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London Fair DEALER Monday 11 April 2011 1
11 APRI L 2011
For round-the-clock London Book Fair coverage go to www.publishersweekly.com and www.bookbrunch.co.uk
P
alazzo has unveiled a major
study of Steven Spielberg,
to which the acclaimed
director will write a foreword.
Steven Spielberg: Te Man and
His Movies by Richard Schickel,
film critic and documentary-maker
and the author of 30+ books, is
“a definitive retrospective” and
will include images from the
DreamWorks archive. Publication
in autumn 2012 will coincide with
the release of Spielberg’s Lincoln.
Palazzo founder and MD Colin
Webb has already closed deals in
France, Germany, Sweden and
the US, where Sterling President
Marcus Leaver said: “I’m thrilled
that Sterling and Palazzo are
collaborating on yet another
sure-fire hit, the latest in a long
line of winners we have published
together. It’s a personal pleasure
to work with such good friends as
Colin and Pam as they celebrate
the tenth anniversary of Palazzo!”
Palazzo’s latest project, No
Direction Home, a director’s cut of
Robert Shelton’s classic Bob Dylan
biography – just out in Australia
to widespread praise – will be
celebrated at LBF tomorrow by
Omnibus Press. ■
S
peaking from three diverse
perspectives – film and TV,
the music business, and
publishing – the morning speakers
kicked off this year’s London Book
Fair Digital Conference with some
common observations: platform is
key, distribution will be a challenge,
but the digital numbers are finally
beginning to live up to the hype.
“2011 will be a tipping point,”
said the morning’s first speaker,
Michael Comish, from UK
video provider, Blinkbox. Citing
smartphones and tablets, Comish
said consumers were shifting from
a culture of “ownership” to one of
“access”, and they are now likely to
pay for content on their devices.
He stressed the benefits of offering
a mix of free and paid content.
Most digital businesses cannot
survive on ads alone, he noted.
But ad-supported free content is a
great way to underwrite “customer
acquisition”, and is also how
consumers come to know, like and
trust new products.
Paul Brindley, CEO of digital
music provider MusicAlly.com,
characterized the history of the
music business in one word:
resistance. But Brindley cited a
wave of innovative new digital
businesses and deals refocused
on providing music as a service.
Unlike the music business, which
was at the tip of the digital spear,
he suggested book publishers were
in an excellent position. Te timing
is great, he noted: the devices are
here, books are not easily “ripped,”
and the “unbundling” of books
is an opportunity for publishers.
In addition, digital adds new
value, such as the ability to take
a library on vacation, search, and
networking capabilities.
Bloomsbury’s Evan Schnittman
closed the morning keynotes
with a look at the surging US
ebook market, echoing some of
the opportunities and challenges
raised by Comish and Brindley.
A device may have jump-started
the market – the Kindle – but
the market is not device driven,
he stressed. Rather, platform
is the key. On that front, each
speaker alluded to the challenges
LBF Digital – the future is now
of distribution. Schnittman
suggested there loomed “a
tremendous channel problem,”
for publishers as the dominance
of the closed platforms from
Apple, and Amazon, is essentially
a tax on reaching your customers.
“Apple is not your friend,”
Comish earlier warned.
“Content is king, but not
forever, as distribution power
concentrates.” ■
Palazzo’s Close
Encounter
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The Rowman & Littlefield Publishing Group is one of the largest and fastest growing independent
publishers and distributors in North America & the U.K.
Its numerous imprints publish in virtually all fields in the humanities and social sciences, including
academic, reference, and general interest books.
For more information about The Rowman & Littlefield Publishing Group and all of our imprints,
visit www.rlpgbooks.com
The Rowman & Littlefield Publishing Group
Booth # i605
ALTAMIRA PRESS
BERNAN PRESS
IVAN R. DEE
JASON ARONSON
LEXINGTON BOOKS
ROWMAN & LITTLEFIELD
EDUCATION
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PUBLISHERS
THE SCARECROW PRESS
SHEED & WARD
TAYLOR TRADE
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Tel: 1-800-462-6420
Fax: 1-800-338-4550
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RLPG eBooks
A simultaneous release of all frontlist books in print and eBook editions
ROWMAN & LITTLEFIELD PUBLISHERS, INC.
2011, 280 PAGES
978-1-4422-0409-6 $34.95
£21.95 cloth
EBOOK
ROWMAN & LITTLEFIELD PUBLISHERS, INC.
JUNE 2011, 248 PAGES
978-1-4422-0479-9 $32.95
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EBOOK
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978-1-60590-717-8 $39.95
£24.95 cloth
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THE SCARECROW PRESS, INC.
2011, 494 PAGES
978-0-8108-7753-5 $35.00
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EBOOK
kind of fiction that Crown has
traditionally published”.
In the US, Hogarth will publish
between eight and 10 fiction titles
each year. In the UK, it will publish
a smaller list, made up entirely of
books that are also published by
Hogarth in the US. Te “sister
imprints”, as Random House is
calling them, will also collaborate
in developing promotional plans
for shared publications.
Among the lead titles on
Hogarth’s inaugural list in both
territories will be I Am Forbidden by
Anouk Markovits, originally acquired
by Crown’s Lindsay Sagnette from
Scott Moyers of the Wylie Agency. It
looks inside the world of the Satmar,
the most insular and fundamentalist
of Hasidic sects. Another is Te
Watch by Joydeep Roy-Bhattacharya,
acquired by Becky Hardie at Chatto
from Arabella Stein on behalf of
Nicole Aragi, in which an Afghan
woman demands the US military
returns her brother’s body. ■
T
wo divisions of Random
House that exist across the
pond from each other are
launching a fiction imprint that
will share a close but non-exclusive
editorial relationship. Te Crown
Publishing Group in the US and
Chatto & Windus, an imprint of
Vintage Publishing (Random House
UK), announced today (11 April)
the creation of Hogarth, which will
focus on “contemporary, voice-
driven, character-rich stories that
entertain, inform, and move readers”.
Molly Stern, Senior VP, Publisher
of Crown, will lead the imprint
in the US (Stern left Penguin for
Crown with a bit of drama last
summer). Clara Farmer, Publishing
Director, Chatto & Windus, will
lead the UK imprint. Hogarth,
named after Virginia and Leonard
Woolf’s Hogarth Press (founded in
1917), will release its first titles in
summer 2012. Stern said Hogarth’s
books “will be editorially distinct
from, and complementary to, the
Random House forms
US-UK imprint Hogarth
London Fair DEALER Monday 11 April 2011 3
P U B L I S H E R S W E E K L Y & B O O K B R U N C H L O N D O N F A I R D E A L E R
F A I R D E A L I N G S
To contact London Fair Dealer at the Fair
with your news, visit us at the Publishers
Weekly stand G445
London reporting for BookBrunch by
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Liz Thomson (liz@bookbrunch.co.uk)
London reporting for Publishers Weekly by
Andrew Albanese (AAlbanese@publishersweekly.com)
Rachel Deahl (rdeahl@publishersweekly.com)
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President: George Slowik Jr
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Advertising: Joseph Murray (jmurray@publishersweekly.com) and Fiona Valpy
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Layout and Production: Heather Brown
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To subscribe to Publishers Weekly, go to PublishersWeekly.com or
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London Fair Dealer produced by Jelly Fish Print Solutions 01489 897373
BookBrunch has entered into a
partnership with BDS, which has
taken a stake in the news service.
BDS will provide IT expertise,
support and development through
its Ehaus web development
subsidiary, and BookBrunch will
complement BDS’s information
services, including its Books
& Media reviews website and
newsletter.
BookBrunch, run by former
Publishing News Editor Liz
Thomson and ex-Bookseller Editor
Nicholas Clee, began publishing
before the 2008 Frankfurt Book
Fair. Since then, it has built an
archive of nearly 9,000 items of
book industry news. It has also
partnered with Publishers Weekly
to publish the London Fair Dealer
and Frankfurt Fair Dealer. It offers
a premium subscription service
and a free newsletter, which
goes to more than 5,000 industry
professionals each day.
BDS provides book and home
entertainment data to libraries and
retailers. Director Eric Green said:
“The book industry knowledge that
Liz and Nick have really informs the
quality that BookBrunch delivers –
it’s newsy, timely and value-adding
and many of us at BDS have always
loved reading the daily newsletter.
With our expanding portfolio of
businesses and customers, we
really understand and appreciate
how vital it is to keep up-to-date
with industry developments and
news – from bibliographic data
to the latest reviews that you can
access through our fledgling service
Books & Media.
“Making an investment in
BookBrunch is a natural fit for
us not only because we’re in
the information business but
also because we can offer the
technical expertise through one of
our subsidiaries, Ehaus, that will
allow for all the exciting technical
developments that BookBrunch
is ready to make. We’re really
excited about this addition to the
BDS suite of services and can’t
wait to start working with the
BookBrunch duo.”
For BookBrunch, the
partnership marks the next stage
in its development, enabling it
to deliver its news more quickly
and efficiently, and promising to
enhance its offering in partnership
with BDS’s entertainment, film
and reviews services. In a joint
statement, Thomson and Clee
said: “We are delighted that BDS
has chosen to put its faith in us
– their expertise will allow us to
develop BookBrunch at a much
faster pace than was possible
on our own and their investment
gives us solidity and security.” ■
BDS takes stake in BookBrunch
Alistair Burtenshaw, Group Exhibition
Director at the London Book Fair, is
moving up to a new role as Director
of Publishing and Books at Reed
Exhibitions. He will continue to
lead the LBF team, but will also be
responsible for BookExpo America,
Bienal de Livro Sao Paulo, the Tokyo
International Book Fair and e-book
Japan, and Salon du Livre, Paris.
Burtenshaw’s brief is “to identify
opportunities and synergies created not
only through technological advances
but also a commonality of aim and
interests among our global client base”.
Publishing is one of three new groups within Reed Exhibitions, the
others being Pop Culture, and Audiovisual Content & Music.
International role for Burtenshaw
how its investments, influence and
large-scale migration are impacting
at local and regional level.
Foundry Literary + Media
Carol Rifka Brunt has the debut
Tell the Wolves I’m Home (Dial Press),
about an awkward 13-year-old whose
life is thrown into a tailspin after her
uncle, a famous painter, dies. From
Grant Morrison comes Supergods:
Our World in the Age of the Superhero
(Random/Spiegel & Grau), in which
the onetime author of Batman and
Superman looks at what superhero
comics are trying to tell us.
Gernert Company
Gernert is offering Stewart O’Nan’s
Te Odds (Viking, February 2012),
about a couple who go to Niagara
Falls in hopes of salvaging their
marriage. Among non-fiction is
Tim Crothers’ Te Queen of Katwe,
about a chess prodigy from Uganda
who made it to the 2010 Chess
Olympiad.
ICM (handled by Curtis Brown)
Charles Frazier’s Nightwoods
(Random House, October) is set in
a North Carolina town during the
1950s where a woman is saddled
with troubled twins after the murder
of her sister. Tomas L Friedman
and Michael Mandelbaum’s Tat
Used to Be Us (FSG, September)
is an examination of the four
critical challenges America faces.
And Naomi Klein looks at climate
change in Te Message (Picador).
Inkwell Management
In Rin Tin Tin: Te Life and the
Legend (S&S, October.), Susan
Orlean looks at the life of the titular
German shepherd. Dava Sobel has A
More Perfect Heaven (Walker Books,
October), which examines the life
and work of Nicolaus Copernicus.
Janklow & Nesbit UK
Dr Kevin Fong draws on his own
experiences in trauma surgery to offer
an account of the way cutting-edge
medicine is pushing the envelope
of human survival – Extremes. UK,
Hodder; US, Penguin Press.
Curtis Brown/Gelfmann
Schneider
Chris Bohjalian has Te Night
Strangers (Crown, October), a
ghost story from the author of Te
Double Bind. From Einstein’s Dreams
author Alan Lightman comes Mr
G (Pantheon, 2012), the story of
creation from God’s point of view.
Darley Anderson Associates
Anne Cameron’s Angus McFangus:
Storm Prophet is the first in a series
for 9-12 year-olds about a boy
who can predict the weather. US
and Canada, Greenwillow Books/
HarperCollins.
DeFiore and Company
Dr Brandy Dunn and David
Rensin have Te Men on My
Couch: True Stories of Love, Sex, and
Psychotherapy (Berkley, 2013). From
Sophia Fraioli and Lauren Kaelin
is When Parents Text, culled from the
authors’ popular blog.
Diane Banks Associates
John Periam. Brian Cox and
Jeff Forshaw’s new book is Te
Quantum Universe. UK, Penguin;
US, Da Capo. Joanna Tong’s
Dragon Leadership argues that we
need a more holistic approach to
business and bases this in Eastern
philosophy.
Dystel & Goderich
D&G has John Locke’s self-
published Donovan Creed series;
the first six e-books have sold more
than 500,000 copies. From Pamela
Constable there’s Playing with
Fire (Random House, August),
“a sweeping account of modern
Pakistan.”
Ed Victor Ltd
A new series from Eoin Colfer,
WARP - “Die Hard with fairies”.
UK/Commonwealth, Puffi n. Edna
O’Brien’s autobiography Country
Girl takes us to the heart of 20th
century literary history. UK, Faber;
US, Little, Brown.
Felicity Bryan Associates
China’s Silent Conquest by Juan
Pablo Cardenal and Heriberto
Araujo examines how China is
conquering the rest of the world and
Conville & Walsh
Flight by John Heminway
tells the story of Anne Spoerry
who arrived in Kenya from
Ravensbruck and spent 35 years
flying into remote areas of East
Africa, saving thousands of lives.
On her death was found a War
Crimes’ tribunal ruling exiling her
from France and Switzerland for
war crimes...
Curtis Brown
In Te Revolution Will Be Digitised,
Heather Brooke reports from
the front lines of the Information
War, a shadowy world of hackers,
to explore how the internet
is transforming politics. UK,
Heinemann.
4 London Fair DEALER Monday 11 April 2011
P U B L I S H E R S W E E K L Y & B O O K B R U N C H L O N D O N F A I R D E A L E R
F A I R D E A L I N G S
Baror International
Attorney and debut novelist Corban
Addison has A Walk Across the Sun
(Quercus, 2012). Christopher
Hitchens’ Malady and Mortality
(Twelve, spring 2012) is about the
author’s battle with cancer and
grappling with mortality (expanded
from his columns for Vanity Fair).
Blake Friedmann
Te Cannibal Spirit is a debut
novel by Harry Whitehead, based
on a true story of the trial on
charges of cannibalism of George
Hunt, shaman and chieftain
among his people and assistant to
anthropologist Franz Boas - “the
Canadian Heart of Darkness”.
Canada, Hamish Hamilton.
Continued on page 6 ➝
Briefcase: LFD checks out some of the goodies
agents and publishers will be unpacking
Julia Donaldson and Axel Scheffler will be Wednesday’s
Authors of the Day, engaging with events around the Fair.
Meanwhile, we are delighted to bring you a Scheffler
exclusive, drawn specially for LFD to raise money for charity.
An anonymous bidder paid £1,250 for this unique Gruffalo
drawing – the money goes to the National Literacy Trust.
Visting Earls Court with the Gruffalo are Pip and Posy, stars
of The Super Scooter and The Little Puddle (Nosy Crow).
The Gruffalo is published in the UK by Macmillan
MEDlTATlCl Cl THE lATUkE CF MllD
The Dalai Lama
Khonton Pelior Lhundrub
José Ignacio Cabezón
ISBN 9780861716289 ¦ 232 pages ¦ $16.95 ¦ £12.99
Distributed by PGUK Visit us at i205
WISDOM PUBLICATIONS
\ISDOM SHOUID BE SHARED
L O N D O N F A I R D E A L E R
Get Complete.
Digital Conversion
.
Digital Distribution
Digital Print
.
Digital Payment
.
Digital Reporting
Digital Discovery
.
Digital Education
 
www.constellationdigital.com | Booth W715 in the Digital Zone
(Ecco), about a painting passed
through three generations of women.
Sanford J Greenburger
Associates
From Mike Cooper, Clawback
(Viking, April 2012) is a thriller
about a corporate fixer investigating
a string of Wall Street murders.
And Guns N’ Roses bassist Duff
McKagan is out with his memoir,
It’s So Easy (And Other Lies)
(S&S, October).
Sterling Lord Literistic
From Dennis Cooper, Te Marbled
Swarm (HarperCollins, July) is a
story narrated by a cannibal on the
hunt for food. In Ron Hansen’s
A Wild Surge of Guilty Passion
(Scribner, June), a woman in a
loveless marriage coaxes her lover to
kill her husband. Ten there’s Jay
Kang’s “hipster noir,” Te Dead Do
Not Improve (Crown, fall 2012).
Trident Media Group
Former Google chairman Eric
Schmidt and Jared Cohen have a
book on the politicization of the
Internet, Empire of the Mind. Ten
there’s Russell Banks novel Lost
Memory of Skin (Ecco, October)
about a character simply called “Te
Kid” who is trapped in “a strangely
modern-day version of limbo.”
United Agents
John Boyne’s Te Absolutist examines
the events of the Great War from the
perspective of two confused young
privates struggling with complex
emotions. UK, Transworld; Germany,
Arche Atrium; Netherlands, Arena.
From Michael Brooks comes Free
Radicals: Te Secret Anarchy of Science
which explores some of the greatest
breakthroughs and the lengths some
scientists go to in order to make their
theories public.
A P Watt
Untold Story by Monica Ali takes
the life of Princess Diana, imagining
a future and examining the past.
UK, Transworld; US, Scribner.
Heaven on Earth by Sadakat Kadri
takes readers on “A Journey Trough
Sharia Law”. UK, Bodley Head; US,
Farrar, Straus & Giroux.
William Morris Endeavor
Matthew Pearl is out with Te
Janklow & Nesbit US
From Pulitzer Prize-winner Jeffrey
Eugenides comes the long-awaited
novel Te Marriage Plot (FSG,
September.), about a college love
triangle during the 1980s. Jane
Fonda talks about aging gracefully in
Prime Time: Creating a Great Tird
Act (Random House, September).
Jane Rotrosen
Bestseller Tess Gerritsen has her
ninth entry in her Rizzoli and
Isles mystery series, Te Silent
Girl (Ballantine, July). Joseph
Monninger has Te World As We
Know It (Gallery, October), about a
couple separated after a tragedy on
their wedding night.
Jean V Naggar Literary Agency
In Finding the Sun (Da Capo, summer
2012) journalist Mark Anderson
explores the journey three men took in
1769 tracking an event that occurs every
120 years: the passing of Venus across the
Sun. In I, Isabella of Castille (Ballantine,
summer 2012) C W Gortner explores
the life of the Spanish monarch who sent
Columbus to America.
Pollinger Limited
Jeremy Poolman’s Te First and
the Last - the true story of the first
and last British casualties of WWI,
two men who died within a few
hundred metres of each other on the
Western front and who lie opposite
each other in a cemetery in southern
Belgium. UK, S&S.
Rogers Coleridge & White
Something More Tan Love: A True
Story from the Gulag by Orlando
Figes is a love story based on an
archive of letters smuggled in and
out of one of Stalin’s most notorious
labour camps. UK, Penguin; US,
Metropolitan/Holt. On behalf of the
Melanie Jackson Literary Agency:
Te Kid by Sapphire, performance
poet and author of Push which was
adapted into the Academy Award-
winning film Precious. UK, Penguin
Press; France, Editions de l’Olivier.
Sandra Dijkstra Agency
Te agency is pushing Lisa See’s
Dreams of Joy (Random House,
June), which continues the story
of the mother-daughter pair from
Shanghai Girls, Pearl and Joy. Amy
Tan has Te Valley of Amazement
6 London Fair DEALER Monday 11 April 2011
F A I R D E A L I N G S
Continued from page 4
Briefcase....
Continued on page 8 ➝
P
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D
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N
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PARIS COOKBOOK FAIR
March 2012
T
rade m
eets pleasure
GOURMAND
International
Edouard Cointreau - CEO
ecointreau@gourmandbooks.com
www.cookbookfair.com
Meet us at the London Book Fair
LBF / Gourmand Cookbook Corner
Earls Court 2- Z305
Bantam Press
Te Autobiography of Jack the Ripper
by Jack Carnac is an unearthed
manuscript by someone claiming to
have been Jack (January 2012, world
rights, agent Robert Smith).
Bloomsbury
Suzanne Joinson’s debut novel A
Lady Cyclist’s Guide to Kashgar is
set in the present and in the Gobi
desert in the 1920s (world).
Collins
Collins will bring Wonders of the
Universe, the tie-in to Brian Cox’s TV
series, to the Fair (rights sold in the
Netherlands, Hungary and Korea).
Cornerstone
Spills and Spin: Te Inside Story of BP
is Tom Bergin’s “revelatory account
of a corporation in crisis” (Random
House Business Books, world).
Ebury
Lord (Maurice) Saatchi presents
simple concepts that have had
radical effects in Brutal Simplicity of
Tought (Ebury, world).
Granta
Barbara Demick offers Logavina
Street: Life and Death in a Sarajevo
Neighbourhood, a new edition of her
account of living in Sarajevo during
with “charm and humour”, Evan as he
arrives in San Francisco from Dublin
in 1994 (world English).
Portobello
Carmen Aguirre’s Something
Fierce: A Memoir of a Revolutionary
Daughter is a memoir of being
brought up as a revolutionary
(Portobello has translation rights
with Douglas & McIntyre).
Profile
Te next title in the hugely
successful New Scientist series will be
the first to be illustrated: Why Are
Orangutans Orange?, including 80
colour photographs (world).
Quercus
Te new novel from Stef Penney
is Te Invisible Ones, about a gypsy
family dogged by misfortune (world,
rights sold in Brazil, Finland, Italy,
the Netherlands, Norway, Poland,
Sweden, US and Canada).
Serpent’s Tail
Far South by David Enrique
Spellman is “a multi-platform
experiment in the possibilities of
digitised fiction as well as a compelling
bookwork on paper” (world).
Simon & Schuster
Covenant is the first in a series
of high-concept, high-octane
archaeological thrillers by Dean
Crawford (world).
Viking
Celestial Mechanics by Tom
Bullough tells the story of a young
boy following his obsession with
astronomy (world, rights sold in
France, Israel, Italy, Serbia, agent Clare
Alexander at Aitken Alexander).
the siege of 1992-1996 (world).
Harper NonFiction
Jermaine Jackson offers a candid
portrait of his brother in You Are
Not Alone: Michael, Trough a
Brother’s Eyes (world).
Hodder & Stoughton
From Sceptre, Te Marlowe Papers
by Ros Barber is a novel in verse
about Christopher Marlowe (world).
Michael Joseph
St John “Singe” Greene tells the
story of his dying wife’s bequest in
Mum’s List (world).
Frances Lincoln
Helena Attlee’s Great Gardens of
Britain surveys 25 gardens, from
classic to modern, with photographs
by Alex Ramsay (world exc German
and Danish).
Little, Brown
Judy Finnigan makes her fiction
debut with Eloise (Sphere, world).
Macmillan
Te winner of the New Blood
Dagger in 2010, Ryan David Jahn
has a noir thriller, Te Dispatcher
(world, rights sold in the US,
Germany, France, Taiwan).
Octopus
Allegra McEvedy, co-founder of
Leon, offers “her most personal
book to date”, Bought, Borrowed and
Stolen (Conran Octopus, world).
Pan
Te Playdate by Louise Millar is a
chilling psychological thriller, sold to
publishers in the US, the Netherlands,
France, Germany, and Spain.
Picador
Te Tenderloin by John Butler follows,
Technologists (Random House), a
thriller set in the 19th century that
follows a group of MIT students.
David Finch’s memoir, Te Journal
of Best Practices (Scribner) grew
out of a New York Times “Modern
Love” column in which the author
chronicles his marital strife tied to
a late-in-life diagnosis of Asperger’s
syndrome.
Writers House
WH has Michael Lewis’s Boomerang
(Norton, September), a follow-up
to his bestseller about the financial
crisis, Te Big Short. In fiction
is international bestseller Ken
Follett’s Fall of Giants, as well as
the forthcoming Winter of the World
(Septeber 2012).
The Wylie Agency
George Packer looks at diplomat
Richard Holbrooke in Richard
Holbrooke and the American Eclipse.
Olivia Harrison and Mark Holborn
deliver George Harrison: Living in the
Material World, which will feature
everything from photos to objects
from the musician’s life. Wylie also
has Martin Amis’s latest, Lionel Asbo:
State of England (Knopf ).
8 London Fair DEALER Monday 11 April 2011
L O N D O N F A I R D E A L E R
F A I R D E A L I N G S
Get Future
Proof.
Fall 2008:
Spring 2009:
Fall 2009:
Spring 2010:
Fall 2010:
Spring 2011:
11 Partners
17 Partners
19 Partners
20 Partners
21 Partners
29 Partners
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Anne Spoerry in Kenya - her story is told by
John Heminway (Conville & Walsh)
Continued from page 6
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Content Services
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· Editorial and design services ÷
managed in the U.S.
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· Ìn-house digital and offset printing
services ÷ matched to your budget
and quantities
· Soft and hard cover, spiral and
saddle-stitched bindings
· CD/DVD duplication
Distribution
Promoting Titles, Enhancing Sales
· Domestic and global multichannel sales
· Marketing and public relations services
· Direct-to-consumer support
Dennis Ciccone, CEO,
Carnegie Learning, Inc.
Visit our booth at the
London Book Fair:
Earl’s Court 1,
G405
WWW.BOOKMASTERS.COM
001.419.281.5100
¨BookMasters is a trusted and
dependable partner that has played
an important part in tripling our
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and concentration of the population
– but it will be easier to make a
living servicing the 100,000 people
of Cambridge than the 3.5m spread
across metropolitan Birmingham.
Te independent store that
knows its customers, and has the
right pitch in the right town, can
survive. Tis is not an opportunity
to get rich, however; independent
booksellers will have to adapt
their offer, and not be precious
about the route they take, or the
diversification they embrace.
Tey’ll need an online presence,
and a willingness to mix new and
second-hand books, and other
product categories.
In his recent address to the
Association of American Publishers
(AAP), Barnes & Noble (B&N)
chairman Len Riggio painted an
uplifting picture of a future in
which bestselling mass market titles
had transferred substantially from
physical to digital formats, causing
the mass merchants (supermarkets)
to scale back their space and
commitment to books. Although
supermarket space is flexible (it
would increase at Christmas), the
limiting of this channel would be
good news for specialist bookstores.
I believe that there are significant
opportunities to sell more physical
books out of non-traditional outlets.
Stores such as Urban Outfitters/
Anthropologie, Conran Shop and
the Royal Horticultural Society sell
fluid ranges of the titles that their
customers will want to buy this
season, at a full mark-up. Tere
is an opportunity for many more
non-book retailers to participate in
this space, selling desirable, giftable
Philip
Downer
entertainment categories that
barely existed when recorded
music was at its peak.
Te book trade has a better
opportunity to predict and shape
its market evolution, and to plan
accordingly. Various individual
entities – publishers, Nielsen,
B&N, Amazon, Apple etc – have
some insight into the behaviour of
download purchasers, but there is
insuffi cient objective data in the
public domain, and no consensus
at this time on the shape of
the download market, and the
behaviour of customers.
Te range of challenges within
epublishing is huge – pricing;
formats; copyright control
and piracy (particularly in the
growth economies); “traditional”
publishing vs self-publishing
(the wave of stories about self-
published Kindle millionaires has
a whiff of dotcom bubble about
it); marketing and the “browsing
experience”; and the power and
wealth of Apple, Google etc.
Nevertheless, bookselling has
reinvented itself many times
over recent decades – chains and
superstores may, like book clubs,
have had their day in the sun.
Te reinvention will continue.
Publishing in the new world will
be radically different – the changes
will be greater and more global than
those created by (say) the growth
of paperbacks, the amalgamation
of houses, or by the end of price
maintenance. Redefining the nature
of the book redefines the roles of
both bookseller and publisher. I
firmly believe that however future
developments work out, there is a
crucial role for both. Enjoy the Fair!
1
Institute of Direct Marketing research:
www.theidm.com
2
Business Insider, 18 February 2011: Te
REAL Death of the Music Industry:
www.businessinsider.com
Philip Downer is a retailer and consultant,
and the owner of CBT Trading Ltd.
Formerly CEO of Borders UK, he blogs on
the book trade and general retail at
http://frontofstore.wordpress.com ■
books (with content least susceptible
to digitisation) at full margin to
customers who are seeking to
accessorise their homes and lives.
Similarly, while the range of
children’s apps and content streams
will continue to multiply, there is
an untapped opportunity to create
browsable children’s book offers –
whether in focused, book-led stores,
or as part of a broader kids offer.
Online sales of physical books
will continue to grow. Recent
research
1
indicated that Amazon has
about 80% of the UK’s online book
sales – but no one can seriously
participate in the book market
without having an online solution.
I would recommend avoiding the
obvious frontlist-led offer in favour
of a more distinctive editorial voice
– but I recognise the cost of this
commitment, and would advise
booksellers to keep their online offer
as simple and focused as possible.
At this early stage in the
development of ebooks, we are
shooting in the dark as we try to
identify the ultimate size of the
market, and to understand the
channels those “books” will be
sold through.
Te music market is much
further along this cycle than
bookselling. Te parallels are far
from absolute – books are used in
many different ways, and come in
many different formats, whereas
music is simply sound; fidelity
vs portability. In the US, the
paid-for recorded music market
(including downloads) has shrunk
dramatically, from $73 spend per
head in 2000 to $26 per head in
2009 (at constant pricing)
2
. Record
shops are on their last legs globally.
Te music business imploded in
slow-motion across a decade, with
plenty of mis-steps and no prior
experience to draw upon. Where
has all the activity gone? In part,
to illegal downloads. But absolute
consumption has also fallen,
simply and dramatically, as music
consumers have found other ways
to spend their time and money –
gaming, phone apps and online
gambling are three examples of
T
his year’s London Book
Fair is taking place at a
time of unique change.
Te shift from the printed word to
the downloaded text is accelerating;
chains and standalone bookstores
are closing down around the world;
and the very future of the book
“entity” is being challenged by
commentators and industry sages.
It’s the worst time to try and
predict the future, but despite
this uncertainty, the trade is not
without optimism. Te future will
be different, exciting and full of
opportunity – if only we could be
certain what those opportunities
will be.
We can, however, be reasonably
certain that, while the market for
ebooks (and econtent in all its
forms) will grow exponentially, the
demand for classically published
books will not collapse as radically
as the markets for CDs (or for
road atlases or software manuals).
Te market will find room for
both formats, with a different
physical/digital weighting in each
category. However, I would expect
the value of the physical book
market to shrink by more than
30% over the next five years.
So, where will these physical
books be bought? Te biggest risk
is to the traditional, deep range
specialist stores. As new channels
(the usual suspects, online and
supermarkets) took their share
of sales through the mid to late
noughties, it became progressively
more diffi cult for store chains to
maintain an economically viable
backlist that met customers’ general
needs. With the supermarkets
taking a larger slice of the bestsellers,
and the internet mopping up the
long tail, the bookshops’ range
became more and more piebald,
and too many retail execs started to
describe backlist as “wallpaper”.
Tis doesn’t presage the “death of
the bookshop”; rather, I anticipate
an evolutionary phase, as we pass
from big, general stores to more
specialised outlets. In capital cities
and college towns, good bookstores
can flourish, thanks to the profile
An evolutionary phase
10 London Fair DEALER Monday 11 April 2011
P U B L I S H E R S W E E K L Y & B O O K B R U N C H L O N D O N F A I R D E A L E R
Philip Downer looks at how bookselling is evolving in the face of increasing
online sales and digital publishing
W
hen looking at the show
today, it is incredible to
think that the first Fair
was held in the basement of a hotel
off London’s Oxford Street, with 22
publishers exhibiting, writes Alistair
Burtenshaw. Now 40 years on, the
London Book Fair welcomes more
than 1,600 exhibitors and 23,000
attendees annually.
Te Fair evolves with the publish-
ing industry, with new features
regularly introduced; this year is no
different. Following the extraordi-
nary changes in the digital publish-
ing landscape, LBF has doubled
the size of the Digital Zone, and it
should once again prove a popular
destination for companies looking
for solution partners. Tere will be
53 exhibitors from 14 countries
showcasing digital solutions, from
content management systems to
distributors, apps developers to eread-
er devices. We also have an expanded
programme of digital seminars.
Reflecting the huge
developments in children’s
publishing, the Fair is introducing
a new Children’s Innovation
Zone. It includes a new theatre,
on the show floor, dedicated to
promoting exciting new ideas in
children’s publishing, by hosting a
series of 15-minute presentations
each day.
Te Children’s and Young Adult
Publishing Zone is one of the largest
zones and main seminar streams;
it will feature 150 exhibitors with
a further 450 general exhibitors
offering children’s content. We also
have a fantastic line-up of leading
children’s writers at the Fair, including
Philip Pullman, Roger McGough,
Eoin Colfer, Francesca Simon,
Lauren Child, Julia Donaldson, Axel
Scheffl er, Tony Bradman, Aidan
Chambers, Beverley Naidoo, Frank
Cottrell Boyce, INJ Culbard, Rob
Davis and MG Harris.
Te Market Focus initiative is
now in its eighth year. Now an
integral part of the Fair, it has done
much to create commercial and
cultural partnerships around the
world since it was first introduced.
It is pleasure to have Russia as
the Market Focus in 2011, with
more than 50 Russian companies
representing all areas of publishing,
including new digital technologies,
in attendance. We are delighted
to have worked with our partners
– LBF’s strategic partner the
British Council, and Te Russian
Federal Agency for Press and Mass
Communication and Academia
Rossica as their offi cial partner – to
pull together such an impressive
line-up of writers and academics
for the Market Focus Cultural
Programme. It will showcase a
cross section of Russian literature,
as is evident from the diversity of
the speakers and events lined up,
from poetry to science fiction,
to award-winning novelists and
contemporary Russian prose.
On behalf of the London Book
Fair team at Reed Exhibitions, I
would like to welcome you to the
Fair, and wish you a successful,
productive and enjoyable show!
Alistair Burtenshaw is Group
Exhibition Director, the London
Book Fair ■
Welcome to LBF’s 40th
Alistair Burtenshaw
London Fair DEALER Monday 11 April 2011 11
P U B L I S H E R S W E E K L Y & B O O K B R U N C H L O N D O N F A I R D E A L E R
His Highness Dr Sultan Al Qasimi of Sharjah signs
copies of his book, with Ahmed Al-Amri, Director of the
Sharjah International Book Fair
warm and welcoming fellow
man of Sussex was, in fact, the
Ruler of Sharjah.” His daughter,
Sheikha Bodour – now, with
Kalimat, one of the region’s
most successful and innovative
children’s publishers – had
in fact spent time working
in Bloomsbury’s children’s
department.
Replying to the speech
in front of an audience that
included many of the British’s
book trade’s most respected
figures, including the LBF’s
Alistair Burtenshaw, Pearson’s
Lynette Owen, the PA’s Trade
and International Director
Emma House, and historian
Lucy Worsley, Chief Curator at
the Historic Royal Palaces, Dr
Sultan thanked Newton and his
colleagues for what he called
“this exquisite edition”, praising
the “meticulous” editing and the
translation work of Andy Smart.
Te era he writes about was
always “vivid in my memory. I
used to recall it for my wife and
children, who pleaded with me
to preserve the details for others
to read.” ■
H
is Highness Dr Sultan
Bin Muhammad Al
Qasimi of Sharjah
was last week fêted at a grand
dinner held – unusually – amid
the splendour of the British
Library, where, over the years,
he has spent a good deal of time
researching the many books he
has written. Te occasion was
preceded by a special tour of the
BL, conducted by Dame Lynne
Brindley, its CEO.
Te occasion marked the
UK publication by Bloomsbury
of HH’s autobiography,
published originally in Arabic by
Bloomsbury Qatar Foundation
Publishing. Introducing
his esteemed author, CEO
Nigel Newton said the book
offered “a unique historical
and political insight into the
tensions between the emerging
Gulf States and the British
administration in the 1950s and
1960s. But it’s also a very warm-
hearted story, which charts
your own personal and political
development until your selection
as Ruler of Sharjah. I commend
it to everyone and urge you to
pick up a copy as you
leave this evening.
Tis is no anodyne
statesman’s memoir
and it contains many
enthralling stories,
including when
Sharjah took its stand
on Suez.”
Newton recalled
“a chance encounter,
across the table from
a man wearing a
white dish-dasha at a
breakfast in honour
of the Arab nations
at the London Book
Fair three years ago.
When I asked if he
had flown in that
morning for the
book fair he replied
that he had woken
up at his home in
East Sussex… It
was only later that I
discovered that this
BL honours HH
Dr Sultan Al Qasimi
12 London Fair DEALER Monday 11 April 2011
NEWS BRI EFS
Andrew Nurnberg Associates International is to represent Raja
Alem, joint winner of the 2011 International Prize for Arabic Fiction.
Her novel The Dove’s Necklace explores the disappearing world
of Mecca from the unique perspective of a female Saudi author.
“Tackling powerful issues with beautiful and evocative writing, it is
an astonishing and compelling story.” Born in Mecca, Alem now
lives in Paris, and her work includes 10 novels and two plays, as
well as biography, short stories, essays and literary journalism. She
is a member of English PEN International, a member of the Board
of Trustees of Al-Mansouria Foundation for Culture and Creativity,
Paris, a member of the House of Photographers, Jeddah, and a
member of Al-Yamama news foundation.
Kirsty Dunseath at Weidenfeld & Nicolson has acquired “an
absolutely stunning new literary talent”, Scottish author
Kenneth Macleod. The Incident is “a searing novel about fate –
about those moments that change the course of a life forever”
and history, from the Second World War to the present. The
agent was Peter Straus at RC&W and Weidenfeld has UK/
Commonwealth rights.
Craig Russell, author of the Fabel and Lennox series of thrillers,
has moved from Blake Friedmann to David Higham Associates,
where he will be represented by Andrew Gordon. “I’m delighted to
be working with Andrew. He is a highly committed and ambitious
agent and I was hugely impressed with his enthusiasm and
professionalism from the outset. I’m sure we can achieve great
things together. I am very grateful for the work Carole Blake has
done for me and will continue to work with Blake Friedmann on
existing contracts.” It was Blake who discovered him in the slush
pile a decade ago.
Now Reaching:
United States
.
Canada
United Kingdom
.
Europe
.
Asia
Australia
.
Africa & the Middle East
Latin America & the Caribbean
Get Global.
www.constellationdigital.com | Booth W715 in the Digital Zone
L O N D O N F A I R D E A L E R
Accelerate Your
eBook Business
www.qbend.com
Stand
W 725
DIGITAL ZONE
Anywhere. Anytime. Any Device.
Build and Distribute eBooks
Deliver to Many Platforms and Devices
Sell in Your Own Language
Reach a Global Audience
At this stage, American
authors are only starting to take
advantage of POD production
options in the Benelux
countries, where English
is widely spoken. Mathijs
Suidman, Manager of Digital
Services for Central Bookhouse,
explains: “My take is that
currently local DIY publishers in
[the] EU are more successful due
to the local approach… local
ISBNs, local marketing etc.”
Looking to future of self-
publishing in the UK and EU,
some industry observers predict
a steep upward trajectory similar
to the one seen in the US
between 2005 and 2010. “In
the US, self-publishing is [now]
the rule, not the exception;
but internationally the growth
potential for this model is
virtually untapped,” says Author
Solution’s Kevin Weiss.
A 2005 study by the
Book Industry Study Group
found that book sales outside
bookstores and libraries in the
US now total at least $11 billion
annually. A substantial portion
of these “non-traditional” sales
is attributable to self-published
books. In 2011, the self-
publishing boom is spreading
from the US to the UK, with
further growth imminent in the
EU and Australia.
Danny O Snow founded Unlimited
Publishing LLC in 2000. He
previously served as Director of
Communications and Planning for
1stBooks (now Author Solutions) and
later as Senior Planning Consultant
for Lulu Enterprises. ■
According to Kevin Weiss,
CEO of Author Solutions,
“AuthorHouse UK in 2005 was
our first international venture
and it has experienced steady
growth every year. AuthorHouse
UK’s success has been [a]
catalyst for expansion of our
Xlibris imprint, as well as our
partnership imprint Balboa
Press, into European markets.”
Like many companies that
sell book publishing services
to aspiring writers, Author
Solutions has much of its
printing done by Lightning,
which has production facilities
in the US and UK, and will
open a plant in Australia this
summer. “Te expansion of
our Lightning Source global
print solution into Australia
provides publishers with
expanded market reach and
sales opportunities that were
impossible in many cases,” says
Skip Prichard, President and
CEO of Ingram Content Group.
Lulu.com is another major
force in the self-publishing
world, and its founder, Bob
Young, sees international
expansion as a key to growth.
“Yes, our global ambitions
continue,” Young says. Born in
Canada, Young made his fortune
taking Red Hat Linux public
in 1999, and self-published his
memoir – Under the Radar –
about it, leading to his founding
of Lulu in 2002.
Perhaps the most globally-
oriented of the leading DIY self-
publishing services, Lulu, has
sites in six languages, allowing
writers to self-publish books in
a variety of international trim
sizes, with e-commerce in half
a dozen currencies. More than
a million writers from 200
countries have published at Lulu
to date.
A book ordered from Lulu is
printed at the most appropriate
geographical location, from the
US to the UK to France. Like
Author Solutions, Lulu sends
many print orders to Lightning.
Lulu also has printing
arrangements with Central
Bookhouse (Centraal Boekhuis)
in Te Netherlands.
I
n 2009, the number of self-
published books released in
the US exceeded the number
of new titles from conventional
publishers for the first time in
history. Now, a similar pattern is
emerging overseas. Until recently,
costly transatlantic shipping,
different trim sizes and business
models, and language barriers
conspired to segregate the US
author-publisher from foreign
markets, and vice versa. But the
tide has started to turn, driven
by Print-on-Demand (POD)
technologies. A spokesperson for
POD printing giant Lightning
Source says, “Ingram Content
Group has over 100 author
services publishers who print in
the UK using Lightning Source…
On average, we’re seeing over a
million units printed annually as
well as double digit growth.”
With POD, books can be
printed on either side of the
Atlantic without prohibitive
shipping costs; trim sizes can be
adjusted painlessly, say from 6x9”
to Royal format, or from 8.5x11”
to A4. Driven almost universally by
POD, self-publishing companies
such as Author Solutions, Blurb,
Café Press, CreateSpace, Lulu and
Wordclay now offer US writers
greater access than ever to overseas
markets. And the road runs both
ways: foreign writers can use
POD companies to gain a toehold
among American audiences,
usually in niche markets outside
bookstores and libraries.
Going global
14 London Fair DEALER Monday 11 April 2011
Danny O Snow
Danny O Snow explains how self-
publishing companies are offering
their writers greater access to
overseas markets
The Most Complete
Digital Service for
Independent Publishers
Get Digital.
www.constellationdigital.com | Booth W715 in the Digital Zone
L O N D O N F A I R D E A L E R
Looking to future of self-
publishing in the UK and EU,
some industry observers predict
a steep upward trajectory
similar to the one seen in the
US between 2005 and 2010.
“In the US, self-publishing
is [now] the rule, not the
exception; but internationally
the growth potential for this
model is virtually untapped,”
says Author Solution’s Kevin
Weiss.
A 2005 study by the
Book Industry Study Group
found that book sales outside
bookstores and libraries in
the US now total at least $11
billion annually. A substantial
portion of these “non-
traditional” sales is attributable
to self-published books. In
2011, the self-publishing boom
is spreading from the US to
the UK, with further growth
imminent in the EU and
Australia.
Danny O Snow founded Unlimited
Publishing LLC in 2000. He
previously served as Director of
Communications and Planning for
1stBooks (now Author Solutions)
and later as Senior Planning
Consultant for Lulu Enterprises. ■
provides publishers with
expanded market reach and
sales opportunities that were
impossible in many cases,” says
Skip Prichard, President and
CEO of Ingram Content Group.
Lulu.com is another major
force in the self-publishing
world, and its founder, Bob
Young, sees international
expansion as a key to growth.
“Yes, our global ambitions
continue,” Young says. Born
in Canada, Young made his
fortune taking Red Hat Linux
public in 1999, and self-
published his memoir – Under
the Radar – about it, leading to
his founding of Lulu in 2002.
Perhaps the most globally-
oriented of the leading DIY
self-publishing services, Lulu,
has sites in six languages,
allowing writers to self-
publish books in a variety of
international trim sizes, with
e-commerce in half a dozen
currencies. More than a million
writers from 200 countries have
published at Lulu to date.
A book ordered from Lulu is
printed at the most appropriate
geographical location, from the
US to the UK to France. Like
Author Solutions, Lulu sends
many print orders to Lightning.
Lulu also has printing
arrangements with Central
Bookhouse (Centraal Boekhuis)
in Te Netherlands.
At this stage, American
authors are only starting to take
advantage of POD production
options in the Benelux
countries, where English
is widely spoken. Mathijs
Suidman, Manager of Digital
Services for Central Bookhouse,
explains: “My take is that
currently local DIY publishers in
[the] EU are more successful due
to the local approach… local
ISBNs, local marketing etc.”
I
n 2009, the number of self-
published books released
in the US exceeded the
number of new titles from
conventional publishers for
the first time in history. Now,
a similar pattern is emerging
overseas. Until recently,
costly transatlantic shipping,
different trim sizes and business
models, and language barriers
conspired to segregate the US
author-publisher from foreign
markets, and vice versa. But
the tide has started to turn,
driven by Print-on-Demand
(POD) technologies. A
spokesperson for POD printing
giant Lightning Source says,
“Ingram Content Group
has over 100 author services
publishers who print in the
UK using Lightning Source…
On average, we’re seeing over a
million units printed annually
as well as double digit growth.”
With POD, books can be
printed on either side of the
Atlantic without prohibitive
shipping costs; trim sizes can
be adjusted painlessly, say from
6x9” to Royal format, or from
8.5x11” to A4. Driven almost
universally by POD, self-
publishing companies such as
Author Solutions, Blurb, Café
Press, CreateSpace, Lulu and
Wordclay now offer US writers
greater access than ever to
overseas markets. And the road
runs both ways: foreign writers
can use POD companies to
gain a toehold among American
audiences, usually in niche
markets outside bookstores and
libraries.
According to Kevin Weiss,
CEO of Author Solutions,
“AuthorHouse UK in 2005 was
our first international venture
and it has experienced steady
growth every year. AuthorHouse
UK’s success has been [a]
catalyst for expansion of our
Xlibris imprint, as well as our
partnership imprint Balboa
Press, into European markets.”
Like many companies that
sell book publishing services
to aspiring writers, Author
Solutions has much of its
printing done by Lightning,
which has production facilities
in the US and UK, and will
open a plant in Australia this
summer. “Te expansion of
our Lightning Source global
print solution into Australia
Going global
14 London Fair DEALER Monday 11 April 2011
Danny O Snow
Danny O Snow explains how self-
publishing companies are offering
their writers greater access to
overseas markets
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PRINT MOBILE
WEB
years trade publishers will have
to understand and embed the
semantic web in their process.
Semantic web is the process by
which machines understand
the meaning of information
available on the World Wide
Web – and therefore the process
by which they filter it and make
it searchable for the end user.
Academic publishers, with their
wealth of online content, for the
most part, are already learning
how to master semantic web
processes and it will be very
important for trade publishers in
the next five years.
Without it, as more and more
content goes online, publishers will
find online material disappearing
into the web blackhole, never to be
found again.
Companies cannot predict
the future but
they can ask the
right questions.
Tey need the
imagination to
consider what plausible futures
might have in store for them
in a world that is constantly
surprising and uncertain.
Publishers need to try and
understand how the world
will change. Tis is not about
trying to predict the future
but imagining a different set
of futures, making sense of the
patterns, and making sure the
process and business model they
opt for allows for change and
innovation.
Jane Tappuni is Business Development
Director (Europe) at Publishing
Technology. She spoke at the London
Book Fair’s Digital Conference
yesterday (10 April) in the panel on
Investment, Innovation and Change.
For more information on the BML
research and the future of publishing
go to blog.publishingtechnology.com.
For a chance to win a bottle of
champagne, post your comments
on the blog about what you think
publishing will look like in ten
years’ time or tell us what you do
to stay ahead. ■
media companies and not
book publishers. Tey
should see their authors
as brands that can be
exploited in many ways,
via blogs, social networks,
advertising etc. Tey
should start by thinking
what a publishing
company really is. I
recently visited a major
bank that opened the
meeting by stating that
they too were a publishing
company as they produce
masses of written content.
It certainly opened the
door to freeing us from
our own mental map
of where our customers
might come from. I would
also encourage ideas people to
listen out for ideas from within
their own
companies.
Good
ideas and
innovation
are not the preserve of senior
management.
So what’s next? Publishers
are already seeing an increased
emphasis on searchability and
discoverability through metadata
management. Te digital
revolution is also impacting on
licensing, consumer marketing
and royalties.
Te increased amount of
books and data available online
means that in the next five
I
n 2001, 81% of publishers
were already preparing for
the coming ebook (BML
research March 2001). Indeed
they thought it would come
quickly, with half predicting
ebooks would deliver more than
10% of total book income by
2006. However new research
conducted by BML has shown
that in 2011, there are still only
10% of publishers who have
reached this milestone today.
But while their birth may
have been more protracted than
anticipated, it seems that 2012
will be the tipping point, in
revenue terms, for ebooks, with
a third of publishers predicting
they will make more than 10%
of revenue by next year.
So where will the next
paradigm shift come from and
how do you ensure that your
company is at the vanguard
of changes? Well, often good
ideas come from the left field,
so you have to ensure that you
can recognise good ideas from
anywhere, you need an open
approach to innovation – seek
innovation from customers,
suppliers and other sectors,
such as academic publishers, as
well as keeping an eye on your
competitors.
Consider the digital media
industry in 1999. At that point,
the company that was in the best
position to drive a revolution
in the digital content industry
was Sony. It had a strong history
in portable music players, and
even owned a record and movie
company. Sony should have
been in the perfect position to
create the iPod and iTunes, yet
it took Apple, a company from
outside the industry, to create
these products and services. Tis
was a failure of imagination.
Sony simply could not break
free of their own “mental maps”
of the future.
Tinking about the future
requires us to consider how an
uncertain world will evolve.
We typically have mental maps
that guide our thinking, but
these can quickly become out-
dated. Early mapmakers often
created maps that had major
inaccuracies and, despite all
evidence pointing to the fact
that they had made a mistake,
it often took many decades for
these maps to be corrected.
Once you believe a map, it is
very hard to change. We become
trapped by our own mental
maps because they have served
us so well in the past.
Publishers need to be
open-minded and challenge
all existing conceptions of
what their business is, they
need to think of themselves
as content creators or even
Keeping an open mind
Publishers need to think of themselves
as content creators or even media
companies and not book publishers.
They should see their authors as
brands that can be exploited in
many ways, via blogs, social
networks, advertising...
16 London Fair DEALER Monday 11 April 2011
Jane Tappuni
P U B L I S H E R S W E E K L Y & B O O K B R U N C H L O N D O N F A I R D E A L E R
Jane Tappuni urges publishers to challenge existing conceptions of what their
business is when facing up to the digital future
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and authors,”
Fessenden
notes,
“though, of
course, we
lend our
support to
campaigns spearheaded by
organisations such as PEN,
the Committee to Protect
Journalists and Human Rights
Watch”.
Founded by the AAP in 1975
to “defend and broaden the
freedom of the written word,
and to protect and promote
the rights of book publishers
and authors around the world,”
the committee monitors and
publicises free-expression issues
around the world; sends fact-
finding missions to countries
where free expression is under
siege; and lobbies both in the
US and overseas on behalf of
persecuted book publishers. It
A
s the saying goes “may
you live in interest-
ing times”, and for the
Association of Ameri-
can Publishers’ International
Freedom to Publish Commit-
tee, these are interesting times
indeed, writes Andrew Albanese.
With governments falling one
by one in the Middle East, and
democracy taking root in China
amid reports of internet censor-
ship, the IFTPC is sure to have
its hands full in the coming
years.
Viking Penguin’s Hal
Fessenden, chair of IFTPC,
told the London Fair Dealer
that world events and digital
developments raise a number
of “extremely challenging and
complex issues” for authors
and publishers, which the
committee is monitoring
closely. “Our primary focus is
still traditional book publishers
As dictators fall and digital rises
also offers
“moral
support and
practical
assistance”
to
threatened
publishers abroad.
In recent years, the IFTPC
has been on a variety of
missions, Fessenden says,
most recently to Zimbabwe,
Turkey, Egypt and Cambodia.
“In Cambodia, we identified
Tararith Kho, the founder of the
Nou Hach Literary Project, as
a publisher in need,” he recalls.
Kho, a poet and short story
writer, was under government
threat for his work addressing
Cambodia’s societal and
educational problems, as well as
the environmental destruction
in his country. For his work,
Kho was awarded the IFTPC’s
2008 Jeri Laber International
Freedom to Publish Award,
and with the help of PEN and
Scholars at Risk, the IFTPC
helped to bring Kho and his
family to Brown University for a
year of study.
Last year, New Century
Press, a Hong Kong-
based publisher, was awarded
the Jeri Laber Award for its
commitment to make available
in Chinese books of historic
and political interest banned
on the mainland – a virtually
unprecedented initiative in the
Chinese-language publishing
world.
Currently, Fessenden adds,
the IFTPC is coordinating a
series of symposiums to bring
together US advocacy groups
supporting democracy in Iran.
For more on the efforts of the AAP’s
IFTPC and to get involved, visit the
committee’s website: www.iftpc.org. ■
featuring women writers and
intellectuals from the Gulf.
Te statistics are impressive: six
days, 180 events; 875 exhibitors
from 58 countries; 500,000 titles;
200,000 visitors; 10,000 students
from 209 schools. Certainly it
would appear that unrest in the
region deterred no one – and
served to promote stimulating
discussion both within and
without the exhibition centre.
Te Rights Subsidy Programme
attracted more than 200
applications, with Lynette Owen
of Pearson, who takes a week’s
holiday to
run it, noting
that “Kitab
has tried
to establish
the fair as a
pan-Arabic
rights trading
forum – and
in a part of
the world
that hasn’t
had a great
copyright
compliance
record, it’s
been rather
successful.”
Tis
year for the
first time,
the British
Ambassador
hosted an afternoon tea – part
of the Fair’s high-profile match-
making between UK publishers
and their Arab counterparts.
Said Te UK PA’s Trade and
International Director, Emma
House: “In what are unsettled
times for the Arab World, the
Abu Dhabi International Book
Fair awarded some great literary
prizes, attracted publishing
professionals from all over the
Middle East and from further
afield, such as Turkey and
South Korea. A great success all
round.”
Tomorrow afternoon, House
will chair a seminar on “Business
Opportunities for Academic
and Educational Publishers
in the Gulf Region”, with Bill
Kennedy, Director of the Avicenna
Partnership, Ian Grant, MD of
Encyclopaedia Britannica UK and
Mike Tompson, Director of ELT at
Cengage Learning EMEA. Te event
takes place in the Wellington Rooms
(Earls Court 1) at 2.30pm. ■
Abu Dhabi looks to the future
20 London Fair DEALER Monday 11 April 2011
P U B L I S H E R S W E E K L Y & B O O K B R U N C H L O N D O N F A I R D E A L E R
T
he organisers of the Abu
Dhabi International Book
Fair are hoping to build
on the success of this year’s Fair
and to consolidate the gains
made over the event’s 21 years.
Te broader cultural
programme – much as LBF and
Frankfurt have long nurtured
– met with particular success
and KITAB General Manager
Monica Krauss was heartened
by “the participation of a lot of
strong Arab women, both as
publishers and as speakers.” Te
aim, for 2012, is a programme
Emma House
presents a
book to His
Highness as
the British
Ambassador
looks on
HH Sheikh Mansour bin Zayed bin Sultan Al Nahyan watches a
demo of the Espresso Book Machine during his fair walkabout
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students and teachers in a pilot
project to change the learning
and teaching environment.
As for mobile apps, their
fast and furious growth has
prompted PW to launch a special
column, Tis Week in Apps, last
December. In total, the number
of apps offered through Apple
Apps Store has grown from two
in May 2008 to 352,032 in
February 2011, nearly 15% of
which are games.
Revenues from mobile devices,
meanwhile, are projected to hit a
staggering $119 billion by 2015.
“Tere is no denying that
mobile devices are going to be
a huge part of our daily lives,
whether it is for reading books,
listening to music, watching
movies, buying products,
navigating an area or doing
offi ce tasks,” says cofounder and
Chief Technology Offi cer of
KiwiTech Gurvinder Batra, who
is responsible for redesigning
PW’s app. “But publishers are
cautious as they have yet to see
big revenue dollars associated
with apps.” Experimentation,
he adds, is crucial. “You need to
test the platform using your top
product lines. Tat said, bigger
players have more resources to
experiment with, whereas smaller
ones have more at stake with
each app project.” (KiwiTech,
like Aptara, is based in New
York with production facilities
in India; LearningMate is based
in Mumbai.)
And in the frenzy to create
ebooks, apps and elearning
modules, the herd mentality
is alive and well. Batra likens
this to the launch of the Web.
“Everyone wanted to have an
online presence but had not a
clue why they were doing it,
how someone would find the
website or why people would
want to visit the site in the first
place. Te only justification for
this was that ‘everyone else is
doing it, so we should too’.
Tis is now happening to the
mobile space.” ■
coming from digital products, is
predicting that the trend is going
to continue at the company.”
LearningMate’s revenues are set to
grow at least 80% this year, “and
given that small and mid-size
publishers are eagerly jumping
onto the digital bandwagon,
the market has expanded quite
significantly for us”.
In mid March, Pearson and
McGraw-Hill announced their
investment in San Francisco-
based Inkling, a company that
creates interactive textbooks
from the ground up for various
ereaders, especially iPad.
Redesigning textbooks and
adding multimedia components
is the way forward to attract
the generation of students who
grew up with smartphones and
tablets. Tree months ago, in
city-state Singapore (where this
correspondent is based), four
schools handed out iPads to
E
books, mobile apps and
elearning modules are hot.
Tat’s the conclusion from
a quick survey of 18 content
services vendors operating in
India. Te findings are not that
surprising given the ubiquity of
handheld devices and laptops
around the world. “Publishers’
commitment to ebooks is evident
from the amount of investment
in backlist conversion. Te fact
that ebooks consistently outsell
their print version on Amazon.
com is a sign of an impending
tipping point,” says Sriram
Panchanathan, Senior Vice
President, Digital Solutions, at
Aptara, who used to be in charge
of Kindle’s content operations.
“For sure, ebooks are here to
stay and perhaps on the way to
becoming the dominant format.”
Ebook sales at 16 publishing
houses, according to the
Association of American
Publishers, jumped 115.8% to
$69.9 million during the first
three months of 2011. But the
variety of e-deliverables is proving
to be a headache. For vendors,
tweaking content to fit each and
every one of the devices –whether
it is intended for an ereader or
smartphone – is time-consuming.
For publishers, it is a costly
practice. And no-one dares to
favour one format (or device)
over the other.
Some publishers, however,
are holding back because they
can’t be sure what to do given
the proliferation of e-gadgets in
the marketplace. But for how
long? Te difference between
being a technology laggard and
an early adopter is that of a flat
line versus growth in this fast-
changing economy.
As of now, iPad and iPhone are
the clear winners in the device
race. Te plethora of Android-
powered options with open-
source operating systems has
failed to erode Apple’s dominance
in the smartphone and tablet
markets. Te fact that Apple does
not support Flash – which is
primarily used to create elearning
modules and multimedia ebooks
– and yet manages to come out
on top causes both consternation
and amazement among
publishers and vendors alike.
Naturally, all vendors surveyed
wish that there was one format
for all devices, saving them the
hassle of tweaking content to suit
Apple, Amazon, Barnes & Noble,
Sony and so on. (Having said
that, you can be sure that they
love tabulating different costs
for different formats and adding
them up in the final bill for their
publishing clients.)
“Investments from publishers
in digital products will continue
to grow in the foreseeable
future,” says Samudra Sen,
CEO of elearning company
LearningMate. “Even Pearson
Education, with a balance
sheet that already shows one
third of their recent revenues
What’s cooking in content services?
For vendors, tweaking content to
fit every one of the devices is time-
consuming. For publishers, it is a costly
practice. And no-one dares to favour
one format (or device) over the other
22 London Fair DEALER Monday 11 April 2011
Sriram Panchanathan: The fact that
ebooks consistently outsell their print
version on Amazon.com is a sign of an
impending tipping point.
P U B L I S H E R S W E E K L Y & B O O K B R U N C H L O N D O N F A I R D E A L E R
Life in the content services industry is very busy as vendors tweak content for
use on a wide range of digital devices. Teri Tan reports
Gurvinder Batra: There is no denying
that mobile devices are going to be a
huge part of our daily lives.
London Fair DEALER Monday 11 April 2011 23
R
eal lives are more
incredible than anything
in novels – this is the
first lesson the biographer
learns. Who would believe a
story about a hard-working
actress who bore ten children to
the son of a king of England?
Or credit a fiction about a man
who fell in love with his wife
after her death, having hated
her for years, and proceeded to
write some of the most perfect
love poems in the language in
celebration of her? How about
the young woman who, having
been the secret mistress of a
world-famous writer, on his
death subtracted ten years from
her age, married a clergyman
and went on to live a second
life of perfect respectability? All
these stories are true, as I learnt
by researching for biographies.
And they make most novels
seem tame.
I was drawn to writing
biography by an interest in
history. I found research
deeply absorbing, and in my
early books I most enjoyed
bringing women out of the
shadows into which they
were consigned, exploring
the often overlooked detail
of their lives, and rescuing
them from misrepresentation
and condescension. Mary
Wollstonecraft and Dora
Jordan both seemed to me great
heroines, one a thinker, the
other a superb and dedicated
actress.
When I was asked to write
about Jane Austen, my first
thought was that she was their
contemporary, my second, that
I had been reading her all my
life and wanted nothing better
than to spend more time in
her company. Her supposedly
uneventful life turned out to
be full of incident, love and
pain, out of which came her
marvellously inventive fiction.
So while writing about
obscure characters appeals
to me, so does writing about
well-known writers. Even men:
the frank account of himself
by Samuel Pepys in his diaries
told me more about what it is
to be a man than anything else
I have read, as well as giving
a panoramic picture of 17th-
century London. To write his
life, I had not only to read the
diaries – more than a million
words – but understand the
political history of his age, from
1633 to 1703. It was the most
interesting era this country
ever experienced, when we got
rid of king, lords and bishops
and then brought them back;
and then got rid of another
king and brought in one from
abroad. Pepys knew everyone
from king to servant girl, and
he was so companionable a
subject that I mourned when I
had to kill him off.
For the last few years I have
been working on a life of
Dickens, a man as mysterious
and surprising as the plots
of his novels. He had the
capacity and the energy to live
several lives at once. He was
an intensely good man who
found himself in middle age
driven off course by passion,
by dissatisfaction, by the need
to conceal the truth about
himself. He became ill, he died
untimely, yet always within
him the core of his being
kept working, bringing him
visions, characters, stories –
stories that have entranced and
thrilled generations of readers.
Grappling with how to keep
up with Dickens may be the
hardest task I’ve yet attempted.
Claire Tomalin’s biography of Dickens will
be published on 6th October by Viking. ■
Claire Tomalin: Real lives make most
fiction seem tame
Narrating life
If you are looking for
non-English rights to:
NY Times Best Sellers
Contact:
Carl Dobrowolski
1.347.247.2106 (mobile)
Goodwill Rights Management
carl@goodwillrights.com
www.goodwillrights.com
...and Titles on:
Contemporary Social
& Political Issues
L O N D O N F A I R D E A L E R
symbols that cannot be represented
in other alphabets. PubMatch is
a great solution to build a gate
for Easterners and Westerners to
connect effectively,” says Lee.
Currently the membership of
PubMatch is approximately 2,100,
and Malinowski and Slowik expect
that number to climb to at least
10,000 by the end of 2012. Te
portal site will be partially supported
by advertising.
Malinowksi conceived of
PubMatch at the Beijing Book
Fair in 2008 when he met with
a panel of US, UK and Chinese
book publishing executives
whose goal was to establish better
communications. Publishers Weekly
signed on as an equal partner in
PubMatch after Malinowski invited
Slowik to attend a meeting at the
Frankfurt Book Fair in October
2010. Malinowski says, “Few
players in the industry can boast the
worldwide reach and respect that
Publishers Weekly has, let alone the
quality and breadth of reporting
that they offer. Publishers Weekly was
a natural fit as an equal PubMatch
partner.” ■
“who are looking to share their
titles and available rights with
potential business partners around
the world”. Among the features
in PubMatch are posting options,
a rights catalogue creations tool,
messaging systems and data entry
tools. Te pubmatch.com site is
currently up and running, with
levels of beta testing in place and
regular updating to accommodate
new material and coding. It is
planned to go live with the new
functionality later this spring.
PubMatch’s first premiere Asian
affi liate is Naoko Lee, head of
the Taiwan-based Lee’s Literary
Agency. In addition to English,
PubMatch is to be offered initially
in three other languages – Chinese
(traditional and simplified),
Japanese and Korean – and will
provide a custom registration portal
for Lee’s database of 25,000 Asian
publishing insiders. More languages
are to be added as new affi liates sign
on. Lee will maintain a PubMatch
offi ce in Taiwan as well. “Tere
are a lot of language boundaries
between every country in Asia, with
different written characters and
P
ubMatch, the book
publishing portal and rights
database jointly owned by
Publishers Weekly and Combined
Book Exhibit, continues to add
partners and members, writes Jim
Milliot. Earlier this spring, Lee’s
Literary Agency signed on as an
Asian affi liate and a deal has just
been reached with Edelweiss,
which powered the revamped PW
Announcements issue, to work on
the service. Te agreements position
the site to dramatically increase its
global membership and become
the leading website for multilingual
rights information around the world.
“For the first time, the global
rights market will have a home
where all comers can communicate,
find out what rights are for sale
and find out what rights are being
offered via custom catalogues,”
says PW President George Slowik,
Jr. “PubMatch opens the territory
to include foreign lettersets and
possibilities for online rights
communication that did not exist
before. With PubMatch, there will
be a place where a French agent can
sell a French title to a Polish agent
and have that transaction recorded
and open to the PubMatch
community.”
Jon Malinowski, President of
the Combined Book Exhibit who
launched PubMatch in 2008,
says the goal of PubMatch “is to
be a global rights resource, and to
that end we are reaching out to
the worldwide book-publishing
industry”. PubMatch, Malinowski
notes, is aimed at publishers,
authors, agents/agencies and others
PubMatch adds partners, members
L
ast fall, four international
publishing executives
with backgrounds
heavily rooted in the art
publishing world
formed a new
illustrated book
publishing house
called Vivays
Publishing, writes
Lynn Andriani.
Te house –
which is focusing
on fashion,
collectibles, art, crafts,
architecture
and popular
science – is
debuting
its first five
titles at the
Fair. Sergey
Ivlev, who is
also owner
and publisher of
Art-Rodnik in
Moscow, is Vivays’s
publisher and the
house’s
major
shareholder.
(Vivays is
not a subsidiary of
Art-Rodnik, however.)
Pierre Toromanoff, a
former export sales
manager at Taschen,
is Sales Director.
Ivlev and Toromanoff teamed
with Lee Ripley – formerly
of Laurence King
Publishing and of
Little, Brown –
who is serving as
Vivays’s publishing
director and Klaus
Kramp – formerly
of Taschen and based
in Cologne, Germany
– now Vivays’s editorial
director. Headquarters
is in London. Te four
men saw a gap in the
market for “innovative
and
affordable
illustrated
titles” that were
“attractively
priced” and
“original in
their approach
– at times even
quirky.”
Many of the
books on Vivays’s
spring and fall lists
are Russian-themed,
including Russian
Ornament, which
has text in English,
Spanish, French
and German;
Russian
Elegance:
Country and
City Fashion;
and Icons:
Masterpieces
of Russian
Art. Other books
fall into the “quirky”
category, such as
Crazy Gifts and
Crazy Design.
Antique Collectors’
Club is distributing
Vivays’s titles in the
UK, and
Continental
Sales/
Innovative
Logistics is
distributing
its books in
the US. ■
Vivays
24 London Fair DEALER Monday 11 April 2011
George Slowik: For the first time, the
global rights market will have a home
where all comers can communicate.
P U B L I S H E R S W E E K L Y & B O O K B R U N C H L O N D O N F A I R D E A L E R
STORIES FROM THE GOLDEN AGE:
WHERE ADVENTURE COMES TO LIFE
L. Ron Hubbard is the author of 19 New York Times bestsellers, his works are distributed in
over 150 nations and have appeared on over 100 international bestseller lists.
The Stories from the Golden Age collection features 80 volumes, literary gems spanning the genres
of western, adventure, science fiction, fantasy and mystery.
· 800K5 |LA1URL 0R|0|hAL 00VLR AR1w0RK Ah0 |LLU51RA1|0h5
FROM THE 1930S AND 1940S
· |ULL-0A51 AU0|0800K 0RAHA5 RL00R0L0 w|1H
CINEMA QUALITY SOUND EFFECTS AND MUSIC
HZPYPNO[ZJVT‹PUMV'HZPYPNO[ZJVT
Representing the literary, theatrical and musical works of L. RON HUBBARD PUBLICATIONS INTERNATIONAL APS
© 2011 NEW ERA APS. All Rights Reserved. NEW ERA is a trademark owned by NEW ERA Publications International ApS and is a registered trademark in Denmark among other countries.
PUBLICATIONS INTERNATIONAL APS
5LL U5 A1 0201· HALL 1
|0R w0RL0w|0L 0|51R|8U1|0h Ah0 PU8L|5H|h0 R|0H15 00h1A01 AU1H0R 5LRV|0L5, |h0.
memoir that was to take us into
the world of government, foreign
policy, political intrigue and human
relationships over one of the most
secretive periods of history.
Except that it didn’t. Why was
there nothing on Hungary in 1956
and Czechoslovakia in 1968? And
if we read that our author had
breakfast with Alec Douglas-Home,
would it not have been helpful for
the hapless reader to learn what
was discussed, or even what they
ate? I should say that I had already
sold this book blind in more than
20 countries and realised what a
disappointment the anodyne text
would be to the various publishers.
I immediately despatched a telex to
VAAP (this was in the days before
fax machines) simply saying that I
needed to discuss the manuscript as
a matter of urgency.
Te scene of my meeting in
Moscow was surreal: seven clearly
worried offi cials sat along one
length of a boardroom table while
I faced them from the other. Tey
had all read the manuscript and
all agreed with my assessment.
Yet, for them, there was but one
question: “Who’s going to tell
him?” As soon as I said, “I will”,
all seven men suddenly looked as
if they had avoided a fate worse
than death. One wasted no time
and scurried off to make the date:
Murdoch, Susan Hill and other
fine authors to the attention of
the Russian public. Given its own
tradition in science fiction, it was
more than satisfying to place, as the
very first foreign work the USSR
bought after joining the Copyright
Convention, Arthur C Clarke’s
Rendezvous with Rama.
Sometime in the early 1980s, the
directors of VAAP (the Soviet State
Copyright Agency that had been
established to control all publishing
activity into and out of the country)
expressed their disappointment
that I had been placing western
authors in their country, but never
any of their authors in the West.
I explained, truthfully, that I had
simply not discovered an author
whom I thought would have a
market. Yet when, a few years later,
Mikhail Gorbachev had broken
fresh political ground, I called VAAP
and asked if they would contact
Andrei Gromyko on my behalf.
Here, I argued, was a man who had
been Foreign Minister for 37 years,
had served every leader from Stalin
to Gorbachev, and was a household
name throughout the world.
To my amazement, I was not
only told that he would be willing,
but within a few months thereafter
I received a huge box containing a
1,500-page manuscript. I pounced
upon it and read it through from
beginning to end, a task that took
well over two weeks. Here was a
I
t doesn’t seem so long ago
that we used to gawp at the
occasional postage stamps
that would appear on a letter
from the USSR: oversized, bright
images extolling the successes of
Communist endeavour. Soviet
books in contrast were distinctly
drab affairs whose covers would
have appealed to few in the West
other than the likes of J D Salinger
– strictly no images.
It is just over 20 years since
publishing in that country changed,
literally, overnight. Until then,
all publishers were state-owned,
each allocated a specific annual
tonnage of paper, which the
publishing directors would then
divide amongst the titles they had
chosen to appear during the year.
Consumer demand was irrelevant,
not least because there was no profit
incentive in a prevailing command
economy. Editors, eager to advance
their careers, would give preference
to books of which their Party
bosses would approve. A collection
of speeches by General Secretary
Brezhnev would have a print run of
250,000, while the first edition of
Te Master and Margarita – much
anticipated by those who knew
of its existence – was limited to
30,000. Even then, in order to
minimise its impact, half the print
run of Bulgakov’s classic work
was sent for export (and valuable
foreign currency) while much of the
rest was scattered
throughout the
provinces. Moscow’s
biggest bookshop,
Dom Knigi, had a
queue around the
block on the day it
was released and the
shop’s director had
to come out and
ask the majority
to leave.
Of course,
before the USSR
joined the Geneva
Convention in
1973, information
about international
authors published
there was scant. When news
reached Michael Bond that A Bear
Called Paddington had appeared
there, he asked a Russian-speaking
friend to make some investigations
on her next visit to Moscow. She
tracked down the publishing
house, met the editor and was
astonished to learn how big a print
run they had produced. “Do you
mean to say,” she asked the editor,
“that there are 300,000 Russians
who want to read this book?” Te
editor replied, deadpan: “No, there
are many more, but they will have
to share.”
Limited print runs, drab covers
and poor quality paper aside, there
was – and there remains to this
day – a love of reading, a passion
for literature. Every school
child will be able to recite
stanzas from Eugene Onegin;
every third person on the
Metro will have their head
in a book. Whether you
are a university professor
or a factory worker, your
home will have a bookcase.
Te book itself, not just its
contents, is revered.
It was against this
background that I made my
first foray into the Russian
publishing world. For all the
obvious reasons, we couldn’t
place too many authors
there, but we were proud to
bring Virginia Woolf, Iris
On representing Yeltsin
Yeltsin with international and Russian publishers at a dinner in the Kremlin, on the occasion of his
second book being published in 1996
26 London Fair DEALER Monday 11 April 2011
P U B L I S H E R S W E E K L Y & B O O K B R U N C H L O N D O N F A I R D E A L E R
Andrew Nurnberg reflects on working with Boris Yeltsin among others during his
long involvement with publishing in the USSR and Russia
Andrew Nurnberg with Yeltsin
Continued on page 28 ➝
RU55IA
A NEw CHAPTER
12 APRIL, 10.00 - 17.00
HOT OFF THE 5HELF: 25 BOOK5. 7 HOUR5.
1 INCREDIBLE NEw EVENT
Academia Rossica presents `Hot
Òff The Sheíf - a unique chance
for internationaí pubíishers to get
intimateíy acquainted vith Russias
booming book scene in one intense
day. This vhirívind encounter -
seven sessions of one hour each -
viíí bring you up to speed vith the
best nev Russian books. Lvery hour
is devoted to a particuíar genre,
íike thriííer, biography or fantasy,
and ñííed vith `bíitz presentations
on individuaí books, giving you aíí
you need in one informative and
entertaining package. ¥ouíí hear
from those in the knov - authors,
agents and pubíishers - about vhy
these books have taken Russia by
storm and vhy they can do the
same in 8ritain and beyond. lts
íike speed-dating, but vith quaíity
nev vriting. And dont forget many
of these nev books are eíigibíe for
Russkiy lir transíation grants. lts
time to dump your Dostoevsky and
faíí in íove vith a nev generation of
Russian íiterary taíent.

10.00 - 11.00
Thríllers
Tnc Dcvil´s vnccl by likhaií
Cigoíashviíi
Point of No Rcturn by Poíina
Dashkova
/ vnitc Dovc of CorJoco by Dina
Rubina

11.00 - 12.00
Bíographíes
Lco Tolstov. Flignt from PoroJisc by
Paveí 8asinsky
Cogorin. Vvtn onJ Von by lev
Donilkin Rulcr of tnc Dcscrt by
leonid ¥uzefovich
Postcrnok by Dmitry 8ykov

12.00 - 1J.00
Detectíves
ßrcotnlcss by Tatiana Ustinova
Pct Fool of tnc Housc of Vonvokn by
Dmitry Kosyrev
Tnc Poco /rrovo cooks by Sergei
Kostin, author

1J.00 - 14.00
Líterary Fíctíon
Lcttcr-ßook by likhaií Shishkin
UnJcrgrounJ or o Hcro of our Timc by
Víadimir lakanin
Tnc Pcrsion by Aíexander líichevsky
Tnc Timc of vomcn by Líena Chizhova

14.00 - 15.00
Hístorícal Fíctíon
Tnc Stonc ßriJgc by Aíexander
Terekhov
Solovvov onJ Lorionov by Lvgeniy
Vodoíazkin
LigntncoJcJ by Òíga Síavnikova
Danieí Stein, Transíator by ludmiía
Uíitskaya

15.00 - 16.00
Current Polítícs
Sin by Zakhar Priíepin
Tnc List by Dmitry 8ykov
í om o Cnccncn! by Cerman Saduíaev
/svstolc by Òíeg Pavíov

16.00 - 17.00
5cíence Fíctíon and Fantasy
Living by Anna Starobinets
)cllownommcrs by Denis Òsokin
Licrorion by likhaií Líizarov
11 APRIL, 11.00
OFFICIAL OPENINC
OF THE RU55IAN
PAVILION
ln the presence of lr Sergei
Naryshkin, Head of the
Administration of the President of
Russia lr Dmitry ledvedev, HL
Aíexander ¥akovenko, Ambassador
of the Russian Federation,
lr likhaií Shvydkoy, Speciaí
Representative of President of
Russia for Cuíturaí Coííaboration,
lr likhaií Sesíavinsky, Head of the
Federaí Agency for Press and lass
Communications and internationaí
vriters and pubíishers
veícome from Director of
The london 8ook Fair, Aíistair
8urtenshav
(Press conference - I0.30 am at the
Russian Paviíion, v555)
íf vou connot ottcnJ tnc crcscntotions
cut woulJ likc to mokc on occointmcnt
witn tnc outnors, ogcnts or cuclisncrs,
clcosc contoct /coJcmio Rossico ot
RVF(ocoJcmio-rossico.org or coll
-44 20 /28/ 25I4. For morc informotion
ocout writcrs, ovoiloclc rignts onJ
tronslotion gronts, visit
www.ocoJcmio-rossico.org onJ
www.cooksfromrussio.org
12 APRIL, 12.00
CACARIN
CELEBRATION
Come and ceíebrate vith us the
50th anniversary of ¥ury Cagarins
fight into space vith a video íink
vith Russian cosmonauts taíking
about íiterature in space.
RU55IAN PAVILION
PROCRAMME HICHLICHT5
w555, EARL5 COURT 2
www.ACADEMIA-RO55ICA.ORC
his agreement that we represent
him. He not only agreed but, as
he was still relatively unknown,
accepted my request that he make a
promotion tour in Europe. His only
requirement was that I arrange for
him to meet some political leaders,
in particular the British PM.
During an otherwise perfectly
regular exchange of views at
Number 10, Boris Nikolayevich
suddenly asked the PM if she
would agree to a commercial
treaty between the UK and Russia,
as opposed to one between the
UK and USSR. Tis caught Mrs
Tatcher off-balance; she looked
down, briefly played with the
clasp on her handbag, and then
diplomatically suggested that such
an idea might be considered in
the fullness of time. Yeltsin was
jubilant. As we stepped out of the
front door into Downing Street, he
took me by the arm and said: “She
didn’t say no!” I had had no idea
before the meeting that this would
be on the agenda, but it became
clear that, for him, this had been
the primary purpose of the visit. By
the time he landed in Moscow, he
had concluded, and announced,
that the British Prime Minister had
accepted the proposal.
In the autumn of the following
year, the USSR collapsed, ushering
in a new dawn in publishing.
Without further funding,
most State-owned
publishing houses
collapsed or else
transformed themselves
into quasi-autonomous
companies. In their
wake a slew of private
publishing houses
sprang up to cater
to a huge reading
public, avid to read
anything and everything that had
never been published in Russian
before – from George Orwell to
Jackie Collins. Amidst the “shock
therapy” of economic reform, the
country lost its reliable state-run
distribution system, with the result
that new titles were not reaching
bookshops but were sold off trestle
tables in the street.
Some publishers were bright,
intelligent entrepreneurs, very
often serious readers themselves,
while others were simply in it to
make what they thought would
be a quick buck. Tese soon
realised that there were no big
riches in publishing and that
they would earn more by selling
refrigerators or cigarettes. In those
early days, piracy was rife, as were
intimidation, corruption, poor
translations, lurid jacket designs
and low quality paper in the books
themselves.
Yet for anyone who was aware
of the sanctity of the written word
within Russia, there was hope, and
for those who hoped, there was a
future. We established Moscow’s
first private literary agency in
March 1993. By sheer coincidence,
and not inappropriately, the first
contract we concluded was for
Geoffrey Hosking’s
History of the Soviet
Union, acquired by
Vladimir Grigoriev,
then Publishing
Director of Vagrius
Publishers.
Today, 20 years on
from the demise of
the USSR, the changes
are evident: all genres
of literature, high-brow
and low-brow, are available.
International and Russian authors
sit side by side on the shelves.
Publishers are finally beginning
to invest in marketing campaigns
and author promotion tours.
Te most pressing problem is
distribution – there are fewer
booksellers, given the level of
high street rents, and publishers
are not being paid by some of the
leading distributors whose own
finances are precarious. For us
agents, there are myriad problems:
wresting accurate royalty reports
and prompt accounting from
publishers is just one of them.
Te dominance of two massive
publishing corporations, which
have both the financial as well
as distribution muscle, makes
life diffi cult for those smaller
houses that do not possess this.
Borrowing runs at interest rates
not far short of 20% p.a.
Te feeding frenzy of all that was
foreign has abated, and Russian
writers are again at the fore.
Some of these will be showcased
at LBF, courtesy of the British
Council and the Russian sponsors
who are prepared to invest in
translations, not only of the texts
themselves, but also of outlines
and sample chapters, which will
enable British editors to make
considered decisions based on
their own reading, rather than
having to rely on readers’ reports
and their instinct. Until now, few
contemporary Russian authors
have made their way into English
homes. Whether this will now
change will become apparent
within the next few years.
Andrew Nurnberg is Managing Director
of Andrew Nurnberg Associates.
www.andrewnurnberg.com ■
“Tomorrow morning at 9:30 in
the Kremlin,” came the message,
“but you have only 30 minutes as
Andrei Andreyevich will chair the
Presidium at 10:00 am”.
In person, Mr Gromyko seemed
a kindly man, who was unaware
that his text did not pass muster.
He furiously scribbled notes with a
thick blue pencil, apparently taking
on board all that I suggested. I
noticed that we were approaching
10:00 am and then that we were
well past it. Twenty minutes
later, I pictured the members of
the Presidium waiting patiently
upstairs, but Mr Gromyko was
clearly more interested in attending
to his future bestseller. We agreed
he would write a further 150
pages and that we would be free
to edit the original text to make
one regular full-length volume
(in Russia, it was published in
two volumes). Alas, when we did
finally receive the new material,
it was more of the same. He had
tried his best, and I am sure that he
wasn’t deliberately holding back,
yet it then occurred to me that
anyone who had managed to stay
ahead of the game and survive for
so many years at top level in the
USSR would have done so only
by keeping his head down. It was
not for nothing that he was known
abroad as “Mr Nyet”.
I was determined to make good
one day for what I had failed to
deliver on this occasion, so while
Mr Gorbachev was becoming
the darling of world leaders – in
Margaret Tatcher’s words, “I
spotted him because I was searching
for someone like him” – I personally
became fascinated by another
man. Boris Yeltsin, despite his
stereotypical Soviet career, had
appeared on the scene with a host
of daring new ideas. Tis, I decided,
was my man; and I flew to Moscow,
virtually door-stopping him to gain
Andrew Nurnberg with Vladimir Grigoriev signing first Russian deal following
the USSR joining Copyright Convention in 1973
There was – and there remains to
this day – a love of reading,
a passion for literature
P U B L I S H E R S W E E K L Y & B O O K B R U N C H L O N D O N F A I R D E A L E R
28 London Fair DEALER Monday 11 April 2011
Continued from page 26

his agreement that we represent
him. He not only agreed but, as
he was still relatively unknown,
accepted my request that he make a
promotion tour in Europe. His only
requirement was that I arrange for
him to meet some political leaders,
in particular the British PM.
During an otherwise perfectly
regular exchange of views at
Number 10, Boris Nikolayevich
suddenly asked the PM if she
would agree to a commercial
treaty between the UK and Russia,
as opposed to one between the
UK and USSR. Tis caught Mrs
Tatcher off-balance; she looked
down, briefly played with the
clasp on her handbag, and then
diplomatically suggested that such
an idea might be considered in
the fullness of time. Yeltsin was
jubilant. As we stepped out of the
front door into Downing Street, he
took me by the arm and said: “She
didn’t say no!” I had had no idea
before the meeting that this would
be on the agenda, but it became
clear that, for him, this had been
the primary purpose of the visit. By
the time he landed in Moscow, he
had concluded, and announced,
that the British Prime Minister had
accepted the proposal.
In the autumn of the following
year, the USSR collapsed, ushering
in a new dawn in publishing.
Without further funding,
most State-owned
publishing houses
collapsed or else
transformed themselves
into quasi-autonomous
companies. In their
wake a slew of private
publishing houses
sprang up to cater
to a huge reading
public, avid to read
anything and everything that had
never been published in Russian
before – from George Orwell to
Jackie Collins. Amidst the “shock
therapy” of economic reform, the
country lost its reliable state-run
distribution system, with the result
that new titles were not reaching
bookshops but were sold off trestle
tables in the street.
Some publishers were bright,
intelligent entrepreneurs, very
often serious readers themselves,
while others were simply in it to
make what they thought would
be a quick buck. Tese soon
realised that there were no big
riches in publishing and that
they would earn more by selling
refrigerators or cigarettes. In those
early days, piracy was rife, as were
intimidation, corruption, poor
translations, lurid jacket designs
and low quality paper in the books
themselves.
Yet for anyone who was aware
of the sanctity of the written word
within Russia, there was hope, and
for those who hoped, there was a
future. We established Moscow’s
first private literary agency in
March 1993. By sheer coincidence,
and not inappropriately, the first
contract we concluded was for
Geoffrey Hosking’s
History of the Soviet
Union, acquired by
Vladimir Grigoriev,
then Publishing
Director of Vagrius
Publishers.
Today, 20 years on
from the demise of
the USSR, the changes
are evident: all genres
of literature, high-brow
and low-brow, are available.
International and Russian authors
sit side by side on the shelves.
Publishers are finally beginning
to invest in marketing campaigns
and author promotion tours.
Te most pressing problem is
distribution – there are fewer
booksellers, given the level of
high street rents, and publishers
are not being paid by some of the
leading distributors whose own
finances are precarious. For us
agents, there are myriad problems:
wresting accurate royalty reports
and prompt accounting from
publishers is just one of them.
Te dominance of two massive
publishing corporations, which
have both the financial as well
as distribution muscle, makes
life diffi cult for those smaller
houses that do not possess this.
Borrowing runs at interest rates
not far short of 20% p.a.
Te feeding frenzy of all that was
foreign has abated, and Russian
writers are again at the fore.
Some of these will be showcased
at LBF, courtesy of the British
Council and the Russian sponsors
who are prepared to invest in
translations, not only of the texts
themselves, but also of outlines
and sample chapters, which will
enable British editors to make
considered decisions based on
their own reading, rather than
having to rely on readers’ reports
and their instinct. Until now, few
contemporary Russian authors
have made their way into English
homes. Whether this will now
change will become apparent
within the next few years.
Andrew Nurnberg is Managing Director
of Andrew Nurnberg Associates.
www.andrewnurnberg.com ■
“Tomorrow morning at 9:30 in
the Kremlin,” came the message,
“but you have only 30 minutes as
Andrei Andreyevich will chair the
Presidium at 10:00 am”.
In person, Mr Gromyko seemed
a kindly man, who was unaware
that his text did not pass muster.
He furiously scribbled notes with a
thick blue pencil, apparently taking
on board all that I suggested. I
noticed that we were approaching
10:00 am and then that we were
well past it. Twenty minutes
later, I pictured the members of
the Presidium waiting patiently
upstairs, but Mr Gromyko was
clearly more interested in attending
to his future bestseller. We agreed
he would write a further 150
pages and that we would be free
to edit the original text to make
one regular full-length volume
(in Russia, it was published in
two volumes). Alas, when we did
finally receive the new material,
it was more of the same. He had
tried his best, and I am sure that he
wasn’t deliberately holding back,
yet it then occurred to me that
anyone who had managed to stay
ahead of the game and survive for
so many years at top level in the
USSR would have done so only
by keeping his head down. It was
not for nothing that he was known
abroad as “Mr Nyet”.
I was determined to make good
one day for what I had failed to
deliver on this occasion, so while
Mr Gorbachev was becoming
the darling of world leaders – in
Margaret Tatcher’s words, “I
spotted him because I was searching
for someone like him” – I personally
became fascinated by another
man. Boris Yeltsin, despite his
stereotypical Soviet career, had
appeared on the scene with a host
of daring new ideas. Tis, I decided,
was my man; and I flew to Moscow,
virtually door-stopping him to gain
Andrew Nurnberg with Vladimir Grigoriev signing first Russian deal following
the USSR joining Copyright Convention in 1973
There was – and there remains to
this day – a love of reading,
a passion for literature
P U B L I S H E R S W E E K L Y & B O O K B R U N C H L O N D O N F A I R D E A L E R
28 London Fair DEALER Monday 11 April 2011
Continued from page 26

Delivering Visibility, Control and Measurable Value
Virtualized Logistics (VL)
is a team of experts in
supply chain best
practice and is part of
the SBS Worldwide Group
of companies. VL is dedicated
to assisting publishers build efective
supply chains to achieve high
performance from strategy development,
right through to implementation.
VL understand the publishing industry and
re-engineer the supply chain around your
needs, making you and your staf more
productive, reducing cost while increasing
efciencies across your business enabling you
to seize opportunities as they arise.
www.virtualizedlogistics.com - email: info@vl.cx
To learn more visit stand: J400 or call: +44 (0) 207 930 2888
We call it Smart Centralization.
With the NAW model, one
writer at a time benefits from
a high-level textual edit from
a professional, but because the
edit is observed the session also
benefits the onlookers.
Te NAW Masterclasses,
which were piloted at
Birmingham City University,
create a spectacle and a buzz
that can be absent from classes
dependent on writer anecdotes
or the ABC
of standard
writing
tuition. Tey
also avoid
the menace of
generalisation, and
critical observations
are made exclusively
with reference to the context of
specific pieces of work produced
by the writers on the course.
Tis stays true to the original
principles of the Academy,
which was founded in 2000 to
provide training for writers that
is equivalent to RADA for actors
or the Royal College of Music
for musicians. Ever since, the
Academy has been supported by
a distinguished list of writer-
patrons, and the 2011 course is
led by Costa-shortlisted novelist
Jennie Rooney and writer/Radio
4 broadcaster Ian Marchant.
Tis year’s visiting NAW writer-
patrons include bestselling
authors Iain Banks, Minette
Walters, David Almond and
Elizabeth Buchan.
Te 2011 NAW writers will
be published in an anthology
produced by Lightning Source,
which will be launched at
Foyles, Charing Cross Road,
London on Wednesday
9 November.
Ion Trewin is Honorary
President of the National
Academy of Writing. www.
thenationalacademyofwriting.org.
uk. Te NAW has a presence at the
Fair via the Free Word stand. ■
T
he National Academy
of Writing (NAW)
has always had a close
connection to the publishing
industry, particularly through
the NAW Board, which guides
the activities of this non-
profit organisation. Te NAW
chairman Francis Bennett has
worked in publishing for
more than 40 years,
but isn’t resting on
the laurels of
his Lifetime
Achievement
honour at the
British Book
Awards. “Te
National
Academy
helps demystify
the publishing industry for
emerging writers,” he says. “At
the same time our new course
instills high editorial standards,
and introduces writers to the
importance of being flexible in a
changing marketplace.”
Te Academy combines
one-to-one mentoring with
workshops, but is introducing a
unique system of Masterclasses.
Te Academy’s Director,
novelist Richard Beard,
explains: “Masterclass is a word
often misused in the world
of creative writing – a vague
catch-all term promising that
a published writer will turn
up and say something about
writing. Te source of the
Masterclass concept, in music
schools, makes for a much more
stimulating writing experience.”
Te Academy has looked
closely at Masterclasses in the
Conservatoire system for trainee
musicians, and then adapted
the format for writers. In a
violin Masterclass, a visiting
professional will correct and
encourage a student violinist in
front of a student audience. Te
underlying philosophy assumes
that the suggestions offered are
likely to be widely relevant.
RADA for writers
Ion Trewin explains the National Academy
of Writing’s innovative new course starting
this April at the Free Word Centre in London
London Fair DEALER Monday 11 April 2011 29
L O N D O N F A I R D E A L E R
(download). (Contact Mandy
Knight, mknight@publishers.org.uk)
Western publishers seeking to
do rights business with Russia for
the first time may need to consider
whether they wish to work direct or
via one of the subagents specialising
in the market. Te Andrew
Nurnberg Agency has long had an
offi ce in Moscow (contact Ludmilla
Sushkova, sushkova@awax.ru);
other subagents representing western
titles include Alexander Khorzenevski
(alex@akagency@gmail.com) and
Synopsis (contact Natalia Sanina,
Nat@synopsis-agency.ru). All tend
to concentrate on trade titles.
Many Russian publishers work
directly with western partners and
regularly visit international book
fairs such as London, Bologna,
BookExpo America and Frankfurt.
Tere are several book fairs in
Russia itself; the St Petersburg Fair
in April, the Moscow International
Book Fair in early September (the
largest) and the slightly oddly
named Non/Fiction Book Fair
in Moscow in early December
(upmarket fiction and non-fiction).
All are open to the public, who
can purchase books at a discount,
but these fairs can also provide
opportunities to meet Russian
publishers on their home ground.
What are Russian publishers
looking for? Certainly western
bestsellers that may appeal to their
market, but also literary fiction for
adults and children, biographies and
autobiographies (if the personalities
concerned are known in Russia),
popular history, illustrated books
on leisure topics, self-help titles and
popular business books, as well
as more specialised academic and
professional titles. ELT publishers,
who came early to the market,
have tended to abandon licensing
line of children’s books by domestic
authors. Egmont is also active in
the children’s book market. On the
academic and professional front,
key players are Binom, Geotar,
Infra-M, Unity-Dana, Ves Mir,
Alpina and Olympus Business.
Te sale of rights is a key strategy
for reaching the Russian market,
both for reasons of language and
because book prices in Russia still
remain very low by comparison with
the west – this can sometimes make
costing for co-editions diffi cult.
On the copyright front,
Russia is a signatory to all three
major international conventions
(Berne, the Universal Copyright
Convention and the WIPO
Copyright Treaty) and the period
of copyright protection is now
comparable to that in the European
Union and the United States, i.e.
the life of the author plus 70 years.
However, Russia’s accession to Berne
in 1995 contained a proviso that
foreign works first published before
27th May 1973 (the date of the
Soviet Union’s accession to UCC)
would remain in the public domain
and could be published without
permission or payment – the source
of some controversy even amongst
Russian intellectual property lawyers.
Te market is also subject
to substantial piracy of music,
audiovisual works and computer
software as well as books, and
this impacts on domestic as well
as on foreign publishers. Piracy is
increasingly taking place online.
For a general overview of
the market, the UK Publishers
Association produced an updated
survey of the Russian Book Market
in November 2010; this is available
free of charge to PA members or
can be purchased by non-members
at a price of £100 (print) or £85
W
ith Russia the market
focus country at the
Fair, Russian publishers
will be at Earls Court in force
and there will be many associated
literary and cultural events.
For publishers interested in
tackling this market for the first
time, what are the possibilities?
First, it’s worth remembering that
the present Russian publishing
industry is relatively young – until
the collapse of the Soviet Union
in 1991, publishing was entirely
state-controlled. Tere were a
limited number of publishing
houses, most with a monopoly in
publishing in a particular subject
area. Tere was state censorship
and the works of many western
writers – George Orwell and John le
Carré among them – were banned.
Te importation of western books
took place via a state monopoly,
Mezhdunarodnaya Kniga, with
priority given to scientific and
technical works; this meant that
western academic publishers came
earliest to the market. All rights
business had to pass through the state
copyright agency, VAAP, and rights
payments were made on the basis of
rates set down by the state, relating to
the category and length of the book
rather than the size of print run.
Following the radical political
and economic changes, it became
possible to set up private publishing
houses and hundreds sprang up
almost overnight, many of which
did not survive. Te new publishers
initially concentrated primarily on
mass market titles as those provided
a quicker return on investment. It
was often quite diffi cult to determine
the profile of a new publisher as
their range of publications were so
diverse – in effect, “anything that
sells”. In the early 1990s translations
of western books dominated the
market, including the works of
many hitherto banned authors, and
also books on topics, and produced
in styles, new to the market – for
example, Dorling Kindersley’s highly
illustrated and well-designed titles
proved very popular. Coffee table
books on lifestyle topics found a
market amongst newly wealthy
Russians in a market that had
hitherto depended on publishers
maintaining low book prices
through state subsidies.
Te former state publishers either
went out of business or privatised,
with the result that it became
harder to place rights in specialised
titles. However, completely new
markets emerged for books on
topics such as computing and
western business methods, and
indeed on the history and politics
of the former eastern bloc.
What is the situation now?
From the late 1990s onwards there
was something of a reaction against
so many translations of western
trade titles and more promotion of
domestic authors, some of whom
have been successfully published in
the west, in particular crime writers
such as Boris Akunin. Statistics show
that there are nearly 6,000 active
publishers in Russia, but of these
only 100 produce approximately
46% of publishing output.
Publishers are mainly concentrated
in Moscow and St Petersburg and
broad distribution throughout this
vast market remains a problem.
Ten publishers currently each
produce more than 1,000 titles
per year. AST and Eksmo are
the largest of these and both also
own distribution networks and
chains of bookstores. Other key
players are Olma, Ripol Classik
and Rosman, the publishers of the
Russian editions of Harry Potter;
Rosman also produces an excellent
Selling rights in Russia
This is not a market to be ignored,
and this year’s London Book Fair will
provide ample opportunity to make
contact with Russian partners
30 London Fair DEALER Monday 11 April 2011
Lynette Owen
P U B L I S H E R S W E E K L Y & B O O K B R U N C H L O N D O N F A I R D E A L E R
The sale of rights is a key strategy for reaching the Russian market. Lynette Owen e
market should consider
in terms of direct distribution of
original editions.
Are there particular points that
need to be borne in mind when
working with Russian publishers?
Tis has sometimes been a volatile
market, so as with any potential
new licensee it is always wise to take
up references with other western
publishers who have done business
with them in the past. As mentioned
earlier, book prices remain low (the
average price could be equivalent
to between US$2 and US$6 –
Russian publishers do tend to
think in dollars), and print runs can
be modest (3,000-5,000 copies with
no guarantee of repeat printings).
When asking Russian publishers
for data in order to calculate licence
terms, they will often quote what
they call the “publisher’s price”.
Tis is not a fixed or recommended
retail price, but rather an average
price quoted to wholesalers, which
could be considerably lower than
the range of prices at which that
book might be sold to end users
in different bookshops. If royalties
are to be calculated on that price,
the royalty percentage should be
raised accordingly to compensate
for the discount. Advances are by
negotiation. Tere may still be
cases where the total royalty from a
modest print run might lend itself
better to a lump sum payment for
an agreed number of copies.
Russian publishers are still
subjected to considerable
bureaucracy and some (fortunately
not all) may require licence contracts
to be signed in both English and
Russian. All will find it easier to remit
payments (advances, lump sums and
ongoing royalties) if they receive a
stamped and signed invoice for the
amount due. Sales statements and
accounting can be intermittent,
so regular reminders are helpful.
Some publishers seem to require
additional paperwork such as signed
certificates that payment has been
received by the western licensor.
A key point to bear in mind is
that in 2004 Russia imposed a rate
of 18% VAT on royalties remitted
abroad. Different Russian publishers
seem to deal with this in different
ways, but it behoves the western
licensor to word licence contracts in
such a way that they do not lose an
18% VAT deduction from amounts
due to them – the Russian publisher
should fulfil that commitment over
and above the contracted payments.
Te question of the territory to be
granted to a Russian licensee needs
to be carefully considered. Some
publishers may be happy to grant
world rights in the Russian language,
but it may be worth questioning
licensees on what channels they
realistically have outside Russia itself,
where even internal distribution can
be problematic. Some of the larger
publishers do have channels to many
of the former Soviet Republics (in
particular Belarus, Ukraine and the
Baltic States), where there are still
significant Russian populations.
Russian publishers are
increasingly seeking to acquire
ebook rights as part of their
translation licences. Before agreeing
to include those additional rights,
care should be taken to establish
the following: whether they already
have an ebook programme in place;
whether they are supplying direct
or via third party retailers; if they
are including ebooks in aggregated
collections (all of which would affect
the financial model); what the end
user is permitted to do; and whether
the ebooks are DRM-protected.
Most Russian publishers would
admit that their market was
particularly hard hit by the economic
recession and it is certainly the
case that some have delayed
publication of licensed editions or
even cancelled contracts altogether.
However, the UK Publishers
Association’s delegation to Moscow
in December 2010 saw signs of
recovery and optimism for the future.
Tis is not a market to be ignored,
and this year’s London Book Fair
will provide ample opportunity to
make contact with Russian partners.
Lynette Owen in Copyright Director of
Pearson Education Ltd; she is a regular
visitor to Russia, having first visited the
Soviet Union in 1977. ■
London Fair DEALER Monday 11 April 2011 31
explains what those who are new to this
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U
ntil recently, reading a book
had resisted technological
advances, but like every-
thing else, this has started to evolve
and now we are embracing technol-
ogy. Books are now more easily
available in electronic format and
sharing your opinion about a title
– print or ebook – is more popular.
So when LibraryTing, the online
cataloguing and
social networking
site for book lovers
was launched more
than five years ago,
its success was hardly surprising.
LibraryTing connects people
based on the books they read and
also provides a space to create
a library-quality catalogue of
books. Users can contribute tags,
ratings and reviews, participate in
member forums and find people
with similar taste in books. It also
provides details of thousands of
local bookstores, libraries and book
festivals, plus author readings,
signings, discussions and other
book-related events in your area.
Its popularity with its 1.2 million
registered users would account
for the 54 million books and 66
million tags that
have been added
by its users since
launch.
Described
by one user as “one of the seven
wonders of the web”, the data is
drawn from Amazon.com and
more than 690 libraries around
the world, including the Library
of Congress. Once you have set
up your library, you can search
commented recently that staff liked
the enhancements because it makes
the catalogue more dynamic and
offered a lot of extra content. Te
general impression they had was
that their users had noticed the
difference to the catalogue, and had
been using the tags to see whether a
particular title suited their needs.
In general, the response from
libraries around the world has been
positive and users are benefiting
from the communities being
created. As one Client Services
Librarian said: “LibraryTing is
fabulous. My library has recently
added LibraryTing to our
catalogue and it’s been really helpful
with readers advisory.”
So as the reviews and tags
continue to be added to the website,
the communities keep growing and
spreading further around the world
to all those who have a passion for
books, and a desire to share their
knowledge with others.
Go on, release your inner
librarian – you know you want to!
Jo Grange is Marketing Manager,
Bowker UK. Bowker, the distributor for
LibraryTing for Libraries in the UK and
all other territories outside of the US, is at
stand L305. Te first 25 people interested
in setting up their own LibraryTing
account, will also receive a LibraryTing
mouse for scanning barcodes and creating
their own home library catalogue. ■
your books, sort them, create new
collections, edit book information,
print a copy of your catalogue,
write reviews and apply tags, as well
as connect with other readers.
“LibraryTing is a sort of
Facebook for people who like
books,” says one member, “I can
share my library with others, and
meet people with similar tastes.
Te experience is like walking into
someone’s home and looking at
their collection of books. Within a
minute, you know whether he or
she is your type, and you begin to
wonder what else you might have
in common with them.”
And with the launch of
LibraryTing for Libraries,
libraries can now use this wealth of
information too. Tis works within
the library’s existing operating
system, allowing library users
to access much of the content
generated by LibraryTing users.
It also has library-specific features
such as a virtual shelf browser
and mobile access via Library
Anywhere.
For many libraries, the appeal
was the wealth of reviews available
for their users (all approved for
usefulness and appropriateness
by LibraryTing librarians), plus
the ability for their users to add
their own reviews. Tere are two
packages for a library to subscribe
to: catalogue enhancements (book
recommendations, tag-based
discovery and other editions
and translations) or review
enhancements (user reviews,
widgets to blog and links to
Facebook, plus more than
450,000 reviews).
Anna Brynolf, of Digital
Information Services at Malmö
University Library in Sweden,
Social networking for bookworms
LibraryThing is a
sort of Facebook
for people who
like books
32 London Fair DEALER Monday 11 April 2011
Sharing your library with others
P U B L I S H E R S W E E K L Y & B O O K B R U N C H L O N D O N F A I R D E A L E R
Jo Grange of Bowker UK looks at how LibraryThing and LibraryThing for Libraries
are helping to develop communities of book lovers
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Kindle, iPad and other device
owners are now descending on
the library.
Despite the simmering
controversy, ebooks, library
advocates stress, also represent an
opportunity for publishers. Sarah
Rosenblum, a librarian from
Hennepin County in Minnesota,
said at the ALA meeting that her
library system spent $35,000 in
2010 on ebooks. In 2011, they
will spend more than $350,000,
based on the “overwhelming
success” of their first foray
into ebook service, which was
powered by Overdrive, the
leading vendor facilitating library
ebook lending.
Overdrive, meanwhile, reports
that library ebook downloads
in 2010 shot up more than
200% from 2009. At a Digital
Book World panel in January,
Overdrive CEO Steve Potash
praised libraries, saying that a
book in a library OPAC (Online
Public Access Catalogue) was
better marketing than “some
blogger”. In fact, Potash said, for
all the marketing libraries do for
publishers’ books, “publishers
should pay them”.
On the same panel,
Christopher Platt, a librarian at
the New York Public Library,
urged publishers to come to
the table and forge an equitable
solution. “Current content is
king,” Platt said, bemoaning the
absence of some major publishers
and ebook titles from library
offerings, such as Keith Richards’
recent autobiography Life, and
Jonathan Franzen’s Freedom. “You
try explaining why to a patron,”
Platt said. “All they know is that
the library failed them.” ■
terms that satisfy the needs of
libraries and protect the value
of our intellectual property,”
Macmillan CEO John Sargent
recently explained. “When we
determine those terms, we will
sell ebooks to libraries.”
But Brewster Kahle, founder
of the Internet Archive and
a digitisation initiative called
Open Library, says things needn’t
be so diffi cult. Kahle rallied
librarians in January at the ALA
Midwinter Meeting with a strong
message: don’t let a few powerful
corporations take control of your
digital future. “What libraries do
is buy stuff and lend it out,” he
said at the meeting. He suggested
libraries “digitise what we have
to, and buy what we can,” but
not to allow the promise of
managed, licensed access turn
libraries into “agents for a few
major corporations”.
In July 2010 Kahle’s Open
Library scanning efforts with
the Boston Public Library drew
questions about whether they
would be sued for scanning
and lending digital copies of
in-copyright books. But Kahle
said that after some “initial hand-
wringing”, there has been “nary
a peep” from publishers. “We’re
just doing what libraries do,”
Kahle said.
He urged more dialogue with
publishers, but some librarians
wonder how much time they
have to talk. As ebooks surge in
popularity, librarians say they
must offer them or risk being
seen as outmoded. One librarian
at ALA Midwinter dubbed the
recently concluded holiday
season “the Kindle Christmas,”
and noted that the millions of
F
rom research and pilot
programmes to digitisation
efforts and financial
support for a range of vendors,
libraries have helped seed the
ground for ebooks. But now that
the consumer market for ebooks
has taken off, are libraries at risk
of being marginalised? Tat is
the concern after HarperCollins
recently announced that it would
limit library ebooks to only 26
lends before the ebook must
be repurchased. Tat policy,
however, has met with stiff
resistance from libraries since
its implementation a month
ago, putting libraries and the
publisher on a digital collision
course – with patrons in the
middle.
In an open letter to librarians
in March, HarperCollins’
president of sales Josh Marwell
asserted that unlimited
digital lends of ebooks would
“undermine the emerging
ebook ecosystem,” and “lead
to a decrease in book sales
and royalties paid to authors”.
Librarians, however, aren’t buying
it – no pun intended. Keeping an
unoffi cial running tally, Library
Journal reports that dozens of
library consortia, representing
hundreds of individual
libraries, are refusing to buy
HarperCollins’ ebooks. But,
don’t call it a boycott. Rather,
the librarians say it is simply a
reasoned purchasing decision.
In a note on the Library
Journal website at the end
of March, Jo Buder, Kansas
State librarian, announced a
moratorium on HarperCollins’
ebook titles purchased via the
Kansas state library consortium,
pointing to a range of questions,
including how the library would
handle MARC records, and
what the policy would mean for
patron holds. Te lend limit is
especially unwelcome, librarians
say, considering the great budget
stress facing libraries. “At a time
when libraries are struggling to
remain open and staffed,” said
Roberta Stevens, President of the
American Library Association
(ALA), “this new limitation
means that fewer people will
have access to an increasingly
important format for delivering
information”.
Te uproar over the
HarperCollins policy highlights
the uneasy reality now facing
libraries in the digital age: while
print books are purchased,
owned and lent subject to
copyright law and their physical
limits, ebooks are licensed and
subject to licence terms – or,
in some cases, not sold at all.
Macmillan and Simon &
Schuster are two major American
publishers that do not sell ebooks
to libraries at present. “We are
working diligently to try to find
26 lends?
As ebooks surge in popularity,
librarians say they must offer them or
risk being seen as outmoded
34 London Fair DEALER Monday 11 April 2011
Brewster Kahle: Don’t let a few powerful corporations take control of your digital future.
P U B L I S H E R S W E E K L Y & B O O K B R U N C H L O N D O N F A I R D E A L E R
Andrew Albanese reports on a dispute in the US over HarperCollins’ decision to
limit the lending of ebooks by libraries
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