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THE UPPER EAST SIDE ISSUE + MCQUEEN AT THE MET + NEW YORK’S POWER BREAKFAST
THE UPPER EAST SIDE ISSUE + MCQUEEN AT THE MET + NEW YORK’S POWER BREAKFAST

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8 | april 2011

editor’s note

elcome to the second issue of NYO Magazine, the Observer Media Group’s newest publication. We had a great time

Media Group’s newest publication. We had a great time 26 W chatting with our cover star

26 W

chatting with our cover star Dylan lauren, the perfect example of a New York entrepreneur who built a $20 million candy empire on her own. We spoke to Kurt Gutenbrunner, who started off in a small Austrian town and went on to become one of New York’s most influential chefs, and Robert A.M. Stern, one of the greatest architects of the 21 st century. Then there were the people who know where to get a good meal and the best place for drinks—the concierges of the Plaza, the Carlyle and the Mark. We visited the power break- fast at the Regency and explored the late Alexander McQueen’s exhibit at the Met. We covered art, dining, restaurateurs, architecture, culture, real estate, busi- ness and the larger than life personalities of the city.

ness and the larger than life personalities of the city. Rachel Morgan , Senior Editor SENIOR

Rachel Morgan , Senior Editor

SENIOR EDITOR

RACHEL MORGAN

DESIGN DIRECTOR

IVYLISE SIMONES

WRITERS

MEREDITH

BENNETT-SMITH

ALEX CACIOPPO

CHARLOTTE GARDEN

ANDREW GUARINI

MEREDITH HOFFMAN

NATALIE HOWARD

CHIU-TI JANSEN

EVA KARAGIORGAS

CHELSIA MARCIUS

RACHEL OHM

DAISY PRINCE

ALEXIS THOMAN

RUDISILL

SYDNEY SARACHAN

FASHION CONTRIBUTORS PRISCILLA POLLEY COCO MELLORS

CONTRIBUTING

PHOTOGRAPHERS

MICHAEL CHIMENTO

CHAD GRIFFITH

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS MICHAEL CHIMENTO CHAD GRIFFITH SENIOR DESIGNERS LAUREN DRAPER SCOTT DVORIN
CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS MICHAEL CHIMENTO CHAD GRIFFITH SENIOR DESIGNERS LAUREN DRAPER SCOTT DVORIN

SENIOR DESIGNERS

LAUREN DRAPER

SCOTT DVORIN

PUBlISHER

ROBYN WEISS

SAlES SPENCER SHARP BETTY LEDERMAN DAN D’ANDREA MITCHELL BEDELL DAVID BENDAYAN PAUL KORNBLUEH KAREN KOSSMAN MICHELE MORGAN ALEXANDER NUCKEL DAVID M. WOLFF

OBSERVER MEDIA GROUP PUBlISHER JARED KUSHNER PRESIDENT CHRISTOPHER BARNES EXECUTIVE V.P. BARRY LEWIS ASSOCIATE PUBlISHER JAMIE FORREST V.P. ADVERTISING STEPHEN GOLDBERG V.P. SAlES AND MARKETING DAVID GURSKY ClASSIFIED ADVERTISING DIRECTOR KEN NEWMAN MARKETING MANAGER JILL GUTEKUNST V.P. CIRCUlATION KRATOS VOS

PRODUCTION MANAGER TYLER RUSH PHOTO EDITOR PETER LETTRE ADVERTISING PRODUCTION LISA MEDCHILL

CIRCUlATION

ALEXANDRA ENDERLE

PETER PARRIS

CARLOS RODRIGUEZ

© 2011 Estate of Pablo Picasso/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

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contents 58 62 36 70 24 14 People The Upper East Side’s most eligible millionaires.

contents

58

62

36
36
70
70

24

14

People The Upper East Side’s most eligible millionaires.

16

Neighborhood Buzz Revisit your favorite neighborhood in the city.

18

People Meet the concierge of the Plaza, the Mark and the Carlyle.

24

Cover Dylan Lauren shares the sweet secrets to her success, her impending nuptials and what it was like growing up with Ralph Lauren as her dad.

32

Art Meet the next generation of China’s millionaires.

36

artist profiles Four emerging artists sound off on their technique, recent shows and what inspires them.

44

Art Get a sneak peak at the upcoming Alexander McQueen exhibit at the Met.

48

Collector Meet a local art collector with a surprising connection to Andy Warhol.

52

Art Explore the nearly-completed Museum of African Art.

57

Philanthropy Carnegie Hall shakes things up with this year’s gala.

58

Places Step back in

time at an iconic Upper East Side barbershop.

60

On the town See Patrick McMullan’s

favorite party shots from this season.

10 | april 2011

62

Fashion An up-and- coming design duo makes their mark.

65

Fashion Get fashion tips from Bloomingdale’s resident expert.

66

Chef Meet the man behind the stove at Cafe Sabarsky.

70

Food column Eva Karagiorgas’ picks for best brunch on the Upper East Side.

72

Food Hear the story behind the Regency’s Power Breakfast.

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contents 74 Wine Gary Vaynerchuk discusses the intersection between social media and wine. 76 Architecture
contents 74 Wine Gary Vaynerchuk discusses the intersection between social media and wine. 76 Architecture

contents

74

Wine Gary Vaynerchuk discusses the intersection between social media and wine.

76

Architecture Robert A.M. Stern talks about designing classic buildings on the Upper East Side

78

Architecture Hear the stories behind the neighborhood’s most magnificant mansions.

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Interior Design Design scion Celerie Kemble talks about her newest projects in

96 the Manhattan House.

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Real estate The experts’ take on the real estate climate on the Upper East Side.

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NYO
NYO

XXXXXXX

Winston laphaM

toppeR MoRtiMeR

nat Rothschild

NYO XXXXXXX Winston laphaM toppeR MoRtiMeR nat Rothschild How to Marry a Millionaire The most eligible

How to Marry a Millionaire

The most eligible bachelors in New York aren’t easy. You need to have the pedigree, the looks, the right social circle, and most importantly, get along with the future mother-in-law. Below is our guide

on how to snag a millionaire of your very own. By Rachel MoRgan illustRation By scott dvoRin

Harry LeFrak

MoRgan • illustRation By scott dvoRin Harry LeFrak Bio: The brainy Harry works under papa Richard

Bio: The brainy Harry works under papa Richard LeFrak, who heads up the LeFrak Organization. While a regular on the gala-and-benefit circuit, the Upper East Side bachelor is a bit camera shy with not much of a storied past in the way of dating. While he may not be your typical all-American bachelor, we think his awkward grin is just adorable.

LeFrak’s

out-on-the-town sightings are G-rated; any upscale Upper East Side eatery, or the New York Botanical Garden’s 10th Annual Winter Wonderland Ball (which he attended with socialite Alex Kramer in the past), assuming you can snag an invite.

An

avid dog lover, Karen LeFrak once squealed with delight when

Watering

HoLe:

Future

MotHer-in-LaW:

14 | april 2011

she learned a potential girlfriend shared a birthday with the fam- ily schnauzer. She’s also just published her third children’s book about dogs, aptly titled Best in Show. Prepare for your new BFF, as Mrs. LeFrak has been anxiously awaiting her baby boy’s new wifey. Get ready to log some serious hours at Bergdorf’s, mother-in-law in tow, of course.

topper MortiMer

mother-in-law in tow, of course. topper MortiMer Bio: Ah, Topper. This second- round bachelor has the

Bio: Ah, Topper. This second- round bachelor has the boyish, Ivy League good looks that seem to be inborn with a blue-blooded upbringing. A charmer on his be- loved Upper East Side, he’s not the type of guy you’d go backpacking through Europe with. We hear he’s great friends with the Santo Domingos, and while he would probably resist traveling outside

the Upper East Side, he would go anywhere with that clan—on their yacht, of course. No doubt the Topper/Tinsley divorce human- ized this playboy—he even had a “downtown moment,” growing a beard for about five minutes. It al- most made us long for the perfect Upper East Side society couple to reunite, which didn’t happen. Topper is back on the market, and Tory Burch–clad 20-somethings everywhere are rejoicing. past: Everyone knows of Topper and socialite–turned–fashion de- signer Tinsley Mortimer. Lesson learned: When you have an Upper East Side pedigree, marriage at age 18 is a bit frowned upon by your well-to-do parentals. Even annulling the marriage, attend- ing universities in New York and getting married later didn’t work for this duo. When it comes to tak- ing sides in this breakup, we’re on

TeamTopper.Afterall,whowould want to spend their marriage al- ways playing second fiddle to Patrick McMullan? Topper then embarked on a romance with Vogue-er Valerie Boster, but the romance had roughly the same shelf life as the September issue. He then moved on to Meredith Ostrom. But in our book, Topper is still a bachelor, at least until he puts a ring on it.

ropes

part for Topper—and we hear he’s practically the patron saint of the

Boom Boom Room.

Mrs.

Mortimer is the family stalwart, and upholds loyalty above all else. While she at first may be tough to crack, once you’re in, you’re in. Unless, of course, you marry her son at age 18, annul the marriage, remarry a few years later and make a career frequenting the

Watering

Future

HoLe:

Velvet

in

LaW:

MotHer

getty images; patrick mcmullan

Harry lefrak

social circuit, only to divorce her heartbroken baby boy. Then, only then, may she not like you.

Winston Lapham

boy. Then, only then, may she not like you. Winston Lapham Bio: The adorable Winnie has

Bio: The adorable Winnie has made it his business to get well acquainted with the journal- ism industry. The Lapham family made their fortune in the publishing industry, as Winnie’s dad, Lewis Lapham, was the ed- itor of Harper’s Magazine for two separate stints and is now the magazine’s editor emeritus. Winnie hangs out with the likes of the Bloomingdales and Hearsts. past: Winnie has made the rounds—in the publishing indus- try, that is. This low-key bachelor dated magazine scion Amanda Hearst for three years before the pair split in 2008. Winnie, how- ever, wasn’t left crying in his Pellegrino. He went on to ro- mance department store heiress Hayley Bloomingdale. The pair is still happily in coupledom. Both Bloomingdale and Hearst were featured in Vanity Fair ’s Fortune’s Children photo shoot. Awkward much? Watering hoLe: Upper East Side eatery Amaranth.

As

Future

mother

in

LaW:

Winnie is her baby boy, Joan Lapham is naturally protective. The other Lapham siblings mar- ried a prince and the daughter of the former prime minster of Canada, respectively, so there’s a lot to live up to.

nat rothschiLd

so there’s a lot to live up to. nat rothschiLd Bio: Rothschild is a true down-

Bio: Rothschild is a true down- towner. But don’t be fooled. Hon Nathaniel Philip Victor James Rothschild, otherwise known at Nat, isn’t lacking in funds. The British-born bachelor attended Eton and Oxford and is now the chairman of JNR Unlimited, but has also held posts at hedge fund Atticus Capital. A businessman with a British accent with an af- finity for planes? We’re in. past: Also a second-round bach- elor, Nat was married to model

Annabelle Neilson for two years. The pair divorced in 1998. And word is, the ex–in-laws aren’t friendly. Elizabeth Neilson, Nat’s former mother-in-law told the Daily Mail that Nat was “a very naughty boy.” We can’t decide if that’s a point for or against.

West

Village restaurants.

Watering

hoLe:

Trendy

Future

mother

in

LaW: The

baby of the family, Nat’s moth- er is English lady Serena Rothschild, granddaughter to Sir James Dunn, Canadian in- dustrialist and financier. Once you’re in with the mother, you can bet on enjoying holiday at the family place in Corfu, Greece. We hear it’s like the party house in high school— that is, if all the high-school kids grew up to become billionaires, CEOs and heads of state.

It’s like the party house in high school—that is, if all the high-school kids grew up to become billionaires, CEOs and heads of state.

XXXXXXX

jamie joHnson

NYO
NYO

Jamie Johnson

and heads of state. XXXXXXX jamie joHnson NYO Jamie Johnson Bio: The Johnson & Johnson heir

Bio: The Johnson & Johnson heir started a film career based on being Born Rich, also the title of his Emmy-nominated 2003 HBO doc- umentary, a move that definitely alienated some in his social cir- cle. Johnson also writes an online series or Vanity Fair on the same subject. Oh, the irony. This hand- some, N.Y.U.-educated filmmaker seemstobemoreofarisk-takerthan his fellow bachelors. past: Johnson formerly dated Jessica Joffe, a model redhead em- ployed at none other than The New York Observer some years ago. Watering hoLe: This N.Y.U. grad shuns the Upper East Side in favor of the underground East Village bar circuit.

Future mother in LaW: Not your

typical Upper East Side mother. Gretchen Johnson is very arty— and is also a risk-taker, but in art. Word is that she was an early be- liever in Robert Mapplethorpe. It seems the whole family has the tendency to go against the grain, as his father, James Loring Johnson, partially funded a documenta- ry about South African apartheid and economic unfairness and was widely criticized by members of the Johnson & Johnson clan.

MicHaEL cHiMEnTO fOR nYO MagazinE; gETTY iMagEs

NYO
NYO

UES nEighborhood bUzz

1

2

rediscover

the UpperEast Side

Upper East Siders are privileged in more ways than one — most notably, to have some of New York’s best retail and restaurants right at their fingertips. We’ve compiled a list of our favorite Upper East Side spots below. So go ahead, rediscover the neighborhood!

By Charlotte Garden, Natalie Howard and Rachel Morgan Photos by Michael Chimento

At Sant Ambroeus, brunch is a formal affair— and it’s no surprise considering the eatery’s Mi- lan roots. While sipping their world renowned cappuccino or munching on Salmone Af- fumicato or Omelete Della Casa, be prepared to see a few famous faces. Careful attention has been paid down to the smallest detail, from floral arrangements to the temperature of the coffee. And to us, success is in the details (1000 Madison Ave., 212-570-2211).

K Chocolatier is the second generation of the storied Krön Chocolatier, opened by Tom and Diane Krön in 1973. But this wasn’t your aver- age chocolate shop—it served society elite such as Jacqueline Kennedy, Katherine Hepburn, Andy Warhol and Richard Avedon. Their reci- pes dated back three generations on Tom’s side, whose great-grandfather was chocolatier to Emperor Franz Josef of Austro-Hungary. But it was Tom himself who invented the chocolate- covered strawberry, an impressive feat in itself. But in 1983, the pair retired and sold the shop. Lucky for us, they weren’t done forever with the chocolate business. Diane opened K Chocolati- er in 2000 and has been perfecting her already- perfect recipes ever since. It’s downright sinful not to stop in (19 East 69th St., 212-861-2111).

Nothing says the Upper East Side like French retailer Hermès. This neighborhood staple is home to the coveted Birken and Kelly bags—named after two very famous society ladies, respectively—and carries everything one Upper East Sider needs to fit the part—the

16 | april 2011

Birken bag, signature Hermès perfume, top- of-the-line housewares, shoes, even tiny, yet supremely pricey cuff links. Status cuffs, if you will (691 Madison Ave., 212-751-3181).

Pickles & Olives, Etc. is one specialty store not to be missed. The cornichons, made from tiny gherkin cucumbers, are especially satisfying, as are the kosher dill. Feeling adventurous? Go for the giardiniera, a mix of pickled vegetables. Pickles & Olives, Etc. is Snooki’s dream house of various pickled items—while there are olives too, as the name denotes, it is the pickles that are really the showstopper (1647 First Ave. between 85th and 86th streets, 212- 717-8966).

Walk through the doors of this little nook of a shop and enter the wide world of buttons. Ten- der Buttons, a seamstress and craft enthusiast’s dream world, still can amaze those who have never thought much about the button, with its rows upon rows of shiny, perfectly round, one-of-a-kind fasteners. Antique, jeweled, hand-painted, carved ivory are just a few of the materials you’ll see. Tender Buttons is a store dedicated to the art, craftsmanship, design, cre- ativity, ingenuity and functional elegance of this formerly underrepresented bauble (143 East 62nd St., 212-758-7004).

The Silver Peacock is a true gem of an antique store. Opened in 2009, it is the brainchild of two interior design veterans—Charlie Akwa, former owner of Elegant Egg Cup; and Jennifer Flanders, formerly of interior design company

Cullman & Kravis. The store itself is everything a home interior store should be, as every item is hand-selected by the co-owners—it’s like having your very own interior designer. The inven- tory mostly hails from European designers like Nason Moretti and Hermès, and bridal registries are welcome. After shopping, kick back at the wine and cappuccino bar in the back (1110 Park Ave. at 89th St., 212-426-2610).

It might be hard for some to create a sense of intimacy in a 22,000-square-foot space, but not for the new Ralph Lauren store at 888 Madison Avenue. Majestic glass doors welcome shoppers into four floors of retail decadence. This new flagship Ralph Lauren store is something even the brand’s most loyal followers have never seen before. It’s the first Ralph Lau- ren location to carry only the brand’s women and home collections. The footwear salon chan- nels the opulence of the French Rococo era, and the grand salon houses the latest runway collection in a space made to feel like a high-end Upper East Side apartment. Also unique to this store are its watch and fine jewelry salon, the only place of its kind in the United States, and its display of Ralph Lauren Collection Sleepwear. The line of silk and cashmere nightwear for women is exclusive to this new flagship location. Ralph Lauren revamps the shopping experi- ence with this new store on the Upper East Side. The comfort of home with the variety of a de- partment store? Sign me up (212-434-8000).

1. Ralph Lauren store at 888 Madision. 2. Pickles & Olives, Etc. 3. Hermès at 691 Madison. 4. Tender Buttons

➊

KEYS

to the City

Meet the most powerful men in New York—concierge of the Carlyle, the manager of the Mark and the chef concierge of the Plaza

18 | APRIL 2011

By Coco Mellors It helps to have friends in high places, or in this case,
By Coco Mellors
It helps to have friends in high
places, or in this case, behind a front
desk. The best way to reap the benefits of
hotel life in the city you live in is to know
the concierge.
We visited three of the Upper East Side’s
most luxurious hotels—the Mark, the Car-
lyle and the Plaza—to pick the brains of the
men who make it their business to know the
city better than the natives. These concierge
have seen it all—tracking down live taran-
tulas, drawing a bath of pure Evian water or
delivering a wedding dress via plane.
Read on for our concierge’s top picks for
lunch, dinner and dancing and prepare to
be pampered.
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PEOPLE

NYO PEOPLE the carlyle hotel head concierge Dwight Owsley Where would you send hotel guests for

the carlyle hotel head concierge

Dwight Owsley

Where would you send hotel guests for lunch or dinner?

Café Boulud and Orsay are wonderful. 3 Guys [Restaurant] on Madison; I have lunch there every other day. Swifty’s is a New York institution. For dinner, Paola’s Restaurant and Sfoglia.

Your recommendation for a night of drinks and dancing?

Well, obviously the Carlyle, our restau- rant and especially our bar, which is one of the best bars in town.

What exactly does your role entail?

You never know what the day is going to hold, so you have to be ready to plug into anything. Since our clientele are some of the most cosmopolitan in the world, they might want to discuss the opera, ballet, a Knicks game, the theater or some Off Off Broadway show, so you have to be ready to think outside the box in terms of entertainment and dining. As I learned years ago from my mentors, you have to be able to divorce what your tastes are from your clients, and many people cannot do that. You have to learn your clients’ taste—sometimes what they think they want is also not what’s going to make them happy.

What’s the strangest request you’ve ever received?

One client needed her wedding dress de- livered to her in London, so we had to put an employee on the Concorde to bring it to her by hand while it was still being beaded. He was back in time for dinner. Things like that used to happen with some regularity in the Concorde days.

20 | APRIL 2011

with some regularity in the Concorde days. 20 | APRIL 2011 the plaza hotel chef concierge

the plaza hotel chef concierge

Raphael Pallais

Where would you send hotel guests for lunch or dinner?

Daniel. Or the really trendy Asian restau- rant Geisha. On Madison there is the famous Italian restaurant Nello’s, which Upper East Siders have been going to forever.

Your recommendation for a night of drinks and dancing?

Lavo, which has a nightclub next door. The scene there is explosive; it’s virtually impos- sible to get a table there.

What exactly does your role entail?

People come to you to help you organize their entire stay. You have to be aware of everything that’s going on. You also have to be psychological and be able to match what’s going on with who is asking.

What’s the strangest request you’ve ever received?

One of the strangest things was that a fam- ily once asked me where to find live taran- tulas that they could take home to roast and eat. Now, edible tarantulas are very difficult to find. But I remembered that the Ex- plorer’s Club hosts a dinner and they served them on a skewer. So I contacted them and managed to get them from Colombia. See, you never say no.

managed to get them from Colombia. See, you never say no. general manager of the mark

general manager of the mark hotel

Olivier Lordonnois

Where would you send hotel guests for lunch or dinner?

Definitely ABC Kitchen, which is a new restaurant opened by our chef Jean-Georges in the ABC Carpet & Home. The Lion is a great restaurant downtown with excellent food. On the Upper East Side, there are so many hidden gems ,too, like Caravaggio by the Whitney Museum or Sushi of Gari, which is some of the best sushi in the city. It’s really simple in terms of décor, but the food is exquisite. For Saturday brunch, everyone’s at Le Bilboquet.

Your recommendation for a night of drinks and dancing?

Bars like the Boom Boom Room are still very popular with our guests.

What exactly does your role entail?

Dealing with all the operations around the hotel and making sure our guests are enjoying themselves. A large part of it is sales and marketing and making sure new customers and clients are coming to the hotel. It’s a very social job; you’re interacting with cli- ents or guests at the restaurant every day. You get to be out there and meeting people as much as possible.

What’s the strangest request you’ve ever received?

Once you get to a certain level, things stop being odd. I remember one guest wanted a bath of only Evian water, for example .

CONCIERGE’S PICKS Café Boulud Swifty’S Daniel The Explorer’s Sushi of Gari 20 East 76th St.
CONCIERGE’S PICKS
Café Boulud
Swifty’S
Daniel
The Explorer’s
Sushi of Gari
20 East 76th St.
1007 Lexington
60
East 65th St.
Club
402
East 78th St.
Ave.
46 East 70th St.
Orsay
1057 Lexington
Ave.
3 Guys
Restaurant
1381 Madison Ave.
Geisha
Le Bilboquet
Paola’s
33 East 61st St.
ABC Kitchen
25 East 63rd St.
Restaurant
35 East 18th St.
Nello’s
The Boom
1295 Madison Ave.
696 Madison Ave.
The Lion
Boom Room
Sfoglia
62 W Ninth St.
848 Washington St.
Lavo
1402 Lexington Ave.
39 East 58th St.
Caravaggio
23 East 74th St.

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24 | april 2011

C

CCCCaaannnnddddy

Dylan Lauren,

the Ralph Lauren heir who set out on her own sweet business venture

yyyy

behind the

hehe

hehehehe

d

by Daisy Prince

PHOTOS

BY

CHAD

GRIFFITH

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COVER STORY

I t is comforting to know that despite Dylan Lauren’s gilded upbringing, successful business and recent engagement to hand- some hedge fund manager Paul Arrouet, she is not entirely without a couple of quirks, one being a fascination with stuffed rabbits. Lauren is a little self-conscious about her

leporine fixation. “Yup, you think I’m crazy,” she said when explaining her commitment to her 3,000-piece collection of stuffed rabbits. Her other passion is, expectedly, candy. She opened her confectioner’s nirvana Dylan’s Candy Bar on the Upper East Side in the bleak week following Sept. 11, and despite austere beginnings, the company has grown to include satellite locations in East Hampton and Garden City on Long Island; Houston; and Orlando.

and Garden City on Long Island; Houston; and Orlando. the Lauren clan. The Laurens talked about
and Garden City on Long Island; Houston; and Orlando. the Lauren clan. The Laurens talked about
and Garden City on Long Island; Houston; and Orlando. the Lauren clan. The Laurens talked about

the Lauren clan. The Laurens talked about branding the way the Kennedys talked about politics, she said. Dinner- time conversation focused on work. “My mom, my brother David, my brother Andrew, we’re all creative,” she said. “It’s lots of artists, and there is always a discussion. If my dad opens a store in Asia, we discuss what kind of models he wants there, what the clothing line should be. I’m doing a stroller with Maclaren and everyone has different ideas about whether it should have lollipop handles or candy cane handles.” But Lauren didn’t go the usual route of summer intern- ships to learn about business. Instead she traveled with her parents, learning from their experience and friends. She always knew her future lay in being an entrepreneur, although she said she was never tempted to join the family business. “I always respected that my dad started his own com- pany, [but] I wanted to start my own thing,” she said of not

The Laurens talked about branding the way the Kennedys talked about politics.

Lauren is a candy entrepreneur. She is focused on a large-scale expansion, including a line of T-shirts, station- ary and even a candy-themed stroller with luxury brand Maclaren. This year, Lauren’s sweet business venture will reputedly rake in $20 million. Dylan’s Candy Bar contains 7,000 types of candy, including oversize gummy bears, endless M&Ms and gargantuan lollipops in all varieties. Lauren talks about her brand in the obsessive way a new mother talks about her first child; every conversation loops back around to Dylan’s Candy Bar. Her company also functions as her security blanket—any moment she feels the conversation is straying into personal territory, she steers it right back to candy. While Lauren doesn’t like the term “controlling,” she will admit to being a perfectionist who can spend hours choos- ing between two different types of turquoise for a T-shirt. “If my name is on a product then I want it to be perfect,” she said. It seems difficult not to be a perfectionist growing up in

26 | APRIL 2011

following in his fashion footsteps. “My interest in fashion was about color and design.” It was her passion for color that lent itself to designing Dylan’s Candy Bar. “My parents said, ‘You love candy, make it like Disney- land, make it big—don’t just open a little candy store, make it over the top,” she said. After visiting Dylan’s Candy Bar and taking in its over- size, brightly colored wares and décor, it’s obvious that Lauren took her parents’ advice. But to her, this business venture isn’t just about candy. “I don’t see it as a candy store, and very few people understand that,” she said. The seed for the venture was planted early. As a col- lege student at Duke University, Lauren spent her time browsing the shelves of North Carolina’s vast array of 24-hour supermarkets, checking out the new packaging and cereals. Lauren’s first venture into business was Dylan’s Creative Events, an event-planning company, which

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Cover Story

Clockwise from top:

Dylan and fiancé Paul Arrouet; Ricky Lauren, Dylan Lauren and Lauren Bush at the Ralph Lauren Collection Fall 2010 Fashion Show; Greg Lauren, Elizabeth Berkley, Dylan Lauren, Olivia Palermo and guest at the relaunch celebration at Dylan’s Candy Bar in October 2008; Dylan and Ralph Lauren.

Dylan’s Candy Bar in October 2008; Dylan and Ralph Lauren. “I love color; I think they
Dylan’s Candy Bar in October 2008; Dylan and Ralph Lauren. “I love color; I think they
Dylan’s Candy Bar in October 2008; Dylan and Ralph Lauren. “I love color; I think they
Dylan’s Candy Bar in October 2008; Dylan and Ralph Lauren. “I love color; I think they

“I love color; I think they call it synesthesia.”

didn’t pan out because she felt constrained by budgets and themes. Her next thought was to open a cafe–art-gallery hybrid, which featured pop artists, another venture into color. Instead, she went the candy route. But color was still on the forefront. “I love color; I think they call it synes- thesia,” she said, referencing a condition in which one type of simulation produces the sensation of another, so hearing music might induce the visualization of a certain color. While Lauren’s business venture was funded by her father, that doesn’t mean she takes it for granted. “Dad put up the money,” she said. “But it’s not like I live every day sitting back and thinking that it’s just private money; I work very hard.” Initially, Lauren had a business partner, Jeff Rubin. “He and I had different visions of where the company should go,” she said. “We were starting to open stores very fast, and I felt Dylan’s Candy Bar should be specialized. I wanted a more boutique and elegant store. We still get along great and both love candy—how many people do you know can sing candy tunes?” Ultimately, candy tunes weren’t enough to hold them together. The business pair split in 2006 and Lauren continued on her venture into Candyland alone. On a personal note, one has to wonder: Just how does Lauren maintain her physique as the founder and CEO of a candy store? A self- proclaimed fitness lover, Lauren claims she eats just as much candy as she ever did, but by adding weight training to her regime and cutting out wheat products, she’s dropped the baby fat she once had in college. “I guess I realized that now that I’m the spokesperson of my company, and have to be on

wHitney museum of american art

wHitney.org

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modern life

edward Hopper and His time

last

cHance!

closes

april 10

Hopper and His time last cHance! closes april 10 Edward Hopper (1882–1967), Self-Portrait , 1925–1930.

Edward Hopper (1882–1967), Self-Portrait, 1925–1930. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Josephine N. Hopper Bequest 70.1165 © Heirs of Josephine N Hopper, licensed by the Whitney Museum of American Art.

Media Partner WNET.ORG

Bequest 70.1165 © Heirs of Josephine N Hopper, licensed by the Whitney Museum of American Art.
Clockwise from top: Dylan poses among the many sweet treats available at Dylan’s Candy Bar;

Clockwise from top: Dylan poses among the many sweet treats available at Dylan’s Candy Bar; Dylan’s Candy Bar; and a model at the relaunch of Dylan’s Candy Bar in October 2008.

at the relaunch of Dylan’s Candy Bar in October 2008. “I would never be a stay-at-home

“I would never be a stay-at-home mom. I want to have it all. I have very clear goals of where I want to take my company.”

The Today Show, I’d better look good,” she said. While Lauren tends to err on the side of cautious when discussing her personal life, she does talk a bit about her upcoming nuptials to French-born Paul Arrouet, who manages Marblegate Assets, a hedge fund. The couple has been together for four years after being set up on a blind date. Lauren seems excited if apprehensive about getting married. “I wouldn’t be with the guy I’m marrying if he was a control freak or if he didn’t under-

30 | april 2011

stand my desire to put my business first,” she said. The wedding will take place in June at her parents’ East Hampton Estate. While it has its undeniable perks, being a Lauren isn’t always easy. She admits that there were certain demands that came with growing up in the public eye. “We’re a very grounded family, but I think that there is a pressure to look a certain way and go to a lot of events and travel places that you might not want to travel,” she said. “But to me, my dad’s just my dad.”

With marriage fast approaching, children are certainly on her mind, as is the balance between continuing to grow her business and meeting the demands of a family. “Much as I own a candy store, it’s for kids and adults,” she said. “I would never be a stay-at-home mom. I want to have it all. I have very clear goals of where I want to take my company.” Catching my eye for second, she smiles. “The good thing is if I do have kids they will probably enjoy what I do.”

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left: CHI Peng; RIgHt: CHIu-tI JAnSen.

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ART

CHINA Happenings
CHINA
Happenings

Above: Chi Peng, “I’m sorry, I just don’t love you,” C-Print, 2008. Right: A news- stand at the Shanghai Hongqiao Airport offers a glimpse of what recreational activities engage the new Chinese elite.

China’s

Thirty-

Something

Millionaires

By Chiu-Ti Jansen

I f you asked me to identify the single most influential phenomenon that will transform the Chinese lifestyle industries and economy in the next 10 years, I would not hesitate one second to answer—the youth of the new wealthy.

Whether you are a real estate broker in New

York looking for a fresh supply of buyers, a Fortune 500 CEO agonizing over your next move in China,

a wine connoisseur active in the auction markets,

a high-end fashion designer trying to crack the

code of the so-called “Chinese taste” or a fine jewelry store trying to attract the next Chinese tourists, take note: based on the data compiled by

the Hurun Report—the Chinese equivalent of the

Forbes 400—as of 2010, 8.9 percent of the 1,000 richest men in China are younger than 40. What’s more, the average age of the Chinese with personal wealth of more than 100 million yuan—about $15 million—is 43, and the average Chinese with personal wealth of more than 10 million yuan— about $1.5 million—are on average as young as 39, 15 years younger than their counterparts in the United States or Europe. Cultural differences aside, in most societies, the youth are more attracted to certain styles and tastes than their older counterparts. When these young people are exercising their newly gained purchasing power, the impact on the luxury goods market is apparent. China’s younger luxury-goods consumers will, through the dictation of their lik- ings, change the game of the luxury markets, which

32 | APRIL 2011

LEFT: CHI PENG; RIGHT: CHIU-TI JANSEN.

traditionally have tailored their brand identities to generally older buyers. While many devel- oped markets are experiencing growth or contraction in luxury industries, China already boasts a 25 to 30 percent annual growth in luxury goods market, on track to overtake Japan as the largest market in the world by 2014. While some of the young rich are “princelings”—politically connected descendents of the senior Communist officers—or heirs or heiresses—fu’erdai, or second-generation rich, as they are called in China—a majority of them are self-made. And few of them are from dot-coms. They make their money in media, en- ergy, finance, technology, health, art, fashion and real estate and

“Western brands continue to dominate the brand recognition among the Chinese elite.”

represent a major departure from an old China, so proud of its an- cient history and its reverence of the elderly. They are the children of one-child policy, unscarred by the Cultural Revolution. They are the first generation in the past 200 years to be freed from China’s tumultuous history of foreign invasions and civil wars. They grew up with Louis Vuitton, Armani and BMW.

Artists such as Liao Yibai, 39, Cao Fei, 33, and Chi Peng, 29, allude amply in their works to the characteristics of what I call the “Louis Vuitton Generation,” or LV Generation, self-obsessed and consumption-oriented. Louis Vuitton opened its first store in China at Beijing’s Peninsula Palace Hotel in 1992, at a time when the LV Genera- tion was at the cusp of entering

XXXXXXX

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Caption in this space here. Caption in this space here. Caption in this space here. Caption in this space here. Caption in this space here.

adolescence. Chi Peng, for instance, emblematically titled his recently opened solo show at the Groninger Museum in the Netherlands “Me, Myself and I.” It’s also telling that the acronym “MQ,” which stands for money quotient and measures money intelligence, is as in vogue as EQ or IQ in China. Search for the taste of this af- fluent LV Generation has become the Holy Grail for many Western companies. Many surveys of the young elite in China show that their favorite way of relaxation and leisure is travel—ahead of golfing, reading and driving. On average, the wealthy surveyed by the Hurun Report travel overseas four times per year. The United States ranks as the

CHIU-TI JANSEN

NYO
NYO

ART

Liao Yibai, Fake Ring, Pink Iceberg, 2010, Stainless Steel and Synthetic Quartz.
Liao Yibai, Fake Ring,
Pink Iceberg, 2010,
Stainless Steel and
Synthetic Quartz.

China

Tool Box

Five quick ways to grasp the culture and style of the young elite in China:

1. See the hip movie

Du Lala’s Promotion, based on the best-selling urban romance about a college graduate who works her way up the corporate ladder and romances her boss along the way.

2. Watch the TV series

Struggle (Fendou), about several college graduates’ attempt to define success and themselves in a materialistic society.

CH7 - Liao Yibai, Fake Bag YB, 2009, Stainless Steel.

3. Read Hurun Report’s

annual Hurun Rich List and Best of Best: Preferred Brands of China’s Richest.

4. Visit the 798 Art District and Caochangdi in Beijing and Moganshan Road Art District in Shanghai or some of the major art fairs and biennials in China (e.g., China International Gallery Exposition [CIGE], Art Beijing, Contemporary, Shanghai Art Fair, Shanghai Biennale).

5. Read Young Chinese

Artists: The Next Generation about artists born after 1975 and their works.

No. 1 destination, followed by France. The young elite are also quick studies and receptive to new ideas. Only about three or four years ago, most Chinese collec- tors did not care about collecting contemporary Chinese art, but they are now doing so zealously. Chinese were previously not big wine drinkers—now they snap up 70 to 80 percent of the wine sold in the worldwide auctions. When I look around, my young Chinese friends with education seem to be optimistic about their opportunities. They do not have to be an investment banker or a tech wizard to make their first million dollars. They typically do not have education- al debt, nor do they necessarily have advanced degrees. Many of them have never studied abroad. Yet every few months when I return to Beijing or Shanghai , I notice they have just bought a new Mercedes, returned from a trip to Japan or discovered a new fashion brand in Europe that I

have not yet heard of. Given the regional differ- ences in China and diverse ways in which fortunes are created, it is hard to generalize what constitutes the “Chinese taste.” Overall, it is safe to say that the new young elite’s spending habits differ from their parents’ and those of the older wealth, as the older generations tend to spend under the shadow of their prior hardship and scarcity; the younger generations embrace more luxury spending. For example, when my 30-some- thing friends recently invited me to a newly opened restau- rant, Xuxian in Beijing, the full house buzzed with young people. Outside the restaurant there were two bespoke sports cars—a Pagani Zonda Cinque, one of only five in the world, with a price tag exceeding $2 million plus a 33 percent luxury tax; and a Dutch-made Spyker, priced at upward of $1 million plus luxury tax. Observing how my young

millionaire friends spend their money, I don’t think they subscribe to a simple dichotomy between the Western and Chi-

nese brands, or a static “Chinese taste.” While intrigued by for-

eign cars and Western fashion,

Vertu cell phones and iPhones,

they are also eager to discover

Chinese antiques and pricy Pu’er tea from the Yunnan Province. They are not concerned with dragon, panda or other osten- tatious “Chinese signifiers.” Western brands—particularly in cars, fashion and watches— continue to dominate the brand-recognition among the Chinese elite, due to perceived superiority in quality. As lifestyle and cultural activities gradually dominate the LV Generation millionaires’ discretionary spending, the young elite will also increas- ingly look for Chinese luxury brands that more eclectically reflect contemporary China’s

mix of traditional and Western

influences.

34 | APRIL 2011

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NYO

XXXXXXX

PhotograPhic love affair

Ciaran Tully sees the city through a different lens . By Andrew Guarini

sees the city through a different lens . By Andrew Guarini Since photographer Ciaran Tully came

Since photographer Ciaran Tully came to New York by way of Dublin in 1990, he has entered into a sort of love affair with the city. Tully captures both sharp and realistic images of New York, but also those that are blurred and dreamlike. The two extremes create a unique dynamic in his portfolio and show his supreme admiration for all things New York.

You’re from Dublin. What have you found

36 | april 2011

in New York as a city that is different for your photography from European cities? As I kid I loved New York. My first exposure to New York was Kojak with Telly Savalas as the detective. What I loved about that show is it showed New York as down and dirty; it showed New York as it was in my mind. Then the humor of the people in the city and how they related to one another, it all seemed really real to me.

Where are your favorite places to shoot photos in the city? I shoot all the iconic buildings and bridges; they’ve all been shot before. Everyone has done them, especially the famous pho- tographers. So when I am shooting them, I try weave myself into the pictures,

somehow put myself into them. I try to be original— I’m not a painter, I could never paint—but I really do

try to weave myself into it. Sometimes I’m successful, and those are the photos

I love to show, and other

times when I’m unsuccess- ful, I’m just going to keep trying until I get them right.

Your photos are keen on careful aesthetic manipulations to make the city dreamlike— distorted lenses, slow shutter speeds, use of filters. Do you feel these techniques give you a leg up? I don’t think I’m any better than any other pho-

tographer, this is just how

I see it. What separates me

from others is love, the fact

that I really do adore this city—I think it’s the center of the universe. There are

Left, going to the Mermaid Parade; below, Snow N.Y.C.

Left, going to the Mermaid Parade; below, Snow N.Y.C . times when I’ll be walking around

times when I’ll be walking around and it’s like I’m

back here for the first time again, thinking about my first few weeks here when everything was incredible and brand new.

You were at the open- ing night of the Artist’s Project this month. Did you lean towards a theme with your gallery or was it more of a mix- ture of your catalogue? I put a lot of planning into it and there were a lot of people I wanted to attract. I wanted the images to be big;

I wanted to show as much of my work as possible within the space that was allotted to me. So I made them big with a nice clean look with

a simple frame, a look that’s very in right now, until next month when it probably won’t be. I went in there with intention of probably losing money but I was more concerned with the attraction.

What book is on your nightstand right now? Oh, Keith Richard’s Life. Ah, I love it. The guy inspires me. I also bought another one, a book of poetry by Rudyard Kipling which I read a lot of in the weeks leading up the show because I was very nervous. Mixing that with Keith Richards, it’s brilliant.

See more of Tully’s work at www.ciarantully.com.

NYO
NYO

art

Art on fire

Jeremy Penn lights his work on fire after its done—don’t worry, it just gives it character.

By Natalie Howard

worry, it just gives it character. By Natalie Howard Was there a moment when you first

Was there a moment when you first realized you wanted to be an artist? There wasn’t any specific moment. It always felt like a predetermined thing, like being an artist is woven into my DNA.

What drives you as an artist and propels your passion forward? I’m really driven by the connection between myself and the work. My latest work is all about seduction between certain looks, especially the moment when two people first lock eyes. That’s the purest form of interpersonal connec- tion. With certain images, the viewer is the one being seduced, and with others, the person in the image is very vulnerable and you’re the seducer.

Tell me about your exhibit at Pier 92. The show at the Artist Project at Pier 92 [closed March 20] and was where I revealed my latest series. I had a stack of mug shots and

38 | april 2011

one of them kept haunting me. I started researching the gentleman, his life and what happened to him. At first, I didn’t want to learn more about him. I was afraid I’d learn he was 5-foot-4 and lived with his mother and I would lose our connection. I learned he was arrested at age 21 for being a pimp. The San Bruno National Archives found out that the man’s name is William Murphy. They also found two men with that name—one was a war hero and the other was killed in a knife fight on a train. We don’t know which William Murphy this is. That’s where the mystery gets left in the viewer’s hands.

You often use very vibrant colors in your work.

I like vibrant colors be-

cause I want my art to grab the attention of the room and be the centerpiece, and vibrant colors stand out more than others. Also, I think they spice up the pieces. A lot of things in real life are boring colors, but in art I can make them any color I want. This is the only life you live, why not make it exciting?

What are some of the primary materials you use when creating art?

I really like to work with

rare materials, especially encaustic wax. Encaustic wax is a primitive form of painting; it was used to

wax is a primitive form of painting; it was used to William Murphy W02 ; William
wax is a primitive form of painting; it was used to William Murphy W02 ; William

William Murphy W02; William Murphy B02.

  Animal Instinct. paint portraits on sarcoph- I would say it’s indefin- agi because
Animal Instinct.
paint portraits on sarcoph-
I
would say it’s indefin-
agi because it lasts forever.
able. Labels to me are really
I
like that encaustic wax is
tactile and dangerous. You
have to heat up the wax,
and once it’s melted you can
apply it like paint. You’re
working straight off instinct
because you have two sec-
onds before the paint dries
on the brush and becomes
solid again. To me, instinct
is the purest form of art.
pigeonholing. I don’t be-
lieve in them. My art takes
me all over the place—into
portraiture, abstract art,
painting.
What has been your
favorite exhibition of
your art thus far?



I
would probably have

I’ve heard you add a
unique last touch to a lot
of your pieces.
After they’re done, I light
to say the latest show at
the Artist Project. It was
mostly the mug-shot
series, and I’ve never put
myself out there like that.
It was really rewarding


a
lot of my paintings on
because of the audience’s
fire. I don’t want to destroy
them; I’m just adding an
organic element to make
them not so pretty. Things
reactions, so I’m riding
pretty high on that.
What are you most

that are too perfect are cold
and boring. Usually I do it
for my wood pieces. It roasts
the surface and reveals all
the colors underneath.
excited about for the
future of your art?
I’m excited to explore
more and really challenge
myself to try different
mediums.



If you had to describe
your art in one sentence,
what would it be?
See more of Jeremy Penn’s
work at www.jeremypenn.com.


rader Galleries

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       

NYO
NYO

art

NYO art For Paul Thek; Untitled . PumP uP the volume Chris Martin turns up the

For Paul Thek; Untitled.

NYO art For Paul Thek; Untitled . PumP uP the volume Chris Martin turns up the

PumP uP the volume

Chris Martin turns up the volume

on his art. By Rachel Morgan

the volume o n h i s a r t . By Rachel Morgan When did

When did your first realize you wanted to pursue a career in art? I was inspired by a Picasso painting called The Dance. I was 14 years old, drinking Coca-Cola, listening to the James Brown record Mashed Potato Popcorn and paint- ing with tempera paint on paper. I got very excited and realized this was it.

Tell me about your self-titled exhibit at the Corcoran Gallery. My exhibit at the Corc- oran will consist of three parts. One long gallery will contain six large paintings from 2002 until 2010. The Rotunda Gallery will contain a salon style hanging of like a hundred smaller paintings from the last 30 years. And I am making three gigantic—26 feet tall—paintings to sit in the Atrium.

What drives you as an artist? What propels you? Listening to music. Living in the landscapes that I love—the New York City urban landscape and the northeast Catskill for- est, to communicate with people and animals.

You use such vibrant colors in your work— why is that? I love very vibrant colors. It feels like turning up the volume. And then I also make the paintings really big—so that is like turning up the volume even more. I mean a few inches of bright red and green is nice—but 10 feet of red and green is really great.

What are the primary materials you use? Paint—all kinds of paint—oil paint, acrylic paint, house paint, spray paint, paper, cardboard,

canvas, plastic, glue, mirrors, photographs, clothes, artificial flow- ers, ribbons, garlands, pompoms, staples, nails, screws, records, rhine- stones, glitter, artichoke leaves, Wonder Bread, pillows, slippers.

What type of art do you do for fun? Or is all your art created for ‘fun’? All my art is created for fun—that doesn’t always mean fun and laughter— sometimes it’s serious fun.

What do you want your art to say to viewers? I have my ideas and my passions—but at the end of the day, what comes out as ‘my art’ is often quite surprising. Each viewer can feel what I am saying in a different way.

See more of Martin’s work at www.miandn.com.

40 | april 2011

Vincent

Van gogh

Vincent Van gogh Vincent van Gogh 1853-1890 • Dutch Still Life with Two Sacks and a

Vincent van Gogh 1853-1890 • Dutch Still Life with Two Sacks and a Bottle

Antiques • Fine Art • Jewelry
Antiques • Fine Art • Jewelry

Circa 1884-1885 Canvas laid on panel Canvas: 12” high x 16” wide

wide

Frame: 19 1 /2” high x 23 1 /8

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Ideas When I’m Drunk . Kuo’s quirKy style The offbeat artist shares his secrets. By

Ideas When

I’m Drunk.

Kuo’s quirKy style

The offbeat artist shares his secrets. By Rachel Morgan

The offbeat artist shares his secrets. By Rachel Morgan Tell me about your self-titled show at

Tell me about your self-titled show at Taxter & Spengemann. What was the theme? The show is about trying to equate things big and small—and maybe in the end, com- ing to terms with certain realities.

You just had a book published, What Me Worry. What’s the feel of the book? It’s a collection of charts, paintings, photos and group emails from the last few years. It was really fun to make because the publishers were supportive and open to weirdness.

Why write a book? Because I’m a big fan of books. It sounds old-fashioned these days, but I enjoy sitting down and reading or look- ing at something. No disrespect to the Internet, though.

Describe the moment you first real- ized you wanted to pursue art as a career.

42 | april 2011

I liked making things at a pretty early age, but of course I had no clue what that meant post-kindergarten-wise. I went to art school in Providence and came back to New York right afterwards. Now it’s 2011 already.

What drives you as an artist? If I get a piece done, I let myself eat a sandwich. No work no food.

What has been your favorite exhibi- tion of yours thus far? My last solo at Taxter and Spenge- mann. They let me throw a closing party where Brian DeGraw from Gang Gang played solo for the first time ever and Mike Fellows from one of my favorite bands growing up, Rites of Spring, played a kind of rare but always amazing set. That meant a lot to me.

You use very vibrant colors in your work—why is that? Because for a while I was using all dull and flat colors. It’ll swing back, I’m sure.

If you had to describe your style of art in a sentence or less, what would you say? ‘This dude is a mess.’

Student ARt SpRing eventS

Our picks for the best student artist events of the season. You never know, you could stumble upon the next big thing

You never know, you could stumble upon the next big thing April 8-23 | Poisoned Apples

April 8-23 | Poisoned Apples and Smoking Lamps: In- terpreting Fairy Tales and Adventure Stories

Third-year students in the School of Visual Arts’ B.F.A. Illustration and Car- tooning Department take a cue from their childhood fantasies in this fairy- tale–inspired exhibition. Department Chair Thomas Woodruff curates. Free and open to the public (10 a.m.–6 p.m., Monday–Saturday, Visual Arts Gallery, 601 West 26 St., 15th floor).

Through April 9 | The Col- lege Art Association New York Area MFA Exhibition

Catch the tail end of this top-notch exhibition, which showcases the best of the best when it comes to greater New York student artists. Artists from more than 20 institutions have works on display at this exhibition hosted by Hunter College. Free and open to the public (1 p.m.–6 p.m., Tuesday–Sun- day, Hunter College/Times Square Gallery, 450 West 41st St.).

April 15 | MFA Photography, Video and Related Media De- partment Spring Salon

The School of Visual Arts opens the doors of its graduate Photography, Video and Related Media program to the public. Come take a sneak peek at new works by these aspiring shutter- bugs. Free and open to the public (7:30 p.m., 214 East 21st St., 1st floor).

April 26-June 11 | Common Love, Aesthetics of Becoming

This student-curated exhibition explores love within the modern

sociopolitical discourse. Four current students in Columbia University’s M.A. in Modern Art: Critical and Curatorial Studies program—Alexander Benen- son, Kristen Chappa, Donald Johnson- Montenegro, and Tomoko Kanamitsu— curate works by recent graduates of Columbia’s M.F.A. Visual Arts program. Free and open to the public (1 p.m.–5 p.m., Wednesday–Saturday, Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Gallery, Schermerhorn Hall, 8th floor, 1190 Amsterdam Ave.).

MAy 3-9 | The Cooper Union’s School of Art Spring Exhibitions

These soon-to-be graduates cap off their studies at the Cooper Union’s School of Art with this final exhibition. Free and open to the public. (Also on April 5–9, 12–6, 19–23, 26–30, 11 a.m.–6 p.m., Tuesday–Saturday, the Cooper Union, East 7th St.).

MAy 17 | Graduate Student Thesis Reading: Fiction

You might be in the presence of the next David Foster Wallace when grad- uating M.A. and M.F.A. candidates read excerpts from their original fiction manuscripts. Head over the next night for the graduate poetry reading. Free and open to the public (7 p.m., the Lil- lian Vernon Creative Writers House).

MAy 20 | 2011 CUNY Asian American Film Festival

Student filmmakers enrolled at any of the City University of New York’s cam- puses will show their cinematic works at this ninth annual film festival. Winners and runners-up will be announced and interviewed following the screenings. Free and open to the public (6 p.m.–8 p.m., CUNY Graduate Center, Martin E. Segal Theatre, 365 Fifth Ave.).

MAy 24-26 | Truth Be Told Documentary Film Festival

Treat yourself to three nights of doc- umentary short films and Q&A ses- sions with the filmmakers, students in the New School’s Documentary Media Studies graduate certificate program. Now this is something you won’t get at Tribeca. Free and open to the public (Tishman Auditorium, Alvin Johnson/ J.M. Kaplan Hall, 66 West 12th St.).

Antique Arms & Armour Orders Historical Collectibles

International Auctions

Orders ✦ Historical Collectibles International Auctions HERMANN HISTORICA “Neu eröffnete Hof-Kriegs-Reit-Schul”

HERMANN

HISTORICA

Collectibles International Auctions HERMANN HISTORICA “Neu eröffnete Hof-Kriegs-Reit-Schul” by Georg

“Neu eröffnete Hof-Kriegs-Reit-Schul” by Georg Engelhard von Löhneisen, Nuremberg 1729

N E xT AuCTION:

28 April - 12 May

6 CATALOGuES of military and historical interest

Antiquities, Antique Arms & Armour,

Fine Antique & Modern Firearms, Orders and Military Collectibles

Catalogues online available at:

and Military Collectibles Catalogues online available at: A Russian Life Guard helmet, circa 1900 / A

A Russian Life Guard

helmet, circa 1900 /

A model 1881/1910

Cossack officer’s

shashqa / Order of St. Anne,

1st Class

Breast Star,

Russia

shashqa / Order of St. Anne, 1st Class Breast Star, Russia A Nuremberg black and white

A Nuremberg black and white armour, circa 1570 / A German cross- bow, early 16th century / A heavy German war chest, Nuremberg, circa 1750 / A suit of armour, Flemish or French, circa 1580-90 / A South German hand-and-a-half sword, circa 1560

1580-90 / A South German hand-and-a-half sword, circa 1560 www.hermann-historica.com Rare Colts An Illyrian type

www.hermann-historica.com

Rare Colts

An Illyrian type helmet with gold edging, 6th - 5th cent. B.C. and a Roman

figure of

Bacchus, 1st -

2nd cent. A.C.

a Roman figure of Bacchus, 1st - 2nd cent. A.C. A carved a, xi d rhinoceros
a Roman figure of Bacchus, 1st - 2nd cent. A.C. A carved a, xi d rhinoceros

A carved

a, xi d
a,
xi
d

rhinoceros

horn

cup,

China,

Kangxi

period

A carved a, xi d rhinoceros horn cup, China, Kangxi period A coin cup by silversmith
A carved a, xi d rhinoceros horn cup, China, Kangxi period A coin cup by silversmith

A coin cup by silversmith G. C. Kessel, Berlin, circa 1715, and an Augsburg silver tankard by silversmith L. Neusser, circa 1630

VW Kübelwagen KDF type 86/87, VW Käfer 1947 and Horch 951A951A PullmanPullman CabrioCabrio

1947 and Horch 951A 951A Pullman Pullman Cabrio Cabrio Hermann Historica oHG ✦ Linprunstr. 16 ✦

Hermann Historica oHG Linprunstr. 16 D-80335 Munich Phone +49- 89- 54726490

Fax +49- 89- 547264999

E-Mail: contact@hermann-historica.com

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McQueen does the Met

NYO ARt McQueen does the Met The late designer’s collections take center stage in ‘Savage Beauty’

The late designer’s collections take center stage in ‘Savage Beauty’

By Chelsia Marcius Photography by Sølve Sundsbø

44 | april 2011

Ensemble, VOSS,

spring/summer 2001

GETTY IMAGES

GETTY IMAGES The last time the Metropolitan Museum of Art featured fashions by Alexander McQueen, the
GETTY IMAGES The last time the Metropolitan Museum of Art featured fashions by Alexander McQueen, the
GETTY IMAGES The last time the Metropolitan Museum of Art featured fashions by Alexander McQueen, the

The last time the Metropolitan Museum of Art featured fashions by Alexander McQueen, the designer paid the Met a personal visit. Curator Andrew Bol- ton personally greeted the famed designer at the 2005 exhibition “AngloMania: Tradition and Transgression in British Fashion,” and the pair made their way to the galleries. As they approached a display of ensembles—many of them McQueen’s own creations—Bolton said the designer paused, his eyes locked on a lavender silk taffeta skirt and one stubborn, out-of-place pleat. The episode was over as fast as it had begun—McQueen strode over to his creation, tugged its hem and flattened out the imperfection. It is one of the few moments the curator shared with the designer prior to his sui- cide in February 2010. Yet Bolton said the encounter—and a year of collaborations with those who knew McQueen’s work best—helped him build a vision for the museum’s upcom- ing exhibition, “Alexander McQueen: Savage Beauty.”

Le : Dress, VOSS, spring/ summer 2001. Right: Dress, autumn/winter

2010–11.

From May 4 through July 31, the Costume Institute at the Met will display 100 garments from McQueen’s 19-year career in the fashion industry. The exhibition will also feature more than 70 accessories, making it one of the institute’s largest shows yet. Many of the garments will come from the Alexander McQueen archive in London, and Bolton said the task of choosing what pieces to showcase boiled down to which fashions truly captured McQueen’s mind-set. “We went through every single article of clothing and got access to the press books,” Bol- ton said, referring to a collection of hundreds of published articles about the designer. “I read just about every single one to find out the major themes of McQueen’s work. There’s an incred- ible synergy between artists and writers of the Romantic Movement and McQueen.”

Based on McQueen’s design themes— nature, technology, death and dereliction— Bolton said he and his team began to formulate just how they’d bring the body of work to life. Upon entering, museumgoers will “be confronted with two pieces which, to me, seem to epitomize the sort of swings in his work,” Bolton said, pointing to a conceptual sketch depicting two female mannequins, the one Satanic with sheer, billowy red coverings, and the other Christ-like, draped in beads of white. “McQueen was obsessed with the ecstasy and the agony of passion,” Bolton said. “I wanted the notion of the sublime to be a starting point of the exhibition so that you are struck with awe or wonder and fear or terror, so that you experience his work.” Fluorescent lights will bring stark, studio- lighting to garments in the first gallery, the

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46 | april 2011

NYO ART 46 | april 2011 “McQueen was obsessed with the ecstasy and the agony of

“McQueen was obsessed with the ecstasy and the agony of passıon.”

Dress, VOSS,

spring/summer 2001.

GETTY IMAGES

GETTY IMAGES Naomi Campbell, Alexander McQueen, Kate Moss and Annabelle Nielsen Romantic Mind . The room’s
Naomi Campbell, Alexander McQueen, Kate Moss and Annabelle Nielsen
Naomi Campbell,
Alexander McQueen,
Kate Moss and
Annabelle Nielsen

Romantic Mind. The room’s exposed concrete walls and distressed wooden floors are meant to

replicate the raw setting of an art studio. Bolton said the display of tailored pants, jackets, coats and skirts will “show how consistent McQueen was in terms of his silhouette but to also show how innovative he was in terms of skill. ” Next door, Bolton said, the gallery Romantic Gothic will feature garments inspired by “vampires, phantoms, pirates and highway- men— people living on edge of society who were, in a way, very much celebrated as the antihero and the cult of the individual.” Gallery three, the Cavern of Curiosities, will showcase McQueen’s creative collaborations with several designers including Philip Treacy. Film projec- tors nestled in cubbyholes will flicker scenes from the McQueen catwalk. The designer’s trademark use of the tartan—

pattern commonly associated with Scottish kilts—inspired the fourth gallery, Romantic Nationalism. “He was very proud of his Scottish heritage,” Bolton said, adding that McQueen first used tartan in Highland Rape, the collection that jump-started his international career and will also appear at the Met.

a

ral-
ral-

Number five is Romantic Exoticism, which ch

Le : Ensemble, It’s a Jungle Out There, autumn/ winter 1997–98. Right: Ensemble, Dante, autumn/
Le : Ensemble,
It’s a Jungle Out
There, autumn/
winter 1997–98.
Right: Ensemble,
Dante, autumn/
winter 1996–97.
Right: Ensemble, Dante, autumn/ winter 1996–97. APRIL 2011 | 47 will display McQueen’s use of the
Right: Ensemble, Dante, autumn/ winter 1996–97. APRIL 2011 | 47 will display McQueen’s use of the
Right: Ensemble, Dante, autumn/ winter 1996–97. APRIL 2011 | 47 will display McQueen’s use of the

APRIL 2011 | 47

will display McQueen’s use of the Japanese e ki- ki-

mono. The exhibit will conclude with Natural-

ism, Bolton said, McQueen’s very last complete plete

collection.

After the designer’s unexpected death, Bolton said he jumped on an opportunity to to do do an all-exclusive McQueen exhibit.

“We always wanted to do an exhibition for for McQueen, and we would have done one eventually,” he said. “But with his passing, I had to move fast; I wanted to work with a team that worked with McQueen because I thought

it would have more integrity. I was

worried that in five years’ time, the team would be dispersed, the archive would be dispersed and I re- ally wanted to tap into people’s recent memories of McQueen.” Bolton said he wanted bring the de- signer’s creations to the public and make ake

his fashions accessible to people who

never witnessed the designer’s theatrical ical runway presentations.

The convergence of art and fashion n is is

exactly what Bolton intended with this his

exhibit—for museumgoers to “look at at the the

garment and truly appreciate the artistry rtistry

behind it.” A noble goal, one that McQueen cQueen

himself would appreciate.

Michael chiMento foR nyo Magazine

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Uptown

Art

One collector’s take on new artists and the infamous Warhol scandal By Rachel Morgan

It takes only a few minutes for art collector Richard Ekstract to mention Andy Warhol’s self-portraits. It’s not surprising, consider- ing that Ekstract has found himself at the center of a swirling debate surrounding their authenticity, counts the late Warhol among his friends and has The Red Warhol hanging on the wall in his Upper East Side apartment. “He made 11 of these originally and he had me make another 8 or 10,” said Ekstract, a former trustee on the board of the New Museum. There’s an ongoing controversy—art collec- tors on one side and the Andy Warhol Founda- tion and the Andy Warhol Art Authentication Board on the other. The players are varied— the authentication board on one side, and private art collectors like Joe Simon-Whelan, who are in possession of what they deem as authentic Warhols and what the board deems otherwise. “This is called The Red Warhol,” Ekstract said, gesturing toward the striking red-and- black silk-screen painting holding court next to the apartment’s massive picture window with an unobscured view of the East River. The logic is simple—Warhol created these particular silk screens, but didn’t actually do the rolling. “[The experts] are saying that they couldn’t denote that the artist had a hand in making

48 | april 2011

this piece, but that’s why he made silk-screen separations,” Ekstract said. “[Warhol] wasn’t sitting there rolling these things; he gave them to other people. This is what Andy invented all those years ago—instant art; art made by other people, but it was your idea.” It’s clear Ekstract has a far more conceptual view of art. “His point was it’s the concept that counts, the execution, anyone can do that,” he said. “So when he gave me the silk-screen separa- tions, he didn’t care who the silk screener was as long as they followed the instructions that were written on the separations.” He paused. “In fact he liked the version I [had ordered] better than his own,” Ekstract said. “I know it’s real because it comes from the original Andy Warhol Separation silk screens and he wanted them made this way.” But the conflict doesn’t end with the self-portraits. There is also the ongoing case of the fabricated Andy Warhol Brillo boxes. Art world giant Pontus Hulten reportedly fabricated 105 Brillo boxes in the 1990s, years after Warhol’s death, passing them off as those created in 1968. These “Stockholm type” Brillo boxes were widely dispersed, and 94 were later called authentic by the Andy War- hol Authentication Board—a fact frustrating to many, including Ekstract. The board is

XXXXXXX

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Richard and Eileen Ekstract in front of John Newsom’s ladybug painting.

miChAEL ChimENto foR Nyo mAgAziNE

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currently reviewing the authenticity claim of these boxes. “They say mine isn’t authentic because they couldn’t denote [Warhol’s] hand in it,” Ekstract said. “But the Brillo boxes they authenticated were made years after he died.” Despite his frustrations, Ekstract is still an avid art collector. The grand Upper East Side apartment he shares with his wife, Eileen, seems more museum than home, with the exception of Denzel, the couple’s energetic dog, who gallops around the apartment like there isn’t a $7 million Andy Warhol hanging on the wall. Ekstract, who made his fortune in the consumer-periodicals industry, started with a single piece of African art. His collection soon grew to include upward of 150 pieces. But the difference between Ekstract and other art collectors is clear. Ekstract buys art based on a visceral reaction, a personal prefer- ence, and leans toward younger, less estab- lished artists. Sometimes this pays off, when an artist really makes it big; but it’s not always lucrative, as Ekstract will be the first to admit. “I bought a lot of stuff that you can’t give away today,” he said with a laugh. “It’s a learning process when you buy young artists. For me, that’s more fun than buying some established name everybody knows. It only shows that you have this much more money than someone else.” With the exception of the Warhol, Ek- stract’s art collection is marked by relative unknowns like Bradley Castellanos, Carmen McCullough and Brad Kalhammer, and more well-known names like Chakaia Booker and Ida Applebroog. “It wasn’t the intent to make a lot of money,” he said. “I bought things that seemed right.” He said his collection has definitely evolved over the years, as has his taste. “If you’ve been looking at art for as long as I’ve been looking at it—say, 40 years—and you don’t have the eye, shame on you,” he said. “The more you look at art, the more you get a sense of what you like.” As far as his advice to new collectors, Ek- stract warns that collecting art isn’t a cheap hobby. “It’s gotten way more expensive to start building a collection,” he said. “Three to four years ago, you could buy a work by an emerg- ing artist for $5,000. Today [it’s closer to] $10,000 to $12,000. Things changed that way.”

50 | april 2011

to $12,000. Things changed that way.” 50 | april 2011 Clockwise from top: Richard and Eileen
to $12,000. Things changed that way.” 50 | april 2011 Clockwise from top: Richard and Eileen
to $12,000. Things changed that way.” 50 | april 2011 Clockwise from top: Richard and Eileen

Clockwise from top: Richard and Eileen pictured with the infamous Andy Warhol “red” self-portrait, with a photo-based work by Bradley Castellanos on the wall behind; in front of a painted glass piece by Peter Bynum, backlit by LED bulbs; pointing at a Native American graffiti painting by Brad Kalhamer; a “scumac” machine- made sculpture by Roxy Paine.

pointing at a Native American graffiti painting by Brad Kalhamer; a “scumac” machine- made sculpture by

it’s time we Met

FOR A SPECTACULAR SPRING SEASON

it’s time we Met FOR A SPECTACULAR SPRING SEASON CÉZANNE’S CARD PLAYERS Through May 8 ROOMS

CÉZANNE’S CARD PLAYERS

Through May 8

SPRING SEASON CÉZANNE’S CARD PLAYERS Through May 8 ROOMS WITH A VIEW THE OPEN WINDOW IN

ROOMS WITH A VIEW

THE OPEN WINDOW IN THE 19TH CENTURY

Through July 4

A VIEW THE OPEN WINDOW IN THE 19TH CENTURY Through July 4 GUITAR HEROES LEGENDARY CRAFTSMEN

GUITAR HEROES

LEGENDARY CRAFTSMEN FROM ITALY TO NEW YO

Through July 4

LEGENDARY CRAFTSMEN FROM ITALY TO NEW YO Through July 4 RICHARD SERRA DRAWING A RETROSPECTIVE Opens
LEGENDARY CRAFTSMEN FROM ITALY TO NEW YO Through July 4 RICHARD SERRA DRAWING A RETROSPECTIVE Opens
LEGENDARY CRAFTSMEN FROM ITALY TO NEW YO Through July 4 RICHARD SERRA DRAWING A RETROSPECTIVE Opens
LEGENDARY CRAFTSMEN FROM ITALY TO NEW YO Through July 4 RICHARD SERRA DRAWING A RETROSPECTIVE Opens

RICHARD SERRA DRAWING

A RETROSPECTIVE

Opens April 13

Complete sched

Cézanne’s Card Players was organized by The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, and The Courtauld Gallery, London. It is supported by an indemnity from the Federal Counc The Card Players (detail), 1890–92, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Bequest of Stephen C. Clark, 1960. Guitar Heroes: Legendary Craftsmen from Italy to New York is made possible i Monteleone, Archtop Guitar, Sun King model (serial number 195), detail, Islip, New York, 2000, Private Collection. Photograph © Archtop History, Inc. from the book ARCHTOP G Rudy Pensa and Vincent Ricardel. Rooms with a View: The Open Window in the 19th Century is made possible by the Anna-Maria and Stephen Kellen Foundation and The Isaacson-Dr at the Window (detail), 1822, Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Alte Nationalgalerie. © Bildarchiv Preussischer Kulturbesitz/Art Resource NY. Photo: Joerg P. Anders. Richard Serra Drawin Jane and Robert Carroll Fund. It was organized by the Menil Collection, Houston. Richard Serra, September, 2001, paintstick on handmade paper, Private Collection. © Richard Ser

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The new Museum of African Art building will open in the fall in the shade of Central Park and on the border between Harlem and the Upper East Side.

52 | APRIL 2011

ART

NYO
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Home at Last

The Museum for African Art finds its long-awaited home on Museum Mile

By Rachel Ohm

finds its long-awaited home on Museum Mile By Rachel Ohm he Museum for African Art has

he Museum for African Art has finally found its permanent home. This fall, the museum will put down roots at the corner of 110th Street and Fifth Avenue, a welcome turn of events for a mu- seum that has floated between locations on the Upper East Side, Soho and, most recently, Long Island City, for the past 25 years. The new location puts the $95 million mu- seum at the northern end of New York’s storied Museum Mile and will become the permanent home to a collection of exhibits that have lived a sort of nomadic existence until now. Elsie McCabe Thompson, president of the Museum for African Art, has lofty aspirations for the museum. “We want the world to visit,” Thompson said, whose husband, former New York City comptroller William Thompson Jr., ran unsuc- cessfully against Mayor Michael Bloomberg last year. “We want all four of the communi- ties that we neighbor to grow up and live in the museum and we want to think of ourselves as a

cultural bridge between them.” The Robert A.M. Stern–designed building, which occupies the lower floors of a 19-story residential building, sits strategically at the intersection of the Upper East Side, Harlem, Spanish Harlem and Central Harlem, in an area with a growing community of African immigrants. Carnegie Hall and MoMA have similar joint-space relationships with residen- tial buildings, which helps assuage the costs of prime real estate. “The residential tower and the museum express themselves in very separate ways,” said Dan Lobitz, a partner at Robert A.M. Stern Architects LLP. Founded in 1984, the Museum for African Art first opened its doors in a rented tenement building on the Upper East Side. It moved to Soho in 1992 and then to its current location in Long Island City, Queens, in 2002. Its collec- tion includes traditional, contemporary and African diaspora art. Since 2005, the museum’s gallery space has been closed and exhibits have been on dis- play only at visiting museums around the country while administrators

worked on developing a new space that would allow the museum to grow. “We won’t disappoint. We’ll open with a number of fantastic exhibitions,” Thompson said, in spite of the projected $8 million annual operating costs projected for the museum. Groundbreaking for the new building began in 2007. The opening, originally slated for April, was postponed to this fall, with the museum cit- ing construction delays. According to a March 9 New York Times article, the museum has raised $76 million of the $90 million in construction costs, including a recent $3 million donation by the Ford Foundation. The architectural design was created with the museum’s contents in mind. “The design was based on traditional African motifs sort of abstracted and modernized,” Lobitz said. “We looked at the character of West African masonry architecture as well as other African textiles and motifs and adapted them to create a modern New York building.” When it does open, the new space will have three floors, with a movable wall system that

will have three floors, with a movable wall system that El Anatsui, Akua’s Surviving Children ,

El Anatsui, Akua’s Surviving Children, 1996; wood and metal, dimensions variable.

APRIL 2011 | 53

NYO ART COURSTESY OF THE MUSEUM FOR AFRICAN ART
NYO
ART
COURSTESY OF THE MUSEUM FOR AFRICAN ART
NYO ART COURSTESY OF THE MUSEUM FOR AFRICAN ART Above: El Anatsui’s Sacred Moon , 2007.
NYO ART COURSTESY OF THE MUSEUM FOR AFRICAN ART Above: El Anatsui’s Sacred Moon , 2007.

Above: El Anatsui’s Sacred Moon, 2007. Far le : El Anatsui’s Assorted Seeds II, 1989. Le : El Anatsui’s Untitled, 1980s.

“Architecture in a cultural space is so important.”

allows curators to set up a space that reflects the intended narrative. “Every time I walk into this space, my heart races,” said Lisa Binder, a curator of contemporary art at the museum. “It’s an amazing layout. We worked very closely with the architect to make sure the space would highlight the narratives we want to tell and wouldn’t distract from them.” Each of the three floors will have gallery space dedicated to a different facet of African art: contemporary, traditional and Diaspora. “Architecture in a cultural space is so im- portant,” Thompson said. “When you walk

54 | APRIL 2011

portant,” Thompson said. “When you walk 54 | APRIL 2011 into a building, it does set

into a building, it does set the tone for your entire experience. This architecture will help shape the experience for the average visitor in a transcendent way.” One key feature of the new building will be the mullion wall in the museum’s lobby. Visitors will enter through an L-shaped plaza to stand in a room full of trapezoidal windows that from a distance suggest an abstract woven basket pattern. Among the exhibits that will make their debut along with the museum are an installa- tion of sculptures and photographs by South African artist Jane Alexander and paintings by Sudanese modernist Ibrahim El Salahi.

Thompson says that people are accus- tomed to thinking of African art as an- thropological or as utilitarian objects, as sub-Saharan or made only by certain groups of people, but there are many other facets to the genre. “The show by Jane Alexander, a white South African, challenges the notion of African art as belonging to sub-Saharan Africa and being made by black people,” Thompson said. “The exhibition on Sudanese modernism is another example of how we plan on continuing the tradition of challenging previously held assumptions about what African art is.”

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music

NYO music Pounding the keys Arguably the best pianist of the 21st century, Emanuel Ax talks

Pounding the keys

Arguably the best pianist of the 21st century, Emanuel Ax talks James Taylor, how his daughter exposed him to Jay-Z and taking part in Carnegie Hall’s 120th Anniversary Gala Concert. By Rachel Morgan

What do you think about the less classical line-up for this year’s Carnegie Hall 120th Anniversary Gala Concert? I think it’s fantastic. I think it was Duke Ellington who said, ‘There are only two kinds of music, good music and bad music.’ I believe that very much. [Ellington] was one of the great performers of our time. And James Taylor —I don’t need to tell you he’s an iconic figure in the music world.

Who will you perform with? One of the people I’ll be on stage with, Yo-Yo Ma, has been incredibly instrumental in bridging gaps. He does the Silk Road Project [and is]beneficial in using his abilities as a great performer and is one of the great communicators of our time, [bringing together] different kinds of music and different kinds of people.

How do you think music acts as a great communicator? Everybody responds to it. You don’t need to know the language in order to enjoy it, as you do with reading. I can’t read a Russian

novel without knowing Russian, but I can listen to a Russian song and get something out of it.

How do you think Clarissa Bronfman is changing the way Carnegie Hall is per- ceived with this gala? Well I think Carnegie Hall has always been a Mecca for many kinds of music. Benny Goodman did a Carnegie Hall concert in the ‘30s, so many great pop artists have played in Carnegie Hall and been thrilled about it. It’s a real destination, not just for great names in classical music.

So do you think Carnegie Hall is wrongly perceived as a classical venue? I would like to think that the whole idea of separating classical music from music in general is [obsolete.] When you go to the movies and hear music, a lot of that comes from a classical background, when you hear songs from Santana, those [come from] Brahms Symphony.

What is your favorite memory of performing at Carnegie Hall?

I played there for the first time in 1974 and I think it is always a highlight, it’s an exciting thing.

I’ve played there with Isaac Stern and Yo-Yo Ma; I played there with

a number of orchestras; I played

there alone. Just being on that stage is a highlight. Even rehears- ing on that stage is a highlight.

How does it feel to be considered the Have you had the chance to meet with the other Honorary Artist Com- mittee members like Jay-Z? No, but I’m hoping I will.

Have you ever heard Jay-Z’s music? Oh yeah, I’m sure I have, but

I’d be hard pressed to recognize

it off the cuff, but my daughter

certainly make me listen to everything.

The 120th Anniversary Gala is hosted by James Taylor and takes place at 7 p.m. Tuesday, April 12 in Stern Auditorium/Perelman Stage. Special guests include Steve Martin, Dianne Reeves, Sting, Barbara Cook and members of the Tanglewood Festival Chorus. Tickets are $200-$5,000.

of the Tanglewood Festival Chorus. Tickets are $200-$5,000. Chairwoman of the Gala Clarissa Bronfman shakes things

Chairwoman of the Gala

Clarissa Bronfman shakes things up with a big hitting lineup including Emanuel Ax, Yo-Yo Ma, and James Taylor

By Coco Mellors

This year’s gala honors James Taylor, who’s quite a departure from Carnegie Hall’s usual artists. Why the change? I have always felt that the per- ception of Carnegie Hall has been very focused on classical music and this year I wanted us to try to really follow the mis- sion of Carnegie Hall, which is to present extraordinary music to the widest possible audience.

How are you hoping this gala will change Carnegie Hall’s image? One of the things people don’t

realize is the wealth of amazing artists we’ve had through our doors. The first time The Beatles arrived in America

in 1964 they played in Carnegie Hall.

We’ve hosted Bob Dylan, Elton John, Sting and The Doors, as well as jazz legends like Louis Armstrong and Ella

Fitzgerald.

How has it been working with James Taylor?

[Taylor has been] very involved in the entire production. He wants to really surprise the audience on the night and has organized secret special guests.

A lot of the people helping out have

grown up with James’s music and

have a kind of melancholic, sentimen-

tal attachment to him.

Half of the proceeds from this year’s gala are going to Carnegie Hall’s artistic and

educational programs. Tell me about these programs. We have a very extensive education department that reaches 150,000 people a year, but most New Yorkers don’t know about it. We teach young children on the poverty line how to

play musical instruments and provide concerts in the community so they can get more acquainted with music. We also offer a seniors program and

a teaching program for teachers in public schools.

with music. We also offer a seniors program and a teaching program for teachers in public

MICHAEL CHIMENTO FOR NYO MAGAZINE; MEREDITH BENNETT-SMITH

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PLACES

CHIMENTO FOR NYO MAGAZINE; MEREDITH BENNETT-SMITH NYO PLACES Men all over the Upper East Side get

Men all over the Upper East Side get cut, shaven and washed at the iconic Paul Molé barbershop.

A Close Shave

The iconic Paul Molé barbershop holds court on the Upper East Side

By Meredith Bennett-Smith

A Paul Molé deluxe shave starts off with a

hot towel, followed by layers of essential oils, then shaving cream with a layer of hot lather on top. This step is followed by more hot oil, and a repeat of the cream and lather steps. This process serves to help prep the face and neck for the actual shave, performed with

a sharpened 5/8-inch-wide steel blade. In

around 15 strokes, the process is complete. But a good barber never hurries, said Adrian Wood, 63, the current owner of the Upper East

“All men are men in a barbershop.”

of the Upper East “All men are men in a barbershop.” Side shave shop. A good

Side shave shop. A good barber takes his time and tailors his approach to the unique angles of each man’s face so that the skin is smooth but never irritated, he said. Inside the vintage leather and mahogany cocoon of the storied Paul Molé barbershop, time slows to a comfortable crawl. Founded on this same block by its namesake, Paul Molé, in 1913, the self-proclaimed “Oldest Barbershop in Manhattan” has catered to the hair and whisker needs of Manhattan’s men and boys for nearly a century. It’s a tradition that Wood takes very seriously. Everything from the polished wooden surfaces

to the rows of top-of-the-line badger hair lather brushes to the nattily dressed barbers exudes

a casually refined aesthetic. Yet there is also

something inexplicably cozy about the atmo- sphere. Customers are rewarded for climbing the second-floor walk-up’s stairs with a welcome from the shop’s grimacing tobacco store Native American, while a faded 1950s carousel horse holds court in the corner. Three of the original Paul Molé barbershop chairs are still in use today. “All men are men in a barbershop,” Wood said.

58 | APRIL 2011

The Molé family owned the shop for 50 years before passing it along to its current master barber–in–residence, the English-born Wood, in 1973. Today, Paul Molé is still very much a

family business. Wood’s four children all work in different capacities for their father’s business. Michael, 26, who started sweeping floors and carrying towels when he was just 8 years old, is now a master barber himself. “Me and my sister, we grew up in here,” Michael said. “Working with my dad is great. [Cutting hair] is just natural for me. It’s hard to explain it.” Diane, 29, and also a master barber, travels the world under the moniker “Queen of Shaves,” helping U.K.-based company King of Shaves with product development and marketing. On a recent Monday afternoon, half of the shop’s 10 second-floor chairs stood

empty. A middle-aged man with a receding hairline and goatee walked purposefully over to his favored chair near the back. Two older gentlemen in for shampoos and trims picked spots in the front of the shop. A young boy wearing a yellow rain slicker stomped along obediently behind his Burberry-clad mother. Each customer picks his own chair, creating his own sense of comfort and routine. Privacy is respected here, Michael said. There is a special first-floor chair area for young children and the disabled, but the second-floor chairs are the most sought-after. “Most guys like the second floor. They don’t like having their hair cut ‘in public,’” he said, referring to the large picture windows prevalent in ground-floor barbershops. Paul Molé’s also remains politely tight- lipped when it comes to its celebrity clientele. But autographed head shots along the walls speak louder

than words. In one such photo, John Steinbeck, his trademark growl firmly in place, enjoys a shave from the smiling, curly-haired Paul Molé himself. A young Donald Trump had his hair cut in a Paul Molé chair, Wood said. And when David Lettermen shaved off his wooly beard on air a few years ago, it was none other Paul Molé’s own Diane Wood and Roberto who did the honors. Weekends and mornings are busiest, especially Saturdays, when it is not uncom- mon to see 60 or so customers lining the walls waiting for an open chair. Wood prides himself on customer loyalty; over the decades he has shaved families going back two and three

generations. On ledges that run the length of the upper level are hundreds of shaving mugs, each one personalized with the first and last name of a customer who has patronized

the first and last name of a customer who has patronized NOTABLE NAMES OF PAUL MOLÉ
NOTABLE NAMES OF PAUL MOLÉ These celebrities have all had a haircut or straight- razor
NOTABLE
NAMES OF
PAUL MOLÉ
These celebrities
have all had a
haircut or straight-
razor shave at the
iconic barbershop
David Letterman
George Clooney
Daniel Craig
John McEnroe
Donald Trump
Mike Wallace
Joseph Pulitzer
Lionel Barrymore
John Steinbeck
Joshua Logan
Eddie O’Brien
Henry Fonda
Roger Vadim
Herman Wouk
Tennessee Williams

Paul Molé’s for 30 years or more. There must be more than 2,000 of these mugs, all of them porce- lain testaments to the longevity of the place. Ultimately, this is the reason so many men return again and again. Paul Molé charges between $25 and $30 for haircuts and shaves, along with optional $4 shoe shines and all the complimentary cappuccino and espresso one can consume. Besides being generally better than his competitor’s machine- made haircuts—cutting with an electric blade is equivalent to the indiscriminate shearing of a sheep, Wood said—the proprietor and his colleagues generally treat scissors and straight-razor shav- ing more like an art form than a trade. “I love my job,” Wood said. He hesitated for a second. “It’s not a job, it’s a passion.”

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events

60 | april 2011

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61

XXXXXXX Right, the designer behind the Lake and Stars, Maayan Zilberman (left) and Nikki Dekker.
XXXXXXX
Right, the designer
behind the Lake
and Stars, Maayan
Zilberman (left)
and Nikki Dekker.
Photo by Tom Hines.
Below, models
wearing The Lake
and Stars lingerie.
“It’s not just about
skinny or fat; it’s
about confidence.”
ANDRew BickNeLL
NYO
NYO

fashion

New Designers on the Block

ANDRew BickNeLL NYO fashion New Designers on the Block Maayan Zilberman and Nikki Dekker burst on

Maayan Zilberman and Nikki Dekker burst on the scene with their lingerie line, The Lake and Stars

By Priscilla Polley

MaayanZilbermanandNikkiDekker,the duo behind lingerie line The Lake and Stars, have laid the groundwork for a fashion empire. They pair have based their success on one principle—designing undergarments that are meant to be seen. After a watershed year in 2010, which in- cluded collaborations with Urban Outfitters, a Barneys New York event during Fashion’s Night Out and their first store opening, the collection is on the cusp of mainstream recognition. Top that off with a 2011 Ecco Domani Fashion Foundation Award for Womenswear, with a list of previous winners that include fashion heavyweights Alexander Wang, Rodarte and Proenza Schouler. Just five years ago, Zilberman and Dekker were working in the lingerie world inde- pendently when they were introduced by a mutual friend. “At the time, we were both wearing swim tops as lingerie” Zilberman said. “For us, bras were something that you should be able to show, and back then it was hard to find that on the market.” Fast-forward to The Lake and Stars’ first fashion show in February, in which the designers debuted a line that did just that. “The Lake and Stars was founded as a response to what our friends were wearing; we want women of all body types to feel in- cluded,” Zilberman said. “It’s not just about skinny or fat; it’s about confidence.” Case in point: When a model was late to their February presentation, they turned to their friend and fellow designer Abigail Lorick, who was hanging out backstage, and threw her in the look as a last-minute replacement. She ended up being the star of the show. The pair’s next venture? A line of under- wire and structural garments to be sold in department stores and their first bridal capsule and handbag collections.

62 | april 2011

CHAMBER ORCHESTRA
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CHAMBER ORCHESTRA a t caRneGIe HaLL Season Finale HAYDN’S LONDON Arabella Steinbacher violin STRAUSS H A
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COURTESY OF BLOOMINGDALES

What trends do you see on the Upper East Side with staying power? The trends that were happening in the Upper East Side are now infiltrat- ing the Lower East Side and the Village, particular- ly from what I’m predicting for fall. There’s a new at- titude toward dressing and there’s a certain segment of the population, particu- larly below 14th Street, that really have never dressed up before. We’ve often seen the dressed-up ladies and young girls on the Upper East Side, but we see a dif- ferent uniform really going on down below 14th Street, [in] Soho, Tribeca, Nolita and particularly the Lower East Side.

So do you think the hipster look is over? I think it’s just become a little passé and won’t look fresh. I say this not from purely my instincts, but because I interviewed two designers during Fashion Week in New York; one was Rachel Zoe. She designed her first collection, and I asked her [about] her inspiration for this very grown-up and sophisticated collection

FASHION

NYO
NYO

Words from the (Chanel-clad) wise

StephanieSolomon,operatngvicepresidentofwomen’s fashion direction at Bloomingdale’s, decides what looks make the trek from the runway to the racks at Bloom- ingdale’s. She sounds off on how Upper East Side style is trickling downtown, reminisces about her first designer purchase—a Chanel coat, no less—and gives us her top picks for spring/summer.

for young girls. She said, ‘I’m giving a segment of the population clothes to dress up in because they’ve never dressed up before,’ and it started me thinking. Then when I attended the fashion show at the Plaza Hotel, [Alice + Olivia designer Stacey Bendet was showing] this very sophisticated, grown-up, glamorous, polished collec- tion geared toward young customers. And there it was again.

What’s your worst fashion moment? We were going through

a mod moment in fashion

time [in the 1980s] and

I was going to an Isaac

Mizrahi show. I had on these black-patent-leather go-go boots and this bright

chartreuse miniskirt and over a coat with a very exag- gerated A-line, almost like

a tutu. My husband said as I

was leaving my apartment, ‘You look ridiculous in that outfit’ and I said, ‘You’re crazy; I look fantastic.’

What are your top five picks for spring? The first thing you need to buy is something in color; it could be a dress,

a blouse or a pair of jeans. The next thing is some- thing in print. My per- sonal favorite this season is the maxi-dress. I think

it looks so fresh after so

many seasons of short dresses and miniskirts. Also something in stripes, but not the traditional nautical stripe, some-

thing in a colorful stripe, anything from a T-shirt to

a T-shirt dress. Another

great pick would be a wide-leg jean, by J-Brand. The wide leg or flared jean, because that works with anything. Last, a peasant-type blouse that

could be in print or in a creamy white color with a

poet sleeve flowing away from the body.

What was the first designer piece you purchased? A Chanel jacket when

I was 39 years old. It was

white. I pined after it. I waited until I could get

enough money to afford it.

It was a classic white tweed

cropped rolled button jacket, and when I put it on, and felt the chain along the edging, I never in my life felt more glamorous. —Rachel Morgan

APRIL 2011 | 65

NYO
NYO

FOOD

H ow did you get started in the culinary industry? I knew since I was a little boy that I wanted to be a chef. I grew up in a very

small village in Austria, and in the 1970s, most of the famous chefs I knew worked on

cruise ships. I saw all the ships go by and I thought, ‘That looks cool. That’s a way to get out of here!’ There’s a famous Lou Reed and John Cale song called ‘Small Town,’ and I think I had their feelings about growing up in

a small town. My approach was, ‘What can get me out into the world?’

How have you modernized Austrian

cuisine? Has anyone ever objected to you changing traditional dishes?

I have a strong classic background, but I

think I’m creative, and I take the classics and turn them around my way. If I start to worry what every single person thinks of my food,

I would lose the game already. The most

important thing is that you’re happy with yourself, and then you have a good chance of making your customers happy, too.

What is the most popular dish on Sabarsky’s menu? At Sabarsky, I try to keep the classics the way they’re supposed to be. The number-one seller is definitely the apple strudel, followed by the Sabarskytorte chocolate cake.

You live with your three daughters. What’s your favorite thing to cook for them at home? I’m really lucky with my daughters, that they eat everything. Although the other day I was cooking lamb chops and I had to use loins with no bones, so the girls were sitting at the dinner table with their noses up. Of course, desserts are a big hit at home, too.

What was the earliest dish you remember making?

It was a cake for my mother’s birthday.

It didn’t come out well, and I hid it under my bed.

Why do you think design is so important to a dining experience?

If you go back a hundred years and look at

Vienna, there were such incredible artists like Adolf Loos, who designed our chairs, or Josef Hoffmann, who did the upholstery and light fixtures. We’ve tried to bring together all the elements of art and design in this space. Everything is important, even down to the sugar shakers, because people notice.

66 | april 2011

a Walk

on the

Wild

NYO Magazine sits down with Kurt Gutenbrunner in Café Sabarsky, his Viennese- style café in the Upper East Side’s Neue Gallery, to dish on Austrian pastries, rock and roll and cooking for his children

Side

By Coco Mellors Photos by E.F. Angel

XXXXXXX

NYO
NYO
NYO
NYO

FOOD

You mentioned Lou Reed earlier; is music a big part of your life?

I love rock and roll. John Fogerty has a song

called ‘Centerfield,’ and the whole week before

I opened my downtown restaurant, Wallsé, I

was blasting it. A few days after opening the restaurant, Lou Reed himself walks through the

door. Of course, being a boy from a little town in Austria, I was like, ‘Oh my God, I’m shaking, I don’t know what to do.’ Now we’ve developed a good friendship, and he eats three or four times

a week in my place. I make sure that he leaves

happy the same way he leaves me happy when I

listen to his music.

Chilled Smoked Trout Crêpes & Horseradish –Crème Fraîche

How did you learn about wine? My first job was in the wine area in Austria, and so I learned about it at a very early age. I love Austrian wines, and I think I have the largest collection in the United States. The first time I got drunk, I was 15 at a boarding school for hotel management. I worked at a hotel, and every day at 11 a.m., we would have a bottle of wine with lunch, take an hour break and then go back to work.

You have your first cookbook coming out this November. What has it been like writing that? My book, Neue Cuisine: Elegant Tastes of Vienna, is coming out for Café Sabarsky’s 10th anniversary. It’s about my view of Austrian food and art together with the Neue Gallery.

Will this be the first of many books?

I want to do another book that focuses on

children’s food. I promised my daughter Lou that I would do a book with her called ‘Lulu the Spoon.’ It will help teach kids and their parents that healthy food leads to a healthy mind, which leads to great success and learning in life.

Matjes Herring on Egg Spread and Apple.

So children’s food is an important issue

for you? Because I have three daughters in public schools,

I really like what the administration is doing

right now to help our kids eat healthy and fight obesity and diabetes. We should take the mo- mentum and work with our schools. What is the new thing in the culinary world? I hope it’s better food in our schools.

What’s the next challenge?

I just saw Julian Schnabel’s film at the United

Nations, and I thought it’s great that he is an art- ist but is also able to make film. So I think making

a film is something I would like to do one day.

Maybe I’m not talented enough, but I will learn.

But for now, it is maintaining what I have and spending a bit more time with my girls. If you can make time to see your children, you quickly learn nothing else matters that much.

68 | april 2011

Classic Viennese dark Chocolate Cake with house- made Apricot Confiture.

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NYO

food

Good

Morning,

Upper East

Siders…

Brunch has long been considered a tradition and institution in the city. But skip the throngs of sweatpant-wearing post-college types on Second Avenue and use those calories wisely indulging in the best, most interesting and delicious brunch destinations on the Upper East Side

70 | april 2011

By Eva Karagiorgas

Park Avenue

Spring

Undeniably the most lauded brunch spot in New York City, Sarabeth’s has remained a comforting and classic restau- rant for a weekend brunch or if you want know what it feels like to dine inside a Laura Ashley print. Lovingly prepared egg dishes and a popular lemon- ricotta pancake plus their legendary scones and preserves have remained favorites of the Upper East Side brunch-with- the-kids set. Full disclosure—I went here every week with my mom for scones (1295 Madison Ave. at 92nd St., 212-410-7335). Can’t jet-set to France for the weekend? Pas de problem bebes. Enter Le Bilboquet and brunch in the style of the now- defunctBagatelle.Thefood? Truly excellent—but go with the nontraditionaldisheslikethe muchlovedCajunchicken—in any case, what does it matter when you are part of the beauti- fulcrowdandpoppin’magnums of rose? Le sigh (25 East 63rd St.,

212-751-3036).

One of the few restaurants on the Upper East Side that holds a broader appeal—the downtown kids come uptown to go here, a rarity—Park Avenue Spring holds court as one of the most beautiful places to dine on the

Upper East Side. Plus, with a résumé that includes stints working with Christian Delou- vrier at Lespinasse and Gray Kunz, chef Craig Koketsu has created a unique brunch menu that is as appealing on Mother’s Day as it is in the darkest hour of your hangover. Read: butter- milk pancakes for Mom, fried chicken ’n’ waffle sandwich for you. And with a bagel-and-lox dish called the Upper East Sider, Park Avenue Spring clearly knows its clientele (100 East 63rd St., 212-644-1900). Dine under the pretense of international intrigue, world- class mystery and old-world, timeless vibe at The Carlyle Restaurant. While the Sunday brunch is impressive and ex- pensive, the crowd is lacking the youth of the Upper East Side. Go for people-watching while noshing on a lobster omelette. (35 East 76th St., 212-744-1600). Serving a “Scandinavian smorgasbord” brunch every Sunday, Aquavit has its pulse on what it means to deliver a fun, delicious and quite unpre- tentious brunch that keeps it real—who wouldn’t want all- you-can-eat Gravlax, Swedish meatballs and other Scandi- navian delights from a 40-plus

Sarabeth’s

Pumpkin

Waffles

item menu? Finish it off with a glass of Aquavit. You’ll need it (65 East 55th St., 212-307-7311). Eli Zabar’s cumulation of 30-plus years in the retail food industry and more reasonably priced than any of his retail outlets, Taste Restaurant & Wine Bar exemplifies a true New York City brunch experi- ence complete with bagels, smoked salmon, a smoked fish plate, blintzes, brisket on rye and the coveted Woody Allen sighting (1413 Third Ave. at 80th St., 212-717-9798). One of the newest addi- tions to the Upper East Side restaurant scene, Jones Wood Foundry is a self- proclaimed “food-driven pub” with a new game-changing brunch menu that includes bangers and mash, toad in the hole and the very British Sunday roast of the day. The décor is reminiscent of the English countryside, with a lovely center courtyard. Upper East Siders can rejoice in this popular newbie that could just as easily fit into Nolita or Kensington (401 East 76th St.,

212-249-2700).

Follow Eva on Twitter @gastro- girls or email her at ekaragiorgas@ observer.com.

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food

Two Eggs, Toast and Billion-Dollar Deals

The Regency’s Power Breakfast lives on in the 21st century

The Regency’s Power Breakfast lives on in the 21st century By Sydney Sarachan Restaurant Manager Rae

By Sydney Sarachan

Breakfast lives on in the 21st century By Sydney Sarachan Restaurant Manager Rae Bianco stands in

Restaurant Manager Rae Bianco stands in the midst of the storied Regency Power Breakfast.

T he story of how the power breakfast tradition started is a bit of a legend. New York City, reeling from the mid- 1970s market crash, needed

the attention and decision-making prowess of the city’s business, financial and political leaders. Having these disparate parties in close proximity often allowed for the quick decisions the dire times asked of New York’s powerful. So there they congregated, in the dining room of the storied Regency Hotel,

following after the example of the hotel’s owners, brothers Preston Robert and Lau- rence Tisch, who together ran and owned the Loews Corporation. “It was like a hot club in those days,” said Stuart Feigenbaum, the food and beverage director in the mid-’70s, in a phone interview. “You’d see the limos lined up on Park Ave and a queue of men in suits, waiting to be seated.”

72 | april 2011

On the morning that I spent perched over an open-faced omelet, former Giants defen- sive end Michael Strahan moved through the dining room, shaking hands with a couple of tie-clad diners who’d spent the previous half-hour talking in hushed voices. Mr. Jon Tisch himself, son of Preston Robert and brother of Steven Tisch, an owner of the New York Giants, breezed through on the way to a meeting, to return no more than 20 minutes later to sit down for a quick chat. I couldn’t help but wonder—what does one eat at his or her own power breakfast? “Mostly healthily,” said Stuart Schwartz, managing director of the Regency Hotel over his bagel. “I don’t know if it’s supersti- tion or habit, but there are regulars who come here and always order the exact same thing. One man always orders 18 blueber- ries.” In charge of their seating arrangement,

their backstories and the maintenance of their general well-being over the course of breakfast is restaurant manager Rae Bianco. “Bob [Tisch] used to say she’s the most im- portant woman in New York,” said Schwartz of Bianco. Bianco is literally the keeper of the names and a seating chart containing an elite list of New Yorkers. What was Bianco’s most memorable power-breakfast story? She recounted the trauma of once having seated two individu- als on opposite ends of a public and acrimoni- ous lawsuit directly next to one another. “Each party was booked under their guests’ name, so I had no idea either of them were coming in,” she said. When it hap- pened, a nonplussed Bianco rang upstairs to [Preston Robert] Tisch to ask what she should do. Undaunted, he told her: “They’re adults. If they don’t want to be seen, they shouldn’t have breakfast here.” And so the tradition lives on. The roster of names spotted at the power breakfast at the Regency could themselves write a storied history of the city’s business deals. “You’ll read an article in the paper about a deal—and the parties involved will have had breakfast here that same week,” Schwartz said. In an age where many restaurants offer diners the opportunity to book reserva- tions online themselves—as the Regency’s public-relations maven Lark-Marie Anton noted—Bianco still fills reservations into an almost comically voluminous, leather-bound register by hand. Feigenbaum also noted another tradition that is fast becoming an enigma in modern times: mixing the informality of sharing a meal with the formality of business. The 21st century has brought us, among other things, cloud computing, virtual meetings and instant access. The Regency thwarts all of that, continuing to bring together in the same room a diverse cross section of decision makers and wheelers and dealers. As Feigenbaum so rightly notes, “There are just some things you really shouldn’t do over Skype.”

ROGER ERICKSON

ROGER ERICKSON |
ROGER ERICKSON |
ROGER ERICKSON |

|

ROGER ERICKSON |

DISTINGUISHED

PROPERTIES

ROGER ERICKSON | DISTINGUISHED PROPERTIES FULL FLOOR ON FIFTH AVENUE: Entire floor with ±5,000 sq ft
ROGER ERICKSON | DISTINGUISHED PROPERTIES FULL FLOOR ON FIFTH AVENUE: Entire floor with ±5,000 sq ft

FULL FLOOR ON FIFTH AVENUE: Entire floor with ±5,000 sq ft and spectacular Central Park and city views. 5 star hotel services. $25,000,000.WEB:NYO0016598

views. 5 star hotel services. $25,000,000.WEB:NYO0016598 SPECTACULAR CARRIAGE HOUSE: 25’ wide and absolutely

SPECTACULAR CARRIAGE HOUSE: 25’ wide and absolutely spectacular. Two great rooms with 20’ ceilings is just the beginning. +10,000 sq ft. Don’t miss it! $19,000,000. WEB:NYO0017249

+10,000 sq ft. Don’t miss it! $19,000,000. WEB:NYO0017249 FIFTH AVE DUPLEX: Glamorous prewar duplex in mint

FIFTH AVE DUPLEX: Glamorous prewar duplex in mint con- dition with a sun drenched terrace. Opulent master suite with 2 baths and 2 dressing rooms. $4,250,000.WEB:NYO0017516

with 2 baths and 2 dressing rooms. $4,250,000.WEB:NYO0017516 PREWAR PENTHOUSE: 79th St. Outstanding value featuring

PREWAR PENTHOUSE: 79th St. Outstanding value featuring tremendous terrace, 3 bedrooms, living room with fireplace, formal dining, open city views. $3,950,000.WEB: NYO0017375

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38 EAST 61ST STREET NEW YORK, NY 10065

I

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F 212.606.7661

ROGER ERICKSON, SENIOR MANAGING DIRECTOR T 212.606.7612 I www.roger-erickson.com

MANAGING DIRECTOR T 212.606.7612 I www.roger-erickson.com Sotheby’s International Realty and the Sotheby’s

Sotheby’s International Realty and the Sotheby’s International Realty logo are registered service marks used with permission. Operated by Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc.An Equal Opportunity Company.

NYO WINE IPADS, TWITTER & WINE, Oh My! By Alexander Cacioppo & Rachel Morgan
NYO
WINE
IPADS,
TWITTER
& WINE,
Oh My!
By Alexander Cacioppo
& Rachel Morgan

Gary Vaynerchuk isn’t just a wine connoisseur. As founder of the $60 million business Vayner Media—which includes Wine Library, an burgeoning online retail outlet, and Wine Library TV, a revolutionary daily video blog all about vino—Vaynerchuk has single- handedly changed the way people view wine. Add to that his avid tweeting and new gig at the Daily hosting the Next Wave, and it seems Vaynerchuk has made a business out of the intersection between social media and wine.

Tell me about your show, the Next Wave, your show on the Daily. Why are social media outlets like Twitter important to what you do? Next Wave is going to be an opportunity for me to really express my thoughts and views on how social media is evolving. Social media is important to me because I don’t believe in the words ‘social media.’ I believe in the fact that human interaction has fundamentally changed and human interaction matters, and that’s what I’m paying attention to.

How do social media and wine interact? It’s not even just about wine; I don’t really register it that way. I think everything interacts with social media. People talk about things, and that’s what I focus on. People love to talk about wine and engage with the product and leave their thoughts and share their tasting notes. I try to incorporate that into what I do.

Who in the wine world is using social media really well? I think Jancis Robinson, a critic out of the

74 | APRIL 2011

U.K., is doing a great job. I think Rick Bakas is doing a great job. I think Randall Grahm is doing some great work in social media, engaging a lot.

Let’s talk wine. What was your first wine experience? Some people might not know, but my premiere wine experience did not happen early.

I was 22. My parents didn’t let me drink wine.

I went over to the late Steve Verlin’s home, and he had a 1975 Petrus Magnum open for me,

because that was the year I was born. It was just breathtaking, and more importantly, he became

a dear wine friend and mentor .

What’s your favorite place in Manhattan to get wine? Terroir Wine Bar, and the sommelier there is Paul Greico. He does an amazing job and is a guy that I would follow to any part of the city.

You’ve been invited to a dinner party, say, on Park Avenue. What bottle do you bring? I’d probably try to bring something disruptive. It’s easy to bring a young, classic

GARY VEE’S EPIC TWEETS The best of Gary Vee in 140 characters or less
GARY
VEE’S EPIC
TWEETS
The best of Gary Vee in
140 characters or less

@waynothompson doesnt make sense for a business if they dont “own” the person to some level, my businesses OWN me.

3:29 P.M. MARCH 24

@kienan lol - hope I can get to the place where I am zero BS, cause

it’s how I roll. 9:45 A.M. MARCH 24

@armbrusting get gangster. 9:51

P.M. MARCH 23

So excited for dailygrape.com we just added a bad ass new com- ments section, come add your 0.02 and Ill reply :) #YEAHH :)

7:18 P.M. MARCH 23

Doing a live interview at the Pepsi playground at the convention center stop by so I can beat u at thumb. Wresting. 7:39 P.M. MARCH 13

So excited about my New Wine

Journey! I have Retired from Wine

started [the Daily

Library TV

and

Grape.] 5:34 P.M. MARCH 15

Bordeaux, and obviously it has to do with the people. But I’m pretty comfortable even if I don’t know people that well. So I’d probably bring a grower’s Champagne because it’s cel- ebratory and [I] want people to discover that there’s more than Cristal out there. But I’d also consider bringing maybe a premium noir valley red wine. I’m obsessed with chinon and I like to let people discover it.

My father had an impressive collection. What does yours look like? Is it about col- lecting or consuming? Can it be both? You know, my collection, since I live in a New York City apartment, sits in the base- ment of the Wine Library. It definitely leans a little bit towards collecting, at least for those kinds of wines. On the consuming side, it leans extremely toward sparkling and white wines, though I definitely have a different mix of what I collect and what I drink.

NIKKI FIELD

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MANHATTAN’S

PROPERTIES

NIKKI FIELD, SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT: 212.606.7669 KEVIN B. BROWN, SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT: 212.606.7748 HELEN MARCOS,
NIKKI FIELD, SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT: 212.606.7669
KEVIN B. BROWN, SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT: 212.606.7748
HELEN MARCOS, ASSOCIATE BROKER: 212.606.7747
JEANNE BUCKNAM, ASSOCIATE BROKER: 212.606.7717
ZOE HAYDOCK, SALES ASSOCIATE: 212.606.7727
CURRENT MARKET UPDATE AND EXCLUSIVE LISTINGS:
www.nikkifield.com

860

UNITED

NATIONS

PLAZA

LISTINGS: www.nikkifield.com 860 UNITED NATIONS PLAZA DESIGNER'S OWN, APARTMENT 28B $2,750,000 ARCHITECT'S

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GeTTy and PeTer aaron/eSTo for roBerT a.M. STern arCHiTeCTS; MiCHael CHiMenTo

NYO
NYO

real estate

GeTTy and PeTer aaron/eSTo for roBerT a.M. STern arCHiTeCTS; MiCHael CHiMenTo NYO real estate 76 |
GeTTy and PeTer aaron/eSTo for roBerT a.M. STern arCHiTeCTS; MiCHael CHiMenTo NYO real estate 76 |

76 | april 2011

GeTTy and PeTer aaron/eSTo for roBerT a.M. STern arCHiTeCTS; MiCHael CHiMenTo NYO real estate 76 |
GeTTy and PeTer aaron/eSTo for roBerT a.M. STern arCHiTeCTS; MiCHael CHiMenTo NYO real estate 76 |
GeTTy and PeTer aaron/eSTo for roBerT a.M. STern arCHiTeCTS; MiCHael CHiMenTo NYO real estate 76 |
GeTTy and PeTer aaron/eSTo for roBerT a.M. STern arCHiTeCTS; MiCHael CHiMenTo NYO real estate 76 |

real estate

Old

meets

Legendary architect Robert A.M. Stern talks Upper East Side, his home in the

Chatham and what he sees for the future

of the neighborhood .

By Andrew Guarini

New

Over the years, the number of signifiers used to describe the architectural craft of Robert A.M. Stern has bordered on the edge of tedium. He’s been labeled a postmodernist, a traditionalist, a modern traditionalist and a chameleon. “I think that people are always putting other people in silos or boxes,” Stern said. “When people—and I’m not the only one— cross different parts of the discipline, I suppose it makes things more difficult for the

gone on to impressive careers. “I take great pride that so many of them have gone on to do interesting work,” Stern said. Stern has two Upper East Side condo productions, the Chatham at 181 East 65th St. and the Brompton at 205 East 85th St. The Chatham, a 34-story tower with 1920s prewar toning and a main shaft that sits atop an 85- foot base, is accented by tall bay windows and French balconies as the tower ascends upward.

many confines isn’t easy, Stern allows. “There’s not much wiggle room in archi- tecture in New York City, period,” he said. “Incredible pressures come from the high cost of land [and] pressures of the market. I suppose we work within the framework we’re given and we try to be as creative as possible.” Although the Chatham and the Brompton replaced low-rise apartments and tenement houses, some dating back to the 19th century,

NYO
NYO

“Incredible pressures come from high cost of land and pressures of the market. I suppose we work within the framework we’re given and we try to be as creative as possible.”

observer on the outside to categorize. History

and evolution of the discipline are two sides of the same coin. I’m lucky enough to be pretty good at each of them.” Stern’s architectural success can be seen in the reconstruction of 42nd Street’s Theatre Row, 15 Central Park West, the Chatham, the Brompton and East Harlem’s 1280 Fifth Ave. As Stern talks on the telephone, the sound of bodies and mouths in motion circulate through the speakers—his 220-person firm in midtown, Robert A.M Stern Archi-

tects LLP, is bustling in the background. Many of his students or staffers, such as Peter Pennoyer and Andrés Duany, have

Clockwise from top left:

The Brompton, the Chatham, Stern, the Chatham, the Brompton and Stern, circa 1986 at Hearst Castle.

In 2009, almost a decade after the Chatham was completed, Stern was done with work on the Brompton. Whereas the Chatham was situated within the neighborhood’s quiet, residential side streets, the Brompton rests on a busy Third Avenue corner. “We wanted to make a building that was engaged in that vitality but also retreated from it,” Stern said. Named after Brompton Quarter, one of London’s most exclusive neighborhoods, the structure is a work of Gothic and Renaissance stonework comple- mented by a brick and limestone facade, alternating between red brick and masonry on each of its faces. “Many people have commented that they feel like the Brompton has always been there,” Stern said. But designing within the neighborhood’s

Stern doesn’t believe that complete revision is the answer. “Of course, the city evolves, but we need to preserve a certain part of our history,” he said. “We don’t want to turn neighborhoods like Yorkville into twelve 20-story buildings without anything on a lower scale.” Stern seems to have great faith in the future of his craft. “I think residential architecture in the city has been improving in the past 10 or 15 years,” he said. “There are more interesting neighborhoods now than there have been in the last 40 or 50 years. Brooklyn, parts of Manhattan, Queens and the Bronx eventually [are] all neighborhoods that have had so little attention for so long and it’s a shame.” Perhaps Stern will be the one to give these overlooked areas the attention they deserve.

MiChaeL ChiMenTo foR nyo MaGazine

The former Gertrude Rhinelander Waldo Mansion at 867 Madison is now the home of Ralph Lauren’s flagship store.

High Society living

The historic mansions of the Upper East Side and the heiresses that built them By Charlotte Garden

UpperEastSidemansionshaveahistoryall their own, but we unlocked the storied pasts of the heiresses behind these iconic homes— and the scandal that marked their lives. Gertrude Rhinelander Waldo was privi- leged—and beautiful—from birth. Throughout her life, Waldo had an eye for both suitors and real estate. When her husband, Francis Waldo, a stock broker, got hit in the Panic of 1873, her family’s wealth offset the losses. Five years lat- er, when he died, Waldo moved on to her lawyer, Charles Schieffelin, but the relationship was not without its problems. Waldo sued Schief- felin for stealing more than $12,294.22—which she had given him to invest in stocks. Schief- felin was unfortunately under the assumption that they were to be married, a thought which appalled the very proper Waldo. Years later, this headstrong heiress took mat- ters into her own hands and bought a lot at 867 Madison Avenue, at the corner of 72nd Street. She hired the architectural firm Kimball & Thompson and began building one of the Upper East Side’s most stately mansions. Although she never lived in it, the French Revival mansion remained in her possession until she passed

78 | april 2011

away. Currently, the home, known as the Gertrude Rhinelander Waldo Mansion, is the home of Ralph Lauren’s flagship store, a plush reminder of the luxurious era and the heiress it was built for. Isn’t there a saying about a woman scorned? Lucy Drexel Dahlgren, the daughter of Anthony Joseph Drexel, founder of the Paris-based investment banking firm, Drexel, Harjes & Co., and Drexel, Morgan & Co., caught her husband cheating in 1912 after 22 years of marriage and eight children. She decided to get even—a rarity for a woman of her time. She filed for divorce and promptly whisked herself and the children off to Paris to await proceedings. A year later, the divorce may have been final, but Dahlgren’s revenge on her husband was not. Her husband had kept their house on Madison and 68th Street, and she insisted on retrieving all the furniture, which was paid for with her family’s money. So she sent her lawyer to get the keys from her ex-husband in order to start emptying the house. Naturally, he refused, and Dahlgren countered by hiring a protection company to outfit the house with a burglary alarm system and station police at every door to bar him from

entering. She then emptied the entire house of furniture, leaving only his bedroom untouched. Feeling better, she then purchased a plot of land at 15 East 96th Street and erected the house that is today named in her honor. The mansion is still used as a residence today. Florence Baker Loew, also known as “Queenie,” was a firecracker. Having grown up in high society, she knew the rules and for the most part played by them. However she did not understand the strife of those less fortunate— nor did she care to. In the midst of the Great Depression, Queenie built one of the most impressive private residences in the city. Today the lavish home at 56 East 93rd Street houses the prestigious Spence School, but a century ago, it was home to Loew, her husband, William Goadby Loew, and their 16 servants. While the interiors of the home went through a huge overhaul when it was converted into the Smith- ers Alcoholism Center, in order to be more conducive to clinical environmental needs, the original interiors have since been reinstalled thanks to architect Samuel White, who was hired by the Spence School when they obtained the property in 1999.

LOC AL EXPERTS WORLDWIDE

LOC AL EXPERTS WORLDWIDE MAGNIFICENT DUPLEX: Park Ave. Grand, high floor, 15-into-14- room Rosario Candela co-op.

MAGNIFICENT DUPLEX: Park Ave. Grand, high floor, 15-into-14- room Rosario Candela co-op. Sun-flooded 5-6 bedroom, 11’ ceilings, open views. Brilliant entertaining space with wonderful room propor- tions. $28,000,000 WEB: NYO0017522. Anne Corey, 212.606.7733

$28,000,000 WEB: NYO0017522. Anne Corey, 212.606.7733 885 PARK AVENUE: Sun-flooded 9-room prewar coop with South,

885 PARK AVENUE: Sun-flooded 9-room prewar coop with South, East, and North exposures. 33’ gallery, living room with fireplace, over- sized kitchen, 3 bedrooms, 4 baths. Broker owner. $9,750,000 WEB:

NYO0017521. Chris Rounick, 212.606.7643, Lois Nasser, 212.606.7706

Chris Rounick, 212.606.7643, Lois Nasser, 212.606.7706 4 EAST 62ND STREET : The prestigious Curzon House, just

4 EAST 62ND STREET: The prestigious Curzon House, just of Fifth Avenue. Exclusive 3 bedrooms, 3 ½ baths condo crafted from famed Beaux Arts townhouses. 2 fireplaces, high ceilings, south-facing garden. $6,800,000 WEB: NYO0017281. Olivia Hoge, 212.606.7738

$6,800,000 WEB: NYO0017281. Olivia Hoge, 212.606.7738 79 EAST 79TH STREET : Light-flooded, 12-room full-floor

79 EAST 79TH STREET: Light-flooded, 12-room full-floor apartment

in prestigious prewar coop. Open vistas of the Park, bountiful southern exposures and superb period details. $12,750,000.WEB: NYO0017104. Serena Boardman, 212.606.7611, Roberta Golubock, 212.606.7704

Boardman, 212.606.7611, Roberta Golubock, 212.606.7704 140 E 63RD ST : The Barbizon has is a full

140 E 63RD ST: The Barbizon has is a full service condo with ameni- ties of a new building and prewar elegance. Combine 2 high-floor apartments to create over 3,500+/- sq ft of interior space plus 5 ter- races. $7,790,000.WEB: NYO0017424 Michele Llewelyn, 212.606.7716

$7,790,000.WEB: NYO0017424 Michele Llewelyn, 212.606.7716 31 EAST 72ND ST : Perfectly situated, beautiful, 7-room,

31 EAST 72ND ST: Perfectly situated, beautiful, 7-room, high floor

corner residence distinguished by lovely city and skyline views and open sunny exopsures throughout. $6,500,000.WEB: NYO0017449. Serena Boardman, 212.606.7611, Roberta Golubock, 212.606.7704

EAST SIDE MANHATTAN BROKERAGE

38 EAST 61ST STREET NEW YORK, NY 10065

I

sothebyshomes.com/nyc

T 212.606.7660

F 212.606.7661

10065 I sothebyshomes.com/nyc T 212.606.7660 F 212.606.7661 Sotheby’s International Realty and the Sotheby’s

Sotheby’s International Realty and the Sotheby’s International Realty logo are registered service marks used with permission. Operated by Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc.An Equal Opportunity Company.

NYO
NYO

INTERIOR DESIGN

NYO INTERIOR DESIGN Luxury Modern Design scion Celerie Kemble makes her mark on the iconic Manhattan

Luxury Modern

Design scion Celerie Kemble makes her mark on the iconic Manhattan House. BY DAISY PRINCE

O ne of interior design’s new tastemakers, Celerie

Kemble firmly believes you don’t have to sacrifice

comfort for style.

Following in the traditions of industry legends

Sister Parish and Elsie de Wolfe, her articulate

and savvy designs have landed her on House and

Garden’s “50 Tastemakers for the Future of Design.”

Kemble’s latest project is designing signature residences for the iconic Manhattan House’s new design series, The Modern Collection. Her task was turning the stark white condominium apartments into showcases of design so that potential buyers could imagine the full potential of the space. Stylishly turned out in an olive skirt and stiletto heels, Kimble moves with hummingbird-like efficiency. Raised in both Palm Beach, Fla., and New York, she was brought up with design, as her mother is renowned designer Mimi McMakin of Palm Beach’s Kemble Interiors. Despite an East Coast education at Groton and Harvard, Kemble embraces the informality of her Florida upbringing. “I don’t look to design an apartment that’s just pretty,” she said. “I think unless you can hunker down and read a book in all but two chairs in your living room, it’s going to be an unhappy existence. So I look to design spaces that are actually comfortable for barefoot people. People use their spaces [in Manhattan.]” Kemble’s passion is designing spaces ripe for entertaining.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY JASON SCHMITT

80 | APRIL 2011

Manhattan.]” Kemble’s passion is designing spaces ripe for entertaining. PHOTOGRAPHY BY JASON SCHMITT 80 | APRIL

The pictured projec a three-bedroom, thr bath, 1,861-square-f residence tited Modern Collection Celerie Kem

NYO
NYO

interior design

“I think when you walk into an apartment you should feel respite from a city onslaught of noise.”

you should feel respite from a city onslaught of noise.” “I like to design places that

“I like to design places that people are proud to bring their friends to,” she said. “People in New York have such a strong public life, and it’s a treat to be brought into someone’s house. It creates such immediate intimacy that we miss in city living.” When faced with a blank slate like those

82 | april 2011

within the Manhattan House, Kemble turns to color to provide a relief from the frenzied pace of the city. “I think when you walk into an apartment, you should feel respite from a city onslaught of noise,” she said of her two projects within the building, one of which is pictured. “I think

Classic upholstery styles are paired with both modern and 1960s-inspired furniture and vintage textiles throughout the residence.

you should walk into personality. To walk into a white box isn’t really the solace that some people think it is. I think it becomes a bunch of glaring angles unless you can soften the interior.” She sees the open space in Manhattan House as one of the building’s great strengths.

LOC AL EXPERTS WORLDWIDE

LOC AL EXPERTS WORLDWIDE 1130 PARK AVENUE: Elegantly configured 9-room co-op con- tains approximately 3,350+/- sq

1130 PARK AVENUE: Elegantly configured 9-room co-op con- tains approximately 3,350+/- sq ft, high ceilings, and excellent light throughout. Gracious living room with fireplace, looking over Park Ave. $5,200,000 WEB: NYO0017520. Kathy Hoffman Linburn, 212.606.7791

WEB: NYO0017520. Kathy Hoffman Linburn, 212.606.7791 COMBINATION OPPORTUNITY: The Savoy Condo. Unique 23rd

COMBINATION OPPORTUNITY: The Savoy Condo. Unique 23rd floor facing South and West with 2 terraces. 1,800+/- sq ft., floor-to- ceiling windows, hardwood floors. $2,595,000 WEB: NYO0017509. Agnes Beaugendre, 212.606.7629, Cord J. Stahl, 212.606.7621

Agnes Beaugendre, 212.606.7629, Cord J. Stahl, 212.606.7621 215 EAST 72ND STREET: Sun-flooded 8-into-7 room prewar

215 EAST 72ND STREET: Sun-flooded 8-into-7 room prewar co-op overlooking tree-lined street.Well maintained estate. South facing liv- ing room with fireplace, dining room, 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, maid’s with bath $2,495,000 WEB: NYO0017370. Bunny Goodwin, 212.606.7721