Facultad de Idiomas

English Syllabus
For Nutrition Students

Designed by: Aurora Espinoza Lara D Guiot

Justification: This syllabus is directed to nutrition students, by the end of this course, they will improve their skills to communicate effectively in the English language in an easy way. Also they will have a better development at work, and a wider knowledge of the culture. The natural approach is based on the theory that language acquisition occurs only when students receive comprehensible input. The emphasis is on reading and listening comprehension for beginning students. The ten units cover language acquisition, classroom implications on the field, oral communication and improvement through acquisition, dynamic, interactive activities, additional sources of input for cultural knowledge while they interact with others in the field.

General Objectives: 1. Communicate effectively and understand the second language. 2. Apply the knowledge acquired in the course into the professional environment. 3. To develop reflective, analysis and positive attitudes during the course. 4. Evaluate students constantly. Theoretical Framework: Unit 1 1.1. Introduction to Nutrition 1.2. Food Guide Pyramid 1.3. Diet Planning Principles 1.4. Nutrition Labeling: 1.4.1 RDA 1.4.2.DRI Objectives: By the end of this unit, student will be able to: 1. Describe how to properly design individualized eating plans by utilizing diet planning principles, the Food Guide Pyramid, Exchange System and other food guide plans that incorporate personal food preferences. 2. Explain the function of the RDA, DRI, and Tolerable Upper Intake Level. Unit 2 2.1. Digestion Objectives: By the end of this unit, student will be able to: 1. Describe the scientific method, various types of research. Locate referred journal articles using the internet. 2. Describe the digestive system, its functions, including problems that it encounters and solves during the digestive process. Identify the hormones involved in regulating digestion.

Unit 3 3.1. Carbohydrates 3.2. Proteins Objectives: By the end of this unit, student will be able to: 1. Explain the differences between and identify energy- and non energy-yielding nutrients. Identify the functions of phytochemicals. 2. Distinguish between simple and complex carbohydrates in form and function and the health effects associated with carbohydrate intake including fiber and sugar intake. Describe the hormonal regulation of blood sugar and other factors affecting blood sugar. Unit4 4.1. Lipids 4.2.1. Malnutrition 4.2.2. Diseases Objectives: By the end of this unit, student will be able to: 1. Differentiate between members of the lipid family - triglycerides, phospholipids, and sterols - in form and function and the health effects associated with lipid intake, especially the factors increasing serum triglyceride and cholesterol. Identify effects and sources of omega 3 and omega 6 fatty acids. 2. Describe protein form and function, define essential amino acids, and explain the health effects of protein intake, including Protein Energy Malnutrition as well as how vegetarians and non - vegetarians obtain adequate protein. Unit 5 5.1. Metabolism 5.1.1 Alcohol 5.2. Energy Balance & Body Comp 5.3. Weight Management Objectives: By the end of this unit, student will be able to: 1. Explain the steps involved in metabolism and the ways energy is derived from carbohydrate, fat, and protein, including the consequences of consuming too much and too little energy, too little carbohydrate. Describe alcohol metabolism. 2. Describe the factors associated with weight control, including causes of obesity, methods of assessing body weight and composition, and good and poor treatments for obesity. Unit 6 6.1. Water-Soluble Vitamins 6.2. Fat-Soluble Vitamins 6.3. Vitamins, cont.

Objectives: By the end of this unit, student will be able to: 1. Explain the differences between water and fat-soluble vitamins, including how each one functions in the body, the deficiency/toxicity symptoms, and major food sources. 2. State which vitamins have antioxidant effects and identify those effects. Unit 7 7.1. Water Minerals 7.2. Major Minerals 7.3. Race Minerals Objectives: By the end of this unit, student will be able to: 1. Explain the differences between major and minor minerals, including how each one functions in the body, the deficiency/toxicity symptoms, and major food sources. 2. Describe the function of water in the body and the ways electrolytes/fluids are balanced and maintained in the body. Unit 8 8.1. Eating Disorders 8.2. Physic activity and lifestyle Objectives: By the end of this unit, student will be able to: 1. Provide accurate information regarding vitamin/mineral supplementation and the use of ergogenic aids in athletic performance. 2. State the benefits associated with physical activity, the components of a sound fitness or health program, and the fuels that are necessary for physical performance and daily activity. Unit 9 9.1. Physic activity and lifestyle 9.2. Diseases and diets 9.3. Minerals and others Objectives: By the end of this unit, student will be able to: 1. Describe how nutrition and lifestyle choices impact the life cycle before and during pregnancy, during lactation and infancy, during childhood and adolescence, and through adulthood and aging. 2. Explain the impact of nutrition and lifestyle choices on the immune system and on diseases such as cardiovascular disease, cancer, AIDS, and diabetes. Unit 10 10.1. Life Cycle Nutrition 10.2. Food Safety

Objectives: By the end of this unit, student will be able to: 1. Describe nutrition issues surrounding food safety and consumer concerns, including how to handle, store, and prepare foods safely, how water is treated, and how food additives such as MSG, create problems for some people who consume them. 2. Apply knowledge gained from the class that supports healthy lifestyles to their own lives and the lives of their families. Taken from: Austin Community College, TX. [http://www5.austincc.edu/faculty/syllabus.php?id=213855]

Methodology: By and large, communicate effectively in English language is the key to be successful nowadays. The way to acquire the language is more effectively when the approach is natural according to the sets of messages that you want to transmit. The Natural Approach by Teller and Krashen, is the most suitable for the specific purpose of these students as they receive comprehensible input. People acquire language best from messages that are just slightly beyond their current competence. Grammar rules are learned unconsciously and this provides confidence in the students.