BICG University Course 301 “Dashboard/Report Application Development” Day 2

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The “Key” to our Exercise
Throughout our exercises, you’ll occasionally see yellow “Post-it” notes sprinkled throughout. These are topics that we may call out and discuss in class, or we might suggest that you review others on your own time. These “notes” are designed to further your knowledge about the Oracle BI Enterprise Edition; on BI Best Practices; on “Tips and Tricks” to enable you to rapidly develop applications using OBIEE; and other notable topics. We strongly believe that the better educated you are on each of these topics, the better prepared you’ll be. Our “notes” key is below:

Light Bulb: These notes will provide advice, tips or tricks that we’ve developed over the years, or points to ponder. Question Mark: These are questions that we’ll be debating in class. Many of these will have no single correct answer, instead, they’re designed to expand your thinking about pertinent topics. Drafting Table: These are exercises that we’ll be working on in class. At BICG we believe in following standards and best practices, but we don’t believe in limiting creativity. These exercises are your chance to flex your creative muscles!

Agenda Time 15 minutes 30 minutes 20 minutes 20 minutes 30 minutes 10 minutes 30 minutes 20 minutes 30-60 minutes 30 minutes 25 minutes 20 minutes 30 minutes 10 minutes 30 minutes 20 minutes 15 minutes Review Questions from Day 1 Exercise #1 Developing Dashboard Prompts – Page 5 Exercise #2 Adding “Is Prompted” Filters to Requests – Page 15 Exercise #3 “Best Practice Guidelines for Tables and Pivot Tables” – Page 22 Exercise #4 Complex Charts: Line-Bar Combinations – Page 30 Morning Break Exercise #5 Adding a Saved Filter and Formatting an Existing Request – Page 38 Exercise #6 A “Cheat” to Develop New. Complex Requests Based upon an Existing Request – Page 48 Lunch break Exercise #7 Complex Pivot Tables – Page 53 Exercise #8 Ranking and Top and Bottom Requests Page 61 Exercise #9 Combining Column Selectors with a Single Chart View – Page 67 Exercise #10 Bubble Charts – Page 71 Afternoon break Exercise #11 Advanced Dashboard Formatting – Page 77 Exercise #12 Using Guided Navigation to Create Dashboard Alerts – Page 83 Exercise #13 Using Guided Navigation to Display or Hide Dashboard Sections – Page 90 4 Topic .

MN 55122 www.biconsultinggroup.Dashboard/Report Application Development Exercise #1 Developing Dashboard Prompts 2130 Cliff Road. Eagan.com 5 . Suite 200.

which allow the user to selectively filter the contents of a Dashboard page based upon selections made from drop-down lists. 6 . Content: 1. Allowing single selects.Exercise Objectives: In this lesson we will review the process of creating Dashboard prompts. or calendar selections. 3. or text entry. multi-select boxes. 2. We will also be adding Is Prompted filters to a request so it can receive the dashboard prompt selections. Adding “Is Prompted” filters to a request. 4. Using the Dashboard Prompt editor. Adding the Prompt to a Dashboard. text entry fields. multi selects.

7 . Select the Paint subject area from the list that appears. 2.Step #1: Accessing the Dashboard Prompt Editor 1 1 To access the Dashboard Prompt editor. access Answers. 3. 1. select the Dashboard prompt editor from the upper left. and then select the Dashboard Prompt icon (looks like a drop-down list with a star). A list of available subject areas will appear. Select the Answers link in the upper right hand corner. Prior to selecting a subject area (which will bring you into the request editors).

such as causing a prompt on one page to override a prompt on another page. It is a BICG best practice to never (or nearly never) set a Dashboard prompt’s scope to Dashboard. Set the Prompt’s scope to “Page”. either at a Dashboard level. setting it to Page.Step #2: Set the Prompt’s Scope 1 1 The Dashboard Prompt’s “Scope” must be set. will cause the prompt to only affect the page in which it is placed. 1. Doing so can cause unintended effects. will cause the prompt to affect all pages within a Dashboard. or page level. 8 . Setting the scope to Dashboard. and it can also confuse the end user since it won’t be obvious to the user how or where filtered settings were made. unless the prompt itself is on the same page they are viewing.

Region. or they can be removed using the up/down/or remove buttons on the far right. just as it is while developing request objects. and select the “Preview” button in the upper right hand corner. a multi-select. 2 Add Year.Step #3: Building the Prompt 1 3 2 1 You’ll notice that the “pick list” is available on the left. stacked on top of another. Adding these fields to a Dashboard prompt is simply done by clicking. 9 . or a text box. 3 You’ll also notice that you are able to change the control from a dropdown list (allowing only one selection at time). their position can be changed. 2. and the fields are added. 1. Leave the other controls in their default settings. Once selections have been added to the prompt. District and Brand to the prompt.

1. Close the preview window. 10 . and only one selection per prompt. 2. and set the “Control” settings for all prompts to “Multi-Select”. Retest the prompt using the Preview button. 3.Step #4: Testing the Prompt 1 1 You’ll see that the default settings of “drop-down list box” allow the user to select one. Close the Preview window.

opens a browse window allowing the user to make multiple selections.Step #5: Changing to Multi-Select 1 2 1. Select the Central Region from the list and click the back arrow to move it to “Selected”. 4. Save your prompt as “Prompt: Year. Or you can click the arrows to add or remove one or more of your selected values after highlighting them. click “OK”. District. 1 The “Multi-Select” option replaces the drop-down arrow. with an ellipse button which when selected. Click the ellipse button next to Regions. Create a folder called ‘Prompts’. You can also double click on your selection to add or remove it. 2. 11 . 2 Double click your selection to add or remove it from your “Selected” box. 3. Brand” into the ‘Prompts’ folder. Region.

1 Prompts can be dragged and dropped into the Dashboard editor. Select “Save”. Drag and drop your new prompt into the top column. just like another other request object. 2. From your “My Dashboard”.Step #7: Adding the Prompt to a Dashboard Page 1 1. 3. 12 . select the Page Options / Edit Dashboard link.

4. Save Exercise #11. If the field doesn’t exist. District and Brand. 2. Remember that when an element is contained within the request criteria. open the request in Answers and remove any existing filters. This selection allows the field to be filtered based on selections within the prompt. Do the same for Region. you can open the filter dialogue by clicking the filter icon on that field. Holding the <CTRL> key. 1. 13 . From the Operator list. select “Year” from the pick list. If no prompt selection is made for the field. 3. It will open the filter dialogue box. Using Exercise #11 (from Day 1) . the request will either be unfiltered on that field or will be filtered based on the request level filter on that field.Step #8: Adding “Is Prompted” Filters to a request 1 1 The last selection within the Operator list is “is Prompted”. use the <CTRL> click shortcut. which is the last selection in the list. select “Is Prompted”.

14 . Select the Southern and Western Regions from the Region prompt. What happened? If your answer is “one request changed but the other did not”.The Result! 1. and select the “Go” button. That’s for the next exercise. the reason is that we added the “Is Prompted” filters on one request but need to also them to the other request so it can “receive” the prompt selections.

biconsultinggroup. Suite 200. Eagan.Dashboard/Report Application Development Exercise #2 Adding “Is Prompted” Filters to Requests 2130 Cliff Road. MN 55122 www.com 15 .

Content: 1.Exercise Objectives: In this lesson we will review the process of adding what are called “Is Prompted” filters to requests. Saving a filter for reuse. so that those requests can accept the selections made within Dashboard prompts. 16 . 3. Testing the Dashboard Prompt. Adding a saved filter to a request. 2.

You can save any filter for reuse by selecting the “Save Filter” button. Save this request in the “My Filters” folder. 1 Your filtered selections are now shown. each identified as “Is Prompted” filters. 2. 2 17 . 4.Step #1: Saving the “Is Prompted” Filter for Reuse 1 2 1. 3. Open the request for Exercise #10 (from Day 1). Name this filter as “Filter: Exercise #2”. Open Exercise #11 (from Day 1) and select the “Save Filter” button.

Return to your “My Dashboard” and select Central. Save the request. Selecting a saved filter opens the “Apply Saved Filter” dialogue box which shows the contents of the filter and gives two options. if you modify the filter in the future. Also. and select “OK”. 2. 3. the contents of the filter will be added to the request. those changes will automatically be populated to any requests that have the filter “referenced”. This option also affects what the user sees which is explained on the next slide. 18 . the saved filter will be added to the request without removing any existing filters. Select the filter from the My Filters folder. If it is unchecked. 1. If the first option is checked. If the second option is checked.Step #2: Adding the Saved Filter to Other Requests 1 1 The saved filter is now available as a selection from the pick list on the left. 4. Eastern and Southern regions from the region prompt. it will add a reference to the filter’s name instead of the contents. If it is unchecked. Check both boxes. the saved filter will replace any existing filters previously added to the request.

Often users will want certain things excluded but won’t want to see the filter with the request. if the second option is checked. In this example. the filter will be displayed on the dashboard. there is a filter to exclude the ‘Enterprise’ brand. 19 .Step #2: User Perspective for Filter Options From a user’s perspective. The next slide shows how to do this.

This option needs to be used carefully as it is possible that a user won’t realize that certain things are excluded from a request. the filter will not be displayed on the dashboard. there is a filter to exclude the ‘Enterprise’ brand but it is not displayed. 20 . Referenced filters are used when users want filters included in requests but don’t want to see them on the dashboard. if the second option is un-checked. In this example.Step #2: User Perspective for Filter Options From a user’s perspective.

The Result! 21 .

MN 55122 www.biconsultinggroup.com 22 .Dashboard/Report Application Development Exercise #3 Best Practice Guidelines for Tables and Pivot Tables 2130 Cliff Road. Suite 200. Eagan.

Setting tables and pivot tables to “stretch” to fit the Dashboard column in which they’re placed. Content: 1.Exercise Objectives: In this lesson we will review several basic best practice guidelines when developing tabular views and pivot tables. 23 .

From the tabular editor. 1. The width (and height. 2. The width setting is hidden under the “Additional Formatting Options”. and edit the tabular view. Click the “plus” button to the left of “Additional Formatting Options”. 24 .Step #1: Stretching Tables to “Fit” within the Dashboard Column 1 2 3 1 The width setting of the tabular request is accessed using the “Table View Properties” button. 3 Open Exercise #10 (from Day 1). 4. which is accessed by clicking the “plus” button. Save the request. 2 3. and padding) options can either be set to a number of pixels. 6. in the upper left corner). 5. select the “Table View Properties” icon (looks like a hand. Click “OK”. or as a percentage. Enter 100% in the width field.

3. Make the appropriate changes to set the width to 100%. Once those changes are made. 25 . now contains just the view selector.and using the editor navigation dropdown. and selecting the appropriate view to edit. 1. You can access the table and pivot table themselves by accessing them from the navigation drop-down list. Open Exercise #11 – from Day 1 .Step #2: Accessing Hidden Views from the Drop-Down 1 1 The compound layout in this request. select the “Pivot Table” from the navigation drop-down. select “Table”. This will take you into the table editor. 2.

Save the request. The width (and height.Step #3: Setting Pivot Tables to fit 100% 1 2 3 1 The width setting for pivot tables is fairly well hidden. 2. or as a percentage. Set the pivot tables width to fit 100%. 3 26 . Select “OK”. 1. 2 Select the pivot tables property icon (looks like a hand). and padding) options can either be set to a number of pixels. 3. and is accessed by clicking the properties icon (looks like a hand) situated below the sections and above the rows. which is accessed by clicking the “plus” button. 4. The width setting is hidden under the “Additional Formatting Options”.

27 . It is a BICG best practice to set column widths to an equal size – 50% each for two column Dashboards. To set the column widths. enter the Dashboard editor. 1.Step #4: Setting Columns to 50% Width 1 1 You’ll notice that your Dashboard columns don’t quite look even – the tabular request has pushed the graph slightly to the left.

and padding) options can either be set to a number of pixels. height and padding can be set by selecting the “Properties” option for each column (ensure that you select the properties button for the column. which is accessed by clicking the plus sign. The width (and height. 28 . 3 Select the “Properties” button for the column in the lower left. 2. Expand the “Additional Formatting Options” and set the column width to 50%. Select “Save” on the Dashboard editor. 5. 2 3. Select “OK” and repeat the procedures for the column in the lower right. and not the section or request). or as a percentage. The width setting is hidden under the “Additional Formatting Options”. 4.Step #4: Setting Columns to 50% Width 1 2 3 1 Column properties such as width. Select “Column Properties” (if you don’t see “Break” as the other option. 1. you’ve clicked the wrong properties button).

The Result! 1 1 Compare the two images above – the Dashboard above did NOT have it’s column width’s equally set. 29 . and the Dashboard below has both columns set to 50% width.

Eagan.biconsultinggroup. MN 55122 www.Dashboard/Report Application Development Exercise #4 Complex Charts: Line-Bar Combinations 2130 Cliff Road. Suite 200.com 30 .

Content: 1. 31 . something that is nearly impossible to do on a numeric request. 2. Creating a Line-Bar Combination Chart. We’ll also look at how to use these charts without improperly implying a “trend” where no trend exists. 3. Using a symbol in place of the line. line-bar combinations which allow the user to quickly determine the interaction of two metrics. Using conditional formatting.Exercise Objectives: In this lesson we will dive deeper into one of the more powerful chart types.

2 3 Create a new request and add a a line-bar combination chart with regions in the x-axis.Step #1: Creating a Line-Bar Combination Chart 1 2 3 1. and dollars and % Chg Year Ago Dollars in the y-axis. we’re not big fans of line charts. 2. That’s because the line can incorrectly imply a trend. 1 Line-Bar Combination charts are developed by placing an attribute (such as Region) in the x-axis. And a Metric (such as Dollars) in the y-axis (which equates to the bars). unless it’s plotting real-time data. we’re big fans of line-bar combos. And another metric in the other yaxis (indicated by the wavy line. which is something very difficult to see on a numeric request. That said. signifying the metric that will be plotted in the line). 32 . where no trend exists. because they can immediately provide insight into how two metrics interact. Filter on Year 2006 At BICG.

and color of the symbol. On the line-bar combo. on 6 tipped on its side) allows you to modify the color and other options on the lines and bars. 3. 4. Select a symbol type and color. 1 The “Format Chart Data” icon (looks like a pencil. and then select a symbol type. Uncheck the first line. 3 33 . you must select from the chart component drop-down. In this case. 2 Select the “Format Chart Data” icon. and set the line width to zero. You must uncheck the “Use Default” checkbox. Our favorite symbol is a triangle. Select “OK”. 2. The secret to hiding the line. is to then set the line width to zero pixels. we’ll be working on the line.Step #2: Using a Symbol in Place of a Line 1 2 3 1.

Step #3: View the Result 1. 34 . Reselect the “Format Chart Data” icon.

Select the “Conditional” tab on the Format Chart Data dialogue box. 35 . and select % Chg Year Ago Dollars. 4.Step #4: Using Conditional Logic 1. Select the “Add Condition” button. Set the first condition to “is less than or equal to 50”. 3. Select “OK”. 2.

Step #4: Using Conditional Logic 1. Save the request as ‘Exercise #4 – Line-Bar Example’ 36 . Click the ‘Save’ button and click the ‘New Folder’ button and create a new folder called ‘Day 2 Requests’ (save all requests built today into this folder). Set the symbol of the first condition to a red triangle. and set its symbol to a green triangle. 3. 4. Add a second condition and set it to “greater than 50”. Select “OK”. 2. 5.

The Result! You’ll notice that in the legend. 37 . the triangle is being shown in the color that you’d previously set. or you can set it as a neutral color such as gray. You can change this color to be one of the “conditional” colors.

Dashboard/Report Application Development Exercise #5 Adding a Saved Filter and Formatting an Existing Request 2130 Cliff Road. Eagan. MN 55122 www.com 38 .biconsultinggroup. Suite 200.

Exercise Objectives: In this lesson we will add our saved filter to a request that was built in Day 1. 2. Setting width formatting. 5. 3. We will also be setting formatting for the request and doing some advanced work in the compound layout. Content: 1. Adding a saved filter. Deleting objects from a request. Combining objects in the compound layout. Finding hidden objects in the compound layout. 39 . 4.

2. Add the saved filter from Exercise #2.Step #1: Add the Saved Filter 1. Open Exercise #13 (from Day 1). 40 .

You may choose those objects from here to edit them directly. 1.Step #2: Find the Table object 1 1 When you click the editor navigation dropdown. all objects that have been created previously for the request have a green circle. Click the editor navigation dropdown and choose Table 41 .

42 . Set the table properties to fit 100% within the column.Step #3: Format Table 1.

Use the editor navigation dropdown to edit the Pivot Table Set the pivot table width properties to fit 100% within the column.Step #4: Find and Format Pivot Table 1. 43 . 2.

1. the object will be created but will not be attached to the compound layout. If you happen to click an object in the editor navigation dropdown list that does not have a green circle. Click the editor navigation dropdown and choose Filters. 44 .Step #5: Create a Filters object 1 1 When you want to add something to the compound layout you need to use the Add View menu.

Step #6: View the Filters Object We now have a Filters object for this request but it is not associated with the Compound Layout. 1. Click the Compound Layout icon. 45 . The next slide will show you how to fix this.

Step #7: Add the Filters Object to the Compound Layout

1

1.

From the Add View menu, click the Filters icon

46

The Result!

Because we had previously created the Filters object, it was added to the Compound Layout when we used the Add View menu.

1.

Save your request into the Day 2 Requests folder as “Exercise #5 Region Summary”

47

Dashboard/Report Application Development Exercise #6 A “Cheat” to Develop New, Complex Requests Based upon an Existing Request

2130 Cliff Road, Suite 200, Eagan, MN 55122 www.biconsultinggroup.com

48

2. Content: 1. “Replacing” columns within an existing request. Modifying minor components of the request.Exercise Objectives: In this lesson we will show a shortcut or “cheat” on how you can build upon existing request structures to shorten your workload as you develop newer requests. 3. 49 . Doing a “Save As” a new request.

including a column selector. until you’ve reached a moment of insight.Step #1: Starting with “Region Summary . and several charts. and an action can be taken. Here’s how you get there. 50 . What would it take to redevelop this entire “package” for a brand analysis? 2 At BICG. the Multi-View Request 1 2 1 “Region Summary . tabular formatting. we’re big fans of shortcuts. Select the Criteria Tab. real fast. A view selector with four views. painting a different picture of the insight that can be gained from analyzing the regions. including graph settings.Exercise #5”. pivot table. and we’re also big fans of analyzing information in multiple ways. each of which has had very specific formatting set. This request is predominately based upon analysis of regions. etc. with a tabular request. 1.Exercise #5” has many complex request objects. We’ve found that it’s valuable to have similarly structured requests side by side so that you can easily compare information in multiple ways.

Delete the contents of the “Column Formula”. 3. Select “OK”. 51 . You’ll notice that the column name has now changed to “Brand” without requiring you to check the “Custom Headings” box and entering a new name. 4. 2. Select “Brand” from the pick list (you’ll see that it’s “formula” will now appear where Region used to be”.Step #2: Replacing Columns 1. Select the “Edit Formula” icon on the Region column.

52 . Save the request as “Exercise #6 Brand Summary”. 2. rather than Regions. to have them refer to Brands. 3. such as renaming several of the views in the view selector.The Result! 1. You’ll need to do some minor edits. Rename the views in the view selector as appropriate. you’ll notice that the column selector has even updated. replacing Region with Brand (although you’ll want to go in and drop the second “Brand” that was available as a replacement column). Back on the Results Tab.

Suite 200. Eagan.com 53 . MN 55122 www.Dashboard/Report Application Development Exercise #7 Complex Pivot Tables 2130 Cliff Road.biconsultinggroup.

Exercise Objectives: In this lesson we’ll dive deeper into Pivot Tables. and will look at how to use pivot tables to “shorten” long requests using multiple pivot tables and view selectors. 2. Content: 1. and how to mimic a re-pivoting of the pivot table through the Dashboard. using column selectors. Using pivot tables to “break up” wide requests. Using column selectors to “mimic” pivoting the pivot table through the Dashboard. 54 .

Make sure to add conditional logic. 3. and the “excluded” measures are all Dollar measures.Step #1: Create a new Pivot Table Every request designer has run into the situation where the end users asked for “just a few more columns”. so they included them all. or. This is a trick we use to “shorten” long requests. Add the saved filter from Exercise #2 to the request Notice that the measures “included” are all Unit measures. Create a pivot table identical to the one above. 2. . and the row and column totals. 55 1. breaking them into smaller. in effect. the end users couldn’t decide on how to limit the number of columns contained within a request. digestible chunks.

without “reinventing the wheel” (i. Clicking this option lets you duplicate the view that you’ve just created.e. and select “Duplicate View”. Select the “Duplicate. resetting all formatting and design.Step #2: “Duplicate” the Pivot Table 1 1 A little known (and little used) option within each editor is a “Duplicate. allowing you to do minor edits. Specialize or Delete” button. 56 . 1. Specialize or Delete” option.

Swap the metrics that are in the “Included” and “Excluded” list. and add a view selector. Return to the compound layout.Step #3: Swap the “included” and “Excluded” Metrics 1. 57 . 2.

. 58 Add the two pivot tables to the view selector.Step #4: Add the two (or more) Pivot Tables to a View Selector 1. naming them “Dollars” and “Units”. (“Dollars” should be first on the list) Add the caption: “Dollars or Units”. 2.

59 . Save the request as “Exercise #7 .Step #5: Adding a Column Selector to Mimic a Re-Pivot 1. Add a filter object to the compound layout. but multiple other attributes as well. 2. allowing the user to not only replace Region with Brand and Brand with Region. 3.Dollars and Units”. Add a column selector option to the Region and Brand columns.

60 . Add prompting on top of the “re-pivoting” and selecting between dollars and units. without once calling IT. and the end user can now produce hundreds of permutations.The Result! Shown are three of the dozens of permutations now available within this request. all available through the Dashboard.

MN 55122 www. Eagan.com 61 . Suite 200.Dashboard/Report Application Development Exercise #8 Ranking and Top and Bottom Requests 2130 Cliff Road.biconsultinggroup.

For example. without limiting the User. if you’ve built a top ten request. Using “Page” controls to create top and bottom “n” requests. to see the “top” or “bottom” performers within a certain category. that is. 62 . do you need to build a new request? Content: 1. Using Oracle Answers. 2. we’ve developed short-cuts to provide these types of requests. and they want to see the next ten. Using column selectors to increase the permutations of top and bottom requests.Exercise Objectives: In this lesson we’ll look at one of the most common requests.

Add the saved filter from Exercise #2 to the request. 4. and to sort low to high on the % Chg column. The next logical step would be to add a ranking column. Also. Click the compound layout button and edit the Table View. Create a request identical to the one above. 2. 3. What do you do if the user then wants to see the next ten? 63 . enable column sorting on the request. Enable Alternating Row “GreenBar” Styling. Make sure to add conditional logic. and filter off only those rows greater than 10 (for example). but that limits you to only the top 10 (for example).Step #1: Create a New Request 1.

Access the “Table View Properties” icon in the upper left corner.Step #2: Using the Paging Function to Make a Top Ten 1. 3. Set the “Rows per Page” to 10. 64 . 2. Select “OK”.

2. to get a “Bottom Ten” request. 65 .Step #3: Testing your Top and Bottom Request 1. Test your Top and Bottom request using the Preview button. Return to the first page. and change the sort order on the % Chg column. 3. Use the “Next Page” button to move from the “Top Ten” to the “Next Ten”.

2. Add a filter object to the compound layout. allowing the Market column to be replaced with District. Save your request as “Exercise #8 Exceptions! Top and Bottom Performers”. or UPC. Add a column selector to the top of the compound layout. Test out your new Top and Bottom request using the Preview option.The Result! 1. 3. 4. Color. 66 .

biconsultinggroup. Suite 200.Dashboard/Report Application Development Exercise #9 Combining Column Selectors with a Single Chart View 2130 Cliff Road. Eagan.com 67 . MN 55122 www.

Adding a Column Selector. Building a Pie Chart. and combine it with a column selector to allow the user to have multiple permutations of the chart. 2. 68 . and will create a request with a single graph. Content: 1.Exercise Objectives: In this lesson we’ll use a few of the lessons learned from previous exercises.

4. 69 . 2. Create a pie chart based on Brand and Dollars.Step #1: Create a New Pie Chart with Custom Formatting 1. Notice that by Checking Custom Title and leaving it blank you removed the title and by overriding the Data Labels you changed the default view of two decimal places. Remove the Title Change Show Data Labels to Always Click Override Default Data Format. 3.

Brand Results by District”. Test the request using the Preview option. 2. 70 . Save the request as “Exercise #9 . 5. If you use a column selector to allow the user to replace the metric used on a Pie Chart.Step #2: Add a Column Selector 1. Add a filter object to the compound layout. 4. Add your filter from Exercise #2 in the Criteria tab. it is a best practice to only use ordinal numbers. rather than percentages or indexes. 3. Add a column selector. allowing the user to replace Brands and Dollars with the columns above.

biconsultinggroup.Dashboard/Report Application Development Exercise #10 Bubble Charts 2130 Cliff Road. Suite 200.com 71 . Eagan. MN 55122 www.

and a column selector. We like it so much. Adding a tabular view. Content: 1.Exercise Objectives: In this lesson we’ll use one of our favorite methods of visualizing information. The bubble chart uniquely allows a user to immediately (we mean immediately) interpret how three metrics interact. Building the bubble chart. 2. something that is virtually impossible to do on a number request. 72 . the bubble chart. we made it part of our logo.

The bubble chart is based upon an x. Click the compound layout button Add a chart to the compound layout You’ll want to experiment with the three metrics that you use for plotting on the bubble chart. Create a new request with Total US. rather it would aggregate using an average (or weighted average). y and a z-axis. such as averages. and % Chg Year Ago Units selected. the zaxis being displayed as the size of a bubble. and how they interact. 4. or contribute to one another. a “percent of”.Step #1: Selecting Metrics Appropriate to a Bubble Chart 1. Add your saved filter from Exercise #2. Bubble charts are designed to plot three metrics. and non-additive numbers. Units. That 3rd metric is most meaningful if it’s based on a ratio. or ratios for the z-axis (the bubble size). Dollars. It’s our best practice to use additive numbers on the x and y-axis such as dollars or units. 3. percentages. a “percent to” or some other metric that isn’t meant to be summed. 2. 73 . Region.

an additive metric under the “y-axis” column. it’s a best practice to limit the number of elements to less than 20. Like any other chart legend. 3. or less than 10 if possible. 1. The key columns to “check” are to place an additive metric under the “x-axis” column. Under the “Legend” column. 2. and a non-additive fact under the “bubble” column. Check the box for “% Chg Year Ago Units” under the bubble column. 5. check the element that you’d like to do a comparison across. 4. Check the box for “Dollars” under the x-axis column.Step #2: Creating the Bubble Chart 1 1 The bubble chart axis palette offers more options than any other chart. 74 . Check the box for “Regions” under the legend column. Check the box for “Total US” under the “level axis” column (the first column). Check the box for “Units” under the y-axis column.

2. select “Zoom to Data Range”. Select OK. 75 . it is a best practice to use the “zoom to data range” option found under the “Axis Scaling” icon. On both the left and bottom tabs.Step #2: Creating the Bubble Chart 1 1 To force the chart axis to eliminate the “white space” below the lowest y-axis and x-axis actuals. 1. 3. Select the “Axis Scaling” icon (looks like a chart with a vertical green arrow).

Click the Column Format tab and click the hide checkbox. 4. Hiding ‘Total US” removes the grouping.The Result! The column ‘Total US’ is needed for the bubble chart but not displayed in the tabular view. allowing the user to drop Region. 3. Add a formatted Tabular view under the bubble chart. Add a filter object to the compound layout. it is fine to enable the alternating row greenbar formatting on this request. Save your request as “Exercise #10 Performance by Dollars.” . 2. Therefore. Units and Percent Change. and allow the user to drop “% Chg Year Ago Units” with each of the other % Chg” columns. 76 1. To hide a column. go to the Criteria tab of a request and click column properties of the column you want to hide. Add a column selector. and replace it with Brand or District.

com 77 . MN 55122 www.Dashboard/Report Application Development Exercise #11 Advanced Dashboard Formatting 2130 Cliff Road.biconsultinggroup. Eagan. Suite 200.

2.Exercise Objectives: In this lesson we’ll use a few of the more advanced Dashboard formatting techniques. 78 . Content: 1. Renaming sections and turning on the top border. and forcing column sizes to fit. Forcing column widths to fit. including the use of sections.

Create one column across the top. and two columns beneath. 79 . 2. 4. Name the Dashboard page “Day Two”.Step #1: Create a “Day Two” Dashboard 1. 3. Select the “Add Dashboard Page” button from Edit Dashboard. Drag and Drop your Day 2 requests in the sequence above.

and to rename the section using the request name. It’s a BICG best practice to drop each request into its own section. 3 Enter a new name for the section. 80 5. It is not recommended to use the “Modify” link if displayed directly on a request. . which will turn on the solid blue heading at the top of each section. 6. For the prompt section. and to display the section heading. Rename each section using the request name (omit the “Exercise # …” heading). name it “Selections”. 7. Check the “Display Section Heading” and. 3. Click Properties\Modify on each request on the dashboard. Check the “Display Section Heading” box after re-naming each section. On the dashboard.Step #2: Format the Sections 1 3 2 1 Clicking the “Rename” option on each section allows you to rename the section. 1. Remove the title bar from the compound layout. Remember to save each request. click Page Options\Edit Dashboard Select the “Rename” button on each section. 2 4. It is a BICG best practice to use the Edit Dashboard – Properties – Modify option to edit requests on a dashboard. 2.

setting the width of both columns to 50% will always keep the column width consistent. or to a percentage. and will force the contained requests to fit within that column width. 81 1. Set both columns width to 50% 3 . On a two column Dashboard. 2 2 Expand the Column Properties dialogue box by clicking the plus sign next to “Additional Formatting Options”.Step #3: Fit the Columns each to 50% 1 3 1 Clicking the “Properties” option on each column allows you to set the width of each column either to a pixel width.

The Result! 82 .

Eagan.biconsultinggroup.Dashboard/Report Application Developer Exercise #12 Using Guided Navigation to Create Dashboard Alerts 2130 Cliff Road. MN 55122 www. Suite 200.com 83 .

Content: 1.Exercise Objectives: In this lesson we’ll use one of several methods of “Guided Navigation” to indicate to the Dashboard user when certain thresholds have been exceeded. Creating an “Exceptions” request. 84 . and when action should be taken. 2. Adding the Guided Navigation Link to a Dashboard page.

Change the Prompt scope to be ‘Dashboard’ Save the prompt 85 . 3. Day Two page by clicking Page Options. Edit Dashboard. and Modify.Step #1: Change Prompt Scope 2 1. Modify the Prompt at the top of the My Dashboard. Properties. 2.

Create a new request showing Year. An exception request typically filters off either very good or very bad data. Add a filter object to the compound layout for this request. naming it “Exercise #12 . Using prompts on the Dashboard page.Exceptions Request”. Save the request. District. both good and bad) are a key part of designing good iBots and Guided Navigation. 2. 1. 86 . you can allow the user to adjust exactly what constitutes an “exception”. Add your saved filter from Exercise #2 as well as a new filter on the % Chg Year Ago column. 4.Step #2: Create an “Exceptions” Request 1 1 “Exceptions” requests (requests that are used to search for exceptions. and % Chg Year Ago Dollars. 3. based upon one or more columns. which will filter the request to contain only rows where “% Chg Year Ago Dollars is less than or equal to 30 (percent)”.

This type of object can be dropped into any column and section on the Dashboard. Select the “Properties” button on the Guided Navigation Link that you just added. Link” object to this new section. Rename the new section “Alerts” and check the box to “Display Section Heading”. 3. 1. Drag and drop a “Guided Nav. 87 . Create a new section on the top of the right column by dragging ‘Section’ from the Dashboard Objects. 2.Step #2: Add a “Guided Navigation Link” to your Dashboard 1 1 “Guided Navigation” links allow you to add hyperlinks to the Dashboard page which will appear or disappear based upon the content of an underlying exception request. 4.

4. The “Target” Request (meaning Request) or Dashboard is what your Guided Navigation Link will call.Step #3: Configure the Guided Navigation Link 1 2 3 4 1 Using the browse list to select a “Source Request” allows you to link this Guided Navigation Link to an exceptions request. Select the radio button which indicates that the link will appear “If the request returns rows”. 88 1. The Guided Navigation Link’s behavior (whether it appears or not) will be determined by whether or not this attached request returns rows. 4 . It can be the same request used in the source request above. Select “OK”. 3 Select your “Exceptions” request in both the Source Request and Target fields. 2 3. or a more detailed request or Dashboard. The “Caption” is the text that will appear along with the Navigation link when/if it appears on the Dashboard. Enter a caption similar to that shown above. 2.

and “CENTRAL REGION” AND “WESTERN REGION” for Region and click “Go”. select 2006 for Year.The Result! 1. On the prompt. Click on the Guided Navigation Link to retrieve your Exceptions request. Did your Guided Navigation Link appear? How about when you select 2006. and the “SOUTHERN REGION” and “EASTERN REGION”? 2. 89 .

MN 55122 www. Suite 200.biconsultinggroup.com 90 .Dashboard/Report Application Developer Exercise #13 Using Guided Navigation to Display or Hide Dashboard Sections 2130 Cliff Road. Eagan.

Setting a Sections Properties using “Guided Navigation”.Exercise Objectives: In this lesson we’ll use another method of “Guided Navigation” on the Dashboard to hide or display complete Dashboard sections. Content: 1. 91 .

92 .Step #1: Display a Section based upon “Guided Navigation” 1 1 Applying “Guided Navigation” to a section will control whether the section will appear or disappear based upon the content of an underlying exception request. 1. Click on the section properties for the Guided Navigation Link we added in the last exercise.

Select your “Exceptions” request in the Source Request.Step #2: Configure the Guided Navigation Section 1 2 3 1 Set the section to reference the source request. Select “OK”. 93 . 2. Select the radio button which indicates that the link will appear “If the request returns rows”. 2 Set the source request to be referenced. 3. 1. 3 Determine whether or not the section should be shown based upon the results of the Source Request request.

The Result!

1.

On the prompt, select 2006 for Year, and “CENTRAL REGION” AND “WESTERN REGION” for Region and click “Go”.

Did your Section appear? How about when you select 2006, and the “SOUTHERN REGION” and “EASTERN REGION”?

2.

Click on the Guided Navigation Link to retrieve your Exceptions request.

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Questions & Answers

Don’t forget to continually review the ‘BICG Best Practices Development Guide’ to help your team members get the most out of OBIEE!

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Thank you for taking the Dashboard/Report Application Development course!!

Please check out the BICG University site at http://www.bicguniversity.com for information on additional courses.

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com 97 .martin@biconsultinggroup. Pharma. Contact Information: Michael Martin [President] 651-210-1790 michael. Finance. One of the few consulting firms to have deployed against Oracle Finance and PeopleSoft. Services.mayer@biconsultinggroup. Experts at both stand alone implementations and application implementations including Sales. Collectively worked on more than 200 Oracle BI Enterprise Edition projects and more than 300 data warehouses and datamarts.com Amy Mayer [Senior Vice President] 612-237-9843 amy. and more than 10 years of BI/DW experience. Average consultant has 3+ years of Oracle BI Enterprise Edition experience. Every customer is referenceable including those who had previous failures with other consulting firms. and Marketing Analytics.About BI Consulting Group Oracle’s largest consulting partner dedicated exclusively to Oracle BI EE.

Multiple projects deployed across multiple divisions. Integrating multiple source systems together in a unified frontend Dashboard. Deploying Service Analytics and a custom data warehouse across international divisions. Deployment of Order Analytics against a new. custom EDW. Deployment of Oracle’s Pharma Analytics. Other Notable Customers: • • American Express • • Fidelity • • Cbeyond Shopzilla Bayer Medtronic Emergency Response • • RBC Dain • UBC • Pharmaceutical Life Fitness Benderson Development 98 . after failed implementation by another Systems Integrator. Sales Analytics application against existing EDW. and developed several new custom data warehouses.Notable BICG References Deployed Oracle RMW for Service Analytics after failed deployment by other Systems Integrator. including a Price Scenario application allowing “what-if” forecasting. Redeveloped dozens of existing Dashboards using BICG’s “best practices” methodology.