CALIFORNIA

GEOLOGY
A PUBLICATION OF THE.
DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION
DIVISION OF MINES AND GEOLOGY
Stal. 01 Calitomia PETE WILSON
Governor
The Resoo'Cfi Agency DOUGLAS P. WHEELER
Secrerary lor Resources
(lepanment 01 eonse",al.," eDWARD G. HEIDIG

In This Issue I
JAMESTOWN LEAF GOLD 63
GOLD - CALIFORNIA STATE MINERAL 66
THE GOLD BUG MINE 68
THE MINERAL INDUSTRY OF CALIFORNIA 74
LITERARY PROSPECTS 76
TEACHER FEATURE 80
PUBLICATIONS REQUEST FORM 81
CALIFORNIA GEOLOGY SUBSCRIPTION AND
CHANGE OF ADDRESS FORM 82
CALIFORNIA GEOLOGY
MAY/JUNE 1993
Volume 461Number 3
CGEOA 46 (3) 61·84 (1993)
l-leaoqual18rs:
80\ K Street.!zu, F""". MS 12-30
sacrarnenlo. CA 950814·3531
(916) 445·1825
Pybkillions a"" I"l"'mario<> Olha!
801 K StrOO1, 14th FIooI', MS 14-33
SaaarTll,lnlO. CA 95814·3532
(9IG) 44S,S716
South&rn Regoonal Ol1iat;
107 South Br03d",ay, Room lC165
Los Angelos. CAo 90012·4402
(213) 620·3560
881 Alea Revoonal OItice'
185 Berry SlrOOl, SUI1I13600. 3,d Fklo<
San F,ancI!!a>, CA 94107
(415) 904·7723
CALlFOflNIA GEQLOOY (ISSN 0026 4555) is publist>ed til·
monl!lly by It>e Department 01 Cot\s&rIIallOO. DiYlSlOtl o! Mines
_Geology. The Recotds 0fl1Ce is 3"0S9 Vine Strum, Suit..
103. SacramenlO. CA 9S814 5ecorId class;>ostago 15 al
sacramanlO. CA. POSlmaSler: Sand _'1155 change$IOCALI·
FORNIA GEOLOGV (USPS 35(840). Bo. 2980. Sacramento.
CA95812·2980
Repros conce,ning DMs>on 01 Mines and Geololl1 ptojeels,
and artidots and rKIWS ralale<l to 1he aarlh sciences irl
Calilomia. a'a inclUded In lha magaZJrKI. Cont'ibuted artidlts,
pIIoIographs. rKIWS items. ancl geologlcal mael'''Il aMOUnce·
mems ..... wek;ame.
THE CONCLUSIONS AND OPINIONS EXPRESSED IN
ARTICLES ARE SOlELV THOSE OF THE AUTHORS AND
ARE IoKIT NECESSARILY ENDORSED BV rHE DEPART·
MENT OF CONSERVATION.
should be _,essed 10: Editor.
CALIFORNIA GEOlOGV. 801 K Sl'....l. MS 14·33.
Sacramento. CA 9S814·3532
SubscriPIlons: 110.0011 y,. (6 issoos). 119.0012 y's 112 is·
sues): 528.0013 y's, \1 Bis&ues) Sand subScripIion orders and
cnanoe 01 atld'lI55 irlIoo-mal.", 10 CAliFORNIA GEOlOGY,
P O. Bo. 2980. S80'amerllo. CA 9S812·2980.
Technical Editors:
Copy Editor:
Art Oi/octor,
Publications Supervisor:
JAMES F. DAVIS
Stare Geologist
Elise Mattison
John Buman
Lena Tabllio
Peggy Walker
Jet! Tamben
For more infOlTll3tion on the Workshop and Expedition below, contact:
Dr. Dorothy L. Stout
Cypress College
9200 Valley View Slreet
Cypress, CA 90630
'8' (714) 826-2220 FAX (714) 527-8238
Email: dSlout@eis.calstate.edu
Cypress College
COMPUTER WORKSHOP
The National Science Foundation has awarded a grant to Cypress College
for a June 20 to July 7. 1993 workshop entitled Project Update Geoscience -
PUG. This highly intensive computer-aided learning workshop is for instruc-
tors of college-level introductory geosciences courses. It will include lectures.
tutorials. seminars, and hands-on laboratory exercises. In addition, there will
be a 3-day fiekltrip in the OvJens Valley to examine computer monitoring of
water flow. earthquakes. and volcanoes.
SEMINAR EXPEDITION
"Geology and Volcanology of the
Kamchatka Peninsula"
The National Association of Geology TeacheTS is offering this July 20 -
August 1, 1993 seminar expedition to Kamchatka Peninsula. This long-inac-
cessible area forms part of the Circum-Pacific Ring of Are. and is home to
over 200 spectacular volcanoes, about 30 of which are considered active.
Seminars and field trips to these volcanoes will be led by members of the
Volcanological Institute of Kamchatka.
Cover photo: Some or the Jameslown tear gold specimens. The
upper pan of the largest piece is speckled with tiny crystals of has·
Site, a Silver lellunde. Crystals prepared by Knstal/e, Laguna Beach,
California. Photo by Harold and Erica Van Pelt.
62 CALIFORNIA GEOLOGY MAY/JUNE 1993
JOHN L. BUANETI, Geologist
Division of MInes and Geology
On December 26. 1992. a large
pocket of gold was discovered at the
Crystalline-Alabama claim of the
Jamestown Mine. Tuolumne County.
Operated by the Sonora Mining Corpora-
tion. the Jamestown Mine is a consolida-
tion of several older mines that included
the Crystalline-Alabama claim as well as
the more famous Harvard Mine. Unlike
other large pockets of California gold. this
find. named the "Christmas Pocket.
M
is
unique because the gokl crystallized in the
form of bright. flattened ribbons ca1Ied
leaf gold. The ""'"'" '"'" "<lhtly "'""
or. and about 50 feet (15 m) bebN. the
ok! Alabama glory hole. which was mined
0Ye1 a hundred years ago. The entire
pocket has now been mined.
The gold \lIas mined from a fault zone
separating black graphitic slate from talc
sericite schist. The find included several
dozen pieces. The largest weighs over 73
troy pounds· (60 avoirdupois pounds or
27 kg) and measures approximately 22
by 13 inches (56 by 33 an) with an aver-
age thickness of 3 inches (8 em). This
piece has not yet been photographed.
Photos in this article show details of
some pieces that have been treated
chemically only to remove extraneous
vein material.
PhafOS in this article are by
Harold and Erica Van Pel!.
All gold specimens are from
fhe Jamestown Mine. They
were prepared by Kristal/e.
Laguna Beech, California. )
• The system of weights for preciOuS rnetM
soc:h as gold. silver. and platinum. One troy
pound (12 troy ounces or 373.2509 g)
equals 0.82286 a\lOirdupois pound. the
customary unit in lhe United States.
CALIFORNIA GEOLOGY MAYIJUNE 1993
"
(25-hectare) park provides a safe walk
through a real mine (F"lgure 2). In addition
to the tv.<> main adlts (GokI Bug and
Priest mines). the park has an 8-stamp
min used to reduce are to pc:y..vder and
a third, undeveloped adit, the Silver
Pine Mine
Big Canyon Creek, which formed
the central valley of the park. was !irst
prospected b-y Chilean miners in 1848.
The returns must have been worthwhile.
because the park has eighl adits and over
250 prospecting holes. Trenches were
dlJJ to locate additional quartz veins.
HISTORY
MINE
20
N r . '!' E

o
Foet
A Field Trip to an Underground Gold Mine
INTRODUCTION
Placerville, EI Dorado County
JOHN l. BURNETT, Geologist
Division of Mines and Geology
The expeTience of going through a real
mine cut into the bo.uels of the earth is one
that few win ever forget. Ught is uneven
and fiDe:! With shacIc:JI.l.'S. The walls glisten
IAlith groundwater. If the lights are turned
ofLtotal darkness-the kind of blackness
few of lIS have ever really known.
Hangtown's' GJld Bug Park has such a
mine from the 1860s (Agure 1). Over the
years the city has improved and enlarged
this display of hardrock gold mining, one of
""I'l,;f; the few left in northern California. With tv.<>
adits (horizontal passages into a hillside) and
a connecting Io'ertical shaft. the 61·acre
Ponal
Figure 2. lsometnc dra.....lng stlowlf'Ig the
Gold Bug and Priest mtnes. The lines
01 sectIOn are spaced Sleet (1.5 m)
apart. Orawmg by George Wheekbn
and As.socIales.
If Wasn't Beginner's Lucke by Carol Mathis.
68 CAUFQRNIA GEOlOGY MAY/JUNE 1993
'"
0
EL DORADO
~
COUNTY
.. .,.
0
.' •
q..#::
~
0>
o

0-
Placerville
Figure 1. Locallon map of Gok:! Bug Par1l.
49
0.5 Kilometer
0.25
N
~
o
I
o
The upper level. the Priest Mine. was
staned before the Gold Bug. which
worked the same quartz vein. This upper
level is an excellent example of an early
Records from this early period have
been lost to fire but VJe do know some-
thing of lhe Gold Bug's history, Mining
was probably started by William
Craddock and John Dench in 1888.
lbey named the mine the Hattie Mine
after Craddock's eldest daughter, 1he
claim was then sold to Thomas Bishop
and Frank Monaghan in 1902, In 1926
llle nexl owner. John McKay, renamed it
tile Gold Bug Mine and operated it until
World War n. when President Roosevelt
ordered all gold mines closed because
they were deemed non-essenlial.
Shaft
open to surface
Near the Gold Bugr'l by Corol Malhis,
CALIFORNIA GEOLOGY MAY JUNE 1993 69
The Mother Lode gold deposits of California rank
with a handful of others in the world as the most pro-
ductive. The total production of the Mother Lcde far
exceeds several billion dollars. Much of this gold was
produced when it sold for less than $30 per ounce.
Photo 1. POi1al of the Gold Bug Mine.
The Melones Fault Zone seems to
control the location of gold deposits and,
in this area, truly is the Mother Lode. The
surface of this fault can be seen in a near
vertical roadcut behind a group of stores
on Main Street across from Placerville's
City Hall. Here, vertical layers of sheared
talc schist and metamorphosed shale are
well exposed, With a little huntlng, you
can find a few small quartz veins in the
exposure.
THE MINE TOUR
HangtOWfl's wid Bug Mine Park is in
a pleasantly shaded valley \.\lith a stream
running through it. Stairs lead up a hill to
the entrance, or portal. of the wid Bug
Mine (photo 1). There sits an old ore cart
similar to the ones used in the mine
(photo 2). The steel doors and heavy
timbering were recently added for safety
areas where large masses of gokHlearing
rock were removed.
The quartz veins followed by the
mine workings dip steeply to
the east and parallel the
metamorphosed sand-
stone and shale layers.
The large, irregular open-
ings that extend above
the ceiling of the wid
Bug adit are stapes,
The wid Bug Mine is approximately
1,000 feet (305 m) east of the Melones
Fault Zone. the geologic name for the
Mother Lcde. The wid Bug and Priest
mine adits are in metamorphosed sand-
stone and shale of the Calaveras
Fonnation.
tabular and dip steeply to the northeast.
The mineralogy of the deposits is simple.
consisting mostly of white quartz rib-
boned with bands of slate or schist and
minor amounts of iron pyrite (fool's gold)
with pure gold (Dodge and Loyd, 1984).
The Mother Lode is a 1- to 4-mile- (2, to 6-km-) wide
system of mineralized rock and quartz veins that extends
from Mariposa County north to EJ Dorado County
(Clark. 1980). Some geologists extend this zone to
include related deposits in Placer. Nevada, and Sierra
counties north as far as l::>o\.vnieville. Productive quartz
veins are typical of the northern portion. while gold
deposits in large bodies of carbonate rock are more
common in the south. The veins and ore b<xlies are
Figure 3. Three adit
terms can be remem-
bered by visualizing a
'our-legged animal heading
toward the end of the passage-
way.
Near the caved entrance to the Silver Pine Mine is
the 8-stamp mill. The two sets of four stamps were
assembled from two 5-stamp mills and were probably
placed here in the 1920s or 19305. They are some of
thousands turned out by the Joshua Hendy [ron Works
in San Francisco. The stamps, a hopper, amalgam
plates. and a shaker table, all of which are being restored
to working order. are housed in a new structure.
GEOLOGY OF
THE MOTHER LODE AND
THE GOLD BUG MINE
185O's mine and the back, or ceiling,
shows tool marks left by hand picks
(Rgure 3). Priest Mine is so named
because of the Catholic priest sent by
the Archbishop of San Francisco to say
mass for the early miners.
70 CALIFORNIA GEOLOGY MAY/JUNE 1993
and security against vandals. Inside, the
ribs (as the walls are called) and back are
heavily timbered because thts is the zone
where the rock is most weathered and
therefore weakesl (Photo 3). The dark
metamorphosed schist in the mine is
exposed just outside the portal. beside
the ore cart. This hard. tough rock origi-
nated as soft mud and sand on the floor
of a PaleozoK: sea some 300 minion
years ago.
More than SO feet (ISO Tn) inlO the
mine the waDs are not timbered. so the
passage IAlidens. Stop for a few minutes
and adjust to the darkness. Look up at
the rock u.>aIls !ising above your head.
The large opening above you is a stope.
otice the white quartz eagerly folb.l..oed
by the miners because they thought it
might contain gokl. As you walk farther.
watch the exposuTes of this quartz vein.
C\earty the miners were following it to
wherever it might lead. Several other
Photo 2. eta cart at Gold Bug portal.
Photo 3. TImt>enng in the Gold Bug Ilear
the ponal.
stopes suggest that the miners' labor was
well rewarded. Sporadically along the left
rib there are sleel plates hekl in place by
large nuts and bolts. These are rock bolts
used to prevent the black schist from
collapsing into the adit. The bolts were
put into drill holes. anchored in the rock.
and secured with plate and nut.
A pneumatic drill Is 170 feel {52 m}
from the portal. positioned as it VoIOUId
have been for drilling holes for explo-
sives (Photo 4). Operated by compressed
piped-in air. this machine was a vast
improvement over the hand tools used
for many years in the Mother Lode. The
nWTlber of holes drilled in the IN'Orking
end of the adit (the face) depended on
the hardness of the rock. Each hole was
carefulJy Joaded with blasting poYJder or
dynamite and fuses. Cloth was gendy
packed into the remainder of the hole to
concentrate the force of the blast on the
rock. The man responsible for this most
important job was called the po..vder
man. He was among the most highly
respected of the mine crew because the
lives of the other miners depended on
his care and skill. It has been said that
there were no oklo careless powder men.
The adit turns to the left and aban-
dons the white quartz vein. VJhy the
change in direction? Possibly the gold
recovered so far was not up to expecta-
tions. or maybe the miners just thought
their luck woukl improve by striking off
in a new direction.
This part of the adit runs across the
structure of the rock and exposes some
other kinds of rock. Notice the white
rock in contact with the black schist. This
was a pure quartz sand on the floor of
the Paleozoic ocean and has now been
hardened and solidified by the heat and
pressure of metamorphism. In terms of
mineral content it is almost identical to
the white quartz vein foUoo.ved by the adit
behind you. but its origin is quite different.
The sandstone quartz accumulated on the
floor of an ancient ocean: the vein quartz
crystallized from hot igneous fluids.
Walk 20 feet (6 m) beyond the drill.
10 Stop 8 (designated by a reflector). and
look up. The back glistens I4'ith groundu:a-
ler. Under the moisrure. tiny stalactites of
caldte are beginning to fonn from the
lime in the groundwater solution. These
little cave ornaments did not start to form
CAlIFORNIA GEOlOGV MAV/JUNE 1993
Tour Information
• Tours are guided and a nominal fee
is charged. Tours can be arranged
for groups throughout the year.
• The mine lighting is subdued, so you
may want to bring a strong flashlight
to see details in the high stopes.
• The mine's numbered slops are
designated by reflectors. These stops
correspond to an audio cassette tour
available at the mine.
Photo 4. Pneumatic drill.
REFERENCES
until the arlit was dug. With a sharp eye
and a good light. you can see that many
other parts of the back are covered with
calcite.
unmineralized dead end. It is apparent
that no ore was found on the right
branch other than in the vertical stope
because there are no other slopes.
Clark, W.B., 1970. Gold districts 0' California:
Division of Mines and Geology Bulletin
193, 186 p.
Dodge. F,W" and Loyd, R.e.. 1984, Gold
deposils of the western Sierra Nevada:
Field Trip Guide: U.S. Geological Survey
Open File Report 84-169, 25 p.
Seven feet (2 m) beyond Stop 8. the
black schist and white metasandstone are
interfingered (Photo 5l. That is. bands of
schist and metasandstone penetrate one
another as when the fingers of two hands
interlace. These formed in an ocean basin
where white sand settled on black mud. In
the next 15 feet (5 m) of adil. thick layers
of schist and metasandstone alternate.
Can you lind a plane between these two
rock types? This plane. now tilted. origi-
nated on the level floor of the ocean.
The adil splits alter another 80 feet
(24 mI. The left branch of the adit
explores new ground for nearly 30 feet
(9 m) and then ends. The right branch
follows a second quartz vein-the same
one followed by the Priest Mine on the
level above. Look over your head. A verti-
cal stope rises 20 feet (6 ml. then turns
at a steep angle. continues 30 feet (9 ml.
and joins the adit above. The slope then
rises another 50 feet (15 m) and breaks
free to the surface. It is this combination
of venical shafts and stapes that provides
air circulation throughout the mine.
The branch follows the new group of
quartz veins for 55 feet (17m) to an Photo 5. Black schist and white metasandstone near Stop 8.
CALIFORNIA GEOLOGY MAY/JUNE 1993
HANGTOWN'S
Gold Bug Park
PIaceMIJe Parks and
Recreation Department
(916) 642-5232
Gold Bug Pari<. is off Bedford Avenue. less than
1 mile north of U.S. SO.
Houts
late March through April 30
Saturdays and Sundays. 10 am to 4 pm
May 1 through Labor Day
Daily, 10 am 10 4 pm
After Labor Day until md-October
Saturdays and Sundays, 10 am to 4 pm
On February 1. 1985. the Gold &9
Mine was placed on the Notional
Register of Historic Places.
Picnlc area near lhe Gold Bug Mme portal
E/ Dorado Rockerc by Carol Mathis.
}
, t
J .
Acatalog of the mining sketches in this article and other drawings by Mathis family artists is available from FRIDAY HOUSE.
941 Cottage Street, Placerville. CA 95667. (916)621-1661. $5.00 postage paid.
CALIFORNIA GEOLOGY MAY/JUNE 1993
73
The Mineral Industry of Califomia-1992
INTRODUCTION
Califomia "''as secorxl in the nation in
the value of nonfueJ minerals produced
dUring 1992, following Arizona. California
production was estimated at $2.47 billion.
dropping 2 percent from 1991 arx:l
accounUng for nearly 8 percent of the U.S.
total. California led the other 48 stales in
the production of boron minerals. port-
land cement. diatomite. calcined gypsum.
construction sand and gravel. rare earth
concentrates, natural scxllum sulfate. and
tungsten. Portland cement was the most
valuable commodity produced. loll()\.lJ(?(j by
construction sand and graveL gold. boron.
crushed slone. soda ash. and diatomite.
11le continued drop in gold and silver
prices led to declines in precious metal
exploration throughout the State. HO\.lr
ever. explorntion continued in the MOlher
Lode arca of the Sierra Nevada and the
desert region of southeastern California.
CASTLE MOUNTAIN MINE
On February 17. 1992. Castle Moun-
tain Mine poured lis first gok:I. This San
Bernardino County mine Is expected 10
prodoce 100,000 ounces of gold the first
year. increasing to 160,000 ounces in the
fourth year of production. The property
has the potential to operate at this level
until the year 2004. Castle Mountain ranks
fourth among the gold mines in California.
trailing the Mclaughlin Mine in Napa
County. the Mesquite Mine in Imperial
County. and the Jamestown Mine in
Tuolumne County.
Castle Mountain Mine is in what was
kJlo,.m as the Hart Distrkt. Discovered
in 1907. the Hart District experienced a
mining boom only to bust" by 1910,
after the high grade ore had played out.
Since then there ha...e been several unsuc-
cessful aflempts to reactivate gokl produc-
tion. During the 19205 and 19305 there
was major production of high grade clay
from hydrothermal alteration zones in and
around the gold deposits. The day was
used to produce high quality day products
such as toilets. sinks. and floor tile.
The Castle Mountains were again
prospected in the 1980s. but with the
ob;ective of finding large low-grade gold
deposits rather than high grade veins.
The most promising target was drilled
with good results. Surprisingly. six ore
JOHN BURNETT, Geologist
Division of Mines and Geology
bodies were located, three of which had
proven reserves of minable gold ore.
1he gold deJX)Sits are within a complex
rhyolite dome field intruded by rhyolite plugs
and cut by zones of broken day-rich rock.
Commercial day production came from
these common zones of altered silica and
clay. Silicified and mineralized arcuale frac-
tures suggest that the deposits lie near the
center of a small caldera. or collapsed vol-
cano. One deposit. buried by as much as
300 feet of gravel, was discovered by ge0-
logical interpretation (Under. 1989).
Viceroy Gold Corporation. the Castle
Mountain Mine operator. has been a leader
in establishing good environmental policies
to develop. operate. and close the mine
(Pirozzoli and Pompy. 1992).
SODA ASH
California has large reserves of soda
ash. a baslc raw material in the glass and
paper pulp industries. Recent techllOiogical
developments by the two largest soda ash
producers in California may result in impor-
tant increases in production.
Kerr-McGee Corporation sold the brine
deposits at dry Searles Lake, San
dino County. to the North American
Chemical Company. New solution mining
technology scheduled to be implemented in
1984 is expected to triple production to
1.800.000 tons per year.
At Qv.rens Lake in Inyo County.
Corninco American has been scraping
soda ash from the surface salt deposit at
the dry lake. A recent agreement with
Vulcan Chemicals of Binningham. Alabama
allows for advaoced mining equipment and
increase in capacity of this operation to
600.000 shan tons per year.
ASBESTOS
After 20 years of controversy. the Occu-
pational Safety and Heahh Administration
(OSHA) has ruled is insufficient evi-
dence to conclude that llQl1-asbestiform tre-
molite. anthophyllite and actillOlite (amphib-
oles) present a health risk similar in kind and
magnitude to that of their asbesliform coun-
terparts -
The crux of the flOfl-asbestifonn amphi-
bole issue has been the assumption that
all fonns of amphibole and chrysotile are
hannful. and the designation of a 3: 1 length
to width ratio for mineral fiber as the crite-
rion for this dassiHcation. Such definitions
have kept the issue in dispute since 1972.
when the first Asbestos Standard was issued
by OSHA. The issue was further compli-
cated by the Mining Enforcement and
Safety Administration (MESA), which pro-
posed to replace the word "asbestos" in the
existing legislation with the term
fiber: In 1984, OSHA acknowledged that
its asbestos definition was mineralogically
imprecise but it was not until this year that
there was a fonnal recognition that non-
asbestifonn materials are not health risks.
Although this is good news lor the
North American mining industry. it comes
too late to save the California tak industry
whose product contained a small percent-
age of tremolite. 1he closure of Calaveras
Asbestos Ltd. in Calaveras County late in
1987 left only one California asbestos
producer. KCAC. This San Benito County
operation is consklered the largest ore
deposit of this commodity in the \.VOrid.
covering 40 square miles to a depth of at
least 1.000 feet. It produces short fiber
chrysotile without asbestifonn amphibole
contamination and exports it to Asia for use
in asbestos cement.
1872 MINING LAW
The General Mining l...aw of 1872
W<lS passed to regulate mining on federol
lands. In recent years it has been criticized
by those who contend that its provisions
are outdated and contrary to the public
good.
The process of patenting is a very
controversial issue. Some see it as a "give-
away" because public land can pass into
private ownership for only a small fee
($2.50 to $5.00 an acre according to
Baca. 1991). However, the government
does not consider patenting unless discovery
and polenlial economic recovery of the
mineral resource have been proven. Analy-
sis of patenting costs shows they average
about $17.000 per acre {Blubaugh. 1992).
Critics also charge that the 1872 law
does not require payment 01 royalties 00
minerals extracted from public lands. Sup-
porters of the existing Act argue that law
refonn would result in a net Joss of state
revenue.
"
CALIfORNIA GEOLOGY MAY JUNE \993
Baca. Jim. 1991. 1872 Mining Law: TIme
lor retorm: Geolimes, v. 36. no. 11. p. 6.
Blubaugh. RoE" 1992, 1872 Mining law:
TIme lor clanlicalJOn and affirmation:
Geotlmes. v. 37. no. 4. p. 6.
REFERENCES
Under. Harold, 1989, Hart Minmg Dlstncl,
San Bernardino County. California: CALI·
FORNIA GEOlOGY. v. 42, no. 6. p. 134-
140,143.
Plrozzoh, L.A., and Pompy, J,S., Implement-
ing an award winning reclamation plan at
Castle Mountain Mme: CALIFORNIA
GEOLOGY, v. 45, no. 6, p. 182·186.
NONFUEL MINERAL PRODUCTION IN CALIFORNIA 11
1990 1991 1992el
MINERAL
QUANTITY VALUE QUANTITY VALUE QUANTITY VALUE
(Ihousands) (thousands) (thousands)
Boron minerals ............. thou. metric Ions 1,094 $436,176 1,240 $442.531 1,020 $332,720
Cement (portland) .......... thou. short tons 10.032 604,080 e18.702 e{522,12O 9.145 548,700
Clays 21.................................. metric tons 2,163.515 40,217 2.074,707 27.464 1,975.828 33.800
Gemslones .......................................... NA 1,501 NA 10.450 NA 10.119
Gold
3J
............... .................... kllograms 29,607 368.300 29,873 348,919 37,160 418,152
lime ........... ................... thou. shor1 tons 345 19.425 307 20,389 351 23,310
Mercury ................................. melrlc tons (41) ( 4 ~ ( 4 ~ 1 (41) 1
Pumice .............................................. 00. 71,739 5.068 61.237 4.372 W W
Rare-earth metal concenlrales .......... 00. W W 16,465 W 16,000 W
Sand and gravel:
Construe!lon ............ thou. short Ions 132,214 626,000 &1101.900 ef489.1OO 96.800 473.300
Industrial .................................... oo. 2,452 48.055 2,104 41,690 2.010 40.572
Silver
3J
................................. metric Ions 21 3.209 W W 15 1,929
Stone:
Crushed .. .............. thou. shor1lons e/42.5OO 200.600 45,816 216,156 41.200 200,200
Dimension .. ................... shor1 tons ef30.077 eJ5,213 44,757 5,254 23,292 4,148
Combmed value of asbeslos (1990·91):
bante (1990): calcium ChlOride (nalural
1990·1991). cement (masonry), clays
(Mer's earth), copper (1990,91): dialomile.
leldspar. gypsum (crude), iron ore (usable),
magnesium compounds. mica (crude 1991),
molybdenum, perlite. potash. sail.
soda ash, sodium sulfale (nalural),lalc
and pyrophyllite.titanium concentrates
(Ilmenite). tungslen ore concentrates.
and values indicated by symbol W.
XX 421,820 XX 403,592 XX 379,631
Total XX 2.779,684 XX 2,532,038 XX 2,466,582
ef. EstImated. NA • Not available W • Withheld to aVOid disclosing com·
XX • Not applICable pany proprietary data: value Included
Wllh ·comblned value"ligure.
1f. Production as measured by mme shipments, sales, or mar1<;etable PfoducllOn (including consumption by producers).
21. Excludes cer1ain clays: klnd and value Included With "Combllled value" data.
3/. Recoverable conlent 01 ores. elc.
4/ • Less than 1{2 Unit.
CALIFORNIA GEOLOGV MAY/JUNE 1993 75
Mines. Mining. and Mitlerals
MINES AND MINERAL DEPOSITS
OF SAN BERNARDINO COUNlY.
CAUFORNlA. By L.A. Wright. R.M.
Sl:ewart. T.E. Gay. Jr.. and G.C.
Hazenbush. 1991. California Prospecting
Co.. 7906 La Pabna, Buena Park. CA
90621.(7141761-1846 192 p. $32.50.
soft covet'.
A private reprinting of the 1953
report published by the Division of Mines.
this volume fills an important niche. The
original report has been out of print for
25 years and is only available through
libraries. The report gives a brief summaI)'
of each mineral deposit in lhe intensely
mineralized. largest county in lhe United
States.
The entire volume is reprinted includ-
ing the tabulated list of mines and mineral
deposits and a one-color map. The
text provides a summaI)' of the geology.
descriptions of the most significant metal
and non-metal mines and mineral dis-
tricts. and an exhaustive bibliography.
The book will be a \.vdcome addition to
the Iibral)' of anyone Interested in the
California desert.
MINERALOGY OF THE MOHAWK
MINE. SAN BERNARDINO COUN1Y.
CAUFORNIA. By William S. Wise. 1990,
Quarterly. v. 37. no. 1. San Bernardino
County Museum Association. 2024
Orange Tree Lane. Redlands. CA 92374.
(714) 798-8570.31 p. $12.78 including
shipping and tax. soft cover.
This publication is a geologic and
mineralogic descripdon of a mine INeSt
of Nipton that is a source for interesting
arsenates of line. copper. and lead. as
well as zinc-manganese oxides and various
carbonates Forty-three minerals. derived
through the oxidation of simple sulfKJe
ore minerals. are described in detail.
lhese and other varieties are in color
macropholographs and photomicro-
graphs.
STANDARDS FOR AGGREGATES.
By D.C. Pike. 1990. Prentice·HaD. Inc.
Order Processing Center. PO Box
11073. Des Moines. lA 50381·1073
(SIS) 284-6751 280 p. $9900. ham
"""'.
Aggregates Include a variety of materi·
aIs such as sand and gravel. crushed rock.
and processed waste products that can
be \.l:SC!d as substitutes for q.Janied rock
in construebOn, Because aggregates are
used in nearly aU engineering pro,eas.
they are indispensable. The annual
demand for aggregales in the United
Stales is about 7 Ions per person and
this demand is expected 10 remain fairly
"""""',
Aggregates must conform to specific
engineering standards lor optimum use.
They must be hard. strong. and durable
particles. The author divides aggregate
standards into four main categories: con·
crete, building mortars. bituminous mate-
rials. and unbound aggregates. Some
important aggregate standards pertain
10 grading. particle shape and texture.
specif)c gravity. absorption capacity. resis-
tance to freezing and thawing. resistance
to abrask>n and chemical reactivity. and
compressive strength. Review by Don
Dupras.
BlBUOGRAPHY FOR METAlliC MIN-
ERAL DISTRICTS IN APACHE.
COCONINO. AND NAVAJO COUN-
TIES. ARIZONA. OrOJlar 28. &j John
W Welty and William L ~ .
1989 Arirona Geological 50""". 845
N Park Avenue. #100. Tucson.A2
85719.(602) 882-4795. 47 p. $9.00.
plus $3.00 postage. soft cover.
For each of lhese three nonhem
Arizona counties. references are listed by
mining district. There are nearly 1.000
citations. This cirOJlar is the fifth and
last in a series of county-by-county bibli·
ographies for metallic mineral districts in
Arizona.
"
CAUfORNlA GEOlOGY MAY JUNE 1993
QUICKSILVER The Complete History
of Santa Clara County' s New Almaden
Mine. By Jimmie Schneider. 1992. New
Almaden Quicksilver County Park Asso-
ciation. P.O. Box 124. New Almaden.
CA 95842. (408) 268-6541. 178 p.
$29.23 plus $7.77 postage. hard cover.
This book depicts the fascinating his-
tory of the New Almaden. the United
States' largest quicksilver (mercury) mine.
The story encompasses the time from
the mine's discovery in 1848 by Andres
I
,I
Castillero, through its present situation
as one of Santa Clara County's largest
parks. It tells of the financial manipulation
and legal conflict: the growth, prosperity,
and decline of the deepest quicksilver
mine on earth: and the people who con-
ducted the business of the mine, worked
the mine, and pursued everyday life on
hill."
Quicksilver contains over 150 orig-
inal photographs, charts. and maps.
most of which have not been previously
published.
Group tours of the museum. town,
and mines can be arranged by calling
Kitty Monahan at (408) 268·6541.
HARD PLACES: Reading the Landscape
of America's Historic Mining Districts. By
Richard Francaviglia. 1991. University
of Iowa Press, Publications Order Depart-
ment. Oakdale Hall. Iowa City. 1A 52242.
(800) 235-2665. 237 p. $35.00. hard
rove,-
Visually and socially. mining areas are
"hard places." Francaviglia categorizes
the basic elements of the landscapes of
mining districts-the topography and
vegetation, the arrangement of streets
and property parcels. and architecture.
These visual clues help detennine the
major processes and forces that shaped
the landscapes.
Mines are often isolated initially. but
eventually settlements grow around the
mineralized area. With growth comes
diversity. and specialized mining and pro-
cessing communities develop in the min-
ing district. The percentage of miners in
the population decreases as providers of
services move in. What ultimately hap-
pens to the declining district depends
largely on perceptions. FrancavigJia ex-
plores America's "hard and how
they reveal our deeply hekl values and
attitudes toward land and life.
Petroleum Exploration
and Engineering
BIOLOGICAL MARKERS IN SEDI-
MENTS AND PETROLEUM. Edited by
J. Michael Moldowan. Pierre Albrecht.
and R. Paul Philp. 1992. Prentice-Hall,
Inc.. Order Processing Center, P.O. Box
11073, Des Moines. IA 50381-1073.
(515) 284-6751. 411 p.. $68.00. hard
cover.
This handbook presents new results
in biological marker research covering
biomarker organic chemistry. structure
identifications. and the effects of deposi-
tional environments on biomarker diagen-
esis. It will assist the reader in applied
and fundamental research in organic
chemistry as well as petroleum explora-
tion. Subjects include case histories for
petroleum basins. advances in geochemi-
cal processes. and the latest techniques
for biomarker analysis.
WELL PERFORMANCE. Second
edition. By Michael Golan and Curtis
H. Whitson. 1991. Prentice Hall. Inc..
Order Processing Center. P.O. Box
11073. Des Moines,lA 50381-1073.
1515) 284-6751. 669 p.. $74.00.
hard cover.
This book explores the engineering
operations involved in analyzing the pro-
duction behavior of oil and gas wells. The
effect of well size. reservoir data. and
operation conditions are discussed along
with practical techniques for hydraulic
design of wells. Well Performance
includes numerous examples of proce-
dures, productivity changes due to stimu'
lation treatments or reservoir depletion.
and applications of artiflciallift methods.
ASlronomy
CELESTIAL DEUGHTS: The Best Astro-
nomical Events through 2001. By Francis
Reddy and Greg Walz-Chojnacki. 1992.
Celestial Arts Publishing. P.O. Box 7123.
Berkeley. CA 94707. (BOO) 841·2665.
135 p. $16.95. soft cover.
Many people believe that exploring
the night sky requires lots of time. expen-
sive equipment. and perfect weather con-
ditions. but this book shows us how we
can en}oy the simple beauties of the sky
in much the same way our ancestors
did-with the unaided eye. Knowing that
the planets circle the sun is one thing.
but recognizing how that movement
expresses itself in the sky above us is
quite another. The reason that most of
us do not appreciate the heavens is sim-
ply that we have not taken the time to
look The ancients may not have under-
stood the sky as well as we do. but they
certainly knew it better. Yet we have the
advantage because the basic motions that
fascinated the ancients remain on display.
We have the opportunity to both know
and understand.
The introouction and eight other
chapters describe the motions of heavenly
bodies such as the moon. sun. planets.
and meteors. There are color photo-
graphs from satellites and large tele-
scopes. as well as many illustrations in-
cluding silhouettes of astronomical situ-
ations and the dates they are expected.
CALIFORNIA GEOLOGY MAY/JUNE t993 n
The appendix can only be described
as a datebook of future events. For
example:
- Nouember 3. 1995---SOuthern
Taurid meteor shower peaks tonight.
Moon interferes.
-June 11. 1999-Moon near SatUrll
this morning. Venus (4.3J reaches
greatest eastern elongation (45
G
).
This is its least greatest elongation in
the twentieth century. Mercury (·O.6)
emerges from the sun's glare and
enters euening twl/ight. Begin look-
ing for it below and to the right of
brilliant Venus. low In the west thirty
minutes after sunset. /t remains well
placed for the rest of the month.
Applied Enhanced Oil Reeouery will
be of special interest to field engineers
and personnel. investors. managers. 0\.VTl-
ers. and anyone involved in petroleum
production. energy supply. and environ-
mental issues.
SIERRA NORTH: 100 Back-Country
Trips. Sixth Edition. By Thomas Winnett.
Jason Winnett. and Lyn Haber. 1991.
Wilderness Press. 2440 Bancroft Way.
Berkeley, CA 94704. (800) 443·7227.
303 p. $14.95. soft cover.
This book describes 100 2-day 10
2-week back-country trips chosen by the
authors on the basis of scenic attraction,
wildemess character. and recreational
potential. It covers the Sierra Nevada
from Carson Pass SOlIth to Mono Creek.
The Sierra Nevada is the longest and
most extensively-trailed mountain range
in the United States with much of the
finest scenery and best fishing in the
back country. accessible only by foo.
According to Sierra North. when
Yosemite's Galen Clark (MOld Man of the
VaIIeyM) was asked how he ~ g o t about"
that famous valley he replied. MSIovJIy!M
lhat is the philosophy the authors have
adopted in this book. With only a lew
exceptions, trips are based on a leisurely
pace so the hiker can enjoy more of the
sights and smells of the country.
Celestial Delights is
a good choice for anyone
interested in developing an
appreciatkln of the stars and
planets.
APPUED ENHANCED
OIL RECOVERY. By Aurel
Carcoana. 1992. Prentice-
Hall. Inc.. Order Processing
Center. P.O. Box 10073.
Des Moines.]A 50381-1073.
1515) 284-6751. 292 p..
$64.00. hard cover.
The step-by-step progres-
sion of the complex problems
of oil displacement in porous
media using enhanced oil
recovery methods is presented
in this volume. Basic engineer-
ing conceptS. illustrations.
example cakulations. and
case histO!ies help the reader
understand the target. meth-
ods. and results, as well as
emphasize the importance
of the future of enhanced
oil recovery. This book
describes and illustrates meth-
ods. presents procedures for
thermal oil displacement using
steam and in-situ combustion.
explains petro-mining and
flocx:ling techniques. and
covers recent developments
in microorganism·enhanced
recovery.
Columnar ;OInting In a PleIstocene basalt Ilow, DeVilS Post
Pile NallOna! Monument. Madera County. CaUfarnla. Phoro
by Dale SrlC1<ney
The book points out that
while most people think of
Yosemite Valley as too
crOVJded, it is possible to
spend a week in the back
country of northern Yosemite
National Park and see no one.
Most of Yosemite is declared
wilderness area. One can take
advantage of that by following
some of the nearly 1.000 miles
of trails.
Readers are provided with
a day---by-.ooy account describ-
ing whal they will see and
I4'here to camp. For instance
when describing the Carson
Pass the authors state, M1he
Carson Pass area flanks the
first trans-Sierra highway
soulh of Lake Tahoe, As a
recreational area. it OOasts
many lakes off the highway
and a few beside the
highway...Some of the best
flower displays in the entire
Sierra grow alongside
the trails in this part of Sierra
Nor/h. such as the trails to
Scout Carson Lake and Show-
ers Lake." Or. regarding
camping near Carson Pass
they suggest, M... you could
spend the night before hiking
at Sorensen·s. Kit Carson
Lodge. Caples Lake Resort or
Kay's Sliver Lake Resort...•
78 CALIFORNIA GEOLOGY MAY/JUNE 1993
Rocks. trees. flowers. and animals are
given anention in this book. It includes a
41::oIor fold-out traiJhead map and states
which topographk: maps are needed
This latest edition contalflS hundreds
of updates and three new trips. Sierra
South. a compankxl vobne CCllJering the
southern Sierra is also available
DAYHIKER. By Robert 5 Wood 1991
Ten Speed Press. PO. Box 7123. Berke-
Ioy.CA94707(SOO)841·2665175p.
895. soft CoYer'
Dayhiking possibilities. from an exu-
berant five.minute jaunt on a lunch break
to an aD day trek In the wilderness. are
CO\.o'efed in this book. Dayhiking offers
something lor ~ t i o n . fit-
ness. increased energy. retief from stTess.
comnu\ion W\th nature. and a sense of
achie\lement. h is also free. safe. and fm.
Doyhlker describes basic types of
woIks _. half dayo. IuD dayo. rom·
brnations. extended tnps. and climbs. It
provides prac:ticaI information on how to
get the most from each type of walk
Other chapters cover the secrets of where
to go. what to take. trail manners. walking
technique. hiking with children. reading
the VJeather. and route finding. Special
features include eating for greater energy
and weight loss. and trailside first akl.
Volcanoes
VOLCANOES OF NORTH AMERICA,
United States and Canada. Edited by
Charles A. Wood and Jurgen Kienle.
1990. Cambridge University Press. 110
Midland Ave.. Port Chester. N.Y. 10573.
(914) 937·9600.354 p. $79.95 plus
$2.00 shipping. hard CoYer'.
This survey of all North American
~ active during the last 5 million
years is Ulustrated with numerous maps
and pho<_pN. The moq>hoJogy. ""'"
live history. hthoklgy. access routes. and
references for each of 262 vobnoes are
detailed by 81 expertS. For example. the
entry for Mount Shasta. California's most
prominent and. possibly. most important
\IlJk:ano. is:
Type: Stratouolcano
Lat.wng: 41.40"N. 122.18'W
Eleuotlon: 4.317 m
Eruptive HIstorv:
• Initiation of octllllty
059 Mo
Cone collapse and auo-
lancfle,03Ma
• Sargents Ridge Cone:
<0.25 Ma
• MIsery Hill Cone: <0 13 Ma
• $hastma Cone -9.500 vr BP
• Hot/urn Cone <9.500 yr BP
• JO or more additIOnal
Holocene eruptiOns
Composition: Silicic andesite to
dacite
A""""""" 0I1he """"","",t and
histay of Momt Shasta folcN.rs ~ , t h
aerial pho<""",pN (obloque and """""l.
and a topographic map.
This compilation is essential for v0ca-
tional and avocationall1lOll'ltain hunters
who want a solid reference on some of
the most excitmg peaks anywhere
Paleontology
AFTER THE ICE AGE. By E.C. Pieloo
1991 University of ChiCagO Press.
11030 South Langley Avenue. Chicago.
IL60628 (8001621·2736.366 p..
$13.95. sollcoYer'. $24 95. hard cover.
pM $3.00 "",!age.
Environmental transfonnations have
been greatest in northem North America.
umere ice sheets of the last ice age
formed an unbroken expanse covering
nearly aU of Canada and the northem tier
of the United States.
After the fee Age tells what happened
in this land betu!een the glacial maximlnl
20.000 years ago and now The environ-
ment changed as the ice melted and life
returned to the lifeless semk:ontinent
Mastodons. mammoths. sabertooth cats.
and giant short-faced bears were some of
the early inhabitants that became extinct.
replaced by grizzly and polar bears. cou-
gars. bighorn sheep. and other species
that still survive in what wUd land remains.
The author traces these lNeflts
through the fossil record and presents an
easily read stOfY of changes to the land.
its plants. and animals. Common names
are used throughout. but two appendices
list all terms used. by the common name
and the sdentifk: name. ExtensiYe notes
W\th references are induded for each
chapter and an index completes the c0l-
lection of loois that wiD be helpful for the
reader WIthout a technical background.
PLANT FOSSlLS IN GEOLOGK:AL
INVESTIGATION The Palaeozoic.
Edited by ChriSl:opher J. C1eal. 1991
Eiis Horwood Umited Distributed by
Prentice·HaD. Inc.. Order Processing Cen-
ter. PO Box II07l. DesMoines.1A
50336-1071 (515)284-6751 233p.
$7400. hard cover.
This book disct asses how terrestrial
plant macrofossils can assist in the paM»
geographical. biosrratigraphical. and pa-
IeoecdogK:aI analysis of Silurian to Per·
mian strata throughout the world. The
approach is to demonstrate the sort of
resolution that these fields can provide.
and in what types of sedimentaIy rocks
they can be used.
Space limitahons have restricted the
documentation included. but the refer-
ences will guide the reader 10 the litera-
ture where descriptions and iBustral)()l'lS of
the fossils can be found. The discussKln is
limited to large land plant fossils because
the study of marine fossils is more limited
in scope or requires complex laboratory
procedures. The author believes the mate·
rial presented w111 be of greatest value to
the field geologist.
Eustasy
EUSTASY: The Historical
Ups and DovJns of a Major Geological
Concept. Memoir 180. Edited by Robert
H. Doll. Jr. 1992. Geological Society
of America. Inc.. P.O. Box 9140. Boul-
der. CO 80301. (BOO) 472-1988. III p.
$4500. hard cover.
Eustasy. or woRfwXie change of sea
Ievel.. ts a significant and complex concept
thai had its historical beginnings m the
flood myths of ancient do.iJiz.ations The
nine chapters of thts book discuss the
history of eustasy. from the l&h century
Ideas of neptunism 10 the 20th centlA'y
thoo..ght of Chamberlin and Grabau. The
Idea of cyclothems and the modem per-
spective of seismic stratigraphy are aho
d""""",
CAlIFORNIA GEOlOGY MAY JUNE 1993
"
Teacher Feature
MIMNG AND MINERAL
RESOURCES GUIDE
When requesting in/ormation. use
school stationery.
ASSOCIATIONS
Bureau of Mines. Audiovisual Ubrary.
Cochrans Mill Road. P.O. Box 18070.
Pittsburgh, PA 15236. Rims and videos
(short-term. free-loan): free brochures and
publications: INTite lor free catalog.
Department of the Interior Office of
Public Affairs. Washington. IX 20240.
Motion pictures and video tapes dealing
with resources (short-tenn, free loan).
U.S. Geological Survey. Mary Orzech.
912 National Center. Reston. VA 22092.
FAX: (703) 648-6683. JEDI-An innova-
live approach to data sharing by scientists
and teachers.
American Coal Foundation. 918
Sixteenth Street. NW.. Washington, DC
20006. Brochures. publications.
American [ron Ore Association. 514
BuIkey Building, 1501 Euclid Avenue.
Cleveland, QH 44115. Brochures.
American Mining Congress. 1920 N
Street, NW, Sulle 300. Washington. DC
20036. (2021861-2800. Mining
Means to brochure free to
teachers.
California Mineral Education Founda-
tion. 9647 Folsom Boulevard. Suite 148.
Sacramento. CA 95827. (916) 362-9305
or (209) 223-0658. Education materials:
Earth Science Resource Guide; mineral
education conference for teachers.
California Mining Association. 1121
L Street. Suite 909. Sacramento. CA
95814. (916) 447-1977. Mine lour
infonnation. videos.
Lawrence Hall 01 Science. University
of California. Berkeley. CA 94720.
(415) 642-7771. GEMS. a series of activi-
ties for K-l 0 grade students.
Mineral Information Institute. Inc..
1121 17th Street, Suite 2070, Denver,
CO 80202. Curriculum materials: material
for students: career information; VJrite for
free list.
North American Association for Envi-
ronmental Education. P.O. Box 400.
Troy, OH 45373. (513) 339-6835.
Society of Mining, Metallurgy & Explo-
ration, Inc., P.O. Box 625002, UttJeton,
CO 80162-5002. Educational materials:
publications.
BOOKS AVAILABLE IN
THE PUBLIC LIBRARY
• Rocks and Minerals by Lou Williams.
• What is a Rock? by John Syrocki.
• A Golden Guide to Rocks and
Minerals by Herbert S. Zirn and
Paul R. Shaffer.
• Rocks and Minerals by ilia Podendorl.
• The Earth's Story by Gerald Ames
• Geology by Catherine E. Orr and Vere
de Vault.
80 CALIFORNIA GEOLOGY MAY/JUNE 1993




I DlVISION OF MINES AND GEOLOGY
I Publications Request Fonn
Number of copies
I SPECIAL PUBLICATIONS
I SP034 Geology of placer deposils. 1970......... . $5.00
I SP041 Basic placer mining. Reprinled 1970 $5.00
I SP086 Foolhill counties mining handbook. 1985...... . $6.00
SP087 Placer gold recove!)' methods. 1986..... . $5.00
I SP094 Minerals for indusl!)'. northern California volume II. summa!)'
I of geological survey of 1955-1961 ..$12.00
I SP095 .. .. .. ... $12.00
I SP098 Fluvial geomorphology and river·gravel mining: a guide for planners. case
studies included. 1990. . $8.00
SP103 Mines and mineral producers active in California (1988,1989). 1990 .. $10.00
GEOLOGIC MAPS OF CALIFORNIA (scale: 1:250.000). Olaf P. Jenkins edition. (REPRINTS).
GAMOO2 Bakersfield Sheet 1964 ... $7.00
GAM010 Needles Sheet. 1963 ... $7.00
GAM013 Sallon Sea Sheet 1967 ... $7.00
GAM015 San Oiego-EI Cenlro Sheel. 1962 .. . $7.00
GAM018 San Luis Obispo Sheet 1958 .. $7.00
GAM021 Santa Maria Sheet 1959 $7.00
GAM025 Ukiah Sheet. 1960 $7.00
teacher feature continued...
• Rocks and What They Tell Us by
Lester del Rey.
• Everybody Needs a Rock by Byrd
Baylor.
• A New True Book, Rocks & Minerals
by llla Podendorf.
• The Magic School Bus Inside the
Earth by Joanna Cole.
• How to Dig a Hole to the Other Side
of the World by Faith McNulty.
• Secrets in Stones by Rose Wyler and
Gerald Ames.
LENDING VIDEO LIBRARY
California Mining Association. 1121 L
Street. Suite 909. Sacramento. CA
95814.19161447-1977.
• All That Glitters-Using cyanide safely
in gold mining operations.
• Auoilability of Federal Minerals-U.S.
Bureau of Mines.
• Boron-Light Heavy-Weight
• Cillifomia Natural Resource Video
Tope series-Emphasizes valuable
resources on public lands.
• Common Ground: Modern Mining
and You
• Early Gold Mining Techniques in
Siskiyou County-Produced by fifth
grade students for California History
Day.
• Hardrack Showcase-Humboldt
National Forest
• Intro to Racks & Minerals
• Natural Recouery of Prince William
Sound
• Out of the Rock
• Poway Project
• Prosperity Is a State of Mines
• The Artie Notional Wildlife Refuge
• The Earth Beneath Us
• The Greenhouse Conspiracy
• The Pet Rock
• What Am I Worth?
and silver specimens and mining equip-
ment from Cerro Gordo and other mines
in the O-vens Valley region.
Empire Mine State Historic Park.
10791 E. Empire Street, Grass Valley.
CA. (916) 273-8522. Produced nearly
6 million ounces of gold. The park has
10 miles of hiking trails and a mine
with 367 miles of passagewaY'S. The
restored buildings include the owner's
cottage. clubhouse. blacksmith shop.
hoist house, and machine shop. Films.
tours, and lectures are offered daily.
Marshall Gold Discovery State
Historic Park, SR49, Coloma. CA.
(916) 622-3470. Includes Marshall's
1860 cabin. gold discovery site, replica
of Sutters mill. picnic facilities, visitor
center. and museum. Fishing is permitted.
CALIFORNIA GEOLOGY
_ Back Issue (specify volume and rnonlh).
OTHER
LiSI of Available PUblications
INDONESIAN SUBDUcnON
ZONE SUDE SET
This set of 25 slides illustrates
classic features of the Indonesian
subduction zone. It includes geologic
maps, Landsat views, Krakatau, an
advancing nuee ardente on Merapi
Volcano, the carved volcanic temple
of Borobudur on Java, Lake Toba on
Sumatra, and Batur Volcano on Bali.
Profits go to the National Association
of Geology Teachers (NAGl) Sum-
mer Field Scholarship Fund. For
more information, contact:
NAGT
P.O. Box 5443
Bellingham, WA 98227-5443
. $2.00
........................ Free
PLACES TO GO
California Stale Mining and Mineral
Museum. Highway 140. Mariposa. CA
95338. (209) 742-7625. Houses
California's mineral collection: great field
trip.
Eastern California Museum. 155
North Grant Street, Independence, CA
93526. (619) 878-2411. Contains gold
AMOUNT ENCLOSED (PrIce Includes postage and sales tax.) $ ........
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with an intarnational money order or draft payable In U.S. dollars and made out to DIVISION OF MINES
AND GEOLOGY. Send order to: DIVISION OF MINES AND GEOLOGY, P. O. Box 2980, SacramenlO.
CalifornIa 95812,2980.
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CAUFORNIA GEOLOGY MAY/JUNE 1993
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Teacher's Mineral Education Conference
August 18·20. 1993
The California Mineral Education Foundation will host its third Mineral Education Conference at California State
University. Sacramento (CSUSl, California. The CSUS Geology Department and the California Department of
ConS€lVation are cosponsors.
The conference is for teachers of K-12 and will include classes in geology. the history of mining and mining tech-
niques in California. environmental and reclamation issues. and the uses and value of minerals. Workshops provide
hands"On activities designed for classroom use.
Registration is $25.00 and includes a field trip to an operating mine. hand-outs. and some meals. For more infor-
mation. contact Barbara Stewart. (209) 223-0658 or:
California Mineral Education Foundation
9647 Folsom Blvd., Suite 148
Sacramento. CA 95827
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Reprints Available
(scale: 1:250,000)
OLAF P. JENKINS EDITION
The maps may be ordered on
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page 81.
GEOLOGIC MAP
OF CAUFORNIA
Bakerstield Sheet. 1993. Compiled by
Arthur A. Smith.. 1964.. $7.00
Needles Sheet 1993. Compiled by
Charles C. Bishop.. 1963.. $7.00
Sallon Sea Sheet. 1993. Compiled by
Charles w. Jennings.. 1967.. $7.00
San Diego-El Centro Sheet. 1993.
Compiled by Rudolph G. Strand..
1962.. $7.00
san luis Obispo Sheet. 1993. Com-
piled by Charles W. Jennings.
1958.. $7.00
santa Maria Sheet. 1993. Compiled
by Charles W. Jennings.. 1959.. $7.00
Ukiah SheeI..1993. Compiled by
Charles W. Jennings and Rudolph G.
Strand.. 1960.. $7.00
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(12 issues)
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A CHECK OR MONEY ORDER MUST ACCOMPANY THIS ORDER. All non·U.S. orders mUSl be paid
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82 CALIFORNIA GEOLOGY MAY/JUNE 1993
Inside the Priest by Carol Mothis
CAlIFORNIA GEOlOGY MAY.AJNE 1993
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