GROUP 1 - Noella Cantu, Jonathan Cordingly, Kenny Olson GROUP 2 - Brad Bosworth, Brendan Hofmann, Garrett Taylor GROUP

3 - Michael Morow, Chelsea Serrano-Piche, Austin Wilson Idea The idea was to create a park that crosses and connects Seattle’s urban areas without affecting or denying the project helps to create an interaction between the community while taking advantage of the views of the Olympic Mountains across Puget Sound. Design Team Lead Designer Site Design/Architecture: WEISS/MANFREDI, Architecture, Landscape, Urbanism New York, NY Principals: Marion Weiss and Michael Manfredi Weiss/Manfredi Architects were hired in 2001 after an international search and competition. They were selected because of their expertise in architecture, landscape and urban design. Consultant Team Civil and Structural Engineering Consultant Magnusson Klemencic Associates, Seattle Involved with the innovative environmental engineering for the site including grading, subgrade utilities and envionmental remidiation. Structural engineering for sitewalls, bridges, garage and PACCAR Pavilion. Aquatic Engineering Consultant Anchor Environmental, Seattle, WA Involved with the aquatic structural engineering for the shore and beach, including the landscaping and the salmon habitat restoration. Geotechnical Engineering Consultant Hart Crowser, Seattle Involved with the geotechnical engineering which included the remediation for the contaminated site, seawall stabilization, foundation and earthquake design for s tructures, dewatering and slope stabilization design. Mechanical and Electrical Engineering ConsultantABACUS Engineered Systems, Seattle Lighting Design Consultant: Brandston Partnership Inc., New York Environmental Consultant: Aspect Consulting, Seattle Graphics Consultant: Pentagram, New York Security and AV/IT Consultant: ARUP, New York Catering & Food Service Consultant: Bon Appétit, Seattle Kitchen Consultant: JLR Design, Seattle Retail Consultant: Doyle + Associates, Philadelphia General Contractor: Sellen Construction, Seattle Project Management: Barrientos LLC, Seattle Project Manager: Chris Rogers, Seattle Art Museum

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NOELLA CANTU, JOHNATHAN CORDINGLY kENNETH OLSON

Olympic Sculpture Park, Seattle

1910

UNOCAL (Union Oil Company of California) establishes a petroleum transfer and distribution facility on what later becomes the Olympic Sculpture Park.

UNOCAL ceases petroleum operations at the future Olympic Sculpture Park site and closes and spends 10 years on cleanup efforts.
1946 1958 1988 1994

1975–1999

Out of 52 designers from around the world, Weiss/Manfredi Architects of New York is selected as Lead Designer for the park.

2001

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In the summer, construction of the Olympic Sculpture Park began. Park construction and art installation are substantially completed. The Olympic Sculpture Park opens to the public on Jan. 20.

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Weiss/Manfredi unveil the park's design and model on May 14.

2002

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Seattle constructs a waterfront seawall from Washington to Broad streets.

SAM, in collaboration with the Trust for Public Land, raises $16.5 million in private funding for the purchase of the UNOCAL site. site. Jon and Mary Shirley pledge to endow the park’s operations ensuring it is open and free to everyone, and help name the park.

1999

2004

92,986 cubic yards of dirt is removed from the site of SAM's downtown museum expansion project, and is transported to the park for use as recycled fill.

NOELLA CANTU, JOHNATHAN CORDINGLY kENNETH OLSON

Olympic Sculpture Park, Seattle History

The idea of creating a park for contemporary sculpture in Seattle grew from a discussion in 1996 between Seattle Art Museum director (and wife ofWilliam Gates Sr.) Mimi Gardner Gates and Martha Wyckoff while Wykoff, being a trustee of the Trust for Public Land, soon after began an effort to identify possible locations for the park.A $30 million gift from Mary and Jon Shirley (former COO of Microsoft and Chairman of the Seattle Art Museum Board of Directors) established them as foundational donors. The Olympic Sculpture Park soon evolved from the commitment of the Seattle Art Museum and the Trust for Public Land to preserve Seattle's last undeveloped waterfront property. In 1999, the museum purchased property on Seattle's waterfront from Union Oil of California (UNOCAL) with private and public funding. SAM later acquired an additional property (10 Broad St.) with the support of the City of Seattle and King County and leased part of the Alaskan Way right-of-way to create complete accessiblity to the waterfront. In 2001 SAM selected WEISS /MANFREDI architecture to design for SAM’s Olympic Sculpture Park. The Architecture Award. Harvard University Graduate School of Design’s Ninth Veronica Rudge Green Prize in Urban Design went to Weiss/Manfredi for the Seattle Waterfront Project. Their design was choosen because it expressed an integration of landscape, architecture and urban design. The Veronica Rudge Green Prize in Urban Design is awarded every two years by the GSD to recognize excellence in urban design. The entry’s include projects from all around the world that emphasize their contributions to the public realm of a city and improvement of the quality of urban life. The prize has previously honored major projects in Amsterdam, Rio de Janeiro, Barcelona, Aleppo, Mexico City and Tokyo by such leading designers as Sir Norman Foster, Fumihiko Maki, West 8 and Alvaro Siza.

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NOELLA CANTU, JOHNATHAN CORDINGLY kENNETH OLSON

Competition

Vision Statement: Words from the design team, SAM

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As a cultural endeavor, this sculpture park circumvents the typical relationship of art inside the museum and offers a radical alternative: art and design as part of the public realm. We wondered what transformation would capitalize on the urban infrastructure that divided the site. How could this park generate new relationships between the city and Puget Sound? How might this project illuminate the immeasurable power of art and landscape together? The genesis of our design originated with these questions. Our design, an invented ground plane that wanders from the city to the water’s edge, is sculpted to rise over the existing infrastructure. This new, uninterrupted Z-shaped landform for sculpture links the three separate parcels and offers multiple settings to view both city and sound. Central to this landform is a 2,200-foot path that leads visitors from a luminous steel-and-glass pavilion for art, performances and educational programming, through a series of outdoor sculpture “galleries.” The path links three emblematic landscapes: the Valley, an archetypal evergreen landscape of the Northwest; the Grove, with deciduous trees adaptable to the urban environment;and the Shore, a waterfront setting shaped by wind and saltwater and As one traverses this path, views are directed north toward the sea and mountains and then south toward the city and port. Throughout the park, seemingly parallel lines converge, accentuating the laws of perspective to suggest Our fundamental aspiration was to create a sculpture park at the intersection of the . Our intent was to establish connections where separations existed, inventing a setting that brings art, city and sound together - implicitly questioning where the art begins and where it ends.

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At the site of Seattle’s largest and last remaining waterfront property, the Seattle Art Museum’s Olympic Sculpture Park transforms a nine-acre former industrial site into a vibrant new venue for contemporary sculpture. Formerly a fuel storage and transfer station, the site fell 40 feet from the city to the water and was divided by highway and train lines into three separate parcels. With such a complex site, traditional distinctions between art and nature, design and ecology were no longer relevant. At the Olympic Sculpture Park, art, architecture, landscape architecture, infrastructure and ecology are reciprocal conditions embedded within the trajectory of our design. Our ambition was to exploit the friction of combining these disciplines to foster new insights and perceptions.

NOELLA CANTU, JOHNATHAN CORDINGLY kENNETH OLSON

Concept

As part of constructing the sculpture park, 5.7 million dollars were spent transforming 1,000 feet (300 m) of the seawall and underwater shoreline inside Myrtle Edwards park. A three level underwater slope was creattract sealife and large kelp. It is hoped that this recreated strand will help revitalise juvenile salmon from the Duwamish River and serve as a test for future efforts.

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NOELLA CANTU, JOHNATHAN CORDINGLY kENNETH OLSON

Structure

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Pavilion Pavilion: The Paccar Pavilion is located at the main entrance to the park. The 11,000 sq. ft. pavilion houses a café and space for exhibits and public events. There is a 22,000 sq.ft. of parking space below. There is an outside amphitheater, with descending grass terraces outside the pavilion doors. Path The path consist of a 2,200-foot Z-shaped path that joins three parcels of land above a street and railroad tracks. The path slopes down toward Elliott Bay. The park has four distinct landscapes: the valley, grove, shore and meadow. Two Bridges The two bridges merge with the continuous Z path. The path creates locations to view and contemplate the art, city and bay. Elliott Bridge consists of a dramatic V shape and features a series of continuous concrete seats that provide places to enjoy the view. The BNSF Bridge rises 26 feet above the train tracks and provides a stretch of lawn and concrete steps. Cloud Cover(2004-06), a laminated glass walkway, covers the south path over the tracks. Art The park opened with 21 installations but now inlcudes spaces for over 30. Landscape There is an integratation of native plants and sculptured soils to create natural drainage on the site. Dense native vegetation helps to retain rainfall above the soil surface. Native plants are the visible and re-establishthe landscape from upland to shoreline in four distinct precincts: Valley, Grove, Meadows and Shore.

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Natural Light

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The pavillion is designed in a way to allow maximum amount of light in with the use of glass and steel. The open spaces within the pavillion create less of a transistion from interior to exterior.

The materials used on the pavilion interact with the site throughout the day. The transparent materials let natrual light in during the lighting from the nightlife.

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NOELLA CANTU, JOHNATHAN CORDINGLY kENNETH OLSON

Massing

The plan and the elevation of the park look similar due to the forty foot eleation change that takes place from the pavillion to the beach. The plan for the park to have the “Z-shaped” green platform came from teh architects wanting to create “a continuous surface that unfolds as a landscape for art, wandering from teh city across highway and rail lines to reach the water’s edge.”

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NOELLA CANTU, JOHNATHAN CORDINGLY kENNETH OLSON

Plan to Section/Elevation

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The primary circulation path is the “Z-shaped” path which stretches from the pavilion across the lower infrastructure to the beach and creates layers of circulation in the process. Off this path there are secondary paths that guests can visit. The park also has 12 entrances guests can access the park from. This variation of entrances and paths create a variety of expierences for users. An exhibition pavilion provides space for art, performances and educational programming. From this pavilion, the pedestrian route descends to the water, linking three types of landscapes: a dense evergreen forest, a deciduous forest and a shoreline garden. The design brings sculpture outside of the museum walls and the park itself into the landscape of the city. Many linkages have been created through this park design including that between art and the city, the city and nature, and organic and inorganic form. The park stretches over a highway while offering views of the Olympic Mountains, another linkage crosses the train tracks offering views of the city, and another linkage descends to the water offering views of the newly created beach.

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NOELLA CANTU, JOHNATHAN CORDINGLY kENNETH OLSON

Circulation to Use

Unit to Whole

OLYMPIC SCULPTURE PARK, SEATTLE BY WEISS / MANFREDI 1996

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NOELLA CANTU, JOHNATHAN CORDINGLY kENNETH OLSON

Throughout the Olympic Sculpture Park many experiences occur some which are repetitive through the area and others unique. Repetitive Main Walkway Materials Unique Main to Secondary Walkway: Paved to Non-paved Green Space: Tree Types vs. Grass Sculptures: Types and Materials Wake Sculpture

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Wake Sculpture

Ketcham Family Grove

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Elliot Avenue

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Glass Bridge

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Glass Bridge

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Eagle Sculpture

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NOELLA CANTU, JOHNATHAN CORDINGLY kENNETH OLSON

Repetitive to Unique

Symmetry to Balance

Green versus Solid Form The park is 9 acres, approximately 8.5 which is purely landscaping and exhitibion spaces. The forms and landscaping within the area are reacting to the sloping site. Angles and materials vary to create a unique

Exterior The park brings a relaxing atmosphere to a busy city. The buildings on the park site are positioned in a manner to create a large open space throughout the majority of the park. This open space creates a sense of safety which adds to the day and night use. Interior As for the interior of the building, the use of transparent materials in comparision to solid, gives a sense of beign outdoors when inside. The double height spaces bring light in and also give the building a sense of lightness from the exterior views.

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NOELLA CANTU, JOHNATHAN CORDINGLY kENNETH OLSON

Geometry

Additive & Subtractive

Art Sculpture like the “Eagle” sculpture by Alexander Calder stands out with its red color and organic shape against green background with sharpe angles. Landscape The amount of landscaping approximately 8.5 acres stands out against the city scape as there is no other area like it around this vicinity. Materials and Shape The metal panels on the exterior with angles jutting out contrast with the organic landscaping. . The provides a great background for art display. Interaction The interaction between the railway, automobiles, water, and pedestrian walkways is like no other in the city.

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NOELLA CANTU, JOHNATHAN CORDINGLY kENNETH OLSON

Hierarchy

Olympic Sculpture Park Park Maps

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NOELLA CANTU, JOHNATHAN CORDINGLY kENNETH OLSON

LANDSCAPES INFRASTRUCTURE

DRAINAGE

MEADOW STRUCTURE / RETAINING WALLS

LANDSCAPES
OLYMPIC SCULPTURE PARK, SEATTLE BY WEISS / MANFREDI 1996

POWER / TELEDATA / SECURITY CONDUITS

BEACH

LIGHTING

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TURF

GROUP 2 & GROUP 3

PEDESTRIAN PATHS

TRANSPORTATION

PRIMARY PATHS STREETS / TRUCKING ROUTES

SECONDARY PATHS

BNSF/AMTRAK RAILWAYS / WATERFRONT TROLLEY

PEDESTRIAN / BIKE PATH/ FERRY LINE

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OLYMPIC PARK

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BRAD BOSWORTH, BRENDON HOFFMAN, GARRETT TAYLOR

Park History
The rst public park within the city limits of Seattle was Denny Park - a gift to the city by David T. Denny in 1884. In 1887, the Board of Park Commissioners was established to oversee development of the Seattle park system. Seattle Parks Commissioners hired the famed Olmsted Brothers landscape architecture rm in 1903 to design a comprehensive system of parks and boulevards for the city. The Olmsted Plan for Seattle’s parks spurred the early development of the Seattle park system and has been the basis of our modern day park system. Much of Seattle Park history was documented by Donald N. Sherwood (1916-1981). The Seattle Parks and Recreation's Sherwood History Files is the incredible legacy of Sherwood, who worked as an engineer for Parks for 22 years from 1955 to 1977.

BRAD BOSWORTH, BRENDON HOFFMAN, GARRETT TAYLOR

LAST NAME HOFFMAN 3x3 10x10 R+D 02-14-2011 01-28-2011 OLYMPICGERUNDS SELECTing SLIPPing WEAVing TOP TEN PARK FRAMing HINGing JOINing LINing PATCHing PROFILing SCALing

01 Noella Cantu

02 Austin Wilson

03 Kenny Olson

04 Michael Morow

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1 FR HI JO LI PA PR SC SE SL WE 10

Texas Tech University ARCH 5503 - 304 Spring 2011 R&D 10x10 Anton Sinkewich Lonnie Hoogeboom

How the train Section Moves
Brad Bosworth 06 Garret Taylor 07 Chelsea Serrano- Piche 08 Brendon Ho man 09 Jonathan Cordingley 10

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Olympic Sculpture Park
1234567Kreielsheimer North Meadow Gates Atmosphere Allen Family Foundation Plaza Ackerley Family East Meadow Neukom Vivarium West Meadow Ketcham Families Grove 3 6 7 5 4

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# Sculpture Location Park Entry Points 15 14 13 12 11 10

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NOELLA CANTU, JOHNATHAN CORDINGLY kENNETH OLSON

GROUP 1 + GROUP 3

(1) Curve XXIV
Ellsworth Kelly 1981 On Loan
No preview available

(2) Temporary Exhibits

(3) Wake

Richard Serra 2004 Purchased

(5) Persephone Unbound (4) Two Plane Vertical Horizontal Variation III
George Rickey 1973 Gift Beverly Pepper 1999 Gift

(6) Perre’s Ventaglio III

Gift

(9) Neukom Vivarium
Mark Dion 2006

(7) Sky Landscape I
Louise Nevelson 1976-1983 Loan

(8) Split

Roxy Paine 2003 Loan

Gift

(10) Stinger

Gift

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Tony Smith 1967-1968/1999

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Beverly Pepper 1967

MICHAEL MOROW, CHELSEA SERRANO-PICHE, AUSTIN WILSON

(11) Wandering Rocks
Tony Smith 1967-1974 Loan

(12) Typewriter Eraser, Scale X

(13) Untitled
Roy McMakin 2004-2007 Gift

Claes Oldenburg + Coosje van Bruggen 1998 Loan

(14) Eagle

Alexander Calder 1971 Gift

(15) Bunyon’s Chess
Mark di Suvero 1965 On Loan

(16) Seattle Cloud Cover
Teresita Fernandez 2006 Bridge Design

Louise Bourgeois 2005

(17) Eye Benches II
Louise Bourgeois 1996-1997 Gift

Gift

(20) Schubert Sonata
Mark di Suvero 1992 Gift

(19) Eye Benches III
Louise Bourgeois 1996-1997 Gift

(21) Love & Loss
Roy McMakin 2004-2007 Gift

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Gift

(19) Eye Benches I
Louise Bourgeois 1996-1997

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MICHAEL MOROW, CHELSEA SERRANO-PICHE, AUSTIN WILSON

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YMPIC SCULPTURE PARK, SEATTLE WEISS / MANFREDI 1996

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MICHAEL MOROW, CHELSEA SERRANO-PICHE, AUSTIN WILSON

Olympic Sculpture Park Sources Used
Image 1 http://www.djc.com/special/OSP/ Image 2 Timeline create by Group 1 Image 3 http://www.djc.com/news/en/11146940.html Image 4 http://www.topboxdesign.com/seattle-art-museum-olympic-sculpture-park-by-weissmanfredi-united-states/seattle-art-museum-olympic-sculpture-park-urban-landscape-art-and-ecology-city-and-waterfront/ Image 5 http://www.djc.com/news/en/11143878.html Image 5a http://www.arcspace.com/architects/Weiss_Manfredi/sculpture/ Image 6 http://atelier-ad.blogspot.com/2007/11/2007-seattle-aia-honor-awards-unbound.html Image 7 http://www.arcspace.com/architects/Weiss_Manfredi/sculpture/ Image 7a http://www.archdaily.com/101836/olympic-sculpture-park-weissmanfredi/hand-diagram-vert/ Image 8 http://www.arcspace.com/architects/Weiss_Manfredi/sculpture/ Image 9 http://www.thecreativezone.com/blog/2008/10/06/olympic-sculpture-park/ Image 10 http://www.thecreativezone.com/blog/2008/10/06/olympic-sculpture-park/ Image 11 http://www.thecreativezone.com/blog/2008/10/06/olympic-sculpture-park/ Image 12 http://archrecord.construction.com/tech/techbriefs/0707dignews/3.asp Image 13 http://archrecord.construction.com/tech/techbriefs/0707dignews/7.asp Image 14 http://archrecord.construction.com/tech/techbriefs/0707dignews/4.asp Image 15 http://archrecord.construction.com/tech/techbriefs/0707dignews/5.asp Image 16 http://www.djc.com/special/OSP/ Image 17 http://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/jYPvzXe6VU2TcS0PX9Bnrg Image 18 http://www.djc.com/special/OSP/ Image 20 Diagram by Group 1 Image 21 http://homeandgardenphotos.photoshelter.com/image/I0000jb1mFpuIvPs Image 22 http://www.artnet.com/magazineus/reviews/mandarino/mandarino2-13-07_detail.asp?picnum=3 Image 23 http://www.djc.com/special/OSP/ Image 23a Diagram by Group 1 Image 24 http://en.urbarama.com/project/olympic-sculpture-park-seattle-art-museum-1019 Image 24a Diagram by Group 1 Image 25 http://www.destination360.com/north-america/us/washington/olympic-sculpture-park Image 26 Diagram was made by Group 1 Image 27 http://seattle-daily-photo.blogspot.com/2007/04/paccar Image 27a http://www.djc.com/news/en/11146940.html -pavilion-olypmpic-sculpture-park.html Image 27b Diagram by Group 1 Image 27c Diagram by Group 1 Image 27d http://www.seattleartmuseum.org/SAMcollection/code/emuseum.asp?emu_action=collection&collection =6096&collectionname=WEB.Olympic%20Sculpture%20Park&currentrecord=1&moduleid=1&module= Image 27e http://www.seattleartmuseum.org/visit/osp/AboutOSP/PDF/OSP_PlantFinal.pdf Image 28 http://www.djc.com/news/ae/11185547.html Image 29 Diagram was made by Group 1 Image 31 http://www.destination360.com/north-america/us/washington/olympic-sculpture-park Image 33 Image 34 Image 35 Image 36 Image 37 Image 38 Image 39 Image 40 Image 41 Image 42 Image 43 Image 44 Image 45 Image 46 http://eastcokercathy.blogspot.com/2007_02_01_archive.html http://www.seattlepi.com/visualart/299881_art18.html http://healthylaps.com/2010/09/15/sculpture-park-space-needle-homegrown-seattle-wa/ http://www.archdaily.com/101836/olympic-sculpture-park-weissmanfredi/ http://sabafarmand.livejournal.com/ http://en.urbarama.com/project/olympic-sculpture-park-seattle-art-museum-1019 http://www.seattlepi.com/visualart/299887_the_art18.html http://www.sculpture-info.com/news-561/walking-tour-of-olympic-sculpture-park-i.html http://www.arcspace.com/architects/Weiss_Manfredi/ http://zeroalligator.com/Media/2007/SAMOSP.html http://theparsley.wordpress.com/tag/public-art/ http://landscapeandurbanism.blogspot.com/2008/01/revisit-olympic-sculpture-park.html http://robertwadephoto.blogspot.com/2007/04/olympic-sculpture-park-2.html http://brightlightsearch.blogspot.com/

Image 48 http://landscapearchitecturejord.blogspot.com/2007/08/seattles-olympic-sculpture-park.html Image 49 http://www.jonkrauss.com/?p=design&client=seattletimes&index=sti26 Image 50 http://www.seattlepi.com/visualart/190824_sculpture15.html

GROUP 1 - Noella Cantu, Jonathan Cordingly, Kenny Olson GROUP 2 - Brad Bosworth, Brendan Hofmann, Garrett Taylor GROUP 3 - Michael Morow, Chelsea Serrano-Piche, Austin Wilson

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CLASS COLLABORATION