1.

Overview of Performance Monitoring
1.1 Concept of Performance Monitoring

1.1.1

"Where You Are" Versus "Where You Should Be"

Performance monitoring is the process of continuously evaluating the production capability and efficiency of a power plant and its equipment over time using measured plant data. Performance monitoring evaluations are repeated at regular intervals using data readily available from on-line instrumentation. This differs from a performance test, a one-time event that relies on precision instrumentation installed specifically for that test. The objective of performance monitoring is to continuously evaluate the degradation (decrease in performance) of the plant and its equipment in order to provide plant operators additional information to help them identify problems, improve performance, and make economic decisions about scheduling maintenance and optimizing plant operation. A successful performance monitoring system can tell plant operators how much the plant performance has changed and how much each piece of equipment in the plant contributed to that change. This information enables operators to localize performance problems within the plant and to estimate the operational cost incurred because of the performance deficits. While it is expected that performance monitoring will help operators diagnose and repair faults in plant equipment, the diagnostic procedures to accomplish this are beyond the scope of this book. To answer the question "How good is my performance?" one must compare the current capability of the power plant and its equipment to its expected capability. Thus, performance monitoring is a comparison of the current capability, "Where You Are", to the expected capability, "Where You Should Be". Production capability is a measure of the ability of equipment to produce the output that the equipment is designed to produce; it is not the current production. In other words, a plant that is designed to generate (produce) 600 MW, might only be able to generate 550 MW on a hot day, but still be capable of generating 600 MW when operating at its design conditions. The objective of performance monitoring is to continuously evaluate this capability and monitor its change over time. Degradation is defined as the shortfall in equipment performance caused by mechanical problems in the equipment (such as wear, fouling, and

Abu Bader

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1. Concept of Performance Monitoring

oxidation), but not by changes to set points under the control of the plant operators. For example, if plant operators increase the excess oxygen on a coal-fired boiler to reduce CO emissions when burning low quality fuel, the boiler efficiency will decrease. The boiler capability has not changed: if the fuel and excess oxygen level were returned to their original value, the boiler efficiency would also improve to its original value. Thus, the observed efficiency decrease in this example is not degradation, but is instead an opportunity for economic optimization. A second example is a gas turbine whose water-to-fuel injection ratio must be increased to meet more restrictive NOX emissions requirements. The engine power would increase and the heat rate would get worse (increase). These changes in performance do not represent degradation, just a change in operating conditions. Economic optimization is concerned with finding the plant operating mode and control set points that meet all constraints on plant operation (such as equipment protection and emissions limits) and maximize plant profits. The current degradation of plant equipment is an important input to optimization analysis and the current plant control set points are important inputs to degradation analysis, but the two are separate evaluations. Performance monitoring involves two calculations: current production and expected production. The evaluation of performance degradation is a comparison between these two values. For example, a plant designed to produce 600 MW on a 59 F day may be expected to produce 550 MW on a 100 F day. If the plant meets its expected production of 550 MW on the 100 F day, then its performance is as expected (zero degradation) even though it did not perform at its design production level of 600 MW. Table 1-1 lists the plant equipment types discussed in this book, the production objective(s) of each equipment type, and an output parameter that is a measure of each production objective. Any performance evaluation of the equipment listed in the table must relate the cur r ent production capability of the equipment to the expect ed production capability. Notice that the equipment types that consume fuel have two production objectives, and hence two measurements of performance. This is because output and efficiency are independent parameters for these equipment types. For fuel-consuming equipment, efficiency needs to be evaluated along with output production capability because it may be possible to achieve higher output by simply consuming more fuel. For other equipment types (non-fuel-consuming types such as heat exchangers and steam turbines), the input source of energy is fixed (that is, not determined by the performance of the equipment type being monitored)

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1. Concept of Performance Monitoring

and therefore higher efficiency causes higher output. Thus, for these equipment types output and efficiency are not independent performance parameters.

Table 1-1 List of equipment types and their production objectives Equipment
Power Plant Gas Turbine Boiler

Production Objective
Electricity Efficiency Electricity Efficiency Steam Generation

Measured Output
Net Power (MW) Net Heat Rate Power Heat Rate Steam Flow(s), Temperature(s) and Pressure(s) Boiler Efficiency Steam Flow(s), Temperature(s) and Pressure(s) Power Condenser Shell Pressure Cooling Water Temperature to Condenser Feedwater Outlet Temperature

Efficiency Heat Recovery Steam Generator Steam Generation Steam Turbine Condenser Cooling Tower Feedwater Heater Electricity Vacuum Energy Rejection Feedwater Heating

The performance of a power plant has two measures: power and heat rate. They are independent measures of performance in that the highest power is not necessarily achieved at the best (lowest) heat rate. A plant operator generally has the option to control the plant for maximum power output or to control for maximum efficiency. A performance evaluation of a power plant must include evaluations of both the power generation capability and the heat rate capability.

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1. Concept of Performance Monitoring

A gas turbine is like a power plant; in fact, a simple-cycle gas turbine is a power plant. Thus, both power and heat rate are independent performance parameters that must be evaluated when monitoring a gas turbine. A boiler consumes fuel to generate steam. Both the steam generation capability and the boiler efficiency are important parameters of boiler performance, and both must be evaluated. The job of a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) is to convert the available exhaust gas energy into as much steam as possible. When the plant is operating at full load, the temperature and pressure of the steam are controlled by the plant, and therefore are not independent parameters of HRSG performance. They represent requirements that the HRSG must meet. Improved HRSG effectiveness or efficiency results in increased steam generation. There is no opportunity to increase steam generation capability without increasing HRSG efficiency; thus, efficiency and steam generation are not independent parameters of performance. A performance monitoring system must compare the current value of HRSG steam generation or efficiency to its expected value. A condenser's job is to condense all of the steam exhausted from the steam turbine at a pressure as low as possible. The need to condense all of the steam is a requirement that must be met. Condenser pressure is the measure of condenser performance: the lower the pressure the better the performance. A performance monitoring system must compare the current value of this pressure to its expected value. Other parameters of condenser performance, such as cleanliness, are only important because they are an indication of the ability of a condenser to reduce steam turbine exhaust (condenser) pressure to its expected value. A cooling tower must reject all of the steam condensation energy (condenser duty) to the cooling media (air or water). The quantity of energy to reject is a requirement that the cooling tower must meet. The measure of performance of a cooling tower is the cooling water temperature at the exit of the cooling tower (or at the inlet to the condenser). A lower value of this temperature indicates better performance. A performance monitoring system must compare the current value of this temperature to its expected value.

1.1.2

Performance Calculation Procedure

Performance monitoring involves a calculational procedure that is repeated at regular time intervals. The details of the calculation vary greatly from plant to plant, depending upon the measured data that is available, the plant type, and the degree of sophistication of the calculations. However, a

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1. Concept of Performance Monitoring

performance monitoring calculational procedure always involves some or all of the following steps:

1. Acquire measured data. 2. Review, check and/or validate the raw measured data to find errors and omissions. 3. If possible, fix errors or omissions identified in the measured data. 4. Improve precision of the measured data by averaging and/or other techniques. 5. Compute fluid thermal properties, such as enthalpy and entropy, from measurements. 6. Use mass, energy and/or chemical balances to calculate data that is not measured, but can be
computed from the measurements that do exist.

7. Compute current values for equipment parameters of performance such as heat rates, efficiencies,
effectiveness's, temperature differences, and cleanliness.

8. Predict expected values for equipment parameters of performance. 9. Compute the corrected performance of the plant equipment 10. Calculate the shortfall in performance (degradation), based upon the difference between the
expected and current values of the performance parameters.

11. Estimate the effect (impact) that the equipment degradation has on plant performance and plant
operating cost.

12. Perform plant optimization calculations to predict the most cost-effective way to run the degraded
plant equipment. A given performance monitoring system often will not perform all of these calculational steps, but the list is a fairly complete compilation of the calculations that can be and probably should be done in a comprehensive and successful performance monitoring system.

1.1.3

Expected Performance: "Where You Should Be"

For performance monitoring to be meaningful, one must compare current performance to expected performance, and track that comparison over time. This process is equivalent to tracking degradation (the difference between expected and current performance) over time. Since performance monitoring is a continuous process, as opposed to a one-time event like a

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1. Concept of Performance Monitoring

performance test. The procedure to calculate expected performance is to start with the expected performance at the reference operating conditions (the rated performance). Gas turbine vendors typically provide performance curves which show how performance will change with environmental conditions. as illustrated by the expected power line in this figure. Notice that one point on the expected power line is the r at ed power. A vendor performance curve can be used to compute the expected power line. which occurs at only one air inlet temperature (shown as TRererence in Figure 1-1). The baseload power of a gas turbine engine varies with inlet air temperature. the performance evaluation will be performed over a variety of plant operating conditions. It is assumed for the purposes of this discussion that ambient temperature is the only environmental parameter that is changing. This makes the evaluation of expected performance the most challenging aspect of performance monitoring. or very complex. as illustrated in Figure 1-1. Figure 1-1 illustrates the concept of expected versus actual (degraded) power for a gas turbine engine. Concept of Performance Monitoring . The difference between the rated and corrected power is the degradation of the engine from rated. Page 18 1. When a degraded gas turbine is operated over a range of inlet air temperatures. and then use a model or models of equipment performance to predict the change in equipment performance when the equipment is operated at conditions different from the reference operating conditions. such as table look-ups. The model(s) of equipment performance can be very simple. The cor r ect ed power is the power that the actual (degraded) engine would produce if operated at the reference temperature. the measured gas turbine power levels will likely be along a line below the expected power line. such as a physically based computer code.

Concept of Performance Monitoring . any gas turbine performance monitoring system must also account for changes in other reference operating conditions such as inlet pressure loss. and the total power change is the product of the power changes predicted from the changes in each reference operating condition. Using curves to evaluate equipment performance is discussed later in this chapter under "Curve-Based Methods". fuel properties. steam/water injection. exhaust pressure loss. inlet guide vane angle and firing temperature. measured and corrected power for a gas turbine The expected performance line in Figure 1-1 is actually a simple example of a performance model of a gas turbine. separate models can be used for each condition. inlet relative humidity. Since these are independent parameters of gas turbine performance. Page 19 1. This line shows how gas turbine power will change as the gas turbine inlet temperature changes. Of course.Performance Evaluation Terms Figure 1-1 Comparison of rated. This line could be converted into a table look-up as part of a computerized performance model. expected. inlet pressure.

and the power and heat rate of the engine will change (from rated). Several ways to define equipment ratings are: • • • • Use vendor guarantees Use acceptance test (as-built) data for the plant and equipment Use plant measured data at the time the monitoring system is installed Baseline (tune) the ratings on a regular basis using plant measured data A gas turbine will produce its rated power and heat rate only at the reference operating conditions listed. For performance monitoring purposes. the choice is somewhat arbitrary since a monitoring system tracks changes in performance or degradation over time. It would be necessary to adjust (tune) such a computer code so that it accurately predicts the gas turbine rated performance at the reference operating conditions. the absolute value of the rating cancels out. 1.Table 1-20 Typical rating specifications for a gas turbine engine An alternative model of gas turbine performance is a computer code that includes physically based mathematical models of the compressor. . All of the data in Table 1-2 are related. combustor and expander. There are several ways to obtain the rating data for a plant and its equipment.4 Equipment Ratings The rated performance of plant equipment must include a specification of all the external conditions and control settings that change equipment performance but are not part of the equipment itself. Such a code would take the operating conditions as inputs and predict the gas turbine power and heat rate at those operating conditions.1. If the monitoring system defines degradation as the fall-off in performance over time. Then the performance monitoring system could input measured data into the computer code to predict the expected performance at the current measured operating conditions. Change any of the operating conditions (from their reference values). The values of the reference operating conditions are called the r ef er ence data. Using physically based computer models to evaluate equipment performance is described later in this chapter under "Model-Based Performance Analysis". Table 1-1 lists all of the specifications that are required to state the rating of a gas turbine.

Table 1-2 Typical rating specifications for a steam turbine/generator Gas Turbine Rating Specifications RATING: Gross Power Gross Heat Rate Example Data 170 MW 9400 Btu/KW-hr 59 deg-F 14.0065 lbm H20/lbm air 4 in H20 12 in H20 none Natural Gas 20200 Btu/lbm 86 deg 2300 deg-F none REFERENCE OPERATING CONDITIONS: Ambient Temperature Ambient Pressure Ambient Specific Humidity Inlet Pressure Loss Exhaust Pressure Loss Steam Water Injection Fuel Type Fuel Lower Heating Value Inlet Guide Vane Angle Firing Temperature Inlet Cooling or Heating The expected performance prediction for a gas turbine.65 psia 0. Table 1 -3 lists the rating specifications for a typical heat recovery steam venerator. Page 21 1. requires both a set of rating specifications (which includes both the rated performance and the reference operating conditions). or for any equipment type. plus a model of performance that predicts how performance changes as the operating conditions change. Concept of Performance Monitoring .

000 lb/hr 3.000 lb/hr REFERENCE OPERATING CONDITIONS: Exhaust Gas Flow Exhaust Gas Temperature Exhaust Gas Composition HP Drum Pressure IP Drum Pressure LP Drum Pressure Inlet Feedwater Temperature HP Steam Temperature Duct Burner Fuel Flow Steam Extraction to Process Water Extraction to Process Once again. To predict HRSG expected performance. a monitoring system must be able to predict the change in HRSG performance as operating conditions change from their reference values. Concept of Performance Monitoring .000 lb/hr 1138 F 3% H20 1900 psia 400 psia 100 psia 140 F HOOF none 20.Table 1-3 Typical rating specifications for a heat recovery steam generator (HRSGj Heat Recovery Steam Generator Rating Specification RATING: HP Steam Flow IP Steam Flow Example Data 415.250. the rating specifications for an HRSG indicate that the HRSG will produce the rated steam flows only if it is operating at the reference operating conditions.000 lb/hr 30.000 lb/hr 70. Page 22 1.

Page 23 1.000 lb/hr 1137 F 1800 psia 0. Any change in these flow conditions or pressures will cause the steam turbine power to change. Concept of Performance Monitoring .000 lb/hr REFERENCE OPERATING CONDITIONS: Throttle Steam Flow Throttle Steam Temperature Throttle Steam Pressure Condenser Back Pressure Reheat Steam Temperature HP Extraction Flow LP Admission Flow A steam turbine will generate its rated power only at the rated steam flow conditions and condenser pressure. Steam Turbine Rating Specification Example Data RATING: Gross Power 190 MW 930.Table 1-4 gives typical rating specifications for a steam turbine.8 psia 1000 F none 160.

The condenser is designed to achieve its rated pressure at a given (reference) set of inlet flow conditions.000 lb/hr 80 F A condenser is required to condense all of the incoming steam and transfer the energy released from condensation to the cooling water.8 psia 930. Page 24 1. The condenser duty. Any change in the inlet steam or water flows will be expected to change the condenser pressure.Table 1-5 Typical rating specifications for a condenser Condenser Rating Specification RATING: Shell (Steam) Pressure REFERENCE OPERATING CONDITIONS: Inlet Steam Flow Inlet Steam Enthalpy Cooling Water Flow Cooling Water Inlet Temperature Example Data 0.000 lb/hr 1000 Btu/lb 6. Concept of Performance Monitoring . the cooling water flow and the cooling water inlet temperature are imposed upon the condenser by the performance of other equipment in the plant (external to the condenser).000.

4.2.560.4.000 lb/hr 592 psig 11.Table 1-25 Typical rating specifications for a feedwater heater Table 1-6 Typical rating specifications for a COAL-FIRED BOILER Boiler Rating Specification RATING: Main Steam Generation Boiler Efficiency Example Data 2. H:0.8. S.275. H.495 Btu/lb (64.19.2. Concept of Performance Monitoring page 26 .9) 475 F 80 F 60 % 1.4.0. Ash) Inlet Feedwater Temperature Inlet Air Temperature Inlet Air Relative Humidity 3374 mmBtu hr 2800 psig 1005 F 1005 F 2.59% REFERENCE OPERATING CONDITIONS: Fuel Input Energy Steam Drum Pressure Steam Temperature Reheat Steam Temperature Reheat Steam Flow Reheat Steam Inlet Pressure Fuel Higher Heating Value Fuel Composition (C. N.1.4.1.000 lb/hr 89.5.

000 lb/hr 890 F REFERENCE OPERATING CONDITIONS: Inlet Steam Flow Inlet Steam Temperature Page 26 1. Concept of Performance Monitoring .Table 1-7 Typical rating specifications for a feedwater heater Feedwater Heater Rating Specification RATING: Outlet Feedwater Temperature Outlet Drain Water Temperature Example Data 420 F 380 F 120.

Table 1-27 Typical rating specifications for a feedwater heater Inlet Steam Pressure Inlet Feedwater Flow Feedwater Inlet Temperature Inlet Drain Water Flow Inlet Drain Water Temperature 320 psia 2. The corrected performance is the performance that would be expected if the current (degraded) engine were operating at the reference operating conditions. Concept of Performance Monitoring page 26 .1. 1.600.000 lb/hr 460 F 1. as the measured values of most performance parameters vary due to changes in plant operating conditions.5 Corrected Performance: The Indicator of Degradation For combined-cycle power plants. To cor r ect the performance means to account for the performance variations that would be expected due to the changes in environmental conditions and control set points. This makes it difficult to track changes in performance. the expected performance varies greatly over time. One methodology to make the identification of performance changes over time easier is to "correct" the current performance to a standard operating condition. any change in a corrected value represents a change in equipment performance capability.000 lb/hr 370 F 150. The virtue of corrected performance is that its expected value remains constant and equal to the rated value. Thus. usually the reference operating conditions.

It goes down when degradation increases and it goes up when degradation decreases. fuel heating value. Notice that measured Page 28 1. Figure 1-2 Measured and corrected gas turbine power over a nine-month time period. Concept of Performance Monitoring . Figure 1-2 is an actual trend of gas turbine measured and corrected power. the degradation in performance from one point in time to another is equal to the change in corrected performance over that time range. If changes in the engine operating conditions were to cause changes in gas turbine power. the corrected power would not change. ambient conditions. load level. and exhaust delta-P).Corrected power is a barometer of engine performance. Corrected gas turbine power accounts for changes in engine operating conditions and predicts the equipment performance if the equipment were to operate at the reference operating conditions (including inlet filter delta-P. water/steam injection. The measured power is shown on the plot only when the engine was operating at or above 99% percent of baseload power. this time period is evident on the plot as the time during which there is no measured data. An overhaul was performed on the gas turbine during October 2002. In fact.

The engine overhaul in October improved the corrected power back up to approximately 162 MW. this plot shows that the overhaul improved the engine's power capability by 3 MW to 4 MW. In other words. Notice the slow increase in corrected pressure over 150 days. Each corrected power point shown in Figure 1 -2 is an average of calculated corrected power over a time period of approximately two hours. or it is a prediction of the power the engine would achieve in a performance test at reference operating conditions. and is higher in the winter months than in the summer months. The trend display of measured power is a history of operation. Corrected power is a prediction of the power that the engine would generate if operating at reference operating conditions.baseload power vanes during each day. Concept of Performance Monitoring . a loss of approximately 3 MW over a three-month period. The corrected power is a convenient plotting parameter because it shows degradation in the engine. When the tubes and Page 29 1. Figure 1-3 shows corrected condenser pressure at a combined-cycle power plant in the United Kingdom. It is essentially the current rating of the engine. indicating fouling of the condenser tubes and/or blockage in the waterboxes. Cooling water flow through the tubes also decreased about 4° o during this time period (not shown on the figure). but gives the viewer little information about degradation. Notice that the engine corrected power started at over 161 MW in July and degraded to approximately 158 MW by October.

6 What is My Degradation? Degradation is the reduction in equipment performance capability that has occurred over time. degradation may be stated as the difference between the current equipment capability and its rated capability. the corrected condenser pressure improved back to approximately the same level as the beginning of the trend. Often when historical data is not available. the equipment may not have ever operated at its rated performance. Ideally. the difference in corrected power from one point in time to another is the degradation that has occurred over the time period. which is from the time the equipment was put into service to the present. indicating that the equipment is performing better than the guarantee level. This is equal to the difference between the rated performance and the corrected performance.1. For the value of degradation to be meaningful. while a change from guarantee may be misleading. some plant equipment may show may show negative degradation. the start time and end time of the degradation must be stated. it is usually assumed that the degradation is over the operational lifetime of the equipment. the rated performance should be defined as the actual performance at some given point in time. Since the corrected gas turbine power is a prediction of the current rating of the engine. Thus. If the degradation is defined as the change from guarantee (a level of performance that the equipment may never have actually operated at). degradation may be defined as the change in corrected performance over time.waterboxes were cleaned during a plant outage. this definition of degradation is only true if the equipment actually achieved its rated performance at some point in time. The definition of degradation as a change over time instead of the change from vendor guarantee is significant to the concept of performance monitoring because a change over time is an aid in identifying changes in equipment performance. it compares equipment capability at one point in time to that at another time. Page 30 1. but if sufficient plant data is not available it may be set equal to the vendor guarantee. Rated performance is often set equal to the vendor guarantee as opposed to a performance test at the beginning of equipment life. and the cooling water flow rate also recovered (not shown on the figure). Thus. Since degradation is defined as a change in performance over time. It is a relative parameter. If no time range is stated. Concept of Performance Monitoring . Degradation will be defined throughout this book as the difference between corrected and rated performance. 1.

The steam turbine power changes because the gas turbine exhaust flow and temperature normally change as a result of the gas turbine degradation. a reduction in gas turbine performance (power and heat rate) has an effect on overall combined-cycle plant performance. Degradation normally is evaluated in different engineering units for each equipment type: gas turbine degradation is in MW while condenser degradation is in either psia or percent cleanliness. Here is a situation where the definition of degradation as a change in performance over time.1 psi (0. This degradation causes a reduction in steam turbine power.1. The best that the operators can be expected to do is to maintain plant performance at a level that the plant actually operated in the past. Once the plant is accepted and goes into commercial operation it is too late to worry about equipment guarantees. The heat rate increase of the gas turbine will cause the plant to consume more fuel per MW-hr of power produced. Concept of Performance Monitoring . The power reduction in the gas turbine reduces plant power because both the gas turbine and the steam turbine power levels will change. which can be calculated using an overall plant model. For example.1. and/or a MW-hr cost to the power which is not being sold because of the degradation.1 psia (6. heat rate and operating cost. For example. Page 31 1.7 How Much is Degradation Costing Me? Knowing the amount of degradation is important. Therefore. One way to make a meaningful comparison is to calculate the impacts of the degradation on overall plant power. In order to make decisions about which maintenance to perform. is particularly important. The impact of the condenser degradation on plant power is equal to the change in plant power caused by the degradation of the condenser. This makes it difficult to compare degradations calculated for different parts of the plant or for different equipment types. These effects on plant power and heat rate can then be converted to operating costs by applying a fuel cost to the extra fuel being burned. This means that the condenser is operating at a pressure 0.69 mbar) higher than it would operate if the degradation were zero.9 mbar). The definition of a plant impact is the change in plant performance that would be realized if the degradation were to be returned to zero by some maintenance action. as opposed to a change from vendor guarantee. degradation is an estimate of the performance improvement that is possible. and any existing degradation can be looked upon as the source of an operational cost that is potentially avoidable. which is also a reduction in plant power. but it's not the full story. a condenser may have a degradation of 0. plant operators need to know how much the degradation is costing plant operation.

Concept of Performance Monitoring . Actually. fuel flow in a Rankine cycle plant with condenser degradation may decrease slightly because the increased condenser pressure will lead to higher feedwater temperature entering the boiler. The idea behind the overall plant impacts is to convert all of the degradations in the plant to their respective costs on plant performance. the plant power always decreases and heat rate always increases when condenser pressure increases. even so.3 2. Table 1-7 below illustrates the concept for a combined-cycle plant. The change in plant heat rate caused by the degradation in the condenser is called the impact of condenser degradation on plant heat rate.8 MW 0.2 5.8 0. Table 1-8 Example of plant equipment degradations and their impacts on plant performance Equipment Degradation Impact on Plant Performance Power Heat Rate Operating Cost (MW) (Btu/kw-hr) ($/hr) 0.1 in-H20 1.4 0.000 lb/hr 0. resulting in a net operating cost to the plant.1 F Page 32 1. The change in plant revenues minus fuel costs is called the impact of condenser degradation on plant costs.2 0.1 psi 2.The reduction in plant power due to the condenser degradation increases plant heat rate since fuel flow is not changed.9 MW 12. These changes in plant performance reduce electric sales revenues and increase fuel costs. Then these degradations can be compared and evaluated on a consistent (apples to apples) basis. which will reduce boiler fuel consumption.1 16 75 41 31 25 13 191 46 294 169 84 56 22 671 Inlet Air Filter GAS Turbine HRSG Steam Turbine Condenser Cooling Tower Total Plant 1.2 1.

the total of the equipment impacts on plant power is equal to the degradation in plant power.1 MW. the corrected plant heat rate is equal to the rated plant heat rate plus the total of the equipment degradations in plant heat rate (191 Btu/kW-hr in Table 1-8). In other words.The inlet air filter in Table 1-8 has a pressure-loss degradation equal to 1. and the total power degradation from rated is 5.1 in-H.9 MW) is called the corrected plant power. the gas turbine inlet pressure would increase. An example of calculated optimization outputs for a combined-cycle power plant with two gas turbines is illustrated in Table 1-9. Concept of Performance Monitoring . The current plant operating costs (electric sales revenues minus fuel costs at the reference operating conditions) are $671/hr higher than they would be if the plant was performing as rated and was operating at the reference operating conditions. "What is the best way to operate the plant so as to maximize plant profits?" The idea is to adjust the plant set-points that are under the control of the operator to make as much money as possible for the plant. if the plant were rated at 400 MW. the plant operator is prepared to answer the question. In a similar manner. "Impacts of Degradation on Overall Plant Performance". resulting in a gas turbine power increase. The total plant power degradation is equal to the sum of the equipment impacts on plant power. Overall these changes in plant power and heat rate would yield a net increase of 46 $/hr in plant operating profits (electric sales revenues minus fuel costs). The equipment degradation listed in Table 1-8 summarizes maintenance issues.9 MW if operated at the plant reference operating conditions. the plant would be expected to now produce only 394. For example. Methods to calculate these impacts are reviewed in the chapter 6. The steam turbine power would also increase because of the increase in gas turbine exhaust energy.8 Optimization: "Where You Could Be" Once the degradation of the plant and its equipment is known. Page 33 1.3 MW. when the degradation is calculated from rated. This power (394. Then. This plant power increase would cause a plant heat rate decrease equal to 16 Btu/kW-hr.1. If this degradation were eliminated by replacing the air filters. which is defined as the impact of the air filter on plant power. but optimization is concerned with actions the operator can take to improve performance without maintenance. 1.0. which is equal to the rated plant power minus the corrected plant power. The total plant power would increase by 0.

9 Controllable Loss Displays Controllable loss displays are an alternate way to present the degradation and optimization data of tables 1-7 and 1-8. and the Opt i mal Val ue column shows where the plant could operate if the operator took the appropriate control actions. This screen is different from the degradation screen in Table 1-8 in that no maintenance actions are required. and the cost incurred by not operating the plant at these target values.Table 1-9 Example optimization outputs for a combined cycle power plant Controllable Set-point GT l Power GT 2 Power Inlet Chiller #1 Inlet Chiller #2 Duct Burner #1 Duct Burner #2 Number of Cooling Tower Fans On Total Savings Possible Current Value 170 MW 150 MW On On Off Off 7 Optimal Value 161 MW 159 MW Off Off Off Off 6 Cost Savings ($/hr) 90 88 12 11 0 0 21 222 The C ur r ent Val ue column shows current plant operating data. Finally the C os t Savi ngs column estimates the increase in plant operational profit that would be achieved if the operator took the suggested actions. and the cost savings achieved. Controllable loss displays show the current value of selected plant performance parameters. and the optimal operating conditions are achievable by operator action. Concept of Performance Monitoring . These displays are most often used for Rankine cycle plants where the expected or target values of plant performance parameters do not vary widely with plant operating conditions. No one knows if the degradation in Table 1-8 is fully recoverable. 1. their target values. Page 34 1. but the control actions suggested in Table 1-9 can be taken (assuming no environment or other operational limit on plant operation is violated).1.

controllable loss parameters do not report degradation specific to individual plant equipment. The target values for controllable loss displays are generally based upon expected overall plant performance with no equipment degradation anywhere in the plant. but instead report a departure in overall plant performance from the values that the performance parameters would have if the entire plant were "new and clean". If there is no degradation in plant equipment. and the feedwater heaters must all Page 35 1. Concept of Performance Monitoring . the controllable loss display will show small losses and vice versa. Controllable loss displays are a very useful way to summarize plant status: they inform the operator if there is a plant performance problem. Thus. The disadvantage is that they give little information as to the location of plant performance problems. For example. degradation in one area of the plant will likely show up as deviations in several controllable loss parameters calculated from measured data in other areas of the plant. the economizers. the air preheater. in order to achieve the target main steam temperature in a boiler. Due to the regenerative nature of a Rankine cycle.Figure 1-4 Example controllable loss display for a fossil (Rankine cycle) plant The advantage of controllable loss displays is that they are readily understandable summary of the plant performance status.

the absolute accuracy of measured performance is stressed as opposed to ease of testing. instrumentation. and several will likely change when one of them changes.2 ASME Test Codes ASME Performance Test Codes provide test procedures that yield results of the highest level of accuracy consistent with the best engineering knowledge and practice currently available. 1. The test procedures were developed by balanced committees of professional individuals representing all concerned interests. which might change the steam turbine efficiency and the condenser pressure. The following table lists the test codes that are most closely related to power plant performance monitoring. A change in the steam temperature may change the throttle pressure. the test results will be of the highest quality and the lowest uncertainty available. Page 36 1. Concept of Performance Monitoring . The test codes specify procedures. calculation methods. many of the controllable loss parameters are related to each other. and uncertainty analysis. The focus of the ASME test codes is to provide test specifications appropriate for verification of compliance with guarantee or warranty performance. The target values used in controllable loss displays are a very different concept from the equipment degradation calculations described above where the expected performance of each equipment type depends upon the operational conditions that the equipment is exposed to and is independent of the degradation of other equipment in the plant. equipment operating requirements. Thus. When tests are run in accordance with an ASME code. In general it is very difficult to implement the AMSE test code procedures as the basis of performance monitoring at an operating power plant. As such.operate with their target performance. Degradation in any of these may cause the steam temperature to change.

1993 Description General Instructions Code on Definitions and Values Air Heaters Gas Turbine Heat Recovery Steam Generators Steam Turbines Appendix to PTC 6 Evaluation of Measurement Uncertainty in Performance Tests of Steam Turbines Procedures for Routine Performance Test of Steam Turbines Centrifugal Pumps Fans Closed Feedwater Heaters Steam Surface Condensers Deaerators Test Uncertainty Performance Test Code on Gas Turbines Atmospheric Water Cooling Equipment Overall Plant Performance Performance Monitoring Guidelines for Steam Power Plants page 3" 1 .1981 (R2003) PTC 6 .1990 PTC 11 .1997 PTC 19.1980(R1997) PTC 4.2 .1997 PTC PM.1996 PTC 6A . C o n c e p t o f P e r f o r m a n c e Nlonitoring .2 .1988 (R1995) PTC 8.1968 (R1991) PTC 4.3 .1 -2000 PTC 12.4.1 .1998 PTC 22.1999 PTC 2 .Table 1-10 ASME Performance Test Codes closely related to performance Monitoring ASME Test Code PTC l .1998 PTC 12.3 .1984(R1995) PTC 12.1997 PTC 23 .2000 PTC 6 Report 1985 (R1997) PTC 6S.1986 (R197) PTC 46.

The equipment being tested is operated at conditions as close to design and. The objective of performance monitoring is to detect changes in equipment performance (degradation) so that proper corrective action can be taken.3 Performance Testing versus Online Monitoring A performance test is a one-time evaluation of equipment performance that relies on precision instrumentation installed specifically for that test. The principal differences between testing and monitoring are summarized in Table l-l l below. but is usually acceptable for tracking changes in equipment degradation. Concept of Performance Monitoring . The objective of a performance test is to measure the absolute capability of the equipment. The tests are often done to verify vendor guarantees on new or upgraded equipment. As such. The absolute value of performance is not necessarily important to performance monitoring.1. monitoring data is usually not adequate for vendor guarantee testing. Table 1-11 Comparison of performance testing and online monitoring Performance Test Objective Instrumentation Type Measurement Requirement Test Interval Test Conditions Absolute Performance Precision Test Instruments Accuracy One Time Event Equipment Isolated and at Full Load Online Monitoring Detect Degradation Whatever Is Available Repeatability Repeated Often Normal Plant Operation The basic difference between performance monitoring and performance testing is that monitoring uses whatever instrumentation is continuously available at the plant to give the operators an indication of plant performance status. repeatability of results is most important. or guarantee as possible. instead. Page 38 1. so that changes over time can be evaluated. The fact that monitoring evaluations are repeated many times gives the engineer the opportunity to reject results that are not consistent with longterm trends.

The current performance is usually directly measured or is calculated from measured data. Although the relative contributions of random and bias errors are unknown for most instruments. heat rate or efficiency) when one of the operating conditions changes.1 Performance Curves Performance monitoring involves a comparison of the expected (new and clean) equipment performance to its current (measured) performance. Concept of Performance Monitoring . repeatability is the long-term variation in bias error.4 Curve Based Methods 1. However. 1. The conclusion is that even though installed plant instrumentation may not be adequate for precision tests.4. The basic concept behind curve based methods is to assemble a set of performance or correction curves that plot the variation in a specific equipment performance parameter (such as power. Curve based methods are a simple and reliable method to predict equipment performance changes as long as the operating conditions have not changed too much from the reference conditions. This means that degradation (change in performance) can be measured more accurately than absolute performance. where each multiplying factor is generated using a separate correction curve. Two equipment characteristics must be known in order to predict the expected performance of any plant equipment: l. the repeatability of performance monitoring results often approaches the accuracy of precision tests. the ASME Performance Test Code Committee has estimated the repeatability as one-half the overall instrument uncertainty. Rating specification for the equipment that includes both the rated performance and the reference operating conditions at which the rating applies. Accuracy is achieved only if both the bias and random uncertainties are small. Page 39 1. The prediction of expected equipment performance requires both a measurement of equipment operating conditions and a method or model to use to predict how the equipment performance changes as operating conditions change. The total equipment performance fractional change is then computed by multiplying together the fractional changes for each operating condition.The uncertainty of a measurement is considered to be the sum of two components called the bias and the random uncertainties.

exhaust gas composition. Table 1-12 is an example of the rating specifications for a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG). or from measured data. figure 1-5 shows the variation of HP steam flow and HRSG effectiveness as the gas turbine exhaust temperature varies. When generating a performance curve it is assumed that all other equipment-operating conditions remain constant and equal to their reference values. Each curve shows how equipment performance will change if only one of the equipment operating conditions changes. of equipment performance that can predict how the performance changes when any of the reference operating conditions change. These curves may come from vendor performance guarantee tables. which could be in the form of performance curves. drum pressures. A method or model.2. Page 40 1. HP steam temperature. inlet feedwater temperature. and Figures 1-5 through 1-8 are example performance curves for that same heat recovery steam generator. Thus. Concept of Performance Monitoring . a computer model of the HRSG. and duct burner fuel flow) remain equal to their reference values as stated in Table 1-12. but only if the other operating conditions (exhaust gas flow.

Concept of Performance Monitoring .Table 1-12 Ratings specification for the example heat recovery steam generator Heat Recovery Steam Generator Rating Specification RATING: HP Steam Flow LP Steam Flow Effectiveness Data 511.300 lb/hr 93.00 Page 41 1.200.000 lb/hr 1135 F 10% H.700 lb/hr 88.0 1900 psia 100 psia 136 F 1000 F 0.4 REFERENCE OPERATING CONDITIONS: Exhaust Gas Flow Exhaust Gas Temperature Exhaust Gas Composition HP Drum Pressure LP Drum Pressure Inlet Feedwater Temperature HP Steam Temperature Duct Burner Fuel Flow 3.

Concept of Performance Monitoring page 42 .Figure 1-5 Example HRSG performance (HP steam flow and HRSG effectiveness) versus changes in gas turbine exhaust gas temperature I.

Figure 1-6 Example HRSG performance (HP steam flow and HRSG effectiveness) versus changes in gas turbine exhaust gas flow rate Page 43 1. Concept of Performance Monitoring .

"igure 1-7 Example HRSG performance (HP steam flow and HRSG Effectiveness versus changes in highpressure steam drum pressure Page 44 1. Concept of Performance Monitoring .

to some value is. the total impact in performance can be computed by combining the impacts of the individual parameters.2 Expected Performance from Curves The basic assumption behind the curve-based performance-prediction methodology is that the individual operating conditions impact equipment performance independently. Fractional Change from to where Page 45 1. The methodology used to combine the individual impacts into a net impact on performance is to convert all the individual impacts into a fractional or percentage change in the performance parameter.Figure 1-8 Example HRSG performance (HP steam flow and HRSG effectiveness) versus changes in duct burner fuel energy input 1. When this assumption is true. The fractional change in HP steam flow when the exhaust temperature changes from the reference value.4. Concept of Performance Monitoring .

Concept of Performance Monitoring . at temperature is the steam flow at the reference exhaust temperature from the same performance curve The expected HP steam flow is the combination of all the fractional changes from all of the parameters that affect the HP steam flow. which occurs at the reference exhaust temperature is the value read from the exhaust temperature performance curve at temperature is the value read from the exhaust temperature performance curve at temperature is the value from the exhaust flow rate performance curve at temperature is the value from the exhaust flow rate performance curve at temperature is the value from the drum pressure performance curve at temperature is the value from the drum pressure performance curve at temperature is the value from the duct burner fuel flow performance curve at temperature is the value from the duct burner fuel flow performance curve at temperature Page 46 1. at the exhaust temperature exhaust flow . and duct burner fuel flow is the rated value of the HP steam flow. Figure 1-5. drum pressure . Expected HP Steam Flow from Performance Curves: where is the expected value of the HP steam flow.is the look-up value of the HP steam flow from the HRSG exhaust temperature performance curve.

For example. The expected HRSG effectiveness at the new gas turbine exhaust conditions would be calculated in the same manner.As an example. i 1. consider what happens to the HRSG performance when the gas turbine exhaust conditions change.7 klb/hr at the reference flow (3200 klb/hr). An addition of a quantity of energy to a system will likely cause the outputs of the system to increase by an additive amount that is proportional to the quantity of energy added. a given amount of water or steam injected into a gas turbine will increase the gas turbine power by an increment that is proportional to the amount of steam/water injected. and the exhaust flow reduces from 3200 klb/hr to 2800 klb hr. the expected HP steam flow at the new exhaust conditions is equal to: Notice. The exhaust flow performance curve (Figure 1-6) gives HP steam flow values of 511. but instead by incremental changes in performance. In this situation. The exhaust temperature performance curve (Figure 1-5) gives HP steam flow values of 511. and 480. It would make little sense in this case to use a multiplier on the reference gas turbine power.6 klb/hr at exhaust temperature equal to 1100 F. Thus. except that the calculation must use curve look-up values for the effectiveness instead of the steam flow. only two terms out of four possible change factors are included in the calculation because the drum pressure and duct burner fuel flow did not change.4.5 klb/hr at exhaust flow equal to 2800 klb/hr. and 448. and their contributions to the calculation would equal unity (1. it would be Page 47 1. Concept of Performance Monitoring . but is not closely related to the power level of the gas turbine without the steam/water injection.0).3 Additive Performance Factors Some operational parameters are not best represented by fractional changes in performance.7 klb/hr at the reference temperature (1135 F). such as when the exhaust temperature into the sample HRSG changes from its reference value of 1135 F to 1100 F.

HRSG vendors have the same option on duct burner fuel energy. and to admission or extraction from a steam turbine where the flow rate is not directly related to the throttle flow. This argument also applies to other situations such as adding duct burner fuel energy added to an HRSG. the performance increment when the duct burner fires at level equal to some value. Note also that if the impact of water injection on gas turbine power is expressed using the water-to-fuel ratio as the independent parameter instead of a specified water injection flow rate.5) Where Cur ve D B (w F ) is the value from the HRSG performance versus duct burner firing curve (Figure 18) at the x-axis value equal to w F . this impact is better presented by adding an increment of power proportional to the amount of steam/water that is injected. For example. This is because the water injection has been normalized back to rated conditions by dividing the quantity of water injection by the quantity of fuel flow.C ur ve D B (0) } (1. Thus. w F . steam. Thus. Cur ve D B (0) is the HRSG performance at the reference duct burner firing level. Concept of Performance Monitoring . instead of firing at the reference duct burner firing level is: Per f or mance Incr ement = { C ur ve D B (w F ) . the performance effect would be multiplicative. the expected HP steam flow would be: Page 48 1. Instead. If the duct burner fuel energy were expressed as a fraction of the input exhaust gas energy. which equals zero. then the effect on performance is better represented as a multiplicative factor. Additive changes in performance are computed by adding the increment in performance calculated from the performance curves to the reference performance value. gas turbine vendors have the option of expressing the effect of water injection on gas turbine performance as an additive factor (when the amount of water injection is plotted versus gas turbine power) or as a multiplicative factor (when water to fuel ratio is plotted versus gas turbine power). Additive correction factors generally are only used to represent discrete quantities being added to or taken from the equipment or system. If the duct burner in the example HRSG fires at a level equal to 200 mmBTU hr when all other operating conditions remain at their reference values. The rated HRSG performance occurs at a duct burner firing level equal to the reference value.n on-intuitive to express this impact as a multiplier on the reference gas turbine power.

1.4 Expected Performance from Curves In summary. Concept of Performance Monitoring .4. the expected equipment performance at actual operating conditions can be calculated from a set of performance curves of the equipment performance versus equipment operating conditions by the following formula. Cur veVal ue(i ) is the value off the performance curve at operating condition i Note that the above formula can be used to predict the performance at any set of operating conditions when the performance is known at any other set Page 49 1. if the equipment performs with rated capability Per f or mance rated is the expected or rated equipment performance at the reference operating conditions (expected equals rated at the reference operating conditions) is a mathematical operator indicating that all the terms in the following parenthesis are to be multiplied together. is a mathematical operator indicating that all the following terms are to be added together. one term for each additive performance increment until terms from all the additive performance increments are included in the final sum. Expected Performance from Performance Curves: wher e Per f or mance e x p is the expected equipment performance at the actual operating conditions. one term for each performance curve until terms from all the performance curves are included in the final product.

is a mathematical operator indicating that all the following terms are to be added together. one term for each performance curve until terms from all the performance curves are included in the final product. the expected HP steam flow rate would be: Page 50 1. and with the duct burner consuming 200 mmBtu/hr of fuel. and the rated performance to be equal to that known performance value. Concept of Performance Monitoring . Simply define the reference conditions to be equal to the operating conditions where the performance is known. Cur veVal ue(i ) is the value off the performance curve at operating condition i If the example HRSG is operated at inlet exhaust gas temperature of 1100 F.of operating conditions. and inlet gas flow rate of 2800 Klb/hr. Predicted Performance at ( 1 ) Given Test Performance at ( 2 ) : where Per f or mance(l ) is the predicted equipment performance at the operating conditions (1) if the equipment performs with the same capability as the known or test performance at conditions (2) Per f or mance(2) is the known or test equipment performance at the operating conditions (2) is a mathematical operator indicating that all the terms in the following parenthesis are to be multiplied together. one term for each additive performance increment until terms from all the additive performance increments are included in the final sum.

and provide correction curves for each of these operational and environmental effects.1. gas turbine base-load power is known to be dependent upon inlet air temperature. This forces the Y-axis value to equal unity (1. Concept of Performance Monitoring . water injection rate and fuel type. exhaust pressure loss. inlet air pressure. The gas turbine vendor would rate the engine power at a given set of these conditions.5 Correction Factors The traditional method to account for operational and environmental effects on equipment performance is the correction factor method. inlet air humidity. This method was developed by equipment vendors to enable their customers to predict the performance of the vendor's equipment at various operating conditions. The equipment output parameter (Y axis on the performance curve) value is divided by its rated value. and to avoid the need to provide the physically based computer models of equipment performance from which the curves are usually derived.4. The disadvantage is that the absolute value of performance is not available from the curve. steam injection rate. The advantage of correction curves is that the value read directly from the plot is equal to the correction factor needed to predict performance at the reference conditions given performance at some other operating condition. Page 51 1. A correction curve is simply a normalized performance curve. The basic assumption of this curve-based methodology is that the individual operating conditions have independent impacts on equipment performance. Each correction curve would quantify the change or percent change in engine performance that would result when the given operational or environmental condition changes. This means that the total impact on performance can be computed by combining the individual parameter impacts. The methodology is to apply independent correction factors for each operational and environmental effect.0) at the X-axis value equal to the reference value. inlet pressure loss. There is no need for the user to divide by the rated performance value to obtain a correction factor. For example.

Expected Performance at Test Conditions from Correction Factors: wher e is a mathematical operator indicating the product of all the following terms (each term multiplied by the next term) Page 52 1. This predicted performance at reference conditions is called the corrected performance. Concept of Performance Monitoring .Figure 1-9 Correction factor curve for the effect of exhaust gas temperature on HP steam flow. They are often used in performance testing to predict the equipment performance at the reference conditions when the performance was measured at conditions other than the reference conditions. this curve is equal to the curve in Figure 1-5 divided by the rated HP steam flow Correction factors are defined as the fractional change in performance from rated when an operational condition changes from the reference conditions.

if the equipment performs with the same capability as the known or test performance at operating conditions (2) Per f or mance (2) is the known or test performance at operating conditions (2) Per f or mance rated is the rated performance at the reference operating conditions Cor r ect i onFacot r s (l ) are the values off the correction curves at operating conditions (1) Cor r ect i onFacot r s (2) are the values off the correction curves at operating conditions (2) Page 53 1.is a mathematical operator indicating the sum of all the following terms (each term added to the next term) Performance Performance rated is the expected or rated performance at the reference operating conditions e x p is the expected performance at test operating conditions if the equipment performs with rated capability C or r ect i onFact or s are the values from the correction curves at the test operating conditions Addit i veC or r ect i ons are the values off the additive correction curves at the test operating conditions The correction factor curves. Predicted Performance at Operating Conditions (1): where Per f or mance ( I ) is the predicted performance at operating conditions (1). The formula for the predicted equipment performance at operating condition (1). given known performance at operating condition (2) is below. Concept of Performance Monitoring . just like performance curves. can be used to predict equipment performance at any operating condition given the performance at one other operating condition.

4.6 Percent Change Correction Factors Sometimes the variations in equipment performance with operating conditions are presented as a percentage change in performance versus the percentage change in the operating condition. the prediction of performance at some operating conditions (1) requires the knowledge of both the rated performance as well as the performance at operating conditions (2). 1. An example of such a performance curve is shown in Figure 1-10. and the x-axis is equal to the change in reference condition (current operating condition minus the reference operating condition) divided by the reference condition. These curves are fully normalized performance curves where the y-axis is equal to the change in equipment performance (equipment performance minus the rated performance) divided by the rated performance. .Addi t i veFacot r s (l ) are the values off the additive correction curve at operating condition (1) Addit i veFacot r s (2) are the values off the additive correction curve at operating condition (2) Because the correction factor curves are based upon a rated performance value at reference operating conditions.

However. contain complex.5 Model-Based Performance Analysis The correction curves that equipment vendors supply to customers are based upon physically based computer models of the equipment performance. in this time of powerful computers on every desk. Pepse™ and GTMaster™. except that the correction factor must be calculated from the curve look-up value in the following manner. Why not use the computer codes directly to calculate expected and corrected performance? Computer software programs like GateCycleIM. and are a convenient way for vendors to transmit the results of complex computer analysis to their customers.Figure 1-10 An HRSG percent change correction curve for the HP steam flow versus exhaust gas temperature The use of these percentage change correction curves is essentially the same as that for correction curves. physically based models of equipment performance that . 1. it is not necessary to simplify the analysis into a few curves.

equipment vendors often use these computer codes to create the correction curves. These changes are handled directly by computer models. Physically based models give detailed information about the expected performance. This additional information may help the engineer diagnose problems. and computer codes are often built specifically to handle these interactions. Physically based models can compute impacts of parameters for which no curves are available. Computer models can compute corrections for parameters that the vendor may not have supplied correction curves for. the method words very well. the exhaust gas compositions will change.0. not available from curves. The individual equipment operating conditions may not have independent effects on equipment performance. which is an assumption of the curve-based method.can be used in place of correction curves. but seldom accounted for in correction curves. as conditions change over a broad range. As long as each correction factor is near unity. the assumption that the overall effect of changes in all the operating conditions can be computed by multiplying the correction factors together may is not valid over a wide range of operating conditions. Concept of Performance Monitoring . the interactions between environmental parameters become more and more important. their product may not represent the true performance change in the equipment. In other words. Page 56 1. In fact. Some advantages of using the computer codes (model-based analysis) instead of performance or correction curves are listed below: • • • • Interaction of varying operating conditions can be modeled. Physically based models can allow wide variations (far from reference) in operating conditions. For example. but when correction factors get far from 1. In particular. if the gas turbine uses varying amounts of water injection or switches from natural gas to oil fuel. Computer models can handle wide variations in environmental parameters and operational modes for which curves do not exist or do not accurately model.

The actual surface areas of the tube bundles were obtained from vendor information and input into the computer model. Concept of Performance Monitoring . Test the model versus vendor guarantee data and/or plant-measured data over a wide range of operating conditions. The computer model in Figure 1-11 was constructed to replicate the actual steam/water flow path in an existing HRSG. Page 57 1. The procedure to build such a model is specific to the software used. 3. Run the model and obtain the expected equipment performance as a model output. The following figures illustrate the use of physically based computer code analysis for the example heat recovery steam generator used in the chapter on performance curves. Then the design-point heat transfer coefficient in each tube bank was adjusted so that the model prediction matches the rating specification for the HRSG.The methodology for model-based performance analysis is. 2. This resulted in a design point model of the HRSG. At each performance monitoring calculation interval input the measured equipment operating conditions into the model 4. 1. 5. Build a computer model of the equipment being monitored. Evaluate degradation by comparing the expected performance from the model to the measured performance. Correct the model where necessary.

the model also computes the complete temperature distributions within the HRSG. Figure 1-12 is a plot of these temperature distributions.gure 1-11 shows the output of the model when the reference operating conditions from Table 1-12 are input to the computer model. the predictions (off-design mode in GateCycle™) of the HRSG model were compared to vendor warrantee data over a range of operating conditions to verify model accuracy. and the verification process repeated until the predictions of the HRSG model matched the vendor data to within one percent over the entire operating range of the HRSG.Next. The resulting model can then be used to give predictions of the expected performance of the HRSG as operating conditions change. F-. In addition to predicting the rated steam flows. corrections were made to the design-point model. Concept of Performance Monitoring . Notice that the model predicts the rated steam flows to three digits of accuracy or better. Page 58 1. If necessary.

On the right hand side of the plot the gas exit (stack) temperature is 206 F. The closer the gas exit temperature is to the feedwater inlet temperature the higher the effectiveness of the HRSG. Concept of Performance Monitoring . the gas enters at a temperature of 1135 F. Page 59 1. while the inlet feedwater temperature is 136 F. and does not predict temperature distributions within a tube bundle.Figure 1-12 Temperature profile from GateCycle™ for the example HRSG at reference conditions The upper straight line in Figure 1-12 is the exhaust gas temperature as the gas goes from the HRSG inlet to the stack. Notice on the left hand side of the plot (at zero on the x-axis). There is one steam/water straight line for each tube bundle modeled in the HRSG. The computer code only predicts the inlet and outlet conditions for each tube bundle. A straight line is drawn from one predicted point to another. The lower set of straight lines is the corresponding steam/water temperature distribution. where the corresponding steam temperature is 1000 F.

Figure 1-13 Model-based prediction (from GateCycle™) of the HRSG performance at exhaust gas temperature equal to 1100 F. How do these compare to the curve-based method? Table 1-13 below compares the model-based results to the curvebased results for the situation where the exhaust gas temperature and flow change from 1135 F and 3200 klb/hr to 1100 F and 2800 klb/hr respectively.9 Page 60 1. Figure 1-13 shows the model-based prediction of HP steam flow and effectiveness. Table 1-13 Comparison of results between curve-based and modelbased methods for a change in HRSG inlet predicted Performance conditions after exhaust gas flow & temperature changeCurve-Based MethodModel Based Method HP Steam Flow (klb/hr) 420421HRSG Effectiveness (%)92. Interactions between the inputs can be predicted only if all changes in operating conditions are input to the model. all operating conditions are input to the model and the output accounts for changes in all the operating conditions at once. Concept of Performance Monitoring . and exhaust gas flow equal to 2800 Klb/hr Figure 1-13 shows the predicted HRSG performance when the exhaust gas inlet temperature and flow rate are changed to 1100 F and 2800 mmBtu/hr respectively. Notice that when using model-based analysis.892.

exhaust gas flow. and duct burner fuel flow all change from reference Now let's add a significant change in duct burner firing level.595. Figure 1-14 Predicted HRSG performance (from GateCycle™) when exhaust gas temperature. Changes in exhaust conditions of this size could be expected to occur as a result of ambient temperature changes on the order of 40 F. from zero at the reference conditions to the maximum possible for this HRSG (200 mmBtu/hr). the curve-based and the model-based methods yield approximated equal predicted performance values when exhaust gas temperature and flow change over a relatively narrow range.Thus.1 Page 61 1. Table 1-14 Comparison of results between curve-based and modelbased methods for high duct-burner firing situation Predicted Performance after exhaust gas flow & temperature & duct firing level all changeCurve-Based MethodModel Based MethodHP Steam Flow (klb/hr)612614HRSG Effectiveness (%)94. and once again compare the predictions of the curvebased method to the model based method. Concept of Performance Monitoring .

all of the differences in calculated results are due to the simplifying assumptions inherent in the curve-based method. the curve-based method is based upon the model. the curves for this example were calculated from the model. In other words. and is a simplification to the model that makes it possible to predict performance without needing to run the computer code.Notice that differences between the curve-based method and the model-based method begin to become important. Concept of Performance Monitoring . at least for effectiveness. Page 62 1. as the changes in operating conditions get larger. Since.