Table of Contents

CHAPTER 1: THE EVOLUTION IN EDUCATION ........................................ Error! Bookmark not defined. 1.1 History ........................................................................................ Error! Bookmark not defined. 1.2 Introduction ................................................................................ Error! Bookmark not defined. 1.3 Summary .................................................................................... Error! Bookmark not defined. CHAPTER 2: FUTURE IN OUR HANDS (By Sir Kher Jagatsingh) ................ Error! Bookmark not defined. 2.1 Few Words on Sir Kher Jagatsingh ............................................... Error! Bookmark not defined. 2.2 Introduction ................................................................................ Error! Bookmark not defined. 2.3 Pre-Primary Sector ...................................................................... Error! Bookmark not defined. 2.4 Primary Sector Of Education ....................................................... Error! Bookmark not defined. 2.5 All These Efforts Have Taken Into Consideration The Needs Of The Child .. Error! Bookmark not defined. 2.6 Community & Secondary Education ............................................ Error! Bookmark not defined. 2.7 Occupational & Vocational Training (The Central Training Office) Error! Bookmark not defined. 2.8 Cultural & International Aspects.................................................. Error! Bookmark not defined. 2.9 Conclusion .................................................................................. Error! Bookmark not defined. CHAPTER 3: CRITICAL ANALYSIS “FUTURE IN OUR HANDS” ............ Error! Bookmark not defined. 3.1 Retrospective: Future in our Hands (Mrs PULTON-AUDIT, ID: 101993)...... Error! Bookmark not defined. 3.2 (Mrs ALLYJAUN Shaheen, ID: ) ..................................................... Error! Bookmark not defined. 3.3 (Mrs MALLECK-HOSSEN Reshma, ID: ) ......................................... Error! Bookmark not defined. CHAPTER 4: PRESENTATION .................................................................. Error! Bookmark not defined. References ........................................................................................... Error! Bookmark not defined.

CHAPTER 2: FUTURE IN OUR HANDS (By Sir Kher Jagatsingh)
“When almost by accident and force of historical circumstances, I was offered the portfolio of Education and Cultural Affairs in January 1977, I was already aware of the long and arduous task that awaited me. It was a crucial and decisive time to be

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a weekly.” ~Honorable Kher Jagatsingh~ 2. 2 . Minister of Economic Planning and Development from 1971 to 1976 and Minister of Education and Cultural Affairs from 1977 to 1982. Was part of the first delegation of independent Mauritius at the International Sugar Conference. civic awareness and skills. he also served. Addressed the 7th Special Session of the United Nations. the like of which I had never faced before. First elected to the Mauritian legislature in 1959. Was General Secretary of the Mauritius Labour Party from 1961 to 1982. 1931 in Amritsar. With independence. This colossal task of reform and development was a real challenge. General Assembly. Served on the Times of India. 2.1 Few Words on Sir Kher Jagatsingh • • • • • • Sir Kher Jagatsingh Born on 23rd July. It was necessary to prepare a labour force with appropriate attitude. Was knighted in December 1980. 1985 in London. and again joined the Legislative Assembly in January 1977. The Nation. Geneva. rather briefly.Minister of Education and Cultural Affairs. He was re-elected in 1967. beliefs and values. He also founded Mauritius Today. Became active in politics in 1948 Co-founded the Mauritius Times. on the Slough Observer and the Paddington Times.2 Introduction Mauritius inherited a colonial system of education. New York. Was Minister of Health from 1967 to 1971. June 1981 Died July 18th. Delhi. • • • • • • • • • He founded The Triveni in 1958 and mooted the idea of creating the Mahatma Gandhi Institute. After secondary studies started his career as a clerk in the Civil Service before becoming a journalist. in April 1968. there has been a growing realization: the most important resource was the man power. He was also a member of the Board of Directors of the daily Advance. London. September 1975 Published Petals of Dust. India. in 1954 and in 1970 he again co-founded the daily newspaper.

His aim was to match the education with the changing needs of the country. 2. With the rapid changes during the past decade. He planned to implement a whole series of reforms in all the educational sectors by providing equality of educational opportunity for each and every Mauritian individual. “petites ecoles”. providing people with what is best and what ought to be functional. His clear cut vision was to move Mauritius from the agricultural country to a more industrialized society.The 1977 & 1978 have been momentous & eventful years in the history of the Mauritian Education. and parents. kindergarten” have always existed and run by various institutions such as: • • • • • • • • • The Joint Child Health Education Project Churches Sugar Estates Private Enterprises Sugar Industry Labor Welfare Fund Local branch of the organization Mondiale Pour L’Education Prescolaire Village councils Municipalities Benevolent organisations Even in this connection these had not been reliable and so careful attention was given to this sector in the following manner: 3 . The Govt decided that secondary & university education should be free as from Jan 1977. according to the Jagatsingh Report it was found that with steady industrialization. administrators. there was a need to cater for a greater number of young children. So. ´creches’. Sir Kher Jagatsingh assumed the direction of education and cultural affairs and he was faced with a real challenge.3 Pre-Primary Sector For the Minister. Emphasis was placed on the democratization of the education system. and with more women participating in all sectors of the economy. adequate facilities had to be provided for the children of working mothers. He believed that education as a national issue would benefit from dialogue with students. pre-school education had not been given sufficient attention for quite a long time. the spreading out of schools and colleges evenly over the country so as to balance the educational facilities between the urban and rural areas and the diversification of the curricula. teachers.

planning & supervision. school environment. Accordingly emphasis was laid on mauritianisation of the curriculum to bring better development in education. work condition and so on. pedagogical and socio-economic so as to foster a higher level of education. This unit acted also as an umbrella agency to provide guidance for policy. It was accepted that fundamental changes had to take place on all fronts.000 students only 270 schools were in existence. administration. the main consideration was to prepare the young child to accede to primary schooling in a smooth manner. It was noted that for 135. who was the Director of the MIE.4 Primary Sector Of Education The Minister stressed on quality education which was the main focus and to achieve this certain parameters had to be respected such as staff. to: 4 . The Minister also proposed to abolish Junior scholarship as it pressurized the whole education sector. Financial and human resources played an important role in the initiation of quality education. He decided to merge the Certificate of Primary Education with Junior Scholarship by 1980. Teacher/ pupil ratio would go down with more schools being built.• • • an evaluation study was carried out targets were set for both quantitative & qualitative development the Mauritius college of Education and the Mauritius Institute of Education were involved in improving the standard of pre-primary education through the training of teachers & setting up of pilot projects • Pilot studies concerning the needs of small children and problems posed by working mothers were identified and carried out especially in the context of the celebration for the International year of the child in 1979 • since there were about a thousand pre-primary schools & related establishment out of which half were registered with the Ministry of Education. a pre-primary unit was set up in the Ministry to control and report on the pre-primary schools. showing unequal ratios in certain areas. • All partners in the pre-primary sector as well as outside assistance mainly UNICEF was sought On the whole. 2. The government after the experience of 1977 appointed a commission of inquiry headed by Mr Frank Richard. Yet it must start at the primary level itself.

According to the report. to members of the MIE looked into various aspects of teachers’ duties and roles. better buildings etc were catered. cultural and economic circumstances of the country. Ministry of Finance. federations of civil service unions. provide administrative reforms consider problems arising out of the changing needs of the country and make recommendations regarding social. 5 .• • • review the scope and functions of the primary sector of education assess the need for further curricular. The PTA has brought about a greater participation of the community in the educational sector. • • • • • • The role of PTA was more clearly defined Free distribution of shoes and continuation of World Food Programme was reviewed Better deployment of graduates in the primary Concurrent facilities provided to Mauritian students to Rodrigues Training of Extra teaching assistants Review of the Primary School Leaving Certificate examinations with the MIE 2. UNICEF. World Bank. The creation of a Federation of PTA and the subsidy of 50 cents per head of the primary school population was a great incentive. The decisions taken in 1977 and 1978 reflected a real concern for all aspects of a concerned approach to policy. All the stakeholders ranging from the representatives of unions. They were also provided with a comprehensive course on educational administration and management. books. In fact the quality of education depends on the head teachers.5 All These Efforts Have Taken Into Consideration The Needs Of The Child The provision of additional facilities. There should be the aspect of decentralization involving immediate responsibility to head teachers. and amenities. better water supply. planning and administration of the primary education: • Moray house in collaboration with the Min Of Education and the MIE and the British Council already carried out briefing on conducting the examination in view of merging Junior Scholarship and Primary School Leaving Certificate. these recommendations would enable the Ministry to bring about global reform in this sector of education. The role of the head teacher was also reviewed. UNESCO. Children could even take their books home with them.

• Students who could not join a normal secondary school and who did not get through std VI. in 1978. aptitudes and abilities. • The Community Schools will aim to develop a three-year cycle and will operate in the Junior Secondary Schools and will also get the best facilities as far as teaching staffs. contents and methodology. 7000 students are expected in this exercise. Children who fail to obtain a certificate of Primary Education after two attempts will be given an opportunity to make good in community schools in line with the policy that the basics of a certain amount of numeracy and literacy are essential for the healthy development of every child. to give equal opportunity to all.One main preoccupation of the Jagatsingh report was the reassessment of the contents and teaching of oriental languages. Emphasis was placed on the training of teachers in all these languages and on better local textbooks to give oriental language and culture more credibility. Hence since the policy of free primary education for all was adopted and no one of school going age was to be refused admission to a primary school. • As far as the approximately 1000 small community schools like baitkas and madrassas together with some 2000 part time teachers are concerned. The Mahatma Gandhi Institution collaboration with the Ministry looked deeper into examination of oriental language teaching. will be sent to community schools.6 Community & Secondary Education Community Schools • • The main policy of the government is to provide education to each child according to his needs. Honourable Kher Jagatsingh was determined to further democratize education. 4000 students went to community schools and in 1979. • The role of the MIE is to devise a curriculum and to train staffs for the community schools by taking into consideration the needs of children who requires special attention and the changing needs of the community. learning materials are concerned. actions will be taken to improve the quality of teaching and reinforce their role in our social and cultural life as these schools are an essential link to the preservation and dissemination of our cultural heritage. 6 . 2.

Triolet. 7 . UNDP and the World Bank. IV and VI. the government had to expand its programme of assistance and also provide its own expanded facilities. Riviere. Goodlands. Release of teachers to upgrade their professional qualifications.Secondary Education • • Approximately 80 000 children have access to free education provided by 7 SSS. • Decolonisation of the Mauritian education system as many people look to Government and education as a means for rectifying or overcoming the nation’s problems and deficiencies since free education became the greatest leveller in society. The PSSA exercises effective control of nearly 90% of all the secondary sector. • Government set up an Institute of Education with major commitment to curriculum development and responsibilities for teacher training. du Rempart. Collaboration of the MIE in preparing secondary textbooks. Rose Belle. • • More buildings for secondary and post primary education with the assistance of UNESCO and the World Bank. Bambous and Mahebourg. preparation of materials and eventually educational research. the salary of teachers in the profit making schools was aligned on the basis of the award of the Permanent Arbitration Tribunal in favour of teachers in non-profit making schools. In 1978. the government of Mauritius has decided to undertake a reform of its educational system with the cooperation of the UNESCO. implementation of the Book loan scheme and its inspectorate has been strengthened. government intake was roughly 700 pupils in Form I. MGI and 12 JSS with approximately 3000 teachers. Souillac. • Availability of quality education to rural areas by location of schools in such places as Terre Rouge. the intake rose to 2 380 and in early 1979 to 2800. that was the biggest single act of democratisation that has ever been carried out in the annals of the Mauritian history. This wider access to education in State schools is in line with the policy of democratisation and providing for more equity. in early 1978. Up to the beginning of early 1977. Most of the prescribed texts were given on loan to pupils of Forms I. • • • • • • The PSSA was reinforced with better means of control supervision and guidance. Centre de Flacq. Occupational training was in need for reorganisation and it was recognised that to reduce competition for secondary schools and to improve the quality of the private sector.

8 . Our educational system had to be molded in such a way to meet the needs of the job market and this report attempted to deal with these challenges. Vocational and Training centres are set up under the close attention of UNESCO and the World Bank. 2. More emphasis was laid on technical and vocational orientation to meet the needs of a fast developing society. All junior secondary schools are provided with the necessary infrastructure to cater for students up to Form V and for a wide range of cultural activities as well as specialist rooms for some subjects. Existing secondary schools and Junior schools have been expanded and consolidated. • • Arrangements made for the opening of JSS in Rodrigues. Employment was estimated to increase for the Plan Period 1975 – 1980.7 Occupational & Vocational Training (The Central Training Office) Training was an important objective of the policy. trained and Mauritius Institutes of Education diplomates. • Concerning the 12 Junior secondary schools built under the World Bank Education Project. experts have said that the facilities in these schools are among the best in this part of the hemisphere while they have been staffed by well qualified.• • • In consequence less privileged parents and students have gradually greater access to amenities. This is illustrated in the figure below.

000 35.000 0 15 .000 20. The institutions that were responsible for training are listed as: • • • • • • • • MOE and Cultural Affairs Schools of Nursing Hotel & catering Schools Telecommunication Sector Private Sector Development Works Corporation Municipalities Handicraft Training Sector Due to this unorganised way.000 30. there was no coordination between the various stakeholders involved for training.40.000 5.000 10000 > 25 Years Male Female Legislation about training existed with the Apprenticeship Act No 9 and the Trade Proficiency Act 1972.000 25. However. The duties of the CTO are: • • • • • To monitor the needs for occupational training Provide for continuous review of employment opportunities Coordinate the training programmes sponsored by various ministries and agencies Administer training institutions if required Initiate new training programmes as and when required 9 . Training was given in a haphazard manner without a systematic approach. training was not satisfactory.000 11.000 36.000 15.24 Years 20.000 10. which is why The Central Training Office was created in 9978.

8 Cultural & International Aspects A decent attempt was made to mauritianise the educational system in the island to maintain the multilingual. for example the syllabus for Mauritian History was modified for F4 – F6. “I believe that one of the objectives of education in Mauritius is to preserve the Mauritian cosmopolitan personality and the uniqueness of the average Mauritian as an open.Occupational training was considered as an important avenue to enhance the chances of finding a suitable job. Mauritian Maison D’Edition became a reality with close collaboration between international institutions (Nathan and MacMillan) and the local expertise. 2. His contribution towards the emancipation of the masses and the political. syllabus. sensitive human being. The MIE was given the responsibility of looking at the various aspects of Mauritian history and culture. He had many great accomplishments to his credit and had made a sterling contribution to the building of the Mauritian society. dance and cultural manifestation were provided.” Honorable Kher Jagatsingh 10 . The impact of the British colonies could still be felt. He has his imprint both in Government and in the Labour Party while serving as Cabinet Minister and Secretary General. examination and assessment modes were reviewed to adapt them to the needs of our society. multi-racial. 2.9 Conclusion Sir Kher Jagatsingh was a fitting symbol of culture and education. The curriculum. With the passing away of Sir Kher Jagatsingh in the morning of Thursday 18th July 1985 in London. Opportunities to the study of music. social and economic development of the country has been positive and significant. The Mauritian remains a versatile person with an extraordinary ability to adapt himself and the education system must ensure the full flowering of this aspect of his personality. This encouraged Mauritian to write materials that were more suitable our educational system. Mauritius lost one of its most illustrious son and a pillar of the Mauritian society. multi-cultural and multi-religious heritage.

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