April 16, 2011 - April 16, 2011, The Afro-American A1

By Zenitha Prince
Washington Bureau Chief
Read’s Drugstore in
downtown Baltimore
was given temporary
historical landmark status
on April 12, delighting
preservationists and
disappointing offcials and
developers.
The Commission for
Historic and Cultural
Preservation’s ruling will
allow for a longer review
on whether the building –
site of a ground breaking
civil rights victory – should
be preserved. But city
offcials say the decision
further bogs down already
slow-moving progress
on the Lexington Square
project, which promises
to revive the blighted west
downtown area known as
“Superblock.”
“The mayor is
disappointed with the
decision as it may slow job
creation for Baltimore’s
citizens and delays
much-needed investment
and revitalization of
Baltimore’s Westside,”
said Ryan O’Doherty,
spokesman for Mayor
Stephanie Rawlings-Blake,
in an e-mailed statement.
In other news reports,
the mayor is quoted as
saying the decision will
delay the $150 million
development by at least
six months. But Johns
Hopkins, executive director
of Baltimore Heritage
which spearheaded efforts
to preserve Read’s, said
this issue should have been
addressed years ago. “For
seven years we have been
pushing for more historic
preservation on this project.
And it hasn’t gone
forward for seven years not
[because of] this issue but
because of other factors
[such as funding],” he told
the AFRO. “This review
should have happened
a while ago and it’s not
holding up the project for
any signifcant period.”
Preservationists and
community leaders earlier
this year waged a concerted
campaign to block the
development’s initial plans,
which called for the partial
to full demolition of about
17 landmarks to make way
for a mix of retail shops,
apartments, hotels and
offces.
Civil rights leaders were
particularly concerned
about the fate of Read’s
Drug Store, the site of an
By Zenitha Prince
Washington Bureau Chief
“Of all the forms of
inequality, injustice in health
care is the most shocking and
inhumane,” said Dr. Martin
Luther King Jr. in a speech to
the Medical Committee for
Human Rights back in 1966.
And yet, decades later, that
injustice thrives – Blacks
and other minorities continue
to lack, disproportionately,
access to health care and to
suffer and die from a gamut of
diseases.
“Our preexisting condition
remains race and ethnicity,”
said Fredette West, chair of
the Racial and Ethnic Health
Disparities Coalition. A six-
year cancer survivor, West
said many more minority
women who suffered breast
cancer did not make it.
“And, sad to say, in a lot of
instances, even though the
death certifcate may have
read ‘breast cancer,’ the
underlying cause for many
of them was race-based and
ethnic-based health disparities
– medical injustices – that
should not be in this great
country of ours.”
That’s why West and
other medical equality
advocates welcomed the
Obama administration’s
announcement last week
of a “frst-of-its-kind”
national plan to reduce – and
eventually eliminate – those
disparities. “Thank you,
Lord,” was West’s reaction
as she spoke at the press
conference called to announce
the initiatives.
Effective immediately
within all Department of
Health and Human Services
offces, the HHS Action
Plan will seek to increase
the number of minority
physicians; tap “promotoras,”
community health workers
to guide Spanish-speaking
residents in seeking health
services and provide dental
care to poor children, among
other steps.
“This action plan ... is
the most comprehensive
federal effort ever to address
racial/ethnic disparities,”
said Dr. Howard Koh,
assistant secretary of Health
and Human Services.
Emphasizing its importance
and the need for across-the-
board support, he later added,
“We know that the health
of the individual is almost
inseparable from the health of
the larger community [and]
By Shernay Williams
AFRO Staf Writer
One of the two men accused of murdering
an AFRO security guard last spring was
sentenced to life in prison with all but 35 years
suspended by a circuit court judge April 11.
Troy Taylor, 20, pled guilty to frst-
degree murder, the use of a handgun in the
commission of a crime, conspiracy to commit
armed robbery and two other charges for his
role in the killing.
He, along with accomplice Michael Hunter,
20, allegedly robbed a Greenmount Avenue
carryout at gunpoint shortly after midnight
April 8, 2010.
Charles Bowman Sr., a 73-year-old
overnight security guard for the AFRO, was
inside grabbing a meal in preparation for
his shift when the two men rushed the store.
Startled, Bowman made a sudden movement,
which prosecutors say prompted Hunter to
open fre. Bowman later died from gunshot
wounds at Johns Hopkins Hospital.
The Vietnam War veteran had served eight
years at the AFRO and was a deacon at his
church.
Police say the defendants retrieved $13
over the course of the stickup.
Carrie Bowman, one of the deceased’s
daughters, said “nobody wins” in this case.
“We are happy justice is being served but
we’re sad he’s just a kid,” she said. “They are
children. All we can do is hope they receive
rehabilitation.”
A trial for Michael Hunter is scheduled for
June 30.
www.afro.com Volume 119 No. 36
Copyright © 2011 by the Afro-American Company
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APRIL 16, 2011 - APRIL 22, 2011
$1.00
Listen to “First Edition”
Join Host Sean Yoes
 Sunday @ 8 p.m. on
88.9 WEAA FM, the
Voice of the Community.
Continued on A8
Join the AFRO on
Twitter and Facebook
B4
Continued on A8
‘Mr. Cummings, I Need a Job!’
B3
• Urban Call
INSERT
Lil’ Mo Makes Acting Debut
at National Theatre
A7
By Kristin Gray
AFRO Managing Editor
Democracy teeters on the brink of
obscurity in Cote d’Ivoire, a tropical West
African nation rife with verdant cacao trees
and, in recent months, bloodshed.
The confict brewing there stems from
a historically sought-after triumvirate
— power, money and respect — which
illegitimate president Laurent Gbagbo
clamored to maintain before his arrest in the
nation’s capital on April 11. After losing
the country’s 2010 presidential election
to Ivorian politician Alassane Ouattara,
Gbagbo unleashed armed security forces on
protestors decrying his leadership. In brutal
retaliation, pro-Ouattara mobs combed cities
like Duekoue, Blolequin and Guiglo, where
the International Federation of the Red Cross
and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC) estimates
thousands were killed and wounded. The
country’s infghting spawned a protracted
Continued on A3
Who Cares about Cote
d’Ivoire’s Bloody Confict?
Not Western Media
UN Photo/Basile Zoma
Pictured are displaced Ivorians in Duékoué, in the western Moyen-Cavally region of
Côte d’Ivoire. The area has been plunged into crisis since fghting erupted between
military forces loyal to former Ivorian President Laurent Gbagbo and supporters of
the internationally-recognized new president, Alassane Ouattara.
Finally, a Plan to Reduce
Health Disparities
AFRO File Photos/Rob Roberts and J.D. Howard
Congresswoman Barbara Lee, D-Calif., and Sen. Ben
Cardin, D-Md., have given their support to this plan.
“We are happy justice is being
served but we’re sad he’s just a
kid.”
–Carrie Bowman
Killer Sentenced
Troy Taylor gets 35 years for role in AFRO security guard’s death
Read’s Granted
Temporary Historic
Landmark Status
Charles Bowman Sr., a member of
the AFRO family, was killed by Troy
Taylor and his alleged accomplice
Michael Hunter during a robbery on
April 8, 2010. He is missed.
One-on-One
with Austin Rivers
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A2 The Afro-American, April 16, 2011 - April 22, 2011
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AFRO National Briefs
‘Fox and Friends’ Roast Crayola’s Multicultural
Markers
The hosts of “Fox and
Friends,” Fox News Channel’s
morning show, recently blasted
arts and crafts maker Crayola for
manufacturing a special brand
of markers the company says are
ethnically sensitive.
The brand’s Multicultural
Markers feature many different
hues of skin tones, unlike its
traditional sets. On April 7, host
Brian Kilmeade introduced the
story and news contributor Michelle Malkin criticized the
markers. “It’s just goofy. I have to say that I am proud to say
that I say I survived my childhood without [them],” Malkin
said on the show. “I was fne with ‘Burnt Sienna’ and I think
really most elementary school kids are fne with pink or blue.”
Malkin then suggested the special brand is really an
underlying method of capitalizing off of liberal parents, rather
than appealing to children.
“I understand that this is pandering more to liberal parents
than it is to kids who really have no need for such things,” she
added. “The only color that this really is about is green—it’s
good, smart savvy politically-correct marketing by Crayola.”
Chelsea Rudman, blogger for Media Matters, questioned the
segment’s recent feature of the markers and claimed the special
brand had been around for years. Crayola’s website supports
Rudman’s claims as a timeline of the company’s products
shows that the multicultural line was indeed introduced in
1992.
MLK III and Andy Young Join Forces to Form
New Black TV Network
By fall 2011, Black television viewers won’t need cable to
watch a station dedicated to broadcasting images of people that
look like them; they’ll have Bounce TV.
The network,
which will target
Black audiences
between the ages
of 25 and 54, will
broadcast an array
of programming,
including
movies, live
sporting events,
documentaries, faith-based programs and original series all
available on the digital signals of local television stations,
the network’s organizers told
reporters April 6.
Instead of being conveyed
through cable or over satellite
signals, Bounce will arrive
over the airwaves, like TV was
delivered before the explosion
of technological choices.
“We are basically targeting
the rabbit-ear consumer,”
Ryan Glover, a former Turner
Broadcasting executive and
Bounce organizer, said,
referring to the households that
are not equipped with cable
or satellite hardware and still
rely on over-the-air television
signals
Bounce TV’s founders,
which include Martin Luther
King III and former United
Nations Ambassador Andrew
Young, announced the venture
during a news conference. “My
father envisioned the day that
African Americans would play
major roles in entertainment
within ownership, not just serve as entertainers on the stage or
in front of the cameras,” King said in a statement. “That’s what
makes this even more exciting to me as we embark on this new
endeavor of an independently owned and operated broadcast
television network featuring African Americans.”
A promotional video on Bounce TV’s website contends that
over 14 million African-American households watch more TV
than those in any other demographic, yet only two networks
serve Black audiences. Latinos have over 80 channels.
“If African-Americans watch more TV than anyone else,
why don’t we have more choices?” questioned Young, a
businessman and minister who worked as a top aide to MLK Jr.
during the civil rights movement, held elective offce as mayor
of Atlanta, Ga. and a member of the House of Representatives,
and later served as U.N. ambassador during the administration
of President Jimmy Carter. “Bounce will help meet that need.”
Young, King III and their partners have acquired television
rights to nearly 400 prominent Black flms, including Ray, Do
The Right Thing, Car Wash, Boyz ‘n The Hood, Glory and A
Raisin in the Sun.
Norfolk Principal Apologizes for Mock Slave
Auction
NORFOLK (AP) — A Norfolk school principal has
apologized for a classroom activity last week in which a teacher
staged a mock auction of Black and mixed-race students as part
of a Civil War history lesson.
The Virginian-Pilot reports that Sewells Point Elementary
School Principal Mary B. Wrushen wrote the students’ parents
this week to say that while the teacher’s actions were well-
intended, “the activity presented was inappropriate for the
students.” She said the activity was not supported by the school
or division.
Division spokeswoman Elizabeth Thiel Mather said the
teacher separated Black and mixed-race fourth-graders from
their White classmates and auctioned them. She said the
division was taking “appropriate personnel action.”
Wrushen declined to comment Friday and the teacher, Jessica
Boyle, did not return a call to the school, the newspaper reported.
Marian Wright Edelman Receives National
Leader for Justice Award
Marian Wright Edelman, an African-American social
activist and founder of the Children’s Defense Fund (CDF),
received a national award for her advocacy for children and
social change on April 5 as part of the annual John Jay Justice
Awards.
Celebrated flm icon and
activist Harry Belafonte
presented Edelman with the
national leader for justice
award during the ceremony,
which was held in the
Harold M. Proshansky
Auditorium at the CUNY
Graduate Center in New
York City.
“When John Jay
College extended the
invitation for me to
participate in the program, there was no thought, no hesitation
– mention Marian Wright Edelman and I’m where you want me
to be,” Belafonte said as he presented the award. “I’m honored
to have been given this task to celebrate her life, leadership and
justice.”
Across the nation, Edelman’s name and the Children’s
Defense Fund have become synonymous with a dedication to
bettering the lives of children, especially the poor, minority
or physically disabled. Edelman said it’s a fght that is needed
more than ever before.
“This has been a wonderful evening,” said Edelman. “I’m
moved to be honored and it makes me want to fght even
harder. We have got to stand up, fght back and reclaim our
children. We can make changes—it’s movement night.”
Edelman founded the non-proft organization in 1973 and
it has been supported for over 38 years with foundation and
corporate grants and individual donations. Acting as a voice
for children, this organization heads various campaigns that
are devoted to protecting, uplifting and educating children
throughout America.
Marian Wright
Edelman
Martin Luther
King III
Andrew
Young
Courtesy Photo
Courtesy Photos
Courtesy Photo
A2 The Afro-American, April 16, 2011 - April 16, 2011 April 2, 2011 - April 8, 2011 The Afro-American A5
By Alan King
AFRO Staff Writer
Jennifer Hudson and other
relatives positively identified
the body of her 7-year-old
nephew Monday, just hours
after his body was found in a
sport-utility vehicle sought in
connection with the murder of
Hudson’s mother and brother.
The white, 1994 Chevrolet
Suburban with Illinois license
plate X584859 was found on
Chicago’s West Side after
police received a 7 a.m. call
from a neighbor about a suspi-
cious vehicle. The man noticed
the vehicle while walking his
dog. According to the Chicago
Tribune, the boy had been shot
multiple times in the back seat
of the vehicle. The SUV, regis-
tered to Hudson’s murdered
brother, was towed with the
boy’s body inside and is being
processed by evidence techni-
cians and workers. The body
was later removed and taken to
the Cook County Medical
Examiner’s office.
Hudson and other family
members arrived at the Medical
Examiner’s office mid-after-
noon to identify the body.
Given the choice between look-
ing directly at the body or
viewing it on a wall-mounted
video screen, the family chose
the latter. According to the
Tribune, Hudson said, “Yes,
that’s him.”
A spokesman for the office
told the newspaper that Hudson
“remained strong for her fami-
ly” and was clearly its leader.
“She held hands with her fami-
ly,” the spokesman said. “It
was obviously a very emotional
moment.”
The boy – the son of Julia
Hudson, Jennifer’s sister – had
been missing since Friday,
when a relative found Julian’s
grandmother, Darnell
Donerson, 57, and his uncle,
Jason Hudson, 29, shot to death
in his grandmother’s home in
the 7000 block of South Yale
Avenue.
An Amber Alert – a desig-
nation for high-risk missing
children – was issued Friday
after Julian was discovered
missing after the murders.
Police arrested William
Balfour, the missing boy’s step-
father and estranged husband
of Julia, at his girlfriend’s
Southside apartment several
hours after the murders.
Balfour’s mother, Michele, has
told reporters that her son had
nothing to do with the slayings.
Balfour remains a suspect in
the murders but is being held in
jail for parole violation after
being convicted of attempted
murder and vehicular hijack-
ing. Cook County records show
that he pleaded guilty to both
charges in 1999. He was also
convicted in 1998 for posses-
sion of a stolen motor vehicle.
He was released from prison in
2006 after serving seven years
for the attempted murder and
car hijacking charges.
The boy remained missing
through a long weekend in
which police and volunteers
posted fliers bearing his photo-
graph around the city. On
Sunday, Jennifer Hudson asked
for the public’s help in finding
her nephew. In her MySpace
blog, she thanked fans and sup-
porters for their prayers and
offered a $100,000 reward to
anyone who returned the boy
alive.
Since the investigation,
Hudson – who gained stardom
after appearing on “American
Idol,” and then won an
Academy Award for her role in
the movie Dreamgirls – has
stayed out of the public eye.
The Chicago Tribune report-
ed that a parade of cars moved
slowly past her family’s home
Monday morning, past the
news vans, reporters and curi-
ous onlookers.
Neighbors stood
quietly and
reflected on the
violence.
In front of the Hudson’s
home, men in heavy jackets
and hooded sweatshirts came to
kiss the twin white crosses bar-
ing the names of Donerson and
Jason.
“Everybody is sick of going
through stuff like this,” Artisha
West, a former resident of the
area told the Tribune. “We all
have to stick together. All these
young children are dying, and
for what?”
By Alan King
AFRO Staff Writer
Presidential candidate John
McCain’s attack on ACORN –
Associated Community
Organization for Reform Now –
confirms the success of the
organization, the head of the
group says.
“This is testimony to the work
we’ve done and success we’ve
had,” Maude Hurd, president of
ACORN, said in an interview
with the AFRO.
“When this attack started, we
had just announced that we had
registered 1.3 million new vot-
ers,” she said. “That’s just to say
that someone’s running scared
because of ACORN’s success.”
McCain, who is running for
president on the Republican tick-
et, lashed out at ACORN in the
final debate against Barack
Obama, contending the group “is
on the verge of maybe perpetrat-
ing one of the greatest frauds in
voter history in this country,
maybe destroying the fabric of
democracy.”
Factcheck.org, a non-partisan
Web site, found those claims to
be “exaggerated,” with “no evi-
dence of any such democracy-
destroying fraud.”
Hurd believes the McCain
charges were politically motivat-
ed.
She said, “Because it’s low-
and moderate-income people,
and people of color, I believe the
McCain campaign thinks those
voters are going to vote
Democratic, which is not neces-
sarily true.”
ACORN is no stranger to
controversy.
For 38 years, the non-partisan
organization has fought for social
and economic justice for low-
and moderate-income
Americans. With 400,000 mem-
ber families organized into more
than 1,200 neighborhood chap-
ters in 110 cities nationwide,
ACORN has over the years seen
its share of criticism while advo-
cating for affordable housing,
living wages, healthcare for the
underserved— and while organ-
izing voter registration drives.
But none has been as withering
and baseless as this one.
With the presidential election
less than two weeks away,
ACORN’s detractors allege the
organization has engaged in mas-
sive voter registration fraud after
the reported discovery of bogus
names, such as Mickey Mouse
and Dallas Cowboys players
Tony Romo and Terrell Owens,
among the names submitted to
election officials.
Hurd said those workers, who
were doing those things without
ACORN’s knowledge or permis-
sion, were fired.
“The evidence that has sur-
faced so far shows they faked
forms to get paid for work they
didn’t do, not to stuff ballot
boxes.” ACORN, she said, is the
victim of fraud, not the perpetra-
tor of it.
Hurd said the only things
bogus are the charges them-
selves. And factcheck. org
agrees.
It concluded, “Neither
ACORN nor its employees have
been found guilty of, or even
charged with, casting fraudulent
votes.”
The problem came about pri-
marily because of the way
ACORN operates. Rather than
rely on volunteers, it pays peo-
ple, many of them poor or unem-
ployed, to sign up new voters.
The idea was to help both those
being registered and those doing
the registration.
Maud explained, “We have a
zero tolerance policy for deliber-
ate falsification of registration.”
Most news account neglect to
point out that ACORN is
required by law to turn in all reg-
istration forms. And they also fail
to note that it was the organiza-
tion, in many instances, that first
brought the phony registrations
to the attention of authorities.
The McCain camp apparently
isn’t interested in those fine
points, preferring to air mislead-
ing ads that seek to link Obama
to ACORN, thereby undercutting
his political support.
McCain: I’m John McCain
and I approve this message.
Announcer: Who is Barack
Obama? A man with “a political
baptism performed at warp
speed.” Vast ambition. After col-
lege, he moved to Chicago.
Became a community organizer.
There, Obama met Madeleine
Talbot, part of the Chicago
branch of ACORN. He was so
impressive that he was asked to
train the ACORN staff.
What did ACORN in Chicago
engage in? Bullying banks.
Intimidation tactics. Disruption
of business. ACORN forced
banks to issue risky home loans.
The same types of loans that
caused the financial crisis we’re
in today.
No wonder Obama’s campaign is
trying to distance him from the
group, saying, “Barack Obama
Never Organized with ACORN.”
But Obama’s ties to ACORN run
long and deep. He taught classes
for ACORN. They even endorsed
him for President.
But now ACORN is in trouble.
Reporter: There are at least
11 investigations across the
country involving thousands of
potentially fraudulent ACORN
forms.
Announcer: Massive voter
fraud. And the Obama campaign
paid more than $800,000 to an
ACORN front for get out the vote
efforts.
Pressuring banks to issue risky
loans. Nationwide voter fraud.
Barack Obama. Bad judgment.
Blind ambition. Too risky for
America.
Since McCain’s comments,
ACORN’s 87 offices have been
bombarded with threats and
racist mail.
The day after the presidential
debate, vandals broke into the
organization’s Boston and Seattle
offices and stole computers.
After a Cleveland representative
appeared on TV, an e-mail was
sent to the local office saying she
“is going to have her life ended.”
Aworker in Providence, R.I.,
received a threatening call say-
ing, “We know you get off work
at 9” and uttered racial epithets.
Acaller to one office left a
message on the answering
machine, saying: “Hi, I was just
calling to let you know that
Barack Obama needs to get
hung. He’s a (expletive deleted)
nigger, and he’s a piece of
(expletive deleted). You guys are
fraudulent, and you need to go to
hell. All the niggers on oak trees.
They’re gonna get all hung hon-
eys, they’re going to get assassi-
nated, they’re gonna get killed.”
Another message said, “You
liberal idiots. Dumb (expletive
deleted). Welfare bums. You
guys just (expletive deleted)
come to our country, consume
every natural resource there is,
and make a lot of babies. That’s
all you guys do. And then suck
up the welfare and expect every-
one else to pay for your hospital
bills for your kids. I jus’ say let
your kids die. That’s the best
move. Just let your children die.
Forget about paying for hospital
bills for them. I’m not gonna do
it. You guys are lowlifes. And I
hope you all die.”
Hurd thinks the hate calls will
cease soon.
“In two weeks, I think these
attacks will be over. But I think it
will be harder for us to get our
name back on good graces
because they really trashed us in
the last few weeks.”
But ACORN will not be
deterred.
“We’ve been fighting for a
long time, for over 30 years, for
the rights of low- and moderate-
income people all across the
country,” Hurd said. “We’re
going to continue to fight for
economic justice in our commu-
nities.”
November 1, 2008 - November 7, 2008, The Washington Afro-American A3
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counting and identifying shapes activate a child’s learning ability,
and help them enter school more prepared. That’s why PNC
founded Grow Up Great and its Spanish-language equivalent Crezca
con Éxito, a 10-year,
$
100 million program to help prepare young
children for school and life. Pick up a free bilingual Sesame Street™
“Happy, Healthy, Ready for School” kit at a PNC branch. It’s filled
with all kinds of simple, everyday things you can do to help a child
learn. Together, we can work with our communities so an entire
generation won’t just grow up... but grow up great.
Identification Statements
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Jennifer Hudson and Relatives Identify Body of Her Slain Nephew
“She held hands with her family. It was obviously a very emotional moment.”
Courtesy Photos
Jennifer Hudson and her mom, Darnell Donerson who
was killed, as well as her brother, Jason.
Jason Hudson
Julian King, Jennnifer Hudson’s nephew.
ACORN Fights Back
Leader Calls Voter Registration Fraud Charges ‘Bogus’

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“The youngest man
performing today–
–energy–enthusiasm–
optimism–vocal prowess–
mastered both his medium
& his message”
NewYork Examiner—2/2011
Broadway Lecture & PerforMance
By Shernay Williams
AFRO Staf Writer
Just before the General
Assembly wrapped up this week,
state lawmakers gave fnal approval
to a bill changing how minority
contractors are viewed when dealing
with state contracts. Under the
new legislation, state agencies
fulfll their commitment to MBE by
outsourcing 25 percent of the total
value of their contracts to either of
the defned minority groups, which
includes, Blacks, women and other
racial minorities.
Crossfled Senate and
House versions of the measure
overwhelming cleared both
chambers. Governor Martin
O’Malley is expected to sign the
legislation by mid-May before the
new law takes effect July 1.
The stopgap legislation renews
the state’s commitment to the
MBE program, which expires
July 1. Lawmakers are expected
to formulate a long-term plan for
the program next session, after
completion of a comprehensive
review of MBE.
The Presidents’ Roundtable, an
organization of Black CEOs from
the Baltimore Metropolitan area,
support the measure, contending
in a statement that it “will further
strengthen the integrity of [MBE]
while at the same time provide the
state and the affected stakeholders
the much needed time to devise a
practical and pragmatic approach
to ensuring the continued inclusion
of minority and woman-owned
businesses in the Maryland
procurement process.”
A recently released study vetting
the MBE program found that
disparities prevail in Maryland’s
contracting market place, and in the
last fve years, most state contracts
failed to garner the obligatory 25
percent minority participation.
Proponents of the new legislation
say eliminating the percentage
clauses for Black and women-
owned businesses by mandating
that 25 percent of awards go to
any minority group will encourage
state agencies to reach out to more
minorities.
The bill also stiffens minority
business participation clauses.
Under the new rules, the Governor’s
Offce of Minority Affairs must
establish guidelines for state
entities to allocate funds for sub
groups; contractors must submit
extensive proof that they were
unable to attract qualifed minority
businesses before receiving pardons
from the state; and state agencies
must submit to Public Works and
the Governor’s Offce of Minority
Affairs annual reports detailing
pardons requested and granted.
Delegate Barbara A. Robinson of
Baltimore City said the legislation
“contains some much needed
requirements.”
“In the old MBE program, if
the prime contractor did not attain
the required MBE percentage,
there were no consequences,” she
said in a letter to the AFRO. “They
were permitted to continue to bid
on contracts and prove excuses.”
The new bill includes debarment
procedures for non-compliance.
“What this legislation means
is that the state of Maryland
is committed to building the
program and making it stronger,
more effective and create more
opportunities for minority
businesses,” said Luwanda W.
Jenkins, special secretary for the
Governor’s Offce of Minority
Affairs, which administers MBE.
“It is the enabling legislation that
allows us to legally continue the
program.”
State Legislators Greenlight Minority Business Bill
April 16, 2011 - April 22, 2011 The Afro-American A3
“In the old MBE program, if the prime contractor did
not attain the required MBE percentage, there were
no consequences.”
– Delegate Barbara A. Robinson
tug-of-war between Gbagbo’s
supporters, Ouattara’s rebel
forces and international
democracy organizations.
The political instability in
Cote d’Ivoire comes on the
heels of massive uprisings in
North African countries such
as Yemen, Libya and Egypt,
which prompted round-the-
clock coverage on major
American media outlets like
CNN and MSNBC. In all
these countries, hundreds of
innocent civilians have been
killed and thousands displaced
due to violent public uproars.
Yet, many foreign relations
experts say the confict in
Cote d’Ivoire and other Sub-
Saharan African countries
garner a modest fraction of
news coverage in Western
media.
Determining why Western
media maintains a love affair
with specifc African nations
– and blatantly snubs others
– unearths myriad socio-
economic, political and even
racial implications.
“There is a bias against
Sub-Saharan Africa,” said
Richard Downie, deputy
director and fellow with
the Center for Strategic and
International Studies’ Africa
program. “People have this
mindset that it’s somehow
less important than the rest
of the world because it’s not
a strategic priority for the
United States. People here
are obsessed with the Middle
East…because of the strategic
interests involved.”
With Libya exporting
1.3 million barrels of oil a
day in 2010, according to
the International Energy
Agency, political stability
in the country has global
importance. But advocacy
organizations are more
concerned with human rights
abuse and deaths of unarmed
civilians in Libya, Cote
d’Ivoire and Egypt, many of
whom participated in peaceful
protests against governmental
regimes.
According to the United
Nations High Commissioner
for Human Rights Ravina
Shamdasini, at least 536
Ivoirians died as a result of
armed confict in April alone.
Add in reported mass rapes
and the IFRC-estimated
exodus of more than 100,000
Ivoirians to neighboring
countries, and it seems likely
Cote d’Ivoire’s confict would
rank among top news stories
worldwide.
But this has been untrue
from a historical perspective,
said Yvonne Captain, a
professor of international
affairs and an African
Diaspora expert at The George
Washington University.
“It’s certainly true that
the francophone, Sub-
Saharan African nations and
other regions of the world
where there are signifcant
populations of people of
African descent, receive less
media attention,” Captain
told the AFRO in an e-mail.
“Race is probably a factor,
but another big issue is the
perception by the media and
by many policy decision-
makers that interacting with
these regions offers no great
advantages for the U.S.
When you look at or read
the coverage about what is
happening in countries like
Libya and Egypt, there is
invariably some coverage
of the oil situation and the
question of the price of
gasoline in this country. In
contrast, not much mention
is made of the loss of cocoa
production in Ivory Coast.
After all, our supply of cocoa
has not dwindled.”
American reporters alone
cannot bring global attention
to Cote d’Ivoire’s political
nightmare, however. With
journalism evolving into a
public-driven medium and
news organizations worldwide
making massive funding cuts,
coverage of Cote d’Ivoire’s
crisis situation may suffer
as reporters lack fnancial
backing.
“The problem with the
media here in the U.S., and
in general as well, is that
they’ve had massive cutbacks.
The frst thing they cut back
on is foreign news coverage,
because it’s expensive to run
a foreign bureau,” Downie
said. “If they’re looking
at international coverage,
the frst continent they’re
probably cutting back on is
Africa. They seem to think,
wrongly, that there’s not so
much interest out there in
what goes on in Africa. Also,
it’s a very expensive continent
to cover because of the
communication diffculties,
problems with infrastructure
and diffculties traveling
around.”
Thanks to the advent of
social media, some Ivoirians
and journalists have provided
shocking frst-person accounts
of violence in the country to
international audiences. But
poverty prevents the vast
majority of people living in
Cote d’Ivoire from accessing
sites like Twitter and
Facebook, widely hailed as
groundbreaking promotional
and organizational tools in
Egypt’s uprising three months
ago.
According to statistics
compiled by the Central
Intelligence Agency, 967,300
Ivoirians had Internet access
in 2009. However, more than
21 million people live in the
small West African nation,
indicating a disparity in
Internet access.
Yet Black Americans, who
comprise one of the largest
user demographics on Twitter,
have the technological means
to champion African causes
with grassroots activism,
according to Captain.
“Black Americans should
feel that they have a vested
interest in what is happening
in Ivory Coast and other
countries of sub-Saharan
Africa. Even before the
African Union declared the
Diaspora as the sixth region
of Africa, it was important
for us to feel connected to
the continent. However, our
knowledge of what goes on
there on a regular basis is
scanty at best,” Captain said.
“While there have always
been some individuals in
the Black community who
have made it their business
to remain on top of current
events in Africa, the average
Black U.S. citizen does not
have Africa on her or his
mind. This should change as
we become more globally
literate.”
Who Cares about Cote d’Ivoire’s Confict?
Continued from A1
“They seem to think, wrongly, that there’s not so much interest out there in what goes on in Africa. “
– Richard Downie
April 16, 2011 - April 16, 2011, The Afro-American A3 A4 The Afro-American, April 2, 2011 - April 8, 2011 A4 The Afro-American, April 16, 2011 - April 22, 2011
By Shernay Williams
AFRO Staf Writer
A state prosecutor
dismissed all criminal charges
against former City Council
President Lawrence Bell
III April 7 after the woman
plaintiff failed to present
suffcient evidence. Shan
Mabry had alleged Bell, 49,
burglarized her home, stole
prescription sunglasses worth
$700, harassed and repeatedly
stalked her over several
months in 2010.
Mabry, who claimed
she dated Bell for over 20
years, had requested a peace
order against the former
politician last month. A
circuit court judge denied the
order, asserting that Mabry
“could not meet the required
burden of proof” on Bell’s
wrongdoing.
A spokesman for the
Baltimore state’s attorney’s
offce said prosecutors had
decided to throw out the
criminal case for that same
reason. “We investigate
and where appropriate, we
prosecute,” said spokesman
Mark Cheshire. “We spoke
with her and concluded that
we could not successfully
prosecute in this case.”
Mabry did not appear in
court April 7. At a previous
hearing for the peace order,
she refused to comment when
approached by the AFRO,
but told the judge she was “in
fear of (her) life.”
After the prosecutor
announced the charges
were dropped, Bell told
the AFRO that the city’s
court system should be
overhauled to prevent persons
from submitting “frivolous
claims.”
“I do believe that it is
too easy for people to fle
complaints,” he said.
His attorney Michael
Mitchell said, “One can tell
by reading the statement of
charges that [Mabry] has
an emotional illness.” Bell
and his second attorney,
who handled the peace order
case, have also contended
that Mabry should seek
psychiatric help due to her
“off-the-wall” allegations.
In a three-and-a-half-
page criminal complaint,
Mabry alleged Bell destroyed
security cameras that
recorded him breaking into
her home, cyber-stalked
her, tapped into her phone
conversations, took showers
in her bathroom and watered
down her shower gels and
broke into her car “to take
things just to torture [her].”
Mitchell said he is
considering suing Mabry for
malicious prosecution and
emotional distress for the
several months of hearings
that resulted from her
assertions. When asked why
Mabry would have targeted
Bell, a woman he claims is
just an acquaintance, Mitchell
said he wasn’t sure. “My
mother always says when you
start trying to rationalize what
crazy people do and why
they do it, it’s futile,” he said.
“That’s all I can say.”
He is working to have the
criminal case expunged, an
effort that would essentially
erase the allegations from
Bell’s records.
Bell said it’s “hard to
say” whether the charges
have smeared his image. “In
personal matters, people
make outrageous claims,” he
said. “It would be my hope
that people believe in the
idea of innocent until proven
guilty, but it remains to be
seen.”
Bell headed the City
Council for 12 years until
launching an unsuccessful
mayoral bid against political
friend Martin O’Malley in
1999. He later dropped out
of the city’s political scene
to host a radio show in
Atlanta before resurfacing in
Baltimore in 2006 for a state
Senate race eventually won
by Catherine Pugh.
AFRO File Photo/Bill Tabron
Criminal charges against Lawrence Bell were dropped
April 7. Bell said he hopes the people of Baltimore believe
in innocent until proven guilty.
Prosecutors Drop Charges Against Lawrence Bell
“We spoke with her and concluded that
we could not successfully prosecute in this
case.”
–Mark Cheshire
By Sean Yoes
Special to the AFRO
On April 11 the Baltimore
City Council voted to hold
hearings on preserving the site
of the old Read’s drugstore
at Lexington and Howard
streets, where in 1955 lunch
counter sit-ins protested
public accommodation
segregation, which resulted in
a landmark U.S. civil rights
victory.
Then on April 12, the
Baltimore Commission for
Historical and Architectural
Preservation voted 7-1 to
grant temporary status to the
old Read’s building, which
is owned by the city. The
move delays and complicates
the city’s plans to redevelop
the area. It’s the latest
chapter in an ongoing battle
between preservationists
and developers over a swath
of downtown Baltimore’s
Westside development known
as, “Superblock.”
University of Maryland
law professor Larry Gibson,
who has spent decades
studying and researching
the civil rights history of
Maryland, believes the old
Read’s building is of great
historical signifcance and
should be preserved as a
landmark of the civil rights
era. “The Morgan students
Read’s sit-ins up at Loch
Raven and Cold Spring Lane
were the frst sustained sit-
in campaign in the nation,”
explained Gibson from his
home as he prepared for an
exhibit on the Maryland sit-in
movement to be presented at
Morgan State University.
“Clearly, the January 1955
desegregation of 37 stores
was historic and that resulted
from the pressure of Morgan
students near Northwood and
CORE (Committee On Racial
Equality) downtown,” Gibson
added. “They were working
in a coordinated fashion and
that therefore is the frst really
successful sit-in activity
that led immediately to the
desegregation of 37 stores.”
According to Gibson the
desegregation breakthrough
at Read’s came fve years
prior to the Greensboro
sit-ins in 1960, which are
acknowledged, perhaps
erroneously, as the frst sit-in
demonstrations in the country.
The AFRO reported on
the Read’s victory in its
January 22, 1955 edition.
“Read’s Drug Stores will
now serve all customers at
its soda fountains and lunch
counters,” the AFRO reported.
“This change in policy was
announced on Thursday
afternoon by Arthur Nattans
Sr., president of the chain
which operates 37 stores
throughout the city.”
The article continued,
“Under the direction of Mr.
(Ben) Everingham, Dean
McQuay Kiah of Morgan
State College, and Joan
Wertheimer, CORE staged
a ‘sit-in’ demonstration last
Thursday at the Read’s store,
Howard and Lexington Sts.,
and Morgan College students
staged similar demonstrations
at the company store in the
Northwood Shopping Center
all week.”
The AFRO also
published a letter written by
Everingham, who was vice
chairman of the Baltimore
CORE, in that same edition.
“May I bring to the attention
of your readers the fact that
the Morgan State College
Student Social Action
Committee played a very
important part in the recently
successful effort to bring
about the integration of all
the eating facilities of the
Read’s stores,” Everingham
stated. “It is quite possible
that without their fne and
The History
Read’s Drugstore: Site of First Successful Sit-Ins
AFRO File Photo
Read’s Drugstore has been placed in the center of a
controversy between preserving history and promoting
progress.
Continued on A8
April 16, 2011 - April 22, 2011, The Afro-American A5
JEANNE | HOMELAND
JOE & ANNE | BALTI MORE
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Advertiser: BGE
Publication: Afro American
Insertion Date: April 16, 2011
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BGE_2011_Choice_for_us_Afro_Layout 1 3/30/11 3:19 PM Page 1
Community
By Bobby Marvin
Special to the AFRO
One thing that excites
Mothyna James-Brightful
is marriage. The passion is
evident in her voice when
she talks about it. Today,
as a married woman and
a promoter of sisterhood,
James-Brightful wants to
spread the importance of
marriage to more women.
That’s why “relationships”
is the theme for this year’s
Heal a Woman to Heal a
Nation (HWHN) conference.
Now in its eighth year, the
one-day event of workshops
and activities will focus on
teaching women how to build
and strengthen relationships
on April 16.
“We truly believe
that healthy individuals
and healthy families are
the cornerstone of our
communities. And so,
keeping with our mission of
building families, we wanted
to take this year to focus on
relationships. We haven’t
really dealt with that issue
previously and we wanted the
chance to deal with various
kinds of relationships,” said
James-Brightful, founder and
visionary director of HWHN.
James-Brightful launched
the frst HWHN conference
in 2004 on the campus of
Morgan State University.
Following its success, she
decided to start a non-proft
organization under the
same moniker. From there,
James-Brightful worked to
rejuvenate women from all
walks of life.
Past conferences have
focused on single parenting,
healthy living, and fnancial
management.
For the frst time this year,
however, the conference
will tackle the issue of
sexual violence and abuse
with a support workshop for
survivors coping with the
trauma of sexual assault while
in a relationship.
“When they [survivors]
begin to enter into
relationships, having that
moment of honesty with
their partner does become a
part of that process in that
relationship [as well as ]
sharing with their partner
what they learned about
what works for them and
their healing ,” said James-
Brightful, who is also the
community educator for
TurnAround Inc., a non-proft
organization that works with
survivors of sexual assault.
HWHN also added “You
Are the Prize” workshop for
adolescent girls ranging from
ages 14-16. This forum will
give teen girls tips on how to
develop better relationships
with their mothers and self-
esteem building.
Tracy Eaddy-Ward, co-
founder of the sexual abuse
non-proft group Phoenix
Rising Baltimore, was
tapped by HWHN to lead the
discussion with the young
girls. As a one-time teenage
mother, she believes it is vital
to teach young girls about
healthy decision-making
early.
“You know when you
teach a woman something,
you’re not just teaching an
individual, you’re teaching
the whole entire community.
She’s the future mother, she’s
the future doctor…she’s the
future, period,” said Eaddy-
Ward. “If there weren’t any
women…pouring into young
girls, there would be a lot of,
you know, hurt young girls
becoming grown women.”
Every HWHN conference
features a panel discussion;
this one will include
relationship experts Nisa
Muhammad, founder of the
Wedded Bliss Foundation
and Black Marriage Day;
and psychiatrist Dr.
Melva Green. Author
and radio personality
LaDawn Black will be the
moderator for the panel
discussion that will cover
relationship building with
self, youth and spouses.
“One of the things that
a lot of the speakers are
going to talk about and
what I would like to get
out there is…changing
the perceptions that we
have when it comes to
relationships. Are we
able to look [realistically]
about the things that we
want versus the things that
we really need in order to
have love in our loves,”
said Black, host of 92Q’s
popular radio segment “The
Love Zone.”
HWHN plans to do more
with relationships throughout
the year, particular with
marriages. It’s all a part of her
ambitious goal of rebuilding,
James-Brightful said.
“Our goal, our sole goal is
to build strong families,” she
said. “And for us that starts
with building strong, healthy,
whole women and young
ladies who will grow up to be
young women.”
Heal a Woman to Heal a Nation Launches 8th Annual Conference
Mothyna James-Brightful,
founder of the annual Heal
a Woman to Heal a Nation
conference
Courtesy Photo
By Blake Bryson
Special to the AFRO
Spring has arrived, and with it the Laurel Fair, which opens
April 15 at Laurel Park Racetrack in Laurel, Md. The fair,
which provides unusual but amazing entertainment, will be
open on weekends and will run through May 1.
This year, there will be over 100 attractions for customers
to enjoy, from rides such as The Orbiter, Wacky Worm Roller
Coaster and The Giant Wheel, to an extraordinary educational
session with animal rescuer and trainer Michael Sandloffer.
There will be a showcase of the proclaimed World’s Largest
Horse, and also sessions where an Arabian stallion will walk
across a 60 foot arena on his hind legs. No matter how young
or old the amusement seeker is, organizers said, there will be
multiple attractions to keep them entertained.
Fair manager Ron Weber states, “The Laurel Fair is a
family-friendly event that while it is especially fun for kids,
people of all ages will enjoy the Great American Frontier
Show, the Wolves of the World Show and the Old West
Theatre, and no one will
want to miss Lance Gifford’s
Magic and Illusion Show
with his amazing illusions
and sleight of hand tricks.
Everyone loves fair food like
funnel cakes, corn dogs and
gyros.”
For those that maybe a
little skeptical and feel that all
fairs and carnivals are created
equal, Weber wants them to
know something else.
“The Laurel Fair will
be more fun than people
expect. It will offer families
a variety of entertainment
and performances, thrilling
amusement rides, and
traditional fair food, and the
freworks on Saturday night
will be spectacular, a real
treat for people of all ages.”
The Laurel Fair will be
open Fridays, Saturdays and
Sundays, April 15-17, April
22-24 and April 29-May
1. Gates open at 5 p.m. on
Fridays and 12 p.m. on all
other days. The fair closes
at midnight every day.
Admission to the Laurel
Fair is $8. Buy one get one
free admission coupons are
available at www.LaurelFair.
com. For a schedule of
events, directions and for
vendor information, please
visit www.LaurelFair.com or
call (631) 920-2738.
Laurel Fair Opening
This Weekend
Courtesy Photo
Area residents can expect the usual--and unusual--
carnival attractions at the Laurel Fair in Laurel, Md.
A6 The Afro-American, April 16, 2011 - April 22, 2011
April 15
‘And He Blessed My Soul’
Easter Production
Mount Moriah Baptist
Church, 2201 Garrison Blvd.,
Baltimore. 7-9 p.m. Mount
Moriah Baptist Church
will premiere this Easter
production that chronicles
the life of Christ. For more
information: 410-945-3575.
April 16
Bringing Sexy Back to the
Marriage
Holiday Inn Express-
Stadium, 1701 Russell St.,
Baltimore. 8 a.m.-5 p.m. In
this conference, participate in
fun and informative activities
dedicated to livening up your
marriage. $85. For more
information: 301-646-1259.
Uplifting Minds II
Entertainment Conference
2011
Sojourner-Douglas
College, 200 N. Central
Ave., Baltimore. 9 a.m.-3
p.m. Some of the nation’s
current entertainment
industry executives and artists
will share what it takes to
become successful. For more
information: upliftingminds2.
com.
City Lit Festival 2011
Enoch Pratt Free Library,
Central Branch, 400 Cathedral
St., Baltimore. 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
Come out for this literary
festival featuring authors,
poets, panels and workshops.
For more information: 410-
396-5430.
Spring Bazaar 2011
The Emmanuel Church,
8729 Church Lane,
Randallstown, Md. 10
a.m.-4 p.m. The Women’s
Day Commission of the
Emmanuel Church will
host their frst annual spring
bazaar. Various vendors will
be exhibited and food and
beverages will be available
for purchase. $15-$25. For
more information: www.
theemmanuelchurch.com.
April 17
Charm City Sunset Jazz
Concert Series Featuring
H. Wade Johnson
Latin Palace, 509 South
Broadway, Baltimore. 4
p.m. Relax, unwind, meet
new people and enjoy live
music at this concert series
featuring some of the best
jazz and R&B players
in the region. $8. For
more information: www.
charmcityjazz.com.
If It Ain’t One Thing, It’s
Another
St. Paul Praise and
Worship Center, 501
Reisterstown Road,
Pikesville, Md. 3:30-6:30
p.m. The Voices of Praise
of the St. Paul Praise and
Worship Center will present a
Palm Sunday concert, aiming
to uplift your spirits and give
you motivation. $15. 410-
486-2028.
April 19
UniverSoul Circus
Security Square Mall
Parking Lot, 1717 N. Rolling
Road, Baltimore. 7:30 p.m.
Come out as the UniverSoul
Circus returns to Baltimore
for its 17th season. $12-$40.
For more information: www.
universoulcircus.com.
April 20
Energy Saving with BGE
Enoch Pratt Free Library,
Pennsylvania Avenue
Branch, 1531 W. North
Ave., Baltimore. 2 p.m. In
this interactive workshop,
a representative from
Baltimore Gas and Electric
(BGE) will explain how
to read your monthly bill
and present an overview of
conservation tips. For more
information: 410-396-0399.
April 22
Marva’s Third Annual
Good Friday Flashback
Party Fish Fry
Steelworkers Hall, 550
Dundalk Ave., 9 p.m.-1 a.m.
Celebrate Good Friday and
enjoy good food and fun.
$20. For more information:
410-599-9159.
April 23
Open Mic
Enoch Pratt Free Library,
Herring Run Branch, 3801
Erdman Ave., Baltimore.
2-3 p.m. Read your original
poems or sing your favorite
tunes at this open mic event.
For more information: 410-
396-0996.
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Community Calendar
April 16, 2011 - April 22, 2011, The Afro-American A7
Opinion
One has to wonder why this same premise was unsuccessful
after the Bush-era tax cuts. Under the budget plan, one must
also wonder what the justifcation is for maintaining subsidies
and tax credits that shield corporations from paying their fair
share of taxes.
As I view the Ryan budget
plan, I see a fundamental shift
in the economic philosophy
of this nation—a plan that
places the burden of economic
solvency upon the working
class, while relieving the
wealthy from the “nasty” chore
of returning revenue to the country in proportion to the level at
which they receive benefts of citizenship.

Dr. E. Faye Williams is chair of the National Congress of
Black Women and chair of the board of the Black Leadership
Forum. See website at www.nationalcongressbw.org or call
202/678-6788
Rev. Jesse L.
Jackson Sr.
(TriceEdneyWire.com) -
The jobs numbers were hailed
as good news last week,
with employers adding over
200,000 jobs last month,
and the unemployment
rate ticking down to 8.8
percent. Less attention
was given to the downside
of these numbers. Black
unemployment remains about
twice as great as the national
unemployment average – and
is going up, not down.
What is going on here? To
some extent, this refects the
old patterns: Minorities are
the last hired and the frst fred; the last to be brought in and the
frst to go.
But it is more than that. The stepladders that hard-working
minorities could climb into the middle class are being
dismantled. With the migration to the North after World War II,
African Americans fooded into cities and eagerly sought jobs
in the growing manufacturing sector. But manufacturing has
been in decline since the 1980s, as companies began shipping
more good jobs than goods abroad.
Then African Americans with growing educational
achievement sought employment in the public sector, particularly
at the state and local level. As more equal opportunity opened
up, they found work as teachers, managers, sanitation workers,
cops and frefghters. But now, layoffs of public employees
are spreading, and minorities often are those with the least
seniority and the frst to go. Latinos and blacks also focked to
the residential, often non-union, construction industries, but these
have been devastated when the housing bubble burst.
This Great Recession has been a Great Depression for young
people. Hit with trillions in losses in retirement accounts and
housing values, older workers struggle to hold onto their jobs
longer. With jobs growth slow, openings for the young are scarce.
Here again there is a racial divide. Nearly one-half of all
African Americans between ages 16 and 24 are unemployed.
Nearly one-fourth of all Whites of that age are also without
work. This is, without question, a social catastrophe. Young
people are graduating from high school or college into the
worst jobs situation since the 1930s. Without jobs, they lose
skills, discipline, dignity and hope. Economists tell us that
those who lose months to unemployment often take years to
catch up with their peers, if they ever do.
Beneath this is the continued legacy of discrimination in
America. Young African Americans still suffer the disadvantage
of unequal opportunity from the start. Too many are born into
poverty, raised in broken homes; suffer the savage inequality
that comes from the absence of affordable pre-K programs,
underfunded public schools, and the absence of good teachers
who fee to affuent suburbs. Urban residents suffer from the
rising cost of and decreasing access to mass transit, making it
more and more diffcult to get to jobs that might be available in
the suburbs.
In Washington, the focus has turned to cutting defcits, not
to creating jobs. With interest rates near zero, and businesses
sitting on trillions waiting for customers, even conservatives
have a hard time arguing that “cut and grow” works. They
suggest that businesses aren’t hiring because they are worried
about potential future tax increases or befuddled by regulations,
or lack confdence in the future. More likely, they simply lack
customers, as 25 million are still in need of full time work,
wages are not keeping up with rising costs of food and gas,
home values continue to sink, and Americans continue to
tighten their belts.
This is a national emergency.
We cannot allow mass
unemployment to be the new
normal. We cannot write off an
entire generation. At the current
rate of jobs generation, it will take six years to make up the jobs
lost in the Great Recession. Young people can’t wait six years
to get to work. The long term unemployed can’t wait six years
for jobs to come back.
We need a National Commission on Jobs and the Young. We
need to focus on the depression that is devastating the newly
emerging Black middle class, and snuffng out hope among the
young. And if Washington can’t hear this yet, we’ve got to raise
our voices and demand that they listen.
The Rev. Jesse Jackson is a civil rights leader, former
presidential candidate and the founder and president of the
Rainbow PUSH Coalition.
Sufer Unto the Young
“…those who lose months to unemployment often take years
to catch up with their peers, if they ever do.”
(TriceEdneyWire.com)
- The medieval vassal state
was legend for the disparity
established between haves
and have-nots. Feudal lords
routinely ruled their serfs
without compassion or
regard for their humanity.
It was customary for feudal
lords to live and feast in the
lap of luxury while serfs
scraped a meager living from
unforgiving soil. When a serf
was bold enough to poach
food from the land to feed his
family and was caught, the
lord would usually infict brutal retribution. This circumstance
is often portrayed in the “Robin Hood” stories.
Most readers would consider this information to be
disconnected from any frame of contemporary reference
related to reality, but if we give full consideration to the “new”
Republican budget presented by Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wis.,
and project its results to the logical conclusion, it portends an
ominous economic future.
One of the most important tenets of the US Constitution is
that government has the responsibility to act in a manner that
supports the general welfare. As I have always known, general
welfare relates to those actions which are so great in scope that
it is impossible for the individual to manage alone. Examples of
this are: construction of roads and infrastructure, public safety
services, public education and public health programs.
The “new” Republican budget eliminates one of these
programs and does serious damage to others. One could
consider Ryan’s plan a program of Robin Hood in reverse.
Under Ryan’s plan, affordable healthcare would be eliminated
and Medicare and Medicaid would change drastically.
True to their pledge, the Republican budget plan would repeal
the recently passed healthcare Bill. Among other things, this
eliminates the extension of parental insurance benefts to students
and the protections afforded citizens with pre-existing conditions.
Under Medicare, instead of the government reimbursing
doctors and hospitals for medical services, seniors would be
responsible for purchasing an optional private health care plan.
The government would then pay the private insurer a subsidy
up to a specifed amount. Costs for needed or desired coverage
beyond the subsidy would have to be paid for by the consumer
or be forgone. Fortunately, these new plans would not affect
those currently age 55 or over.
Likewise, Medicaid would change dramatically. Unlike the
current matching plan that provides for cost-sharing between
the federal and state governments, Ryan’s plan would have the
federal government give a set amount of funds to each state and
have the states manage their individual programs based upon
available funds rather than the healthcare needs of recipients.
While introducing his budget plan, Ryan stated that the U.S.
did not “have a taxation problem, but a spending problem.”
Accordingly, his budget plan lowers the top tax bracket from
35 percent to 25 percent. One tax analyst projects that this will
lower the tax liability for the average millionaire by $100,000 a
year – saving that person $1 million dollars over each 10-year
period. This generosity to millionaires is said to be justifed by
the belief that reducing the tax burden of the rich will lead to
rapid economic growth and increase jobs.
Dr. E. Faye Williams
“…a plan that places the burden of economic solvency upon
the working class, while relieving the wealthy from the ‘nasty’
chore of returning revenue to the country in proportion to the
level at which they receive benefts of citizenship.”
Return of the Vassal State
Congressman Elijah
Cummings
I wish that Republican
opponents of federal funding
for job creation and training
would travel to Baltimore’s
5th Regiment Armory
(on the corner of Howard
and Dolphin streets) next
Monday, April 18.
If those congressional
budget cutters would arrive
at my Annual Job Fair just a
little early, they would see the
job seekers standing patiently
in line, even before we open
the doors at 9 a.m.
Then, perhaps, the
economic realities that
America’s working families confront every day would change
those budget slashers’ priorities. Helping America back to
work might again play a larger role in the ongoing federal
budget debates.
Unemployed Americans want to work. What they need is
the practical help that will allow them to obtain good jobs that
pay enough to support their families.
Washington should take this real-life lesson to heart. When
we open doors to real economic opportunity, people will do
whatever they can to walk through those open doors to success.
This is as true for African American families as it is for
anyone else.
When the Federal Bureau of Labor Statistics revealed that
the national unemployment rate for March had improved to 8.8
percent (its lowest level in two years), that announcement made
national news.
Yet, those same unemployment fgures also acknowledged
that the percentage of African-American families currently
without jobs actually worsened from 15.3 to 15.5 percent in
March.
Even in the best of economic times, African-American
communities suffer from unemployment levels that are twice
that of our White countrymen and women. I need only walk
through my own community to see Black America drowning in
a near-permanent recession.
Even before they greet me, all too often, people on my street
cry out, “Mr. Cummings, I need a job!”
Thanks to massive government intervention, this nation’s
overall economy is slowly improving. Yet, for minorities and
other vulnerable groups, especially young adults, we are living
through a true “depression” that may require years to resolve.
This is why the budgetary battles over federal funding for
education, job training and re-training are so important to our
community.
“There is no way that we can look at an African-American
unemployment rate that is almost double that of the overall
population and not wonder if race is playing a part in that,” I
recently observed to a reporter from the Internet site, BET.com.
“Yet, the unemployment statistics also make it crystal clear that
the less education a person has attained, the more likely he or
she is to be unemployed.”
Still, for many Baltimore families, the immediate challenge
is to survive. They need a job now. And many of these
neighbors already have acquired excellent job skills.
This is why I have invited employers with jobs to fll,
representing a wide range of industries and government
agencies, to my job fair on the April 18. They include some
of our region’s top employers, including Johns Hopkins, the
University of Maryland, Under Armour, Comcast and Whiting
Turner Contracting Co.
Informational sessions will provide valuable insights into
job preparedness, green jobs, and workforce development, as
well as direct access to the public services (like foreclosure
prevention, consumer credit counseling and social services) that
many people need while they look for work.
As always, all of these services, contacts and leads are
provided without charge. However, job seekers should come to
my job fair prepared and dressed professionally and bring with
them their résumé and their photo identifcation.
In the halls of Congress and
here in our community, we all
must continue to do our parts in
helping unemployed America get
back to work – and I hope that
everyone who may beneft will
attend our job fair next Monday.
More information can be obtained by calling (410) 685-9199.
I realize, however, that more than these once-a-year job fairs
will be required to reverse the desperate economic tide in our
community. That is why I will continue to strongly support our
community’s One-Stop Career Centers, conveniently located
at 1100 North Eutaw St. (410-767-2148), 3001 E. Madison St.
(410-396-9030) and Mondawmin Mall (410-523-1060).
Baltimore County and Howard County residents can fnd
the same help at 3637 Offutt Road in Randallstown (410-887-
8912) and 7161 Columbia Gateway Drive (410-290-2600).
Americans want to work – and we all have a personal
interest in helping them achieve their dreams.
Congressman Elijah E. Cummings represents Maryland’s
Seventh Congressional District in the United States House of
Representatives.
‘Mr. Cummings, I Need a Job!’
“When we open doors to real economic opportunity, people
will do whatever they can to walk through those open doors
to success.”
A4 The Afro-American, April 16, 2011 - April 16, 2011
courageous work this happy
development might have
been further delayed for a
considerable time.”
For Gibson – who was
about to enter Baltimore City
College High School at the
time of the Read’s sit-ins –
and the rest of Baltimore’s
Black community, the
opening up of the drug store’s
lunch counter was much more
than a symbolic victory.
“It meant Black people
had places they could
eat outside of the Black
neighborhoods,” Gibson
explained. He added, “I lived
in Govans and I could go to
Read’s. I remember I was on
City’s cross-country team and
we ran a lot all over the city
... That was the only place we
could go as I recall.”
But, Gibson explains the
entire block where Read’s
stood was important for the
city’s Black community.
“The 200 block of
Lexington Street was
downtown to Black
Baltimoreans ... because it
was the block in downtown
that welcomed Black people,
the frst places where we
could shop and not feel
hassled,” Gibson said.
“Even before then there
had been the desegregation
of the 5 and 10 cent stores
along that street as a result
of national pressures. So, it
was the most hospitable block
to Black folks in downtown
Baltimore ... I don’t know of
anything like it in the country.
Something like this, once it’s
gone, it’s gone.”
A8 The Afro-American, April 16, 2011 - April 22, 2011
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Urban League
impromptu sit-in staged by
Morgan College students in
1955 that eventually led to
the desegregation of all the
company’s city stores.
“The Morgan students
Read’s sit-ins up at Loch
Raven and Cold Spring Lane
were the frst sustained sit-
in campaign in the nation,”
Larry Gibson, University
of Maryland law professor
and scholar of Maryland’s
civil rights history, told the
AFROin a recent interview
about the signifcance of the
building.
In mid-March Lexington
Square Partners, the project’s
developers, had announced
plans to retain the outer walls
of the edifce in what seemed
to be a compromise with
preservationists and civil
rights leaders.
“Honoring our history and
building for our future should
not be mutually exclusive
goals,” Rawlings-Blake had
said at the time. “I’m very
pleased that Lexington Square
Partners is taking real steps
to commemorate the Read’s
site and is moving forward
with new investment for
the Westside. Without new
investment, this historic part
of Downtown Baltimore will
continue to deteriorate.”
Given Read’s historic
import, however, a
thorough, unrushed review
is appropriate, Hopkins and
others said. “The Read’s
building is of incredible
importance to Baltimore and
the country and [Tuesday]
the preservation commission
recognized that importance,”
Hopkins told the AFRO.
“We fully support having
this important civil rights
building go through the
city’s established process
for reviewing proposals on
historic buildings.”
Read’s Status
Continued from A1
we know that the health of the
community determines the
overall health of our nation.”
As a physician and the
son of immigrants, Dr. Koh
said he’s seen far too many,
whose poor health was
linked to social or economic
disadvantage. And so the plan
acknowledges “that health
depends on much more than
what happens in the doctor’s
offce,” he said. “It’s impacted
by where people live, labor,
learn, play and pray.”
A major player in the
disparity of health care
outcomes is the unequal
access to health insurance.
According to HHS, minorities
account for more than half of
the 50 million uninsured in the
United States.
The Affordable Care Act,
President Obama’s 1-year-
old health care overhaul,
addresses some of those
gaps. But, the plan also
acknowledges the more
complex factors that feed
those disparities. The fve
major goals of the HHS
Action Plan are to:
- Transform health care by
expanding health insurance
and increasing access to care
through development of new
service delivery sites among
other actions.
- Strengthen the HHS
workforce by creating a
new pipeline program to
recruit more minorities
into public health and
biomedical sciences careers,
providing more translators
and interpreters for non-
English-speaking patients, and
supporting more training of
community health workers.
- Advance the health,
safety and well-being of all
Americans by implementing
the CDC’s new Community
Transformation Grants, and
additional targeted efforts
to achieve improvements
in cardiovascular disease,
childhood obesity, tobacco-
related diseases, maternal and
child health, fu and asthma.
- Advance scientifc
knowledge and innovation by
implementing a new health
data collection and analysis
strategy authorized by the
Affordable Care Act, and
increasing patient-centered
outcomes research.
- Increase the
effciency, transparency
and accountability of HHS
programs by making health
disparities assessments part of
all HHS decision-making and
doing yearly evaluations of
the progress toward reducing
health disparities.
The plan was developed
over a few years with the input
of about 4,500 individuals
including community
stakeholders. A separate
document offers several
strategies to guide community
efforts.
Offcials said the
Affordable Care Act is the
vehicle for moving much of
this disparities reduction plan
forward. “We want to make
sure that our commitment
does not depend upon one
president or one secretary,
[but] that this is a permanent
commitment to deal with
these problems,” said Sen.
Benjamin Cardin, D-Md., who
many thanked for his key role
in ensuring health disparity
provisions were included in
the health care legislation.
That will demand
everyone’s efforts, especially
in light of the ongoing budget
battles, said Congresswoman
Barbara Lee, D-Calif., a
longtime minority health
advocate and a member of
the House appropriations
subcommittee that determines
health funding. “We’re under
siege right now ... and we
have to make sure these
(initiatives) are fully funded,”
she said of current Republican
attempts to dramatically slash
the budget. “We cannot allow
this current debate on the
defcit to be used as an excuse
not to fund what we have to
fund to close these ethnic and
racial disparities that now is
law. We can’t go to sleep; we
must be vigilant.”
For more information
about the plans and the
National Partnership for
Action, visit: http://www.hhs.
gov/news/press/2011pres/04/0
4hdplan04082011.html
For more information
about health disparities and
the Affordable Care Act,
visit: http://www.hhs.gov/
news/press/2011pres/04/
hdstrategy04082011.html
Finally, a Plan to Reduce Health Disparities
The History: Read’s Drugstore
Continued from A4
Continued from A1
Apparently the compromise to preserve the external walls of the Read’s Drugstore
property -- despite the poor condition of the inside of the building -- was not enough for
local groups interested in the historical signifcance of the building.
C
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u
r
t
e
s
y

P
h
o
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o
April 16, 2011 - April 22, 2011, The Afro-American B1
Standing: Kirk and Monet Sykes. Sitting:
Deborah Thomas, Dawn Simmons-Matthews
and Kimberly Stevens
Photos by Anderson R. Ward
Isaiah Foreman, Fay Wilson,
Ronnie Pembroke, Audrey
Pembroke, Evelyn Garrison
First row: Peggy Green, Gwendolyn Foreman and Adrienne Bourne.
Second row: Deborah Neely, Sheila Weems, Doretha McFadden and
Deborah Weems
On April 2, graduates of Baltimore’s Carver Vocational
Technical High School gathered at Martin’s West for an
evening of memories, food, dancing and fun. The “Alumni
Association Dance” featured music from “L.J.” Leon Jones
and attendees included Baltimore City Councilman Ken
Oliver and members of civic organization Baltimore-
Xiamen China Sister City Committee.
Kirk Sykes, principal, Carver Vocational Technical High School,
left; Denise Taylor, president, Carver Alumni Association; Nha Kim,
Baltimore-Xiamen China Sister City Committee and W. Fontaine Bell,
Baltimore-Xiamen China Sister City Committee
Marion Gee, Barbara Christian and Charlene Wylie
Shandi Brown, Rick Workman and Tifany Trusty
Samuel Johnson, Lucille Wynn
and Ronald Small
D.J. Leon “L.J.”Jones
Attendees sing the school song.
Michael Brown
and Eboni Trusty
Morris York and Pat Brown
Sharron Simmons, Inez Robb
and Bernetta Dyson
Yvonne Wooten, Ronald
Small and Faye Pines
Attendees do “The
Wobble.”
Marion Gee,
Ellen Jones and
Brenda Hall
Olivia and
Laferell Buster
Edna Brown,
left, Bernard
White, Dwight
Harris, Faye
Pines and
Michelle
Rigsby
Lillian Frederick, Horatio
Rice and Paulette King
Beverly Smith, left, Baltimore City Councilman Ken
Oliver, Dist. 4; Audrey Pembroke, Edna Mack and
Brenda Stith
B2 The Afro-American, April 16, 2011 - April 22, 2011
April 15
The Drama Ministry of New Metropolitan Baptist
Church presents “The Rock and the Stone: Peter? Peter
Who?” 7 p.m. at 1501 N. McCulloh St. Sarah Crest and
Bettie Durant are directors of the production. The Rev.
Dr. Richard Dickens is pastor of the church.
April 22
Ebenezer AME Church, 20 W. Montgomery St.,
will host its 175th Anniversary Celebration, 7:30 p.m.,
at Martin’s West. The guest preacher will be the Rev.
Ricky Spain, pastor of Waters AME Church. For more
information, call 410-783-0190. The Rev. Charles A.
Baugh is Ebenezer’s pastor.
Good Friday worship services
The United Council of Christian Community
Churches, 11 a.m., The Divine Cathedral Church, 219
N. Chester St.
Preachers include the Revs. Vanessa Alford, Melvin
Jackson, Howard Jackson, Patricia Chase, William
Sellers and Antoine McClurkin, pastor of The Divine
Cathedral Church. The Rev. Jimmy C. Baldwin Sr. is
president of the Council.
Gillis Memorial Christian Community Church,
Noon, 4016 Park Heights Ave., 410-466-2800,
gillismemorial.org.
The Revs. Dr. Stephen Tucker, Terris King, Kevin
Rogers, Tommie Jenkins Jr., Emmett Burns and Alfreda
Wiggins. The Rev. Dr. Theodore C. Jackson Jr. and the
Rev. Melvin Jackson pastor the church.
New Christian Memorial Church, 7 p.m., 3525 W.
Caton Ave., 410-566-5063, newchristian.verizon.net.
Preachers are the Rev. Everett Givens, Dr. James
Lightfoot, Timothy Loftin, Zollie Bagby, Paula Murray
and Marvin Underwood. The Rev. Walter Brunson is
pastor of the church.
St. John AME Church, Noon, 810 N. Carrollton
Ave., 410-523-5468, stjohname.org.
Preachers are the Revs. Myeiska Coger Watson,
Dr. Leah White, Bishop Vashti McKenzie, Dr. J. Ruth
Travis, Dawn K. Thomas, Dr. Alfreda Wiggins and Dr.
LaRessa Smith-Horn. The Rev. Dr. Peggy E. Wall is
pastor of the church.
Southern Baptist Church, 1701 N. Chester St.,
410-732-8566.
9 a.m. “Sleepless at the Cross,” the Revs. Frank M.
Reid, Howard John Wesley, Walter Brunson, Andrew
Foster Connor, Phillip Pointer and Delman Coates.
11 p.m. “Midnight Madness,” the Revs. Clifton
Urquhart, Stephen Dickerson, Joshua Thomas, Reginald
Kennedy Jr., Kadi Webb, Marissa Farrow and Derod
Broady.
The Rev. Donte L. Hickman is pastor of Southern
Baptist Church.
April 23
Experience the launching of Resurrection Church,
8 p.m., at Perkins Square Baptist Church, 2500
Edmondson Ave. The Rev. Drew Kyndall Ross is the
pastor of Resurrection, under the leadership of the
Rev. Dr. David L. Blow Sr., who serves as executive
director. The launch weekend continues with an 8
a.m. Easter service at The Gala Center, 1700 Hill
Drive and regular Saturday Night Experiences, 8 p.m.,
also at Perkins Square. For more information visit
resurrectionchurchbaltimore.org or call 410-922-2920.
May 7
Enjoy food, fun and fellowship at “A Mad Hatter’s
Tea” presented by the Women’s Ministry of St. John’s
Transformation Baptist Church, 2 p.m., in the dining
hall of Hope Community Ministry, 719 Poplar Grove
St. For more information, call 443-449-0381. The Rev.
Carita Mills is the minister to women. The Rev. Dr.
Bertha Borum and the Rev. Dorothy Boulware pastor the
church.
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April 16, 2011 - April 22, 2011, The Afro-American B3
www.afro.com
‘Kam’s Kapsules’: Weekly Film Previews
By Gregory Dale
AFRO Staf Writer
While the District is mostly known for its go-go
rhythms and bounce beats, hip hop electronica beat maker
and recent transplant Jerztheproducer is aiming to put his
own stamp on the city.
“D.C. is a city that is known for embracing change,”
JTP told the AFRO during a recent interview. “When a lot
of people come to D.C., they usually want to become a
lawyer or get into the political scene. I came here to be a
big fsh in a small pond.”
Beyond the city’s traditional go-go repertoire, the
District is indeed the home of politicians, lobbyists and
executives galore. But an emerging hip-hop music scene
lies in the city’s crux and JTP is a recent inductee.
Originally born and raised in Mount Holly, N.J.,
the musician got his start in production when he taught
himself how to play the keyboard and saxophone at a
young age. When he turned 11, JTP started playing drums
for his grandfather’s gospel group and later tried his hand
at beat making, utilizing MTV’s Music Generator PC
program.
He left New Jersey in 2002 and enrolled in Atlanta’s
Morehouse College. Following his collegiate career, he
briefy moved to Los Angeles and returned to Atlanta
shortly thereafter to perfect his craft. But he later realized
that his unique style of production, electronic and dance-
infused hip hop, didn’t match the city’s Dirty South
signature sound.
Thus, he packed up and settled in the District and says
the move was ultimately ideal.
“There are great studios in this area--as a DJ or
producer, you have everything you need right here,” he
said.
JTP’s now celebrating the release of his new recently
released single “Solar Love,” and is hoping his unique
sounds will capture his new city’s attention.
“I just want to present audiences with a different
side of music,” JTP said. “[They] hear a lot of R&B
and rap, but I think [my] music represents freedom. It’s
very eclectic and experimental and I think it’s time for
something new to come around.”
And for the District, that time has arrived especially
with the recent infux of locally-based artists who are
garnering mainstream exposure.
“The music that [local artists] are providing is very
innovative and I think D.C. needs that,” JTP said. “I
think people really need to take a look at the city−yeah
there’s New York and Atlanta, but D.C. [still] has a lot
of opportunities. Those guys are really utilizing their
resources here.”
JTP added that he his eyes set on quite a few DMV-
area artists that he wants to work with in the future.
“I would love to work with Mya; she’s great and I grew
up on her,” JTP said. “I like Phil Ade; he’s a great artist
as well. He’s not really boxed in either with his musical
style.”
Next up for JTP is an extended play (EP) album
named Ear Anatomy which he says will be solely hip hop
electronic dance music, with just a few songs with vocals.
“It’s going to be experimental and innovative,” he
said, speaking on the project. “People are just ready for
good music and I just want to bring something new and
refreshing.”
For more information on JTP, visit www.jtp.fm.
Electronic Hip-Hop
Producer Brings
Unique Sounds to
the District
By Courtney A. Bonaparte
Special to the AFRO
The last few weeks have
been epic for the Food
Network’s homegrown star
Aaron McCargo Jr. Hailing
from the meanest streets of
Camden, N.J., the chef is
prepared to make another
major stride in his career.
April marks the release
of his frst cookbook entitled
Simply Done, Well Done,
featuring sumptuous yet
simple recipes for those
who are new and old to the
kitchen. Each recipe includes
a memory that helped spark
its creation. In addition, the
book is choc full of colorful
photos and anecdotes.
Although this cookbook
was two years in the making,
no blood, sweat or tears
went into its creation. The
chef said dreams, enjoying
“liquid creativity” (alcohol)
with family and cooking
challenges with relatives
inspired his recipes.
“The hardest part was
really making sure that
the original recipes were
tested, making sure that they
work right [and that] the
temperature of the oven and
the type of pan you need
work for the everyday cook,”
said McCargo.
McCargo’s show, “Big
Daddy’s House,” is entering
its sixth season on the Food
Network this month and will
be shot on a brand new set.
Although the set has changed
to a loft setting that McCargo
described as “beautiful and
airy,” he assures his viewers
the season will feature the
same elements they’ve grown
to love.
“The food is still simple,
but more fun,” he said. “The
food is going to be awesome.
It tasted great, it looked great,
and it felt great. So, I’m
hoping that everybody is like,
‘Wow, this is rocking.’”
McCargo’s love for food
began when he was a child,
a time when he was “always
hungry and always greedy.”
However, getting started was
literally a piece of cake, as
he sold homemade sweets to
neighbors as a child.
And while McCargo enjoys
the culinary fair of gourmet
foods, he’s not immune to
commmonplace cravings.
“I do crave fast food
sometimes. I have no any
problems with Popeye’s spicy,
or the original KFC or just
having a Big Mac, no pickles,
extra cheese,” he confessed,
describing himself as a
“regular dude.”
McCargo comes from a
large family and his fondest
memories center around
meals shared at the family
table. From his dad’s burger
and fries dinner to his mom’s
shrimp-stuffed chicken recipe,
those dishes have become part
of his own family tradition.
McCargo’s kids love to be
part of what goes down in the
kitchen as well. He dedicates
the cookbook to his eldest
son Joshua, who is currently
serving time in a juvenile
center, and calls the teen “his
frst sous chief.”
He was at his side before
his big break on the 2004
season of “The Next Food
Network Star.” Meanwhile,
McCargo’s eldest son inspired
him to create Play To Win
Inc., which aims to prevent
and increase the graduation
rate of young males.
“What we want to do is
help them continue to survive
through the tough times
of being in the streets of
Camden,” he said.
While growing up, his
passion for cooking did not
always get positive reactions
from his peers, but McCargo
said he attributes his success
to God.
Simply Done, Well Done
New Cookbook Brings Simple Yet
Refned Recipes to the Kitchen
My Infamous Life: The Autobiography of Mobb
Deep’s Prodigy
Busting onto the scene in the mid 1990s, hip hop duo
Mobb Deep quickly ascended from being two inner-city
youths to one of the most revered groups in hip hop. My
Infamous Life takes a look at Prodigy’s life with the group
and his struggles with drugs, crime, illness and more.
Albert “Prodigy” Johnson takes readers
through his amazing journey, starting with his
childhood and his early introduction to the music
industry. His mother, Fatima Frances Johnson,
was a member of the Crystals, whose records
“And Then He Kissed Me” and “He’s a Rebel”
became chart-topping hits in the ‘60s. Under her
wing, Prodigy was exposed to many music legends
including Diana Ross and Dizzy Gillespie.
But while his mother taught him lessons
that would eventually lay the foundation
for his future career, his father, a heroin
addict and petty crook, taught him the rules of the streets.
After his father was jailed, Prodigy and his mother moved
to a gritty neighborhood in Queens, N.Y. In high school, he
linked up with Kejuan “Havoc” Muchita and the two formed
Mobb Deep. After the group caught the ear of music execs,
they were signed to a major label and eventually recorded
their album The Infamous, now considered a hip hop classic.
But trouble lurked around the corner for
Prodigy as his newly acquired success set
him on a path to destruction. Along with the
fame of the music industry, the rapper was
introduced to the fast life that came along with
it. After his precarious lifestyle landed him in
prison, he would eventually have to
part with his old ways he picked up as
youth and learn how to truly become
a man.
Final Word: Fast-paced
autobiography of a member of one of
hip hop’s most infuential duos.
Reader’s Corner
By Blake Bryson
Special to the AFRO
To stay relevant in the
entertainment industry,
celebrities must be
imaginative and willing to
reinvent themselves. This has
proven to be true for R&B
sensation Lil’ Mo, who is set
to take her talent from the
recording studio to the theater.
Lil’ Mo, born Cynthia
Loving, makes her acting
debut in the stage play The
Color Purple at the National
Theatre April 12–24. The
Maryland-based star said she
is taking full advantage of the
spotlight and calls her role
in the production a gift from
God.
“I prayed and God gave
me favor. No audition!”
Lil’ Mo told the AFRO in
an online message. “I got
an email on my wpgc.com
(ask Lil’ Mo) blog and the
producers were looking for
me. They found me and the
rest is a blessing.”
Lil Mo’ plays a church
choir soloist in the show and
will draw from her extensive
musical background for
inspiration. She has already
been featured on hit singles
with star rap artists like
Fabolous, Ja Rule and Missy
Elliott and is currently one
of the voices of midday
radio in the Washington,
D.C. area on 95.5 WPGC.
If her performance on the
stage is well received by
critics, then Lil’ Mo will be a
bona fde triple threat in the
entertainment industry.
“I would love to [act] if
time permits,” Lil’ Mo said.
“I don’t want to do it just to
be like everyone else. I want
to do it and rock people’s
minds. I wouldn’t want a
stereotypical role either.
I should play a lawyer or
villain, not in a straight to
bootleg type theme.”
The self-proclaimed
military brat has spent
signifcant pieces of her
life performing in front of
audiences, so performing
in a theater setting doesn’t
incite “stage fright.” “I’ll be
singing. This is what I do.
I’m my biggest critic. So I’m
more nervous about me ftting
into my outfts. I’m way too
excited to be scared.”
Although Lil’ Mo has been
completely concentrated on
giving her best performance
possible for The Color
Purple, she won’t neglect her
music career.
“My new album entitled
P.S. I Love Me, is set to be
released this summer. It’s
been a long time coming, but
the platform that is before me
is one I’ve wanted my whole
life. Feels so good to be
loved!” the singer added.
Other musical acts such
as Chaka Khan, Bebe Winans
and Fantasia have starred in
The Color Purple, and they
all fared quite well. Even
though Lil’ Mo admits she
has big shoes to fll, she
hopes to deliver a standout
performance.
For more information on
“The Color Purple,” go to
www.ColorPurple.com.
Lil’ Mo Set to Star in
‘The Color Purple’ at
National Theatre
Lil’ Mo makes her
acting debut in
the stage play The
Color Purple at the
National Theatre
April 12–24.
Courtesy Photo
Courtesy Photo
Courtesy Photo
Aaron McCargo Jr., host of The Food Network’s “Big
Daddy’s House”
B4 The Afro-American, April 16, 2011 - April 22, 2011
By AFRO Staf
University of Connecticut (UCONN) Huskies star Kemba
Walker announced he will enter the 2011 NBA Draft during a
news conference on April 12.
Walker put on one of the greatest single-season
performances in Huskies history, bringing a third national title
to UCONN’s campus this spring. Now the junior guard will
take the blessings of Head Coach Jim Calhoun and join the
draft after being projected as a frst round lottery pick.
“It’s a lot of speculation about me going to the NBA and
I just want to confrm everything … I will be going to the
NBA,” Walker said during the news conference. “I want to
thank coach Calhoun for turning me into a man from day one
... I think this is the right time for me to go to the NBA and I
think coach has done a great job of preparing me to go to the
next level.”
Walker boosted his draft stock with a stellar junior year,
improving his scoring average from 14 points per game in
2009-10 to 23 points per game in 2010-11. He also led the
Huskies to a Big East Conference Championship prior to the
NCAA Tournament, and was recently honored with the Bob
Cousy Award for the nation’s top point guard.
Walker told reporters that he considered returning next
year for a chance to win two-straight national titles, but
ultimately decided to leave because of his great chances of
being selected within the top-10 frst round picks.
Coach Calhoun said he’s excited for Kemba’s future, but
also sad to see one of his
favorite players leave.
“I’m so happy for him
that he’s achieved this, but
I’m also sad that I won’t
see him in my offce every
single day,” Calhoun said.
“He’s as fne a kid as
I’ve ever coached ... a lot
of our success begins with
him and I feel very blessed
by the fact that I was able to
coach him.”
Although Walker is
leaving early, he won’t
go empty handed. The
6-foot-1-inch, 172-pound
combo junior guard has
accumulated enough
academic credits to be
scheduled to receive his
bachelor’s degree from
UCONN when spring
semester ends, just in
time before summer draft
workouts begin.
If you’re HIV+ and think you can’t afford the medication you
need, there’s something you should know.
MADAP CAN HELP.
The Maryland AIDS Drug Assistance Program (MADAP) helps cover the
cost of many medications for low to moderate income people in Maryland
who are living with HIV/AIDS.
There are exciting, new drugs in the fight against HIV/AIDS. Don’t miss out
because you can’t afford them.
Call MADAP today.
410-767-6535 Baltimore Area
1-800-205-6308 Toll Free in Maryland
410-333-4800 tdd
MADAP is a program of the AIDS Administration
Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene
High School Basketball Tournament
Baltimore’s Carr Shines at AAU Tourney
By Stephen D. Riley
AFRO Staf Writer

The Big Shots AAU Basketball Tourney invaded
Washington, D.C., on April 9 and 10, bringing out some
of the most high profle high school players in the region.
With college scouts and other notable basketball browsers in
the building, all eyes were centered on Baltimore’s Aquille
Carr. The Patterson High School (Baltimore, Md.) product is
nothing short of an athlete, literally. The 5-foot-6-inch Carr
did double duty over the two-day tourney, hooping with two
AAU teams. Carr, 17, is just a sophomore, which allows him
to practically play nonstop with his summer hoops team, the
Under Armour Baltimore Panthers.
On the fnal day of the tourney, Carr brought what’s
quickly becoming a bit of Baltimore City folklore to the
Capital Sports Complex in District Heights, Md. The
Baltimore Sun’s 2011 Player of the Year narrowly missed out
on a 17-and-under title on a buzzer-beating three-pointer but
immediately returned to action and won a championship for
his 16-and-under team.
“I just keep my head,” Carr said about playing for two
teams. “I know my teammates are going to help me out
because they know I’m coming from game to game so when
I’m tired they help me out. It’s a good chemistry around our
team so basically we just know how to play and we play off
of each other.”
Carr didn’t need much help for his last game of the day,
fnishing strong with some impressive drives to the basket,
a few lightening quick passes and some effortless shooting.
The 16-and-under title offered redemption for Carr after a
poor showing in his 17-and-under game.
The legend around Carr is apparently brewing as
evidenced by the standing room only space for his 17-and-
under title match. A few chants of “overrated” rang out
from a pair of hecklers, or “haters” as Carr calls them, in the
stands after a string of sloppy turnovers from the point guard.
“It’s just normal to me,” Carr said about the increasing
attention. “I don’t worry about what people are saying and
just play.”
It wasn’t just the “haters” who were out to see Carr
perform, a small contingent of basketball scouts who
attended the tourney were all in line to catch a glimpse of
Carr.
“He’s good, small, but man can he play,” said Clark
Francis, publisher of the HOOP SCOOP, a nationally
acclaimed recruiting service.
The Baltimore City phenomenon is scheduled to return
to action in the area on April 30 when Big Shots travels to
the Leadership Through Athletics (LTA) sports facility in
Lansdowne, Md., to host another two-day tournament. Carr
will need all the rest he can get as he’s expected to be pulling
double-duty once again. The life of a living legend never
gets a rest.
Check out exclusive video footage of the Big Shot
tournament at afro.com.
More Sports on afro.com
By Stephen D. Riley
AFRO Staf Writer
It didn’t take long for Austin Rivers to become the top prep
basketball player in the country—it just took hard work.
The 6-foot 3-inch guard has been working on his game since
he was a toddler, shooting three-pointers since third grade
and locking down on defense since little league. Under the
guidance of his father, former NBA pro and current Celtics
coach Doc Rivers, the younger Rivers has become the next big
thing on the basketball landscape.
Outftted with quickness, a killer crossover and his
trademark pull-up jumper, Rivers will be taking his talents
to Tobacco Road next season as a member of the Duke
University Blue Devils. Throughout his stellar prep career, the
lean combo guard has left several defenders grasping at the air,
but even the elusive Rivers couldn’t shake the AFRO sports
desk as he sat down for a one-on-one.

AFRO: You’re the top prospect in the country, committed
to Duke and the son of a former NBA player, how have you
handled all the pressure so far?
Rivers: I just don’t let the pressure get to me; I just play my
game. I’ve never really thought about the pressure or worried
about anybody else’s expectations because I’ve always felt like
my expectations are higher than [theirs]; the only pressure is
from myself. I’ve always loved the game and played it hard
and everything else has just come into place.

AFRO: You’re going to Duke next season. You’ll be playing
under Coach Mike Krzyzewski and being cheered on by the
Cameron Crazies. What are you looking forward to next
season?

Rivers: Just playing college basketball, man, there’s nothing
like it. It’s a great experience. I’m getting to play with some
great players and arguably the best coach out there. It’s a
primetime stage man and it’s just going to be fun to play on
that level playing at a style of play that I like. It’s just going to
be real fun.

AFRO: You’re a 6-foot-3-inch guard who can run the point
guard spot, but you have the size and the scoring ability to
play off the ball. What do you consider yourself?

Rivers: I’m defnitely a combo guard: point guard, shooting
guard, either one. If Coach K says I need 10 assists from you
but just 10 points, then I’m going to go out there and get 10
assists and 10 points. If he says I need you to get 30 then I’m
going to try to get 30…

AFRO: You grew up under an NBA father and now you’re
going to a school that puts a lot of players into the league.
Have you given any thought to the NBA and what may await
you there?

Rivers: No, not yet. People always talk about me going into
the NBA and all that jazz but right now all I’m concentrated on
is going to Duke. That’s all that’s on my mind; I just want to
go in there with an open mind. I have a lot to learn and a lot to
improve upon as a player and a person. I just got to get better,
man.

AFRO: Your team’s season is over but you still have a couple
of high school all-star games left. What’s the mindset as you
head into the last portion of your prep career?

Rivers: To win, defnitely. We lost the McDonald’s Game,
and I lost my last high school game, so that’s two games in
a row. Even though the McDonald’s Game was an all-star
game, a loss is a loss in my opinion, I don’t care if it’s an all-
star game or not. So, frst things frst: go to this Jordan Brand
Game [April 16], play my hardest to get the “W” and then I
look forward to going to that hoops summit out in Oregon [the
Nike Hoops Summit on April 9], because that’s a big deal, and
represent my country and do my thing out there.
(AFRO Photo/John Moore)
Austin Rivers, the top prospect in high school basketball
and a Duke recruit, sat down with the AFRO to recap his
stellar prep career and discuss his upcoming collegiate
stint.
One-on-One with Austin Rivers, High School Basketball’s Top Prospect
Kemba Walker Declares for NBA Draft
By Stephen D. Riley and
Perry Green
AFRO Sports Writers
With days left in the
NBA’s regular season, playoff
projection is already starting
to heat up in what promises
to be another wild and crazy
postseason. An eventful
summer and a few marquee
trades throughout the year have
led to what may be one the
most anticipated NBA playoffs in recent memory.
With LeBron James now in Miami, Carmelo Anthony now in
New York and the newly redesigned Chicago Bulls atop the NBA
ladder again, the Eastern Conference playoffs alone will make for
some sleepless, digital-video-recorder-aided nights. Perry Green
and Stephen D. Riley of the AFRO sports desk have been squaring
off all year over who they think will square off in the NBA Finals
in June. Check out part one of their debate over their picks for the
Eastern and Western Conference representatives, starting with the
East.
Stephen D. Riley (S.D.R): The Boston Celtics are heading
back to the Finals—simple. People want to talk about Chicago,
people want to talk about Miami and that’s fne. But the Celtics still
have the best team in the East, and they still can play lockdown
defense. It’s clear this is the last go-around for Boston, and I think
they’ll go out of their way to make the most of it. I hate the fact that
they’re relying on the two O’Neals (Jermaine and Shaquille, not
related) to return to good health, but once they get their center duo
back they can pretty much close out the paint against any team and
their top four stars form an incredible nucleus.
Perry Green (P.G): As you’ve seen it for most of the year,
the Bulls have been the best team out East and the best defensive
squad. Derrick Rose is the MVP and head coach Tom Thibodeau
just brings something different to the table when you’re talking
defense. The former Celtics defensive coach has installed toughness
to this team, and I love it. The acquisition of forward Carlos Boozer
means they can now score in the post, and small forward Luol
Deng is having a career season, both offensively and defensively. A
year ago, I would’ve picked Boston, easy, but they’re not the same
dominant team they used to be.
Read more at afro.com…
Fighting for a Title
Courtesy Photos
Carmelo Anthony and
LeBron James
April 16, 2011 - April 22, 2011, The Afro-American B5
By Stephen D. Riley
AFRO Staf Writer
It’s safe to say that Keith D. Murray has a mind for the housing
market. The founder and president of PCV Murcor, Real Estate
Services has provided home appraisal services for the last 30 years,
growing the company from a local southern California product into
a nationwide service. His most recent venture, Vendor Resource
Management (VRM), has been running steadily for the last fve years
by helping to erase marketing time while maximizing loan recovery.
Murray’s register of real estate services is extensive. Along with its
primary duties, VRM also manages loss mitigation and provides short
sales analysis along with pre-marketing, closing, and title service
solutions. Despite the expanded workload, Murray found time away to
sit down with the AFRO and provide some insight into the real estate
market and his fourishing networks.
AFRO: With PCV Murcor already established and running strong,
what infuenced the additional blueprint for VRM?
Murray: The obvious need for accuracy evaluation space is what
drove us to VRM. [And] there
were [also] a lot of opportunities
that we saw to increase what
we were doing by way of trying
to bring some stability to the
communities which are hardest
hit—communities of color. If
you’re going for a new mortgage
it’s critical from the bank’s
perspective to make sure that
the property making the loan
on is accurate. And if you’re a
homeowner in the market place,
where properties are being sold
around you, then you want to
make sure that properties are being sold at an accurate value and not
below market because at the end of the day that hurts neighborhoods.
AFRO: The last few years have been especially rough for the
housing market and those associated with it. What challenges are
your companies currently facing in trying to maneuver through the dry
spell?
Murray: I think the biggest challenge is in making sure we
continue to have our pulse on the dynamics of the market. The market
is more dynamic than it’s ever been in my 30 years; there’s so many
different forces that are having impact on value. For us, the biggest
challenge is to make sure that we understand what’s going on in
markets across the country and we do all we can to make sure our
business partners have a clear understanding of what’s going on [but]
it’s happening so fast.
AFRO: Besides the two businesses, what other projects are
currently in the works?
Murray: VRM In Motion. We travel around country to foreclosed
areas and do recruitment for real estate professionals, brokers and real
estate agents to add onto our broker network. Over 60 percent of our
broker-owned network is of women- and minority-owned businesses.
It brings economic development back into the communities where
foreclosures are most prevalent.
AFRO: With your clear understanding of the market, what’s
perhaps the biggest thing that new home buyers neglect when they go
into purchasing? And if there’s one piece of advice you could give to
them what would it be?
Murray: In relation to buying a home it’s defnitely more than
one. One piece of advice I’d say is don’t over commit to what you
can’t afford [and] don’t look at the purchase of a home as a short-term
investment. Look at the opportunity to own a home as the opportunity
to plug into a community—[and that requires] more than going to
a home and taking care of it but participating in the PTA and other
things that make a community vibrant.
IS THAT YOU
MOM?
©
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FILET-O-FISH
®
Real Estate
Courtesy Photo
President and CEO of
PVC Murcor, Real Estate
Services and founder
of Vendor Resource
Management, Keith D.
Murray, has his ear to the
real estate market.
Real Estate Mogul Talks Business with
the ‘AFRO’
IN THE CIRCUIT
COURT FOR
BALTIMORE CITY
Case Number
24C11001497/FR
PIKESWOOD, LLC
c/o Allen C
Tochterman, Esquire
11411 Cedar Lane
Kingsville, Maryland
21087
Plaintiff
v.
JOHNNIE MOORE, III
SHERRY N. MOORE
FIRST FINANCIAL OF
MARYLAND
FEDERAL CREDIT
UNION
Tenants of the Subject
Property
The Mayor and City Coun-
cil of Baltimore, Maryland,
and all Persons having or
claiming to have
An interest in the property
listed below;
Their respective heirs, de-
visees, executors, admin-
istrators, grantees, as-
signs, or successors in
right title and interest
ORDER OF
PUBLICATION
The obj ect of t hi s
proceeding is to secure
the foreclosure of all
rights of redemption in
the property in the City
of Baltimore, sold by the
Collector of Taxes for the
City of Baltimore and the
State of Maryland to the
Plaintiff in this proceed-
ing:
2403 McElderry Street,
Baltimore, Maryland,
Ward 07, Section 15,
Block 1640 Lot 058,
Lot Size 14-4 x 67
The Complaint states,
among other things, that
the amount necessary
for redemption has not
been paid.
It is thereupon this 15th
day of March, 2011 by
the Circuit Court of Bal-
timore City,
ORDERED, that notice
be given by the insertion
of a coy of this order in
THE AFRO AMERICAN,
a newspaper of general
circulation in the City of
Baltimore once a week
for three (3) successive
weeks, warning all per-
sons interested in the
property to appear in this
Court by the 14th day of
May, 2011 and redeem
the subject property and
answer the Complaint or
thereafter a final judg-
ment will be entered
foreclosing all rights of
redemption in the prop-
erty, and vesting in the
Plaintiff title to the prop-
erty, free and clear of all
encumbrances.
Frank M.Conaway, Clerk
TRUE COPY TEST
W. Michel Pierson
JUDGE, CIRCUIT
COURT FOR
BALTIMORE CITY
4/15, 4/22, 4/29
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WATERFRONT
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IN THE CIRCUIT
COURT FOR
BALTIMORE CITY
Case No.:
24D10002505
IN THE MATTER OF
ANTWAN LEMONTT
LEWIS
FOR CHANGE OF
NAME TO
DAVID TYRONE
MCKOY
ORDER FOR
NOTICE BY
PUBLICATION
The object of this suit
is to officially change
the name of the peti-
tioner from
Antwan Lemontt
Lewis
to
David Tyrone McKoy
It is this 23rd day of
March, 2011 by the
Circuit Court for Bal-
timore City,
ORDERED, that pub-
lication be given one
time in a newspaper of
general circulation in
Baltimore City on or
before the 23rd day of
April, 2011, which
s h a l l w a r n a l l
interested persons to
file an affidavit in op-
position to the relief
requested on or be-
fore the 4th day of
May, 2011.
Frank M. Conaway
Clerk
4-15
IN THE CIRCUIT
COURT FOR
BALTIMORE CITY
Case No.:
24D10001826
IN THE MATTER OF
BENJAMIN L.
WILLIAMS JR.
FOR CHANGE OF
NAME TO
JOSEPH LEON
WILLIAMS JR.
ORDER FOR
NOTICE BY
PUBLICATION
The object of this suit
is to officially change
the name of the peti-
tioner from
Benjamin L. Williams Jr.
to
Joseph Leon Williams Jr.
It is this 21st day of
March, 2011 by the
Circuit Court for Bal-
timore City,
ORDERED, that pub-
lication be given one
time in a newspaper of
general circulation in
Baltimore City on or
before the 21st day of
April, 2011, which
s h a l l w a r n a l l
interested persons to
file an affidavit in op-
position to the relief
requested on or be-
fore the 2nd day of
May, 2011.
Frank M. Conaway
Clerk
4/15
IN THE CIRCUIT
COURT FOR
BALTIMORE CITY
Case Number
24C11001613/FR
PIKESWOOD, LLC
c/o Allen C
Tochterman, Esquire
11411 Cedar Lane
Kingsville, Maryland
21087
Plaintiff
v.
TERRI MARTIN
HOUSEHOLD
FINANCE CORP III
Tenants of the Subject
Property
The Mayor and City
Council of Baltimore,
Maryland,
And all Persons having
or claiming to have
An interest in the prop-
erty listed below;
Their respective heirs,
devisees, executors,
administrators, gran-
t ees, assi gns, or
successors in right ti-
tle and interest
ORDER OF
PUBLICATION
The obj ect of t hi s
proceeding is to secure
the foreclosure of all
rights of redemption in
the property in the City
of Baltimore, sold by the
Collector of Taxes for the
City of Baltimore and the
State of Maryland to the
Plaintiff in this proceed-
ing:
2828 Harlem Avenue,
Baltimore, Maryland,
Ward 16, Section 07,
Block 2377A, Lot 044
Lot Size 14x70
The Complaint states,
among other things, that
the amount necessary
for redemption has not
been paid.
It is thereupon this 18th
day of March, 2011 by
the Circuit Court of Bal-
timore City,
ORDERED, that notice
be given by the insertion
of a coy of this order in
THE AFRO AMERICAN,
a newspaper of general
circulation in the City of
Baltimore once a week
for three (3) successive
weeks, warning all per-
sons interested in the
property to appear in this
Court by the 18th day of
May, 2011 and redeem
the subject property and
answer the Complaint or
thereafter a final judg-
ment will be entered
foreclosing all rights of
redemption in the prop-
erty, and vesting in the
Plaintiff title to the prop-
erty, free and clear of all
encumbrances.
Frank M.Conaway, Clerk
TRUE COPY TEST
Vinetta A. Brown
JUDGE, CIRCUIT
COURT FOR
BALTIMORE CITY
4/15, 4/22, 4/29
LEGAL NOTICES LEGAL NOTICES
IN THE CIRCUIT
COURT FOR
BALTIMORE CITY
Case Number
24C11000684/FR
PIKESWOOD, LLC
c/o Allen C
Tochterman, Esquire
11411 Cedar Lane
Kingsville, Maryland
21087
Plaintiff
v.
MARGO L. BAILEY
CHASE MANHATTAN
MORTGAGE CORPORA-
TION
DONNA M. HUGHES,
TRUSTEE
Tenants of the Subject
Property
The Mayor and City Coun-
cil of Baltimore, Maryland,
And all Persons having or
claiming to have
An interest in the property
listed below;
Their respective heirs, de-
visees, executors, admin-
istrators, grantees, as-
signs, or successors in
right title and interest
ORDER OF
PUBLICATION
The obj ect of t hi s
proceeding is to secure
the foreclosure of all
rights of redemption in
the property in the City
of Baltimore, sold by the
Collector of Taxes for the
City of Baltimore and the
State of Maryland to the
Plaintiff in this proceed-
ing:
2624 East Biddle Street,
Baltimore, Maryland,
Ward 08, Section 15, Block
1539, Lot 021
Lot Size 14 x 70
The Complaint states,
among other things, that
the amount necessary
for redemption has not
been paid.
It is thereupon this 8th
day of April, 2011 by the
Circuit Court of Bal-
timore City,
ORDERED, that notice
be given by the insertion
of a coy of this order in
THE AFRO AMERICAN,
a newspaper of general
circulation in the City of
Baltimore once a week
for three (3) successive
weeks, warning all per-
sons interested in the
property to appear in this
Court by the 7th day of
June, 2011 and redeem
the subject property and
answer the Complaint or
thereafter a final judg-
ment will be entered
foreclosing all rights of
redemption in the prop-
erty, and vesting in the
Plaintiff fee simple title to
the property, free and
clear of all encum-
brances.
Frank M.Conaway, Clerk
TRUE COPY TEST
Sylvester B. Cox
JUDGE, CIRCUIT
COURT FOR
BALTIMORE CITY
4/15, 4/22, 4/29
IN THE CIRCUIT
COURT FOR
BALTIMORE CITY
Case Number
24C11000539/FR
PIKESWOOD, LLC
c/o Allen C
Tochterman, Esquire
11411 Cedar Lane
Kingsville, Maryland
21087
Plaintiff
v.
JACQUELINE T. ELLIOTT
NATIONAL CITY MORT-
GAGE COMPANY
D/B/A COMMONWEALTH
MID - ATLANTIC MORT-
GAGE
LAWYERS TITLE REALTY
SERVICE,
INCORPORATED,
TRUSTEE
Tenants of the Subject
Property
The Mayor and City Coun-
cil of Baltimore, Maryland,
And all Persons having or
claiming to have
An interest in the property
listed below;
Their respective heirs, de-
visees, executors, admin-
istrators, grantees,
assigns, or successors in
right title and interest
ORDER OF
PUBLICATION
The obj ect of t hi s
proceeding is to secure
the foreclosure of all
rights of redemption in
the property in the City
of Baltimore, sold by the
Collector of Taxes for the
City of Baltimore and the
State of Maryland to the
Plaintiff in this proceed-
ing:
1120 Bonaparte Avenue,
Baltimore, Maryland
Ward 09, Section 14,
Block 40101, Lot 011
Lot Size 16x78-3
The Complaint states,
among other things, that
the amount necessary
for redemption has not
been paid.
It is thereupon this 7th
day of April, 2011 by the
Circuit Court of Bal-
timore City,
ORDERED, that notice
be given by the insertion
of a coy of this order in
THE AFRO AMERICAN,
a newspaper of general
circulation in the City of
Baltimore once a week
for three (3) successive
weeks, warning all per-
sons interested in the
property to appear in this
Court by the 6th day of
June, 2011 and redeem
the subject property and
answer the Complaint or
thereafter a final judg-
ment will be entered
foreclosing all rights of
redemption in the prop-
erty, and vesting in the
Plaintiff leasehold title to
the property, free and
clear of all encum-
brances.
Frank M.Conaway, Clerk
TRUE COPY TEST
Sylvester B. Cox
JUDGE, CIRCUIT
COURT FOR
BALTIMORE CITY
4/15, 4/22, 4/29
Baltimore City Public Schools.
INVITATION FOR BIDS:
BCS-11089
Provide HVAC System Renovation
Services at
Chinquapin Building #46
The Baltimore City Board of School Commis-
sioners is inviting interested companies to
submit bids to: BCS-11089.
In order to participate, interested bidders
need to visit eMaryland Marketplace website
at https://ebidmarketplace.com
Solicitation BCS-11089 will be available for
review commencing Friday, April 8, 2011.
The Bid Due Date is Thursday, May 5, 2011
at 11:00 a.m. local time. No bids will be
accepted after that time. Any questions re-
lated to this solicitation should be directed to
the Buyer.
File No. BCI-10#49
Maxwell C. Cohen, Esq.
The Law Offices of Maxwell C. Cohen, LLC
17 Warren Road, Suite 14-B
Baltimore, Maryland 21208
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
BALTIMORE CITY, MARYLAND
Civil Action No. 24-C-11-001882 TAX SALE
ORDER OF PUBLICATION
REV PS, LLC, Assignee
Plaintiff
vs.
FAREED NASSOR HAYAT AND/OR UNKNOWN
TENANTS/OWNERS OF 509 Wildwood Pkwy.,
PNC BANK, NATIONAL CITY MORTGAGE
AND/OR NATIONAL BANKING ASSOCIATION,
BANK OF AMERICA, and MAYOR AND CITY
COUNCIL OF BALTIMORE CITY and All Un-
known Owners of the Property described be-
low; all Persons, all heirs, devisees, personal
representatives, and executors, administra-
tors, grantees, assigns or successors in right,
title, interest, and any and all persons having
or claiming to have any interest in the prop-
erty and premises situate in the City of Bal-
ti more, known as Tax Account No.
20-03-2295-036; situate in the City of Bal-
timore, known as 509 Wildwood Pkwy. de-
scribed as Lot Size 20x75. Ward 20, Section
03, Block 2295, Lot 036.
Defendants
The object of this proceeding is to secure the
foreclosure of all rights of redemption in the
herein above described property sold, either di-
rectly or via assignment, by the Collector of Taxes
for the State of Maryland and Baltimore City to
the Plaintiff in the proceeding. The Complaint
states, among other things, that the amounts
necessary for redemption of the subject property
has not been paid, although more than six (6)
months from the date of the sale have expired,
and more than two (2) months from the date that
the first of two (2) separate pre-suit Notices of
the tax sale was sent to each required interested
party have expired.
It is thereupon this 29th day of March, 2011, by
the Circuit Court for Baltimore City, Maryland,
ORDERED, that notice be given by the insertion
of a copy of this Order in some newspaper having
a general circulation in Baltimore City, Maryland
once a week for three (3) successive weeks, on
or before the 28th day of April, 2011 warning all
persons interested in the Property referenced
above to appear in this Court by the 28th day of
May, 2011 and redeem the Property referenced
herein or to answer the Complaint or thereafter
a Final Decree will be entered foreclosing all
rights of redemption in the property, and vesting
in the Plaintiff a title, free and clear of all
encumbrances.
The Defendants are hereby informed of the latest
date to file a written Answer or Petition to
Redeem the property mentioned in the Complain
described above, and that failure to file a re-
sponse on or before the date specified may result
in a Default Judgment foreclosing all rights of
redemption in and as to the Property being
rendered by this Court against them.
John A. Howard
JUDGE- Baltimore City Circuit Court
4/8, 4/15, 4/22
S
U
B
S
C
R
I
B
E

T
O
D
A
Y
INVITATION TO BIDDERS: PARK HEIGHTS KIDSCAPE EDUCATIONAL
GARDEN at 4329 Park Heights Ave, Baltimore, MD
PARK HEIGHTS RENAISSANCE INC. (PHR) IS INVITING YOU TO BID.*
PLEASE PROVIDE THE FOLLOWING:
• Acompletelumpsumbidpriceforallworkshownwithinthe
constructiondocument,BPP-1,BPP-2,LAP-1,andLAP-2dated
March3,2011.
Call our offce for the bid drawings at (410) 664-4890.
• Separateyourbidpricebylineitemsforthebasictrades.
• Anestimatedamountofworkingdaysforcompletionofproject.
• Aseparatelineitempriceforthelogoforthefencing.
• LiabilityInsurance
• MDStateContractorsLicense
• WorkersCompensationCertifcate
For general questions contact: For technical questions contact:
Cheo Hurley
Vice President, PHR
Dawn Clamp
Project Engineer, CMR
(410) 664-4890 (410) 653-3838
All bids are due on May 2nd at 4pm to:
PARK HEIGHTS RENAISSANCE INC.
4151 Park Heights Avenue, Suite 207, Baltimore, MD 21215
*Musthavelandscapingexperience
www.phrmd.org
2402 McElderry Street,
Baltimore, Maryland, Ward
07, Section 15, Block 1640
Lot 058, Lot Size 14-4 x 67
TYPESET: Wed Apr 13 13:06:40 EDT 2011
HOUSING AUTHORITY OF BALTIMORE CITY
REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS
LEGAL SERVICES
RFP NUMBER: B-1656-11
The Housing Authority of Baltimore City
(”HABC”), a public body corporate and politic
created under Maryland law, is requesting pro-
posals from interested, qualified and exper-
ienced solo practitioners or law firms to repre-
sent HABC as outside counsel for litigation.
The contract awarded under this Request for
Proposals (”RFP”) will require the selected
outside counsel to performthe requested legal
services in cooperation, consultation and co-
ordination with the HABC General Counsel, in
accordance with professional and ethical stan-
dards pertaining to the practice of law.
HABC reserves the right to make multiple
contract awards for any or all of the legal
services required pursuant to this RFP.
PROPOSALS WILL BE DUE no later than
2:00 p.m. EasternTime onWednesday, May
4, 2011.
Anon-mandatory pre-proposal conferencewill
be held on Monday April 18, 2011, at 11:00
a.m., at 417 E. Fayette Street, Room 416,
Baltimore, Maryland, 21202.
HABC has established a minimum goal of
twenty percent (20%) of the total dollar amount
of the proposed contract for Minority Business
Enterprise (”MBE”) utilization, applicable to all
minority and non-minority businesses propos-
ing to provide the requested services as the
prime contractor. No goal has been estab-
lished for participation of Women-owned
businesses (”WBEs”). However, HABC
strongly encourages and affirmatively pro-
motes theuseof WBEs inall HABCcontracts.
Responders shall also comply with all ap-
plicablerequirements of Section3of theHous-
ing and Urban Development Act of 1968, 12
U.S.C. Section 1701u.
The RFP may be obtained on or after Monday,
April 11, 2011, at the following location:
Housing Authority of Baltimore City
Division of Fiscal Operations,
Purchasing Department
417 E. Fayette Street, Room 414
Baltimore, Maryland 21202
Attention: John Airey,
Chief of Contracting Services
Tel: (410)396-3261 Fax: (410)962-1586
Questions regarding the RFP should be di-
rected in writing to the address and individual
indicated above, and must include the refer-
ence: HABC RFP Number B-1656-11.
SUPPORT OUR
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LEGAL NOTICES
April 16, 2011 - April 22, 2011, The Afro-American B7
www.afro.com
Baltimore City Public Schools.
INVITATION FOR BIDS:
BCS-11090
Provide HVAC System
Renovation Services at
William H. Lemmel Building #79
The Baltimore City Board of School Commis-
sioners is inviting interested companies to
submit bids to: BCS-11090.
In order to participate, interested bidders
need to visit eMaryland Marketplace website
at https://ebidmarketplace.com
Solicitation BCS-11090 will be available for
review commencing Friday, April 8, 2011.
The Bid Due Date is Thursday, May 5, 2011
at 11:00 a.m. local time. No bids will be
accepted after that time. Any questions re-
lated to this solicitation should be directed to
the Buyer.
Baltimore City Public Schools
INVITATION FOR BIDS:
RFP-11088
Communications Support
The Baltimore City Board of School Commis-
sioners invites interested companies to sub-
mit proposals to: provide broad and long-
term Communications Support for a series
of integrated initiatives.
In order to participate, interested bidders
need to register with eMaryland Marketplace
by visiting their website at https://
ebidmarketplace.com and clicking the Reg-
istration button.
Solicitation RFP-11088 will be available for
review commencing Thursday, April 7,
2011.
The Proposal Due Date is Thursday, April
21, 2011, at 11:00 a.m. local time. No
proposals will be accepted after that time.
Any questions related to this solicitation
should be directed to the Buyer, Shabray
Stanfield at sstanfield@bcps.k12.md.us
City of Baltimore
Department of Finance
Bureau of Purchases
Sealed proposals addressed to the Board of
Estimates of Baltimore, will be received until,
but not later than 11:00 a.m. local time on
the following date(s) for the stated
requirements:
APRIL 27, 2011
TANDEM AXLE TRACTORS AND LOWBOY
TRAILER B50001927
MAY 4, 2011
SALE OF SCRAP VEHICLES B50001913
REFLECTIVE SIGN SHEETING B50001914
TAPERED STEEL SQUARE POLE
B50001918
www.baltimorecitibuy.org
File No. BCI-10#83
Maxwell C. Cohen, Esq.
The Law Offices of Maxwell C. Cohen, LLC
17 Warren Road, Suite 14-B
Baltimore, Maryland 21208
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
BALTIMORE CITY, MARYLAND
Civil Action No. 24-C-11-001985 TAX SALE
ORDER OF PUBLICATION
REV PS, LLC, Assignee
Plaintiff
vs.
PEGGY A. MILES, MARJORIE M. JONES,
MARGARET E. RANDALL, UNKNOWN
TENANTS/OWNERS OF 3616 GWYNN OAK
AVE., CITIBANK SOUTH DAKOTA N.A., AC-
TION MANAGEMENT, INC., PERFORMANCE
CAPITAL MANAGEMENT, AND/OR MAYOR
AND CITY COUNCIL OF BALTIMORE CITY and
All Unknown Owners of the Property de-
scribed below; all Persons, all heirs, devisees,
personal representatives, and executors,
administrators, grantees, assigns or succes-
sors in right, title, interest, and any and all
persons having or claiming to have any inter-
est in the property and premises situate in
the City of Baltimore, known as Tax Account
No. 28-02-8253-025; situate in the City of
Baltimore, known as 3616 Gwynn Oak Ave.
described as Lot Size 50x172-6; Ward 28,
Section 02, Block 8253, Lot 025.
Defendants
The object of this proceeding is to secure the
foreclosure of all rights of redemption in the
herein above described property sold, either di-
rectly or via assignment, by the Collector of Taxes
for the State of Maryland and Baltimore City to
the Plaintiff in the proceeding. The Complaint
states, among other things, that the amounts
necessary for redemption of the subject property
has not been paid, although more than six (6)
months from the date of the sale have expired,
and more than two (2) months from the date that
the first of two (2) separate pre-suit Notices of
the tax sale was sent to each required interested
party have expired.
It is thereupon this 30th day of March, 2011, by
the Circuit Court for Baltimore City, Maryland,
ORDERED, that notice be given by the insertion
of a copy of this Order in some newspaper having
a general circulation in Baltimore City, Maryland
once a week for three (3) successive weeks, on
or before the 29th day of April, 2011 warning all
persons interested in the Property referenced
above to appear in this Court by the 29th day of
May, 2011 and redeem the Property referenced
herein or to answer the Complaint or thereafter
a Final Decree will be entered foreclosing all
rights of redemption in the property, and vesting
in the Plaintiff a title, free and clear of all
encumbrances.
The Defendants are hereby informed of the latest
date to file a written Answer or Petition to
Redeem the property mentioned in the Complain
described above, and that failure to file a re-
sponse on or before the date specified may result
in a Default Judgment foreclosing all rights of
redemption in and as to the Property being
rendered by this Court against them.
Evelyn Omega Cannon
JUDGE- Baltimore City Circuit Court
4/8, 4/15, 4/22
Electrical Apprenticeship
IEC Chesapeake is
accepting applications for
Fall apprenticeship
program. For information
call 800-470-3013 x107.
Accountant Advanced
Experienced professional needed to assist in the review
and analysis of market studies and financial forecasts for
proposed and expanding Continuing Care Retirement
Communities (CCRCs). Candidates with work experience
in cost accounting, financial forecasting, statistical analysis,
market studies, and computing market penetration rates
are encouraged to apply. For the official job announcement
and MS-100 application form, visit www.mdoa.state.md.us/
employment.html. Send MS-100 and salary requirements
by May 2, 2011 to: MDoA, HR, 301 West Preston St., Suite
1007, Baltimore, MD 21201. EOE
Education -
DIRECTOR OF DISABILITY
SUPPORT SERVICES
CARROLL COMMUNITY COLLEGE
has a full-time, 12-month position as a
Director of Disability Support Services.
Additional information may be obtained
at www.carrollcc.edu. EOE/M/F
REQUEST FOR SERVICES
PQS-2011-6
Extended Learning Services
City Schools invites interested organizations
to submit applications to provide summer and
after school extended learning programs for
Baltimore City Schools.
In order to participate, interested parties
need to download and complete the PQS
documents at
http://www.bal ti moreci tyschool s.org/
Procurement/PQS.asp
A pre-proposal meeting will be held on
Thursday, April 14, 2011 at 11:00 am in
room 301 at 200 East North Avenue.
All applications are due Thursday, April 28,
2011 at 11:00 am. Any questions should be
addressed to the buyer, Shabray Stanfield at
sstanfield@bcps.k12.md.us.
BOARD OF LIQUOR LICENSE COMMISSIONERS FOR BALTIMORE CITY
NOTICE
Petitions have been fled by the following applicants for licenses to sell alcoholic beverages at the
premises set opposite their respective names. The real property for these applications will be posted on
Monday, April 11, 2011. Written protests concerning any application will be accepted until and including
the time of the conference or hearing. Conferences and public hearings will be held after April 28, 2011.
Interested parties should contact the offce of the Board, 231 E. Baltimore Street, 6th Floor, Baltimore,
Maryland 21202 or by calling (410) 396-4385 to determine the exact time and date that a particular ap-
plication will be considered by the Board. Written protests will be acknowledged by the Board and such
protestants will be notifed as to the date, time and place of the hearing and/or conference.
1. CLASS “A” BEER, WINE & LIQUOR LICENSE
Yun, Inc. Transfer of location from 4420 4416-18 Park Heights Avenue
Bu Sup Yun Park Heights Ave. to 4416-18 Park Heights Avenue
Jeong Hui Yun
Sun Ja Gim
2. CLASS “B” BEER, WINE, & LIQUOR RESTAURANT LICENSE
New Hong Kong Restaurant, Inc. Transfer of ownership 2426-32 N. Charles Street
Hou Yin Chen
Qing Chen

3. CLASS BD7, BEER, WINE & LIQUOR TAVERN LICENSE
Semper Fidelis, LLC. Transfer of ownership 900 S. Kenwood Avenue
Alex van Breukelen
Jennifer van Breukelen

Julian’s, LLC. Tansfer of ownership from 2312-16 Boston Street
Paul Chrzanowski secured creditor, request to add live entertainment

Lora’s Fire Side, LLC Transfer of ownership & location 112 S. Broadway
Lorena Morales from 206 S. Broadway
Liquor Store of Maryland, LLC Expansion to add 2246-48 E. North Avenue 2246-50 E. North
Gregory Fisher to existing license at 2250 E. North Avenue; Avenue
Joanne Peang request for live entertainment
KiKi Liquor Store, Inc. Transfer of ownership 3716 W. Belvedere Avenue
Ki Jeong Lee
4. CLASS”B” BEER, WINE & LIQUOR RESTAURANT LICENSE (HOTEL-MOTEL)
Shazaline Hospitality Corporation Transfer of ownership 5050 Falls Road
Alnashir Tejani
Nimet Tejani
Sheila Scott

5. CLASS”D” BEER, WINE & LIQUOR TAVERN LICENSE
Akal Purakh, Inc. Transfer of ownership & location 400 W. Saratoga Street
Parmsit Kaur from 406 Park Avenue
Jaswant Dhaliwal
Leon Albin
LEGAL NOTICES
TYPESET: Wed Apr 13 13:15:37 EDT 2011
HOUSING AUTHORITY OF BALTIMORE CITY
REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS
VEHICLE LEASE
RFP NUMBER: B-1658-11
The Housing Authority of Baltimore City
(HABC) i s requesti ng proposal s from
interested and qualified entities to to lease
various vehicles to HABC.
PROPOSALS WILL BE DUE no later than
2:00p.m. EasternTimeonFriday, May2011.
A non-mandatory pre-proposals conference
will be held on Wednesday, April 20, 2011, at
10:00 a.m., at 417 E. Fayette Street, Room
416, Baltimore, Maryland, 21202.
HABC has established a minimum goal of
twenty percent (20%) of the total dollar amount
of the proposed contract for Minority Business
Enterprise (”MBE”) utilization, applicable to all
minority and non-minority businesses propos-
ing to provide the requested services as the
prime contractor. No goal has been estab-
lished for participation of Women-owned
businesses (”WBEs”), however, HABC
strongly encourages and affirmatively pro-
motes theuseof WBEs inall HABCcontracts.
Responders shall also comply with all ap-
plicablerequirements of Section3of theHous-
ing and Urban Development Act of 1968, 12
U.S.C. Section 1701u.
The RFPmay be obtained on or after Wednes-
day 2011, at the following location:
Housing Authority of Baltimore City
Division of Fiscal Operations,
Purchasing Department
417 E. Fayette Street, Room 414
Baltimore, Maryland 21202
Attention: John Airey,
Chief of Contracting Services
Tel: (410)396-3261 Fax: (410)962-1586
Questions regarding the RFP should be di-
rected in writing to the address and individual
indicated above, and must include the refer-
ence: HABC RFP Number B-1658-11.
TYPESET: Wed Apr 13 13:00:32 EDT 2011
The Maryland Zoo in Baltimore is accepting
sealed bids for the construction project titled
”The Maryland Zoo Oasis Restroom Renova-
ti on”. Go to www.maryl andzoo.org/
constructionfor RFPandBidForm. Any issues
contact adam.wyatt@marylandzoo.org
TYPESET: Wed Apr 13 13:10:09 EDT 2011
Baltimore City Public Schools.
INVITATION FOR BIDS:
BCS-11090
Provide HVAC System
Renovation Services at
William H. Lemmel Building #79
The Baltimore City Board of School Commis-
sioners is inviting interested companies to
submit bids to: BCS-11090.
In order to participate, interested bidders need
to visit eMaryland Marketplace website at
https://ebidmarketplace.com
Solicitation BCS-11090 will be available for
review commencing Friday, April 8, 2011.
The Bid Due Date is Thursday, May 5, 2011
at 11:00 a.m. local time. No bids will be
accepted after that time. Any questions related
to this solicitation should be directed to the
Buyer.
TYPESET: Wed Apr 13 13:13:33 EDT 2011
HOUSING AUTHORITY OF BALTIMORE CITY
REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS
HOUSING MANAGEMENT
SOFTWARE SYSTEM
RFP NUMBER: B-1657-11
The Housing Authority of Baltimore City
(”HABC”) is requesting proposals from
interested and qualified entities to provide a
mature, web-based, complete software pack-
age of housing authority-specific modules that
are highly customizable as well as im-
plementation and on-going maintenance and
support services that meet the evolving needs
of our complex affordable housing programs
that we administer. Currently, HABC supports
the Public Housing Authority Software (PHAS)
housing management software system devel-
oped by Modern Software Technology (MST)
which the Agency implemented in 2003. The
Housing Choice Voucher and Public Housing
programs manage their day-to-day operations
through this technology system as well as a
variety of other supplementary technology
systems and reporting tools.
PROPOSALS WILL BE DUE no later than
2:00 p.m. EasternTime onWednesday, May
11, 2011.
A non-mandatory pre-proposals conference
will be held on Wednesday, April 20, 2011, at
10:00 a.m., at 417 E. Fayette Street, Room
416, Baltimore, Maryland, 21202.
HABC has established a minimum goal of
twenty percent (20%) of the total dollar amount
of the proposed contract for Minority Business
Enterprise (”MBE”) utilization, applicable to all
minority and non-minority businesses propos-
ing to provide the requested services as the
prime contractor. No goal has been estab-
lished for participation of Women-owned
businesses (”WBEs”), however, HABC
strongly encourages and affirmatively pro-
motes theuseof WBEs inall HABCcontracts.
Responders shall also comply with all ap-
plicablerequirements of Section3of theHous-
ing and Urban Development Act of 1968, 12
U.S.C. Section 1701u.
The RFP may be obtained on or after Monday,
April 11, 2011, at the following location:
Housing Authority of Baltimore City
Division of Fiscal Operations,
Purchasing Department
417 E. Fayette Street, Room 414
Baltimore, Maryland 21202
Attention: John Airey,
Chief of Contracting Services
Tel: (410)396-3261 Fax: (410)962-1586
Questions regarding the RFP should be di-
rected in writing to the address and individual
indicated above, and must include the refer-
ence: HABC RFP Number B-1657-11.
File No. BCI-10#89
Maxwell C. Cohen, Esq.
The Law Offices of Maxwell C. Cohen, LLC
17 Warren Road, Suite 14-B
Baltimore, Maryland 21208
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
BALTIMORE CITY, MARYLAND
Civil Action No. 24-C-11-1547 TAX SALE
ORDER OF PUBLICATION
REV PS, LLC, Assignee
Plaintiff
vs.
IONITA RUTHERFORD, UNKNOWN TENANT/
OWNER OF 2635 Park Heights Terr., CASTLE
POINT MORTGAGE, Inc., THOMAS P. DORE,
Trustee, GOT BAIL, LLC, MORTGAGE
WHAREHOUSE, Inc., AND MAYOR CITY
COUNCIL OF BALTIMORE CITY and All Un-
known Owners of the Property described be-
low; all Persons, all heirs, devisees, personal
representatives, and executors, administra-
tors, grantees, assigns or successors in right,
title, interest, and any and all persons having
or claiming to have any interest in the prop-
erty and premises situate in the City of Bal-
timore, known as Tax Account No. 15-34-
3347E-011; situate in the City of Baltimore,
known as 2635 Park Heights Terrace. Also
described as Lot size 22x100-4; Ward 15,
Section 34, Block 3347E, Lot 011
Defendants
The object of this proceeding is to secure the
foreclosure of all rights of redemption in the
herein above described property sold, either di-
rectly or via assignment, by the Collector of Taxes
for the State of Maryland and Baltimore City to
the Plaintiff in the proceeding. The Complaint
states, among other things, that the amounts
necessary for redemption of the subject property
has not been paid, although more than six (6)
months from the date of the sale have expired,
and more than two (2) months from the date that
the first of two (2) separate pre-suit Notices of
the tax sale was sent to each required interested
party have expired.
It is thereupon this 15th day of March, 2011, by
the Circuit Court for Baltimore City, Maryland,
ORDERED, that notice be given by the insertion
of a copy of this Order in some newspaper having
a general circulation in Baltimore City, Maryland
once a week for three (3) successive weeks, on
or before the 14th day of April, 2011 warning all
persons interested in the Property referenced
above to appear in this Court by the 14th day of
May, 2011 and redeem the Property referenced
herein or to answer the Complaint or thereafter
a Final Decree will be entered foreclosing all
rights of redemption in the property, and vesting
in the Plaintiff a title, free and clear of all
encumbrances.
The Defendants are hereby informed of the latest
date to file a written Answer or Petition to
Redeem the property mentioned in the Complain
described above, and that failure to file a re-
sponse on or before the date specified may result
in a Default Judgment foreclosing all rights of
redemption in and as to the Property being
rendered by this Court against them.
W. Michel Pierson
JUDGE- Baltimore City Circuit Court
4/1, 4/8, 4/15
LEGAL NOTICES
B8 The Afro-American, April 16, 2011 - April 16, 2011
Prizes Entry Deadlines
Charm City Weekend May 3
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Fly Away to Fenway May 24
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Be Part of the Team June 21
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Best Seats in the Park (for 24!) July 19
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Field of Dreams August 16
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