GVI Phoenix Perú

Literacy, numeracy and water tank building projects

Year End Report January ± December 2010
© Global Vision International ± 2011

i

GVI Phoenix Perú Annual Report Submitted in whole to Global Vision International Produced by Dominic Williams ± Phoenix Latin American Director Phomolo Tshaka - Phoenix Perú Project Manager And
Armando Espino Chris Dales Patrick Regan Katrien van der Scheuren Jonathan Tiplady Carla Stephens Hillary Young Anastasia Porteus Oliver White Siobhan White Olivia Somer Youssef Nashed Mariko Ward Megan Rountree Lucy Swinton Anna Guglielmi Ying Wang Freya Lynott Deborah Healey Gideon Hurwitz Jane Parsons Hillary Sapanski Peter O Farrell Daniel Whitford Jillian Oliveras Michael Parrish Melissa Moravec Phoebe Chambre Larissa Reinboth Rebecca Jones Kate Jackson Local Partner Project Coordinator Project Coordinator Project Coordinator Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Peter Holst Valerie Mills Jenny Stride Lucy Dickie Mary Belcher Klaus Heinecke Carly Rose Madeleine Moxon Tess Halperin Rachel Campbell Lauren Basser Michelle Wu Rebecca Crowther Sarah Acheson Ciara O Donnell Kathleen Grueter Pien Raeymaekers Lien van Ballaer Stephanie Pons Sean Lynskey Rachel Lobel Cajsa Landstrom Benjamin Morch Candice Chung Hannah Sue Jack Milligan Nadia Milligan Marissa Caan Sam Brawn Jack Icho Andrew Saetern Volunteer Project Coordinator Project Coordinator Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer

© Global Vision International ± 2011

ii

Marisa Kiefaber Rita Mistry Casper Thomsen Jannis Michael Natalie McDonald Andrew Creadore Susan Leighton Claire Fischer Gemma Davey Alan Heals Fiona Eaton Stephanie Keattch Kate Moffatt Judit Nuszpl Laura Copeland Luke Stevens Patricia Bennett Aaron Tanason Lillian Pei Andrew Alazawi Shelby McInnis Sam Harwood Mic Hsieh

Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer

Luke Childs Amy Tausch Caroline Sherry Nina Visholm Kirsty Brooks Lauren Burns Elizabeth Hebbron Emily Hoyal Genevieve Martin Alan Henzy James Kerr Jack Somervell Katherine Ashcroft Meghan Beach Emma Doherty Ben Reiter Kenneth Shooter Ellen Leventhal Andrew Jordon Nomita Rajan Fahim Sachedina Andrew Liu Hanny Tirta

Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer

GVI Phoenix Perú Address: Avenida San Martin 116, Vallecito, Arequipa, Perú Email: phoenixperu@gviworld.com Web page: http://www.gvi.co.uk and http://www.gviusa.com Blog: gviphoenix.blogspot.com

GVI Charitable Trust http://www.justgiving.com/phoenixperu http://www.globalgiving.org/projects/free-education-in-peru/

© Global Vision International ± 2011

iii

Executive Summary
Our work primarily is concentrated on teaching grades which the local teacher doesn¶t have time to teach, teaching grades when the local teacher is absent, working with smaller groups of children who are struggling and one-on-one with children with learning disabilities. We cover subjects including mathematics, language, sciences and physical education. The communities we work in are still quite new and experience considerable levels of migration in and out of the communities. Many children, especially in the lower grades are enrolled late in the year when their families move in to the area. Some miss a lot a lot of school because their parents are not able, for various reasons, to help them get ready and send them off to school in the mornings. Many of the students in the community of Villa Santa Rosa de Chiguata have learning disabilities. These children inevitably fall behind in school and we help by assigning volunteers to work with them exclusively to help close the gap. We also stay on in the afternoons to help with homework and reinforcement lessons.

Fig. 1 ± Individual lesson in Maldonado

© Global Vision International ± 2011

iv

Once a week we schedule Art, Physical Education and Basic English lessons for each grade. Our volunteers plan and present these lessons. We also pay local teachers to give Quechua lessons to all students. Quechua is one of the official lessons in Peru, but is not taught in these communities. Some children learn the language at home, but would not be able to read or write without these extra lessons.

Fig. 2 ± Physical Education in Chiguata Our volunteers take over the running of the school over the long summer vacations. We have found that the children who attend these lessons are better able to retain what they learn. This also allows the students to receive their fruit and meals as usual. Every child receives a piece of fruit and a hot lunch every day. In some case this is the only meal a child has for the day. In 2010 we continued providing financial assistance to former students who complete their primary school education in our schools to allow them to continue their studies in secondary school. During the year we constructed 6 new community water tanks, benefitting some 100+ families in Villa Santa Rosa de Chiguata.

© Global Vision International ± 2011

v

Highlights of the year include; y Over 25,425 teaching hours have been put in by volunteers in 3 communities benefitting some 195 children between the ages of 4 and 11. This figure includes the days the local teachers could not attend due to strikes, meetings, illness and holidays. y y y y y y y y y y 48,750 pieces of fruit distributed 24,550 hot lunches served 12 Peruvians receive all or part of their income from GVI, including 5 teachers Built a kitchen/dining room in Chiguata New classroom constructed in Maldonado Bought toothbrushes and introduced tooth brushing in Chiguata Introduced Physical Education, Art and English classes in Chiguata Six water tanks built, provided water for many families Over 30 children receiving scholarships for secondary education Maldonado came 4th in the region for educational results

© Global Vision International ± 2011

vi

Contents
Executive Summary.............................................................. Error! Bookmark not defined. Contents ............................................................................................................................. vii List of Figures .................................................................................................................... vii List of Appendices ............................................................................................................ viii 1.1 Introduction .................................................................................................................... 8 1.2 Why financial support is important in education ......................................................... 9 1.2.1 Family Income ............................................................................................................ 9 1.2.2 La Canasta Básica ..................................................................................................... 9 1.2.3 Put into numbers: ....................................................................................................... 9 1.2.4 Additional Costs ......................................................................................................... 9 1.2.5 Conclusion .................................................................................................................10 2.0 Sachaca and Chiguata Community Teaching Projects ............................................10 2.1 Objectives .....................................................................................................................11 2.1.1 Literacy and numeracy .............................................................................................11 2.1.2 Food and fruit ............................................................................................................11 2.1.3 Covering the costs of education ..............................................................................11 2.1.4 Celebrations ..............................................................................................................12 2.1.5 Improvements to School Facilities ...........................................................................12 2.2 Classroom-based Teaching and Spanish Classes ...................................................13 2.2.1 Training and Methods ...............................................................................................14 2.2.3 Review .......................................................................................................................15 3.0 Water Tank Construction Project ................................................................................15 4.0 Financial Support .........................................................................................................16 4.1 GVI Charitable Trust ....................................................................................................16 5.0 References....................................................................................................................16 6.0 Appendices ...................................................................................................................17

List of Figures
Fig. 1 ± Individual lesson in Maldonado Fig. 2 ± Physical Education in Chiguata Fig. 3 ± Children from Chiguata preschool celebrating Independence Day Fig. 4 ± Volunteers on the steps in Maldonado Fig. 5 ± Volunteers teaching in Triunfo Fig. 6 ± Lesson preparation Fig. 7 ± Lunch is served in Chiguata dining room Fig. 8 ± Completed water tank in Chiguata

© Global Vision International ± 2011

vii

List of Appendices Appendix 1. Children¶s national school final results per grade in Villa el Triunfo Appendix 2. Children¶s national school final results per grade in Victor Maldonado Appendix 3. Children¶s national school final results per grade in Villa Santa Rosa de Chiguata

© Global Vision International ± 2011

viii

1.1 Introduction The Global Vision International (GVI) Phoenix Project was initiated in Guatemala in 2002 in San Andrés Itzapa, a Kakchiquel-speaking indigenous community. Soon after, in 2004, another project was opened in Santa María de Jesús, aswell, Kakchiquelspeaking. In the same year, Phoenix started operations in Honduras, firstly on fresh water tubing projects then later on, working in Estanzuela and then San Rafael at the beginning of 2006. Work commenced in Barbasco in 2010. Many of the older population speak Chortí. The Phoenix Secondary school was founded in 2008 in San Rafael. In 2005, operations started in Ecuador, in the Kichwa-speaking communities of Urcusiqui, Muenala and Huayrapungo, with a new community, Larcacunga, starting in 2007. In 2006 work began in Perú, primarily in Socabaya though then moving to two Quechuaspeaking (the ³people¶s speech´) communities in Sachaca outside the base town of Arequipa; Maldonado and Triunfo. Work commenced in a third community, Chiguata, in 2010. Our work around Estelí, Nicaragua, started in La Thompson in January 2009 and Chiriza in 2010. Work in Mata Escura, Salvador, Brazil, started in June 2010. Even though per capita income has improved in recent years, nearly 60% of all Peruvian children live in poverty due to the high rate of inequality, only 66% have access to drinking water and 42% have some form of learning disability. 60% of sixth grade students perform poorly in Communication, for Mathematics the figure is 58%. (UNICEF). One of the main factors contributing to poor performance in school is the nature of the schools; many children are educated in multi-grade (one teacher in charge of 2 or more grades) schools. Another is frequent absence by both students (to look after younger siblings while parents work in the field) and teachers (due to strikes, meetings, training, etc.) Secondary education coverage is greatly reduced compared to that achieved for primary school. The percentage of students from poor backgrounds attending secondary school is 49% compared to 84% for the rest of the population. Among poor students attending school, 71% achieve lower grades compared to their peers.

© Global Vision International ± 2011

8

Other serious issues affecting the communities in which we work include alcohol abuse, domestic violence and abandonment by parents/guardians. It is GVI Phoenix¶s belief that one of the most effective ways of improving standards of living is through education, though this is not always forthcoming in the communities in which we work. 1.2 Why financial support is important in education The following reveals the short-comings of family income and reasons behind lack of education and lack of access to medicines (GVI Phoenix). 1.2.1 Family Income Based on Family A, Mother, Grandparents, 3 children Family A in GVI Phoenix Project in Sachaca earn on average $20 per week. This is an average over the year, and the work is completely seasonal. Often the fathers go away to work in the mines of Southern Peru and are never heard from again. 1.2.2 La Canasta Básica According to INEI (Instituto Nacional de Estadística e Informática), the Canasta Básica in the region of Arequipa, or the basic foodstuffs and other necessary essentials needed by Family A, is $300 per month. NB: the cost of the Canasta Básica varies depending on the size of the family and the price of commodities. 1.2.3 Put into numbers: Family Income: $20/week Canasta Básica: $75/week What is left: $-55 1.2.4 Additional Costs The Canasta Basica does not take into account the following:

© Global Vision International ± 2011

9

Additional cost for education; uniforms, textbooks Alcohol Transport costs Clothing Elderly relatives unable to work Family events like births, weddings, deaths

1.2.5 Conclusion Using these figures, one can deduce the reason why children are mal-nourished, uneducated, unclothed, receive little medical care etc. The family income just is not enough for all the eventualities of life.

2.0 Sachaca and Chiguata Community Teaching Projects We currently work in two communities in Sachaca and one in Villa Santa Rosa de Chiguata. These are ³pueblos jovenes´ (young communities) on the outskirts of the city of Arequipa. They were formed by indigenous Peruvians, mainly from the Sierra, moving to Arequipa as it¶s a large city in search of work and a better way of life. However when they arrived they have no money and nowhere to live, without a registered accommodation they¶re unable to get ³proper´ employment, and without a job they have no money to get somewhere to live. They found some unused land and built their homes there. Maldonado GVI Phoenix started working in Maldonado in 2006. At the time the school had 1 teacher in charge of grades 1 ± 6 in one small room. In 2010 we have 46 students taught by three teachers, two of whom are employed by GVI Phoenix in three classrooms, two of which were paid for by GVI Phoenix. The grades improved markedly in 2010 and the school came in fourth in the region.

© Global Vision International ± 2011

10

Triunfo The project at Triunfo was set up later in 2006. In 2010 the school has grown to 55 students in primary school and 25 in preschool. GVI Phoenix pays for students to receive Quechua lessons once a week. Volunteers teach in both the pre-school and primary school. Chiguata GVI Phoenix started working in Villa Santa Rosa de Chiguata in January 2010. The school has 25 students and 3 teachers. In 2010 GVI Phoenix constructed a dining room where the students are served lunch every day. We also built a water tank to provide water for the school.

2.1 Objectives GVI¶s objectives for working in the ³pueblos jovenes´ are to provide first-time and sustainable education for indigenous children who would otherwise not have access to education due to economic constraints. Many families also do not understand the need for education, so getting the children into school is one of the challenges. Our work can be divided into the following parts: 2.1.1 Literacy and numeracy To provide first-time teaching in basic literacy and numeracy and continued teaching in the latter and also both natural and social science, arts and crafts as well as English and Physical Education. We also provide indigenous language (Quechua) instruction. 2.1.2 Food and fruit To provide daily fruit and a hot nutritious lunch for the children, so their vitamin intake is higher and they have something in their stomachs to be able to concentrate. 2.1.3 Covering the costs of education To pay for education costs for Primary and Secondary school education, so the children can attend school. Education is technically free in Peru, but each student is given a long list of material including textbooks without which they would not be successful in their

© Global Vision International ± 2011

11

studies and many would be forced to drop out. By alleviating the costs of education from the families, the children are more likely to finish the full education. GVI Phoenix has been handing out Secondary school scholarships in Peru since 2006. 2.1.4 Celebrations We feel it is important to celebrate the various occasions in Peru, not least the children¶s birthdays, which we do each month. Other celebrations include Day of the Student, Mother¶s Day, Father¶s Day, Day of the Flag, Day of the Dead, Day of the Living and Christmas.

Fig. 3 ± Children from Chiguata preschool celebrating Independence Day

2.1.5 Improvements to School Facilities GVI Phoenix has constructed community steps leading up to the school in Maldonado. Previously volunteers and members of the community had to scramble up a steep hill of rubble. We constructed two extra classrooms to help ease the load on teachers and volunteers. Where once we had all six grades in one room we now only have two grades per room. We built kitchen and toilet facilities in Maldonado, Triunfo as well as Chiguata.

© Global Vision International ± 2011

12

Fig. 4 ± Volunteers on the steps in Maldonado

2.2 Classroom-based Teaching and Spanish Classes The volunteers assist local teachers teaching in Spanish, or work individually with students who are struggling or left behind. They must lesson plan, using the curriculum and textbooks provided, along with other materials we have. Any costs incurred to undertake their classes are reimbursed.

Fig. 5 ± Volunteers teaching in Triunfo The majority of volunteers take a week of one-on-one Spanish classes at the beginning of their program, which is then supplemented in the evenings.

© Global Vision International ± 2011

13

2.2.1 Training and Methods Using the Peruvian curriculum for day to day teaching, volunteers can plan lessons as per what is being taught in national school, with the vocabulary needed shown in the books. All lessons are conducted in Spanish. One-on-one teaching workshops are carried out in the communities if volunteers want help with planning lessons. A presentation is given on teaching during the first week the volunteer is in the project, which is given in conjunction with the Teaching Manual that is sent to the volunteer before arrival in the country. If numbers of volunteers allow, a new volunteer will team teach with an existing volunteer for the first week, with the aim to takeover that class in the second week. GVI Phoenix staff are on hand to help out, give lesson plan ideas and support.

Fig. 6 ± Lesson preparation 2.2.2 Achievements In November 2010 the grade 2 pupils in Maldonado took a government administered exam and came 4th overall with 2 pupils in the top ten. Similarly the pre-school pupils in Chiguata were selected to take part in a government administered exam and showed a marked improvement over last year.

© Global Vision International ± 2011

14

2.2.3 Review We have seen huge advances in the education received by the children over the year, which can be seen in their final exam results. The construction of a kitchen in Chiguata has reduced incidences of malnutrition in the community.

Fig. 7 ± Lunch is served in Chiguata dining room 3.0 Water Tank Construction Project Building a community water tank takes up to 5 volunteers and a professional builder about 7 days to complete and significantly improves a family¶s access to this precious resource. On average, a family in Villa Santa Rosa de Chiguata can make up to 10 trips a day to get water. Sometimes they have to wait several days for the tanks to be refilled. GVI Phoenix started building water tanks for the community in 2010. To date we have completed 6 tanks.

© Global Vision International ± 2011

15

Fig. 8 ± Completed water tank in Chiguata

4.0 Financial Support The substantial fixed costs and variable costs to run GVI Phoenix in Peru is covered mainly (up to 76%) by volunteer fees and the rest by the GVI Charitable Trust. This is of course dependent on volunteer numbers. 4.1 GVI Charitable Trust We rely on the GVI Charitable Trust to make up the difference between the money we receive from GVI Phoenix volunteers for fixed costs, and what we need overall. These two sources of income are our only sources. Volunteers raise money before and after they join us through running marathons, weddings etc. and also through Standing Orders. The GVI Charitable Trust is registered in the UK, Charity Registration number: 1111494. 90% of all money raised through the Trust comes to us in the field, as GVI covers all administration costs. It is forecast that we will need $30,000 in 2011 to cover these extra costs through the GVICT. 5.0 References Peru Instituto Nacional de Estadística e Informática

© Global Vision International ± 2011

16

UNESCO World Food Programme ± Peru United Nations Development Programme

6.0 Appendices Appendix 1. Children¶s national school final results per grade in Villa el Triunfo A = The student satisfies requirements to advance to the next grade R = Results of recuperation exam (to be taken at the start of the new academic year) pending D = The student has failed to satisfy the requirements to advance to the next grade Gender Lengua Materna Personal Social Ciencia y Ambiente Matematica Final mark Observation A A A Withdrawn Withdrawn Withdrawn Withdrawn Withdrawn

Surname Grade 1 Alvis Gomez Ccahuana Pechortinta Fuentes Verundy Huaranca Hinch Luna Ttaca Luna Ttaca Mallma Mamani Mamani Caceres

Name

Maria Elena Mauricio Liz Blanca Yuliana Estefani Soledad Mayli Jose Armando

F M F F F F F M

B A A -

B A A -

B A A -

B A A -

© Global Vision International ± 2011

17

Morocco Ccallo Oruro llacho Paccaya Lopinta Quispe Pacompia Quispe Condori Sapacayo Salcedo Sapacayo Llacma Sumerinde Itusaca Grade 2 Huamani Alcahua Mallma Mamani Mamani Apaza Mamani Caceres Minaya Sanchez Morocco Ccallo Paccaya Lopinta Perez Sapacayo Quispe Ccompi Sarayasi Luna Suminre Pacompia Valenzuela Puma Grade 3 Caban Puma Ccaso Caaso Huanca Pari Huillca Chuctaya Pari Mamani Quispe Chancuana Sanca Cuevas Suana Cari Grade 4 Chino Coaquira Llacma Sapacayo Llacma Sapacayo Lopez Rosado Mamani Huanca Perez Sapacayo

Netza Erika Miriam Rocio Ayde Marleni Fernando Jose Katherin Estefani Alex Dante Maribel Elena Rodolfo Valentin

F F F M F M F M

A A A A A A B

A A A A A A B

A A A A A A A

A A A A A A A

A A A A A A A

Withdrawn

Withdrawn

Maria Estefani Alex Juan Sebastian Alonso Maykol Brandoi Nayeli Angel Roberto Frederick Sandra Victoria Pamela Sonia Eliana Jenary Dalma Gabriela

F M M M F M M F F F F F

B B A A B B A A A A -

B C B A B B A A A A -

A B A A A A A A A A -

A B A A A A A A A A -

R R R A R R A A A A -

Withdrawn

Withdrawn

Glorit Marlith Jose Antonio Andy Dario Jesus Kevin Milagros Milanya Abraham Tomas Manuel Steven Elias John

F M M M F M M M

A A A C B A A

A A A B B A A

A A A B B A A

A A A B B A A

A A A R R A A

Withdrawn

Emily Dayana Cesar Angel German Gerardo Dixsy Esther Lenin Vladimir Oswaldo Julio

F M M F M M

A A B B A

A A B B A

A A A B A

A A A B A

A A A R A

Withdrawn

© Global Vision International ± 2011

18

Quilca Paucar Salcedo Laime Sarayasi Luna Grade 5 Cabana Puma Ccaso Caaso Ccori Mamani Laque Cayllahua Loayza Ortiz Morocco Ccallo Quispe Condori Sarayasi Luna Valenzuela Puma Grade 6 Ccori Huamani Machaca Ccari Mendoza Huarca Minaya Sanchez Morocco Ccallo Perez Quispe Sapacayo Perez Sapacayo Salcedo

Hector Sonia Ruth Alvaro Elias

M F M

A A A A AD A

A A A

A A A

A A A

Yeny Ruth Holsen Calixto Reny Mariela Beatriz Monica Yesica Alexander Bryan Jose Claver Alex Fernando Roger Fernando Jose

F M F F M M M M M

B A A A A B A A

B A A A A B A A

B A A A A A A A

B A A A A A A A

R A A A A R A A

Withdrawn

Cecilia Luis Rivaldo Monica Maritza Nataly Ronal Richart Santiago Aldair Richard Edith Marisol

F M F F M M M F

A A AD A A A A AD

AD A A A A A A AD

A A A A A A A A

A A A A A A A A

A A A A A A A A

Appendix 2. Children¶s national school final results per grade in Victor Maldonado A = The student satisfies requirements to advance to the next grade R = Results of recuperation exam (to be taken at the start of the new academic year) pending D = The student has failed to satisfy the requirements to advance to the next grade

© Global Vision International ± 2011

19

Gender

Lengua Materna

Personal Social Ciencia y Ambiente

Surname Grade 1 Cahuana Quispe Gallegos Alanoca Loayza Livisi Mamani Quispe Paccaya Condori Paccaya Huamani Grade 2 Caceres Atamari Calcina Ccama Condori Usca Huayhua Machaca Mamani Chuma Puma Ticona Quispe Avila Yucra Yucra Grade 3 Alcahuamani Huamani

Name

Matematica

Final mark Observation A A A A A A A A A A D A R Withdrawn A A R R A A Withdrawn

Elvis Naomi Xiomara Yonatan Diego Ramiro Rosmer Claudia Soley

M F M M M F

A A A B A A

A A B B A A

A A A A A A

A A A A A A

Antuane Mirian Diandra Yubel Maricielo Yajaira Elvis Joel Pabel Luciano Juan Jose Nadia

F F F M M M F

A A A AD C AD B

A A A AD B AD A

A A A AD B AD A

A A A AD B AD A

Denilson Fernando Ancocallo Paccaya Jose Arque Bellido Felix Charly Chambi Mendoza Ruth Yamila Paucar Huallpa Angel Pinto Fernandez Eder Yucra Yucra Alejandra Grade 4 Alcahuamani Huamani

M M M F M F

A A B B A A

A A B B A A

A A A A A A

A A A A A A

Jonathan

M

A

AD AD AD A

© Global Vision International ± 2011

20

Arque Bellido Ccahuana Quispe Ccama Tacanahui Condori Usca Cuyo Puma Mamani Hanccoccallo Pacaya Condori Paucar Huallpa Grade 5 Ancocallo Paccaya Cuyo Puma Mamani Hanccoccallo Paccaya Condori Paucar Huallpa Pinto Fernandez Puma Ticona Grade 6 Alcahuamani Huamani Condori Usca Cuyo Puma

Alex Michael Lurdes Soledad Yulisa Magaly Magdalena Raul Miguel Angel

M F F F F F M M

A B AD A

A B AD A

A A AD A

A A AD A

A R A A

Withdrawn

AD AD AD AD A A A A A A A A A A A

Jaime Nelson Zimel Luis Fernando Rolando Yonathan Ivan Anibal Jose Carlos

M M M M M M M

A A AD A B B B

A A A A B B B

A A A A A A A

A A A A A A A

A A A A R R R

Alfredo Lindaura Nancy Daniela Gallegos Alanoca Alejandra Lurdes Herencia Palomino Lisbeth Biancia Herencia Quispe Beaney Gabriel Wilfredo Roca Machaca Yucra Yucra YoVana

M F F F F F M F

AD AD AD AD A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A

Withdrawn

Appendix 3. Children¶s national school final results per grade in Villa Santa Rosa de Chiguata A = The student satisfies requirements to advance to the next grade R = Results of recuperation exam (to be taken at the start of the new academic year) pending

© Global Vision International ± 2011

21

D = The student has failed to satisfy the requirements to advance to the next grade Gender Lengua Materna Personal Social Ciencia y Ambiente Matematica Final mark Observation A A A A A A A A A A A A A Withdrawn A A A A A A

Surname Grade 1 Capio Lazaro Condori Cruz Huayhua Gamero Huillca Champi Grade 2 Alvarez Chavez Cahuari Garcia Laura Mamani Roque Huamani Grade 3 Casani Barreda Condori Cruz Flores Flores Huallpa Checca Lopez Vilca Mamani Llungo Grade 4 Chavez Puma Condori Cruz Corimaya Flores Vina Zea Grade 5 Fernandez Cervantes Lazaro Gallegos

Name

Adalith Yanet Franglen Groberth Rony Alexis Juan David

F M M M

A A A A

A A A A

A A A A

A A A A

Fernando Jose Miguel Angel Cindy Reyna Leonardo Gear

M M F M

A A A A

A A A A

A A A A

A A A A

Williams Alexis Liz Tatiana Roxana Kelly Rodrigo Paul Richard Ronal Wuilian

M F F M M M

A A A A A

A A A A A

A A A A A

A A A A A

Katherina Juana Jefry Maribel Helmut Alvaro

F M F M

A A A A

A A A A

A A A A

A A A A

Brayan Yoselin Yanet

M F

A A

A A

A A

A A

© Global Vision International ± 2011

22

Mamani Mamani Retamozo Quispe Soncco Parqui Grade 6 Cahuari Garcia Chambi Linares Flores Flores Lopez Vilca Toledo Huamani

Maritza Isabel Sara Isabel Denis Aquilino

F F M

A A A

A A A

A A A

A A A

A A A

Susy Miriam Alexander Manuel Jesus Enrique Jose hasley Luis Fernando

F M M M M

A A C A A

A A C A A

A A C A A

A A C A A

A A D A A

© Global Vision International ± 2011

23

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful

Master Your Semester with Scribd & The New York Times

Special offer: Get 4 months of Scribd and The New York Times for just $1.87 per week!

Master Your Semester with a Special Offer from Scribd & The New York Times