson, the students are expected to:

1. define production/ manufacturing


2. give the importance of production planning
3. comprehend the value of production

II. Content
A. Topic: Entrepreneurship
B. Materials: Visual aids, chalk, board
C. Reference: Technology and Livelihood Education II Workbook, Villaflor,
Padullo, Rocena, Viernes

III. Procedure

A. Preparatory

a.1 Daily Routine


a.2 Drill: Brainstorming
a.3 Review: Retail Outlet
a.4 Unlocking Difficulties: production, manufacturing, layout, design, output,
product
a.5 Motivation: Show sample of layout

B. Development/ Presentation of the lesson


1. Discuss the production
2. Explain the importance of Production Planning
3. Draw layout of the business
C. Closing Activity

Generalization
Production is converting the input into output.
Valuing
The students will able to assume the kind of business they want to put up
Application
Ask the students to draw the businesss layout.
IV. Evaluation
Direction: Fill in the blanks with the word or group of words to complete the
statements below.

1. Production is another term for_______________.


2. Machines and equipment performing similar functions are grouped together in a
___________ a layout.
3. Machines and equipment are arranged according to the order of use in a
________________.
4. Production planning must be included in the _________________.
5. Manufacturing is the act of _____________ or changing raw materials into goods
or services.

V. Assignment

A. CONTENT
Entrepreneurship
B. WORD STUDY
Production Function and System

C. GUIDE QUESTION
1. What is meant by production System?
2. Characterize the production System.
3. What are the material resources included in a production system?
4. How should operation be treated in order to produce good products and
services

D. REFERENCE

Technology and Livelihood Education II textbook, Lee Estifania Gloria

Prepared by:

___________________

Ma. Eliza E. Cagomoc


DTR