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Table of Contents
Dedication....................................................................................................................2 Foreward ......................................................................................................................3 Scotland and England ..................................................................................................4 Barton Stacey to the English Channel .........................................................................4 Normandy “Omaha” Beach .........................................................................................5 Cerisy Forest ................................................................................................................5 Hill 192 and Vire Offensive ........................................................................................6 Brest .............................................................................................................................7 Seigfried Line ..............................................................................................................9 Battle of the Bulge .......................................................................................................10 Presidential Unit Citation ............................................................................................12 Through the Seigfried Line..........................................................................................12 The Pursuit...................................................................................................................13 Victory .........................................................................................................................14 Certificate of Commendation ......................................................................................16 Awarded the Silver Star Medal....................................................................................17 Awarded the Bronze Medal .........................................................................................17 Awarded the Bronze Medal .........................................................................................19 Awarded the Purple Heart ...........................................................................................22 Awarded the Soldier Medal .........................................................................................25 Awarded the Air Medal ...............................................................................................25 Awarded the Croix de Guerre Medal...........................................................................25 Awarded the British Military Medal............................................................................25 Russian Awards ...........................................................................................................25 Missing in Action ........................................................................................................25 Acknowledgements......................................................................................................26 Lest We Forget ............................................................................................................26

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1945 PRINTED BY “NOVÝ VŠETISK” PIZEN. WHO HAVE SURVIVED THE STRUGGLE. MAY ENJOY THE PURSUIT OF HAPPINESS IN THE NEW WORLD OF PEACE. TO YOU GALLANT MEN THIS BOOKLET IS HUMBLY DEDICATED. CZECHOSLOVAKIA ””” Page 2 ””” .””” DEDICATION ””” DEDICATION DEDICATED IN MEMORY OF THOSE MEN OF 612th TANK DESTROYER BATTALION WHO SO GALLANTLY GAVE THEIR LIVES SO THAT WE.

New Jersey. and was alerted on the 18th of February 1944. the 4th of December 1942. The 20th of December 1943. Deeley assumed command of the battalion on the 27th of February 1943. The Third Army Maneuvers 1943. with a readiness date of 25th of March 1944. The Battalion received its men and moved to Camp Bowie. The Battalion embarked on the “Ile de Prance”. the 26th of March 1944. then re turning to Camp Swift.””” FOREWORD ””” FOREWORD The 612th Tank Destroyer Battalion was activated as a light battalion at Camp Swift. and sailed on the 7th of April 1944. Texas. For advanced training as Self Propelled. at the New York Port of Embarkation. the Battalion was reorganized as a Towed Battalion. M. Completing this training the Battalion moved to Camp Swift. Hedden. ””” Page 3 ””” . Texas. on the 25th of June 1942. The cadre of two officers and seventy-three enlisted men were from the 631 Tank Destroyer Battalion. where they received Basic Training. the 3rd of March 1943. 14th of June 1943. under the command of Lt. to Camp Kilmer. on the 5th of April 1944. Texas. Texas. The Battalion moved from Camp Swift. W. from September to November. arriving the 29th of March 1944. The Battalion was made ready for battle by participation in. Texas. Major Jos. A. the Battalion moved to Camp Hood. in Louisiana. Col.

Acquitania. of all. we were fully equipped. schooling in in-direct firing and orientation on our job. The march passed through country rich in old English history. waterproofing vehicles. we had our first real air alert. gave us some unexpected publicity. “It probably isn’t even there anymore”. combat loaded. CHAPTER II BARTON STACEY TO THE ENGLISH CHANNEL On the 27th of May. and sandwiched in between. ””” Page 4 ””” . tents and wooden buildings. Early on the morning of 24th of April. hydrated food. the tiny locomotive did get the train started. We disembarked in two groups at Greenoch at the Pricess Street dock and station on 16th April 1944. The majestic trans-Atlantic liners Queen Mary. and met our new overseas home. and further strengthened the belief we were headed places. and soon. from the largest to the smallest. Moving swiftly through our first total blackout we crossed Scotland and into England. on a golf course. We were now in the big 1eague. A surprise visit from Ernie Pyle. roughly translated means. were to be seen great concentrations of equipment and men. ready to go the 26th of May. Here we got our introduction into the newer things in life. and it was no dry run. Despite our fears. we hardly realized existed. just four miles from Bristol. our Allies were here.””” SCOTLAND AND ENGLAND CHAPTER I ””” SCOTLAND AND ENGLAND Our overseas history starts. and we remember the welcome along the tracks and our first contact with “Any gum chum” the universal greeting in the ETO. when the dawn showed us the far off coast of Ireland and the friendly pilot light off the Firth of Clyde. and by morning we pulled into Flax Bourton station. Driving was done on the left hand side of the road. Alerted on the 15th of April. Failand Tented Camp. leaving many memories and new friends. cold water and daylight at midnight. along with hundreds of warships. we moved toward the English Channel to Barton Stacey “C” Camp near An dover. At Failand Camp everyone was busy. A few hours later we sailed between the green bills of Scotland up the Clyde and dropped anchor off Greenoch. and maybe a broken heart or two. and convoys of smaller ships. We learned “You can’t miss it”.

and we were in formation off the cliffs of Normandy at “Omaha” beach. Already having been assigned to the First United States Army. There were sounds heard that night. At 0215 hrs. or being improved. Water-proofing was completed. and Headquarters Company. and then the express. Grandy and 1st Recon platoon were loaded. On 14th of June. Johnson arrived to complete the forward echelon. we were alerted for the marshalling area. A fortunate short move earlier in the evening. On the 1lth of June. without any mishap. invasion money. the black and white striped gliders and bombers gave us the first idea the curtain had lifted on the big show.-train roar of fire from the battleships going overhead. attached to V Corps. On the 17th of June the remainder of “C” arrived at the CP and the 18th of June. Many a letter was written to loved ones that morning.03 dollars. Headquarters. a total of 25 Officers and 575 men. the 12th of June. and further attached to the 2nd Infantry Division. “A”. arriving on the continent on the 14th of June. forward elements arriving in the marshalling area the 12th of June. the first of a long line of new monies. with Lt. we disembarked on “Omaha” beach in the vicinity of Viereville Sur Mer. 6 CHAPTER IV CERISY FOREST We spent the first night amid the hedge rows. and Headquarters Company. where-as the rest had a dry run. After anchoring in the harbor we headed for France. June 6. the Battalion CP was established in the Forest of Cerisy. through smashed Trevierers and the rail yard at LeMolay. 16th of June. Captain Rosenblatt and his supply section. The next day. where de-waterproofing was accomplished.””” NORMANDY “OMAHA” BEACH ””” “D” day. to the Transit Area. elements of “B” and “C” proceeded to the hard and began loading. saved us from possible serious casualties. to the hard. firing at enemy bombers attacking the beachhead. Lt. the little brown bags. past the pillbox so well known to all. ””” Page 5 ””” . the 17th of June. 2300. In the Cerisy Forest we had our first baptism of artillery fire. 15th of June the remainder of Headquarters. but all escaped. ack. From the LST we proceeded up that narrow taped road. CHAPTER III NORMANDY “OMAHA” BEACH “B” was our first element to sail from England. the enemy heavy artillery was interdicting the road adjacent to the bivouac area. and we were entertained by first. wiser and without injury. and not to forget. At 1713 hrs. to the vicinity of Cerisy Forest. Morning light. the ack. life belts issued and the partial payment of 4. moved out and proceeded. of some local engineering under construction. already preceded by “B” which had landed on the 14th of June. after which we moved out. and the night previous.

Lo. Armand. to be successfully exploited the entire campaign. 1st Lt. which completed the Battalion in. assumed command of Company “A”. with the mission to provide anti-mechanized protection for the Division. giving close-up fire support to the infantry from practically the outpost line. and engaged in harassing interdiction fires. On the 25th of June the rear echelon arrived from England. from anti-mechanized attack. and reconnoitered the Division front and flanks for positions and routes. Our mission was to protect the Division from tanks and SP guns. were ambushed by an enemy pocket. with the 9th Infantry Regiment. CHAPTER V HILL 192 AND VIRE OFFENSIVE One of the things to be remembered was the Hill 192 Offensive. Normandy. During the period 20th of June to 10th of July. John J. was to fol1ow the assault infantry battalions and protect the Regimental fronts from armored penetration. was our contribution to FIRST ARMY’S tremendous display of power and was the beginning of the breakout from the beachhead. two enemy dead observers were found in the ruins. and long range machine gun fire. “C” was the Division reserve. We had the mission of protecting the front and flanks of the 2nd Infantry Div. The Vire Offensive. artillery. Harding and Pvt. The 3rd platoon going into direct fire position at the crossroad at La Mave. On 2nd of August. consisting of two platoons of “B”. and scoring 20 hits. wreckage and death atop Hill 192. Groff Jr. and immediately moved into positions on the line in the 2nd infantry Division sector. Capt. Following the infantry assault. and Capt. the Battalion protected the Division from anti-mechanized attack.””” HILL 192 AND VIRE OFFENSIVE ””” The first element of the forward echelon. Arvin were captured. On the 3rd of July we sustained our first casualty. The gun companies began the teams with the Infantry Regiments. our guns took positions amidst the carnage. and when examined later. and “C” with the 38th Infantry Regiment. The plan of battle for the TDs. William S. the 26th of July to 7th of August. The 2nd platoon later joined the 1st in the vicinity of La Mave. and kept our units covered with continual harassing mortar. The capture of Hill 192 paved the way for the adjacent Division to capture St. This was our first experience on the offensive. landed in France the 14th and 15th of June. Here we witnessed the terrific aerial show over St. firing 24 rounds at an enemy OP in St. Lo after which 7 CPs were established during the next 21 days of advance. “A”. together with his company officers and men on a reconnaissance for gun positions. “B” with the 23rd Infantry Regiment. In this action 3rd platoon of “C” showed their skill and shooting eye. All during this time the enemy was looking down on our positions from Hill 192. with elements harassing the enemy with our high velocity interdiction fire. ””” Page 6 ””” . Harding of “A”. and a knocked out SP guns at the base of the OP.

and eleven houses. 18th September 1944. The Tank Destroyer guns also blasted numerous enemy observation posts.””” BREST ””” We advanced with the 2nd Infantry Division to Tinchebray. destruction of houses. Due to the absence of enemy armor in the Brest area. troops or were obstacles in the path of infantry troops. 23rd Infantry on Hill 105. 2nd Infantry Division on the 19th August 1944. Although they were subjected to heavy mortar and artillery fire. Both of these platoons remained. The devastating accuracy and high velocity fire played no small part in the reduction of the Fortress of Brest. four large caliber artillery pieces. three anti aircraft guns. some of which was timed over the target. Battalion was attached to the 23rd Infantry Regiment. hard apples. including a large hotel. and on the 18th of August we were attached to the THIRD UNITED STATES ARMY. bunkers. harassing fire into the city and sniping at individual enemy soldiers with our three inch guns. Company “B”. Robertson. Moving into Guipavas. At the termination of the siege of Brest. The third platoon of the Tank Destroyer unit also moved into Guipavas 25th August 1944 with the same mission. France. the Company inflicted casualties upon the enemy estimated at more than four hundred. eggs and cognac. one mortar and five machine guns which had impeded the progress of assault companies in the 2nd Battalion for several days. 612th Tank Destroyer. In destroying these enemy installations and material. lined with kisses. two dugouts. Major General W. machine gun emplacements. seventeen machine guns1 one ammunition dump. on the assault on the Fortress of Brest. immediate reconnaissance and preparations for the attack on Brest were begun. closing in on the Falaise pocket. M. where we ended the Normandy Campaign. 24th August 1944. Commanding General of the Second Infantry Division summed up the tactics and courage of the TDs in his commendation of “B” Company. It was 2S1 miles of road. Our missions covered every conceivable type of target. CHAPTER VI BREST The 19th of August the first vehicle of the Battalion crossed the IP enroute to the vicinity of Brest in Brittany. the old city wall of Brest and numerous other installations which either housed enemy. they maintained exposed positions and as a result on 28th August 1944 knocked out a pill box. we furnished close in direct support to the infantry of the 2nd Infantry Division. After the arrival of the Battalion at Ploudaniel on 20th of August. the first platoon of the company prepared to support an attack by the 2nd Battalion. “B” Company’s guns had definitely destroyed fourteen pill boxes. in positions entirely exposed to enemy observation for the next seven days in order to place direct fire on known enemy strong points. pill boxes. ””” Page 7 ””” .

Without this fire. Marc and several gun positions which had held up the advance of the 1st Battalion. “B” Company’s guns destroyed two more machine guns and two mortars. the company received severe counter-battery fire but knocked out a machine gun and killed or wounded what was estimated to be about thirty-five of the enemy. and attachment to Third United States Army. The second platoon enjoyed a field day 12th September while its guns destroyed three pill boxes. 29th August 1944. one ammunition dump. besides inflicting approximately forty casualties upon the enemy. Two platoons entered the city of Brest 11th September.””” BREST ””” The enemy also sustained what was thought to be about twenty-seven (27) casualties as the result of fire from these guns during the day. the second platoon of “B” Company fired approximately 200 rounds per day and eliminated seven more pill boxes besides blasting paths through the center of city blocks in Brest which allowed units of the 23rd Infantry to move forward steadily. after moving to Hill 90. and assigned to the Ninth United States Army. Receiving intense sniper fire as a result of moving directly behind foot troops. both platoons were subjected to exceptionally heavy 88mm fire but nevertheless moved to positions fully visible to the enemy where they could place direct fire on German installations. The next day. On 30th August. The 18th of September saw the campaign successfully brought to a close and the Battalion assembled near Landerneau in preparation for further operations. Many prisoners were taken. After the close of the Brest ””” Page 8 ””” . During the next two days. a large percentage of whom were undoubtedly driven from their positions as a result of the devastating fire from these weapons” “C” supported Ivory “X” a task force that operated on the Ploegastel Penninsu1a to harass and destroy enemy installations in Brest from across the bay. gun crews of both platoons abandoned all cautionary measures as they knocked out a pill box and several enemy observation posts during the day. it is doubtful if the surrender of the enemy garrison would have come as soon as it did. Tank Destroyer guns operating amid front line rifle platoons had a demoralizing as well as casualty effect upon enemy. Despite heavy counter-battery and sniper fire on all gun positions during the final five days of the siege. two dugouts. following closely on the heels of advancing infantry. Gun crews of Company “B” displayed a complete disregard for their own safety and unusual initiative and resourcefulness in rendering infantry troops the closest possib1e supporting fire throughout the siege. two machine guns and sixteen inch naval gun which had been firing on rear installations since the outset of the attack on Brest. On 6th September the first and third • platoons knocked out a strongly defended hotel in St. On the 5th of September we were relieved from assignment to the First United Sates Army. The platoon is believed to have accounted for more than one hundred enemy casualties during the day. Two platoons moved to the top of Hill 105 on 4th September and placed direct fire on enemy strong points and gun positions ‘on Hill 90.

From the 4th of October until the 12th of December we acted in an infantry role. CHAPTER VII SIEGFRIED LINE On the morning of the 27th September we began our 692 mile motor march to the new fighting front. we arrived at our destination. across the Meuse River at Dinaut. in the vicinity of Manderfeld. LI For about a week we bivouaced in the forest. and Headquarters Company and “A” Company of the 612th TDs. Germany on the Siegfried Line. “K” Company of the 9th infantry Regiment. After a long drive across Belgium via Givet. and through the intricate underground fortifications. M. this Battalion was relieved from assignment to the Ninth United States Army. Cannon Company of the 9th Infantry Regiment. in the vicinity of Winterspelt. “C” minus 2C was attached to the 38th Infantry Regiment. a forest bivouac in the vicinity of Steinebruck. winter was in the air. sending out patrols. in the vicinity of Landerneau. Col. Jos. Belgium. ””” Page 9 ””” . Deeley in command. Belgium. in the vicinity of Bleialf. On the afternoon of the 29th of September we passed through Paris. “D” Company of the 741st Tank Battalion and Company Namur of the Belgium Secret Army. “B” was attached to CT 23. with Lt. and darkness came early. There were brushes with enemy patrols. Our mission was defending on a 9000 yard front facing the Siegfried Line. On 22nd of October 1944. Quentin. We traveled back through scenes of earlier fighting. and all in all it was a quiet sector. We bivouacked that night in the vicinity of St. without having any losses. setting up road blocks. 2nd platoon of “C” was attached to the 9th Infantry Regiment. Task force “X” was formed of Headquarters. Rumors had it we would see Paris on the way. and firing at pill boxes on the Siegfried Line. and into the night. It was far from the days of summer on the beachhead of Normandy. and the CP was established in Manderfeld. prisoners were taken. Trips were made into remains of Brest for pictures and souvenirs. blacked-out in the fog.””” SIEGFRIED LINE ””” campaign we spent a rest full interlude from 18th to 26th of September. We took the opportunity to become better acquainted with the local towns and inhabitants. across France and Belgium to Germany. although there were more cases of motor trouble than usual within city.

””” Page 10 ””” . Germany to support the planned attack of the 9th Infantry Regiment. in which “A” was awarded the Unit Citation. The full force of the enemy attack through the Ardennes struck the 1st and 2nd platoons of “B” and the 1st Rcn p1atoon. returned to duty having escaped from the enemy. The enemy was driven off by vigorous counter attacks by “A” Company. The CP moved out of Wirtzfeld that day as soon as a route was reconnoitered and opened up. and our lines were restored. and 1 officer and 18 men of 1st Rcn platoon also missing in action. The 15th of December the Battalion OP moved to Wirtzfeld. with direct fire. which controlled the flood waters of the Roar River and were vital to the Germans defense of Cologne. On the 17th of December. from the Southwest with tanks and armored infantry and resulted in the platoons being surrounded. Gribbin and Tec/5 Charles R. the Battalion moved to assembly at Sourbrodt. S/Sgt.””” BATTLE OF THE BULGE CHAPTER VIII ””” BATTLE OF THE BULGE The 11th of December elements of the 820th TD began to relieve our units and the relief was completed at 0130 hrs. The morning of the 17th of December the Battalion CP in Wirtzfeld was in action against the enemy. Billy F. At 0530. across to Berg to Elsenborn and the OP was again established at Sourbrodt. being wounded in action while infiltrating to safety. Wilson. escaped and was successful in returning to our lines. was detached from the 23rd Infantry Regiment. 1 machine gun and 1 mortar position. the 12th of December. and prevented the penetration of the town. Belgium for the attack on the Roar Dams. of the 2nd Infantry Division. Belgium to prepare for the coming offensive on the Schuemanuel Dams. after being reported as missing in action. fighting as infantry. 1st Lt. which was one of the decisive actions of the Ardennes Campaign. White. The 13th of December “A” was attached to RCT 9 and moved to Hofen. Ronayne C. “B’ with the 1st Rcn platoon attached. 2 SP guns. on Rohren Germany. and a personnel carrier and all the enemy personnel. 1st platoon capturing 3 PWs. and attached to the 99th Infantry Division. During this action the platoons destroyed 3 enemy half-track personnel carriers. 4 enemy tanks and a personnel carrier having attacked the town at daybreak. with 3 officers and 110 men being reported as missing in action. starting a battle at Hofen. and 3 tanks. moved to the vicinity of Honsfeld. the 16th of December the 3rd platoon of “A” was attacked by strong forces of the enemy which had penetrated the infantry lines and threatened the platoon. There was a short engagement in which the town defense destroyed the tanks. enemy dead were piled up and 18 PWs were taken. Morris and Pvt. Belgium and took up positions of readiness. Moving in a blizzard.

“A” completed its conversion in a race against time and the 2nd of January the company minus 2 platoons was attached to the 99th Infantry Division and took up prepared ””” Page 11 ””” . During the evening meal a 380 MM caliber shell struck the kitchen and mess.hall. the maintenance platoon and Company Headquarters of Headquarters Company under the command of 1st Lt. On this day remnants of “B” were relieved from attachment to the 99th Infantry Division and placed in direct support of the 23rd Infantry Regiment. Belgium. and took up AT’ defense positions East of Wirtzfeld on. At the Battalion CP in Sourbrodt. causing 11 casualties. killing 5. and I died as a result of wounds. Col. and placed in support of the 38th Infantry Regiment of the 2nd’ Infantry Division. and again they repulsed the attack. in many sectors of the Battalion activities. capturing 1.””” BATTLE OF THE BULGE ””” The morning of the 17th of December “C” was attached to the 99th Infantry Division. The Battalion Forward moved to Elsenborn to the 99th Division Advance CP. The weather was steadily getting colder. The defense platoon from Headquarters Company was relieved from their defensive position in the vicinity of ‘Berg and returned to the CP at Sourbrodt on the 20th of December. “C” was relieved from the attachment to the 26th Infantry Regiment of 1st Infantry Division. Our personnel section was on the line as doughboys at this same period. 21st of December “A” had another engagement with enemy paratroopers. and took up defensive positions at Butgenbach. Once again “A” was attacked by strong enemy forces. At the end of the year “A” and “B” were relieved from their positions as it found us in the course of being converted to self-propelled M-18 TDs in the vicinity of Verviers. on the same day at 1400 were relieved from attachment and attached to the 26th Infantry Regiment of the 1st Infantry Division. where Lt. Belgium. “A” again was attacked at Hofen by an enemy force estimated to be one Regiment and they beat off this counterattack successfully. even though the conditions were on the rough side. “C” was still maintaining their positions East of Berg. Clearing weather and our heavy air attacks had stabilized the situation somewhat and a regular turkey Christmas dinner was eaten by all. snow falls amounted to two feet. the 19th of December. Deeley took command of AT defenses of the 99th Infantry Division the 20th of December. Kosak was formed and 13 attached to Task Force Hoke and maintained defensive positions Southwest of Berg. Belgium in the place known to us as the Chateau. 11 of our men were reported missing in this action. and was drifting to four and five feet.

by spirited arid out-standing aggressiveness. CHAPTER IX THROUGH THE SIEGFRIED LINE We moved into active offensive operations through Rockerath and Krinkelt. In. Belgium. “A” attached to the 9th Infantry supported their attack on Schoneseiffen. Company “A”. Belgium pushing in the sides of the “Bulge” and opening the way to St Viths re-capture. toward Harperscheid and Schoneseiffen. ””” Page 12 ””” .””” PRESIDENTIAL UNIT CITATION ””” positions East and Northeast of Elsenborn. Their outstanding courage. 612th Tank Destroyer Battalion were employed in the role of infantry. bravery and discipline exhibited to all that this was a superior fighting unit and was instrumental in resisting the northern arm of the German Pincer aimed for Eupen. The terrain was initially densely wooded. During the entire action the personnel of Company “A”. It was a severe test for the new equipment and training. Belgium through Monschau. the entire northern flank of the First United States Army would have been endangered. and Harpescheid. and to Monteneu. “B” attached to the 23rd Infantry. the meantime “B” was attached to the 23rd Combat Team. Germany. fighting with the courage and spirit of infantrymen and being responsible for. while the 2nd platoon was in mobile reserve at Nidrum. breaking into broken terrain and series of high bald hills and deep wooded valleys. 612th Tank Destroyer Battalion distinguished itself by exhibiting outstanding courage and superior heroism in the presence of the enemy. one for which they were not trained nor to which assigned. to seal the enemy escape corridor. the capture of many enemy personnel and enemy materiel as well as the killing of numerous Germans. 612th Tank Destroyer Battalion. Germany. PRESIDENTIAL UNIT CITATION During the period of 12th December 1944 to 29th December 1944 in the vicinity of Hofen. supported their attack through the Monschau Forest on through to Bronsfeld. “A” maintained these positions until relieved by “C” on the 19th of January. and further attached to the 1st Infantry Division and furnished close fire support to the infantry on the attack on Weismes. were successful in preventing a breakthrough by the enemy in the sector occupied by the 3rd Battalion of the 395th Infantry Regiment. The enemy was now being forced into his second belt of Siegfried fortifications and minefields around the Wohlerscheid crossroad. Germany. The officers and men of Company “A”. and the major supply depots in the vicinity of Eupen and Verviers threatened. Had the enemy offensive successfully overrun the positions of Company “A” 612th Tank Destroyer Battalion. on through Ondenval Pass. “C” was in Battalion reserve and attached to the 38th Infantry and gave them fire support on Hellenthal.

the companies had enemy targets of retreating columns over-run by our speeding columns. slowed down the drive until the infantry had dismounted and cleared the towns while the tanks and destroyers covered them with fire. The companies deployed to protect the famed Remagen Bridge from enemy attack from the water. Our 2nd Rcn platoon acted as advance point for the spearhead on the drive to Paderborn. and some sleepless nights. Bernfeld. Guns were sited to engage enemy targets across the Rhine. Continuing the pursuit along the AHR valley to the Rhine. Hitler Youths. and boat loads of enemy escaping across the river. “C” further attached to CCA of the 9th Armored Division. and Homberg. offered little or no resistance. CHAPTER XI THE PURSUIT “A”. we spent a period experimenting with star shells giving the enemy a good case of the nerves.. firing at boats and floating debris suspected of containing demolitions. and some Volkssturm. Traveling from the Roer dams through Gemund the terrain was initially densely wooded hills with deep valleys breaking into open terrain extending to Munstereifel. “C” and Headquarters crossed the Rhine on the 21st of March. with the Battalion CP established at Honningen. dosing in the Ruhr Pocket. Panzerfaust teams. Rechterback. The 11th of March we reached the Rhine in the vicinity of Sinzig. “C” was with the 38th Infantry protecting the south flank of the FIRST ARMY against an enemy thrust at the bridge from the South. Enemy prisoners streamed in. But as we progressed to Homberg and Sachsenhausen the area. Horse flesh was no match for steel and gasoline. the white flag having come into prominence by this time. consisted for the ””” Page 13 ””” . The terrain along the east bank of the Rhine was initially rolling hills with wooded areas here and there. Fill boxes and strong points were taken under Lire and destroyed as continual pressure was exerted on the enemy while we waited for the floodwaters to subside. The majority of towns and villages entered.””” THE PURSUIT ””” The enemy having opened the Roer dams. There were some stubbornly defended towns where Machine Guns. drove along with the combat command up the Rhine and then eastwards through Langescheid. Main defenses consisted of road blocks and scattered mines. CHAPTER X HEADED FOR THE RHINE The 6th of March was our jump-off on the drive for the Rhine.

Thus after 10 months and 23 days fighting. thence East toward the Czechoslovakian border. with the crossing of the Weser and Saale rivers made without difficulty. 9th Armored Division. from beachhead at Normandy to Pilsen. During the course of our combat career. destination Czechoslovakia. There was little enemy opposition. corralling 742 enemy prisoners and killing 1145. But others had plans for us and on the 2nd of May the Battalion began a 209 mile march. “C” with GCA. 1945. “A” with the 9th Infantry Regiment and “B” with the 23rd Infantry Regiment followed closely behind the armored spearheads mopping up by-passed pockets The largest city captured in this area was Gottingen which was subdued by heavy 50 caliber machine gun fire.149 rounds of three inch ammunition against the enemy. From Leipzig the Battalion drove eastward to the Mulde River and ‘continued operations against the enemy. Czechoslovakia. throwing a skyful of airbursts.””” VICTORY ””” main part of high wooded hills with broad valleys dotted with small towns hanging on small peaks jutting from the plain. trucks and bicycles. The terrain being flat made them a formidable obstacle. and operations were under way to relieve and liberate Pilsen. we expended 40. CHAPTER XII VICTORY On the Mulde River it looked like the end of the trail. The enemy was already squeezed out by the meeting of the East and the West. before the attack was made on Le1pzig. and railing at times. found us firmly entrenched in Pilsen and in the hearts of the people. swept toward the American lines ahead of the advancing Russians. The entire distance was covered in one day through a May snow storm. there seemed no new worlds to conquer. which were silenced only by night attacks. Our Ron platoons were bringing in the prisoners in formation. a welcome reminiscent of former days of liberation in France and Belgium. displaced persons and liberated allied soldiers.’ The operations consisted ‘mainly in processing prisoners. moved eastward. Merseberg and Markranstadt area. Germany. and relieving elements of the extended THIRD ARMY in the vicinity of Waldmunehen. which were used to defend Leipzig. still spearheading the northern prong of V Corps attack and pursuit through Central Germany. At once patrols were sent out to contact the Russians. The town was cleared and VE day. We ””” Page 14 ””” .. The enemy leveled them against our armor and infantry. surrounding Leipzig. The terrain was generally open. the European War has ended for the 612th Tank Destroyer Battalion’. traveling on the Autobahn to Bayreuth. May 8th. We traveled 1936 miles on the continent. The 6th of May we were assigned to the THIRD UNITED STATES ARMY. where considerab1e opposition was offered by large caliber anti-aircraft guns. The sharpest engagement in the drive was in the attack on the Leuna. just great evidences of the complete defeat and disintegration of a once great war machine.

determination. Ardennes. for their stand at Hofen. We have a record we can all be proud of and such a record is due to the individual effort. to stop the German breakthrough in the Ardennes.””” VICTORY ””” knocked out 57 machine gun nests. loyalty and courage on the part of each and every soldier. 65 vehicles of all types. 11 tanks and 27 guns from anti aircraft to 6 inch Naval guns. and Central Europe. signifying our participation in the five major campaigns on the Continent. Our units held like a stone wall at Hofen. ””” Page 15 ””” . For these achievements we have been authorized to wear five Bronze Stars on the European Theater of Operations Service Ribbon. Northern France. Rhineland. Few battalions have been so long engaged with the enemy. and so continuously engaged and the superior morale in evidence at all times is an attribution to the success over our common enemy. Our “A” Company proudly wears the Unit Citation. Belgium in the battle of the Ardennes. namely: Normandy. they fought across Germany on the spearhead. to seal the final fate of the Third Reich.

””” Certificate of Commendation ””” Certificate of Commendation ””” Page 16 ””” .

GROVER E. TAYLOR ””” Page 17 ””” . GEHNY Pfc. JEWEL W. BRANNON 1st Lt. W1LLIAM H. ARNE H. RAULINS Pvt. REED Jr. GILBERT T/5 STEPHEN F. ALAN G. Sgt. ROBERTSON Sgt. CLARENCE W. SUOMI Cpl.””” AWARDED THE SILVER STAR MEDAL ””” AWARDED THE SILVER STAR MEDAL for gallantry in action 1st Lt. B. RUSSEL O. PAUL DARRETTA Pvt. HELMICK Pvt. R.

PENTON S/Sgt. HENSLEY Pvt. GARFIELD JAMES Jr. WILLIAM DI NINO Sgt. MARCUS L. FARRINGTON 1st Lt. MURRAY Pfc. JOSEPH S. EZRA C. Capt. HUBLER Pvt. MAYNARD C. CHARLES A. HARDING * T/5 DAVID D. Pvt. FARLEY Pfc. JAMES R. FOY C. KUCERA Pfc. ARCHIE W. WILLIAM S. HAIRSTON Jr. STRACK Pfc. KAMINSKI Sgt. HOLMAN Pvt. JOHN O.””” AWARDED THE BRONZE STAR MEDAL ””” AWARDED THE BRONZE STAR MEDAL for heroic achievement Capt. CHESTER J. ROBERT L. BEALS Jr. TAYLOR Sgt. STROUD Pfc. ERIC S. BLOCK Pvt. THOMAS J. BRYANT * * Also received Oak Leaf Cluster to the Bronze Star Medal. SEAMEON Pfc. HARGROVE T/5 LESLIE F. CHAVES Cpl. MORRIS N. JAMES E. REEVY C. GROSS Pfc. GREGORZIK Cpl. MIKE N. GROFF Jr. RAYMOND W. 1st Lt. HOMER OUSLEY Sgt. BARTO * Pfc. HINSON T/5 ALVIN S. SHAVER S/Sgt. WADIE MENEM ””” Page 18 ””” . ROGER P. GEORGE A. EDWARD H. LEVIO D. Pfc. WILLIAM VICKERS Pvt. KOULIANOS Sgt. PETER W. TYNDALL Pfc. 1st Lt. ROBERT J. FREDERICK T. PEAVY Cpl.

KEMP Capt. HRUNER 1st Lt. FARRINGTON 1st Lt. JOHN B. OAKES S/Sgt. GRIBBON 1st Lt. TOM W. STEPHEN E. S/Sgt. SCALES 1st Lt. JOHN J. JOHN EASTHAM S/Sgt. MAURITZ S/Sgt. CLYDE H. MANN 1st Lt. ALAN G. BRANNON 1st Lt. GRANDY 1st Lt. GROFF Jr. DAVID W. ROY C. WILLIAM J. BEN I. HARDY S/Sgt HERBERT W. JOSEPH DE FINO S/Sgt. Col. LYLE NETHERIJY T/Sgt GEORGE W. WILLIAM S. JOSEPH M. DEWEY W. KING 1st Lt. FAUSNET S/Sgt. KENNEDY Capt. JOHN H. WILLIAM H. McCLOUD Jr. WILLIAMS 2nd Lt. CHAPMAN Jr. RICHARD L CHANDLER M/Sgt. CRAMER U. JOHN B. RAYMOND A. DEELEY Major JAMES B. GEORGE U. ALLEN M. LINTON M/Sgt. OTIS V. WILLIAM M.””” AWARDED THE BRONZE STAR MEDAL ””” AWARDED THE BRONZE STAR MEDAL for meritorious service Lt. CHARLES R. BEANE 1st/Sgt. SHORT ””” Page 19 ””” . JACK A. DIDLAKE M/Sgt. Capt. PATRICK E. CHARLES R. GEORGE E. DULUDE 1st Lt. EDDY 1st Lt. MEYERS Capt. ROBERTSON 1st Lt. HENRY S. EDWARD H. LAURENS B. OBY S/Sgt. LIMUEL T. COUSEY T/Sgt. HAROLD ROSENBLATT Capt. HANLEY T/Sgt. KELSOE T/Sgt. YANCEY Jr. GUSTAVSON S/Sgt. COONEY S/Sgt. S/Sgt. EDWARD J. PARISH T/Sgt. ROWLAND S/Sgt. DICK H. JOHN H. SMITH 1st/Sgt ALBERT B. PATE •S/Sgt. 1st Lt. FRANKLIN G. HALL S/Sgt.

CALVIN A. HAYES Sgt. SHOWALTER Sgt. GEORGE B. PAUL TALLAS Cpl. TRAVIS H. JOSEPH ROIBINCHECK Cpl. MARTIN Jr. DUNN T/5 STEPHEN F. WILLIAM DI NINO Sgt. ARMSTRONG Sgt. WHITAKER ””” Page 20 ””” . RUSSELL A. TAYLOR S/Sgt FRED WHITSON S/Sgt BILLY F. BUNDY T/5 REX L. BROWN T/4 HARRIS W. P75 JAMES W. FRANCIS C. COOPER Cpl. CHESTER E. PETE MERLO Sgt.””” AWARDED THE BRONZE STAR MEDAL ””” S/Sgt. ROBERT E. BATTLES Sgt. WILSON Sgt. JULIAN K. TOWNSEND T/4 LEE W. SMITH Sgt. STONER T74 HERBERT J. JAMES H. DAVIS Sgt. CHRISTINE Sgt. BARTO T/5 FREDERICK P. ALEX WEISBERGER T/5 DAVID D. CHARLES E. JAMES B. VOLK Cpl. RUDERSMITH T/5 FRANCIS TALIERERCH T/5 FELIX M. FRANK H. REED Cpl. BRELAND Sgt PRILLIP A. SMITH Cpl. Sgt. FINUFF Cpl. BEITLER Sgt. HOMER OUSLEY Sgt. DAMON B. CHARLES W. WARREN L. MOUCHETTE Cpl. HAMBRICK T/4 JAMES C. SANDERS Sgt. JOHN S. HUTTOE Jr. MEDDERS T/5 DALE R. WILLIS D. JAMES D. OCIE L. PENUEL Sgt. GERNY T/5 NELSON P. CHARLES O. SCAIRBROUGH Sgt. MADDING T/4 ALFRED E. REIGHARD Cpl. SMITH S/Sgt. BAUER Sgt. MAYNARD C. GALLERY Cpl. RICHARD H. WOFFORD J.

FLYNN Pvt. VIRGIL E. VANCE Pvt. FRANCIS T. HALL Pvt. WILLIAM L. HENGEL Pfc. HERMAN W. WEBB Pfc. THOMAS H. ALBERT L. BACHORSKI Pvt. AARON H. LEWIS Pvt. EDWARD L. JOHN W.””” AWARDED THE BRONZE STAR MEDAL T/5 MORRIS WOODALL Pfc. WILLIAM VICKERS Pfc. PANIK Pvt. JOHN F. GEORGE R. CLAUD M. JOHN W. WILLIAMS Pfc. BERNARD J. WILLIAM A. DeCHANT Pfc. WILSON Pfc. JOHN SEDLAK Pvt. OWENS Pvt. FIE Pfc. JOHN B. ERWIN G. HAGGARD Pfc. NOLAND Pvt. GALLIAN Pvt. ALFORD L. BUTLER Pvt. EARNEST Pfc. VOSBURG Pfc. FOSTER PARKER Pvt. SMITH Pvt. WILSON ””” Page 21 ””” . ANSEL N. CHRISTOPHER Pvt. EDWARD L. SAM DeLEON Pvt. O’MALLEY Pfc. LEVIO D. POTTER Pvt. GALLMAN Pfc. LESTER W. CHARLES W. REEVES Pfc. IRA Pfc. GEARY Pvt. DERRICK Pfc. PARMER R. COONE Pfc. ANDREW J. WILLIAM B. ERNEST G. KENNEDY Pfc. CLETUS D. GEORGE M. PARKER Pvt. GUNTER Pfc. SOWERS Pfc. DESSIE JOHNSON Pvt. DREGGORS Pvt. CASIMAR L. HARTWICK Pvt. SEAMON Pfc. JOHN BARNOSKI ””” Pvt. ELMER R. DEREK J. LEONARD P. KENNETH E. FARLEY Pfc. KENDALL G. ROBERT M. HERBERT E. MALLON Pvt. RUFUS H. PATTERSON Pvt. ROBERT J. FINNIGAN Pfc. RAYMOND B. ROBERT L.

GREENLEE Sgt. COCCHI Sgt. 1st Lt. COOPER Cpl. JULIUS POLITSKY Sgt CLAUDE V. CHAVES Cpl. PAUL T. COLLINS T/5 LEO C.””” AWARDED THE PURPLE HEART ””” AWARDED THE PURPLE HEART for wounds received as a result of enemy action 1st Lt. MADDING T/4 MARTIN SPELLMAN Cpl. JONES T/5 JOHN S. HUTCHINSON Jr. WARREN L. OWENS * Pfc. ALBERT U. RUNCO Cpl. CONROY S/Sgt JOSEPH T. HARMON Sgt ORVILLE A. RADY McCARTER * Pvt. HIGGINSON Cpl. WILEY T/4 MILTON H. SMITH T/5 DAVID D. DAVIS P74 JAMES C. REED Cpl. GONSER T/5 BOBBY T. JACK A. LATHAM T/5 RICHARD A. BARTO T75 VAUGHN S. PENUEL Sgt. JOSEPH S. SAMUEL E. KENNETH C. GESSELL Sgt. PETER W. STANLEY D. WOLLFORD J. DAVIS ””” Page 22 ””” . LYNCH Sgt. GRAHAM T/5 MILTON B. JOHNS Sgt. CAMPER * Sgt. HAIRSTON Jr. HESS T/5 LACY E. WILLIAM T. JOHN J. SCALES T/Sgt. COATES S/Sgt ANTHONY F. T/5 RALPH L. GRIBBIN 1st Lt. MESTREZAT Sgt. EDWARD H. WILSON Sgt. LLOYD M. NORMAN V. HALL * * Also received Oak Leaf Cluster to the Purple Heart. FARRINGON * Sgt. EDWARD F. HANLEY T/Sgt. WILLIAM DI NINO Sgt. LYLE NETHERLY S/Sgt. BILLY F. PETE MERLO * T/4 WALTER F. WILEY T/4 MILTON H. 1st Lt WILLIAM J. JAMES D. ROACH S/Sgt. HOMER OUSLEY Sgt. CHESTER L. JOSEPH C. FRED T. WILLIAM T. BATTLES Sgt. MELVIN Cpl. SHORT S/Sgt. SULLIVAN Sgt JAMES M. GAINEY Cpl. EDWARD J. KOSAK 1st Lt. JAMES B. OTIS V. McKINNEY Sgt JAMES M. ALBERT H. CLEARY T/5 CALVIN W.

WILLIS Pfc. HIGGINSON Cpl. HELMICK Pfc. LATHAM T/5 RICHARD A. ERNEST S. SMITH T/5 DAVID D. McKINNEY T/5 SANFORD L. WARREN L. DONALD J. WOODINGPON Pvt. McCOURT Pfc. GEORGE R. CLARENCE F. TALLEY Pfc. CUNNINGHAM Pfc. TYNDALL Pfc. FARES CARDOVA Pfc. JOSEPH S. CHARLES W. HARRY G. ROBERT M. LOADHOLZ Pfc. PHILLIPS T/5 FRED C. CHAVES Cpl. LOUIS BLASS ””” Page 23 ””” . MELVIN Cpl. LAMBERT Pfc. CLEARY T/5 CALVIN W. ROGER P. GREEN B. SALLER Pfc. LETOURNEAU Pfc. LEROY V. BRYANT Pfc. ALBERT H. BIGLEY Pfc. T/5 RALPH L. LEONARD BACHMAN Pvt. GAINEY Cpl. PETER J. ENOCH Pfc. ADAMS Pfc. LEO G. FRAZIER Pfc. CARUTHERS Pfc. MERCANTANTE Pfc. TIDWELL T/5 ARTHUR E. JAMES B. CARROLL H. LESTER W. RUSSBL O. ALBERT CASTILLO Pfc. CHARLES R. MCGINN Pfc. RONAYE WHITE Pfc. GONSER T/5 BOBBY T. FRED T.””” AWARDED THE PURPLE HEART ””” T/4 JAMES C. MADDING T/4 MARTIN SPELLMAN Cpl. WILBER C. RALPH S. BERNHARD Pfc. JOSEPH RUOCCO Pfc. KENNETH C. HAROLD W. COLLINS T/5 LEO C. BARTO T75 VAUGHN S. THEODORE PORRECO Pfc. MONTGOMERY T/5 TRAVIS R. TENNEY Pfc. COOPER Cpl. JOHN R. HUTCHINSON Jr. MILLER Pfc. ROBERT J. JONES T/5 JOHN S. ALBERT U. WELCH Pfc. REED Cpl. ERNEST J. RUNCO Cpl. BACHORSKI Pvt. AILEY Pvt. LUTHER V. WILLIAM H. HESS T/5 LACY E. GRAHAM T/5 MILTON B. REEVES Pfc. O’MALLEY Pfc. CHESTER L. MORRIS N. FLOYD H. DeCHANT Pfc. HARLEY Pfc. GEORGE L. GEORGE R. ERNEST PERRYMAN Pfc. BOB GALADATI Pfc. GUY HODGIN Pfc.

LYTLE Pvt. SYLVESTER PARTIDA Pvt. PARMELY Pvt. YEAGER ””” Page 24 ””” . RUFUS H. THOMAS M. WORLEY Pvt. BENNIE H. WALKER Pvt. STROUD Pvt. HOWARD N. SANDAGE PVT SAM D. WILLIAM A. EZRA C. FLYNN Pvt. KEITH Pvt. GARFIELD JAMES Jr. RYBAK Pvt. BURCH Pvt. SAM DE LEON Pvt. CAVAZOS Pvt. SEBASTIAN Pvt. JENSON Pvt. RICHARD M. ANTHONY C. ODLE Pvt. GEORGE W. LEONARD P. HARVEY Pvt. GOSS Pvt. STEPHENS Pvt. JULINA G. WALDROP Pvt. RICHARD A. CHARLES W. PAUL A. NOLAND Pvt. THADDEUS J. ERNEST M.””” AWARDED THE PURPLE HEART ””” Pvt. JOHN STRAZIERI Pvt. Pvt. JOHN W. JAMES R. HUGH T. SMITH Pvt. EMORY Pvt. GRAYDEN J. HUGH L.. LLOYD P. RANDKLEV Pvt. CLAY ERVIN Pvt.

HIRSCH AWARDED THE AIR MEDAL for meritorious achievement while participating in aerial flight Capt. TAYLOR AWARDED THE BRITISH MILITARY MEDAL 1st/Sgt.””” AWARDED THE SOLDIER MEDAL ””” AWARDED THE SOLDIER MEDAL for heroism not involving actual conflict with wz enemy T/4 HUGH F. JAMES J. Col JOSEPH M. CHARLES A. JOHN J. KARDOS Jr. DEELEY S/Sgt. McGINITY Pvt. LESTER P. RUPERT E. Pfc. MAYNARD C. EDWARD F. GEORGE W. RALPH W. SCOTT AWARDED THE CROIX DE GUERRE MEDAL Republic of France Lt. DUNN Pvt. Cpl GEORGE R. STRUBLE Jr. ””” Page 25 ””” . ARVIN Pvt. REED Jr. ORVILLE A. JOHNS T/5 MICHAEL J. RAFFERTY Pvt. HARDING Sgt. FARLEY Pfc. ROBERT L. CANADY RUSSIAN AWARDS Sgt. CLARENCE W. POLK MISSING IN ACTION Capt.

HELMICK Pfc. Texas 17 December 1944. HYDE Cpl WILLIS D. West Virginia 18 February 1945. DAVIS Sgt JACK W. Tennessee 3 July 1944. Pfc. REVERE M. Kokamo. Pfc. RUSSELL O. Hoytville.””” ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS ””” ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Narrative and Map T/Sgt. Bennington. RAYMOND E. RUDOLPH ROSENBERGER Sgt DAMON E. Unionville. GEORGE W. Tennessee 18 January 1945. Murfreesboro Tennessee 17 December 1944. Tennessee 17 December 1944. Tennessee 16 February 1945. Humboldt. WALTER E. HEIDERHOFF Pvt. STEGALL T/5 ROBERT H. SAPP T/5 SIDNEY A. GLOVIS MILLER Pfc RUSSELL H. SIMMONS. JORDAN 17 December 1944. Chester. Tennessee 17 December 1944. BUFORD C. Walnut Porte. SCARBOROUGH T/5 EDWARD L. Palm Harbor. Nashville. Pennsylvania 8 February 1945. Austin. Tennessee 17 December 1944. Ohio 20 October 1944. Texas 17 December 1944. Wayne. WILLIAM E. NUTTAL Sgt. La Grange. Pennsylvania 17 December 1944. John M. Lexington. SOWERS. FRANYA Cpl JAY C. Pennsylvania 17 January 1945. Indiana 17 December 1944. Crown Point. Tennessee 18 April 1945. T/5 EDWARD C. CHESTER E. West Point. Hamilton. PEBSWORTH Sgt. CROWELL Pfc PARMER R GUNTER Pfc. Woodbury. Indiana 17 December 1944. THOMAS Pfc JOHN E. Philadelphia. Pensacola. ELLIOTT Pvt. BEATY Sgt. Barney J. SMITH. F1orida 20 December 1944. Norway. Georgia 21 July 1944. Indiana 17 December 1944. Wilson Cover Pfc. Pvt. McQUISTON. Whitleyville. Atlanta. Iowa 20 October 1944. SANDERS Cpl JAMES S. Oklahoma 18 December 1944. JOHN W. Florida ””” Page 26 ””” . Morristown. Wesoly Source of Material Morning Reports & Unit History Advisors Battalion Staff LEST WE FORGET Sgt ROBERT A. Tennessee 29 December 1944. BRADLEY Pvt. Ft.

Pe Ell. Texas 1? December 1944. REEDY Pvt. Georgia 17 December 1944. KING. Tennessee 17 December 1944. WADE K. Beattyville. Ohio 17 December 1944. SHERVIN V. LEO J. Montana 5 April 1945. Cleveland. Grayson. LOCKE Pvt. Austin. EDWARD KLIMEK Pvt. Indiana 17 December 1944. Henderson. MENEM Pvt. Pvt. WADIA K. MILLINER. PARMELY Pvt. WILLIAM D. NORDELL OGDEN Pvt. Columbus. Kentucky 16 April 1945. 23 February 1945. HOMER E. SORTEBERG Pvt. Kentucky 12 August 1944. SAMUELSON. KROLL Pvt. EVERETT H. Ramer. Pvt. Odum. 20 October 1944. THOMAS M. Illinois ””” Page 27 ””” . JAMES M.””” LEST WE FORGET ””” LEST WE FORGET Pvt. Washington 17 December 1944. Kewanee. Milwaukee.

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