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XXXXXXX
8 | april 2011
SENIOR EDITOR
RACHEL MORGAN
DESIGN DIRECTOR
IVYLISE SIMONES
WRITERS
MEREDITH
BENNETT-SMITH
ALEX CACIOPPO
CHARLOTTE GARDEN
ANDREW GUARINI
MEREDITH HOFFMAN
NATALIE HOWARD
CHIU-TI JANSEN
EVA KARAGIORGAS
CHELSIA MARCIUS
RACHEL OHM
DAISY PRINCE
ALEXIS THOMAN
RUDISILL
SYDNEY SARACHAN
FASHION CONTRIBUTORS
PRISCILLA POLLEY
COCO MELLORS
CONTRIBUTING
PHOTOGRAPHERS
MICHAEL CHIMENTO
CHAD GRIFFITH

SENIOR DESIGNERS
LAUREN DRAPER
SCOTT DVORIN
PUBlISHER
ROBYN WEISS
SAlES
SPENCER SHARP
BETTY LEDERMAN
DAN D’ANDREA
MITCHELL BEDELL
DAVID BENDAYAN
PAUL KORNBLUEH
KAREN KOSSMAN
MICHELE MORGAN
ALEXANDER NUCKEL
DAVID M. WOLFF

OBSERVER MEDIA GROUP
PUBlISHER
JARED KUSHNER
PRESIDENT
CHRISTOPHER BARNES
EXECUTIVE V.P.
BARRY LEWIS
ASSOCIATE PUBlISHER
JAMIE FORREST
V.P. ADVERTISING
STEPHEN GOLDBERG
V.P. SAlES AND
MARKETING
DAVID GURSKY
ClASSIFIED
ADVERTISING DIRECTOR
KEN NEWMAN
MARKETING MANAGER
JILL GUTEKUNST
V.P. CIRCUlATION
KRATOS VOS
PRODUCTION MANAGER
TYLER RUSH
PHOTO EDITOR
PETER LETTRE
ADVERTISING
PRODUCTION
LISA MEDCHILL
CIRCUlATION
ALEXANDRA ENDERLE
PETER PARRIS
CARLOS RODRIGUEZ
editor’s note
26
W
elcome to the second issue of NYO
Magazine, the Observer Media Group’s
newest publication. We had a great time
chatting with our cover star Dylan lauren, the perfect
example of a New York entrepreneur who built a $20
million candy empire on her own. We spoke to Kurt
Gutenbrunner, who started of in a small Austrian
town and went on to become one of New York’s most
infuential chefs, and Robert A.M. Stern, one of the
greatest architects of the 21
st
century. Then there were
the people who know where to get a good meal and the
best place for drinks—the concierges of the Plaza, the
Carlyle and the Mark. We visited the power break-
fast at the Regency and explored the late Alexander
McQueen’s exhibit at the Met. We covered art, dining,
restaurateurs, architecture, culture, real estate, busi-
ness and the larger than life personalities of the city.
Rachel Morgan ,
Senior Editor
Scholten Japanese Art
145 West 58th Street, suite 6D
New York, NY 10019
tel. 212.585.0474
fax. 212.585.0475
info@scholten-japanese-art.com
www.scholten-japanese-art.com
NYO_MAG2_PXX_EditorsNote.indd 8 4/1/11 9:04:13 AM
02098_06 / NEW YORK OBSERVER MAGAZINE / COLOUR
COPY DATE: 29 MARCH / TRIM: 273.05 x 225.298 / TYPE: 247.65 x 200.025 / PROOF: 1
New York
Magnifcent Jewels
April 12
Sale 2433
Viewing:
April 9–11
Rahul Kadakia
rkadakia@christies.com
+1 212 636 2300
Russian Art
April 13
Sale 2434
Viewing:
April 9–13
Ksenya Malina
kmalina@christies.com
+1 212 636 2260
500 Years:
Decorative Arts Europe,
Including Oriental Carpets
April 14–15
Sale 2435
Viewing:
April 9–15
Carolina M. Richards
cmrichards@christies.com
+1 212 636 2202
christies.com
Auction Calendar
New York · April 2011
A MAsteR At WoRK
A Trumbauer Estate on the
Philadelphia Main Line
April 15
Sale 2504
Viewing:
April 9–15
Laura e. Armstrong
learmstrong@christies.com
+1 212 636 2434
Prints and Multiples
April 26–27
Sale 2436
Viewing:
April 21–25
Lindsay Griffth
lgriffth@christies.com
+1 212 636 2290
Ceramics by Pablo Picasso:
An Important
Private Collection
April 27
Sale 2523
Viewing:
April 21–25
tudor Davies
tdavies@christies.com
+1 212 636 2290
Sale 2523 Lot 149 · Pablo Picasso · Aztec Vase with Four Faces (A. R. 402) · White earthenware vase painted in blue, beige and white, 1957 · $30,000–50,000
REGISTRATION IS EASY
Register to bid in person or by telephone by calling our Bid Department at +1 212 636 2437. If you are unable to attend
the auction, visit christies.com to arrange for absentee and online bids. Also available on christies.com are the international
auction calendar, online catalogues, and a full listing of upcoming valuation days around the globe.
CHRISTIE’S NEW YORK 20 Rockefeller Plaza, New York, NY 10020
Join us for the presale exhibitions and auctions, all of which are free and open to the public
Monday–saturday 10am–5pm and sunday 1pm–5pm.
For specifc viewing times, please call +1 212 636 2000.
©

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christies.indd 1 3/31/11 3:32:07 PM
14 People The Upper
East Side’s most eligible
millionaires.
16 Neighborhood Buzz
Revisit your favorite
neighborhood in the city.
18 People Meet the
concierge of the Plaza,
the Mark and the
Carlyle.
24 Cover Dylan Lauren
shares the sweet secrets
to her success, her
impending nuptials and
what it was like growing
up with Ralph Lauren as
her dad.
32 Art Meet the next
generation of China’s
millionaires.
36 artist profiles Four
emerging artists sound
of on their technique,
recent shows and what
inspires them.
44 Art Get a sneak peak at
the upcoming Alexander
McQueen exhibit at the
Met.
48 Collector Meet a
local art collector with
a surprising connection
to Andy Warhol.
52 Art Explore the
nearly-completed
Museum of African Art.
57 Philanthropy
Carnegie Hall shakes
things up with this
year’s gala.
58 Places Step back in
time at an iconic Upper
East Side barbershop.
60 On the town See
Patrick McMullan’s
favorite party shots
from this season.
62 Fashion An up-and-
coming design duo
makes their mark.
65 Fashion Get
fashion tips from
Bloomingdale’s resident
expert.
66 Chef Meet the man
behind the stove at Cafe
Sabarsky.
70 Food column Eva
Karagiorgas’ picks for
best brunch on the
Upper East Side.
72 Food Hear the story
behind the Regency’s
Power Breakfast.
contents
XXXXXXX
10 | april 2011
24 70 58
62 36
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74 Wine Gary
Vaynerchuk discusses
the intersection
between social media
and wine.
76 Architecture
Robert A.M. Stern
talks about designing
classic buildings on
the Upper East Side
78 Architecture Hear
the stories behind
the neighborhood’s
most magnifcant
mansions.
80 Interior Design
Design scion Celerie
Kemble talks about
her newest projects in
the Manhattan House.
86 Real estate The
experts’ take on the
real estate climate on
the Upper East Side.
96 Fitness Get the
skinny on the
neighborhood’s
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112 Philanthropy Meet
the woman behind the
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known charity.
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contents
12 | april 2011
96
NYO_MAG2_PXX_TOC.indd 12 4/1/11 9:05:57 AM
Date: March 22, 2011
Project: Lucida
Publication: NY Observer Magazine
Issue: 04.06.2011
Specs: FP 4C
Trim Size: 8.25 in × 10.75 in
File Name: Lucida_NYO_040611_FP.pdf
GD: Kristine
For approval, please sign and date below
Art: Date:
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XXXXXXX
14 | april 2011
NYO
Harry LeFrak
Bio: The brainy Harry works
under papa Richard LeFrak,
who heads up the LeFrak
Organization. While a regular
on the gala-and-beneft circuit,
the Upper East Side bachelor is a
bit camera shy with not much of a
storied past in the way of dating.
While he may not be your typical
all-American bachelor, we think
his awkward grin is just adorable.
Watering HoLe: LeFrak’s
out-on-the-town sightings are
G-rated; any upscale Upper East
Side eatery, or the New York
Botanical Garden’s 10th Annual
Winter Wonderland Ball (which
he attended with socialite Alex
Kramer in the past), assuming
you can snag an invite.
Future MotHer-in-LaW: An
avid dog lover, Karen LeFrak
once squealed with delight when
she learned a potential girlfriend
shared a birthday with the fam-
ily schnauzer. She’s also just
published her third children’s
book about dogs, aptly titled Best
in Show. Prepare for your new
BFF, as Mrs. LeFrak has been
anxiously awaiting her baby
boy’s new wifey. Get ready to log
some serious hours at Bergdorf’s,
mother-in-law in tow, of course.
topper MortiMer
Bio: Ah, Topper. This second-
round bachelor has the boyish,
Ivy League good looks that seem
to be inborn with a blue-blooded
upbringing. A charmer on his be-
loved Upper East Side, he’s not the
type of guy you’d go backpacking
through Europe with. We hear
he’s great friends with the Santo
Domingos, and while he would
probably resist traveling outside
the Upper East Side, he would go
anywhere with that clan—on their
yacht, of course. No doubt the
Topper/Tinsley divorce human-
ized this playboy—he even had a
“downtown moment,” growing a
beard for about fve minutes. It al-
most made us long for the perfect
Upper East Side society couple
to reunite, which didn’t happen.
Topper is back on the market, and
Tory Burch–clad 20-somethings
everywhere are rejoicing.
past: Everyone knows of Topper
and socialite–turned–fashion de-
signer Tinsley Mortimer. Lesson
learned: When you have an Upper
East Side pedigree, marriage at
age 18 is a bit frowned upon by
your well-to-do parentals. Even
annulling the marriage, attend-
ing universities in New York and
getting married later didn’t work
for this duo. When it comes to tak-
ing sides in this breakup, we’re on
Team Topper. After all, who would
want to spend their marriage al-
ways playing second fddle to
Patrick McMullan? Topper then
embarked on a romance with
Vogue-er Valerie Boster, but the
romance had roughly the same
shelf life as the September issue.
He then moved on to Meredith
Ostrom. But in our book, Topper
is still a bachelor, at least until he
puts a ring on it.
Watering HoLe: Velvet ropes
part for Topper—and we hear he’s
practically the patron saint of the
Boom Boom Room.
Future MotHer in LaW: Mrs.
Mortimer is the family stalwart,
and upholds loyalty above all else.
While she at frst may be tough to
crack, once you’re in, you’re in.
Unless, of course, you marry her
son at age 18, annul the marriage,
remarry a few years later and
make a career frequenting the
How to Marry a Millionaire
The most eligible bachelors in New York aren’t easy. You need to have the pedigree, the looks, the
right social circle, and most importantly, get along with the future mother-in-law. Below is our guide
on how to snag a millionaire of your very own. By Rachel MoRgan • illustRation By scott dvoRin
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Millionaire.indd 14 4/1/11 10:20:45 AM
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april 2011 | 15
NYO
social circuit, only to divorce her
heartbroken baby boy. Then, only
then, may she not like you.
Winston Lapham
Bio: The adorable Winnie has
made it his business to get well
acquainted with the journal-
ism industry. The Lapham
family made their fortune in the
publishing industry, as Winnie’s
dad, Lewis Lapham, was the ed-
itor of Harper’s Magazine for
two separate stints and is now
the magazine’s editor emeritus.
Winnie hangs out with the likes of
the Bloomingdales and Hearsts.
past: Winnie has made the
rounds—in the publishing indus-
try, that is. This low-key bachelor
dated magazine scion Amanda
Hearst for three years before the
pair split in 2008. Winnie, how-
ever, wasn’t left crying in his
Pellegrino. He went on to ro-
mance department store heiress
Hayley Bloomingdale. The pair
is still happily in coupledom.
Both Bloomingdale and Hearst
were featured in Vanity Fair’s
Fortune’s Children photo shoot.
Awkward much?
Watering hoLe: Upper East Side
eatery Amaranth.
Future mother in LaW: As
Winnie is her baby boy, Joan
Lapham is naturally protective.
The other Lapham siblings mar-
ried a prince and the daughter
of the former prime minster of
Canada, respectively, so there’s a
lot to live up to.
nat rothschiLd
Bio: Rothschild is a true down-
towner. But don’t be fooled. Hon
Nathaniel Philip Victor James
Rothschild, otherwise known at
Nat, isn’t lacking in funds. The
British-born bachelor attended
Eton and Oxford and is now the
chairman of JNR Unlimited, but
has also held posts at hedge fund
Atticus Capital. A businessman
with a British accent with an af-
fnity for planes? We’re in.
past: Also a second-round bach-
elor, Nat was married to model
Annabelle Neilson for two years.
The pair divorced in 1998. And
word is, the ex–in-laws aren’t
friendly. Elizabeth Neilson, Nat’s
former mother-in-law told the
Daily Mail that Nat was “a very
naughty boy.” We can’t decide if
that’s a point for or against.
Watering hoLe: Trendy West
Village restaurants.
Future mother in LaW: The
baby of the family, Nat’s moth-
er is English lady Serena
Rothschild, granddaughter to
Sir James Dunn, Canadian in-
dustrialist and fnancier. Once
you’re in with the mother, you
can bet on enjoying holiday
at the family place in Corfu,
Greece. We hear it’s like the
party house in high school—
that is, if all the high-school kids
grew up to become billionaires,
CEOs and heads of state.
Jamie Johnson
Bio: The Johnson & Johnson heir
started a flm career based on
being Born Rich, also the title of his
Emmy-nominated 2003 HBO doc-
umentary, a move that defnitely
alienated some in his social cir-
cle. Johnson also writes an online
series or Vanity Fair on the same
subject. Oh, the irony. This hand-
some, N.Y.U.-educated flmmaker
seems to be more of a risk-taker than
his fellow bachelors.
past: Johnson formerly dated
Jessica Jofe, a model redhead em-
ployed at none other than The New
York Observer some years ago.
Watering hoLe: This N.Y.U. grad
shuns the Upper East Side in favor
of the underground East Village
bar circuit.
Future mother in LaW: Not your
typical Upper East Side mother.
Gretchen Johnson is very arty—
and is also a risk-taker, but in art.
Word is that she was an early be-
liever in Robert Mapplethorpe.
It seems the whole family has the
tendency to go against the grain, as
his father, James Loring Johnson,
partially funded a documenta-
ry about South African apartheid
and economic unfairness and was
widely criticized by members of
the Johnson & Johnson clan. g
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It’s like the party house
in high school—that is, if all
the high-school kids grew
up to become billionaires,
CEOs and heads of state.
Harry lefrak
jamie joHnson
Millionaire.indd 15 4/1/11 10:21:06 AM
the
Upper East Side
rediscover
16 | april 2011
NYO
UES nEighborhood bUzz
1
2
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At Sant Ambroeus, brunch is a formal afair—
and it’s no surprise considering the eatery’s Mi-
lan roots. While sipping their world renowned
cappuccino or munching on Salmone Af-
fumicato or Omelete Della Casa, be prepared
to see a few famous faces. Careful attention
has been paid down to the smallest detail, from
foral arrangements to the temperature of the
cofee. And to us, success is in the details (1000
Madison Ave., 212-570-2211).
K Chocolatier is the second generation of the
storied Krön Chocolatier, opened by Tom and
Diane Krön in 1973. But this wasn’t your aver-
age chocolate shop—it served society elite such
as Jacqueline Kennedy, Katherine Hepburn,
Andy Warhol and Richard Avedon. Their reci-
pes dated back three generations on Tom’s side,
whose great-grandfather was chocolatier to
Emperor Franz Josef of Austro-Hungary. But
it was Tom himself who invented the chocolate-
covered strawberry, an impressive feat in itself.
But in 1983, the pair retired and sold the shop.
Lucky for us, they weren’t done forever with the
chocolate business. Diane opened K Chocolati-
er in 2000 and has been perfecting her already-
perfect recipes ever since. It’s downright sinful
not to stop in (19 East 69th St., 212-861-2111).
Nothing says the Upper East Side like French
retailer Hermès. This neighborhood staple
is home to the coveted Birken and Kelly
bags—named after two very famous society
ladies, respectively—and carries everything
one Upper East Sider needs to ft the part—the
Birken bag, signature Hermès perfume, top-
of-the-line housewares, shoes, even tiny, yet
supremely pricey cuf links. Status cufs, if you
will (691 Madison Ave., 212-751-3181).
Pickles & Olives, Etc. is one specialty store not
to be missed. The cornichons, made from tiny
gherkin cucumbers, are especially satisfying,
as are the kosher dill. Feeling adventurous? Go
for the giardiniera, a mix of pickled vegetables.
Pickles & Olives, Etc. is Snooki’s dream house
of various pickled items—while there are olives
too, as the name denotes, it is the pickles that are
really the showstopper (1647 First Ave. between
85th and 86th streets, 212- 717-8966).
Walk through the doors of this little nook of a
shop and enter the wide world of buttons. Ten-
der Buttons, a seamstress and craft enthusiast’s
dream world, still can amaze those who have
never thought much about the button, with
its rows upon rows of shiny, perfectly round,
one-of-a-kind fasteners. Antique, jeweled,
hand-painted, carved ivory are just a few of the
materials you’ll see. Tender Buttons is a store
dedicated to the art, craftsmanship, design, cre-
ativity, ingenuity and functional elegance of this
formerly underrepresented bauble (143 East
62nd St., 212-758-7004).
The Silver Peacock is a true gem of an antique
store. Opened in 2009, it is the brainchild of
two interior design veterans—Charlie Akwa,
former owner of Elegant Egg Cup; and Jennifer
Flanders, formerly of interior design company
Cullman & Kravis. The store itself is everything
a home interior store should be, as every item is
hand-selected by the co-owners—it’s like having
your very own interior designer. The inven-
tory mostly hails from European designers like
Nason Moretti and Hermès, and bridal registries
are welcome. After shopping, kick back at the
wine and cappuccino bar in the back (1110 Park
Ave. at 89th St., 212-426-2610).
It might be hard for some to create a sense
of intimacy in a 22,000-square-foot space,
but not for the new Ralph Lauren store at
888 Madison Avenue. Majestic glass doors
welcome shoppers into four foors of retail
decadence.
This new fagship Ralph Lauren store is
something even the brand’s most loyal followers
have never seen before. It’s the frst Ralph Lau-
ren location to carry only the brand’s women
and home collections. The footwear salon chan-
nels the opulence of the French Rococo era,
and the grand salon houses the latest runway
collection in a space made to feel like a high-end
Upper East Side apartment.
Also unique to this store are its watch and
fne jewelry salon, the only place of its kind
in the United States, and its display of Ralph
Lauren Collection Sleepwear. The line of silk
and cashmere nightwear for women is exclusive
to this new fagship location.
Ralph Lauren revamps the shopping experi-
ence with this new store on the Upper East Side.
The comfort of home with the variety of a de-
partment store? Sign me up (212-434-8000).
Upper East Siders are privileged in more ways than one — most notably, to have
some of New York’s best retail and restaurants right at their fngertips. We’ve compiled a list
of our favorite Upper East Side spots below. So go ahead, rediscover the neighborhood!
ByCharlotteGarden,NatalieHowardandRachelMorgan•PhotosbyMichaelChimento
1.RalphLaurenstoreat888Madision.
2.Pickles&Olives,Etc.
3.Hermèsat691Madison.
4.TenderButtons
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NYO_MAG2_PXX_NeiborhoodBuzz3.indd 16 4/1/11 9:09:40 AM
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Upper East Side
april 2011 | 17
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1.RalphLaurenstoreat888Madision.
2.Pickles&Olives,Etc.
3.Hermèsat691Madison.
4.TenderButtons
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NYO_MAG2_PXX_NeiborhoodBuzz3.indd 17 4/1/11 9:10:03 AM
the
Upper East Side
april 2011 | 17
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1.RalphLaurenstoreat888Madision.
2.Pickles&Olives,Etc.
3.Hermèsat691Madison.
4.TenderButtons
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NYO_MAG2_PXX_NeiborhoodBuzz3.indd 17 4/1/11 9:10:03 AM
KEYS
to the City
Meet the most powerful men in
New York—concierge of the Carlyle,
the manager of the Mark and the
chef concierge of the Plaza
By Coco Mellors
It helps to have friends in high
places, or in this case, behind a front
desk. The best way to reap the benefits of
hotel life in the city you live in is to know
the concierge.
We visited three of the Upper East Side’s
most luxurious hotels—the Mark, the Car-
lyle and the Plaza—to pick the brains of the
men who make it their business to know the
city better than the natives. These concierge
have seen it all—tracking down live taran-
tulas, drawing a bath of pure Evian water or
delivering a wedding dress via plane.
Read on for our concierge’s top picks for
lunch, dinner and dancing and prepare to
be pampered.
18 | APRIL
NYO_MAG2_PXX_PeopleYouNeed.indd 18 4/1/11 9:07:50 AM
Studios, Alcove Studios, 1, 2 and 3 Bedrooms from $2,300 (Net effective rent)
1 block to Lexington Ave subway · 3 blocks to Central Park & The Reservoir · Green building – LEED · NYC's first smoke free residences
16,500 SF of gardens and green roofs designed by Lee Weintraub · Building wide water filtration · 24/7 concierge-attended lobby
Extended-hours fitness center with TechnoGym equipment including 4-station Kinesis™ wall (Open 5AM-Midnight)
Rooftop club with indoor & outdoor fireplaces · Bosch W/D in every residence · Floor-to-ceiling windows
Custom window treatments · WiFi café and conference room/library overlooking landscaped garden
Children's playroom with original artwork by Iza Trapani · On-site garage with valet parking
www.1510Lex.com · 212.348.0500 · No Fee · On-Site Leasing (10AM-6PM, 7 Days/Week)
Resort Living @ Home
IN NYC’S FIRST SMOKE FREE RENTAL RESIDENCE
Professionally-Landscaped Green Roof Park WiFi Pocket Park and Adjoining Café
WiFi Café with Fireplace Overlooking Landscaped Pocket Park Extended-Hours Fitness Center with 4-Station Kinesis™ Wall
Rooftop Club with Indoor and Outdoor Fireplaces Typical Living Room with Open Loft Kitchen
Carnegie Hill Place offers the one-stop convenience of more than 650 Upper East Side residences
in three luxurious rental buildings with a wide variety of amenities, price points and 12 models.
All buildings are owner developed, operated and maintained. www.CarnegieHillPlace.com
28183_NYObsvrRentalMag_FullPg_032211_032211 3/29/11 12:17 PM Page 1
1510 Lex.indd 1 3/31/11 3:43:50 PM
KEYS
to the City
Meet the most powerful men in
New York—concierge of the Carlyle,
the manager of the Mark and the
chef concierge of the Plaza
By Coco Mellors
It helps to have friends in high
places, or in this case, behind a front
desk. The best way to reap the benefits of
hotel life in the city you live in is to know
the concierge.
We visited three of the Upper East Side’s
most luxurious hotels—the Mark, the Car-
lyle and the Plaza—to pick the brains of the
men who make it their business to know the
city better than the natives. These concierge
have seen it all—tracking down live taran-
tulas, drawing a bath of pure Evian water or
delivering a wedding dress via plane.
Read on for our concierge’s top picks for
lunch, dinner and dancing and prepare to
be pampered.
18 | APRIL
NYO_MAG2_PXX_PeopleYouNeed.indd 18 4/1/11 9:07:50 AM
Studios, Alcove Studios, 1, 2 and 3 Bedrooms from $2,300 (Net effective rent)
1 block to Lexington Ave subway · 3 blocks to Central Park & The Reservoir · Green building – LEED · NYC's first smoke free residences
16,500 SF of gardens and green roofs designed by Lee Weintraub · Building wide water filtration · 24/7 concierge-attended lobby
Extended-hours fitness center with TechnoGym equipment including 4-station Kinesis™ wall (Open 5AM-Midnight)
Rooftop club with indoor & outdoor fireplaces · Bosch W/D in every residence · Floor-to-ceiling windows
Custom window treatments · WiFi café and conference room/library overlooking landscaped garden
Children's playroom with original artwork by Iza Trapani · On-site garage with valet parking
www.1510Lex.com · 212.348.0500 · No Fee · On-Site Leasing (10AM-6PM, 7 Days/Week)
Resort Living @ Home
IN NYC’S FIRST SMOKE FREE RENTAL RESIDENCE
Professionally-Landscaped Green Roof Park WiFi Pocket Park and Adjoining Café
WiFi Café with Fireplace Overlooking Landscaped Pocket Park Extended-Hours Fitness Center with 4-Station Kinesis™ Wall
Rooftop Club with Indoor and Outdoor Fireplaces Typical Living Room with Open Loft Kitchen
Carnegie Hill Place offers the one-stop convenience of more than 650 Upper East Side residences
in three luxurious rental buildings with a wide variety of amenities, price points and 12 models.
All buildings are owner developed, operated and maintained. www.CarnegieHillPlace.com
28183_NYObsvrRentalMag_FullPg_032211_032211 3/29/11 12:17 PM Page 1
1510 Lex.indd 1 3/31/11 3:43:50 PM
20 | APRIL
NYO
PEOPLE
the carlyle hotel
head concierge
Dwight Owsley
Where would you send hotel guests
for lunch or dinner?
Café Boulud and Orsay are wonderful.
3 Guys [Restaurant] on Madison; I have
lunch there every other day. Swifty’s
is a New York institution. For dinner,
Paola’s Restaurant and Sfoglia.
Your recommendation for a night of
drinks and dancing?
Well, obviously the Carlyle, our restau-
rant and especially our bar, which is one
of the best bars in town.
What exactly does your role entail?
You never know what the day is going to
hold, so you have to be ready to plug into
anything. Since our clientele are some of
the most cosmopolitan in the world, they
might want to discuss the opera, ballet, a
Knicks game, the theater or some Of Of
Broadway show, so you have to be ready
to think outside the box in terms of
entertainment and dining. As I learned
years ago from my mentors, you have
to be able to divorce what your tastes
are from your clients, and many people
cannot do that. You have to learn your
clients’ taste—sometimes what they
think they want is also not what’s going
to make them happy.
What’s the strangest request you’ve
ever received?
One client needed her wedding dress de-
livered to her in London, so we had to put
an employee on the Concorde to bring
it to her by hand while it was still being
beaded. He was back in time for dinner.
Things like that used to happen with
some regularity in the Concorde days.
general manager
of the mark hotel
Olivier Lordonnois
Where would you send hotel guests for lunch or
dinner?
Definitely ABC Kitchen, which is a new restaurant
opened by our chef Jean-Georges in the ABC Carpet
& Home. The Lion is a great restaurant downtown
with excellent food. On the Upper East Side, there
are so many hidden gems ,too, like Caravaggio by the
Whitney Museum or Sushi of Gari, which is some of
the best sushi in the city. It’s really simple in terms of
décor, but the food is exquisite. For Saturday brunch,
everyone’s at Le Bilboquet.
Your recommendation for a night of drinks and
dancing?
Bars like the Boom Boom Room are still very popular
with our guests.
What exactly does your role entail?
Dealing with all the operations around the hotel and
making sure our guests are enjoying themselves. A
large part of it is sales and marketing and making
sure new customers and clients are coming to the
hotel. It’s a very social job; you’re interacting with cli-
ents or guests at the restaurant every day. You get to
be out there and meeting people as much as possible.
What’s the strangest request you’ve ever
received?
Once you get to a certain level, things stop being odd.
I remember one guest wanted a bath of only Evian
water, for example .
the plaza hotel
chef concierge
Raphael Pallais
Where would you send hotel guests for
lunch or dinner?
Daniel. Or the really trendy Asian restau-
rant Geisha. On Madison there is the famous
Italian restaurant Nello’s, which Upper East
Siders have been going to forever.
Your recommendation for a night of
drinks and dancing?
Lavo, which has a nightclub next door. The
scene there is explosive; it’s virtually impos-
sible to get a table there.
What exactly does your role entail?
People come to you to help you organize
their entire stay. You have to be aware of
everything that’s going on. You also have
to be psychological and be able to match
what’s going on with who is asking.
What’s the strangest request you’ve
ever received?
One of the strangest things was that a fam-
ily once asked me where to find live taran-
tulas that they could take home to roast and
eat. Now, edible tarantulas are very dif cult
to find. But I remembered that the Ex-
plorer’s Club hosts a dinner and they served
them on a skewer. So I contacted them and
managed to get them from Colombia. See,
you never say no.
CONCIERGE’SPICKS
Café Boulud
20 East 76th St.
Orsay
1057 Lexington
Ave.
3 Guys
Restaurant
1381 Madison Ave.
Swifty’S
1007 Lexington
Ave.
Paola’s
Restaurant
1295 Madison Ave.
Sfoglia
1402 Lexington Ave.
Daniel
60 East 65th St.
Geisha
33 East 61st St.
Nello’s
696 Madison Ave.
Lavo
39 East 58th St.
The Explorer’s
Club
46 East 70th St.
ABC Kitchen
35 East 18th St.
The Lion
62 W Ninth St.
Caravaggio
23 East 74th St.
Sushi of Gari
402 East 78th St.
Le Bilboquet
25 East 63rd St.
The Boom
Boom Room
848 Washington St.
NYO_MAG2_PXX_PeopleYouNeed.indd 20 4/1/11 9:08:40 AM
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behind the
24 | april 2011
Candy
Candy
dylan.indd 24 4/1/11 9:41:14 AM
behind the
24 | april 2011
Candy
Candy
dylan.indd 24 4/1/11 9:41:14 AM
behind the
Dylan Lauren,
the Ralph Lauren
heir who set out on
her own sweet
business venture
by Daisy Prince
P H OT O S BY C H A D G R I F F I T H
dylan.indd 25 4/1/11 9:40:09 AM
COVERSTORY
26 | APRIL
NYO
I
t is comforting to know that despite Dylan
Lauren’s gilded upbringing, successful
business and recent engagement to hand-
some hedge fund manager Paul Arrouet,
she is not entirely without a couple of
quirks, one being a fascination with stufed
rabbits.
Lauren is a little self-conscious about her
leporine fixation.
“Yup, you think I’m crazy,” she said when explaining
her commitment to her 3,000-piece collection of stufed
rabbits.
Her other passion is, expectedly, candy. She opened her
confectioner’s nirvana Dylan’s Candy Bar on the Upper
East Side in the bleak week following Sept. 11, and despite
austere beginnings, the company has grown to include
satellite locations in East Hampton and Garden City on
Long Island; Houston; and Orlando.
Lauren is a candy entrepreneur. She is focused on a
large-scale expansion, including a line of T-shirts, station-
ary and even a candy-themed stroller with luxury brand
Maclaren. This year, Lauren’s sweet business venture will
reputedly rake in $20 million.
Dylan’s Candy Bar contains 7,000 types of candy,
including oversize gummy bears, endless M&Ms and
gargantuan lollipops in all varieties.
Lauren talks about her brand in the obsessive way a
new mother talks about her first child; every conversation
loops back around to Dylan’s Candy Bar. Her company
also functions as her security blanket—any moment she
feels the conversation is straying into personal territory,
she steers it right back to candy.
While Lauren doesn’t like the term “controlling,” she will
admit to being a perfectionist who can spend hours choos-
ing between two diferent types of turquoise for a T-shirt.
“If my name is on a product then I want it to be perfect,”
she said.
It seems dif cult not to be a perfectionist growing up in
the Lauren clan. The Laurens talked about branding the
way the Kennedys talked about politics, she said. Dinner-
time conversation focused on work.
“My mom, my brother David, my brother Andrew,
we’re all creative,” she said. “It’s lots of artists, and there
is always a discussion. If my dad opens a store in Asia,
we discuss what kind of models he wants there, what the
clothing line should be. I’m doing a stroller with Maclaren
and everyone has diferent ideas about whether it should
have lollipop handles or candy cane handles.”
But Lauren didn’t go the usual route of summer intern-
ships to learn about business. Instead she traveled with
her parents, learning from their experience and friends.
She always knew her future lay in being an entrepreneur,
although she said she was never tempted to join the family
business.
“I always respected that my dad started his own com-
pany, [but] I wanted to start my own thing,” she said of not
following in his fashion footsteps. “My interest in fashion
was about color and design.”
It was her passion for color that lent itself to designing
Dylan’s Candy Bar.
“My parents said, ‘You love candy, make it like Disney-
land, make it big—don’t just open a little candy store, make
it over the top,” she said.
After visiting Dylan’s Candy Bar and taking in its over-
size, brightly colored wares and décor, it’s obvious that
Lauren took her parents’ advice. But to her, this business
venture isn’t just about candy.
“I don’t see it as a candy store, and very few people
understand that,” she said.
The seed for the venture was planted early. As a col-
lege student at Duke University, Lauren spent her time
browsing the shelves of North Carolina’s vast array of
24-hour supermarkets, checking out the new packaging
and cereals.
Lauren’s first venture into business was Dylan’s
Creative Events, an event-planning company, which
The Laurens talked about branding
the way the Kennedys talked about politics.
dylan.indd 26 4/1/11 9:41:40 AM
XXXXXXX
The Laurens talked about branding
the way the Kennedys talked about politics.
dylan.indd 27 4/1/11 9:41:58 AM
PB | april 2011
didn’t pan out because she felt constrained
by budgets and themes. Her next thought
was to open a cafe–art-gallery hybrid, which
featured pop artists, another venture into
color. Instead, she went the candy route.
But color was still on the forefront.
“I love color; I think they call it synes-
thesia,” she said, referencing a condition in
which one type of simulation produces the
sensation of another, so hearing music might
induce the visualization of a certain color.
While Lauren’s business venture was
funded by her father, that doesn’t mean she
takes it for granted.
“Dad put up the money,” she said. “But
it’s not like I live every day sitting back and
thinking that it’s just private money; I work
very hard.”
Initially, Lauren had a business partner,
Jef Rubin.
“He and I had different visions of where
the company should go,” she said. “We were
starting to open stores very fast, and I felt
Dylan’s Candy Bar should be specialized.
I wanted a more boutique and elegant
store. We still get along great and both love
candy—how many people do you know can
sing candy tunes?”
Ultimately, candy tunes weren’t enough to
hold them together. The business pair split in
2006 and Lauren continued on her venture
into Candyland alone.
On a personal note, one has to wonder: Just
how does Lauren maintain her physique as
the founder and CEO of a candy store? A self-
proclaimed ftness lover, Lauren claims she
eats just as much candy as she ever did, but
by adding weight training to her regime and
cutting out wheat products, she’s dropped the
baby fat she once had in college.
“I guess I realized that now that I’m the
spokesperson of my company, and have to be on
“I love color; I
think they call it
synesthesia.”
Clockwise from top:
Dylan and fancé
Paul Arrouet; Ricky
Lauren, Dylan Lauren
and Lauren Bush at
the Ralph Lauren
Collection Fall 2010
Fashion Show; Greg
Lauren, Elizabeth
Berkley, Dylan Lauren,
Olivia Palermo and
guest at the relaunch
celebration at Dylan’s
Candy Bar in October
2008; Dylan and
Ralph Lauren.
Cover Story
NYO
dylan.indd 28 4/1/11 9:43:06 AM
modern life
edward Hopper
and His time
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Edward Hopper (1882–1967), Self-Portrait, 1925–1930. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Josephine
N. Hopper Bequest 70.1165 © Heirs of Josephine N Hopper, licensed by the Whitney Museum of American Art.
Media Partner WNET.ORG
last
cHance!
closes
april 10
Hopper_NYObsAd.indd 1 3/31/11 5:21 PM
Whitney.indd 1 3/31/11 8:06:43 PM
The Today Show, I’d better look good,” she said.
While Lauren tends to err on the side
of cautious when discussing her personal
life, she does talk a bit about her upcoming
nuptials to French-born Paul Arrouet, who
manages Marblegate Assets, a hedge fund.
The couple has been together for four years
after being set up on a blind date.
Lauren seems excited if apprehensive
about getting married.
“I wouldn’t be with the guy I’m marrying if
he was a control freak or if he didn’t under-
stand my desire to put my business frst,” she
said. The wedding will take place in June at
her parents’ East Hampton Estate.
While it has its undeniable perks, being
a Lauren isn’t always easy. She admits that
there were certain demands that came with
growing up in the public eye.
“We’re a very grounded family, but I think
that there is a pressure to look a certain way and
go to a lot of events and travel places that you
might not want to travel,” she said. “But to me,
my dad’s just my dad.”
With marriage fast approaching, children
are certainly on her mind, as is the balance
between continuing to grow her business and
meeting the demands of a family.
“Much as I own a candy store, it’s for kids
and adults,” she said. “I would never be a
stay-at-home mom. I want to have it all. I
have very clear goals of where I want to take
my company.”
Catching my eye for second, she smiles.
“The good thing is if I do have kids they will
probably enjoy what I do.”
“I would never be a stay-at-home mom. I want to have it all.
I have very clear goals of where I want to take my company.”
Clockwise from top: Dylan
poses among the many
sweet treats available at
Dylan’s Candy Bar; Dylan’s
Candy Bar; and a model
at the relaunch of Dylan’s
Candy Bar in October 2008.
30 | april 2011
dylan.indd 30 4/1/11 9:44:37 AM
680 MADI SON AVENUE I 897 MADI SON AVENUE I 9 BOND STREET
399 BLEECKER STREET I BONDNO9. COM I 1. 877. 273. 3369
Bond.indd 1 3/31/11 8:07:47 PM
NYO
ART
32 | APRIL
CHINA
Happenings
By Chiu-Ti Jansen
I
f you asked me to identify the single
most influential phenomenon that
will transform the Chinese lifestyle
industries and economy in the next 10
years, I would not hesitate one second to
answer—the youth of the new wealthy.
Whether you are a real estate broker in New
York looking for a fresh supply of buyers, a Fortune
500 CEO agonizing over your next move in China,
a wine connoisseur active in the auction markets,
a high-end fashion designer trying to crack the
code of the so-called “Chinese taste” or a fine
jewelry store trying to attract the next Chinese
tourists, take note: based on the data compiled by
the Hurun Report—the Chinese equivalent of the
Forbes 400—as of 2010, 8.9 percent of the 1,000
richest men in China are younger than 40. What’s
more, the average age of the Chinese with personal
wealth of more than 100 million yuan—about
$15 million—is 43, and the average Chinese with
personal wealth of more than 10 million yuan—
about $1.5 million—are on average as young as 39,
15 years younger than their counterparts in the
United States or Europe.
Cultural diferences aside, in most societies,
the youth are more attracted to certain styles and
tastes than their older counterparts. When these
young people are exercising their newly gained
purchasing power, the impact on the luxury goods
market is apparent. China’s younger luxury-goods
consumers will, through the dictation of their lik-
ings, change the game of the luxury markets, which
China’s
Thirty-
Something
Millionaires
Above: Chi Peng, “I’m sorry, I just don’t
love you,” C-Print, 2008. Right: A news-
stand at the Shanghai Hongqiao Airport
offers a glimpse of what recreational
activities engage the new Chinese elite.
L
E
F
T
C
H
I
P
E
N
G
R
I
G
H
T
C
H
I
U

T
I
J
A
N
S
E
N

NYO_MAG2_PXX_ChinaWealth.indd 32 4/1/11 9:47:54 AM
april 2011 | 33
XXXXXXX
NYO
Captioninthisspace
here.Captioninthis
spacehere.Caption
inthisspacehere.
Captioninthisspace
here.Captioninthis
spacehere.
traditionally have tailored their
brand identities to generally
older buyers. While many devel-
oped markets are experiencing
growth or contraction in luxury
industries, China already boasts
a 25 to 30 percent annual growth
in luxury goods market, on track
to overtake Japan as the largest
market in the world by 2014.
While some of the young rich
are “princelings”—politically
connected descendents of the
senior Communist ofcers—or
heirs or heiresses—fu’erdai, or
second-generation rich, as they
are called in China—a majority
of them are self-made. And few
of them are from dot-coms. They
make their money in media, en-
ergy, fnance, technology, health,
art, fashion and real estate and
represent a major departure from
an old China, so proud of its an-
cient history and its reverence of
the elderly. They are the children
of one-child policy, unscarred by
the Cultural Revolution. They
are the frst generation in the
past 200 years to be freed from
China’s tumultuous history of
foreign invasions and civil wars.
They grew up with Louis Vuitton,
Armani and BMW.
Artists such as Liao Yibai, 39,
Cao Fei, 33, and Chi Peng, 29,
allude amply in their works to
the characteristics of what I call
the “Louis Vuitton Generation,”
or LV Generation, self-obsessed
and consumption-oriented.
Louis Vuitton opened its frst
store in China at Beijing’s
Peninsula Palace Hotel in 1992,
at a time when the LV Genera-
tion was at the cusp of entering
adolescence. Chi Peng, for
instance, emblematically titled
his recently opened solo show
at the Groninger Museum in the
Netherlands “Me, Myself and I.”
It’s also telling that the acronym
“MQ,” which stands for money
quotient and measures money
intelligence, is as in vogue as EQ
or IQ in China.
Search for the taste of this af-
fuent LV Generation has become
the Holy Grail for many Western
companies. Many surveys of the
young elite in China show that
their favorite way of relaxation
and leisure is travel—ahead of
golfng, reading and driving. On
average, the wealthy surveyed
by the Hurun Report travel
overseas four times per year.
The United States ranks as the
Above:ChiPeng,“I’msorry,Ijustdon’t
loveyou,”C-Print,2008.Right:Anews-
standattheShanghaiHongqiaoAirport
ofersaglimpseofwhatrecreational
activitiesengagethenewChineseelite.
l
e
f
t
: C
H
I
P
e
n
g
; R
I
g
H
t
: C
H
I
u
-
t
I
J
A
n
S
e
n
.
“Western brands continue
to dominate the brand
recognition among the
Chinese elite.”
NYO_MAG2_PXX_ChinaWealth.indd 33 4/1/11 9:48:17 AM
NYO
ART
32 | APRIL
CHINA
Happenings
By Chiu-Ti Jansen
I
f you asked me to identify the single
most influential phenomenon that
will transform the Chinese lifestyle
industries and economy in the next 10
years, I would not hesitate one second to
answer—the youth of the new wealthy.
Whether you are a real estate broker in New
York looking for a fresh supply of buyers, a Fortune
500 CEO agonizing over your next move in China,
a wine connoisseur active in the auction markets,
a high-end fashion designer trying to crack the
code of the so-called “Chinese taste” or a fine
jewelry store trying to attract the next Chinese
tourists, take note: based on the data compiled by
the Hurun Report—the Chinese equivalent of the
Forbes 400—as of 2010, 8.9 percent of the 1,000
richest men in China are younger than 40. What’s
more, the average age of the Chinese with personal
wealth of more than 100 million yuan—about
$15 million—is 43, and the average Chinese with
personal wealth of more than 10 million yuan—
about $1.5 million—are on average as young as 39,
15 years younger than their counterparts in the
United States or Europe.
Cultural diferences aside, in most societies,
the youth are more attracted to certain styles and
tastes than their older counterparts. When these
young people are exercising their newly gained
purchasing power, the impact on the luxury goods
market is apparent. China’s younger luxury-goods
consumers will, through the dictation of their lik-
ings, change the game of the luxury markets, which
China’s
Thirty-
Something
Millionaires
Above: Chi Peng, “I’m sorry, I just don’t
love you,” C-Print, 2008. Right: A news-
stand at the Shanghai Hongqiao Airport
offers a glimpse of what recreational
activities engage the new Chinese elite.
L
E
F
T
C
H
I
P
E
N
G
R
I
G
H
T
C
H
I
U

T
I
J
A
N
S
E
N

NYO_MAG2_PXX_ChinaWealth.indd 32 4/1/11 9:47:54 AM
april 2011 | 33
XXXXXXX
NYO
Captioninthisspace
here.Captioninthis
spacehere.Caption
inthisspacehere.
Captioninthisspace
here.Captioninthis
spacehere.
traditionally have tailored their
brand identities to generally
older buyers. While many devel-
oped markets are experiencing
growth or contraction in luxury
industries, China already boasts
a 25 to 30 percent annual growth
in luxury goods market, on track
to overtake Japan as the largest
market in the world by 2014.
While some of the young rich
are “princelings”—politically
connected descendents of the
senior Communist ofcers—or
heirs or heiresses—fu’erdai, or
second-generation rich, as they
are called in China—a majority
of them are self-made. And few
of them are from dot-coms. They
make their money in media, en-
ergy, fnance, technology, health,
art, fashion and real estate and
represent a major departure from
an old China, so proud of its an-
cient history and its reverence of
the elderly. They are the children
of one-child policy, unscarred by
the Cultural Revolution. They
are the frst generation in the
past 200 years to be freed from
China’s tumultuous history of
foreign invasions and civil wars.
They grew up with Louis Vuitton,
Armani and BMW.
Artists such as Liao Yibai, 39,
Cao Fei, 33, and Chi Peng, 29,
allude amply in their works to
the characteristics of what I call
the “Louis Vuitton Generation,”
or LV Generation, self-obsessed
and consumption-oriented.
Louis Vuitton opened its frst
store in China at Beijing’s
Peninsula Palace Hotel in 1992,
at a time when the LV Genera-
tion was at the cusp of entering
adolescence. Chi Peng, for
instance, emblematically titled
his recently opened solo show
at the Groninger Museum in the
Netherlands “Me, Myself and I.”
It’s also telling that the acronym
“MQ,” which stands for money
quotient and measures money
intelligence, is as in vogue as EQ
or IQ in China.
Search for the taste of this af-
fuent LV Generation has become
the Holy Grail for many Western
companies. Many surveys of the
young elite in China show that
their favorite way of relaxation
and leisure is travel—ahead of
golfng, reading and driving. On
average, the wealthy surveyed
by the Hurun Report travel
overseas four times per year.
The United States ranks as the
Above:ChiPeng,“I’msorry,Ijustdon’t
loveyou,”C-Print,2008.Right:Anews-
standattheShanghaiHongqiaoAirport
ofersaglimpseofwhatrecreational
activitiesengagethenewChineseelite.
l
e
f
t
: C
H
I
P
e
n
g
; R
I
g
H
t
: C
H
I
u
-
t
I
J
A
n
S
e
n
.
“Western brands continue
to dominate the brand
recognition among the
Chinese elite.”
NYO_MAG2_PXX_ChinaWealth.indd 33 4/1/11 9:48:17 AM
ART
NYO
Five quick ways to grasp
the culture and style of
the young elite in China:
1. See the hip movie
Du Lala’s Promotion, based
on the best-selling urban
romance about a college
graduate who works her
way up the corporate ladder
and romances her boss along
the way.
2. Watch the TV series
Struggle (Fendou), about
several college graduates’
attempt to define success and
themselves in a materialistic
society.
3. Read Hurun Report’s
annual Hurun Rich List and
Best of Best: Preferred Brands
of China’s Richest.
4. Visit the 798 Art
District and Caochangdi in
Beijing and Moganshan Road
Art District in Shanghai
or some of the major art
fairs and biennials in China
(e.g., China International
Gallery Exposition [CIGE],
Art Beijing, Contemporary,
Shanghai Art Fair, Shanghai
Biennale).
5. Read Young Chinese
Artists: The Next Generation
about artists born after 1975
and their works.
China
Tool Box
No. 1 destination, followed by
France.
The young elite are also quick
studies and receptive to new
ideas. Only about three or four
years ago, most Chinese collec-
tors did not care about collecting
contemporary Chinese art, but
they are now doing so zealously.
Chinese were previously not big
wine drinkers—now they snap
up 70 to 80 percent of the wine
sold in the worldwide auctions.
When I look around, my
young Chinese friends with
education seem to be optimistic
about their opportunities. They
do not have to be an investment
banker or a tech wizard to make
their first million dollars. They
typically do not have education-
al debt, nor do they necessarily
have advanced degrees. Many of
them have never studied abroad.
Yet every few months when I
return to Beijing or Shanghai ,
I notice they have just bought a
new Mercedes, returned from a
trip to Japan or discovered a new
fashion brand in Europe that I
have not yet heard of.
Given the regional difer-
ences in China and diverse ways
in which fortunes are created,
it is hard to generalize what
constitutes the “Chinese taste.”
Overall, it is safe to say that
the new young elite’s spending
habits difer from their parents’
and those of the older wealth,
as the older generations tend to
spend under the shadow of their
prior hardship and scarcity; the
younger generations embrace
more luxury spending. For
example, when my 30-some-
thing friends recently invited
me to a newly opened restau-
rant, Xuxian in Beijing, the
full house buzzed with young
people. Outside the restaurant
there were two bespoke sports
cars—a Pagani Zonda Cinque,
one of only five in the world,
with a price tag exceeding $2
million plus a 33 percent luxury
tax; and a Dutch-made Spyker,
priced at upward of $1 million
plus luxury tax.
Observing how my young
millionaire friends spend
their money, I don’t think they
subscribe to a simple dichotomy
between the Western and Chi-
nese brands, or a static “Chinese
taste.” While intrigued by for-
eign cars and Western fashion,
Vertu cell phones and iPhones,
they are also eager to discover
Chinese antiques and pricy Pu’er
tea from the Yunnan Province.
They are not concerned with
dragon, panda or other osten-
tatious “Chinese signifiers.”
Western brands—particularly
in cars, fashion and watches—
continue to dominate the
brand-recognition among the
Chinese elite, due to perceived
superiority in quality.
As lifestyle and cultural
activities gradually dominate
the LV Generation millionaires’
discretionary spending, the
young elite will also increas-
ingly look for Chinese luxury
brands that more eclectically
reflect contemporary China’s
mix of traditional and Western
influences.
34 | APRIL
Liao Yibai, Fake Ring,
Pink Iceberg, 2010,
Stainless Steel and
Synthetic Quartz.
C
H
I
U

T
I
J
A
N
S
E
N
CH7 - Liao Yibai,
Fake Bag YB, 2009,
Stainless Steel.
NYO_MAG2_PXX_ChinaWealth.indd 34 4/1/11 9:48:34 AM
ART
NYO
Five quick ways to grasp
the culture and style of
the young elite in China:
1. See the hip movie
Du Lala’s Promotion, based
on the best-selling urban
romance about a college
graduate who works her
way up the corporate ladder
and romances her boss along
the way.
2. Watch the TV series
Struggle (Fendou), about
several college graduates’
attempt to define success and
themselves in a materialistic
society.
3. Read Hurun Report’s
annual Hurun Rich List and
Best of Best: Preferred Brands
of China’s Richest.
4. Visit the 798 Art
District and Caochangdi in
Beijing and Moganshan Road
Art District in Shanghai
or some of the major art
fairs and biennials in China
(e.g., China International
Gallery Exposition [CIGE],
Art Beijing, Contemporary,
Shanghai Art Fair, Shanghai
Biennale).
5. Read Young Chinese
Artists: The Next Generation
about artists born after 1975
and their works.
China
Tool Box
No. 1 destination, followed by
France.
The young elite are also quick
studies and receptive to new
ideas. Only about three or four
years ago, most Chinese collec-
tors did not care about collecting
contemporary Chinese art, but
they are now doing so zealously.
Chinese were previously not big
wine drinkers—now they snap
up 70 to 80 percent of the wine
sold in the worldwide auctions.
When I look around, my
young Chinese friends with
education seem to be optimistic
about their opportunities. They
do not have to be an investment
banker or a tech wizard to make
their first million dollars. They
typically do not have education-
al debt, nor do they necessarily
have advanced degrees. Many of
them have never studied abroad.
Yet every few months when I
return to Beijing or Shanghai ,
I notice they have just bought a
new Mercedes, returned from a
trip to Japan or discovered a new
fashion brand in Europe that I
have not yet heard of.
Given the regional difer-
ences in China and diverse ways
in which fortunes are created,
it is hard to generalize what
constitutes the “Chinese taste.”
Overall, it is safe to say that
the new young elite’s spending
habits difer from their parents’
and those of the older wealth,
as the older generations tend to
spend under the shadow of their
prior hardship and scarcity; the
younger generations embrace
more luxury spending. For
example, when my 30-some-
thing friends recently invited
me to a newly opened restau-
rant, Xuxian in Beijing, the
full house buzzed with young
people. Outside the restaurant
there were two bespoke sports
cars—a Pagani Zonda Cinque,
one of only five in the world,
with a price tag exceeding $2
million plus a 33 percent luxury
tax; and a Dutch-made Spyker,
priced at upward of $1 million
plus luxury tax.
Observing how my young
millionaire friends spend
their money, I don’t think they
subscribe to a simple dichotomy
between the Western and Chi-
nese brands, or a static “Chinese
taste.” While intrigued by for-
eign cars and Western fashion,
Vertu cell phones and iPhones,
they are also eager to discover
Chinese antiques and pricy Pu’er
tea from the Yunnan Province.
They are not concerned with
dragon, panda or other osten-
tatious “Chinese signifiers.”
Western brands—particularly
in cars, fashion and watches—
continue to dominate the
brand-recognition among the
Chinese elite, due to perceived
superiority in quality.
As lifestyle and cultural
activities gradually dominate
the LV Generation millionaires’
discretionary spending, the
young elite will also increas-
ingly look for Chinese luxury
brands that more eclectically
reflect contemporary China’s
mix of traditional and Western
influences.
34 | APRIL
Liao Yibai, Fake Ring,
Pink Iceberg, 2010,
Stainless Steel and
Synthetic Quartz.
C
H
I
U

T
I
J
A
N
S
E
N
CH7 - Liao Yibai,
Fake Bag YB, 2009,
Stainless Steel.
NYO_MAG2_PXX_ChinaWealth.indd 34 4/1/11 9:48:34 AM
benrimon.indd 1 3/31/11 8:08:28 PM
XXXXXXX
36 | april 2011
NYO
Since photographer Ciaran
Tully came to New York
by way of Dublin in 1990,
he has entered into a sort
of love afair with the city.
Tully captures both sharp
and realistic images of New
York, but also those that
are blurred and dreamlike.
The two extremes create
a unique dynamic in his
portfolio and show his
supreme admiration for all
things New York.
You’re from Dublin.
What have you found
in New York as a city
that is diferent for
your photography from
European cities?
As I kid I loved New York.
My frst exposure to New
York was Kojak with Telly
Savalas as the detective.
What I loved about that
show is it showed New York
as down and dirty; it showed
New York as it was in my
mind. Then the humor of
the people in the city and
how they related to one
another, it all seemed really
real to me.
Where are your favorite
places to shoot photos in
the city?
I shoot all the iconic
buildings and bridges;
they’ve all been shot before.
Everyone has done them,
especially the famous pho-
tographers. So when I am
shooting them, I try weave
myself into the pictures,
somehow put myself into
them. I try to be original—
I’m not a painter, I could
never paint—but I really do
try to weave myself into it.
Sometimes I’m successful,
and those are the photos
I love to show, and other
times when I’m unsuccess-
ful, I’m just going to keep
trying until I get them right.
Your photos are keen
on careful aesthetic
manipulations to make
the city dreamlike—
distorted lenses, slow
shutter speeds, use of
flters. Do you feel these
techniques give you a
leg up?
I don’t think I’m any
better than any other pho-
tographer, this is just how
I see it. What separates me
from others is love, the fact
that I really do adore this
city—I think it’s the center
of the universe. There are
times when I’ll be walking
around and it’s like I’m
back here for the frst time
again, thinking about my
frst few weeks here when
everything was incredible
and brand new.
You were at the open-
ing night of the Artist’s
Project this month.
Did you lean towards a
theme with your gallery
or was it more of a mix-
ture of your catalogue?
I put a lot of planning into
it and there were a lot of
people I wanted to attract. I
wanted the images to be big;
I wanted to show as much of
my work as possible within
the space that was allotted
to me. So I made them big
with a nice clean look with
a simple frame, a look that’s
very in right now, until next
month when it probably
won’t be. I went in there
with intention of probably
losing money but I was
more concerned with the
attraction.
What book is on your
nightstand right now?
Oh, Keith Richard’s
Life. Ah, I love it. The guy
inspires me. I also bought
another one, a book of
poetry by Rudyard Kipling
which I read a lot of in the
weeks leading up the show
because I was very nervous.
Mixing that with Keith
Richards, it’s brilliant.
See more of Tully’s work at
www.ciarantully.com.
PhotograPhic
love affair
Ciaran Tully sees the city through a diferent lens . By Andrew Guarini
Lef, going to
the Mermaid
Parade; below,
Snow N.Y.C.
NYO_MAG2_PXX_ArtistsProfiles.indd 36 4/1/11 9:59:25 AM
XXXXXXX
36 | april 2011
NYO
Since photographer Ciaran
Tully came to New York
by way of Dublin in 1990,
he has entered into a sort
of love afair with the city.
Tully captures both sharp
and realistic images of New
York, but also those that
are blurred and dreamlike.
The two extremes create
a unique dynamic in his
portfolio and show his
supreme admiration for all
things New York.
You’re from Dublin.
What have you found
in New York as a city
that is diferent for
your photography from
European cities?
As I kid I loved New York.
My frst exposure to New
York was Kojak with Telly
Savalas as the detective.
What I loved about that
show is it showed New York
as down and dirty; it showed
New York as it was in my
mind. Then the humor of
the people in the city and
how they related to one
another, it all seemed really
real to me.
Where are your favorite
places to shoot photos in
the city?
I shoot all the iconic
buildings and bridges;
they’ve all been shot before.
Everyone has done them,
especially the famous pho-
tographers. So when I am
shooting them, I try weave
myself into the pictures,
somehow put myself into
them. I try to be original—
I’m not a painter, I could
never paint—but I really do
try to weave myself into it.
Sometimes I’m successful,
and those are the photos
I love to show, and other
times when I’m unsuccess-
ful, I’m just going to keep
trying until I get them right.
Your photos are keen
on careful aesthetic
manipulations to make
the city dreamlike—
distorted lenses, slow
shutter speeds, use of
flters. Do you feel these
techniques give you a
leg up?
I don’t think I’m any
better than any other pho-
tographer, this is just how
I see it. What separates me
from others is love, the fact
that I really do adore this
city—I think it’s the center
of the universe. There are
times when I’ll be walking
around and it’s like I’m
back here for the frst time
again, thinking about my
frst few weeks here when
everything was incredible
and brand new.
You were at the open-
ing night of the Artist’s
Project this month.
Did you lean towards a
theme with your gallery
or was it more of a mix-
ture of your catalogue?
I put a lot of planning into
it and there were a lot of
people I wanted to attract. I
wanted the images to be big;
I wanted to show as much of
my work as possible within
the space that was allotted
to me. So I made them big
with a nice clean look with
a simple frame, a look that’s
very in right now, until next
month when it probably
won’t be. I went in there
with intention of probably
losing money but I was
more concerned with the
attraction.
What book is on your
nightstand right now?
Oh, Keith Richard’s
Life. Ah, I love it. The guy
inspires me. I also bought
another one, a book of
poetry by Rudyard Kipling
which I read a lot of in the
weeks leading up the show
because I was very nervous.
Mixing that with Keith
Richards, it’s brilliant.
See more of Tully’s work at
www.ciarantully.com.
PhotograPhic
love affair
Ciaran Tully sees the city through a diferent lens . By Andrew Guarini
Lef, going to
the Mermaid
Parade; below,
Snow N.Y.C.
NYO_MAG2_PXX_ArtistsProfiles.indd 36 4/1/11 9:59:25 AM
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38 | april 2011
NYO
art
Was there a moment
when you frst realized
you wanted to be an
artist?
There wasn’t any specifc
moment. It always felt like
a predetermined thing, like
being an artist is woven into
my DNA.
What drives you as an
artist and propels your
passion forward?
I’m really driven by the
connection between myself
and the work. My latest
work is all about seduction
between certain looks,
especially the moment
when two people frst lock
eyes. That’s the purest form
of interpersonal connec-
tion. With certain images,
the viewer is the one being
seduced, and with others,
the person in the image is
very vulnerable and you’re
the seducer.
Tell me about your
exhibit at Pier 92.
The show at the Artist
Project at Pier 92 [closed
March 20] and was where I
revealed my latest series. I
had a stack of mug shots and
one of them kept haunting
me. I started researching
the gentleman, his life and
what happened to him.
At frst, I didn’t want to
learn more about him. I
was afraid I’d learn he was
5-foot-4 and lived with his
mother and I would lose
our connection. I learned
he was arrested at age 21
for being a pimp. The San
Bruno National Archives
found out that the man’s
name is William Murphy.
They also found two men
with that name—one was a
war hero and the other was
killed in a knife fght on a
train. We don’t know which
William Murphy this is.
That’s where the mystery
gets left in the viewer’s
hands.
You often use very
vibrant colors in your
work.
I like vibrant colors be-
cause I want my art to grab
the attention of the room
and be the centerpiece,
and vibrant colors stand
out more than others. Also,
I think they spice up the
pieces. A lot of things in real
life are boring colors, but
in art I can make them any
color I want. This is the only
life you live, why not make it
exciting?
What are some of the
primary materials you
use when creating art?
I really like to work with
rare materials, especially
encaustic wax. Encaustic
wax is a primitive form
of painting; it was used to
paint portraits on sarcoph-
agi because it lasts forever.
I like that encaustic wax is
tactile and dangerous. You
have to heat up the wax,
and once it’s melted you can
apply it like paint. You’re
working straight of instinct
because you have two sec-
onds before the paint dries
on the brush and becomes
solid again. To me, instinct
is the purest form of art.
I’ve heard you add a
unique last touch to a lot
of your pieces.
After they’re done, I light
a lot of my paintings on
fre. I don’t want to destroy
them; I’m just adding an
organic element to make
them not so pretty. Things
that are too perfect are cold
and boring. Usually I do it
for my wood pieces. It roasts
the surface and reveals all
the colors underneath.
If you had to describe
your art in one sentence,
what would it be?
I would say it’s indefn-
able. Labels to me are really
pigeonholing. I don’t be-
lieve in them. My art takes
me all over the place—into
portraiture, abstract art,
painting.
What has been your
favorite exhibition of
your art thus far?
I would probably have
to say the latest show at
the Artist Project. It was
mostly the mug-shot
series, and I’ve never put
myself out there like that.
It was really rewarding
because of the audience’s
reactions, so I’m riding
pretty high on that.
What are you most
excited about for the
future of your art?
I’m excited to explore
more and really challenge
myself to try diferent
mediums.
See more of Jeremy Penn’s
work at www.jeremypenn.com.
Art on fire
Jeremy Penn lights his work on fre after
its done—don’t worry, it just gives it character.
By Natalie Howard
Animal Instinct.
William Murphy W02;
William Murphy B02.
NYO_MAG2_PXX_ArtistsProfiles.indd 38 4/1/11 9:59:53 AM
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THE FIRST MAP TO FOCLS ON THE LANDS THAT VERE TO BECOME TEXAS
THE ORIGINAL SPANISH MANLSCRIPT CA. !8u5·6 SHOVING VHY SPAIN VIEVED
AND VALLED THESE LANDS AS A SEPARATE ENTITY
ORIOINAL MANL$CRIPT MAP 'Plano de una parte de la Provincia de la Luisiana v de otra de la Florida Occidental v de la
Provincia de Texas.' ('Map ot a part ot the Province ot Louisiana and the other ot West Florida and the Province ot Texas.') ca.
1803·1806. Ink and watercolor wash on paper. 21'' X +1''
$375.000
AN EXCEPTIONALLY FINE AND HI$TORICALLY IMPORTANT MAP $HOWINO THE ORIOIN$ OF THE $TATE OF
TEXA$ AT THE TLRN OF THE 19TH CENTLRY. A manuscript map emphaticallv asserting in bold color the borders
claimed bv $pain between its Provinces ot Texas and West Florida. and the territories ot the Lnited $tates. including the
Province ot Louisiana newlv conveved bv Napoleon over $panish objections. The valuable lands within what would ultimatelv
become the $tate ot Texas are shown extending westward. highlighted bv the principal river svstems between the $abine and the
strategic capital ot $an Antonio.
Probablv dratted bv a survevor with the Casa·Calvo expedition ot 1805. and possiblv supervised bv celebrated cartographer
Nicholas de Finiels. The map tocuses on an area ot extreme $panish interest at a time when it was becoming impossible tor that
once great Imperial power to maintain its grip in North America in the tace ot reverses in Europe and the increasing hegemonv
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40 | april 2011
When did your frst
realize you wanted to
pursue a career in art?
I was inspired by a
Picasso painting called
The Dance. I was 14 years
old, drinking Coca-Cola,
listening to the James
Brown record Mashed
Potato Popcorn and paint-
ing with tempera paint on
paper. I got very excited
and realized this was it.
Tell me about your
self-titled exhibit at the
Corcoran Gallery.
My exhibit at the Corc-
oran will consist of three
parts. One long gallery will
contain six large paintings
from 2002 until 2010.
The Rotunda Gallery
will contain a salon style
hanging of like a hundred
smaller paintings from
the last 30 years. And I am
making three gigantic—26
feet tall—paintings to sit
in the Atrium.
What drives you as an
artist? What propels
you?
Listening to music.
Living in the landscapes
that I love—the New York
City urban landscape and
the northeast Catskill for-
est, to communicate with
people and animals.
You use such vibrant
colors in your work—
why is that?
I love very vibrant colors.
It feels like turning up the
volume. And then I also
make the paintings really
big—so that is like turning
up the volume even more. I
mean a few inches of bright
red and green is nice—but
10 feet of red and green is
really great.
What are the primary
materials you use?
Paint—all kinds of
paint—oil paint, acrylic
paint, house paint, spray
paint, paper, cardboard,
canvas, plastic, glue,
mirrors, photographs,
clothes, artifcial fow-
ers, ribbons, garlands,
pompoms, staples, nails,
screws, records, rhine-
stones, glitter, artichoke
leaves, Wonder Bread,
pillows, slippers.
What type of art do
you do for fun? Or is
all your art created for
‘fun’?
All my art is created for
fun—that doesn’t always
mean fun and laughter—
sometimes it’s serious fun.
What do you want your
art to say to viewers?
I have my ideas and my
passions—but at the end
of the day, what comes out
as ‘my art’ is often quite
surprising. Each viewer
can feel what I am saying
in a diferent way.
See more of Martin’s work
at www.miandn.com.
PumP
uP the
volume
Chris Martin turns up the volume
on his art. By Rachel Morgan
For Paul Thek; Untitled.
NYO
art
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42 | april 2011
Tell me about
your self-titled
show at Taxter
& Spengemann.
What was the
theme?
The show is
about trying to
equate things big
and small—and maybe in the end, com-
ing to terms with certain realities.

You just had a book published, What
Me Worry. What’s the feel of the
book?
It’s a collection of charts, paintings,
photos and group emails from the last
few years. It was really fun to make
because the publishers were supportive
and open to weirdness.

Why write a book?
Because I’m a big fan of books. It
sounds old-fashioned these days, but I
enjoy sitting down and reading or look-
ing at something. No disrespect to the
Internet, though.

Describe the moment you frst real-
ized you wanted to pursue art as a
career.
I liked making things at a pretty early
age, but of course I had no clue what that
meant post-kindergarten-wise. I went to
art school in Providence and came back
to New York right afterwards. Now it’s
2011 already.
What drives you as an artist?
If I get a piece done, I let myself eat a
sandwich. No work no food.
What has been your favorite exhibi-
tion of yours thus far?
My last solo at Taxter and Spenge-
mann. They let me throw a closing party
where Brian DeGraw from Gang Gang
played solo for the frst time ever and
Mike Fellows from one of my favorite
bands growing up, Rites of Spring,
played a kind of rare but always amazing
set. That meant a lot to me.

You use very vibrant colors in your
work—why is that?
Because for a while I was using all dull
and fat colors. It’ll swing back, I’m sure.

If you had to describe your style of
art in a sentence or less, what would
you say?
‘This dude is a mess.’
April 8-23 | Poisoned Apples
and Smoking Lamps: In-
terpreting Fairy Tales and
Adventure Stories
Third-year students in the School of
Visual Arts’ B.F.A. Illustration and Car-
tooning Department take a cue from
their childhood fantasies in this fairy-
tale–inspired exhibition. Department
Chair Thomas Woodruff curates. Free
and open to the public (10 a.m.–6 p.m.,
Monday–Saturday, Visual Arts Gallery,
601 West 26 St., 15th foor).
Through April 9 | The Col-
lege Art Association New
York Area MFA Exhibition
Catch the tail end of this top-notch
exhibition, which showcases the best
of the best when it comes to greater
New York student artists. Artists from
more than 20 institutions have works
on display at this exhibition hosted by
Hunter College. Free and open to the
public (1 p.m.–6 p.m., Tuesday–Sun-
day, Hunter College/Times Square
Gallery, 450 West 41st St.).
April 15 | MFA Photography,
Video and Related Media De-
partment Spring Salon
The School of Visual Arts opens
the doors of its graduate Photography,
Video and Related Media program to
the public. Come take a sneak peek at
new works by these aspiring shutter-
bugs. Free and open to the public (7:30
p.m., 214 East 21st St., 1st foor).
April 26-June 11 | Common
Love, Aesthetics of Becoming
This student-curated exhibition
explores love within the modern
sociopolitical discourse. Four current
students in Columbia University’s M.A.
in Modern Art: Critical and Curatorial
Studies program—Alexander Benen-
son, Kristen Chappa, Donald Johnson-
Montenegro, and Tomoko Kanamitsu—
curate works by recent graduates of
Columbia’s M.F.A. Visual Arts program.
Free and open to the public (1 p.m.–5
p.m., Wednesday–Saturday, Miriam and
Ira D. Wallach Gallery, Schermerhorn
Hall, 8th foor, 1190 Amsterdam Ave.).
MAy 3-9 | The Cooper
Union’s School of Art Spring
Exhibitions
These soon-to-be graduates cap
off their studies at the Cooper Union’s
School of Art with this fnal exhibition.
Free and open to the public. (Also on
April 5–9, 12–6, 19–23, 26–30, 11
a.m.–6 p.m., Tuesday–Saturday, the
Cooper Union, East 7th St.).
MAy 17 | Graduate Student
Thesis Reading: Fiction
You might be in the presence of the
next David Foster Wallace when grad-
uating M. A. and M.F. A. candidates
read excerpts from their original fction
manuscripts. Head over the next night
for the graduate poetry reading. Free
and open to the public (7 p.m., the Lil-
lian Vernon Creative Writers House).
MAy 20 | 2011 CUNY Asian
American Film Festival
Student flmmakers enrolled at any of
the City University of New York’s cam-
puses will show their cinematic works at
this ninth annual flm festival. Winners
and runners-up will be announced and
interviewed following the screenings.
Free and open to the public (6 p.m.–8
p.m., CUNY Graduate Center, Martin E.
Segal Theatre, 365 Fifth Ave.).
MAy 24-26 | Truth Be Told
Documentary Film Festival
Treat yourself to three nights of doc-
umentary short flms and Q&A ses-
sions with the flmmakers, students in
the New School’s Documentary Media
Studies graduate certifcate program.
Now this is something you won’t get at
Tribeca. Free and open to the public
(Tishman Auditorium, Alvin Johnson/
J.M. Kaplan Hall, 66 West 12th St.).
Kuo’s quirKy style
The ofeat artist shares his secrets. ByRachelMorgan
Student ARt
SpRing eventS
Our picks for the best student artist events of the season. You
never know, you could stumble upon the next big thing
Ideas When
I’m Drunk.
NYO_MAG2_PXX_ArtistsProfiles.indd 42 4/1/11 10:00:48 AM
42 | april 2011
Tell me about
your self-titled
show at Taxter
& Spengemann.
What was the
theme?
The show is
about trying to
equate things big
and small—and maybe in the end, com-
ing to terms with certain realities.

You just had a book published, What
Me Worry. What’s the feel of the
book?
It’s a collection of charts, paintings,
photos and group emails from the last
few years. It was really fun to make
because the publishers were supportive
and open to weirdness.

Why write a book?
Because I’m a big fan of books. It
sounds old-fashioned these days, but I
enjoy sitting down and reading or look-
ing at something. No disrespect to the
Internet, though.

Describe the moment you frst real-
ized you wanted to pursue art as a
career.
I liked making things at a pretty early
age, but of course I had no clue what that
meant post-kindergarten-wise. I went to
art school in Providence and came back
to New York right afterwards. Now it’s
2011 already.
What drives you as an artist?
If I get a piece done, I let myself eat a
sandwich. No work no food.
What has been your favorite exhibi-
tion of yours thus far?
My last solo at Taxter and Spenge-
mann. They let me throw a closing party
where Brian DeGraw from Gang Gang
played solo for the frst time ever and
Mike Fellows from one of my favorite
bands growing up, Rites of Spring,
played a kind of rare but always amazing
set. That meant a lot to me.

You use very vibrant colors in your
work—why is that?
Because for a while I was using all dull
and fat colors. It’ll swing back, I’m sure.

If you had to describe your style of
art in a sentence or less, what would
you say?
‘This dude is a mess.’
April 8-23 | Poisoned Apples
and Smoking Lamps: In-
terpreting Fairy Tales and
Adventure Stories
Third-year students in the School of
Visual Arts’ B.F.A. Illustration and Car-
tooning Department take a cue from
their childhood fantasies in this fairy-
tale–inspired exhibition. Department
Chair Thomas Woodruff curates. Free
and open to the public (10 a.m.–6 p.m.,
Monday–Saturday, Visual Arts Gallery,
601 West 26 St., 15th foor).
Through April 9 | The Col-
lege Art Association New
York Area MFA Exhibition
Catch the tail end of this top-notch
exhibition, which showcases the best
of the best when it comes to greater
New York student artists. Artists from
more than 20 institutions have works
on display at this exhibition hosted by
Hunter College. Free and open to the
public (1 p.m.–6 p.m., Tuesday–Sun-
day, Hunter College/Times Square
Gallery, 450 West 41st St.).
April 15 | MFA Photography,
Video and Related Media De-
partment Spring Salon
The School of Visual Arts opens
the doors of its graduate Photography,
Video and Related Media program to
the public. Come take a sneak peek at
new works by these aspiring shutter-
bugs. Free and open to the public (7:30
p.m., 214 East 21st St., 1st foor).
April 26-June 11 | Common
Love, Aesthetics of Becoming
This student-curated exhibition
explores love within the modern
sociopolitical discourse. Four current
students in Columbia University’s M.A.
in Modern Art: Critical and Curatorial
Studies program—Alexander Benen-
son, Kristen Chappa, Donald Johnson-
Montenegro, and Tomoko Kanamitsu—
curate works by recent graduates of
Columbia’s M.F.A. Visual Arts program.
Free and open to the public (1 p.m.–5
p.m., Wednesday–Saturday, Miriam and
Ira D. Wallach Gallery, Schermerhorn
Hall, 8th foor, 1190 Amsterdam Ave.).
MAy 3-9 | The Cooper
Union’s School of Art Spring
Exhibitions
These soon-to-be graduates cap
off their studies at the Cooper Union’s
School of Art with this fnal exhibition.
Free and open to the public. (Also on
April 5–9, 12–6, 19–23, 26–30, 11
a.m.–6 p.m., Tuesday–Saturday, the
Cooper Union, East 7th St.).
MAy 17 | Graduate Student
Thesis Reading: Fiction
You might be in the presence of the
next David Foster Wallace when grad-
uating M. A. and M.F. A. candidates
read excerpts from their original fction
manuscripts. Head over the next night
for the graduate poetry reading. Free
and open to the public (7 p.m., the Lil-
lian Vernon Creative Writers House).
MAy 20 | 2011 CUNY Asian
American Film Festival
Student flmmakers enrolled at any of
the City University of New York’s cam-
puses will show their cinematic works at
this ninth annual flm festival. Winners
and runners-up will be announced and
interviewed following the screenings.
Free and open to the public (6 p.m.–8
p.m., CUNY Graduate Center, Martin E.
Segal Theatre, 365 Fifth Ave.).
MAy 24-26 | Truth Be Told
Documentary Film Festival
Treat yourself to three nights of doc-
umentary short flms and Q&A ses-
sions with the flmmakers, students in
the New School’s Documentary Media
Studies graduate certifcate program.
Now this is something you won’t get at
Tribeca. Free and open to the public
(Tishman Auditorium, Alvin Johnson/
J.M. Kaplan Hall, 66 West 12th St.).
Kuo’s quirKy style
The ofeat artist shares his secrets. ByRachelMorgan
Student ARt
SpRing eventS
Our picks for the best student artist events of the season. You
never know, you could stumble upon the next big thing
Ideas When
I’m Drunk.
NYO_MAG2_PXX_ArtistsProfiles.indd 42 4/1/11 10:00:48 AM
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2nd cent. A.C.
A coin cup by silversmith G. C. Kessel,
Berlin, circa 1715, and an Augsburg silver
tankard by silver smith L. Neusser, circa 1630
A carved
rhinoceros
horn
cup,
China,
Kangxi
period
A Russian Life Guard
helmet, circa 1900 /
A model 1881/1910
Cossack officer’s
shashqa / Order of
St. Anne,
1st Class
Breast Star,
Russia
Rare Colts
VW Kübelwagen KDF type 86/87, VW Käfer 1947 and Horch 951A Pullman Cabrio
“Neu eröffnete Hof-Kriegs-Reit-Schul”
by Georg Engelhard von Löhneisen, Nuremberg 1729
NYOMag_1p_4c_A61.indd 1 28.03.2011 12:31:17 Uhr
Hermann.indd 1 3/31/11 8:11:02 PM
ARt
NYO
McQueen
does
the Met
The late designer’s
collections
take center stage
in ‘Savage Beauty’
ByChelsiaMarcius
PhotographybySølveSundsbø
44 | april 2011
Ensemble,VOSS,
spring/summer2001
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NYO_MAG2_PXX_AlexanderMcQueen.indd 44 4/1/11 9:49:59 AM
APRIL | 45
The last time the
Metropolitan
Museum of Art
featured fashions by
Alexander McQueen,
the designer paid the
Met a personal visit.
Curator Andrew Bol-
ton personally greeted
the famed designer at
the 2005 exhibition “AngloMania: Tradition
and Transgression in British Fashion,” and the
pair made their way to the galleries. As they
approached a display of ensembles—many
of them McQueen’s own creations—Bolton
said the designer paused, his eyes locked on a
lavender silk tafeta skirt and one stubborn,
out-of-place pleat. The episode was over as fast
as it had begun—McQueen strode over to his
creation, tugged its hem and flattened out the
imperfection.
It is one of the few moments the curator
shared with the designer prior to his sui-
cide in February 2010. Yet Bolton said the
encounter—and a year of collaborations with
those who knew McQueen’s work best—helped
him build a vision for the museum’s upcom-
ing exhibition, “Alexander McQueen: Savage
Beauty.”
From May 4 through July 31, the Costume
Institute at the Met will display 100 garments
from McQueen’s 19-year career in the fashion
industry. The exhibition will also feature
more than 70 accessories, making it one of the
institute’s largest shows yet.
Many of the garments will come from the
Alexander McQueen archive in London, and
Bolton said the task of choosing what pieces to
showcase boiled down to which fashions truly
captured McQueen’s mind-set.
“We went through every single article of
clothing and got access to the press books,” Bol-
ton said, referring to a collection of hundreds
of published articles about the designer. “I read
just about every single one to find out the major
themes of McQueen’s work. There’s an incred-
ible synergy between artists and writers of the
Romantic Movement and McQueen.”
Based on McQueen’s design themes—
nature, technology, death and dereliction—
Bolton said he and his team began to formulate
just how they’d bring the body of work to life.
Upon entering, museumgoers will “be
confronted with two pieces which, to me, seem
to epitomize the sort of swings in his work,”
Bolton said, pointing to a conceptual sketch
depicting two female mannequins, the one
Satanic with sheer, billowy red coverings, and
the other Christ-like, draped in beads of white.
“McQueen was obsessed with the ecstasy
and the agony of passion,” Bolton said. “I
wanted the notion of the sublime to be a
starting point of the exhibition so that you are
struck with awe or wonder and fear or terror,
so that you experience his work.”
Fluorescent lights will bring stark, studio-
lighting to garments in the first gallery, the
Le: Dress,
VOSS, spring/
summer 2001.
Right: Dress,
autumn/winter
2010–11.
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NYO_MAG2_PXX_AlexanderMcQueen.indd 45 4/1/11 9:51:01 AM
ART
NYO
46 | april 2011
“McQueen
was obsessed
with the
ecstasy and
the agony of
passıon.”
Dress, VOSS,
spring/summer 2001.
NYO_MAG2_PXX_AlexanderMcQueen.indd 46 4/1/11 9:51:32 AM
ART
NYO
46 | april 2011
“McQueen
was obsessed
with the
ecstasy and
the agony of
passıon.”
Dress, VOSS,
spring/summer 2001.
NYO_MAG2_PXX_AlexanderMcQueen.indd 46 4/1/11 9:51:32 AM
APRIL | 47
Romantic Mind. The room’s exposed concrete
walls and distressed wooden floors are meant to
replicate the raw setting of an art studio. Bolton
said the display of tailored pants, jackets, coats
and skirts will “show how consistent McQueen
was in terms of his silhouette but to also show
how innovative he was in terms of skill. ”
Next door, Bolton said, the gallery Romantic
Gothic will feature garments inspired by
“vampires, phantoms, pirates and highway-
men— people living on edge of society who
were, in a way, very much celebrated as the
antihero and the cult of the individual.” Gallery
three, the Cavern of Curiosities, will showcase
McQueen’s creative collaborations with several
designers including Philip Treacy. Film projec-
tors nestled in cubbyholes will flicker scenes
from the McQueen catwalk.
The designer’s trademark use of the tartan—
a pattern commonly associated with Scottish
kilts—inspired the fourth gallery, Romantic
Nationalism.
“He was very proud of his Scottish heritage,”
Bolton said, adding that McQueen first used
tartan in Highland Rape, the collection that
jump-started his international career and will
also appear at the Met.
Number five is Romantic Exoticism, which
will display McQueen’s use of the Japanese ki-
mono. The exhibit will conclude with Natural-
ism, Bolton said, McQueen’s very last complete
collection.
After the designer’s unexpected death,
Bolton said he jumped on an opportunity to do
an all-exclusive McQueen exhibit.
“We always wanted to do an exhibition for
McQueen, and we would have done one
eventually,” he said. “But with his
passing, I had to move fast; I wanted
to work with a team that worked
with McQueen because I thought
it would have more integrity. I was
worried that in five years’ time,
the team would be dispersed, the
archive would be dispersed and I re-
ally wanted to tap into people’s recent
memories of McQueen.”
Bolton said he wanted bring the de-
signer’s creations to the public and make
his fashions accessible to people who
never witnessed the designer’s theatrical
runway presentations.
The convergence of art and fashion is
exactly what Bolton intended with this
exhibit—for museumgoers to “look at the
garment and truly appreciate the artistry
behind it.” A noble goal, one that McQueen
himself would appreciate.
Naomi Campbell,
Alexander McQueen,
Kate Moss and
Annabelle Nielsen
Le: Ensemble,
It’s a Jungle Out
There, autumn/
winter 1997–98.
Right: Ensemble,
Dante, autumn/
winter 1996–97.
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NYO_MAG2_PXX_AlexanderMcQueen.indd 47 4/1/11 9:52:15 AM
XXXXXXX
april 2011 | 49
NYO
Uptown
Richard and Eileen
Ekstract in front
of John Newsom’s
ladybug painting.
collector.indd 49 4/1/11 10:48:52 AM
ART
48 | april 2011
NYO
Uptown
Art
It takes only a few minutes for art collector
Richard Ekstract to mention Andy Warhol’s
self-portraits. It’s not surprising, consider-
ing that Ekstract has found himself at the
center of a swirling debate surrounding their
authenticity, counts the late Warhol among
his friends and has The Red Warhol hanging
on the wall in his Upper East Side apartment.
“He made 11 of these originally and he
had me make another 8 or 10,” said Ekstract,
a former trustee on the board of the New
Museum.
There’s an ongoing controversy—art collec-
tors on one side and the Andy Warhol Founda-
tion and the Andy Warhol Art Authentication
Board on the other. The players are varied—
the authentication board on one side, and
private art collectors like Joe Simon-Whelan,
who are in possession of what they deem as
authentic Warhols and what the board deems
otherwise.
“This is called The Red Warhol,” Ekstract
said, gesturing toward the striking red-and-
black silk-screen painting holding court next
to the apartment’s massive picture window
with an unobscured view of the East River.
The logic is simple—Warhol created these
particular silk screens, but didn’t actually do
the rolling.
“[The experts] are saying that they couldn’t
denote that the artist had a hand in making
this piece, but that’s why he made silk-screen
separations,” Ekstract said. “[Warhol] wasn’t
sitting there rolling these things; he gave them
to other people. This is what Andy invented
all those years ago—instant art; art made by
other people, but it was your idea.”
It’s clear Ekstract has a far more conceptual
view of art.
“His point was it’s the concept that counts,
the execution, anyone can do that,” he said.
“So when he gave me the silk-screen separa-
tions, he didn’t care who the silk screener was
as long as they followed the instructions that
were written on the separations.”
He paused.
“In fact he liked the version I [had ordered]
better than his own,” Ekstract said. “I know
it’s real because it comes from the original
Andy Warhol Separation silk screens and he
wanted them made this way.”
But the confict doesn’t end with the
self-portraits. There is also the ongoing case
of the fabricated Andy Warhol Brillo boxes.
Art world giant Pontus Hulten reportedly
fabricated 105 Brillo boxes in the 1990s, years
after Warhol’s death, passing them of as those
created in 1968. These “Stockholm type”
Brillo boxes were widely dispersed, and 94
were later called authentic by the Andy War-
hol Authentication Board—a fact frustrating
to many, including Ekstract. The board is
One collector’s take on new artists and the
infamous Warhol scandal
ByRachelMorgan
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collector.indd 48 4/1/11 10:48:31 AM
XXXXXXX
april 2011 | 49
NYO
Uptown
Richard and Eileen
Ekstract in front
of John Newsom’s
ladybug painting.
collector.indd 49 4/1/11 10:48:52 AM
ART
50 | april 2011
NYO
Clockwisefrom
top:Richardand
Eileenpictured
withtheinfamous
AndyWarhol“red”
self-portrait,witha
photo-basedworkby
BradleyCastellanos
onthewallbehind;
infrontofapainted
glasspiecebyPeter
Bynum,backlitby
LEDbulbs;pointing
ataNativeAmerican
graftipaintingby
BradKalhamer;a
“scumac”machine-
madesculptureby
RoxyPaine.
currently reviewing the authenticity claim of
these boxes.
“They say mine isn’t authentic because
they couldn’t denote [Warhol’s] hand in it,”
Ekstract said. “But the Brillo boxes they
authenticated were made years after he died.”
Despite his frustrations, Ekstract is still an
avid art collector. The grand Upper East Side
apartment he shares with his wife, Eileen,
seems more museum than home, with the
exception of Denzel, the couple’s energetic
dog, who gallops around the apartment like
there isn’t a $7 million Andy Warhol hanging
on the wall.
Ekstract, who made his fortune in the
consumer-periodicals industry, started with a
single piece of African art. His collection soon
grew to include upward of 150 pieces.
But the diference between Ekstract and
other art collectors is clear. Ekstract buys art
based on a visceral reaction, a personal prefer-
ence, and leans toward younger, less estab-
lished artists. Sometimes this pays of, when
an artist really makes it big; but it’s not always
lucrative, as Ekstract will be the frst to admit.
“I bought a lot of stuf that you can’t give
away today,” he said with a laugh. “It’s a
learning process when you buy young artists.
For me, that’s more fun than buying some
established name everybody knows. It only
shows that you have this much more money
than someone else.”
With the exception of the Warhol, Ek-
stract’s art collection is marked by relative
unknowns like Bradley Castellanos, Carmen
McCullough and Brad Kalhammer, and more
well-known names like Chakaia Booker and
Ida Applebroog.
“It wasn’t the intent to make a lot of money,”
he said. “I bought things that seemed right.”
He said his collection has defnitely evolved
over the years, as has his taste.
“If you’ve been looking at art for as long as
I’ve been looking at it—say, 40 years—and you
don’t have the eye, shame on you,” he said.
“The more you look at art, the more you get a
sense of what you like.”
As far as his advice to new collectors, Ek-
stract warns that collecting art isn’t a cheap
hobby.
“It’s gotten way more expensive to start
building a collection,” he said. “Three to four
years ago, you could buy a work by an emerg-
ing artist for $5,000. Today [it’s closer to]
$10,000 to $12,000. Things changed that way.”
m
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A
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N
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f
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o
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A
g
A
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i
N
E
collector.indd 50 4/1/11 10:49:17 AM
ART
50 | april 2011
NYO
Clockwisefrom
top:Richardand
Eileenpictured
withtheinfamous
AndyWarhol“red”
self-portrait,witha
photo-basedworkby
BradleyCastellanos
onthewallbehind;
infrontofapainted
glasspiecebyPeter
Bynum,backlitby
LEDbulbs;pointing
ataNativeAmerican
graftipaintingby
BradKalhamer;a
“scumac”machine-
madesculptureby
RoxyPaine.
currently reviewing the authenticity claim of
these boxes.
“They say mine isn’t authentic because
they couldn’t denote [Warhol’s] hand in it,”
Ekstract said. “But the Brillo boxes they
authenticated were made years after he died.”
Despite his frustrations, Ekstract is still an
avid art collector. The grand Upper East Side
apartment he shares with his wife, Eileen,
seems more museum than home, with the
exception of Denzel, the couple’s energetic
dog, who gallops around the apartment like
there isn’t a $7 million Andy Warhol hanging
on the wall.
Ekstract, who made his fortune in the
consumer-periodicals industry, started with a
single piece of African art. His collection soon
grew to include upward of 150 pieces.
But the diference between Ekstract and
other art collectors is clear. Ekstract buys art
based on a visceral reaction, a personal prefer-
ence, and leans toward younger, less estab-
lished artists. Sometimes this pays of, when
an artist really makes it big; but it’s not always
lucrative, as Ekstract will be the frst to admit.
“I bought a lot of stuf that you can’t give
away today,” he said with a laugh. “It’s a
learning process when you buy young artists.
For me, that’s more fun than buying some
established name everybody knows. It only
shows that you have this much more money
than someone else.”
With the exception of the Warhol, Ek-
stract’s art collection is marked by relative
unknowns like Bradley Castellanos, Carmen
McCullough and Brad Kalhammer, and more
well-known names like Chakaia Booker and
Ida Applebroog.
“It wasn’t the intent to make a lot of money,”
he said. “I bought things that seemed right.”
He said his collection has defnitely evolved
over the years, as has his taste.
“If you’ve been looking at art for as long as
I’ve been looking at it—say, 40 years—and you
don’t have the eye, shame on you,” he said.
“The more you look at art, the more you get a
sense of what you like.”
As far as his advice to new collectors, Ek-
stract warns that collecting art isn’t a cheap
hobby.
“It’s gotten way more expensive to start
building a collection,” he said. “Three to four
years ago, you could buy a work by an emerg-
ing artist for $5,000. Today [it’s closer to]
$10,000 to $12,000. Things changed that way.”
m
i
C
h
A
E
L
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h
i
m
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N
t
o
f
o
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N
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collector.indd 50 4/1/11 10:49:17 AM
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Cézanne’s Card Players was organized by The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, and The Courtauld Gallery, London. It is supported by an indemnity from the Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities. Paul Cézanne,
The Card Players (detail), 1890–92, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Bequest of Stephen C. Clark, 1960. Guitar Heroes: Legendary Craftsmen from Italy to New York is made possible in part by Mr. and Mrs. Richard L. Chilton, Jr. John
Monteleone, Archtop Guitar, Sun King model (serial number 195), detail, Islip, New York, 2000, Private Collection. Photograph © Archtop History, Inc. from the book ARCHTOP GUITARS: The Journey from Cremona to New York by
Rudy Pensa and Vincent Ricardel. Rooms with a View: The Open Window in the 19th Century is made possible by the Anna-Maria and Stephen Kellen Foundation and The Isaacson-Draper Foundation. Caspar David Friedrich, Woman
at the Window (detail), 1822, Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Alte Nationalgalerie. © Bildarchiv Preussischer Kulturbesitz/Art Resource NY. Photo: Joerg P. Anders. Richard Serra Drawing: A Retrospective is made possible in part by the
Jane and Robert Carroll Fund. It was organized by the Menil Collection, Houston. Richard Serra, September, 2001, paintstick on handmade paper, Private Collection. © Richard Serra. Photo: Rob McKeever.
Complete schedule at metmuseum.org
it’s time we Met
FOR A SPECTACULAR SPRING SEASON
CÉZANNE’S CARD PLAYERS
Through May 8
ROOMS WITH A VIEW
THE OPEN WINDOW IN THE 19TH CENTURY
Through July 4
RICHARD SERRA DRAWING
A RETROSPECTIVE
Opens April 13
GUITAR HEROES
LEGENDARY CRAFTSMEN FROM ITALY TO NEW YORK
Through July 4
MET-0067_NYOMag_8.875x10.75(1.21)_Apr6_v2.indd 1 3/30/11 6:15 PM
The met.indd 1 3/31/11 8:11:51 PM
ART
52 | APRIL
NYO
The new Museum of
African Art building will
open in the fall in the
shade of Central Park
and on the border
between Harlem and
the Upper East Side.
El Anatsui,
Akua’s Surviving
Children, 1996;
wood and metal,
dimensions
variable.
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El Anatsui, Akua’s Surviving Children, 1996
Wood and metal, dimensions variable
Photo courtesy: The October Gallery
NYO_MAG2_PXX_AfricanArt.indd 52 4/1/11 10:18:56 AM
ART
52 | APRIL
NYO
The new Museum of
African Art building will
open in the fall in the
shade of Central Park
and on the border
between Harlem and
the Upper East Side.
El Anatsui,
Akua’s Surviving
Children, 1996;
wood and metal,
dimensions
variable.
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El Anatsui, Akua’s Surviving Children, 1996
Wood and metal, dimensions variable
Photo courtesy: The October Gallery
NYO_MAG2_PXX_AfricanArt.indd 52 4/1/11 10:18:56 AM
he Museum for African
Art has finally found its
permanent home.
This fall, the museum
will put down roots at the
corner of 110th Street and
Fifth Avenue, a welcome
turn of events for a mu-
seum that has floated between locations on the
Upper East Side, Soho and, most recently, Long
Island City, for the past 25 years.
The new location puts the $95 million mu-
seum at the northern end of New York’s storied
Museum Mile and will become the permanent
home to a collection of exhibits that have lived a
sort of nomadic existence until now.
Elsie McCabe Thompson, president of the
Museum for African Art, has lofty aspirations
for the museum.
“We want the world to visit,” Thompson
said, whose husband, former New York City
comptroller William Thompson Jr., ran unsuc-
cessfully against Mayor Michael Bloomberg
last year. “We want all four of the communi-
ties that we neighbor to grow up and live in the
museum and we want to think of ourselves as a
cultural bridge between them.”
The Robert A.M. Stern–designed building,
which occupies the lower floors of a 19-story
residential building, sits strategically at the
intersection of the Upper East Side, Harlem,
Spanish Harlem and Central Harlem, in an
area with a growing community of African
immigrants. Carnegie Hall and MoMA have
similar joint-space relationships with residen-
tial buildings, which helps assuage the costs of
prime real estate.
“The residential tower and the museum
express themselves in very separate ways,”
said Dan Lobitz, a partner at Robert A.M. Stern
Architects LLP.
Founded in 1984, the Museum for African
Art first opened its doors in a rented tenement
building on the Upper East Side. It moved to
Soho in 1992 and then to its current location in
Long Island City, Queens, in 2002. Its collec-
tion includes traditional, contemporary and
African diaspora art.
Since 2005, the museum’s gallery space has
been closed and exhibits have been on dis-
play only at visiting museums around
the country while administrators
worked on developing a new space that would
allow the museum to grow.
“We won’t disappoint. We’ll open with a
number of fantastic exhibitions,” Thompson
said, in spite of the projected $8 million annual
operating costs projected for the museum.
Groundbreaking for the new building began
in 2007. The opening, originally slated for April,
was postponed to this fall, with the museum cit-
ing construction delays. According to a March 9
New York Times article, the museum has raised
$76 million of the $90 million in construction
costs, including a recent $3 million donation by
the Ford Foundation.
The architectural design was created with
the museum’s contents in mind.
“The design was based on traditional African
motifs sort of abstracted and modernized,”
Lobitz said. “We looked at the character of West
African masonry architecture as well as other
African textiles and motifs and adapted them to
create a modern New York building.”
When it does open, the new space will have
three floors, with a movable wall system that
ART
APRIL | 53
NYO
By Rachel Ohm
Home at Last
The Museum for African Art finds its long-awaited home on Museum Mile
El Anatsui,
Akua’s Surviving
Children, 1996;
wood and metal,
dimensions
variable.
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El Anatsui, Akua’s Surviving Children, 1996
Wood and metal, dimensions variable
Photo courtesy: The October Gallery
NYO_MAG2_PXX_AfricanArt.indd 53 4/1/11 10:19:19 AM
allows curators to set up a space that reflects
the intended narrative.
“Every time I walk into this space, my
heart races,” said Lisa Binder, a curator of
contemporary art at the museum. “It’s an
amazing layout. We worked very closely with
the architect to make sure the space would
highlight the narratives we want to tell and
wouldn’t distract from them.”
Each of the three floors will have
gallery space dedicated to a diferent facet
of African art: contemporary, traditional
and Diaspora.
“Architecture in a cultural space is so im-
portant,” Thompson said. “When you walk
into a building, it does set the tone for your
entire experience. This architecture will
help shape the experience for the average
visitor in a transcendent way.”
One key feature of the new building will
be the mullion wall in the museum’s lobby.
Visitors will enter through an L-shaped
plaza to stand in a room full of trapezoidal
windows that from a distance suggest an
abstract woven basket pattern.
Among the exhibits that will make their
debut along with the museum are an installa-
tion of sculptures and photographs by South
African artist Jane Alexander and paintings
by Sudanese modernist Ibrahim El Salahi.
Thompson says that people are accus-
tomed to thinking of African art as an-
thropological or as utilitarian objects, as
sub-Saharan or made only by certain groups
of people, but there are many other facets to
the genre.
“The show by Jane Alexander, a white
South African, challenges the notion of
African art as belonging to sub-Saharan
Africa and being made by black people,”
Thompson said. “The exhibition on
Sudanese modernism is another example
of how we plan on continuing the tradition
of challenging previously held assumptions
about what African art is.”
ART
NYO
Above: El Anatsui’s
Sacred Moon, 2007.
Far le: El Anatsui’s
Assorted Seeds II,
1989. Le: El Anatsui’s
Untitled, 1980s.
“Architecture in a cultural space is so important.”
54 | APRIL
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NYO_MAG2_PXX_AfricanArt.indd 54 4/1/11 10:19:52 AM
allows curators to set up a space that reflects
the intended narrative.
“Every time I walk into this space, my
heart races,” said Lisa Binder, a curator of
contemporary art at the museum. “It’s an
amazing layout. We worked very closely with
the architect to make sure the space would
highlight the narratives we want to tell and
wouldn’t distract from them.”
Each of the three floors will have
gallery space dedicated to a diferent facet
of African art: contemporary, traditional
and Diaspora.
“Architecture in a cultural space is so im-
portant,” Thompson said. “When you walk
into a building, it does set the tone for your
entire experience. This architecture will
help shape the experience for the average
visitor in a transcendent way.”
One key feature of the new building will
be the mullion wall in the museum’s lobby.
Visitors will enter through an L-shaped
plaza to stand in a room full of trapezoidal
windows that from a distance suggest an
abstract woven basket pattern.
Among the exhibits that will make their
debut along with the museum are an installa-
tion of sculptures and photographs by South
African artist Jane Alexander and paintings
by Sudanese modernist Ibrahim El Salahi.
Thompson says that people are accus-
tomed to thinking of African art as an-
thropological or as utilitarian objects, as
sub-Saharan or made only by certain groups
of people, but there are many other facets to
the genre.
“The show by Jane Alexander, a white
South African, challenges the notion of
African art as belonging to sub-Saharan
Africa and being made by black people,”
Thompson said. “The exhibition on
Sudanese modernism is another example
of how we plan on continuing the tradition
of challenging previously held assumptions
about what African art is.”
ART
NYO
Above: El Anatsui’s
Sacred Moon, 2007.
Far le: El Anatsui’s
Assorted Seeds II,
1989. Le: El Anatsui’s
Untitled, 1980s.
“Architecture in a cultural space is so important.”
54 | APRIL
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Trim8.875”
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astair.indd 1 3/31/11 8:32:58 PM
NYO
music
What do you think about the
less classical line-up for this
year’s Carnegie Hall 120th
Anniversary Gala Concert?
I think it’s fantastic. I think
it was Duke Ellington who
said, ‘There are only two kinds
of music, good music and bad
music.’ I believe that very much.
[Ellington] was one of the great
performers of our time. And
James Taylor —I don’t need to
tell you he’s an iconic fgure in
the music world.
Who will you perform with?
One of the people I’ll be on
stage with, Yo-Yo Ma, has been
incredibly instrumental in
bridging gaps. He does the Silk
Road Project [and is]benefcial
in using his abilities as a great
performer and is one of the great
communicators of our time,
[bringing together] diferent
kinds of music and diferent
kinds of people.
How do you think music acts
as a great communicator?
Everybody responds to it. You
don’t need to know the language
in order to enjoy it, as you do with
reading. I can’t read a Russian
novel without knowing Russian,
but I can listen to a Russian song
and get something out of it.
How do you think Clarissa
Bronfman is changing the
way Carnegie Hall is per-
ceived with this gala?
Well I think Carnegie Hall has
always been a Mecca for many
kinds of music. Benny Goodman
did a Carnegie Hall concert in the
‘30s, so many great pop artists
have played in Carnegie Hall and
been thrilled about it. It’s a real
destination, not just for great
names in classical music.
So do you think Carnegie
Hall is wrongly perceived as
a classical venue?
I would like to think that the
whole idea of separating classical
music from music in general is
[obsolete.] When you go to the
movies and hear music, a lot
of that comes from a classical
background, when you hear
songs from Santana, those [come
from] Brahms Symphony.
What is your favorite
memory of performing at
Carnegie Hall?
I played there for the frst time
in 1974 and I think it is always a
highlight, it’s an exciting thing.
I’ve played there with Isaac Stern
and Yo-Yo Ma; I played there with
a number of orchestras; I played
there alone. Just being on that
stage is a highlight. Even rehears-
ing on that stage is a highlight.
How does it feel to be
considered the Have you had
the chance to meet with the
other Honorary Artist Com-
mittee members like Jay-Z?
No, but I’m hoping I will.
Have you ever heard Jay-Z’s
music?
Oh yeah, I’m sure I have, but
I’d be hard pressed to recognize
it of the cuf, but my daughter
certainly make me listen to
everything.
The 120th Anniversary Gala is
hosted by James Taylor and takes
place at 7 p.m. Tuesday, April 12
in Stern Auditorium/Perelman
Stage. Special guests include Steve
Martin, Dianne Reeves, Sting,
Barbara Cook and members of
the Tanglewood Festival Chorus.
Tickets are $200-$5,000.
This year’s gala honors
James Taylor, who’s
quite a departure from
Carnegie Hall’s usual
artists. Why the change?
I have always felt that the per-
ception of Carnegie Hall has
been very focused on classical
music and this year I wanted us
to try to really follow the mis-
sion of Carnegie Hall, which is to
present extraordinary music to
the widest possible audience.
How are you hoping
this gala will change
Carnegie Hall’s image?
One of the things people don’t
realize is the wealth of amazing artists
we’ve had through our doors. The frst
time The Beatles arrived in America
in 1964 they played in Carnegie Hall.
We’ve hosted Bob Dylan, Elton John,
Sting and The Doors, as well as jazz
legends like Louis Armstrong and Ella
Fitzgerald.
How has it been working
with James Taylor?
[Taylor has been] very involved in the
entire production. He wants to really
surprise the audience on the night and
has organized secret special guests.
A lot of the people helping out have
grown up with James’s music and
have a kind of melancholic, sentimen-
tal attachment to him.
Half of the proceeds from
this year’s gala are going to
Carnegie Hall’s artistic and
educational programs. Tell me
about these programs.
We have a very extensive education
department that reaches 150,000
people a year, but most New Yorkers
don’t know about it. We teach young
children on the poverty line how to
play musical instruments and provide
concerts in the community so they
can get more acquainted with music.
We also offer a seniors program and
a teaching program for teachers in
public schools.
Pounding the keys
Arguably the best pianist of the 21st century, Emanuel Ax talks James
Taylor, how his daughter exposed him to Jay-Z and taking part in
Carnegie Hall’s 120th Anniversary Gala Concert. By Rachel Morgan
Clarissa Bronfman shakes
things up with a big hitting
lineup including Emanuel
Ax, Yo-Yo Ma, and
James Taylor
Chairwoman
of the Gala
By Coco Mellors
april 2011 | 57
NYO
PLACES
A Paul Molé deluxe shave starts of with a
hot towel, followed by layers of essential oils,
then shaving cream with a layer of hot lather
on top. This step is followed by more hot oil,
and a repeat of the cream and lather steps.
This process serves to help prep the face and
neck for the actual shave, performed with
a sharpened 5/8-inch-wide steel blade. In
around 15 strokes, the process is complete.
But a good barber never hurries, said Adrian
Wood, 63, the current owner of the Upper East
Side shave shop. A good barber takes his time
and tailors his approach to the unique angles
of each man’s face so that the skin is smooth
but never irritated, he said.
Inside the vintage leather and mahogany
cocoon of the storied Paul Molé barbershop,
time slows to a comfortable crawl. Founded on
this same block by its namesake, Paul Molé, in
1913, the self-proclaimed “Oldest Barbershop in
Manhattan” has catered to the hair and whisker
needs of Manhattan’s men and boys for nearly a
century.
It’s a tradition that Wood takes very seriously.
Everything from the polished wooden surfaces
to the rows of top-of-the-line badger hair lather
brushes to the nattily dressed barbers exudes
a casually refined aesthetic. Yet there is also
something inexplicably cozy about the atmo-
sphere. Customers are rewarded for climbing
the second-floor walk-up’s stairs with a welcome
from the shop’s grimacing tobacco store Native
American, while a faded 1950s carousel horse
holds court in the corner. Three of the original
Paul Molé barbershop chairs are still in use
today.
“All men are men in a barbershop,” Wood said.
The Molé family owned the shop for 50 years
before passing it along to its current master
barber–in–residence, the English-born Wood,
in 1973. Today, Paul Molé is still very much a
family business. Wood’s four children all work
in diferent capacities for their father’s business.
Michael, 26, who started sweeping floors and
carrying towels when he was just 8 years old, is
now a master barber himself.
“Me and my sister, we grew up in here,”
Michael said. “Working with my dad is great.
[Cutting hair] is just natural for me. It’s hard to
explain it.”
Diane, 29, and also a master barber, travels
the world under the moniker “Queen of Shaves,”
helping U.K.-based company King of Shaves
with product development and marketing.
On a recent Monday afternoon, half of the
shop’s 10 second-floor chairs stood
empty. A middle-aged man with a
receding hairline and goatee walked
purposefully over to his favored chair
near the back. Two older gentlemen
in for shampoos and trims picked
spots in the front of the shop. A
young boy wearing a yellow rain
slicker stomped along obediently
behind his Burberry-clad mother.
Each customer picks his own
chair, creating his own sense of
comfort and routine. Privacy is
respected here, Michael said. There
is a special first-floor chair area for
young children and the disabled, but
the second-floor chairs are the most
sought-after.
“Most guys like the second floor.
They don’t like having their hair cut
‘in public,’” he said, referring to the
large picture windows prevalent
in ground-floor barbershops. Paul
Molé’s also remains politely tight-
lipped when it comes to its celebrity
clientele. But autographed head
shots along the walls speak louder
than words. In one such photo, John Steinbeck,
his trademark growl firmly in place, enjoys a
shave from the smiling, curly-haired Paul Molé
himself.
A young Donald Trump had his hair cut in a
Paul Molé chair, Wood said. And when David
Lettermen shaved of his wooly beard on air a
few years ago, it was none other Paul Molé’s own
Diane Wood and Roberto who did the honors.
Weekends and mornings are busiest,
especially Saturdays, when it is not uncom-
mon to see 60 or so customers lining the walls
waiting for an open chair. Wood prides himself
on customer loyalty; over the decades he has
shaved families going back two and three
generations. On ledges that run the length of the
upper level are hundreds of shaving mugs, each
one personalized with the first and last name of
a customer who has patronized
Paul Molé’s for 30 years or more.
There must be more than 2,000
of these mugs, all of them porce-
lain testaments to the longevity
of the place.
Ultimately, this is the reason so
many men return again and again.
Paul Molé charges between $25
and $30 for haircuts and shaves,
along with optional $4 shoe
shines and all the complimentary
cappuccino and espresso one can
consume.
Besides being generally better
than his competitor’s machine-
made haircuts—cutting with an
electric blade is equivalent to
the indiscriminate shearing of a
sheep, Wood said—the proprietor
and his colleagues generally treat
scissors and straight-razor shav-
ing more like an art form than a
trade.
“I love my job,” Wood said. He
hesitated for a second. “It’s not a
job, it’s a passion.”
A Close Shave
The iconic Paul Molé barbershop holds court on the Upper East Side
By Meredith Bennett-Smith
Men all over the
Upper East Side
get cut, shaven
and washed at the
iconic Paul Molé
barbershop.
“All men are men
in a barbershop.”
58 | APRIL
NOTABLE
NAMESOF
PAULMOLÉ
These celebrities
have all had a
haircut or straight-
razor shave at the
iconic barbershop
David Letterman
George Clooney
Daniel Craig
John McEnroe
Donald Trump
Mike Wallace
Joseph Pulitzer
Lionel Barrymore
John Steinbeck
Joshua Logan
Eddie O’Brien
Henry Fonda
Roger Vadim
Herman Wouk
Tennessee Williams
M
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NYO
m
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a
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; m
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april 2011 | 59 5
NYO_MAG2_PXX_PaulMoleBarber.indd 59 4/1/11 10:46:01 AM
60 | april 2011
NYO
events
p
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s Kelly RutheRfoRd,
NaNette lepoRe,
Matthew Settle
alliSoN aStoN, ClaRe MCKeoN,
SloaN oveRStRoM, RaChel Roy
JoSh RadNoR,
CaRey MulligaN
RASHIDAJONES
JUSTINLONG
ADAMYAUCH
JOYPHILBIN
REGISPHILBIN
HOPEATHERTON
STEPHANIE
LACAVA
BLAKELIVELY
JOHN
SLATTERY
ALECBALDWIN
PATRICIACLARKSON
SADELYTHCOTT
ZOEKRAVITZ
ZANI
GUGELMANN
RUFUS
WAINWRIGHT
61
NYO_MAG2_PXX_PartyPics.indd 61 4/1/11 10:35:52 AM
62 | april 2011
NYO
XXXXXXX
Maayan Zilberman and Nikki Dekker, the
duo behind lingerie line The Lake and Stars,
have laid the groundwork for a fashion
empire. They pair have based their success
on one principle—designing undergarments
that are meant to be seen.
After a watershed year in 2010, which in-
cluded collaborations with Urban Outftters,
a Barneys New York event during Fashion’s
Night Out and their frst store opening, the
collection is on the cusp of mainstream
recognition. Top that of with a 2011 Ecco
Domani Fashion Foundation Award for
Womenswear, with a list of previous winners
that include fashion heavyweights Alexander
Wang, Rodarte and Proenza Schouler.
Just fve years ago, Zilberman and Dekker
were working in the lingerie world inde-
pendently when they were introduced by a
mutual friend.
“At the time, we were both wearing swim
tops as lingerie” Zilberman said. “For us,
bras were something that you should be able
to show, and back then it was hard to fnd that
on the market.”
Fast-forward to The Lake and Stars’ frst
fashion show in February, in which the
designers debuted a line that did just that.
“The Lake and Stars was founded as a
response to what our friends were wearing;
we want women of all body types to feel in-
cluded,” Zilberman said. “It’s not just about
skinny or fat; it’s about confdence.”
Case in point: When a model was late to
their February presentation, they turned
to their friend and fellow designer Abigail
Lorick, who was hanging out backstage,
and threw her in the look as a last-minute
replacement. She ended up being the star of
the show.
The pair’s next venture? A line of under-
wire and structural garments to be sold
in department stores and their frst bridal
capsule and handbag collections.
Right,thedesigner
behindtheLake
andStars,Maayan
Zilberman(lef)
andNikkiDekker.
PhotobyTomHines.
Below,models
wearingTheLake
andStarslingerie.
New Designers
on the Block
Maayan Zilberman and Nikki
Dekker burst on the scene with their
lingerie line, The Lake and Stars
ByPriscillaPolley
“It’s not just about
skinny or fat; it’s
about confdence.”
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NEWDESIGNERS_new.indd 62 4/1/11 10:37:23 AM
Tickets from $29
Box O∂ce: 57th Street and 7th Avenue
CarnegieCharge: 212.247.7800
www.carnegiehall.org
WWW.ORPHEUSNYC.ORG
HAYDN’S
LONDON
SYMPHONY
FRIDAY
APRIL 29, 2011
8:00 PM
Stern Auditorium | Perelman Stage
Carnegie Hall
Arabella
Steinbacher
violin
Season Finale
This concert is sponsored in part by
S T R AUS S Serenade in E-flat major, Op. 7
HART MANN Concerto funèbre
MOZ ART Rondo in C major, K. 373
MOZ ART Adagio in E major, K. 261
HAY DN Symphony No. 104 in D major “London”
PHOTOS: ORPHEUS (LARRY FINK AT STUDIO 535); STEINBACHER (MICHAEL LEIS)
C H A M B E R O R C H E S T R A
at c aRne GI e HaL L
— THE TI MES [ LONDON]
“An ensemble
of the rst rank”
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carnegie hall.indd 1 3/31/11 8:34:01 PM
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Jaguar.indd 1 2/24/11 3:14:46 PM Jaguar IBC.indd 1 3/31/11 8:35:04 PM
FASHION
APRIL | 65
NYO
Words from the
(Chanel-clad) wise
What trends do you see
on the Upper East Side
with staying power?
The trends that were
happening in the Upper
East Side are now infiltrat-
ing the Lower East Side
and the Village, particular-
ly from what I’m predicting
for fall. There’s a new at-
titude toward dressing and
there’s a certain segment of
the population, particu-
larly below 14th Street, that
really have never dressed
up before. We’ve often seen
the dressed-up ladies and
young girls on the Upper
East Side, but we see a dif-
ferent uniform really going
on down below 14th Street,
[in] Soho, Tribeca, Nolita
and particularly the Lower
East Side.
So do you think the
hipster look is over?
I think it’s just become
a little passé and won’t
look fresh. I say this not
from purely my instincts,
but because I interviewed
two designers during
Fashion Week in New
York; one was Rachel Zoe.
She designed her first
collection, and I asked her
[about] her inspiration for
this very grown-up and
sophisticated collection
for young girls. She said,
‘I’m giving a segment of
the population clothes to
dress up in because they’ve
never dressed up before,’
and it started me thinking.
Then when I attended
the fashion show at the
Plaza Hotel, [Alice + Olivia
designer Stacey Bendet
was showing] this very
sophisticated, grown-up,
glamorous, polished collec-
tion geared toward young
customers. And there it
was again.
What’s your worst
fashion moment?
We were going through
a mod moment in fashion
time [in the 1980s] and
I was going to an Isaac
Mizrahi show. I had on
these black-patent-leather
go-go boots and this bright
chartreuse miniskirt and
over a coat with a very exag-
gerated A-line, almost like
a tutu. My husband said as I
was leaving my apartment,
‘You look ridiculous in that
outfit’ and I said, ‘You’re
crazy; I look fantastic.’

What are your top five
picks for spring?
The first thing you need
to buy is something in
color; it could be a dress,
a blouse or a pair of jeans.
The next thing is some-
thing in print. My per-
sonal favorite this season
is the maxi-dress. I think
it looks so fresh after so
many seasons of short
dresses and miniskirts.
Also something in stripes,
but not the traditional
nautical stripe, some-
thing in a colorful stripe,
anything from a T-shirt to
a T-shirt dress. Another
great pick would be a
wide-leg jean, by J-Brand.
The wide leg or flared
jean, because that works
with anything. Last, a
peasant-type blouse that
could be in print or in a
creamy white color with a
poet sleeve flowing away
from the body.
What was the first
designer piece you
purchased?
A Chanel jacket when
I was 39 years old. It was
white. I pined after it. I
waited until I could get
enough money to aford it.
It was a classic white tweed
cropped rolled button
jacket, and when I put it on,
and felt the chain along the
edging, I never in my life
felt more glamorous.
—Rachel Morgan
Stephanie Solomon, operatng vice president of women’s
fashion direction at Bloomingdale’s, decides what looks
make the trek from the runway to the racks at Bloom-
ingdale’s. She sounds of on how Upper East Side style is
trickling downtown, reminisces about her first designer
purchase—a Chanel coat, no less—and gives us her top
picks for spring/summer.
Top to bottom: Ella
Moss striped maxi
dress, $190; Diane von
Furstenberg top, $198;
Joan & David neutral
patent leather pump,
$225, and Ippolita oval
mother of pearl ring,
$495. All available at
select Bloomingdale’s
(1-800-232-1854) or
bloomingdale’s.com.
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NYO_MAG2_PXX_Bloomingdales.indd 65 4/1/11 11:49:56 AM
FOOD
66 | april 2011
NYO
H
ow did you get started in
the culinary industry?
I knew since I was a little
boy that I wanted to be a
chef. I grew up in a very
small village in Austria, and in the 1970s,
most of the famous chefs I knew worked on
cruise ships. I saw all the ships go by and I
thought, ‘That looks cool. That’s a way to get
out of here!’ There’s a famous Lou Reed and
John Cale song called ‘Small Town,’ and I
think I had their feelings about growing up in
a small town. My approach was, ‘What can
get me out into the world?’

How have you modernized Austrian
cuisine? Has anyone ever objected to you
changing traditional dishes?
I have a strong classic background, but I
think I’m creative, and I take the classics and
turn them around my way. If I start to worry
what every single person thinks of my food,
I would lose the game already. The most
important thing is that you’re happy with
yourself, and then you have a good chance of
making your customers happy, too.
What is the most popular dish on
Sabarsky’s menu?
At Sabarsky, I try to keep the classics the way
they’re supposed to be. The number-one
seller is defnitely the apple strudel, followed
by the Sabarskytorte chocolate cake.
You live with your three daughters.
What’s your favorite thing to cook for
them at home?
I’m really lucky with my daughters, that they
eat everything. Although the other day I was
cooking lamb chops and I had to use loins
with no bones, so the girls were sitting at the
dinner table with their noses up. Of course,
desserts are a big hit at home, too.
What was the earliest dish you
remember making?
It was a cake for my mother’s birthday.
It didn’t come out well, and I hid it under
my bed.
Why do you think design is so important
to a dining experience?
If you go back a hundred years and look at
Vienna, there were such incredible artists
like Adolf Loos, who designed our chairs, or
Josef Hofmann, who did the upholstery and
light fxtures. We’ve tried to bring together all
the elements of art and design in this space.
Everything is important, even down to the
sugar shakers, because people notice.
Walk
Wild
a
Side
on
the
NYO Magazine
sits down with Kurt
Gutenbrunner in Café
Sabarsky, his Viennese-
style café in the Upper
East Side’s Neue Gallery,
to dish on Austrian
pastries, rock and roll
and cooking for
his children
By Coco Mellors
Photos by E.F. Angel
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Wild
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Photos by E.F. Angel
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april 2011 | 67
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Wild
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Photos by E.F. Angel
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FOOD
68 | april 2011
NYO
You mentioned Lou Reed earlier; is music a
big part of your life?
I love rock and roll. John Fogerty has a song
called ‘Centerfeld,’ and the whole week before
I opened my downtown restaurant, Wallsé, I
was blasting it. A few days after opening the
restaurant, Lou Reed himself walks through the
door. Of course, being a boy from a little town
in Austria, I was like, ‘Oh my God, I’m shaking, I
don’t know what to do.’ Now we’ve developed a
good friendship, and he eats three or four times
a week in my place. I make sure that he leaves
happy the same way he leaves me happy when I
listen to his music.
How did you learn about wine?
My frst job was in the wine area in Austria, and
so I learned about it at a very early age. I love
Austrian wines, and I think I have the largest
collection in the United States. The frst time I
got drunk, I was 15 at a boarding school for hotel
management. I worked at a hotel, and every day
at 11 a.m., we would have a bottle of wine with
lunch, take an hour break and then go back to
work.
You have your frst cookbook coming out this
November. What has it been like writing that?
My book, Neue Cuisine: Elegant Tastes of
Vienna, is coming out for Café Sabarsky’s 10th
anniversary. It’s about my view of Austrian food
and art together with the Neue Gallery.
Will this be the frst of many books?
I want to do another book that focuses on
children’s food. I promised my daughter Lou
that I would do a book with her called ‘Lulu the
Spoon.’ It will help teach kids and their parents
that healthy food leads to a healthy mind, which
leads to great success and learning in life.
So children’s food is an important issue
for you?
Because I have three daughters in public schools,
I really like what the administration is doing
right now to help our kids eat healthy and fght
obesity and diabetes. We should take the mo-
mentum and work with our schools. What is the
new thing in the culinary world? I hope it’s better
food in our schools.
What’s the next challenge?
I just saw Julian Schnabel’s flm at the United
Nations, and I thought it’s great that he is an art-
ist but is also able to make flm. So I think making
a flm is something I would like to do one day.
Maybe I’m not talented enough, but I will learn.
But for now, it is maintaining what I have and
spending a bit more time with my girls. If you
can make time to see your children, you quickly
learn nothing else matters that much.
Chilled Smoked
Trout Crêpes &
Horseradish
–Crème Fraîche
Matjes Herring
on Egg Spread
and Apple.
Classic Viennese
dark Chocolate
Cake with house-
made Apricot
Confture.
chef.indd 68 4/1/11 10:44:24 AM
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70 | april 2011
NYO
food
Undeniably the most lauded
brunch spot in New York City,
Sarabeth’s has remained a
comforting and classic restau-
rant for a weekend brunch or if
you want know what it feels like
to dine inside a Laura Ashley
print. Lovingly prepared egg
dishes and a popular lemon-
ricotta pancake plus their
legendary scones and preserves
have remained favorites of the
Upper East Side brunch-with-
the-kids set. Full disclosure—I
went here every week with my
mom for scones (1295 Madison
Ave. at 92nd St., 212-410-7335).
Can’t jet-set to France for
the weekend? Pas de problem
bebes. Enter Le Bilboquet and
brunch in the style of the now-
defunct Bagatelle. The food?
Truly excellent—but go with the
nontraditional dishes like the
much loved Cajun chicken—in
any case, what does it matter
when you are part of the beauti-
ful crowd and poppin’ magnums
of rose? Le sigh (25 East 63rd St.,
212-751-3036).
One of the few restaurants on
the Upper East Side that holds a
broader appeal—the downtown
kids come uptown to go here, a
rarity—Park Avenue Spring
holds court as one of the most
beautiful places to dine on the
Upper East Side. Plus, with a
résumé that includes stints
working with Christian Delou-
vrier at Lespinasse and Gray
Kunz, chef Craig Koketsu has
created a unique brunch menu
that is as appealing on Mother’s
Day as it is in the darkest hour of
your hangover. Read: butter-
milk pancakes for Mom, fried
chicken ’n’ wafe sandwich for
you. And with a bagel-and-lox
dish called the Upper East Sider,
Park Avenue Spring clearly
knows its clientele (100 East
63rd St., 212-644-1900).
Dine under the pretense of
international intrigue, world-
class mystery and old-world,
timeless vibe at The Carlyle
Restaurant. While the Sunday
brunch is impressive and ex-
pensive, the crowd is lacking the
youth of the Upper East Side.
Go for people-watching while
noshing on a lobster omelette.
(35 East 76th St., 212-744-1600).
Serving a “Scandinavian
smorgasbord” brunch every
Sunday, Aquavit has its pulse
on what it means to deliver a
fun, delicious and quite unpre-
tentious brunch that keeps it
real—who wouldn’t want all-
you-can-eat Gravlax, Swedish
meatballs and other Scandi-
navian delights from a 40-plus
item menu? Finish it of with a
glass of Aquavit. You’ll need it
(65 East 55th St., 212-307-7311).
Eli Zabar’s cumulation of
30-plus years in the retail food
industry and more reasonably
priced than any of his retail
outlets, Taste Restaurant &
Wine Bar exemplifes a true
New York City brunch experi-
ence complete with bagels,
smoked salmon, a smoked fsh
plate, blintzes, brisket on rye
and the coveted Woody Allen
sighting (1413 Third Ave. at 80th
St., 212-717-9798).
One of the newest addi-
tions to the Upper East Side
restaurant scene, Jones
Wood Foundry is a self-
proclaimed “food-driven pub”
with a new game-changing
brunch menu that includes
bangers and mash, toad in
the hole and the very British
Sunday roast of the day. The
décor is reminiscent of the
English countryside, with a
lovely center courtyard. Upper
East Siders can rejoice in this
popular newbie that could
just as easily ft into Nolita or
Kensington (401 East 76th St.,
212-249-2700).
Follow Eva on Twitter @gastro-
girls or email her at ekaragiorgas@
observer.com.
Good
Morning,
Upper East
Siders…
Sarabeth’s
Pumpkin
Wafes
ParkAvenue
Spring
Brunch has long been considered
a tradition and institution in
the city. But skip the throngs of
sweatpant-wearing post-college
types on Second Avenue and use
those calories wisely indulging
in the best, most interesting and
delicious brunch destinations on
the Upper East Side
ByEvaKaragiorgas
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NYO_MAG2_PXX_FoodColumnEva.indd 70 4/1/11 10:47:37 AM
KEVIN B. BROWN |
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KEVIN B. BROWN, SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT, ASSOCIATE BROKER
T 212.606.7748 I kevin.brown@sothebyshomes.com
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this European-style home enjoys all of the modern amenities of a full service Condominium building.
$6,200,000. WEB: NYO0017548
Kevin Brown.indd 1 3/31/11 8:39:18 PM
72 | april 2011
food
NYO
T
he story of how the power
breakfast tradition started
is a bit of a legend. New York
City, reeling from the mid-
1970s market crash, needed
the attention and decision-making prowess
of the city’s business, fnancial and political
leaders. Having these disparate parties in
close proximity often allowed for the quick
decisions the dire times asked of New York’s
powerful. So there they congregated, in the
dining room of the storied Regency Hotel,
following after the example of the hotel’s
owners, brothers Preston Robert and Lau-
rence Tisch, who together ran and owned the
Loews Corporation.
“It was like a hot club in those days,” said
Stuart Feigenbaum, the food and beverage
director in the mid-’70s, in a phone interview.
“You’d see the limos lined up on Park Ave and
a queue of men in suits, waiting to be seated.”
On the morning that I spent perched over
an open-faced omelet, former Giants defen-
sive end Michael Strahan moved through the
dining room, shaking hands with a couple
of tie-clad diners who’d spent the previous
half-hour talking in hushed voices. Mr. Jon
Tisch himself, son of Preston Robert and
brother of Steven Tisch, an owner of the New
York Giants, breezed through on the way to a
meeting, to return no more than 20 minutes
later to sit down for a quick chat.
I couldn’t help but wonder—what does one
eat at his or her own power breakfast?
“Mostly healthily,” said Stuart Schwartz,
managing director of the Regency Hotel
over his bagel. “I don’t know if it’s supersti-
tion or habit, but there are regulars who
come here and always order the exact same
thing. One man always orders 18 blueber-
ries.”
In charge of their seating arrangement,
their backstories and the maintenance of
their general well-being over the course of
breakfast is restaurant manager Rae Bianco.
“Bob [Tisch] used to say she’s the most im-
portant woman in New York,” said Schwartz
of Bianco. Bianco is literally the keeper of
the names and a seating chart containing an
elite list of New Yorkers.
What was Bianco’s most memorable
power-breakfast story? She recounted the
trauma of once having seated two individu-
als on opposite ends of a public and acrimoni-
ous lawsuit directly next to one another.
“Each party was booked under their
guests’ name, so I had no idea either of them
were coming in,” she said. When it hap-
pened, a nonplussed Bianco rang upstairs
to [Preston Robert] Tisch to ask what she
should do. Undaunted, he told her: “They’re
adults. If they don’t want to be seen, they
shouldn’t have breakfast here.”
And so the tradition lives on. The roster of
names spotted at the power breakfast at the
Regency could themselves write a storied
history of the city’s business deals.
“You’ll read an article in the paper about a
deal—and the parties involved will have had
breakfast here that same week,” Schwartz
said.
In an age where many restaurants ofer
diners the opportunity to book reserva-
tions online themselves—as the Regency’s
public-relations maven Lark-Marie Anton
noted—Bianco still flls reservations into an
almost comically voluminous, leather-bound
register by hand.
Feigenbaum also noted another tradition
that is fast becoming an enigma in modern
times: mixing the informality of sharing
a meal with the formality of business. The
21st century has brought us, among other
things, cloud computing, virtual meetings
and instant access. The Regency thwarts
all of that, continuing to bring together in
the same room a diverse cross section of
decision makers and wheelers and dealers.
As Feigenbaum so rightly notes, “There are
just some things you really shouldn’t do
over Skype.”
Two Eggs, Toast
and Billion-Dollar Deals
The Regency’s Power Breakfast lives on in the 21st century
BySydneySarachan
RestaurantManagerRaeBiancostandsinthemidstofthestoriedRegencyPowerBreakfast.
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D I S T I N G U I S H E D
P R O P E R T I E S
EAST SIDE MANHATTAN BROKERAGE I sothebyshomes.com/nyc
38 EAST 61ST STREET NEW YORK, NY 10065 T 212.606.7660 F 212.606.7661
ROGER ERICKSON, SENIOR MANAGING DIRECTOR
T 212.606.7612 I www.roger-erickson.com
Sotheby’s International Realty and the Sotheby’s International Realty logo are registered service marks used with permission. Operated by Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc. An Equal Opportunity Company.
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Erickson.indd 1 3/31/11 9:16:07 PM
74 | APRIL
NYO
WINE
Tell me about your show, the Next Wave,
your show on the Daily. Why are social
media outlets like Twitter important to
what you do?
Next Wave is going to be an opportunity for
me to really express my thoughts and views on
how social media is evolving. Social media is
important to me because I don’t believe in the
words ‘social media.’ I believe in the fact that
human interaction has fundamentally changed
and human interaction matters, and that’s what
I’m paying attention to.
How do social media and wine interact?
It’s not even just about wine; I don’t really
register it that way. I think everything interacts
with social media. People talk about things, and
that’s what I focus on. People love to talk about
wine and engage with the product and leave
their thoughts and share their tasting notes. I try
to incorporate that into what I do.
Who in the wine world is using social media
really well?
I think Jancis Robinson, a critic out of the
U.K., is doing a great job. I think Rick Bakas is
doing a great job. I think Randall Grahm is doing
some great work in social media, engaging a lot.
Let’s talk wine. What was your first wine
experience?
Some people might not know, but my
premiere wine experience did not happen early.
I was 22. My parents didn’t let me drink wine.
I went over to the late Steve Verlin’s home, and
he had a 1975 Petrus Magnum open for me,
because that was the year I was born. It was just
breathtaking, and more importantly, he became
a dear wine friend and mentor .
What’s your favorite place in Manhattan
to get wine?
Terroir Wine Bar, and the sommelier there is
Paul Greico. He does an amazing job and is a guy
that I would follow to any part of the city.
You’ve been invited to a dinner party, say, on
Park Avenue. What bottle do you bring?
I’d probably try to bring something
disruptive. It’s easy to bring a young, classic
Bordeaux, and obviously it has to do with the
people. But I’m pretty comfortable even if I
don’t know people that well. So I’d probably
bring a grower’s Champagne because it’s cel-
ebratory and [I] want people to discover that
there’s more than Cristal out there. But I’d
also consider bringing maybe a premium noir
valley red wine. I’m obsessed with chinon and
I like to let people discover it.
My father had an impressive collection.
What does yours look like? Is it about col-
lecting or consuming? Can it be both?
You know, my collection, since I live in a
New York City apartment, sits in the base-
ment of the Wine Library. It definitely leans a
little bit towards collecting, at least for those
kinds of wines. On the consuming side, it
leans extremely toward sparkling and white
wines, though I definitely have a diferent mix
of what I collect and what I drink.
@waynothompson doesnt
make sense for a business if they
dont “own” the person to some
level, my businesses OWN me.
3:29 P.M. MARCH 24
@kienan lol - hope I can get to the
place where I am zero BS, cause
it’s how I roll. 9:45 A.M. MARCH 24
@armbrusting get gangster. 9:51
P.M. MARCH 23
So excited for dailygrape.com we
just added a bad ass new com-
ments section, come add your
0.02 and Ill reply :) #YEAHH :)
7:18 P.M. MARCH 23
Doing a live interview at the Pepsi
playground at the convention
center stop by so I can beat u at
thumb. Wresting. 7:39 P.M. MARCH 13
So excited about my New Wine
Journey! I have Retired from Wine
Library TV.....and started [the Daily
Grape.] 5:34 P.M. MARCH 15
IPADS,
TWITTER
& WINE,
Oh My!
By Alexander Cacioppo
& Rachel Morgan
Gary Vaynerchuk isn’t just a wine connoisseur. As founder of the $60 million business
Vayner Media—which includes Wine Library, an burgeoning online retail outlet, and
Wine Library TV, a revolutionary daily video blog all about vino—Vaynerchuk has single-
handedly changed the way people view wine. Add to that his avid tweeting and new gig
at the Daily hosting the Next Wave, and it seems Vaynerchuk has made a business out of
the intersection between social media and wine.
GARY
VEE’SEPIC
TWEETS
The best of Gary Vee in
140 characters or less
NYO_MAG2_PXX_WineGaryVayberchuk_V4.indd 1 4/1/11 10:50:08 AM
NI KKI FI ELD
REPRESENTING MANHATTAN’ S
P R E M I E R P R O P E R T I E S
Operated by Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc. Sotheby’s International Realty
®
is a registered trademark.
SOTHEBY’ S INTERNATIONAL REALTY I EAST SI DE MANHATTAN BROKERAGE
38 EAST 61ST STREET, NEW YORK, NY 10065 I sothebyshomes.com/nyc
NIKKI FIELD SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT, ASSOCIATE BROKER I T 212.606.7669 I nikkifield.com
NIKKI FIELD, SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT: 212.606.7669
KEVIN B. BROWN, SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT: 212.606.7748
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JEANNE BUCKNAM, ASSOCIATE BROKER: 212.606.7717
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8 6 0 U N I T E D N A T I O N S P L A Z A
Untitled-54 1 3/31/11 9:17:18 PM
NYO
76 | april 2011
real estate
“Incredible pressures come from high cost of land and pressures
of the market. I suppose we work within the framework
we’re given and we try to be as creative as possible.”
Clockwisefromtoplef:
TheBrompton,the
Chatham,Stern,the
Chatham,theBrompton
andStern,circa1986at
HearstCastle. G
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april 2011 | 77
NYO
real estate
Over the years, the number of
signifers used to describe the architectural
craft of Robert A.M. Stern has bordered
on the edge of tedium. He’s been labeled a
postmodernist, a traditionalist, a modern
traditionalist and a chameleon.
“I think that people are always putting
other people in silos or boxes,” Stern said.
“When people—and I’m not the only one—
cross diferent parts of the discipline, I
suppose it makes things more difcult for the
observer on the outside to categorize. History
and evolution of the discipline are two sides of
the same coin. I’m lucky enough to be pretty
good at each of them.”
Stern’s architectural success can be seen in
the reconstruction of 42nd Street’s Theatre
Row, 15 Central Park West, the Chatham, the
Brompton and East Harlem’s 1280 Fifth Ave.
As Stern talks on the telephone, the sound
of bodies and mouths in motion circulate
through the speakers—his 220-person frm
in midtown, Robert
A.M Stern Archi-
tects LLP, is bustling
in the background.
Many of his students
or stafers, such as
Peter Pennoyer and
Andrés Duany, have
gone on to impressive careers.
“I take great pride that so many of them
have gone on to do interesting work,” Stern
said.
Stern has two Upper East Side condo
productions, the Chatham at 181 East 65th St.
and the Brompton at 205 East 85th St. The
Chatham, a 34-story tower with 1920s prewar
toning and a main shaft that sits atop an 85-
foot base, is accented by tall bay windows and
French balconies as the tower ascends upward.
In 2009, almost a decade after the
Chatham was completed, Stern was done with
work on the Brompton. Whereas the Chatham
was situated within the neighborhood’s quiet,
residential side streets, the Brompton rests on
a busy Third Avenue corner.
“We wanted to make a building that was
engaged in that vitality but also retreated
from it,” Stern said. Named after Brompton
Quarter, one of London’s most exclusive
neighborhoods, the structure is a work of
Gothic and Renaissance stonework comple-
mented by a brick and limestone facade,
alternating between red brick and masonry
on each of its faces.
“Many people have commented that they
feel like the Brompton has always been there,”
Stern said.
But designing within the neighborhood’s
many confnes isn’t easy, Stern allows.
“There’s not much wiggle room in archi-
tecture in New York City, period,” he said.
“Incredible pressures come from the high
cost of land [and] pressures of the market.
I suppose we work within the framework
we’re given and we try to be as creative as
possible.”
Although the Chatham and the Brompton
replaced low-rise apartments and tenement
houses, some dating back to the 19th century,
Stern doesn’t believe that complete revision
is the answer.
“Of course, the city evolves, but we need
to preserve a certain part of our history,” he
said. “We don’t want to turn neighborhoods
like Yorkville into twelve 20-story buildings
without anything on a lower scale.”
Stern seems to have great faith in the future
of his craft.
“I think residential architecture in the
city has been improving in the past 10 or 15
years,” he said. “There are more interesting
neighborhoods now than there have been
in the last 40 or 50 years. Brooklyn, parts of
Manhattan, Queens and the Bronx eventually
[are] all neighborhoods that have had so little
attention for so long and it’s a shame.”
Perhaps Stern will be the one to give these
overlooked areas the attention they deserve.
Old
meets
New
Legendary architect Robert A.M. Stern
talks Upper East Side, his home in the
Chatham and what he sees for the future
of the neighborhood .
“Incredible pressures come from high cost of land and pressures
of the market. I suppose we work within the framework
we’re given and we try to be as creative as possible.”
Clockwise from top lef:
The Brompton, the
Chatham, Stern, the
Chatham, the Brompton
and Stern, circa 1986 at
Hearst Castle.
By Andrew Guarini
NYO - MAG2_PXX_Architect.indd 77 4/1/11 11:51:36 AM
78 | april 2011
Theformer
Gertrude
Rhinelander
WaldoMansion
at867Madison
isnowthehome
ofRalphLauren’s
fagshipstore.
Upper East Side mansions have a history all
their own, but we unlocked the storied pasts
of the heiresses behind these iconic homes—
and the scandal that marked their lives.
Gertrude Rhinelander Waldo was privi-
leged—and beautiful—from birth. Throughout
her life, Waldo had an eye for both suitors and
real estate. When her husband, Francis Waldo,
a stock broker, got hit in the Panic of 1873, her
family’s wealth ofset the losses. Five years lat-
er, when he died, Waldo moved on to her lawyer,
Charles Schiefelin, but the relationship was
not without its problems. Waldo sued Schief-
felin for stealing more than $12,294.22—which
she had given him to invest in stocks. Schief-
felin was unfortunately under the assumption
that they were to be married, a thought which
appalled the very proper Waldo.
Years later, this headstrong heiress took mat-
ters into her own hands and bought a lot at 867
Madison Avenue, at the corner of 72nd Street.
She hired the architectural frm Kimball &
Thompson and began building one of the Upper
East Side’s most stately mansions. Although she
never lived in it, the French Revival mansion
remained in her possession until she passed
away. Currently, the home, known as the
Gertrude Rhinelander Waldo Mansion, is the
home of Ralph Lauren’s fagship store, a plush
reminder of the luxurious era and the heiress it
was built for.
Isn’t there a saying about a woman scorned?
Lucy Drexel Dahlgren, the daughter of Anthony
Joseph Drexel, founder of the Paris-based
investment banking frm, Drexel, Harjes & Co.,
and Drexel, Morgan & Co., caught her husband
cheating in 1912 after 22 years of marriage and
eight children. She decided to get even—a rarity
for a woman of her time. She fled for divorce
and promptly whisked herself and the children
of to Paris to await proceedings. A year later,
the divorce may have been fnal, but Dahlgren’s
revenge on her husband was not. Her husband
had kept their house on Madison and 68th
Street, and she insisted on retrieving all the
furniture, which was paid for with her family’s
money. So she sent her lawyer to get the keys
from her ex-husband in order to start emptying
the house. Naturally, he refused, and Dahlgren
countered by hiring a protection company to
outft the house with a burglary alarm system
and station police at every door to bar him from
entering. She then emptied the entire house of
furniture, leaving only his bedroom untouched.
Feeling better, she then purchased a plot of land
at 15 East 96th Street and erected the house that
is today named in her honor. The mansion is still
used as a residence today.
Florence Baker Loew, also known as
“Queenie,” was a frecracker. Having grown up
in high society, she knew the rules and for the
most part played by them. However she did not
understand the strife of those less fortunate—
nor did she care to. In the midst of the Great
Depression, Queenie built one of the most
impressive private residences in the city. Today
the lavish home at 56 East 93rd Street houses
the prestigious Spence School, but a century
ago, it was home to Loew, her husband, William
Goadby Loew, and their 16 servants. While
the interiors of the home went through a huge
overhaul when it was converted into the Smith-
ers Alcoholism Center, in order to be more
conducive to clinical environmental needs, the
original interiors have since been reinstalled
thanks to architect Samuel White, who was
hired by the Spence School when they obtained
the property in 1999.
High Society living
The historic mansions of the Upper East Side and the heiresses that built them ByCharlotteGarden
M
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C
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h
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M
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n
T
o
f
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M
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G
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Mansion1.indd 78 4/1/11 11:32:33 AM
L OCAL E XP E RTS WORL DWI DE
EAST SIDE MANHATTAN BROKERAGE I sothebyshomes.com/nyc
38 EAST 61ST STREET NEW YORK, NY 10065 T 212.606.7660 F 212.606.7661
Sotheby’s International Realty and the Sotheby’s International Realty logo are registered service marks used with permission. Operated by Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc. An Equal Opportunity Company.
MAGNIFICENT DUPLEX: Park Ave. Grand, high foor, 15-into-14-
room Rosario Candela co-op. Sun-fooded 5-6 bedroom, 11’ ceilings,
open views. Brilliant entertaining space with wonderful room propor-
tions. $28,000,000 WEB: NYO0017522. Anne Corey, 212.606.7733
885 PARK AVENUE: Sun-fooded 9-room prewar coop with South,
East, and North exposures. 33’ gallery, living room with freplace, over-
sized kitchen, 3 bedrooms, 4 baths. Broker owner. $9,750,000 WEB:
NYO0017521. Chris Rounick, 212.606.7643, Lois Nasser, 212.606.7706
4 EAST 62ND STREET: The prestigious Curzon House, just of Fifth
Avenue. Exclusive 3 bedrooms, 3 ½ baths condo crafted from famed
Beaux Arts townhouses. 2 freplaces, high ceilings, south-facing garden.
$6,800,000 WEB: NYO0017281. Olivia Hoge, 212.606.7738
79 EAST 79TH STREET: Light-fooded, 12-room full-foor apartment
in prestigious prewar coop. Open vistas of the Park, bountiful southern
exposures and superb period details. $12,750,000. WEB: NYO0017104.
Serena Boardman, 212.606.7611, Roberta Golubock, 212.606.7704
140 E 63RD ST: The Barbizon has is a full service condo with ameni-
ties of a new building and prewar elegance. Combine 2 high-foor
apartments to create over 3,500+/- sq ft of interior space plus 5 ter-
races. $7,790,000. WEB: NYO0017424 Michele Llewelyn, 212.606.7716
31 EAST 72ND ST: Perfectly situated, beautiful, 7-room, high foor
corner residence distinguished by lovely city and skyline views and
open sunny exopsures throughout. $6,500,000. WEB: NYO0017449.
Serena Boardman, 212.606.7611, Roberta Golubock, 212.606.7704
Brokerage 1.indd 1 3/31/11 9:18:20 PM
80 | APRIL
NYO
INTERIORDESIGN
O
ne of interior design’s new tastemakers, Celerie
Kemble firmly believes you don’t have to sacrifice
comfort for style.
Following in the traditions of industry legends
Sister Parish and Elsie de Wolfe, her articulate
and savvy designs have landed her on House and
Garden’s “50 Tastemakers for the Future of Design.”
Kemble’s latest project is designing signature residences for the
iconic Manhattan House’s new design series, The Modern Collection.
Her task was turning the stark white condominium apartments into
showcases of design so that potential buyers could imagine the full
potential of the space.
Stylishly turned out in an olive skirt and stiletto heels, Kimble
moves with hummingbird-like ef ciency. Raised in both Palm Beach,
Fla., and New York, she was brought up with design, as her mother is
renowned designer Mimi McMakin of Palm Beach’s Kemble Interiors.
Despite an East Coast education at Groton and Harvard, Kemble
embraces the informality of her Florida upbringing.
“I don’t look to design an apartment that’s just pretty,” she said. “I
think unless you can hunker down and read a book in all but two chairs
in your living room, it’s going to be an unhappy existence. So I look
to design spaces that are actually comfortable for barefoot people.
People use their spaces [in Manhattan.]”
Kemble’s passion is designing spaces ripe for entertaining.
Modern
Luxury
Design scion Celerie Kemble makes her mark on
the iconic Manhattan House. BYDAISYPRINCE
PHOTOGRAPHYBYJASONSCHMITT
NYO_MAG2_PXX_ID Celerie Kimble.indd 1 4/1/11 11:27:01 AM
april 2011 | 81
The pictured project is
a three-bedroom, three-
bath, 1,861-square-foot
residence tited The
Modern Collection by
Celerie Kemble.
NYO_MAG2_PXX_ID Celerie Kimble.indd 2 4/1/11 11:27:20 AM
82 | april 2011
interior design
NYO
“I like to design places that people are
proud to bring their friends to,” she said.
“People in New York have such a strong
public life, and it’s a treat to be brought into
someone’s house. It creates such immediate
intimacy that we miss in city living.”
When faced with a blank slate like those
within the Manhattan House, Kemble turns
to color to provide a relief from the frenzied
pace of the city.
“I think when you walk into an apartment,
you should feel respite from a city onslaught
of noise,” she said of her two projects within
the building, one of which is pictured. “I think
you should walk into personality. To walk into
a white box isn’t really the solace that some
people think it is. I think it becomes a bunch
of glaring angles unless you can soften the
interior.”
She sees the open space in Manhattan
House as one of the building’s great strengths.
“I think when
you walk into
an apartment
you should feel
respite from a
city onslaught
of noise.”
Classic upholstery styles are
paired with both modern
and 1960s-inspired furniture
and vintage textiles
throughout the residence.
NYO_MAG2_PXX_ID Celerie Kimble.indd 3 4/1/11 11:27:50 AM
L OCAL E XP E RTS WORL DWI DE
EAST SIDE MANHATTAN BROKERAGE I sothebyshomes.com/nyc
38 EAST 61ST STREET NEW YORK, NY 10065 T 212.606.7660 F 212.606.7661
Sotheby’s International Realty and the Sotheby’s International Realty logo are registered service marks used with permission. Operated by Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc. An Equal Opportunity Company.
1130 PARK AVENUE: Elegantly confgured 9-room co-op con-
tains approximately 3,350+/- sq ft, high ceilings, and excellent light
throughout. Gracious living room with freplace, looking over Park Ave.
$5,200,000 WEB: NYO0017520. Kathy Hoffman Linburn, 212.606.7791
COMBINATION OPPORTUNITY: The Savoy Condo. Unique 23rd
foor facing South and West with 2 terraces. 1,800+/- sq ft., foor-to-
ceiling windows, hardwood foors. $2,595,000 WEB: NYO0017509.
Agnes Beaugendre, 212.606.7629, Cord J. Stahl, 212.606.7621
215 EAST 72ND STREET: Sun-fooded 8-into-7 room prewar co-op
overlooking tree-lined street. Well maintained estate. South facing liv-
ing room with freplace, dining room, 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, maid’s with
bath $2,495,000 WEB: NYO0017370. Bunny Goodwin, 212.606.7721
PULITZER MANSION PENTHOUSE: Immensely grand penthouse
duplex with an elegantly proportioned living room featuring 17’ ceil-
ings and sun-fooded exposures. Lovely master suite with terrace.
$2,995,000 WEB: NYO0017463. Serena Boardman, 212.606.7611
CHIC PREWAR LOFT: Classic 6 with striking contemporary fnishes.
Sunken living room with 9’6” ceilings, 2 bedroom, formal dining room,
state-of-art kitchen, offce. $2,575,000 WEB: NYO0016880. Pierrette
Hogan, 212.606.7767, Cheryl Daly, 212.606.7758
DESIGNER HOME WITH SPECTACULAR VIEWS: Rarely avail-
able, this stunning designer home offers 3 bedrooms, 4 baths with
open city, river, bridge views from the 34th foor. $2,450,000. WEB:
NYO0017140. Paul Anand, 212.606.7741, Sharon Elbaz, 212.606.7759
Brokerage 2.indd 1 3/31/11 9:18:57 PM
84 | april 2011
NYO
interior design
“Coming into this space, it’s the light,” she
said. “It’s the permeability of the space. Every
single unit I’ve been in has a view and the
sense that light touches all corners.”
A good design will compliment, not inter-
fere with, the characteristics of a unit.
“The trick is to keep these [apartments]
more loftlike, so the design fows through
them,” she said.
But working in a postwar condominium
does have its share of challenges.
“There is the proximity of the rooms to
each other,” she said. “A lot of people will buy
a house because it speaks to them. It takes
more efort to turn an apartment—especially
a modern one—into your home.”
In a city like New York, Kemble sees the
designer playing a more integral role in trans-
forming an apartment into a home.
“That’s why it’s fun working in New York—
the role of the designer is so important,” she
said. “Whereas outside the city, the role of the
architect is much more important.”
When it comes to her own design method,
Kemble maintains that a key aspect in good
design is not to forget about the less obvious
spaces, like the hallway.
“Often, people spend all their money deco-
rating rooms they don’t spend their time in—I
think that’s a shame,” she said. “It’s harder to
shop for your hallways, but you are in those
rooms all the time; they color the experience
of how you live.”
The children’s bedroom
features Alpha Workshop’s
hand-painted Manhattan
skyline encircling the room.
The ceilings feature a
dreamscape of celestial
constellations.
NYO_MAG2_PXX_ID Celerie Kimble.indd 4 4/1/11 11:28:07 AM
L OCAL E XP E RTS WORL DWI DE
EAST SIDE MANHATTAN BROKERAGE I sothebyshomes.com/nyc
38 EAST 61ST STREET NEW YORK, NY 10065 T 212.606.7660 F 212.606.7661
Sotheby’s International Realty and the Sotheby’s International Realty logo are registered service marks used with permission. Operated by Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc. An Equal Opportunity Company.
15 EAST 91ST STREET: Lovely 7-room co-op with sunny exposures
in a long established full-service doorman building. Living room with
enclosed solarium, dining room, new kitchen, 3 bedrooms, 3 baths.
$2,300,000 WEB: NYO0016051. Pamela O’Connor, 212.606.7709
1ST OFFERING, CONVERTIBLE 3 BEDROOMS: Wonderful
1,750+/- sq ft with south facing terrace. Beautiful gallery/dining foyer,
living room, dining room/3rd bedroom, cook’s kitchen with breakfast
room. $1,495,000 WEB: NYO0017536. Iris Palley, 212.606.7754
PREWAR CONDOMINIUM OFF MADISON AVENUE: 55 East
86th Street. Prestigious 2 bedroom with newly renovated eat-in
kitchen located near Central Park. $1,225,000 WEB: NYO0017498.
LeAnn Waldron, 212.606.7775, Kimberly Jackson, 212.606.7652
6 EAST 68TH STREET: Extraordinary duplex co-op apartment in
prewar mansion close to Central Park featuring 2 enchanting planted
gardens, 2 bedrooms, 2 baths. $1,950,000 WEB: NYO0016571.
Julie Hascoe, 212.606.7695, Meredyth Hull Smith, 212.606.7683
1725 YORK AVENUE: High in the sky with spectacular river and city
views from all rooms and balcony. Large living room, dining room/con-
vertible 3rd bedroom, eat-in kitchen, 2 spacious bedrooms and 2 ½
baths. $1,250,000 WEB: NYO0017495. Phyllis Gallaway, 212.606.7678
71 EAST 77TH STREET: Perfect pied-a-terre. Architecturally com-
pelling 2 bedrooms, 2 baths prewar co-op. Mezzanine level overlooks
sunken living room with 13’ ceilings. $1,195,000 WEB: NYO0017299.
Pauline Evans, 212.400.8740, Dorothy Sexton, 212.606.7608
Brokerage 3.indd 1 3/31/11 9:19:37 PM
86 | april 2011
real estate
NYO
W
hen considering the
Upper East Side,
traditionally one
thinks of luxury
living at its fnest.
High-rise condo-
miniums just steps
from the park, rooftop terraces and historic
mansions immediately come to mind.
In addition to the neighborhood’s classic
prewar buildings, new developments like the
Lucida, Manhattan House, The Georgica,
1280 Fifth Avenue, 515 East 72nd Avenue,
the Laurel and the Azure have been popping
up in the neighborhood, ofering renters and
buyers additional choices when it comes to
selecting their high-price digs.
But just what do brokers say about this
famously high-demand area and the present
real estate climate?
“[The market] is extremely active,” said
Arthur Fenton, senior vice president at Pru-
Upper
East
Side
living
By Rachel Morgan
Photographs by Michael Chimento
In terms of real estate,
the Upper East Side
will always be in style
Upper East Side
development the
Georgica at
305 East 85th St.
NYO_MAG2_PXX_RealEstateOverview.indd 86 4/1/11 11:42:57 AM
Uptown: 924 Madison Avenue / 212- 570-2440
Downtown: 340 West 23rd Street / 212-243-4000
Tribeca: 32 Avenue of the Americas / 212- 941- 8420
Equal Housing Opportunity
Stribling.com
STRIBLING
S T R I B L I N G
UPPER EAST SIDE GEMS
Fantastic Prewar Terraced 2BR on Fifth Ave & East 74th Street. So
rare people stop thinking they can find it! Wonderful, charming 2 bedroom & 2
bath with working fplc, lovely terrace, side Central Park & postcard city views.
Doorman bldg. Co-excl. $3.15M. Web #1215874. A.Lambert 917-403-8819
Exquisite Five Bedroom. E 72nd. Wonderful 9 room apt has a spacious MBR
suite & 3-4 additional BRs. The elegant double LR & sophisticated library both have
wood-burning fplcs & the formal DR is perfect for larger-scale entertaining. $5.49M.
Web #1166068. K.Henckels 212-452-4402/J.Callahan 646-613-268
Triple Mint Fifth Ave Candela Classic. Full service condop 4BR on Museum
Mile. The living room & formal dining room have direct views of museum & Central
Park. Luxury MBR suite with study/fifth BR. Fully renovated bldg. Private fitness spa.
$13.95M. Web #1148455. K.Younger 646-613-2731/S.Song 212-434-7060
Perfect 9 at 1120 Park Ave. Renovated designers home. Semi-pvt landing.
Gracious gallery. Wood-paneled LR with WBFP, wood-paneled library. FDR, high
ceilings, arch detail, MBR, 2BRs, staff BR, 4 bths, laundry & windowed EIK. FS bldg,
gym & stor. Pets ok. $6.495M. Web #1216850. B.Evans-Butler 212-452-4391
Trump Plaza Duplex. E 61st. Beaut renov w/stunning, sun-filled E, W & S vus.
Ideal for entertaining w/spac LR & DRs, cook’s kit, bkfst area, office & wine cellar.
Dramatic stair to lux pvt qrtrs, incl MBR suite w/marble bths, cust clsts. Both flrs have
pvt balcs. $3.15M. Web #1219435. P.Weeks 585-4546/C.Gibson 434-7080
Grand, Bright Prwr 5 on Park Ave. Triple mint 2BR + DR on hi flr w/E, W,
S expos. LR & MBR face Park Ave; 2nd BR w/CP Reservoir view. Hi ceils, square
rms; wndwd kit & bths. PW detail, W/D, new wndws, thru-wall AC. Prime FS bldg
w/gym, stor bin. Ownr/brokr. $2.295M. Web #1219426. J.Wenig 585-4522
2BR Terrazo Terraced Treasure. E 79th. Like living in a townhse w/views &
a doorman! 15th flr apt w/spac LR & DR, open N views & well-apptd kit in excellent
cond. Main level BR w/new stone bth & pvt MBR upstairs w/sep shwr & jacuzzi
tub. Excell FS Art Deco bldg. $1.35M. Web #1206129. A.Shipley 585-4525
Amazing Park Views On Fifth Avenue. New to market. 4 rms w/Central
Park views from 12th flr. LR w/WBFP, formal DR, 3BRs, 2.5 baths, windowed EIK
& laundry rm. Full service prewar w/herringbone floors, high ceils & period details.
Quite elegant & priced well. $4.75M. Web #1216461. Cathy Taub 452-4387
Historic Sutton Square Townhouse. Built in 1899, this 5 story elevatored
10 rm home is a tastefully renov treasure, located in a quintessentially swelligant
hideaway. Major rms overlook E.River & impeccable maintained private grdns.
$10.75M. Web #1071519. B.Evans-Butler 212-452-4391/C.Kurtin 452-4406
Triple Mint, Superbly Renov Fifth Ave 3BR, 3 Bath Condo. E 73rd. High
on the 15th flr + balcony; spectacular views of CP & Manhattan skyline. Sunflooded
with o’size wndws, top kit, crestron, auto shades & custom clsts. FS white glove bldg
with fit cntr & gar. $28K/mo furn rental. Web #1218820. B.Tavakolian 434-7062
Grand Apt on Fifth Avenue with Private Address. 5BR home exquisitely
renov w/highest quality workmanship in the finest Italian-Renaissance-style bldg by
McKim, Mead & White. Elegant & comfortable living, soaring 14 ft ceilings, light,
2 WBFPs, state-of-art systems. $17.5M. Web #1204578. C.Eland 212-452-4384
STRIBLING
A Privately Held Brokerage Firm
Distinguished Residences Worldwide
200 Offces and 48 Countries Globally
Is Now In Association With
28451 ObservMag April11.indd 1 3/23/11 10:16 AM
stribling.indd 1 3/31/11 9:20:33 PM
real estate
NYO
88 | april 2011
dential Douglas Elliman. “Demand is out-
stripping the supply of current inventory.”
C.B. Whyte, senior vice president at
Stribling, agrees.
“Things are moving again on the Upper
East Side,” she said. “There is a scarcity of
product and brokers are bringing product on
at target prices.”
The Upper East Side historically has had a
healthy market, a trend that has continued,
some brokers said.
“Right now, if apartments are priced prop-
erly, they are selling and renting,” said Citi
Habitats senior vice president and associate
broker Caroline Bass.
Evan Rosenfeld, senior associate salesper-
son at Citi Habitats, is a bit more specifc in
his analysis.
“The market is supertight all over town,
but the two-bedroom market is extremely
tight,” he said.
Stephanie Rappoport Wahlgren, sales
associate at Brown Harris Stevens, also sees
movement.
“It’s active at all ends of the market,” she
said. “Larger apartments with two to four
bedrooms are still in great demand. One-
bedrooms and studios are moving if they
are in good shape, in prime location and are
updated and renovated.”
Yet some buildings are having trouble
attracting buyers and renters.
“Buildings that lack amenities and might
need some work or don’t show super-well are
lagging,” she said.
Emily Sertic, Corcoran vice president and
associate broker said that in general, prices
in this neighborhood are on the rise.
“It’s been increasingly active and steady
with both buyers and renters in the New
Year,” she said. “I think buyers understand
and are seeing frsthand that in core loca-
tions and prime condominium buildings,
prices are increasing incrementally. Finding
the right apartment for many of my custom-
“Finding the right apartment for many customers is
becoming more of a challenge as supply is decreasing.”
Right, The Windsor
at 400 East 71st Street.
Below, 181 East 90th St.
NYO_MAG2_PXX_RealEstateOverview.indd 88 4/1/11 11:43:37 AM
©2011. An independently owned and operated member of the Prudential Real Estate Afliates, Inc. is a service mark of Prudential Insurance Company of America. Equal Housing Opportunity. All material presented herein is intended for information
purposes only. While, this information is believed to be correct, it is represented subject to errors, omissions, changes or withdrawal without notice. All property outlines and square footage in property listings are approximate.
LONG ISLAND MANHATTAN BROOKLYN QUEENS THE HAMPTONS THE NORTH FORK RIVERDALE/BRONX WESTCHESTER/PUTNAM
OVERSIzEDOPPORTUNITY
245 East 54th Street, #16D • $595,000 • Corner
1-bedroom unit in full-service luxury building. The
Brevard has a roof deck, doorman, concierge, on-site
super and staff of 18. Make your appointment today.
Web# 1337547. Erin Egan-Rodriguez 646.206.0654
980FIFTHAVENUE
Fifth Avenue & 79th Street • 6 large rooms with style
& elegance. Living room & master bedroom with
dressing area face South affording sunny & bright
view of the Park. 2nd bedroom, large formal dining
room, eat-in kitchen & maids. Web# 1340511.
Rebecca Steindecker 212.891.7080 I 917.670.4193
STUNNING6ONPARKAVENUE
Park Avenue & East 83rd Street • $3,125,000 • Mint
condition spacious classic 6 in full-service door-
man building, washer/dryer, wood burning freplace,
prewar details, state-of-art gym, storage, bike room,
pets welcome. Web# 1331596. Michael Rosenblum
212.769.6541 I Sandy Gansberg 917.733.6337
CENTRALPARK’SPERFECTION
Fifth Avenue/ East 60s • $10,600,000 • 2 bedroom,
2.5 bath, planted terraces overlooking Central Park,
formal dining room, freplace completes this home.
Views, location, and amenities not found in most
co-ops. Web# 1339688. Derek Olsen 212.460.0664
Phatavanh Olsen 212.460.0665
ELEGANTDUPLEXTOWNHOUSE
Chelsea Seminary Block • $15,000 per month • This
expansive and rare landmarked home is comfortable
and private. There is an enormous kitchen, a ball-
room size parlor, landscaped private garden & full
basement. Approximately 4,200 sf. Web# 1325405.
Patricia Henrichs 212.989.2445
PRICESLASHED
10 West 15th Street, #407 • $649,000 • Spacious one
bedroom home facing tree-lined street steps from
Union Square. Open layout, ample closets, excellent
condition. Guarantors or pied-a-terre allowed.
Pets ok. Web# 1326760. Ellen Victor 914.844.8669

NEW:SPACE,SUN,VIEWS,VALUE
East 40s, Trump World • $2,495,000 • Spectacular
2 bedroom, 2.5 bath in world’s most coveted white
glove condo near United Nations. Oversized living/
dining, 2 master suites, chef’s kitchen, 10 ft ceilings.
Motivated relocating owner. Web# 1338440. Tristan
Harper, SVP 917.697. 7845
TOPOFTHECLASS
Fifth Avenue/East 60s • $6,200,000 • 6 room into 5.
Mint renovation in a white glove co-op. Beautiful Park
views from 3 rooms, elegant living room, formal din-
ing room, eat-in kitchen with butler’s pantry. 2 bed-
rooms, 2.5 baths, closets, built-ins. Web# 1303405.
Rebecca Steindecker 212.891.7080 I 917.670.4193
THEDORCHESTER-MINT4BEDROOM
East 57th Street off Park Avenue • $4,250,000
Rare 4 bedroom apartment on high foor in mint con-
dition with large entrance gallery and gracious room
sizes throughout. 2,900 sf, ideal for entertaining.
Separate guest suite. Web# 1319122. Rande Coleman
212.891.7018
prudential.indd 1 3/31/11 9:21:33 PM
90 | april 2011
real estate
NYO
ers is becoming more and more of a challenge
as supply is decreasing.”
When it comes to naming the most popular
enclaves within the Upper East Side, broker
responses vary.
George Arana, licensed associate real
estate broker and senior vice president at
Halstead Property, LLC, said movement is
happening north of 100th Street.
“There has been a steady growth between
East 98th Street to 125th Street,” he said. “It
has grown in popularity.”
Pamela Nichols, senior vice president and
fne homes specialist at Prudential Douglas
Elliman, agrees.
“You can go up much higher along Fifth
Avenue overlooking Central Park into the
100s,” she said. Nichols credits much of this
movement to new developments in the area.
“There was a time when 86th and 85th at
Lexington and Third was considered to be
commercial,” she said. “Now with the Lucida,
the Brompton and the Georgica, this area has
become increasingly residential.”
Things have been moving a bit east as well.
“People are becoming more comfortable
with going further east towards the river
because there is better value while still being
close to schools, parks and restaurants,”
added John Colgate, Elise Roberts and
Graham Ufelman of the Colgate, Roberts &
Ufelman team at Brown Harris Stevens.
Corcoran Associate Broker Lydia Sussek
also sees similar movement.
“Carnegie Hill, Lenox Hill and 60s east of
Third is getting more competitive and prices
seem to be rebounding,” she said.
According to Whyte, those purchasing on
the east side of the area are usually younger
professionals.
“A young urban class has emerged that
want to purchase east of Third Avenue,” she
said. “There is a strong community base with
great attention focused on the needs of young
urban families. The construction of the Sec-
ond Avenue subway, though annoyingly slow,
unsightly and a major cause of disruption, is
a sign of progress and in the end will increase
the desirability of the far eastern portion of
the Upper East Side.”
Rappoport Wahlgren sees things going a
bit further east than her counterparts.
“East End Avenue and East of Second
Ave, where people can get better value [are
popular areas within the neighborhood],”
she said.
As far as what Upper East Side buyers
Normandie
Court
at 205 East
95th St.
“People are becoming more
comfortable with going further east.”
NYO_MAG2_PXX_RealEstateOverview.indd 90 4/1/11 11:44:03 AM
©2011. An independently owned and operated member of the Prudential Real Estate Afliates, Inc. is a service mark of Prudential Insurance Company of America. Equal Housing Opportunity. All material presented herein is intended for information
purposes only. While, this information is believed to be correct, it is represented subject to errors, omissions, changes or withdrawal without notice. All property outlines and square footage in property listings are approximate.
LONG ISLAND MANHATTAN BROOKLYN QUEENS THE HAMPTONS THE NORTH FORK RIVERDALE/BRONX WESTCHESTER/PUTNAM
BRIDGE&RIVERVIEWS
440 East 62nd Street, #16D • $899,000 • East facing,
sun-drenched, spacious 2 split bedroom, 2 bath. 29 ft
living/dining room has loft-like feel. Move-in ready.
Closets galore. Full-service building with roof deck,
storage. Pets ok. Web# 1313981. Michael Rosenblum,
SVP 212.769.6541 I Sandy Gansberg, VP 917.733.6337
2BEDROOMCONDOWITHENORMOUSTERRACE
404 East 76th Street • $1,050,000 • Beautiful, split
2 bedroom, 2 bath at the Impala. Western views, great
light & private 300+ sf terrace. Living room/dining
room, corner master bedroom with en suite bath, 2nd
bedroom with adjoining bath, new hardwood foors &
W/D. Web# 1246646. Julian Berkeley 212.891.7165
FULL-SERVICELOFT-LIKECONDO
345 East 50th Street • $1,850,000 • 2 bedroom, 2
bath home,10 ft ceilings, foor-to-ceiling windows & 2
private balconies. Top-of-the-line chef’s eat-in kitchen,
huge master bedroom suite, W/D and excellent storage
space. 24-hour concierge and a gym, pets ok.
Web# 1303371. Daniela Kunen, Mng Dir 212.891.7611
PRETTYPRIVATEPETITEJUNIOR1BEDROOM
516 East 78th Street, #6G • $349,000 • Your 6th
foor pre-war, beaux-arts, Upper East Side landmark
(non-elevator) home is stocked with value, charm and
washer/dryer too. Low maintenance: $712 including
utilities. Move this spring. Web# 1290708. Mary Mc-
Carthy 212.350.2292
NEWONMARKET–BESTVALUE
75 East End Avenue, #14A • $975,000 • Renovated
2 bedroom, 2 bath home with dining and/or offce or
nursery. Gorgeous kitchen. Full-service building.
Storage, garage, gym. Steps from Carl Schurz Park.
Pets ok. Owner relocating. Web# 1333487. Valerie
Portny 212.650.4822 I 917.589.4344

BRANDNEWONMARKET
907 Fifth Avenue/72nd Street • $7,700,000 • The
epitome of luxury and refnement. Glorious proportions,
gracious layout, painstaking renovation. The ultimate
choice for the most discriminating buyer. Call today.
Web# 1346937. Tristan H. Harper, SVP 917.697.7845
GRACIOUSTOWNHOUSE
East 90s off Fifth Avenue • $15,000,000 • 5-story 20 ft
single family. Formal dining room. Sunny parlor foor,
high ceilings & mouldings. Master suite with 2 marble
baths. 4-6 additional bedrooms. New Sie-Matic kitchen.
Web# 1257776. Millard Dixon, SVP 212.350.2215
Bill Pfaff 212.350.2260
GREATVALUEINPRIMECO-OP
East 70s/Off Park Ave • $1,325,000 • Filled with
light from 4 exposures and open views, this unique
foor-through with fexible layout has 3-4 bedrooms, 3
baths, pre-war detail including wood burning freplace.
Full-service building. Web# 1309620. Judy Auchincloss
212.891.7201
prudential.indd 1 3/31/11 9:22:31 PM
92 | april 2011
real estate
NYO
want, both new developments and classic
prewars are still in demand.
“New developments [are popular,]” Rap-
poport Wahlgren said. “Quality prewar never
go out of fashion. If it’s a prewar condo, even
better. Townhouses are also moving.”
As far as amenities these buyers want, she
names a gym, a playground, a garage and a
doorman. Proximately to Central Park is also
a plus. A safe location is another must-have
for Upper East Side buyers, Arana said.
Buyers in this high-end neighborhood
have high-end wants when it comes to
amenities. Amy Herman, licensed real estate
salesperson and senior vice president at Hal-
stead Property LLC, names outdoor space,
a ftness facility, a washer and dryer in the
apartment or on the foor and pet-friendly
and doorman buildings with roof or outdoor
spaces as popular amenities.
Many buyers and renters move to the neigh-
borhood because of the great public schools.
“Sometimes they are considering moving
to the Upper East Side due to fabulous public
schools,” Herman said. But, as expected,
Central Park is also a major draw. “Other
times, they are athletic and enjoy spring,
summer and fall in Central Park.”
Bass named postwar buildings as having a
leg up on the competition—namely because
of closet space.
“Postwar buildings comprise a good por-
tion of the Upper East Side and are popular
with many people because they maximize
space, have amazing closets and have work-
able foor plans,” Bass said.
Rappoport Wahlgren has seen a return of
interest in the area this spring.
“I think there is a huge group of people
who considered buying but decided to rent,”
she said. “There is also the spring trafc be-
ginning on rentals. I have found people who
live outside the city reconsidering whether
they want to come back to the city and test
out whether they would use a pied-à-terre
and they are opting to rent for a year frst. I
Clockwisefrom
top:TheLaurelat
400East67thSt.,
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at205East95th
St.,Manhattan
Houseat200
East66thSt.
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“Quality prewar
never goes out
of fashion.”
NYO_MAG2_PXX_RealEstateOverview.indd 92 4/1/11 11:45:00 AM
Equal Housing Opportunity. The Corcoran Group is a licensed real estate broker. Owned and operated by NRT LLC.
Search by WEB# on
East Side Elegance
ThirTEEn rOOM MASTErPiECE
E 87th/Madison. 13 rooms. 4-6 BRs, 7 baths. Nonpareil
fnish boasts 600 SF+/- kitchen, master dressing suite,
suburban style laundry room, great room+. $9.95M
WEB# 2085480
Scott Stewart 212.875.2884
TrOPhY hOME WiTh PArK ViEWS
72nd & Fifth. PW elegance facing Central Park. 4 BRs,
3.5 baths, library, screening room & 2 WBFPs. Fab space
for entertaining. F/S premier bldg w/roof garden & gym.
Dramatic price reduction to $11.75M WEB# 1956907
Wendy J. Sarasohn 212.836.1042
TriPLE MinT ArCh DiGEST PArK AVE Six
Park Ave/80s. Top Designer gut renovated/white glove
prewar co-op. LR, formal dining room, 2 bedrooms,
3 bathrooms, chef’s Kit/breakfast room, W/D, thruwall
A/C, best fxtures/fnishes. $2.475M WEB# 2105473
Sharon E. Baum 212.836.1036
SKY hiGh GEM
E 80s. Elegantly renovated, oversized alcove studio with
designer Kit & bath. Open city views. F/S co-op w/24 hr
DM, live-in super, central laundry room & public garage.
Pied-a-terres & pets OK. $349,500 WEB# 2055837
J. Gasdaska 212.821.9138, J. Conlon 212.508.7162
CArnEGiE hiLL COnDO GEM
E 94th St. 7 rooms. Mint 3 bedroom/3 bath + staff
room. New chef’s kitchen with island, top appliances,
new baths. Full service building with storage & garage.
$3.45M WEB# 2128089
Eileen Mintz 212.572.3183
PrEWAr, COnDO, PErFECT
E 80s off Park Ave. 3 BR/3 bath. Beautiful renovation,
loft-like entertaining space/traditional separate BR
wing, chef’s Kit, WBFP, W/D, sound system, closets.
Low common charges + taxes. $2.295M WEB# 2141124
Fern Budow 212.893.1415
GrAnD SCALE LiVinG
Beekman Pl. Maisonette. Duplex, mint condition townhouse
living in one of the fnest PW white glove bldg. 5,550 SF+/-
with a 750 SF+/- riverfront terrace. 3 WBFP. Garage,
gym, indoor pool, squash ct. $PUR. WEB# 1999331
Patricia Cliff 212.836.1063
GrAnD SPACE On PArK
Park Avenue. 7 rooms. Two apartments combined for
a fabulous living home. Exceptional prewar condo.
3 bedrooms with living room, den and offce.
2,100 SF+/-. $1.95M WEB# 2029237
Wendy richardson 212.360.6572
MinT TWO BEDrOOM - TWO BATh COnDO
E 70s. Open views and light abound in this corner
apartment with 3 exposures. Oversized windows,
9’ ceilings. Windowed kitchen. Washer/dryer. Full
service building. $1.635M WEB# 2096244
Sherry Matays 212.875.2831
Corcoran.indd 1 3/31/11 9:23:25 PM
94 | april 2011
real estate
NYO
think that people are afraid the market is
going to get away from them.”
When it comes to renters and buyers on
the Upper East Side, there is defnitely a
specifc type of customer.
“The majority of our clients and cus-
tomers are living and looking on the Upper
East Side for its proximity to private and
public schools, Central Park, restaurants,
museums and shopping,” said Colgate,
Roberts and Ufelman.
Sussek said buyers in the area often
have very specifc demands in terms of
location.
“Buyers uptown usually want to be
within specifc blocks,” she said. “Some-
times the right home is just outside the
initial perimeter—there are so many
wonderful properties and it’s really our
job to stick to the requests while also
showing everything in the range and area,
as sometimes people see the right place for
them isn’t where they initially imagined.”
Fenton describes Upper East Side
buyers as “very security conscious. [They
want to be] close to shopping, access to
both Central Park and Carl Shurz Park.
Green space matters, [as does] access to
both private and public schools.”
If there’s one thing that hasn’t changed,
it’s the desirability of the Upper East Side.
Just why do so many New Yorkers love
this area?
“Celebrities, socialites, television
shows, elegance,” said Tierney Model and
Chris Leavitt of Sotheby’s International
Realty.
Fenton sees the neighborhood as having
the best of nearly everything.
“The Upper East is a magnet for both
families and singles seeking a diversifca-
tion of great restaurants, shopping, an
eclectic mix of neighborhoods, outstand-
ing schools both private and public, easy
access to transportation,” he said.
Arana puts it simply.
“This is where the New Yorkers who
run the world live,” he said, quoting a
popular saying.
We couldn’t have said it better ourselves.
The Lucida is
another Upper
East Side
development.
NYO_MAG2_PXX_RealEstateOverview.indd 94 4/1/11 11:45:25 AM
Learn More about our new Park Avenue Offce at
halstead.com/fagship
Offce Designed by Renowned Architectural Firm, Gensler • Private and Team Windowed Offces
22,000SF of Offce Space • Video Conferencing • Prime Park Avenue Location • Sweeping Views of Skyline
State-of-the-Art Amenities • Wif Connection • Full 14th and 15th Floors of I.M. Pei Designed Building
halstead.indd 1 3/31/11 9:24:01 PM
96 | APRIL
Park Avenue
Perfection
It’s no secret that Upper East
Siders are fanatical about fit-
ness. Here is our guide to the best
workouts in the neighborhood,the
instructors that will really make
you work and which celebrities you
may be sweating next to.
PUNCHFITNESS
1015 Madison Ave., 212-288-2375
BESTBEGINNERCLASS At Punch Fitness, you
are assigned a personal trainer who gauges
just how tough a workout of upper cuts, jabs
and cardio you can handle. This is high-in-
tensity training you won’t get anywhere else.
HARDESTCLASS Get paired up with one of the
DaCosta brothers—Nelson or gym founder
Adelino—and be prepared to seriously sweat.
WHOOWNSIT Punch Fitness has street
cred—founder Adelino DaCosta is a former
national kick-boxing champion.
CELEBRITYCLIENTS Frédéric Fekkai is a
fan. We hear his mane is impeccable—even
while upper-cutting. Heidi Klum and Liv
Tyler are also Adelino converts.
G
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Our picks for the best fitness
classes in the neighborhood
By Alexis Thoman Rudisill
& Rachel Morgan
NYO_MAG2_PXX_FitnessClasses.indd 96 4/1/11 11:46:34 AM
citi habitats.indd 1 3/31/11 9:24:57 PM
98 | APRIL
NYO
FITNESS
SOULCYCLEEAST
1470 Third Ave., 212-639-1300
BESTBEGINNERCLASS There are no begin-
ners at Soul Cycle. Each class is open, allowing
riders to claim bikes just four minutes be-
fore the class begins. We hear it’s an all-out
stampede to claim the front bikes.
HARDESTCLASS While levels aren’t specified
at this spinning haven, we hear classes led by
instructors Stacey, Ayana, Curtis and Rique
really kicks things into high gear.
WHOOWNSIT Co-founded by fitness gurus
Julie Rice and Elizabeth Cutler.
CELEBRITYCLIENTS Kelly Ripa is one Soul
Cycle devotee—and who can argue with a body
like that? Kanye West, Hana Soukupova,
Brooke Shields and Chelsea Clinton are also
Soul Cycle groupies.
COREFUSIONAT
EXHALESPA
980 Madison Ave., 212-249-3000
BESTBEGINNERCLASS Core Fusion Basic.
This core-conditioning class is open to all lev-
els, but don’t think you’ll get of easy. The class
still targets the basic core muscles —abs and
backside—but is a bit tamer than its advanced
counterpart. All core fusion levels combine
Pilates, the Lotte Berk Method, ballet and
traditional strength-training exercises.
HARDESTCLASS We call it a tie between
Core Fusion Advanced—which uses similar
techniques as Core Fusion Basic, kicked up a
notch—and the 60-minute Core Fusion Car-
dio, which combines torturous core exercises
with—you guessed it—tons of cardio.
WHOOWNSIT Co-founded by husband-and-
wife duo Fred DeVito and Elisabeth Halfpapp.
CELEBRITYCLIENTS Heidi Klum, Cameron
Diaz, Julia Roberts, Kate Hudson, Mario
Lopez, Kyra Sedgwick, and Samantha Harris
are all rumored Core Fusion fans.
G
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S
NYO_MAG2_PXX_FitnessClasses.indd 98 4/1/11 11:47:02 AM
Untitled-10 1 3/29/11 9:59:25 AM
APRIL | 99
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For over 30 years,
we’ve been helping
new yorkers
live well
in the world’s
greatest city.
212-744-3330
Betina Equities
Rental Office
227 East 85th Street,
New York, NY 10028
Monday - Friday: 9am - 7pm
Saturday and Sunday: 10am - 6pm
BettinaEquities.com






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Untitled-10 1 3/29/11 9:59:25 AM
Mint Pre-War Gem
East 70s off Park Avenue
Here comes the sun...
This elegant residence is bathed in splendid natural
light. Designed and decorated by renowned interior
decorator, Robert Tartarini of Tartarini Wells. 4.5
rooms, pre-war architectural details and 9.5’ ceilings
throughout. Wood-burnig fireplace, hardwood floors,
custom cabinetry this one has it all. White-glove,
fully serviced cooperative with garden for
shareholders.
Exclusive $1.495M
Untitled-10 1 3/29/11 9:59:25 AM
CLASSIFIED.indd 99 3/31/11 9:32:12 PM
100 | april 2011
Draperies & Shades • Blinds & Shutters • Bedding & Reupholstery • Fabric & Trim
We Still Make House Calls!

Log-on to windowfashions.com for over $300 in coupons!
Call today 212-501-8282 for your
FREE In-Home Decorating Consultation.
Two Convenient Manhattan Locations
Upper East Side 189 East 79th St.
(corner of 3rd Ave.) 212 452-4200
Upper West Side 469 Amsterdam Ave.
(between 82nd & 83rd St.) 212 501-8282
metro window mar 9 2011.pdf 3/1/2011 2:54:49 PM
WE’VESOLD
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Best SERVICE!
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Exclusive by Appointment:
StEphEn p. WAld • 212-750-WALD(9253)
A landmark Osborne Classic: Estate Sale
205 WEST 57TH STREET/ 7th Ave. – Envision mansion
living within a full service landmark building. This 7 1/2
room home with it’s 34+ft ball room sized living room,
library, dining room and 3 bedrooms is replete with
magnifcent details of yesteryear including original
Tiffany Windows, Mahogany paneling, freplace(s)
& almost 14ft ceilings. Live among the legends of
Leonard Bernstein, Lynn Redgrave, Andre Watts,
Fran Lebowitz, Robert Osborne and others who have
called The Osborne their home. An incredible op-
portunity with fabulous views of Carnegie Hall. Ask-
ing $3,250,000.
Luxury Living at The Lombardy Hotel,
nY’s Best Kept Investment Secret!
111 EAST 56TH STREET / Park Ave - Oversized Hotel
Suites from Studios to Four Bedroom apartments
are available in this Pre-war, Full Service Hotel once
owned by William Randolph Hearst. The Lombardy
Hotel unrestricted Rental Program lets you be part of
a Manhattan landmark. Beneft from a savvy invest-
ment property, earn top rental income, and live in
grand style whenever you are in town.The Lombardy
World Class Plaza District location is close to all of
NY’s best shopping, restaurants, theatre, Carnegie
Hall & MOMA. Full hotel services include twice daily
maid service, utilities and more. Prices from $500’s.
On-site Broker
The Landmark Alwyn Court
180 WEST 55TH STREET/CENTRAL PARK SOUTH – Live
above Petrossian in this magnifcently restored, land-
mark 1600+ sq ft 2 bedroom, 2 bath home featuring
a 27ft concert hall sized living room large enough for
2 grand pianos! This home features custom millwork
& lighting, a WB Fireplace, central air, chef’s kitchen
with top appliances including a washer/dryer and a
Bang& Olufsen sound system. Storage included. Full
service luxury co-op. Asking $2,295,000
WaldRealEstate.com
Exclusive by Appointment:
StEphEn p. WAld • 212-750-WALD(9253)
hiring Experienced Agents
Offering new York’s Best town and Country deal
town: Have it all, the most scenic, longitudinal views of Central Park from this 35th story
Central Park South penthouse. It’s all about Star Quality in this superbly renovated
gem featuring six glorious rooms with sweeping Central Park and City Views. Included
is a oversized Living Room & Library, an elegant Formal Dining Room, a true Chef’s
kitchen, a grand Master Suite and a second bedroom and bath.

Also available is a separate, newly renovated one bedroom, one bath apartment for
your guests which doubles as the quintessential executive offce suite. This Full Service
Luxury Cooperative features Doormen, Concierge, Elevator Operators and on site
parking.
Country: The ultimate Hampton’s Bayfront retreat featuring breathtaking views of Sag
Harbor and Shelter Island Sound from your own private beach. This totally refned four
bedroom, 4 bath home is nestled on one lush, landscaped acre with multiple bayfront
decks, a bayfront greenhouse and a free standing two car garage. The views are
unsurpassed and the dreams are endless.
This is like winning the Trifecta: $10,995,000
WaldRealEstate.com
WHEN OPPORTUNITY KNOCKS.........
OPEN 3 DOORS FOR THE DEAL OF A LIFETIME!
WALDfullpage.indd 1 3/31/11 2:49:29 PM
CLASSIFIED.indd 100 3/31/11 9:37:35 PM
APRIL | 101
Draperies & Shades • Blinds & Shutters • Bedding & Reupholstery • Fabric & Trim
We Still Make House Calls!

Log-on to windowfashions.com for over $300 in coupons!
Call today 212-501-8282 for your
FREE In-Home Decorating Consultation.
Two Convenient Manhattan Locations
Upper East Side 189 East 79th St.
(corner of 3rd Ave.) 212 452-4200
Upper West Side 469 Amsterdam Ave.
(between 82nd & 83rd St.) 212 501-8282
metro window mar 9 2011.pdf 3/1/2011 2:54:49 PM
CLASSIFIED.indd 101 3/31/11 9:37:58 PM
102 | APRIL
Lexington
Avenue
Coiffure
• Parisian inspired
salon
• Bridal packages
available
• Hair coloring
experts
• Open 7 days a
week
646.476.2631
1349 Lexington Avenue
New York, NY 10128
Between
89th and 90th
lexingtonavenuecoiffure.com
L e b a n e s e K i t c h e n
The New York Times
“new York has never had a Lebanese restaurant like naya”
Elle Decor ~ Forbes ~ Time Out ~ New York Magazine
Zagat ~ Michelin Guide ~ HX Magazine
1057 Second Ave. bet. 55 & 56 Street 212-319-7777 nayarestaurants.com
Upstairs at the Kimberly Hotel
145 E 50th Street (between Lex & 3rd)
Reservations 212-702-1685
To view the full menu
please visit us at UPSTAIRSNYC.COM
Upstairs
at the Kimberly Hotel
An evening UPSTAIRS will be an
experience like no other, focusing on
refned service in a relaxed luxurious
setting, offering its guests a
one-of-a-kind rooftop experience
and the desire to come back.
BRUNCh
Saturdays and Sundays
unlimited Mimosa, Bloody Mary and
Beer from 12pm-2pm for $15
plus tax and gratuity.
This special does not require
purchase of the food.
DJ on Saturday Brunches that spins
upbeat, modern twist on classics.
212.332.0501
view Our Private Rooms on-line
www.BeaconNYC.com
IMPECCABLE FOOD…
IMPRESSIVE SPACE...
At your Service for all
your Private Dining
& Entertaining needs
Stop in After Work
for a “Tour” and “Taste”
of our new
Wine Bar
Happy Hour, 5 - 8 p.m.
2 drinks +Wood Fired
Pizza or Burger
$19.95
BEACON | New American | 25 West 56 Street | Btw. 5th/6th Ave. | 212.332.0500
EXCEPTIONAL
SERVICE...
BEACON
Your Midtown Event Space
CLASSIFIED.indd 102 3/31/11 9:40:50 PM
e food is scintillating and
the service exemplary.
—e New York Times
Dependably superior for very grown-up
dining … “Solicitous” service led by
engaging owner, George Briguet.
—Zagat 2003
• Open 7 days for lunch and dinner
• Room available for private parties
View our award-winning wine list on
our website: www.leperigold.com
405 East 52nd Street
New York, NY 10022
(212) 755-6244
www.leperigord.com
Dance
~

all styles.
all levels.
all ages.
Steps NYC.com
2121 Broadway @ 74th St.
New York, NY 10023
212.874.2410
®
NYOMagAd.indd 1 3/30/11 4:49:14 PM
Lexington
Avenue
Coiffure
• Parisian inspired
salon
• Bridal packages
available
• Hair coloring
experts
• Open 7 days a
week
646.476.2631
1349 Lexington Avenue
New York, NY 10128
Between
89th and 90th
lexingtonavenuecoiffure.com
L e b a n e s e K i t c h e n
The New York Times
“new York has never had a Lebanese restaurant like naya”
Elle Decor ~ Forbes ~ Time Out ~ New York Magazine
Zagat ~ Michelin Guide ~ HX Magazine
1057 Second Ave. bet. 55 & 56 Street 212-319-7777 nayarestaurants.com
Upstairs at the Kimberly Hotel
145 E 50th Street (between Lex & 3rd)
Reservations 212-702-1685
To view the full menu
please visit us at UPSTAIRSNYC.COM
Upstairs
at the Kimberly Hotel
An evening UPSTAIRS will be an
experience like no other, focusing on
refned service in a relaxed luxurious
setting, offering its guests a
one-of-a-kind rooftop experience
and the desire to come back.
BRUNCh
Saturdays and Sundays
unlimited Mimosa, Bloody Mary and
Beer from 12pm-2pm for $15
plus tax and gratuity.
This special does not require
purchase of the food.
DJ on Saturday Brunches that spins
upbeat, modern twist on classics.
212.332.0501
view Our Private Rooms on-line
www.BeaconNYC.com
IMPECCABLE FOOD…
IMPRESSIVE SPACE...
At your Service for all
your Private Dining
& Entertaining needs
Stop in After Work
for a “Tour” and “Taste”
of our new
Wine Bar
Happy Hour, 5 - 8 p.m.
2 drinks +Wood Fired
Pizza or Burger
$19.95
BEACON | New American | 25 West 56 Street | Btw. 5th/6th Ave. | 212.332.0500
EXCEPTIONAL
SERVICE...
BEACON
Your Midtown Event Space
CLASSIFIED.indd 103 3/31/11 9:41:27 PM
104 | APRIL
Treatments include: Pilates-based rehab,
Yoga-based exercises, Kinesiotaping and
a variety of specialized manual therapy
and sport specifc techniques.
We are a holistic, hands-on PT facility
that offers intimate, practitioner to client
treatment for direct rehab. Our clients
include high end “type A” professionals
who injure themselves during daily activi-
ties, weekend warriors, post surgery rehab
and compensation cases. Get better!
We treat the person,
not the diagnosis.
www.activecarephysicaltherapy.com
Karena Wu
PT, MS, CSCS, CPI
12 West 37th Street, Ste 1202
New York, NY 10018
212 777 4374
ActiveCare.indd 1 3/30/11 11:29:59 AM
JEAN
PATIKY
WORKS ON PAPER
401-270-6943
jpatiky@cox.net
www.patiky.com
Who knows
what’s best
in their bowls?
We do.
How to choose?
Use the PetHealthStore
GOOD
BETTER
BEST
system!
www.pethealhstore.com
10% OFF FOOD
25% OFF TREATS
VALID ALSO FOR SAME DAY
HOME DELIVERIES
GOOD THROUGH APRIL 30, 2011
World’s Best Smoked
Salmon, Sturgeon & Caviar
Unparalled Quality,
Variety & Service
Fine Catering for
Every Occasion
Order Online
lOcal and WOrldWide delivery
fresh seafood
prime aged meats
family owned since 1910
leonards’ is now
accepting orders
for passover and easter
prime 1st cut brisket
prime filet mignon
leg of lamb
all natural turkey
all natural capon
gefilte fish
ground whitefish-
pike-carp
cooking requests
gladly accepted
leonards’ market
1437 second avenue
(bet. 74th and 75th street)
212-744-2600
open 7 days a week • local delivery
nationwide shipping
S
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NEW YORK, NY 10021
FAX: 212-744-4312
1437 SECOND AVENUE
TEL: 212-744-2600
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FAX: 212-744-4312
1437 SECOND AVENUE
TEL: 212-744-2600
FREE DELIVERY
FRESH SEAFOOD PRIME AGED MEATS
NEW YORK, NY 10021
FAX: 212-744-4312
1437 SECOND AVENUE
TEL: 212-744-2600
FREE DELIVERY
FRESH SEAFOOD PRIME AGED MEATS
NEW YORK, NY 10021
FAX: 212-744-4312
1437 SECOND AVENUE
TEL: 212-744-2600
FREE DELIVERY
FRESH SEAFOOD PRIME AGED MEATS
NEW YORK, NY 10021
FAX: 212-744-4312
1437 SECOND AVENUE
TEL: 212-744-2600
FREE DELIVERY
FRESH SEAFOOD PRIME AGED MEATS
NEW YORK, NY 10021
FAX: 212-744-4312
1437 SECOND AVENUE
TEL: 212-744-2600
FREE DELIVERY
FRESH SEAFOOD PRIME AGED MEATS
NEW YORK, NY 10021
FAX: 212-744-4312
1437 SECOND AVENUE
TEL: 212-744-2600
FREE DELIVERY
FRESH SEAFOOD PRIME AGED MEATS
NEW YORK, NY 10021
FAX: 212-744-4312
1437 SECOND AVENUE
TEL: 212-744-2600
FREE DELIVERY
FRESH SEAFOOD PRIME AGED MEATS
NEW YORK, NY 10021
FAX: 212-744-4312
1437 SECOND AVENUE
TEL: 212-744-2600
FREE DELIVERY
FRESH SEAFOOD PRIME AGED MEATS
NEW YORK, NY 10021
FAX: 212-744-4312
1437 SECOND AVENUE
TEL: 212-744-2600
FREE DELIVERY
CLASSIFIED.indd 104 3/31/11 9:49:43 PM
APRIL | 105
Who knows
what’s best
in their bowls?
We do.
How to choose?
Use the PetHealthStore
GOOD
BETTER
BEST
system!
www.pethealhstore.com
10% OFF FOOD
25% OFF TREATS
VALID ALSO FOR SAME DAY
HOME DELIVERIES
GOOD THROUGH APRIL 30, 2011
Sable’s Smoked Fish
1489 Second Ave. (77th & 78th Sts.)
New York, NY 10075
212-249-6177 • Fax 212-249-2672
10% discount on orders over $50
World’s Best Smoked
Salmon, Sturgeon & Caviar
Unparalled Quality,
Variety & Service
Fine Catering for
Every Occasion
ORDER ONLINE
LOCAL AND WORLDWIDE DELIVERY
ORDER ONLINE
LOCAL DELIVERY &
NATIONWIDE SHIPPING
Sable’s Smoked Fish
1489 Second Ave. (77th & 78th Sts.)
New York, NY 10075
212-249-6177 • Fax 212-249-2672
10% discount on orders over $50
World’s Best Smoked
Salmon, Sturgeon & Caviar
Unparalled Quality,
Variety & Service
Fine Catering for
Every Occasion, Order
Now for Passover & Easter
sables.indd 1 3/29/11 1:38:07 PM
World’s Best Smoked
Salmon, Sturgeon & Caviar
Unparalled Quality,
Variety & Service
Fine Catering for
Every Occasion
Order Online
lOcal and WOrldWide delivery
fresh seafood
prime aged meats
family owned since 1910
leonards’ is now
accepting orders
for passover and easter
prime 1st cut brisket
prime filet mignon
leg of lamb
all natural turkey
all natural capon
gefilte fish
ground whitefish-
pike-carp
cooking requests
gladly accepted
leonards’ market
1437 second avenue
(bet. 74th and 75th street)
212-744-2600
open 7 days a week • local delivery
nationwide shipping
S
D
S

-


S
E
T

C
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T
T
E
R

T
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D
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B
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C
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FRESH SEAFOOD PRIME AGED MEATS
NEW YORK, NY 10021
FAX: 212-744-4312
1437 SECOND AVENUE
TEL: 212-744-2600
FREE DELIVERY
FRESH SEAFOOD PRIME AGED MEATS
NEW YORK, NY 10021
FAX: 212-744-4312
1437 SECOND AVENUE
TEL: 212-744-2600
FREE DELIVERY
FRESH SEAFOOD PRIME AGED MEATS
NEW YORK, NY 10021
FAX: 212-744-4312
1437 SECOND AVENUE
TEL: 212-744-2600
FREE DELIVERY
FRESH SEAFOOD PRIME AGED MEATS
NEW YORK, NY 10021
FAX: 212-744-4312
1437 SECOND AVENUE
TEL: 212-744-2600
FREE DELIVERY
FRESH SEAFOOD PRIME AGED MEATS
NEW YORK, NY 10021
FAX: 212-744-4312
1437 SECOND AVENUE
TEL: 212-744-2600
FREE DELIVERY
FRESH SEAFOOD PRIME AGED MEATS
NEW YORK, NY 10021
FAX: 212-744-4312
1437 SECOND AVENUE
TEL: 212-744-2600
FREE DELIVERY
FRESH SEAFOOD PRIME AGED MEATS
NEW YORK, NY 10021
FAX: 212-744-4312
1437 SECOND AVENUE
TEL: 212-744-2600
FREE DELIVERY
FRESH SEAFOOD PRIME AGED MEATS
NEW YORK, NY 10021
FAX: 212-744-4312
1437 SECOND AVENUE
TEL: 212-744-2600
FREE DELIVERY
FRESH SEAFOOD PRIME AGED MEATS
NEW YORK, NY 10021
FAX: 212-744-4312
1437 SECOND AVENUE
TEL: 212-744-2600
FREE DELIVERY
FRESH SEAFOOD PRIME AGED MEATS
NEW YORK, NY 10021
FAX: 212-744-4312
1437 SECOND AVENUE
TEL: 212-744-2600
FREE DELIVERY
CLASSIFIED.indd 105 3/31/11 9:50:09 PM
17
BARBARA A. GRIMALDI
(212) 759 3920
227 EAST 56TH ST
NEW YORK
BGrimaldi@allstate.com
Appointments to fit your schedule.
Whether you’ve had a baby and bought a new car, or now have a teenager
on the road, your insurance should keep up with your life. Call today for
a free review to help you decide what protection is right for you.
Insurance subject to availability and qualifications.Allstate Insurance Company and Allstate Property and Casualty Insurance Company, Northbrook, Illinois © 2009 Allstate Insurance Company.
allstate.indd 2 3/24/11 4:02:04 PM

t
k E t
t s
s DINE OUt
t
EAt At HOME
H pOULtRY
ALtIEs
ANts
AND
VEAL
NEW YORK, NY 10128
t
CLASSIFIED.indd 106 3/31/11 9:50:27 PM
1347 3rd Avenue @ 44th Street
(212) 737-0790
www.mccabeswine.com
30% off 12 bottles of
wine or champagne
with the ad.
McCabe’s
Wines &
Spirits
Manhattan’s
most knowlegable
& friendly staff.
Sake • Single malt
Kosher • Organic
Prompt delivery
McCabes.indd 1 3/29/11 1:52:12 PM

CALL FOR HOME DELIVERY
(212) 289-84 90, 8491, 8330
M E A t
M A R k E t
p R I M E
M E A t s
YOU CAN ALWAYs DINE OUt
BUt
YOU CAN REALLY EAt At HOME
FANCY FREsH pOULtRY
spECIALtIEs
pHEAsANts
sQUAB
AND
VEAL
HOLLAND COURT MEAT MARKET INC.
1423 LEXINGTON
NEW YORK, NY 10128
HOLLAND COURt
H H
CLASSIFIED.indd 107 3/31/11 9:51:15 PM
1347 3rd Avenue @ 44th Street
(212) 737-0790
www.mccabeswine.com
30% off 12 bottles of
wine or champagne
with the ad.
McCabe’s
Wines &
Spirits
Manhattan’s
most knowlegable
& friendly staff.
Sake • Single malt
Kosher • Organic
Prompt delivery
McCabes.indd 1 3/29/11 1:52:12 PM

CALL FOR HOME DELIVERY
(212) 289-84 90, 8491, 8330
M E A t
M A R k E t
p R I M E
M E A t s
YOU CAN ALWAYs DINE OUt
BUt
YOU CAN REALLY EAt At HOME
FANCY FREsH pOULtRY
spECIALtIEs
pHEAsANts
sQUAB
AND
VEAL
HOLLAND COURT MEAT MARKET INC.
1423 LEXINGTON
NEW YORK, NY 10128
HOLLAND COURt
H H
CLASSIFIED.indd 107 3/31/11 9:51:15 PM
108 | april 2011
Exclusive by Appointment:
StEphEn p. WAld • 212-750-WALD(9253)
hiring Experienced Agents
Offering new York’s Best town and Country deal
town: Have it all, the most scenic, longitudinal views of Central Park from this 35th story
Central Park South penthouse. It’s all about Star Quality in this superbly renovated
gem featuring six glorious rooms with sweeping Central Park and City Views. Included
is a oversized Living Room & Library, an elegant Formal Dining Room, a true Chef’s
kitchen, a grand Master Suite and a second bedroom and bath.

Also available is a separate, newly renovated one bedroom, one bath apartment for
your guests which doubles as the quintessential executive offce suite. This Full Service
Luxury Cooperative features Doormen, Concierge, Elevator Operators and on site
parking.
Country: The ultimate Hampton’s Bayfront retreat featuring breathtaking views of Sag
Harbor and Shelter Island Sound from your own private beach. This totally refned four
bedroom, 4 bath home is nestled on one lush, landscaped acre with multiple bayfront
decks, a bayfront greenhouse and a free standing two car garage. The views are
unsurpassed and the dreams are endless.
This is like winning the Trifecta: $10,995,000
WaldRealEstate.com
WHEN OPPORTUNITY KNOCKS.........
OPEN 3 DOORS FOR THE DEAL OF A LIFETIME!
WALDfullpage.indd 1 3/31/11 2:49:29 PM
Pamela Luss (vocals) • Houston Person (tenor saxophone) • Jon Weber (piano)
Jon Burr (bass) • & Alvin Atkinson, Jr. (drums)
For the last four years, the partnership of vocalist Pamela Luss and tenor saxophonist Houston Person has been
one of the most exciting teams on the contemporary jazz scene. It’s not simply that she sings and he plays, but that
they truly create music together, like two minds with but a single thought. Whether swinging on standards, jamming
on the blues, or instilling a romantic mood on a beautiful ballad, singer and saxist are completely in sync with each
other throughout. At Birdland, they’ll perform favorites from their four releases together (the three albums, Your
Eyes, Magnet, and Sweet & Saxy, and the single Bewitched) along with new numbers, both classic and contempo-
rary that they are constantly adding to their repertoire, to the delight of their many fans.
Pamela Luss with Houston Person at
BirdLand
Christopher Loudon of JazzTimes described Pamela and Houston as
“an exalted partnership, meshing like the jeweled movement of
a Patek Philippe,” and Pamela’s voice as “intoxicating.”
“and that band! Luss’s polish and the zip of Person,
Burr, atkinson, Jr. and Weber add up to musical party time.”
- Elizabeth ahlfors, Cabaret Scenes
www.pamelaluss.com
Monday, May 23rd, 2011 7:00 pm
Cover Charge: $25, $10 minimum
315 West 44th Street (between 8th/9th aves)- NYC
*Reservations Required* 212-581-3080
www.birdlandjazz.com
CLASSIFIED.indd 108 3/31/11 9:52:35 PM
Exclusive by Appointment:
StEphEn p. WAld • 212-750-WALD(9253)
hiring Experienced Agents
Offering new York’s Best town and Country deal
town: Have it all, the most scenic, longitudinal views of Central Park from this 35th story
Central Park South penthouse. It’s all about Star Quality in this superbly renovated
gem featuring six glorious rooms with sweeping Central Park and City Views. Included
is a oversized Living Room & Library, an elegant Formal Dining Room, a true Chef’s
kitchen, a grand Master Suite and a second bedroom and bath.

Also available is a separate, newly renovated one bedroom, one bath apartment for
your guests which doubles as the quintessential executive offce suite. This Full Service
Luxury Cooperative features Doormen, Concierge, Elevator Operators and on site
parking.
Country: The ultimate Hampton’s Bayfront retreat featuring breathtaking views of Sag
Harbor and Shelter Island Sound from your own private beach. This totally refned four
bedroom, 4 bath home is nestled on one lush, landscaped acre with multiple bayfront
decks, a bayfront greenhouse and a free standing two car garage. The views are
unsurpassed and the dreams are endless.
This is like winning the Trifecta: $10,995,000
WaldRealEstate.com
WHEN OPPORTUNITY KNOCKS.........
OPEN 3 DOORS FOR THE DEAL OF A LIFETIME!
WALDfullpage.indd 1 3/31/11 2:49:29 PM
april 2011 | 109
CLASSIFIED.indd 109 3/31/11 9:52:57 PM
Exclusive by Appointment:
StEphEn p. WAld • 212-750-WALD(9253)
hiring Experienced Agents
Offering new York’s Best town and Country deal
town: Have it all, the most scenic, longitudinal views of Central Park from this 35th story
Central Park South penthouse. It’s all about Star Quality in this superbly renovated
gem featuring six glorious rooms with sweeping Central Park and City Views. Included
is a oversized Living Room & Library, an elegant Formal Dining Room, a true Chef’s
kitchen, a grand Master Suite and a second bedroom and bath.

Also available is a separate, newly renovated one bedroom, one bath apartment for
your guests which doubles as the quintessential executive offce suite. This Full Service
Luxury Cooperative features Doormen, Concierge, Elevator Operators and on site
parking.
Country: The ultimate Hampton’s Bayfront retreat featuring breathtaking views of Sag
Harbor and Shelter Island Sound from your own private beach. This totally refned four
bedroom, 4 bath home is nestled on one lush, landscaped acre with multiple bayfront
decks, a bayfront greenhouse and a free standing two car garage. The views are
unsurpassed and the dreams are endless.
This is like winning the Trifecta: $10,995,000
WaldRealEstate.com
WHEN OPPORTUNITY KNOCKS.........
OPEN 3 DOORS FOR THE DEAL OF A LIFETIME!
WALDfullpage.indd 1 3/31/11 2:49:29 PM
april 2011 | 109
CLASSIFIED.indd 109 3/31/11 9:52:57 PM
1510 LEXINGTON, NYC’s first en-
tirely non-smoking residential
building, features studio to three
bedroom luxury rental apartments
just steps from Central Park and
the Lexington Avenue Subway on
the Upper East Side. All residences
feature condominium quality finishes, Energy Star
stainless steel appliances, custom closets and wash-
er/dryers. White glove services complement an ex-
tensive amenity package that includes a café, green
roof park, extended hours fitness center, children’s
playroom, and private roof club with billiards, big
screen media area, indoor and outdoor fireplaces.
For more information, call 212.348.0500 or visit
www.1510Lex.com
Ofering immediate occupancy
on one of the most sought after
streets in the world, 1280 FIFTH
AVENUE is a masterpiece of de-
sign with a world class museum.
Designed by celebrated Ameri-
can architect, Robert A. M. Stern,
1280 Fifth has just 116 homes, ranging in size from al-
cove studios to 3 bedrooms. Larger homes available.
Please visit 1280fifth.com or call the sales gallery at
212.996.1280. Exclusive Marketing and Sale Agent:
Brown Harris Stevens Project Marketing.
BETTINA EQUITIES: Living Well,
In the World’s Greatest City. Bet-
tina is known for afordable prices
that make Manhattan living in the
finest buildings within reach, with
NO FEE! Attractive studios, spa-
cious three-bedroom duplexes and
triplexes in the most desired neighborhoods: East/
West Side, Clinton, Murray Hill, Gramercy Park, Union
Square and East Village. Experience the diference
in the way our buildings are run with a quality com-
mitment and ongoing attention to amenities such
as exceptional maintenance/upgrades, a responsive
management staf and roomy, comfortable layouts.
www.bettinaequities.com. (212) 744-3330.
For over 60 years ELGOT has been
Manhattanís premier source for
kitchen and bath design, remodel-
ing and major appliance sales and
installation. Thatís why discerning
New Yorkers rely on Elgot for qual-
ity, service and experience. Our
staf is always happy to help you choose energy
ef cient and eco-friendly products to allow you to
support green living in Manhattan. From too-tight
spaces to arcane building codes to co-op regula-
tions, weíve seen and done it all! 937 Lexington Av-
enue (68th/69th Sts.), New York, NY 10065. 212-879-
1200, www.elgotkitchens.com
The 2011 FRED & ADELE ASTAIRE
AWARDS will take place on May 15 at
the Skirball Center for the Perform-
ing Arts at NYU. The Astaires are
the only awards that recognize ex-
cellence in dance and choreography
on Broadway and in film. The daz-
zling star studded evening will
feature electrifying highlights from Broadway’s best
and will honor legendary dancer and choreographer
Jacques D’amboise with the Douglas Watt Lifetime
Achievement Award. www.theastaireawards.com
Welcome to GRIMALDI & AS-
SOCIATES where Insurance and
Financial planning isn’t compli-
cated. Since 1990 we have pro-
vided our clients with a no hassle
approach to doing business. We
pride ourselves in our knowledge
and taking time to understand
your needs. You’re not a number, but a part of our
family. Our fully licensed and knowledgeable staf
is always there to assist and looks forward to serv-
ing you with the same care and personal attention
you’ve come to expect. Protecting the Present, Fu-
ture and Beyond. Barbara A. Grimaldi, 227 E 56th St /
212- 759 -3920.
HALSTEAD PROPERTY is proud
to announce that they have moved
into their new flagship of ce at
499 Park Avenue. Located on the
southeast corner of Park and 59th
Street, the new Halstead flagship
of ce is more than 22,000-square-
feet and was designed and created
by the reputable architectural firm Gensler. The new
of ce space is representative of the strong Halstead
brand and reputation. To learn more, please visit
www.halstead.com/flagship
HOLLAND COURT MEAT
MARKET is a true New York
experience with the best cus-
tomer service in town. This
meat and fish market is so firmly established in their
Upper East Side enclave that they don’t even print
an area code on their stationary. Since the 1930’s,
highly skilled butchers provide prime meats, fancy
fresh poultry, pheasant, veal and squab to a hungry
neighborhood. You can always dine out, but you can
really eat at home. Perfect for BBQ’s, Home Delivery,
Call now: (212) 289-8490. 1423 Lexington Ave.
Established in 1938, JAGUAR
OF GREAT NECK was the
first Jaguar dealership in the
Country. Our experience has
led to a reputation of value,
personal service and after-
sale support that is unrivaled. For 70+ years we have
been selling to and servicing the New York area with
the pride and attention it deserves. Model for model,
option for option, no one is more competitive than
us. We will beat any advertised price in New York...
Guaranteed! Fulfill your passion for perfection with
one of our awesome 2011 Jaguar XJ models. One
is waiting for you at Jaguar of Great Neck. WWW.
GREATNECKJAGUAR.COM, 888-263-4158
JIMMY BRETT, Senior Vice Presi-
dent, Associate Broker with Citi
Habitats is a highly valued mem-
ber and consistent Top Producer
throughout his decade long ca-
reer with the firm. Beginning in
2007, Jimmy has been consistently recognized by
NRT, the nation’s largest residential real estate bro-
kerage holding company, as being amongst the top
1.4% of NRT’s 54,000 sales associates; Jimmy’s team
“Team Brett” has also been acknowledged within the
top 100 teams nationwide. Please contact Jimmy at
917.687.4614 or jbrett@citi-habitats.com
KEVIN BROWN, Senior Vice Presi-
dent for Sotheby’s International
Realty, is recognized as one of Man-
hattan’s most respected real estate
professionals. A former owner and
chairman of Century 21 NY Metro
and, prior to that, a partner of Ash-
forth Warburg Real Estate (now Warburg Realty),
Kevin is one of the city’s premier luxury townhouse,
co-op and condominium brokers. With over 20 years
of sales experience, Kevin has successfully represent-
ed heads of state, CEOs of major companies, as well
as countless referrals from friends and colleagues.
LEONARDS’ is a Family run, Up-
per East Side Seafood & Prime
Meat market where Quality and
Service are unsurpassed for the
last 100 plus years. Cousins, John and Peter, live up
to their Zagat rating: “Extraordinary to Perfection”,
serving the freshest seafood, highest quality prime
meats and prepared foods to New York’s most dis-
criminating consumers. 1437 Second Ave., (between
74th & 75th) New York, NY 10021. Free Local Delivery
- Open 7 Days - 212-744-2600.
LEXINGTON AVENUE COIFFURE
Hair experts Alex Benharroche
and Sharie Manon, have combined
decades of experience for a fresh,
chic downtown vice and unsur-
passed quality. The staf consists of celebrity stylists,
edgy freelancers and the best hair color department
in Manhattan. We do bridal hair, special occasion and
“A-List” clients. We use organic, ecofriendly and top
of the line products. We continue educating our staf
with the newest techniques and hair materials on the
market. We are open 7 days a week. 1349 Lexington
Ave., Tel 646.476.2631
Just a few exclusive residences remain
at THE LUCIDA, a dramatic 21-story
glass curtain wall condominium devel-
oped by Extell Development Company.
Ofering residents a lifestyle that com-
bines the prestige of the Upper East
Side with the eco-consciousness and
the ultimate in modern amenities, The Lucida features
a LA PALESTRA Fitness, Wellness and Spa Center, a
playground designed by Kidville, N.Y., a private lounge
and game room, wine cellar and bike storage. Immedi-
ate occupancy. For more information, call 212.585.1510
or visit www.thelucida.com
MANHATTAN HOUSE, a land-
marked Modernist icon, ofers five-
star services, exclusive amenities
and re-engineered residential in-
teriors. Set within private gardens,
the building amenities and services
also include the residents-only
NYO DIRECTORY
World’s Best Smoked
Salmon, Sturgeon & Caviar
Unparalled Quality,
Variety & Service
Fine Catering for
Every Occasion
Order Online
lOcal and WOrldWide delivery
fresh seafood
prime aged meats
family owned since 1910
leonards’ is now
accepting orders
for passover and easter
prime 1st cut brisket
prime filet mignon
leg of lamb
all natural turkey
all natural capon
gefilte fish
ground whitefish-
pike-carp
cooking requests
gladly accepted
leonards’ market
1437 second avenue
(bet. 74th and 75th street)
212-744-2600
open 7 days a week • local delivery
nationwide shipping
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FRESH SEAFOOD PRIME AGED MEATS
NEW YORK, NY 10021
FAX: 212-744-4312
1437 SECOND AVENUE
TEL: 212-744-2600
FREE DELIVERY
FRESH SEAFOOD PRIME AGED MEATS
NEW YORK, NY 10021
FAX: 212-744-4312
1437 SECOND AVENUE
TEL: 212-744-2600
FREE DELIVERY
FRESH SEAFOOD PRIME AGED MEATS
NEW YORK, NY 10021
FAX: 212-744-4312
1437 SECOND AVENUE
TEL: 212-744-2600
FREE DELIVERY
FRESH SEAFOOD PRIME AGED MEATS
NEW YORK, NY 10021
FAX: 212-744-4312
1437 SECOND AVENUE
TEL: 212-744-2600
FREE DELIVERY
FRESH SEAFOOD PRIME AGED MEATS
NEW YORK, NY 10021
FAX: 212-744-4312
1437 SECOND AVENUE
TEL: 212-744-2600
FREE DELIVERY
FRESH SEAFOOD PRIME AGED MEATS
NEW YORK, NY 10021
FAX: 212-744-4312
1437 SECOND AVENUE
TEL: 212-744-2600
FREE DELIVERY
FRESH SEAFOOD PRIME AGED MEATS
NEW YORK, NY 10021
FAX: 212-744-4312
1437 SECOND AVENUE
TEL: 212-744-2600
FREE DELIVERY
FRESH SEAFOOD PRIME AGED MEATS
NEW YORK, NY 10021
FAX: 212-744-4312
1437 SECOND AVENUE
TEL: 212-744-2600
FREE DELIVERY
FRESH SEAFOOD PRIME AGED MEATS
NEW YORK, NY 10021
FAX: 212-744-4312
1437 SECOND AVENUE
TEL: 212-744-2600
FREE DELIVERY
FRESH SEAFOOD PRIME AGED MEATS
NEW YORK, NY 10021
FAX: 212-744-4312
1437 SECOND AVENUE
TEL: 212-744-2600
FREE DELIVERY
110 | APRIL
INDEX 108-109 UES NYO.indd 110 3/31/11 9:54:46 PM
rooftop level with Manhattan Club and exhale® spa,
a Roto Studio-designed children’s playroom, exhale®
fitness center, full-time doormen, five-star concierge,
porte-cochere entrances, and on-site garage and va-
let service. With multiple-exposures and generous
balconies, Manhattan House captures the spirit of
New York City’s Upper East Side. Manhattan House,
200 East 66th Street, www.manhattanhouse.com, P:
212.566.0660, E: info@manhattanhouse.com
McCabes at 3rd avenue and 77th
Street, you can’t miss this corner
stores dark blue awning. Step
inside and you will see a thor-
ough selection of esoteric and
hard to find wines and spirits, including one of the
best collections of Scotch available in Manhattan.
The prices are great, the customer service is unbeat-
able, and their experts can help you pick the right
wine for the right occasion. If you can’t make it to
the store, call their kind and knowledgeable staf for
prompt delivery. 1347 3rd Avenue (at 77th Street)
(212) 737-0790.
METROPOLITAN WINDOW
FASHIONS has been serving
the metro area for over 75
years – specializing in cus-
tom window fashions, Hunter
Douglas shades, bedding and reupholstery. Hon-
ored as the National Retailer of the Year, by Draper-
ies and Window Coverings Magazine, Metropolitan
is proud to be family owned since 1934. Stop by our
two convenient locations in Manhattan or our fabric
warehouse in New Jersey. Visit windowfashions.com
or call 212-501-8282 for a FREE in-home decorating
consultation.
NIKKI FIELD, Senior Vice Presi-
dent, Associate Broker, has
been a dynamic presence with
Sotheby’s International Realty
since 1998, consistently rank-
ing among the global agen-
cyís top five producers and
accomplishing sales of over one billion dollars.
Americaís Top 400 Real Estate Professionals, an
annual ranking sponsored by The Wall Street Jour-
nal, ranked Nikki in the top 100 agents in America
and in the top 10 in New York City for Sales Volume.
For more information, visit www.nikkifield.com.
Does your
home or of-
fice have a great view? Explore and enjoy it to
the utmost with OBERWERK Long-Range Bin-
oculars and Binocular Telescopes. Highest qual-
ity optics provide Stunning clarity and sharpness
at surprisingly afordable prices. See us online
at www.giantbinoculars.com For free catalog,
call 866-623-7937 or email to info@oberwerk.
com OBERWERK CORPORATION 866-623-7937.
www.giantbinoculars.com.
For those who are looking to take a short step out
of town we ofer an incomparable location in the
heart of the picturesque village
of Scarsdale, NY. Currently avail-
able is a Duplex: 5 Bedroom, 4.5
Bath, with Terrace. A spacious
apartment home where “every-
thing is taken care of”. Only one
block from the Metro North RR
Station, (20 minutes to Grand Central Station) this
unique unit deserves your attention. THE PARKOFF
ORGANIZATION is determined to continue its four
generation reputation of integrity and tenant ser-
vice. Contact us at: rentals@newparkmgmt.com
PETHEALTHSTORE™ is a group of
professionals dedicated to maximiz-
ing your pet’s health through best
diet practice. With the evolution of
more and better pet health infor-
mation, and more pet food brands, there is an op-
portunity for you to maximize your pet’s health by
selecting their best diet that matches your budget.
Please look at our health articles online, at www.
pethealthstore.com, come in and get more informa-
tion and literature, or call 212-595-4200. We do this
BECAUSE YOUR PET”S HEALTH IS IMPORTANT.
For nearly a century, PRUDENTIAL DOUGLAS ELLI-
MAN has been recognized as a leader in the residen-
tial real estate industry. With more than 3,500 agents
and over 60 of ces from Manhattan to Montauk, the
companyís reach is unsurpassed. Prudential Douglas
Elliman ofers its customers a comprehensive array
of services including residential sales and rental bro-
kerage, retail and commercial sales & leasing, relo-
cation, new development marketing, property man-
agement, mortgage brokerage and title insurance.
So whether youíre in Manhattan, Brooklyn, Queens,
Westchester or Long Island, including the Hamptons
and North Fork, there is a Prudential Douglas Elliman
of ce and agent ready to assist you in any of your
real estate needs. Please contact 1.800.ELLIMAN or
visit elliman.com
ROGER ERICKSON has been a top
producing broker in Manhattan for
over 20 years with sales in excess
of a billion dollars. For the 3rd con-
secutive year, he has been recog-
nized by The Wall Street Journal,
REAL Trends and lore Magazine
as one of the Top 100 Agents in
America by Sales Volume, cur-
rently ranked as the #4 agent in the nation. The prior
year he was ranked as the #1 agent in Manhattan.
www.Roger-Erickson.com
SABLE’S, is an Upper East Side
Icon, renown for its World-Class
Smoked Fish, and superior customer service. The Sze
Brothers honed their craft by working with the best
fish purveyors in New York City. Armed with this ex-
pertise, they select only the highest quality smoked
fish. The finest in caviar, cold cuts, cheeses, salads
and fresh breads is also available ready to meet
every customer’s catering need. 1489 Second Ave.
(between 77th & 78th), New York, NY 10021. Open 7
Days - 212- 249-6177. www.sablesnyc.com
SCHOLTEN JAPANESE ART
ofers exquisite paintings,
ukiyo-e woodblock-prints, lac-
quer, and netsuke in a renovated
townhouse located just steps
from Central Park in midtown
Manhattan at 145 W. 58th (between 6th & 7th),
Suite 6D; (212)585-0474; by appt M-F 11-5 &
some Saturdays; for more information on Japa-
nese art visit www.scholten-japanese-art.com.
SOTHEBY’S The East Side Man-
hattan of ce is just steps away
from Central Park in one of the
most desirable neighborhoods in the city. It is known
for its prime Manhattan real estate, which includes
some of the cityís most elegant historic and prewar
homes. Our brokerage staf ofers unsurpassed service
to our clients. Our agents are thoroughly familiar with
the neighborhoods in this area, and with all aspects
of sales, including the demands of the luxury
market. For more information, please visit
www.sothebyshomes.com/nyc
STEPS ON BROADWAY is the cul-
tural center of the dance commu-
nity providing a world-renowned
faculty, excellence in programming, and a welcoming
facility supporting the art and the artist. Daily pro-
fessional and adult classes are ofered at all levels
in ballet, jazz, modern, contemporary, tap, theater
dance, hip hop, world dance, pilates, zumba, and
yoga. Guest artists, master classes, performances and
events are ofered throughout the year. The School at
Steps ofers year-round programs for ages 2-18. www.
StepsNYC.com 2121 Broadway @ 74th St., New York,
NY 10023, 212-874-2410.
STRIBLING sells the finest
East Side residences from its
townhouse headquarters on
Madison Avenue between 73rd
and 74th Streets. Its stunning window displays of the
latest property oferings attract attention day and
night. Stribling brokers are experienced, knowledge-
able professionals who bring exceptional results and
the highest levels of service to the sale of gem studios,
dream penthouses and everything in between. On the
East Side, as all over town, the right broker makes all
the diference. Visit us at stribling.com
TRISTAN HARPER, Senior Vice Presi-
dent at Prudential Douglas Elliman
and an award winning and record
setting professional with remarkable
sales track of prime cooperatives,
condominiums and townhouses.
Since brokering the sale of Manhat-
tan’s highest-priced apartment of 2001, after 9/11,
Tristan has been consistently ranked among top
producers nationwide, and lauded as “Power Broker
with Distinction” for his command of the market,
multilingual fluency, and gracious demeanor with
eminently refined European background. For direct
contact: 917-697-7845 or tristanharper.com.
Since 1985, STEPHEN P.
WALD REAL ESTATE ASSO-
CIATES, Inc. has been syn-
onymous with exceptional service and consummate
knowledge of New York City real estate. Founded
by industry leader, and principal broker Stephen
P. Wald, our full-service brokerage firm has a well-
earned reputation for outstanding service. We not
only facilitate the buying and selling of residential
and nvestment properties, but we also see beyond
to what makes each property special and unique.
Our understanding of the specific location, the floor
plan, market valuation and the building’s architectur-
al characteristics is most important to our clientele.
It is customer satisfaction that continues to set us
apart from the brokerage community. Our business
was built on it.
StepsNYC.com
2121 Broadway @ 74th St.
New York, NY 10023
212.874.2410
Dance~
all styles.
all levels.
all ages.
APRIL | 111
INDEX 108-109 UES NYO.indd 111 3/31/11 9:55:20 PM
112 | APRIL
NYO
PHILANTHROPY
You started of your career in
journalism. How did you make
the jump to a philanthropic
career?
The jump to philanthropy was
easy—I needed a job. The job soon
became my passion, my life’s work—
in fact, my life. I loved journalism. I
love the thrill of the story. Working
at Meals On Wheels allows me not
only to be an observer of the story,
but also to be a part of it.
What does a typical day look
like for you?
Unfortunately, I am a Black-
Berry addict, so my day begins
and ends by checking my emails. I
admit that I frequently send emails
between 2 and 4 a.m. Sometimes,
I even get responses back at that
hour. I think sleep is a luxury of
which I clearly do not partake in
a healthy way. But, I do manage,
sparingly, to squeeze in time for my
other passions—baseball, movies,
crossword puzzles and the theater.
Why pursue a career in service?
My ‘aha’ moment came many
years ago when I visited a trailer
park in Appalachia. I met a gentle-
man named Al, and he lived in
abject poverty. The filth and stench
of garbage throughout the park and
the vacant, pleading stares by the
residents in my direction were pal-
pable. I delivered Al’s meal to him
and spent some time chatting with
him. He told me that he had cancer
and Meals On Wheels was keeping
him alive. I then saw that he shared
that meal with his stray cats and
dogs that roamed around and were
Al’s only ‘family.’ As I turned to
walk away to deliver more meals, I
looked over my shoulder to catch
one more glimpse of Al. There,
taped to his decrepit trailer, was a
handmade sign he had posted. It
read: ‘God Bless America.’ That’s
why I work for Meals On Wheels.
Because I am an American who
loves my country, too, but know I
can do better as a citizen.
What is the hardest part of your
job?
The hardest part of the job is the
demands of it. I’m way too hands-
on and take it way too personally.
It truly has become a mission
to me and not just a
job. It’s work that
I am passion-
ate about and
truly lose sleep
over. I think
setting out a vision of ending senior
hunger by 2020, which we did, was
a great thing to do. However, it just
adds that much more pressure to
an already pressure-filled job.
Do you feel that seniors are
often overlooked in terms of
service?
I believe that hungry seniors are
truly among the most overlooked
Americans. We tend to think that
because there is Social Security and
Medicare, seniors are taken care of.
But that’s just not the case. There
are over six million seniors today
in America who face the threat of
hunger. That’s one in nine seniors
in the richest nation on Earth
facing the threat of hunger. It’s
unacceptable.
What do you think about
President Obama’s proposed
2012 budget, with the budget
for Senior Nutrition Programs
staying static at $819 million?
The great misconception about
Meals On Wheels is that it is en-
tirely federally-funded. That’s just
not true. The vast majority of the
funding for all Meals On Wheels
programs is raised by the programs
themselves. For those programs
that do receive
some public
funding, it
amounts to
very, very little. President
[Obama’s] proposed budget for
2012 for our programs does remain
static at the funding levels of the
[2010 fiscal year]. Would we like
that number to go up? Certainly.
If you could tell the public one
thing they may not know about
Meals on Wheels, what would
it be?
Lou Gehrig said that he was
the luckiest man alive. I think I’m
the luckiest woman alive. I get to
live out a dream every day. Who
amongst us doesn’t want to make
a diference in the world? Well, I
don’t necessarily make a diference
in the world every day, but I make
a contribution to the world every
day. And, ironically, it’s not deliver-
ing meals at Meals On Wheels. No,
I am delivering on a promise that
I made to both my parents before
they died. They told me never to
forget the old people. I haven’t. I
work to raise the awareness and
the dollars for this cause that I hold
so dearly. But the other thing that
makes me lucky and makes me
realize where I am really making a
diference for many years to come
is with the young women and men
with whom I work on a daily basis
here at Meals On Wheels Asso-
ciation of America. These young
people have chosen to work in
the not-for-profit sector for a
cause that far too many turn
their backs on. They make
me work harder than I
ever have just so I
can keep up with
them.
Journalist to
Philanthropist
Enid Borden, CEO of one of the nation’s most
recognizable charities, Meals On Wheels,
lets us behind the scenes to see just what makes
this philanthropically minded CEO tick .
By Rachel Morgan
Enid Borden
delivers a meal to a
senior in need.
NYO_MAG2_PXX_MealsOnWheels.indd 112 4/1/11 11:47:50 AM
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Date: March 28, 2011
Project: Manhattan House
Publication: NYO UES Guide
Issue: 09.29.2010
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MODERN pENthOusE DEsIGNED BY RItA kONIG
CLAssIC,
COMpELLING,
MANhAttAN.

Manhattan House, a Landmarked Modernist
icon, offers five-star services, exclusive
amenities and re-engineered residential
interiors. From its private gardens and spa
to residences with multiple exposures and
generous balconies, Manhattan House
captures the spirit of New York City’s
Upper East Side.
ONE tO FIvE BEDROOM CONDOMINIuM
REsIDENCEs, pRICED FROM $1.195M
IMMEDIAtE OCCupANCY
manhattanhouse.com +1 877 397 3415
FINANCING AvAILABLE
MANhAttAN hOusE AMENItIEs:
Five-Star Concierge Services, Rooftop Manhattan
Club, exhale
®
Mind Body Spa & Fitness Center,
Children’s Playroom, Private Gardens, Porte
Cochère Entrances, On-Site Parking
The complete offering terms are in an offering plan available from the sponsor. File No. CD06-0055. All dimensions are approximate and subject to normal construction variances and
tolerances. Plans and dimensions may contain minor variations from floor to floor. Sponsor reserves the right to make changes in accordance with the terms of the offering plan. We
are pledged to the letter and spirit of U.S. policy for the achievement of equal housing opportunity throughout the Nation. We encourage and support an affirmative advertising and
marketing program in which there are no barriers to obtaining housing because of race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin.
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