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www.CambridgeESOL.org
9 7 8 1 9 0 6 4 3 8 3 6 4
ISBN 978-1-906438-36-4
Tcachíne Kncwìcdec Tcsl (TKT)
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Lcarníne (CLlL)
Handbook for teachers
www.CambridgeESOL.org/exams/teaching-awards/clil.html
T KT : CL I L HANDBOOK | CONTENTS
1
2 Introduction
4 An overview of TKT: CLIL
5 General description and syllabus
8 Preparation for the CLIL module
10 Sample test
18 TKT: CLIL test administration
18 Grading and results
18 Special Circumstances
19 The production of TKT: CLIL
19 Support for TKT: CLIL candidates and course providers
20 Common questions and answers
20 Sample test answer key
21 Sample OMR answer sheet
22 TKT: CLIL wordlist
23 TKT: CLIL subject-specific vocabulary
26 References
Contents
Preface
This handbook is intended for course providers who are, or intend to become, involved in preparing
candidates for TKT: Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL).
For further information on any of the Cambridge ESOL examinations and teaching awards,
please contact:
Cambridge ESOL Information, 1 Hills Road, Cambridge, CB1 2EU, United Kingdom
Tel: +44 1223 553355, Fax: +44 1223 460278, email: ESOL@ucles.org.uk
www.CambridgeESOL.org
2
T KT : CL I L HANDBOOK | I NTRODUCTI ON
Introduction
■ Introduction to Cambridge ESOL
TKT: Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL) is
designed and produced by University of Cambridge ESOL
Examinations (Cambridge ESOL), a department of the
University of Cambridge and part of the University of
Cambridge Local Examinations Syndicate, which has provided
examinations in English for speakers of other languages since
1913. Cambridge ESOL offers an extensive range of
examinations, certificates and diplomas for learners and
teachers of English, taken by over 2 million people a year, in
more than 130 countries.
■ Introduction to TKT: Content and Language
Integrated Learning – a test of professional knowledge
for English language teachers and also subject
teachers who use English as a medium for teaching
their curriculum subject
■ What is CLIL?
CLIL describes an evolving approach to teaching and learning
where subjects are taught and studied through the medium of
a non-native language. The experience of learning subjects
through the medium of a non-native language is more
challenging and intensive as there is more exposure to the
language and learners acquire knowledge and skills in
different areas of the curriculum. In CLIL, learning a curricular
subject in a second, third or sometimes fourth language
involves drawing on effective pedagogical practice from a
range of different educational contexts. Curricular subjects
apart from languages are taught through the target language.
These include: Art, Citizenship, Classics, Design Technology,
Economics, Environmental Studies, Geography, History,
Information Computer Technology (ICT), Literacy, Maths,
Music, Physical Education (PE), Philosophy, Politics, Religious
Education (RE), Science, Social Science.
There are many different types of CLIL programmes, ranging
from full immersion (Canada) through partial immersion,
about 50–60% of the curriculum (parts of Spain), to language
showers and regular 20–30 minute subject lessons in the target
language (parts of Germany). In Secondary schools, subjects
are usually taught in the target language by non-native
speaker subject teachers. In Primary contexts, CLIL
programmes are commonly delivered by non-native subject
teachers or by English language teachers. In some countries
native speaker classroom assistants support the learners too.
There are also contexts where native speakers teach English to
non-native learners (often from minority language groups) to
enable them to integrate into mainstream classes. Examples of
these programmes are EAL (English as an Additional Language
in Britain) and CBI (Content Based Instruction in the US).
■ Why CLIL?
There are many advantages to the CLIL approach: it develops
confident learners and enhances academic cognitive processes
and communication skills. CLIL encourages intercultural
understanding and community values. In addition, research
shows that learners become more sensitive to vocabulary and
ideas presented in their first language as well as in the target
language and they gain more extensive and varied vocabulary.
In the target language, learners reach proficiency levels in all
four skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing far
beyond what is expected in TEYL programmes. This success is
shown in ICT skills too. See Johnstone, R and McKinstry, R
(2008) Evaluation of Early Primary Partial Immersion document.
In Secondary schools, research indicates that, ‘CLIL leads to
better English proficiency, that it has no negative effect on L1
proficiency, nor on the pupils’ subject knowledge.’
Coleman, L (2006) CLIL behind the dykes; the Dutch bilingual model
in IATEFL YLSIG Journal.
‘CLIL induces the learner to be more cognitively active during
the learning process’, Van de Craen, P, Mondt, K, Allain, L and
Gao, Y (2008) Why and How CLIL Works.
Available at http://www.univie.ac.at/Anglistik/ViewS (Accessed
26 April 2008)
TKT: CLIL is an optional extension module of the Teaching
Knowledge Test (TKT). It tests knowledge of Content and
Language Integrated Learning and concepts related to a CLIL
approach. It tests knowledge about subject teaching in a target
language and the learning, thinking and language skills which
are developed across different curriculum subjects. It tests
knowledge of how to plan lessons as well as knowledge of
activities and resources used to support a CLIL approach. It
also tests knowledge of teaching strategies and how
assessment is carried out in CLIL contexts.
The CLIL module is designed to offer maximum flexibility and
accessibility for candidates and therefore does not test subject
specific knowledge nor include compulsory teaching practice.
It is intended to be a platform for professional development.
However, it is likely that centres and other institutions will
offer courses for TKT: CLIL preparation. These may include
practical issues arising from specific CLIL contexts and some
teaching practice. The CLIL module tests knowledge of a CLIL
approach and the skills that are taught across all subjects. It
should be noted that it does not test teaching ability.
The CLIL module offers candidates a step in their professional
development as teachers. As a result of the global need for
language learning, particularly for English, candidates who are
teachers of other curriculum subjects as well as candidates
who are language teachers can add TKT: CLIL to their existing
qualifications. This will demonstrate their understanding of
how to teach a broader range of subjects for the 21
st
century.
The CLIL module can be taken at any stage in a teacher’s
career. It is suitable for pre or in-service teachers of English or
teachers of other subjects who use the medium of English in a
variety of teaching contexts e.g. primary, secondary or adult
sectors. It is intended for international candidates who may be
non-first language or first language teachers. It is also suitable
for teachers who are moving to English teaching after teaching
another subject or those who are moving from teaching their
subject in the first language to teaching it in English. The CLIL
module forms part of a framework of teaching awards and
tests for teachers offered by Cambridge ESOL.
3
T KT : CL I L HANDBOOK | I NTRODUCTI ON
Cambridge ESOL teaching awards and tests for teachers
TKT Module 1 TKT: CLIL TKT: KAL CELTA CELTYL ICELT Delta Delta Delta
TKT Module 2 Module Module Module
TKT Module 3 1 2 3
Teaching not essential not essential not essential not required not required required recommended required recommended
experience
Previous not essential not essential not essential qualifications qualifications local an initial an initial an initial
qualifications which allow which allow requirements teaching teaching teaching
/ training access to access to apply qualification qualification qualification
higher higher
education education
Suggested minimum of minimum of minimum of minimum minimum minimum of minimum minimum minimum
language Council of Council of Council of Council of Council of Council of Council of Council of Council of
level Europe B1 Europe B1 Europe B2 Europe C2/C1 Europe C2/C1 Europe B2 Europe C2/C1 Europe C2/C1 Europe C2/C1
Teaching age primary, primary, primary, adults (16+) primary or primary, primary, primary, primary,
group secondary or secondary or secondary or secondary secondary or secondary or secondary or secondary or
adults adults adults adults adults adults adults
Can be taken yes yes yes yes yes no not no not
pre-service recommended recommended
Course not required not required not required yes yes yes not required yes not required
attendance
Assessed no no no yes yes yes no yes no
teaching
practice
Continuous no no no yes yes yes no yes no
assessment
Involves no no no yes yes yes no yes no
coursework
Written test / yes yes yes no no no yes no no
examination
Note: Cambridge ESOL also offers IDLTM and the Young Learner Extension to CELTA. IDLTM is an educational management qualification.
The Young Learner Extension to CELTA shares similarities with CELTYL, except that entry is conditional on candidates having completed
CELTA.
4
T KT : CL I L HANDBOOK | OVERVI EW
Cambridge ESOL’s tests for teachers include:
• The Teaching Knowledge Test (TKT)
• TKT: Knowledge about Language (KAL)
• TKT: Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL)
Cambridge ESOL’s practical, course-based qualifications for
teachers include:
• CELTA (Certificate in English Language Teaching to Adults)
• CELTYL (Certificate in English Language Teaching to
Young Learners)
• ICELT (In-service Certificate in English Language Teaching)
Cambridge ESOL also offers the Delta Modules, which cover all
areas of knowledge at an advanced level and include teaching
practice. The Delta Modules are:
• Delta Module One: a written examination
• Delta Module Two: a course-based qualification
• Delta Module Three: an extended assignment
Other teaching qualifications offered by Cambridge ESOL
include two specifically designed for the further education
and skills sector within the UK.
A summary of the entry requirements and content of
Cambridge ESOL’s Teaching Awards and tests for teachers can
be found on page 3.
An overview of TKT: Content
and Language Integrated
Learning
■ The aims of TKT: CLIL
• to test candidates’ knowledge of concepts related to a
CLIL approach and knowledge of the practice of
planning, teaching and assessing curriculum subjects
taught in a second, third or fourth language
• to provide an easily accessible test about CLIL to
speakers of other languages, which is prepared and
delivered to international standards, and could be used
by candidates to access further training, and enhance
career opportunities
• to encourage teachers in their professional development
by providing a step in a developmental framework of
awards for teachers of English.
■ TKT: Content and Language Integrated Learning
candidature
TKT: CLIL is suitable for:
• subject teachers who need to teach their subjects in
English and who want to add language teaching to their
portfolio of skills
• English language teachers who teach curricular subjects
in a second, third or fourth language
• classroom assistants working in CLIL contexts
• classroom teachers who teach curriculum subjects
• English as an Additional Language (EAL) teachers
who work with non-native speaker learners (often
fromminority language groups) in mainstream classes.
Candidates taking TKT: CLIL will normally have some
experience of teaching English to speakers of other languages.
TKT: CLIL may also be taken by:
• pre-service teachers
• teachers involved in training programmes
• candidates studying for teaching qualifications who may
have non-native learners in their classrooms.
To access TKT: CLIL teachers need at least an intermediate
level of English – Level B1 of the Council of Europe’s Common
European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) – e.g.
PET, IELTS band score of 4. However, candidates are not
required to have taken any English language examinations.
Candidates taking the CLIL module are expected to be
familiar with the language of teaching as represented in the
separate TKT glossary as well as the terminology related to
the description of language, subject vocabulary and concepts
for TKT: CLIL. These are found in the syllabus description on
pages 5–7, in the separate CLIL glossary (see also wordlist on
page 22), and in the subject vocabulary lists on pages 23–24.
Candidates are not required to take any other modules of TKT
or to fulfil any specific entry requirements for the CLIL module.
Successful candidates are likely to have some experience of
teaching school subjects through the medium of English.
■ Test format
The CLIL module consists of 80 questions in two parts.
Candidates are required to answer the questions by selecting a
letter for the correct answer. As it tests candidates’ knowledge
of concepts related to a CLIL approach rather than their subject
knowledge, proficiency in the English language or their
performance in classroomsituations, candidates are not
required to listen, speak or produce extended writing when
taking TKT: CLIL.
■ Approaches to teaching and learning
A range of approaches to teaching and learning may be
covered in the test material. Approaches which might bias
against candidates from particular backgrounds or teaching
contexts are avoided. Knowledge of communicative and other
approaches to teaching is expected, as is familiarity with
common ELT terminology.
■ Sources and text types used in TKT: CLIL
Extracts, original or adapted, from the following sources may
feature in the CLIL module:
• CLIL coursebooks, activity books or supplementary
materials including CLIL materials found on the web
• articles relating to CLIL from journals, magazines and
the internet
• diagrams and other visuals (see CLIL glossary for
examples of visual organisers which may be included in
the test tasks)
• descriptions of classroom situations.
4
5 T KT : CL I L HANDBOOK | CONTENT AND LANGUAGE I NTEGRATED LEARNI NG
5
TKT: CONTENT AND LANGUAGE
INTEGRATED LEARNING
GENERAL DESCRIPTION
Examination TKT: CLIL consists of two parts
format
Timing 1 hour 20 minutes
Number of items 80
Task types 3-option multiple choice; 1-1
matching; 3/4/5-option matching; odd
one out; ordering; sequencing
Answer format For all parts, candidates indicate their
answers by shading the correct
lozenges on their answer sheets.
Candidates should use a pencil and
mark their answers firmly.
Candidates should use an eraser to
rub out any answer they wish to
change.
Marks Each item carries one mark.
SYLLABUS
TKT: CLIL is an examination for both subject teachers and
English language teachers involved in CLIL programmes.
It tests knowledge of the aims and rationale of a CLIL
approach and knowledge of CLIL from a teaching
perspective: the planning, teaching and assessment of
CLIL. It also focuses on teachers’ awareness of learning
demands (content, language, communication, cognition)
and support strategies for learners in CLIL programmes.
PART 1
Title Knowledge of CLIL and Principles of
CLIL
Number of items 25
Areas of • aims of and rationale for CLIL
knowledge • language across the curriculum
• communication skills across the
curriculum
• cognitive skills across the
curriculum
• learning skills across the curriculum
Task types 4 tasks of 5–8 items each:
1-1 matching; 3-option multiple-
choice; 3/4/5-option matching; odd
one out
PART 2
Title Lesson Preparation
Number of items 25
Areas of • planning a lesson or a series of
knowledge lessons
• language demands of subject
content and accompanying tasks
• resources including multi-media
and visual organisers
• materials selection and adaptation
• activity types
Task types 4 tasks of 5–8 items each:
1-1 matching; 3-option multiple-
choice; 3/4/5-option matching; odd
one out; ordering; sequencing
PART 2
Title Lesson Delivery
Number of items 20
Areas of • classroom language
knowledge • scaffolding content and language
learning
• methods to help learners develop
learning strategies
• consolidating learning and
differentiation
Task types 3 tasks of 5–8 items each
1-1 matching; 3-option multiple-
choice; 3/4/5-option matching; odd
one out
PART 2
Title Assessment
Number of items 10
Areas of • focus: content; content and
knowledge language; cognitive, learning and
communication skills
• types of assessment
• support strategies
Task types 2 tasks of 5 items each:
1-1 matching; 3-option multiple-
choice; odd one out
6
T KT : CL I L HANDBOOK | CONTENT AND LANGUAGE I NTEGRATED LEARNI NG
6
■ Part 1
This part of the CLIL module tests candidates’ knowledge of a CLIL
approach and knowledge of the learning, cognitive, language and
communication skills across the curriculum.
■ Syllabus area Knowledge of CLIL and Principles
of CLIL
■ Possible testing focus
• CLIL aims: The 4 Cs – Content, Communication,
Cognition and Culture (the 4th C is sometimes called
Citizenship or Community).
BICS and CALP (Cummins) – Differences in cognitive
demands of teaching materials (see separate CLIL
glossary)
CLIL aims to:
introduce learners to new ideas and concepts in
curriculum subjects
improve learners’ performance in both content
subjects and the target language
encourage stronger links with the citizenship
curriculum
increase learners’ confidence in the target language
make the content subject the primary focus of
classroom materials
enable learners to access content subjects by
modifying lesson plans to take into account pupils’
ability in the target language
provide cognitively challenging materials from the
beginning
• Language across the curriculum– the language
demands of curriculum subjects so that learners can
participate (listening, speaking, reading and writing).
These include features such as:
the use of: present, past and future forms (but not in
any more detail e.g. present perfect continuous)
comparative / superlative forms
‘will’ prediction
modal verbs for expressing: ability; certainty;
deduction; obligation; permission; preference;
possibility; probability; prohibition; speculating
conditionals
passive forms
imperatives
questions
reported speech
personal and impersonal pronouns
time expressions
connectors (and, but, or, because)
collocations
synonyms
opposites
use of specialist subject vocabulary
• Communication skills across the curriculume.g.
agreeing or disagreeing; asking questions; clarifying
what has been said; comparing and contrasting;
demonstrating, describing cause and effect; describing a
process; explaining a point of view; evaluating work (self
and others), expressing ideas; generalising; giving
examples; giving information; hypothesising;
instructing; interpreting data; persuading; predicting
and justifying predictions; presenting solutions;
presenting work; suggesting
• Cognitive skills across the curriculume.g. remembering
(list; name; recall; recite; recognise; relate spell; state;
tell), ordering (What happens next? order; organise;
sequence; rank), defining (What is X? What is the
function of . . .? analyse; define; describe; explain;
identify; outline; show; translate), comparing –
contrasting (What is X and what is not X? similarities
and differences; compare; contrast; distinguish;
investigate), dividing (What does X belong to? divide;
separate; share; sort), classifying, (How many classes of
X are there? classify; categorise; decide which group; put
into), predicting (What will / would / could happen to X?
predict; think about . . .; guess; hypothesise), reasoning
(Why X? What causes X? What comes as a result of X?
What justifies X to do Y? choose; conclude; decide;
explain; justify; recommend; solve), creative thinking
(What if . . . ? imagine; build; change; compose; design;
invent; make up; plan; produce; suppose), evaluating
(What do you think about X? assess; give opinion; judge;
rate; prove; what’s the value of . . . ?)
See details in the CLIL glossary and the list at the end of this
handbook.
• Learning across the curriculume.g. locating, organising
and interpreting information; note taking, drafting;
editing; guessing from context; processing and using
knowledge; stating facts and opinions; transferring
information; carrying out investigations, layout,
recording results, reviewing; skimming and scanning
skills, summarising
■ Part 2
This part of the CLIL module tests candidates’ knowledge of
planning, teaching and assessing curriculum subjects taught through
the medium of English.
■ Syllabus area Lesson Preparation
■ Possible testing focus
• Planning a lesson and a series of lessons: learning
outcomes (knowledge – to know; understanding – to
understand; ability – to be able to; awareness – to be
aware of). Activating prior knowledge, statement of
7 T KT : CL I L HANDBOOK | CONTENT AND LANGUAGE I NTEGRATED LEARNI NG
goals, activities, plenary, classroom interaction, syllabus
fit, personal teaching aims.
• Language needed to deliver subject content at word,
sentence and text levels. Genre texts: advertisements;
argument; article; autobiography; biography; description;
discussion; essays; explanation; instruction; letters;
narrative; notices; persuasion; poem; process; proposal;
recount; report; review; song
• Resources required: multimedia; visual / graphic
organisers such as time lines, flow charts, maps, graphs,
tables, charts, diagrams; key concept maps (to show
relationships between ideas) description; cause-effect;
classification; generalisation; process; time sequence
(see CLIL glossary).
• Identifying ways to integrate ICT in the curriculum:
PowerPoint presentations; word processing; web
searches; adding graphics; using a database to sort,
question and present information; designing a database;
using, interpreting and manipulating digital images;
using spreadsheets to collate information and plot
graphs; use ‘draw’ or ‘paint’ software.
The purposes for using resources and ICT: to encourage
student talking time (STT) – exchanging and sharing
information; to present and revisit subject vocabulary; to
encourage learner autonomy; to provide learning
support; to handle data; to develop enquiry skills; to be
creative.
• Materials selection and adaptation: ways of using
materials, ways of adapting native speaker materials
and web pages: adding visuals, omitting unnecessary
detail, simplifying, paraphrasing language,
personalisation, underlining key words, including word
banks, providing glossaries (L1 / target language)
reordering to accommodate syllabus, using a variety of
layout and print designs: font sizes and styles.
• Activity types: classification; cloze; dictation; feature
identification; freeze frames (drama ‘stills’); gap-fill;
information / data transfer; interviews; labelling;
matching; multiple choice; ordering words, sentences,
text; poster presentations; predicting from words, titles,
first sentences and visuals; questionnaires; skimming,
scanning; summarising; table completion; true – false;
sentence completion; text completion; word completion;
word puzzles and word searches.
■ Part 2
■ Syllabus area Lesson Delivery
■ Possible testing focus
• Classroom language
Use of questions to scaffold and promote thinking:
lower order talk (what, where, when, who) →higher
order talk (why, how, what is the evidence, what do
you think of . . .?)
Purpose – developing communicative skills,
encouraging peer feedback, explaining, giving
practical demonstrations, instructing, making
associations, modelling, relaying knowledge,
recasting, questioning
Ways of encouraging student talking time: pair work;
task based learning; group presentations; role play;
explaining results; peer and group feedback.
• Scaffolding content and language:
breaking down tasks into small steps, creating interest,
providing constructive feedback, use of language frames,
substitution tables, word banks, glossaries; use of L1; use
of models for production of language.
• Methods to help learners develop learning strategies:
developing predicting skills, drafting, encouraging risk
taking, identifying key content vocabulary, setting
learning goals, use of visual prompts to aid memory,
teaching study skills: note taking, planning, organising,
reviewing work.
• Consolidating learning:
reminding, repeating, re-demonstrating, directing to
further practice, directing learners to help others.
Differentiation:
least advanced learners – (modified input) provide
additional language frames, word banks, glossaries in
L1 and target language, additional visual support,
simplified texts (modified output) answering fewer
questions, producing shorter texts
most advanced learners – check own work, help
peers, do extension activities, design activities.
■ Part 2
■ Syllabus area Assessment
■ Possible testing focus
• Focus of assessment: content; language; content and
language cognitive skills, learning skills, communication
skills.
• Types: formative, summative, peer, self, portfolio,
performance, ‘Can Do’ statements.
• Support strategies: change vocabulary, simplify language
structures, add visuals, some use of L1 or target
language glossaries, modify test instructions, additional
examples, extra time, oral instructions repeated in L1,
instructions read aloud, instructions explained,
questions from learners in L1.
7
8
T KT : CL I L HANDBOOK | PREPARATI ON
8
Preparation
General
■ TKT: CLIL is concerned with knowledge about teaching
curriculum subjects in English. It would therefore be useful for
candidates to exploit their teaching situation for opportunities
to prepare for the test. They could use every opportunity to
become aware of issues arising from the planning, delivery and
assessment of their subjects in English. This would include
awareness of the use of target language in the classroom by
both the teacher and the learners at different stages of
teaching a lesson e.g. lesson preparation, lesson delivery,
evaluation of work as well as during classroom interaction.
At the preparation stage candidates could, for example:
• examine the subject material, note key words needed for
the lesson, practise saying them, decide how they will be
presented and how the learners will incorporate them
into their active vocabulary
• look at the language demands of the lesson and decide
what kind of support is needed so that learners can
produce the language in spoken and written English
• notice any particular difficulties and include additional
support for the least able learners
• think about extension activities for the most able
learners
• write lesson objectives and key subject vocabulary on
the board
• plan a plenary question at the end of the lesson so
learners can reflect on the learning outcome.
While delivering a lesson, candidates could:
• activate prior knowledge by asking some general
questions about the lesson content before the learners
start reading or writing
• use a selection of different types of visual support to
help learners understand new lesson content
• note the conceptual difficulties learners are having with
learning new subject content
• note what kinds of problems learners are having in
using key content vocabulary
• note the use of L1 and target language when learners are
involved in pair or group work.
After a lesson, teachers could:
• note the achievements made by the learners
• note problems learners have with content and language
• think about possible reasons for those problems
• consider learner feedback for whole class as well as for
individuals.
■ Make use of subject material written in English. There are
many useful materials available for teachers both in book
form and on the web. When looking at these materials it
would be useful to think about how the learner can access
them by asking questions such as: What needs to be adapted,
what needs to be omitted and what needs to be inserted? Do
the learners need to know all the information given? What
aspects of the material are difficult for my learners to
understand and use? Why? Do I need to teach my learners all
the language for this lesson or is it unnecessary for them to
understand every word?
■ Become fully familiar with the exam format and task types
for TKT: CLIL. See page 5 for details of the number of sections
the test contains, the number of tasks in each section and the
task types that could be used in each section. Look too at the
sample paper on pages 10–17 of this handbook. The task types
used are:
• 1-1 matching (See sample paper page 11 for example)
• 3/4/5/-option matching (See sample paper pages 2 and
12 for example)
• 3-option multiple choice
• odd one out (See sample paper page 3 for example)
• ordering
• sequencing
Notice the instructions for each task, read them carefully and
always do as instructed.
■ Check that you can complete the questions in the given
time limit (80 minutes) and make sure you know how to
record your answers on the answer sheet. (See page 21 for a
sample answer sheet.) Remember that all answers must be
given on the answer sheet by lozenging the correct letter.
By part
■ Part 1: Knowledge of CLIL and Principles of CLIL
Candidates
• can build up their awareness of different language
features mentioned in the syllabus by noting these
features in the materials used in the classroom
• can develop an awareness of what, when and how they
communicate with their learners and what, when and
how the learners communicate with each other
• can study the cognitive demands of the curriculum and
consult websites on different types of thinking skills
• can become aware of the range of learning skills needed
and used while learners study particular curriculum
subjects.
9 T KT : CL I L HANDBOOK | PREPARATI ON
■ Part 2: Lesson Preparation
Candidates
• can look at what has to be planned before delivering a
lesson and a series of lessons in a CLIL context
• can look at the language demands of their subject
materials and check these with the features mentioned
in the syllabus
• can study the types of resources used in the classroom
and become familiar with the use of multimedia and
visual organisers for supporting the delivery of subject
content
• can consult books and websites on a range of subject
materials and activities written in English.
■ Part 2: Lesson Delivery
Candidates
• can take advantage of their teaching to raise awareness
of their own classroom language and that of their
learners
• can note how and why they use support materials or
graded language to help learners understand the content
of their curriculum subjects
• can analyse methods used to encourage learners to
develop and use different learning strategies
• can become aware of how learning is consolidated and
how materials and outcomes can be differentiated
(adjusted) for the least able and most able learners.
■ Part 2: Assessment
Candidates
• can look at assessment used in school then analyse
what is being assessed.
• can consult reference books and materials in websites to
know about different types of assessment
• can become aware of a range of strategies to support
learners who are assessed through the target language.
10
T KT : CL I L HANDBOOK | CLI L SAMPLE TEST
10

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C
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r

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e

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D
o

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A
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s
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I

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.


Y
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a
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.


























T
h
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s

p
a
p
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r

c
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s
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s
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s

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f

1
5

p
r
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n
t
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d

1

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k

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.


P
V
1



©

U
C
L
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S

2
0
0
8


[
T
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r
n

o
v
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r

2


F
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r

q
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s

1
-
7
,

m
a
t
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h

t
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t
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k
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1


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2


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p
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l
s
.




3




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e

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a

G
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o
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t

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h

t
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e

c
l
a
s
s

h
a
s

j
u
s
t

r
e
a
d
.

4


L
e
a
r
n
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r
s

g
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r

p
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a
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t

t
h
e
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r

g
r
o
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p

p
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o
j
e
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t
s
.




5


L
e
a
r
n
e
r
s

c
l
a
s
s
i
f
y

p
l
a
n
t
s

a
c
c
o
r
d
i
n
g

t
o

s
e
v
e
r
a
l

c
r
i
t
e
r
i
a
.




6


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e
a
r
n
e
r
s

p
r
e
d
i
c
t

t
h
e

o
u
t
c
o
m
e

o
f

a
n

e
l
e
c
t
r
i
c
i
t
y

e
x
p
e
r
i
m
e
n
t
.




7


L
e
a
r
n
e
r
s

d
o

a

w
e
b

s
e
a
r
c
h

t
o

f
i
n
d

o
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t

a
b
o
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t

t
r
a
d
i
t
i
o
n
a
l

r
e
c
i
p
e
s

f
o
r

b
r
e
a
d
-
m
a
k
i
n
g
.


Sample test
11 T KT : CL I L HANDBOOK | CLI L SAMPLE TEST
3



[
T
u
r
n

o
v
e
r

F
o
r

q
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e
s
t
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o
n
s

8
-
1
3
,

l
o
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t

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s

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d

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e

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e
.


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w
o

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f

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e

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e
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n
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u
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e

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o

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s

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a
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g
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a
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s

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T

c
e
n
t
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a
l

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o

t
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e

t
a
s
k
.


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a
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k

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e

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e
a

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f

l
a
n
g
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a
g
e

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h

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s

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T

c
e
n
t
r
a
l

o
n

y
o
u
r

a
n
s
w
e
r

s
h
e
e
t
.



8


F
o
r

w
r
i
t
i
n
g

a
b
o
u
t

a
n

e
x
p
e
r
i
m
e
n
t

o
n

g
r
a
v
i
t
y

t
h
e

l
e
a
r
n
e
r
s

d
i
d

i
n

t
h
e

l
a
b







A

t
h
e

p
a
s
t

t
e
n
s
e



B

c
o
m
p
a
r
a
t
i
v
e

f
o
r
m
s



C

q
u
e
s
t
i
o
n

t
a
g
s





9


F
o
r

w
r
i
t
i
n
g

a

q
u
i
z

o
n

'
F
a
c
t
s

a
b
o
u
t

W
h
a
l
e
s
'







A

e
x
c
l
a
m
a
t
i
o
n
s



B

q
u
e
s
t
i
o
n

f
o
r
m
s



C

t
h
e

p
r
e
s
e
n
t

t
e
n
s
e





1
0


F
o
r

d
e
s
i
g
n
i
n
g

a

p
o
s
t
e
r

d
e
s
c
r
i
b
i
n
g

t
h
e

d
i
g
e
s
t
i
v
e

p
r
o
c
e
s
s







A

r
e
p
o
r
t
e
d

s
p
e
e
c
h



B

c
o
n
j
u
n
c
t
i
o
n
s

o
f

t
i
m
e



C

i
m
p
e
r
s
o
n
a
l

p
r
o
n
o
u
n
s





1
1


F
o
r

w
o
r
k
i
n
g

i
n

g
r
o
u
p
s

t
o

l
a
b
e
l

p
a
r
t
s

o
f

t
h
e

b
o
d
y







A

a
d
v
e
r
b
s

o
f

f
r
e
q
u
e
n
c
y



B

l
a
n
g
u
a
g
e

f
o
r

c
h
e
c
k
i
n
g

a
n
s
w
e
r
s



C

s
i
n
g
u
l
a
r

a
n
d

p
l
u
r
a
l

f
o
r
m
s

o
f

n
o
u
n
s





1
2


F
o
r

t
a
k
i
n
g

p
a
r
t

i
n

a

c
l
a
s
s

d
i
s
c
u
s
s
i
o
n

s
p
e
c
u
l
a
t
i
n
g

a
b
o
u
t

t
h
e

c
l
i
m
a
t
e

i
n

t
h
e

f
u
t
u
r
e







A

m
o
d
a
l

v
e
r
b
s

e
x
p
r
e
s
s
i
n
g

p
o
s
s
i
b
i
l
i
t
y

o
r

p
r
o
b
a
b
i
l
i
t
y



B

v
o
c
a
b
u
l
a
r
y

f
o
r

e
x
p
r
e
s
s
i
n
g

f
e
e
l
i
n
g



C

l
a
n
g
u
a
g
e

f
o
r

e
x
p
r
e
s
s
i
n
g

o
p
i
n
i
o
n
s





1
3


F
o
r

r
e
c
o
n
s
t
r
u
c
t
i
n
g

a

t
e
x
t

o
n

h
o
w

g
l
a
s
s

i
s

m
a
d
e







A

p
a
s
s
i
v
e

f
o
r
m
s



B

s
e
q
u
e
n
c
i
n
g

w
o
r
d
s



C

s
u
p
e
r
l
a
t
i
v
e

f
o
r
m
s




4


F
o
r

q
u
e
s
t
i
o
n
s

1
4
-
1
9
,

m
a
t
c
h

t
h
e

t
e
a
c
h
e
r
'
s

q
u
e
s
t
i
o
n
s

w
i
t
h

t
h
e

m
a
i
n

t
h
i
n
k
i
n
g

s
k
i
l
l
s

t
h
e
y

a
i
m

t
o

d
e
v
e
l
o
p
,

l
i
s
t
e
d

A
,

B

o
r

C
.

M
a
r
k

t
h
e

c
o
r
r
e
c
t

l
e
t
t
e
r

(
A
,

B

o
r

C

)

o
n

y
o
u
r

a
n
s
w
e
r

s
h
e
e
t
.





M
a
i
n

t
h
i
n
k
i
n
g

s
k
i
I
I
s




A


a
n
a
l
y
s
i
n
g




B


c
r
e
a
t
i
v
e

t
h
i
n
k
i
n
g




C


e
v
a
l
u
a
t
i
n
g





T
e
a
c
h
e
r
'
s

q
u
e
s
t
i
o
n
s


1
4


H
o
w

d
o

y
o
u

k
n
o
w

t
h
i
s

a
n
i
m
a
l

i
s

a

r
o
d
e
n
t
?




1
5


W
h
i
c
h

i
s

t
h
e

c
i
t
y

w
i
t
h

t
h
e

h
i
g
h
e
s
t

r
a
i
n
f
a
l
l
,

a
c
c
o
r
d
i
n
g

t
o

t
h
e

g
r
a
p
h
?




1
6


W
h
o

d
o

y
o
u

t
h
i
n
k

a
r
e

t
h
e

m
o
s
t

i
n
t
e
r
e
s
t
i
n
g

p
e
o
p
l
e

i
n

t
h
e

s
t
o
r
y
?




1
7


W
h
i
c
h

f
e
a
t
u
r
e
s

w
o
u
l
d

y
o
u

h
a
v
e

i
n

y
o
u
r

i
d
e
a
l

c
a
r
?




1
8


W
h
a
t

w
o
u
l
d

y
o
u

d
o

i
f

y
o
u

w
o
n

a
n

O
l
y
m
p
i
c

g
o
l
d

m
e
d
a
l
?




1
9


W
h
i
c
h

P
r
i
m
e

M
i
n
i
s
t
e
r

b
e
h
a
v
e
d

r
e
s
p
o
n
s
i
b
l
y
?

12
T KT : CL I L HANDBOOK | CLI L SAMPLE TEST
12
5



[
T
u
r
n

o
v
e
r

F
o
r

q
u
e
s
t
i
o
n
s

2
0
-
2
5
,

m
a
t
c
h

t
h
e

i
n
s
t
r
u
c
t
i
o
n
s

w
i
t
h

t
h
e

l
e
a
r
n
i
n
g

s
k
i
l
l
s

l
i
s
t
e
d

A
,

B

o
r

C
.

M
a
r
k

t
h
e

c
o
r
r
e
c
t

l
e
t
t
e
r

(
A
,

B

o
r

C
)

o
n

y
o
u
r

a
n
s
w
e
r

s
h
e
e
t
.




L
e
a
r
n
i
n
g

s
k
i
I
I
s




A


l
o
c
a
t
i
n
g

i
n
f
o
r
m
a
t
i
o
n




B


o
r
g
a
n
i
s
i
n
g

i
n
f
o
r
m
a
t
i
o
n




C


c
o
m
m
u
n
i
c
a
t
i
n
g

i
n
f
o
r
m
a
t
i
o
n





I
n
s
t
r
u
c
t
i
o
n
s


2
0


L
i
s
t
e
n

t
o

t
h
e

m
u
s
i
c

t
h
e
n

b
e
a
t

o
u
t

t
h
e

r
h
y
t
h
m

t
o

y
o
u
r

p
a
r
t
n
e
r
.




2
1


F
i
n
d

t
h
r
e
e

w
e
b
s
i
t
e
s

t
o

h
e
l
p

w
i
t
h

y
o
u
r

p
r
o
j
e
c
t

o
n

r
e
c
y
c
l
i
n
g

r
u
b
b
i
s
h
.




2
2


D
e
c
i
d
e

w
h
i
c
h

i
n
f
o
r
m
a
t
i
o
n

t
o

p
u
t

o
n

t
h
e

x

a
x
i
s

o
f

t
h
e

g
r
a
p
h
.




2
3


P
u
t

t
h
e

p
i
c
t
u
r
e
s

i
n

o
r
d
e
r

o
f

t
h
e

l
i
f
e

c
y
c
l
e
.




2
4


L
o
o
k

i
n

t
h
e

l
i
b
r
a
r
y

b
o
o
k
s

a
n
d

f
i
n
d

t
w
o

b
i
r
d
s

t
h
a
t

c
a
n
'
t

f
l
y
.




2
5


S
h
o
w

y
o
u
r

p
i
c
t
u
r
e

a
n
d

e
x
p
l
a
i
n

t
h
e

s
y
m
b
o
l
s

i
n

i
t
.


6


F
o
r

q
u
e
s
t
i
o
n
s

2
6
-
3
1
,

m
a
t
c
h

t
h
e

e
x
t
r
a
c
t
s

f
r
o
m

a

G
e
o
g
r
a
p
h
y

l
e
s
s
o
n

p
l
a
n

w
i
t
h

t
h
e

l
e
s
s
o
n

p
l
a
n

h
e
a
d
i
n
g
s

l
i
s
t
e
d

A
-
G
.

M
a
r
k

t
h
e

c
o
r
r
e
c
t

l
e
t
t
e
r

(
A
-
G
)

o
n

y
o
u
r

a
n
s
w
e
r

s
h
e
e
t
.



T
h
e
r
e

i
s

o
n
e

e
x
t
r
a

o
p
t
i
o
n

w
h
i
c
h

y
o
u

d
o

n
o
t

n
e
e
d

t
o

u
s
e
.




























E
x
t
r
a
c
t
s



L
e
s
s
o
n

p
I
a
n

h
e
a
d
i
n
g
s





2
6

T
o

b
e

a
b
l
e

t
o

e
x
p
l
a
i
n

h
o
w

r
i
v
e
r
s

a
r
e

f
o
r
m
e
d





2
7


Ì
d
e
n
t
i
f
y
i
n
g

p
r
o
c
e
s
s
e
s
,

i
d
e
n
t
i
f
y
i
n
g

c
a
u
s
e

a
n
d

e
f
f
e
c
t
,

p
r
e
d
i
c
t
i
n
g

c
o
n
s
e
q
u
e
n
c
e
s



2
8

A

m
o
d
e
l

o
f

m
o
u
n
t
a
i
n
s

a
n
d

a

v
a
l
l
e
y
,

a

t
u
b

o
f

w
a
t
e
r





2
9


W
e

h
a
v
e

s
t
u
d
i
e
d

h
o
w

r
a
i
n

a
f
f
e
c
t
s

d
i
f
f
e
r
e
n
t

s
o
i
l
s

(
s
a
n
d
,

c
l
a
y
,

r
o
c
k

e
t
c
)

a
n
d

n
e
x
t

l
e
s
s
o
n

w
e

w
i
l
l

g
o

o
n

a

t
r
i
p

t
o

s
t
u
d
y

o
u
r

l
o
c
a
l

r
i
v
e
r
.



3
0


A

v
a
l
l
e
y
,

i
t

c
u
t
s

t
h
r
o
u
g
h
,

a
n

e
s
t
u
a
r
y
,

i
t

r
u
n
s

d
o
w
n
/
t
o
w
a
r
d
s
,

s
t
e
e
p
,

d
e
e
p
,

i
t

w
e
a
r
s

a
w
a
y



3
1


C
h
i
l
d
r
e
n

t
a
k
e

i
t

i
n

t
u
r
n
s

t
o

p
o
u
r

w
a
t
e
r

o
n

t
o

t
h
e

t
o
p
s

o
f

t
h
e

m
o
d
e
l

m
o
u
n
t
a
i
n
s
,

a
n
d

t
h
e
n

d
e
s
c
r
i
b
e

w
h
a
t

h
a
p
p
e
n
e
d

a
n
d

w
i
l
l

h
a
p
p
e
n

t
o

i
t
.


A

B

C

D

E

F

G

S
y
l
l
a
b
u
s

f
i
t

T
a
r
g
e
t

l
a
n
g
u
a
g
e

Ì
n
t
e
n
d
e
d

l
e
a
r
n
i
n
g

o
u
t
c
o
m
e
s

P
r
o
c
e
d
u
r
e

T
h
i
n
k
i
n
g

s
k
i
l
l
s

T
e
a
c
h
e
r
'
s

p
e
r
s
o
n
a
l

a
i
m
s

R
e
s
o
u
r
c
e
s



13 T KT : CL I L HANDBOOK | CLI L SAMPLE TEST
7



[
T
u
r
n

o
v
e
r

F
o
r

q
u
e
s
t
i
o
n
s

3
2
-
3
8
,

m
a
t
c
h

t
h
e

v
i
s
u
a
l

o
r
g
a
n
i
s
e
r
s

w
i
t
h

t
h
e
i
r

n
a
m
e
s

l
i
s
t
e
d

A
-
H
.

M
a
r
k

t
h
e

c
o
r
r
e
c
t

l
e
t
t
e
r

(
A
-
H
)

o
n

y
o
u
r

a
n
s
w
e
r

s
h
e
e
t
.

T
h
e
r
e

i
s

o
n
e

e
x
t
r
a

o
p
t
i
o
n

w
h
i
c
h

y
o
u

d
o

n
o
t

n
e
e
d

t
o

u
s
e
.




V
i
s
u
a
I

o
r
g
a
n
i
s
e
r

n
a
m
e
s




A


T
h
o
u
g
h
t

b
u
b
b
l
e




B


C
o
l
u
m
n

t
a
b
l
e




C


C
a
r
r
o
l
l

d
i
a
g
r
a
m




D


P
i
e

c
h
a
r
t




E


V
e
n
n

d
i
a
g
r
a
m




F


B
a
r

c
h
a
r
t




G


S
u
b
s
t
i
t
u
t
i
o
n

t
a
b
l
e




H


T
r
e
e

d
i
a
g
r
a
m




V
i
s
u
a
I

o
r
g
a
n
i
s
e
r
s


3
2










p
l
a
y

o
u
t
s
i
d
e
?





e
a
t

f
r
u
i
t
?



H
o
w

o
f
t
e
n

d
o

y
o
u

d
r
i
n
k

w
a
t
e
r
?





d
o

a

s
p
o
r
t
?




e
a
t

v
e
g
e
t
a
b
l
e
s
?






3
3






V
e
g
e
t
a
b
l
e
s

r
o
o
t

s
t
e
m

l
e
a
f

14
T KT : CL I L HANDBOOK | CLI L SAMPLE TEST
14
9



[
T
u
r
n

o
v
e
r

F
o
r

q
u
e
s
t
i
o
n
s

3
9
-
4
4
,

m
a
t
c
h

t
h
e

w
a
y
s

o
f

f
o
c
u
s
i
n
g

o
n

c
o
n
t
e
n
t

w
i
t
h

t
h
e

e
x
a
m
p
l
e
s

f
r
o
m

a

c
o
u
r
s
e
b
o
o
k

l
i
s
t
e
d

A
,

B

o
r

C
.

M
a
r
k

t
h
e

c
o
r
r
e
c
t

l
e
t
t
e
r

(
A
,

B

o
r

C
)

o
n

y
o
u
r

a
n
s
w
e
r

s
h
e
e
t
.




C
o
u
r
s
e
b
o
o
k

e
x
a
m
p
I
e
s

A


B


C

'
W
h
a
t

a
r
e

t
e
e
t
h

f
o
r
?

W
h
a
t

k
i
n
d
s

o
f

t
e
e
t
h

a
r
e

t
h
e
r
e
?
'


A
n

a
d
u
l
t

h
a
s

3
2

t
e
e
t
h
.


T
h
e
s
e

a
r
e

t
h
r
e
e

t
y
p
e
s
:



Ì
n
c
i
s
o
r
s

c
u
t

f
o
o
d



C
a
n
i
n
e
s

t
e
a
r

f
o
o
d



M
o
l
a
r
s

c
r
u
s
h

a
n
d

g
r
i
n
d

f
o
o
d

T
h
e
r
e

a
r
e

8

i
n
c
i
s
o
r
s
,

4

c
a
n
i
n
e
s

a
n
d

2
0

m
o
l
a
r
s
.


M
a
k
e

a

d
r
a
w
i
n
g

o
f

y
o
u
r

f
r
i
e
n
d
'
s

t
e
e
t
h
.

C
o
l
o
u
r
:

r
e
d
:

i
n
c
i
s
o
r
s

b
l
u
e
:

c
a
n
i
n
e
s

g
r
e
e
n
:

m
o
l
a
r
s

A
d
a
p
t
e
d

f
r
o
m
:

S
c
i
e
n
c
e

3

(
2
0
0
6
)

M
a
d
r
i
d
:

R
i
c
h
m
o
n
d

S
a
n
t
i
l
l
a
n
a

(
s
a
m
p
l
e

m
a
t
e
r
i
a
l
s
)






W
a
y
s

o
f

f
o
c
u
s
i
n
g

o
n

c
o
n
t
e
n
t


3
9


v
a
r
i
e
t
y

o
f

f
o
n
t

s
t
y
l
e
s

4
0


a
c
t
i
v
a
t
i
n
g

p
r
i
o
r

k
n
o
w
l
e
d
g
e

4
1


c
l
a
s
s
i
f
i
c
a
t
i
o
n

t
a
s
k


4
2


p
e
r
s
o
n
a
l
i
s
a
t
i
o
n

4
3


r
e
p
e
t
i
t
i
o
n

o
f

k
e
y

v
o
c
a
b
u
l
a
r
y

4
4


e
n
c
o
u
r
a
g
i
n
g

p
r
o
d
u
c
t
i
o
n

o
f

t
h
e

t
a
r
g
e
t

l
a
n
g
u
a
g
e

1
0


F
o
r

q
u
e
s
t
i
o
n
s

4
5
-
5
0
,

m
a
t
c
h

t
h
e

S
c
i
e
n
c
e

a
c
t
i
v
i
t
i
e
s

w
i
t
h

t
h
e

e
x
a
m
p
l
e
s

o
f

a
c
t
i
v
i
t
y

t
y
p
e
s

l
i
s
t
e
d

A
-
G
.

M
a
r
k

t
h
e

c
o
r
r
e
c
t

l
e
t
t
e
r

(
A
-
G
)

o
n

y
o
u
r

a
n
s
w
e
r

s
h
e
e
t
.



T
h
e
r
e

i
s

o
n
e

e
x
t
r
a

o
p
t
i
o
n

w
h
i
c
h

y
o
u

d
o

n
o
t

n
e
e
d

t
o

u
s
e
.




A
c
t
i
v
i
t
y

t
y
p
e
s




A


c
l
a
s
s
i
f
y
i
n
g




B


m
a
t
c
h
i
n
g




C


o
r
d
e
r
i
n
g




D


o
d
d

o
n
e

o
u
t




E


l
a
b
e
l
l
i
n
g




F


i
n
f
o
r
m
a
t
i
o
n

t
r
a
n
s
f
e
r




G


w
o
r
d

c
o
m
p
l
e
t
i
o
n






S
c
i
e
n
c
e

a
c
t
i
v
i
t
i
e
s


4
5


R
e
a
d

t
h
e

t
e
x
t

t
h
e
n

a
d
d

t
h
e

k
e
y

w
o
r
d
s

t
o

t
h
e

d
i
a
g
r
a
m

o
f

t
h
e

e
a
r
.




4
6


L
o
o
k

a
t

t
h
e

d
e
s
c
r
i
p
t
i
o
n

a
g
a
i
n
.

N
u
m
b
e
r

t
h
e

s
t
a
g
e
s

a
s

t
h
e
y

o
c
c
u
r

i
n

t
h
e

d
i
g
e
s
t
i
v
e

p
r
o
c
e
s
s
.




4
7


T
h
e
r
e

a
r
e

t
h
r
e
e

s
t
a
t
e
s

o
f

m
a
t
t
e
r
:

s

_

_

_

_

,

l

_

_

_

_

_

a
n
d

g

_

_

.




4
8


P
u
t

t
h
e

m
a
t
e
r
i
a
l
s

i
n
t
o

t
h
e

c
o
r
r
e
c
t

c
o
l
u
m
n





a
n
i
m
a
l

m
i
n
e
r
a
l

p
l
a
n
t




4
9


L
i
s
t
e
n

t
o

t
h
e

r
e
c
o
r
d
i
n
g

a
b
o
u
t

p
l
a
n
e
t
s

a
n
d

c
o
m
p
l
e
t
e

t
h
e

t
a
b
l
e

i
n

y
o
u
r

c
o
u
r
s
e
b
o
o
k
.




5
0


D
r
a
w

a

l
i
n
e

f
r
o
m

t
h
e

a
d
j
e
c
t
i
v
e
s

t
o

t
h
e

d
e
f
i
n
i
t
i
o
n
s
.




1
.

f
r
a
g
i
l
e

a
.

i
t

b
e
n
d
s




2
.

t
r
a
n
s
p
a
r
e
n
t

b
.

i
t

d
o
e
s
n
'
t

a
b
s
o
r
b

l
i
q
u
i
d




3
.

f
l
e
x
i
b
l
e

c
.

i
t

c
a
n

b
e

s
e
e
n

t
h
r
o
u
g
h




4
.

w
a
t
e
r
p
r
o
o
f

d
.

i
t

b
r
e
a
k
s

e
a
s
i
l
y




15 T KT : CL I L HANDBOOK | CLI L SAMPLE TEST
1
1



[
T
u
r
n

o
v
e
r

F
o
r

q
u
e
s
t
i
o
n
s

5
1
-
5
7
,

m
a
t
c
h

t
h
e

t
e
a
c
h
e
r
'
s

l
a
n
g
u
a
g
e

w
i
t
h

i
t
s

t
e
a
c
h
i
n
g

p
u
r
p
o
s
e

l
i
s
t
e
d

A
-
H
.

M
a
r
k

t
h
e

c
o
r
r
e
c
t

l
e
t
t
e
r

(
A
-
H
)

o
n

y
o
u
r

a
n
s
w
e
r
.

T
h
e
r
e

i
s

o
n
e

e
x
t
r
a

o
p
t
i
o
n

w
h
i
c
h

y
o
u

d
o

n
o
t

n
e
e
d

t
o

u
s
e
.




T
e
a
c
h
i
n
g

p
u
r
p
o
s
e
s




A


g
i
v
i
n
g

a

p
r
a
c
t
i
c
a
l

d
e
m
o
n
s
t
r
a
t
i
o
n




B


d
e
v
e
l
o
p
i
n
g

l
e
a
r
n
e
r

i
n
d
e
p
e
n
d
e
n
c
e




C


a
c
t
i
v
a
t
i
n
g

p
r
i
o
r

k
n
o
w
l
e
d
g
e




D


e
n
c
o
u
r
a
g
i
n
g

u
s
e

o
f

f
i
r
s
t

l
a
n
g
u
a
g
e




E


p
r
e
-
t
e
a
c
h
i
n
g

v
o
c
a
b
u
l
a
r
y




F


d
e
v
e
l
o
p
i
n
g

c
o
m
m
u
n
i
c
a
t
i
v
e

s
k
i
l
l
s




G


g
i
v
i
n
g

f
e
e
d
b
a
c
k




H


p
r
o
v
i
d
i
n
g

a

l
a
n
g
u
a
g
e

s
u
p
p
o
r
t

f
r
a
m
e





T
e
a
c
h
e
r
'
s

I
a
n
g
u
a
g
e


5
1


L
e
t
'
s

b
r
a
i
n
s
t
o
r
m

t
o
g
e
t
h
e
r

d
i
f
f
e
r
e
n
t

w
a
y
s

o
f

r
e
c
o
r
d
i
n
g

i
n
f
o
r
m
a
t
i
o
n
.




5
2


T
h
e
s
e

a
r
e

c
a
l
l
e
d

d
a
t
a
b
a
s
e
s
.

T
h
i
s

i
s

E
x
c
e
l
.

T
h
e
s
e

a
r
e

k
n
o
w
n

a
s

c
o
l
u
m
n

g
r
a
p
h
s
.




5
3




D
i
s
c
u
s
s

w
i
t
h

a

p
a
r
t
n
e
r

w
h
i
c
h

o
f

t
h
e

d
a
t
a
b
a
s
e
s

w
i
l
l

b
e

t
h
e

m
o
s
t

e
f
f
e
c
t
i
v
e

f
o
r

p
r
e
s
e
n
t
i
n
g

a
v
e
r
a
g
e

m
o
n
t
h
l
y

t
e
m
p
e
r
a
t
u
r
e
s
.




5
4




L
o
o
k

a
t

t
h
e

s
c
r
e
e
n

a
s

Ì

e
x
p
l
a
i
n
.

O
p
e
n

E
x
c
e
l
.

C
l
i
c
k

o
n

t
h
e

C
h
a
r
t

W
i
z
a
r
d

b
u
t
t
o
n

a
n
d

u
s
i
n
g

C
o
l
u
m
n

g
r
a
p
h
,

w
r
i
t
e

t
h
e

t
e
m
p
e
r
a
t
u
r
e
s
.

C
l
i
c
k

F
i
n
i
s
h

t
o

s
e
e

t
h
e

g
r
a
p
h
.

N
o
w

y
o
u

t
r
y
.




5
5








C
o
m
p
l
e
t
e

t
h
e
s
e

s
e
n
t
e
n
c
e
s

u
s
i
n
g

t
h
e

i
n
f
o
r
m
a
t
i
o
n

f
r
o
m

y
o
u
r

g
r
a
p
h
.

J
a
n
u
a
r
y

w
a
s

_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

m
o
n
t
h
.

J
u
l
y

a
n
d

A
u
g
u
s
t

w
e
r
e

_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

m
o
n
t
h
s
.

N
o
v
e
m
b
e
r

w
a
s
n
'
t

_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

m
o
n
t
h
.




5
6




U
s
e

t
h
e

i
n
t
e
r
n
e
t

t
o

f
i
n
d

t
h
e

a
v
e
r
a
g
e

m
o
n
t
h
l
y

t
e
m
p
e
r
a
t
u
r
e
s

i
n

t
w
o

c
i
t
i
e
s
,

o
n
e

i
n

E
u
r
o
p
e

a
n
d

o
n
e

i
n

A
s
i
a
.

P
u
t

t
h
e

i
n
f
o
r
m
a
t
i
o
n

i
n
t
o

a

s
p
r
e
a
d
s
h
e
e
t

u
s
i
n
g

E
x
c
e
l
.

5
7


Y
o
u
'
v
e

m
i
s
s
e
d

o
u
t

a

c
o
l
u
m
n

o
n

y
o
u
r

s
p
r
e
a
d
s
h
e
e
t
.


L
o
o
k

a
t

i
t

a
g
a
i
n

a
n
d

t
e
l
l

m
e

w
h
a
t

i
t

i
s
.





1
2


F
o
r

q
u
e
s
t
i
o
n
s

5
8
-
6
4
,

m
a
t
c
h

t
h
e

t
e
a
c
h
e
r
s
'

l
a
n
g
u
a
g
e

w
i
t
h

t
h
e

s
c
a
f
f
o
l
d
i
n
g

s
t
r
a
t
e
g
i
e
s

t
h
e
y

u
s
e

d
u
r
i
n
g

g
r
o
u
p
w
o
r
k
,

l
i
s
t
e
d

A
,

B

o
r

C
.

M
a
r
k

t
h
e

c
o
r
r
e
c
t

l
e
t
t
e
r

(
A
,

B

o
r

C
)

o
n

y
o
u
r

a
n
s
w
e
r

s
h
e
e
t
.






S
c
a
f
f
o
I
d
i
n
g

s
t
r
a
t
e
g
i
e
s




A


g
i
v
i
n
g

p
o
s
i
t
i
v
e

f
e
e
d
b
a
c
k




B


b
r
e
a
k
i
n
g

a

t
a
s
k

d
o
w
n

i
n
t
o

s
t
e
p
s




C


r
e
m
i
n
d
i
n
g

t
h
e

g
r
o
u
p

o
f

t
h
e

a
i
m

o
f

a

t
a
s
k





L
e
a
r
n
e
r
s
'

I
a
n
g
u
a
g
e


5
8


T
h
e

f
i
r
s
t

t
h
i
n
g

w
e

h
a
v
e

t
o

d
o

w
i
t
h

t
h
e

d
a
t
a

i
s
.
.




5
9


T
h
e

w
e
a
t
h
e
r

m
a
p

w
e
'
v
e

d
r
a
w
n

s
h
o
u
l
d

r
e
a
l
l
y

h
e
l
p

u
s

w
i
t
h

o
u
r

h
o
m
e
w
o
r
k
.




6
0


W
e

n
e
e
d

t
o

w
o
r
k

o
u
t

t
h
e

f
r
a
c
t
i
o
n
s

w
i
t
h
o
u
t

u
s
i
n
g

a

c
a
l
c
u
l
a
t
o
r
.




6
1


S
o

t
h
e

i
d
e
a

i
s

t
o

f
i
n
d

o
u
t

w
h
i
c
h

m
a
t
e
r
i
a
l

i
s

t
h
e

s
t
r
o
n
g
e
s
t
,

O
K
?




6
2


R
i
g
h
t
,

w
e

m
u
s
t

m
a
k
e

s
u
r
e

w
e
'
v
e

s
a
v
e
d

o
u
r

r
e
s
u
l
t
s

o
n

t
h
e

s
p
r
e
a
d
s
h
e
e
t

b
e
f
o
r
e

w
e

g
o

o
n
.




6
3


C
o
m
e

o
n
.


W
h
a
t

w
e

h
a
v
e

t
o

d
o

i
s

i
d
e
n
t
i
f
y

t
h
e

h
e
a
l
t
h
i
e
s
t

f
o
o
d
,

n
o
t

t
h
e

t
h
r
e
e

h
e
a
l
t
h
i
e
s
t

f
o
o
d
s
.




6
4


T
h
e

p
i
e

c
h
a
r
t
'
s

a
c
c
u
r
a
t
e

b
u
t

y
o
u

n
e
e
d

t
o

a
d
d

a

t
i
t
l
e
.





16
T KT : CL I L HANDBOOK | CLI L SAMPLE TEST
16
1
3



[
T
u
r
n

o
v
e
r

F
o
r

q
u
e
s
t
i
o
n
s

6
5
-
7
0
,

m
a
t
c
h

t
h
e

t
e
a
c
h
i
n
g

i
n
s
t
r
u
c
t
i
o
n
s

t
o

t
h
e

l
e
a
r
n
i
n
g

s
t
r
a
t
e
g
i
e
s

l
i
s
t
e
d

A
-
G

t
h
a
t

t
h
e
y

a
i
m

t
o

d
e
v
e
l
o
p
.

M
a
r
k

t
h
e

c
o
r
r
e
c
t

l
e
t
t
e
r

(
A
-
G
)

o
n

y
o
u
r

a
n
s
w
e
r

s
h
e
e
t
.



T
h
e
r
e

i
s

o
n
e

e
x
t
r
a

o
p
t
i
o
n

w
h
i
c
h

y
o
u

d
o

n
o
t

n
e
e
d

t
o

u
s
e
.




L
e
a
r
n
i
n
g

s
t
r
a
t
e
g
i
e
s




A


s
e
t
t
i
n
g

l
e
a
r
n
i
n
g

g
o
a
l
s




B


u
s
i
n
g

v
i
s
u
a
l

p
r
o
m
p
t
s

t
o

a
i
d

m
e
m
o
r
y




C


f
a
c
i
l
i
t
a
t
i
n
g

a
u
d
i
t
o
r
y

l
e
a
r
n
i
n
g




D


i
d
e
n
t
i
f
y
i
n
g

k
e
y

i
n
f
o
r
m
a
t
i
o
n




E


r
i
s
k
-
t
a
k
i
n
g




F


o
r
g
a
n
i
s
i
n
g

l
e
a
r
n
i
n
g




G


s
e
e
k
i
n
g

c
l
a
r
i
f
i
c
a
t
i
o
n






T
e
a
c
h
i
n
g

i
n
s
t
r
u
c
t
i
o
n
s


T
h
e

t
e
a
c
h
e
r

t
e
l
l
s

t
h
e

s
t
u
d
e
n
t
s

t
o
.



6
5


d
i
v
i
d
e

t
h
e
i
r

n
e
w

M
a
t
h
s

n
o
t
e
b
o
o
k
s

i
n
t
o

s
e
p
a
r
a
t
e

s
e
c
t
i
o
n
s

f
o
r

d
i
f
f
e
r
e
n
t

t
o
p
i
c
s
.




6
6


w
r
i
t
e

t
h
e

n
e
w

w
o
r
d
s

i
n

t
h
e
i
r

G
e
o
g
r
a
p
h
y

n
o
t
e
b
o
o
k

a
n
d

i
l
l
u
s
t
r
a
t
e

t
h
e
m
.




6
7


a
s
k

f
o
r

h
e
l
p

w
h
e
n
e
v
e
r

t
h
e
y

h
a
v
e

n
o
t

u
n
d
e
r
s
t
o
o
d

h
o
w

t
o

r
e
c
o
r
d

d
a
t
a

o
n

g
r
a
p
h
s
.




6
8


w
r
i
t
e

a

l
i
s
t

o
f

t
h
e

t
h
i
n
g
s

t
h
e
y

w
a
n
t

t
o

a
c
h
i
e
v
e

i
n

E
c
o
n
o
m
i
c
s

b
y

t
h
e

e
n
d

o
f

t
e
r
m
.




6
9




e
x
p
r
e
s
s

t
h
e
i
r

i
d
e
a
s

a
b
o
u
t

p
r
o
t
e
c
t
i
n
g

t
h
e

e
n
v
i
r
o
n
m
e
n
t

e
v
e
n

w
h
e
n

t
h
e
y

a
r
e

n
o
t

s
u
r
e

o
f

a
l
l

t
h
e

E
n
g
l
i
s
h

w
o
r
d
s
.

7
0


r
e
a
d

t
h
e
i
r

'
K
e
e
p

H
e
a
l
t
h
y
'

a
d
v
e
r
t
i
s
e
m
e
n
t
s

a
l
o
u
d

t
o

t
h
e
m
s
e
l
v
e
s

a
t

h
o
m
e
.



1
4


F
o
r

q
u
e
s
t
i
o
n
s

7
1
-
7
5
,

m
a
t
c
h

t
h
e

a
s
s
e
s
s
m
e
n
t

a
c
t
i
v
i
t
i
e
s

w
i
t
h

t
h
e

t
y
p
e
s

o
f

a
s
s
e
s
s
m
e
n
t

l
i
s
t
e
d

A
-
F
.

M
a
r
k

t
h
e

c
o
r
r
e
c
t

l
e
t
t
e
r

(
A
-
F
)

o
n

y
o
u
r

a
n
s
w
e
r

s
h
e
e
t
.



T
h
e
r
e

i
s

o
n
e

e
x
t
r
a

o
p
t
i
o
n

w
h
i
c
h

y
o
u

d
o

n
o
t

n
e
e
d

t
o

u
s
e
.




T
y
p
e
s

o
f

a
s
s
e
s
s
m
e
n
t




A


T
h
e

t
e
a
c
h
e
r

i
s

a
s
s
e
s
s
i
n
g

t
h
e

l
e
a
r
n
e
r
s
'

l
a
n
g
u
a
g
e

s
k
i
l
l
s
.




B


T
h
e

t
e
a
c
h
e
r

i
s

a
s
s
e
s
s
i
n
g

t
h
e

l
e
a
r
n
e
r
s
'

u
n
d
e
r
s
t
a
n
d
i
n
g

o
f

c
o
n
t
e
n
t
.




C


E
a
c
h

l
e
a
r
n
e
r

i
s

s
e
l
f
-
a
s
s
e
s
s
i
n
g

h
i
s

o
r

h
e
r

o
w
n

l
a
n
g
u
a
g
e

s
k
i
l
l
s
.




D


E
a
c
h

l
e
a
r
n
e
r

i
s

s
e
l
f
-
a
s
s
e
s
s
i
n
g

h
i
s

o
r

h
e
r

o
w
n

u
n
d
e
r
s
t
a
n
d
i
n
g

o
f

c
o
n
t
e
n
t
.




E


L
e
a
r
n
e
r
s

a
r
e

a
s
s
e
s
s
i
n
g

e
a
c
h

o
t
h
e
r
'
s

l
a
n
g
u
a
g
e

s
k
i
l
l
s
.




F


L
e
a
r
n
e
r
s

a
r
e

a
s
s
e
s
s
i
n
g

e
a
c
h

o
t
h
e
r
'
s

u
n
d
e
r
s
t
a
n
d
i
n
g

o
f

c
o
n
t
e
n
t
.





A
c
t
i
v
i
t
i
e
s


7
1




T
h
e

l
e
a
r
n
e
r
s

a
r
e

l
o
o
k
i
n
g

t
h
r
o
u
g
h

t
h
e
i
r

n
o
t
e
b
o
o
k
s

a
n
d

a
n
s
w
e
r
i
n
g

q
u
e
s
t
i
o
n
s

t
o

f
i
n
d

o
u
t

a
b
o
u
t

w
h
a
t

t
h
e
y

k
n
o
w

a
n
d

d
o
n
'
t

k
n
o
w

a
b
o
u
t

p
o
p
u
l
a
t
i
o
n

g
r
o
w
t
h
.




7
2




T
h
e

l
e
a
r
n
e
r
s

h
a
v
e

w
r
i
t
t
e
n

s
e
n
t
e
n
c
e
s

u
s
i
n
g

c
o
m
p
a
r
a
t
i
v
e

f
o
r
m
s

w
h
i
c
h

t
h
e

t
e
a
c
h
e
r

i
s

n
o
w

m
a
r
k
i
n
g
.




7
3




L
e
a
r
n
e
r
s

a
r
e

c
o
n
d
u
c
t
i
n
g

i
n
t
e
r
v
i
e
w
s

a
b
o
u
t

w
h
a
t

t
h
e
y

d
i
d

l
a
s
t

w
e
e
k

a
n
d

m
a
k
i
n
g

a

n
o
t
e

o
f

t
h
e
i
r

p
a
r
t
n
e
r
'
s

u
s
e

o
f

s
e
q
u
e
n
c
i
n
g

w
o
r
d
s
.




7
4






E
a
c
h

l
e
a
r
n
e
r

i
s

r
e
-
r
e
a
d
i
n
g

a

b
i
o
g
r
a
p
h
y

t
h
e
y

h
a
v
e

w
r
i
t
t
e
n

f
o
r

h
o
m
e
w
o
r
k

b
e
f
o
r
e

h
a
n
d
i
n
g

i
t

i
n

t
o

t
h
e

t
e
a
c
h
e
r
.

T
h
e
y

a
r
e

c
h
e
c
k
i
n
g

w
h
e
t
h
e
r

i
t

i
s

w
e
l
l
-
p
a
r
a
g
r
a
p
h
e
d

a
n
d

h
a
s

a

c
l
e
a
r

i
n
t
r
o
d
u
c
t
i
o
n

a
n
d

c
o
n
c
l
u
s
i
o
n
.




7
5




T
h
e

l
e
a
r
n
e
r
s

h
a
v
e

w
r
i
t
t
e
n

s
o
m
e

q
u
i
z

q
u
e
s
t
i
o
n
s

a
b
o
u
t

h
i
s
t
o
r
i
c
a
l

e
v
e
n
t
s

t
h
e
y

s
t
u
d
i
e
d

t
h
i
s

t
e
r
m

a
n
d

a
r
e

n
o
w

t
a
l
k
i
n
g

i
n

g
r
o
u
p
s
,

a
s
k
i
n
g

e
a
c
h

o
t
h
e
r

t
h
e
i
r

q
u
e
s
t
i
o
n
s
.





17 T KT : CL I L HANDBOOK | CLI L SAMPLE TEST
1
5




F
o
r

q
u
e
s
t
i
o
n
s

7
6
-
8
0
,

m
a
t
c
h

t
h
e

l
a
n
g
u
a
g
e

p
r
o
b
l
e
m
s

a

t
e
a
c
h
e
r

c
a
n

f
a
c
e

w
h
e
n

w
r
i
t
i
n
g

a

C
L
Ì
L

t
e
s
t

w
i
t
h

t
h
e

p
o
s
s
i
b
l
e

s
u
p
p
o
r
t

s
t
r
a
t
e
g
i
e
s

l
i
s
t
e
d

A
-
F
.

M
a
r
k

t
h
e

c
o
r
r
e
c
t

l
e
t
t
e
r

(
A
-
F
)

o
n

y
o
u
r

a
n
s
w
e
r

s
h
e
e
t
.



T
h
e
r
e

i
s

o
n
e

e
x
t
r
a

o
p
t
i
o
n

w
h
i
c
h

y
o
u

d
o

n
o
t

n
e
e
d

t
o

u
s
e
.




S
u
p
p
o
r
t

s
t
r
a
t
e
g
i
e
s




A


W
r
i
t
e

i
n
s
t
r
u
c
t
i
o
n
s

i
n

L
1
.




B


U
s
e

t
e
x
t
s

t
h
a
t

m
o
t
i
v
a
t
e

t
h
e

l
e
a
r
n
e
r
s
.




C


L
e
t

l
e
a
r
n
e
r
s

u
s
e

t
h
e
i
r

L
1
.




D


Ì
n
c
l
u
d
e

a

d
i
a
g
r
a
m

o
f

t
h
e

t
e
x
t
.




E


A
l
l
o
w

l
e
a
r
n
e
r
s

m
o
r
e

t
i
m
e
.




F


Ì
n
c
l
u
d
e

a

g
l
o
s
s
a
r
y

i
n

L
1
.





L
a
n
g
u
a
g
e

p
r
o
b
I
e
m
s


7
6


L
e
a
r
n
e
r
s

m
a
y

n
o
t

u
n
d
e
r
s
t
a
n
d

t
h
e

g
e
n
e
r
a
l

s
t
r
u
c
t
u
r
e

o
f

a

p
o
p
u
l
a
t
i
o
n

r
e
p
o
r
t
.




7
7


L
e
a
r
n
e
r
s

m
a
y

n
o
t

u
n
d
e
r
s
t
a
n
d

k
e
y

w
o
r
d
s

i
n

t
h
e

e
x
p
l
a
n
a
t
i
o
n

o
f

a
n

e
l
e
c
t
r
i
c
a
l

c
i
r
c
u
i
t
.




7
8


L
e
a
r
n
e
r
s

m
a
y

n
o
t

u
n
d
e
r
s
t
a
n
d

w
h
a
t

t
h
e
y

n
e
e
d

t
o

d
o

i
n

M
a
t
h
s

p
r
o
b
l
e
m
s
.




7
9


L
e
a
r
n
e
r
s

m
a
y

n
o
t

h
a
v
e

e
n
o
u
g
h

E
n
g
l
i
s
h

t
o

w
r
i
t
e

a
n
s
w
e
r
s

t
o

t
h
e

E
c
o
n
o
m
i
c
s

q
u
e
s
t
i
o
n
s
.




8
0




L
e
a
r
n
e
r
s

o
f
t
e
n

t
a
k
e

l
o
n
g
e
r

t
o

p
r
o
c
e
s
s

b
o
t
h

c
o
n
t
e
n
t

a
n
d

t
a
r
g
e
t

l
a
n
g
u
a
g
e

w
h
e
n

r
e
a
d
i
n
g

s
e
v
e
r
a
l

l
o
n
g

H
i
s
t
o
r
y

t
e
x
t
s
.


1
6

B
L
A
N
K

P
A
G
E

18
T KT : CL I L HANDBOOK | TEST ADMI NI STRATI ON
18
TKT: Content and Language
Integrated Learning
test administration
■ Entry procedure
Candidates must enter through an authorised Cambridge ESOL
Centre. A list of Cambridge ESOL Examination Centres is available
fromCambridge ESOL fromthe address on page 1. Institutions
wishing to become Cambridge ESOL Examination Centres should
contact the Centre Registration Unit at Cambridge ESOL.
TKT: CLIL is available throughout the year and Centres contact
Cambridge ESOL to arrange a test date. Candidate details must
be submitted to Cambridge ESOL at least six weeks prior to
running the session. Please note that more notice may be
necessary if candidates have special requirements and
therefore need special arrangements (see below).
Copies of the Regulations and more details on entry
procedure, current fees and further information about this and
other Cambridge ESOL examinations can be obtained from the
Cambridge ESOL Centre Exams Manager in your area, or from
the address on page 1.
■ Answer sheet completion
Candidates mark all their answers on OMR (Optical Mark
Reader) answer sheets, which are scanned by computer in
Cambridge. Candidates must fill in all their answers within
the time allowed for the test.
A sample OMR answer sheet can be found on page 21 of this
Handbook, and it is useful for candidates to practise filling in
an OMR sheet before taking the examination so that they are
familiar with the procedure.
Grading and results
■ Grading
Candidates receive a certificate for TKT: CLIL.
Each question carries one mark, so the maximum mark for the
CLIL module is 80. Candidate performance is reported using
four bands.
Our trialling research indicates that for a candidate to achieve
Band 3, a score of at least 45–50 marks (out of 80) is required.
The reporting of results for TKT: CLIL is subject to ongoing
research. Further guidance on the interpretation of results will
be issued in the future.
■ Notification of results
Certificates are despatched to Centres approximately two
weeks after receipt of answer sheets by Cambridge ESOL.
Please note that despatch of candidates’ results will be
delayed if they need special consideration or are suspected of
malpractice (see below).
Enquiries on results may be made through Cambridge ESOL
Centre Exams Managers within a month of the issue of
certificates.
■ Appeals procedure
Cambridge ESOL provides a service to enable Centres to
appeal, on behalf of candidates, against assessment
decisions that affect grades awarded to candidates, e.g.
decisions relating to results and decisions relating to
irregular conduct.
Candidates should first contact their Cambridge ESOL Centre
Exams Manager for advice. Further information about the
appeals procedure can be found at
www.CambridgeESOL.org/support
Special Circumstances
Special Circumstances cover three main areas: special
arrangements, special consideration and malpractice.
■ Special arrangements
These are available for candidates with disabilities. They may
include extra time, separate accommodation or equipment,
Braille versions of question papers, etc. If you think you may
need special arrangements, you must contact the Cambridge
ESOL Centre Exams Manager in your area as soon as possible
so that the application can be sent to Cambridge ESOL in time
(usually 8–12 weeks before the examination, depending on
what is required).
■ Special consideration
Cambridge ESOL will give special consideration to candidates
affected by adverse circumstances before or during an
examination. Special consideration can be given where an
application is sent through the Centre and is made within 10
working days of the examination date. Examples of acceptable
reasons for giving special consideration are cases of illness or
other unexpected events.
■ Malpractice
The Malpractice Committee will consider cases where
candidates are suspected of copying, collusion or breaking the
examination regulations in some other way. Results may be
withheld because further investigation is needed or because of
infringement of regulations. Centres are notified if a
candidate’s results are being investigated.
BAND A candidate at this level demonstrates
1
limited knowledge of CLIL content areas
2
basic, but systematic knowledge of CLIL content areas
3
breadth and depth of knowledge of CLIL content areas
4
extensive knowledge of CLIL content areas
19 T KT : CL I L HANDBOOK | PRODUCTI ON AND SUPPORT
The production of TKT:
Content and Language
Integrated Learning
Cambridge ESOL is committed to providing examinations of
the highest possible quality. This commitment is underpinned
by an extensive programme of research and evaluation, and by
continuous monitoring of the marking and grading of all
Cambridge ESOL examinations. Of particular importance is the
rigorous set of procedures which are used in the production
and pretesting of question papers.
The production process for TKT: CLIL is the same as that
for the Cambridge ESOL language examinations. It begins with
the commissioning of materials and ends with the printing of
question papers.
There are five main stages in the production process:
• commissioning
• pre-editing and editing
• pretesting
• analysis and banking of materials
• question paper construction
■ Question paper production cycle
Pretesting of CLIL test material provides Cambridge ESOL with
valuable information about candidates’ performance on
particular tasks. Pretesting is also useful for Centres or
institutions as it gives candidates the opportunity to familiarise
themselves with the standard task-types under test conditions
and to receive feedback on areas of strength and weakness.
If your Centre or institution would like to be involved in the
pretesting of materials for the CLIL module, please contact the
Pretesting Unit TKT Administrator on + 44 (0) 1223 552998 or
TKTpretesting@CambridgeESOL.org.
Support for TKT: Content and
Language Integrated Learning
candidates and course
providers
General information on TKT: CLIL, including administration
details and downloadable versions of this Handbook, the CLIL
glossary and sample materials, can be found by visiting
www.CambridgeESOL.org/CLIL
Support material for teacher trainers will be available on the
Teaching Resources website
www.CambridgeESOL.org/teach/CLIL
Further support is also available in the form of seminar
programmes in different countries. Contact Cambridge ESOL
Information for further details by emailing:
ESOLhelpdesk@CambridgeESOL.org
Commissioning of material
for question papers
Pre-editing and editing
of material
Pretest construction
Rejection Revision
Pretesting
Item analysis
Live materials bank
Question paper
construction
20
T KT : CL I L HANDBOOK | FAQS AND ANSWER KEY
20
Common questions and
answers
Can candidates make notes on the question paper?
Candidates may write on the question paper during the
examination, but their notes will not be marked. Candidates
must complete an answer sheet, which is then scanned.
Does it matter if candidates write in pen or pencil?
Candidates must use a pencil to mark their answers on the
answer sheet. Answer sheets marked in pen cannot be read by
computer.
Is the use of dictionaries allowed?
No.
What is the mark allocation?
One mark is given for each correct answer.
Do candidates have to take the other TKT modules?
No. The CLIL module is free-standing. Candidates are not
required to take TKT Modules 1, 2 and 3 in addition to TKT: CLIL.
What is the pass mark?
Results are reported in four bands. There is no pass or fail.
Candidates receive a certificate stating which band has been
achieved.
What is the date of the TKT: CLIL examination?
Dates are set by Centres in consultation with Cambridge ESOL,
taking into account local needs and conditions.
Where can candidates enrol?
Your Cambridge ESOL Centre Exams Manager can give you
information about Centres where the examination is taken.
Candidates enrol through local Centres, and not through the
Cambridge ESOL office in Cambridge. Fees are payable to the
local Centre.
How do candidates get their results?
TKT: CLIL certificates are issued to Centres approximately two
weeks after receipt of answer sheets by Cambridge ESOL.
Do candidates need to have taken a particular English language
examination before taking TKT: CLIL?
No. However, it is advisable for candidates to have a minimum
language level of Council of Europe Framework level B1.
What kind of teaching terminology will be tested in TKT: CLIL?
See guidelines on pages 6–7 and the wordlist on page 22.
Candidates are expected to be familiar with the contents of
the TKT glossary and the CLIL glossary.
Sample test answer key
1 B
2 D
3 A
4 B
5 C
6 C
7 D
8 C
9 A
10 A
11 A
12 B
13 C
14 A
15 A
16 C
17 B
18 B
19 C
20 C
21 A
22 B
23 B
24 A
25 C
26 C
27 E
28 G
29 A
30 B
31 D
32 G
33 H
34 D
35 C
36 F
37 B
38 E
39 B
40 A
41 C
42 C
43 B
44 A
45 E
46 C
47 G
48 A
49 F
50 B
51 C
52 C
53 F
54 A
55 H
56 B
57 G
58 B
59 A
60 C
61 C
62 B
63 C
64 A
65 F
66 B
67 G
68 A
69 E
70 C
71 D
72 A
73 E
74 C
75 F
76 D
77 F
78 A
79 C
80 E
21 T KT : CL I L HANDBOOK | SAMPLE OMR ANSWER SHEET
TKT: Content and Language Integrated Learning sample OMR answer sheet
22
TKT: Content and Language
Integrated Learning Wordlist
■ TKT: CLIL candidates are expected to be familiar
with the language of teaching as represented in the
separate TKT glossary.
The list below is indicative only. (For definitions see separate
TKT: CLIL glossary.) Other terms may also be used in TKT: CLIL.
activating previous / prior knowledge
animated
BICS (Basic Interpersonal Communicative Skills)
CALP (Cognitive Academic Language Proficiency)
category
citizenship
classify
closed questions
code switching
cognitive skills
combine / combination
compare and contrast
compose
concept maps
content words / content obligatory
creative thinking
criteria
critical thinking
cue
culture
diagram: Carroll / Venn / tree
differentiation
enable
enquiry
evidence
expand
fair test
findings
flow diagram
frames (speaking and writing)
genre based teaching
grid
higher order thinking skills (HOTS) and
lower order thinking skills (LOTS)
hot seat
ICT / IT skills
immersion programme
information processing
investigate
justify
keys (binary)
L1: first language
L2: second language
learn by heart
learning outcome
list (v)
loop / domino game
majority language
management questions
matching
modify / modification
open questions
oracy
partial immersion
performance assessment
pie charts
plenary
primary language
puzzle
pyramid discussion
quadrants
query
questions: open / closed / display
ranking
rate
reasoning
recite
response partners
revisit
scaffolding
sentence builder
sentence stems
sequencing
shared writing
smiley face
sort
specialist vocabulary
speech bubbles
story board
structure (v)
substitution tables
support
synthesis
target language
technical terms
thought bubbles
trans-languaging
treasure hunt
unbelievable
visual organisers / graphic organisers
volunteer
wait time
whiteboard / interactive whiteboard (IWB)
T KT : CL I L HANDBOOK | CONTENT AND LANGUAGE I NTEGRATED LEARNI NG WORDLI ST
TKT: Content and Language
Integrated Learning
subject-specific vocabulary
The list is indicative only. Other subject related vocabulary
may also be used in TKT: CLIL.
Candidates will not be tested on these items.
■ Art and Craft / Design
abstract
carve
collage
complementary colour
composition
decorate
dye
engraving
fabric
foreground
impressionist
(mixed) media
mould
ornamental
painting
pastel
perspective
portrait
primary colours
secondary colours
sketch
still life
texture
tone
watercolour
■ Economics / Business Studies
cash flow
commerce
corporate
debt
earnings
economy
funding
global market
inflation
interest rate
loss
manufacture
marketing
mass produce
negotiate
overheads
peak
process
profit
retail
revenue
shares
takeover
trends
workforce
■ Environment / Geography
adapted
archipelago
atmospheric pressure
biodegradable
carbon footprint
climate change
compass
ecology / ecological
endangered
energy efficient
equator
erosion
flooding
fossil fuel
glacier / glaciated
global warming
GM (genetically modified) crops
greenhouse effect
habitat
hail
hurricane
infrastructure
lava
natural disaster
organic
ozone layer
packaging
pond
recycling
rural
settlement
tornado
typhoon
urban
volcano
weather fronts
windmill
wind farm
wind turbines
■ History / Politics
ancient
archaeologist
archaeology
campaign
capitalism
civilisation
community
conflict
constitution
coronation
democracy
era
expansion
expedition
hunters
independence
legislation
Middle Ages
monarchy
Prehistoric Times
rebellion
23 T KT : CL I L HANDBOOK | SUBJ ECT-SPECI FI C VOCABULARY
24
reform
reign
republic
revolution
Roman Empire
source
treaty
■ ICT
application
bullet points
click and drag
column
computer controlled
database
download
Excel
folder
font size
grammar-check
graphic
hardware
icon
image
input / output
layout
malware
modem
motherboard
multimedia
operating system
output
paste
PowerPoint
processor
row
scanner
search engine
server
sentence builder
Skype
software
spell-check
spreadsheet
spyware
surf the net
toolbar
upload
URL (Uniform Resource Locator)
USB (Universal Serial Bus) / memory stick
virus
web search
Word
■ Literacy
alphabetical order
anthology
autobiography
chant
chronological
dialogue
distinguish
extracts
facts
fantasy
genre
glossary
identify
image
initials
motive
myth
narrative
non-fiction
opinions
playscript
procedure
proposal
recount
repetition
rhyme
setting
■ Mathematics
algebra
angle
axis (axes)
bar graph
calculate
calculator
chart
circumference
column graph
compasses
coordinates
cube
equation
estimate
formula
fractions
geometry
grid
line graph
parallel
percentage
perimeter
pie chart
protractor
quadrilateral
rectangle
rhombus
set
statistics
symmetry / symmetrical
■ Music
Baroque
beat
brass
choir
chord
clef
crotchet
harmony
lyrics
march
T KT : CL I L HANDBOOK | SUBJ ECT-SPECI FI C VOCABULARY
melody
notes
percussion
pitch
rap
rhythm
Romantic
scale
score
tango
tempo
tune
vocal
waltz
woodwind
■ PE (Physical Education)
aerobic
anaerobic
apparatus
badminton
beanbag
bounce
circuit training
coordination
dodge
footwork
intercept
keep fit
league
momentum
physical
pitch
racket
rope
shot (e.g. tennis / golf / football)
sit-ups
sprint
stamina
stretch
tactic
tournament
twist
■ Science
absorb / absorbent
acceleration
acid
alkali
arachnid
artery
bacteria
beaker
blood cell
butterfly
cartilage
caterpillar
chemical
cocoon
conductor
digest / digestion / digestive system
dissolve
ecosystem
electrical circuit
element
evaporate
evolution
flammable
flexible
friction
gas
genes
germinate / germination
gravity
hydro-electric
inherited
life cycle
liquid
magnet / magnetic attraction
micro-organisms
microscope
mineral
molecules
mould
nutrition
organ
organism
oxygen
penicillin
Periodic table
photosynthesis
precipitation
predator
prey
receiver
reflect
respiration / respiratory system
ribs
rodent
skeleton
skull
socket
solid
source
surface
transmitter
transparent
vacuum
veins
vibrate / vibration
vitamin
waterproof
water vapour
yeast
25 T KT : CL I L HANDBOOK | SUBJ ECT-SPECI FI C VOCABULARY
26 T KT : CL I L HANDBOOK | REFERENCES
References
Calabrese, I and Rampone, R (2008) Cross-curricular Resources for
Young Learners, Oxford: Oxford University Press.
CLIL at School in Europe, Eurydice (2006)
Coleman, L (2006) CLIL behind the dykes; the Dutch bilingual
model, IATEFL YLSIG Journal.
Dalton-Puffer, C (2008) Discourse in Content and Language
Integrated Learning, John Benjamin Publishing Company.
Deller, S, and Price, C (2007) Teaching Other Subjects Through
English(CLIL), Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Fisher, R (2005) Teaching Children to Learn, Cheltenham: Nelson
Thornes.
Gibbons, P (2002) Scaffolding Language Scaffolding Learning,
Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.
Rerences
Hall, D (2001) Assessing the Needs of Bilingual Pupils, London:
David Fulton Publishers.
Johnstone, R and McKinstry, R (2008) Evaluation of Early Primary
Partial Immersion (EPPI), www.scilt.stir.ac.uk/
projects/evaluationwr/documents/EPPI_Book.pdf
Marzano, RJ, Pickering D and Pollock, J (2001) Classroom
Instruction that Works, Alexandria, VA: Association for
Supervision and Curriculum Development.
Mehisto, P, Frigols, M-J and Marsh, D (2008) Uncovering CLIL,
Macmillan.
Van de Craen, P, Mondt, K, Allain, L and Gao, Y (2008) Why and
How CLIL Works, www.univie.ac.at/Anglistik/Views_0703.pdf
(Vienna English Working Papers Vol. 16)

Preface
This handbook is intended for course providers who are, or intend to become, involved in preparing candidates for TKT: Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL). For further information on any of the Cambridge ESOL examinations and teaching awards, please contact: Cambridge ESOL Information, 1 Hills Road, Cambridge, CB1 2EU, United Kingdom Tel: +44 1223 553355, Fax: +44 1223 460278, email: ESOL@ucles.org.uk www.CambridgeESOL.org

Contents
2 4 Introduction An overview of TKT: CLIL

5 8

General description and syllabus Preparation for the CLIL module

10 Sample test

18 TKT: CLIL test administration 18 Grading and results 18 Special Circumstances 19 The production of TKT: CLIL 19 Support for TKT: CLIL candidates and course providers 20 Common questions and answers

20 Sample test answer key 21 Sample OMR answer sheet 22 TKT: CLIL wordlist 23 TKT: CLIL subject-specific vocabulary 26 References

TKT: CLIL HANDBOOK

| CO N T E N T S

1

Environmental Studies. In CLIL. P. In Primary contexts.ac. However. the Dutch bilingual model in IATEFL YLSIG Journal. The CLIL module tests knowledge of a CLIL approach and the skills that are taught across all subjects. Social Science. Y (2008) Why and How CLIL Works. Information Computer Technology (ICT). learners reach proficiency levels in all four skills of listening. Citizenship. The experience of learning subjects through the medium of a non-native language is more challenging and intensive as there is more exposure to the language and learners acquire knowledge and skills in different areas of the curriculum. CLIL programmes are commonly delivered by non-native subject teachers or by English language teachers. Curricular subjects apart from languages are taught through the target language. certificates and diplomas for learners and teachers of English. that it has no negative effect on L1 proficiency. ‘CLIL induces the learner to be more cognitively active during the learning process’. Allain. The CLIL module can be taken at any stage in a teacher’s career. It is intended to be a platform for professional development. ‘CLIL leads to better English proficiency. L (2006) CLIL behind the dykes. ■ Why CLIL? There are many advantages to the CLIL approach: it develops confident learners and enhances academic cognitive processes and communication skills. nor on the pupils’ subject knowledge. See Johnstone. Van de Craen. It tests knowledge of Content and Language Integrated Learning and concepts related to a CLIL approach. Philosophy. Politics. speaking. R and McKinstry. Mondt. it is likely that centres and other institutions will offer courses for TKT: CLIL preparation. about 50–60% of the curriculum (parts of Spain). in more than 130 countries. third or sometimes fourth language involves drawing on effective pedagogical practice from a range of different educational contexts. K. As a result of the global need for language learning. In addition. It is suitable for pre or in-service teachers of English or teachers of other subjects who use the medium of English in a variety of teaching contexts e. to language showers and regular 20–30 minute subject lessons in the target language (parts of Germany).g. Literacy. thinking and language skills which are developed across different curriculum subjects. Religious Education (RE). primary. Classics. R (2008) Evaluation of Early Primary Partial Immersion document. Maths. research indicates that. secondary or adult sectors. It is intended for international candidates who may be non-first language or first language teachers.univie. Economics. History. ranging from full immersion (Canada) through partial immersion. Physical Education (PE). learning a curricular subject in a second. research 2 TKT: CLIL HANDBOOK | INTRODUCTION . It also tests knowledge of teaching strategies and how assessment is carried out in CLIL contexts. There are also contexts where native speakers teach English to non-native learners (often from minority language groups) to enable them to integrate into mainstream classes. Music. Cambridge ESOL offers an extensive range of examinations. Science. In Secondary schools. reading and writing far beyond what is expected in TEYL programmes. taken by over 2 million people a year. ■ Introduction to TKT: Content and Language Integrated Learning – a test of professional knowledge for English language teachers and also subject teachers who use English as a medium for teaching their curriculum subject ■ What is CLIL? CLIL describes an evolving approach to teaching and learning where subjects are taught and studied through the medium of a non-native language. These may include practical issues arising from specific CLIL contexts and some teaching practice. subjects are usually taught in the target language by non-native speaker subject teachers. a department of the University of Cambridge and part of the University of Cambridge Local Examinations Syndicate. It should be noted that it does not test teaching ability.Introduction ■ Introduction to Cambridge ESOL TKT: Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL) is designed and produced by University of Cambridge ESOL Examinations (Cambridge ESOL).’ Coleman. It is also suitable for teachers who are moving to English teaching after teaching another subject or those who are moving from teaching their subject in the first language to teaching it in English. These include: Art. The CLIL module is designed to offer maximum flexibility and accessibility for candidates and therefore does not test subject specific knowledge nor include compulsory teaching practice. The CLIL module offers candidates a step in their professional development as teachers. Design Technology. This success is shown in ICT skills too. Examples of these programmes are EAL (English as an Additional Language in Britain) and CBI (Content Based Instruction in the US).at/Anglistik/ViewS (Accessed 26 April 2008) TKT: CLIL is an optional extension module of the Teaching Knowledge Test (TKT). In Secondary schools. Available at http://www. which has provided examinations in English for speakers of other languages since 1913. candidates who are teachers of other curriculum subjects as well as candidates who are language teachers can add TKT: CLIL to their existing qualifications. In some countries native speaker classroom assistants support the learners too. CLIL encourages intercultural understanding and community values. particularly for English. Geography. There are many different types of CLIL programmes. shows that learners become more sensitive to vocabulary and ideas presented in their first language as well as in the target language and they gain more extensive and varied vocabulary. This will demonstrate their understanding of how to teach a broader range of subjects for the 21st century. In the target language. The CLIL module forms part of a framework of teaching awards and tests for teachers offered by Cambridge ESOL. It tests knowledge of how to plan lessons as well as knowledge of activities and resources used to support a CLIL approach. It tests knowledge about subject teaching in a target language and the learning. L and Gao.

secondary or adults primary. TKT: CLIL HANDBOOK | INTRODUCTION 3 . secondary or adults primary. IDLTM is an educational management qualification. secondary or adults Can be taken pre-service yes yes yes yes yes no not recommended no not recommended Course attendance not required not required not required yes yes yes not required yes not required Assessed teaching practice no no no yes yes yes no yes no Continuous assessment no no no yes yes yes no yes no Involves coursework no no no yes yes yes no yes no Written test / examination yes yes yes no no no yes no no Note: Cambridge ESOL also offers IDLTM and the Young Learner Extension to CELTA. The Young Learner Extension to CELTA shares similarities with CELTYL. secondary or adults adults (16+) primary or secondary primary. secondary or adults primary.Cambridge ESOL teaching awards and tests for teachers TKT Module 1 TKT Module 2 TKT Module 3 TKT: CLIL TKT: KAL CELTA CELTYL ICELT Delta Module 1 Delta Module 2 Delta Module 3 Teaching experience not essential not essential not essential not required not required required recommended required recommended Previous qualifications / training not essential not essential not essential qualifications qualifications which allow access to higher education which allow access to higher education local requirements apply an initial teaching qualification an initial teaching qualification an initial teaching qualification Suggested language level minimum of Council of Europe B1 minimum of Council of Europe B1 minimum of Council of Europe B2 minimum Council of minimum Council of minimum of Council of Europe B2 minimum Council of minimum Council of minimum Council of Europe C2/C1 Europe C2/C1 Europe C2/C1 Europe C2/C1 Europe C2/C1 Teaching age group primary. except that entry is conditional on candidates having completed CELTA. secondary or adults primary. secondary or adults primary.

Cambridge ESOL’s tests for teachers include: • The Teaching Knowledge Test (TKT) • TKT: Knowledge about Language (KAL) • TKT: Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL) Cambridge ESOL’s practical. as is familiarity with common ELT terminology. An overview of TKT: Content and Language Integrated Learning ■ The aims of TKT: CLIL • to test candidates’ knowledge of concepts related to a CLIL approach and knowledge of the practice of planning. and enhance career opportunities • to encourage teachers in their professional development by providing a step in a developmental framework of awards for teachers of English. magazines and the internet • diagrams and other visuals (see CLIL glossary for examples of visual organisers which may be included in the test tasks) • descriptions of classroom situations.g. candidates are not required to have taken any English language examinations. Candidates taking TKT: CLIL will normally have some experience of teaching English to speakers of other languages. The Delta Modules are: • Delta Module One: a written examination • Delta Module Two: a course-based qualification • Delta Module Three: an extended assignment Other teaching qualifications offered by Cambridge ESOL include two specifically designed for the further education and skills sector within the UK. course-based qualifications for teachers include: • CELTA (Certificate in English Language Teaching to Adults) • CELTYL (Certificate in English Language Teaching to Young Learners) • ICELT (In-service Certificate in English Language Teaching) Cambridge ESOL also offers the Delta Modules. third or fourth language • to provide an easily accessible test about CLIL to speakers of other languages. Successful candidates are likely to have some experience of teaching school subjects through the medium of English. and in the subject vocabulary lists on pages 23–24. and could be used by candidates to access further training. PET. Candidates are required to answer the questions by selecting a letter for the correct answer. To access TKT: CLIL teachers need at least an intermediate level of English – Level B1 of the Council of Europe’s Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) – e. which cover all areas of knowledge at an advanced level and include teaching practice. Approaches which might bias against candidates from particular backgrounds or teaching contexts are avoided. in the separate CLIL glossary (see also wordlist on page 22). teaching and assessing curriculum subjects taught in a second. ■ Approaches to teaching and learning A range of approaches to teaching and learning may be covered in the test material. IELTS band score of 4. Candidates are not required to take any other modules of TKT or to fulfil any specific entry requirements for the CLIL module. original or adapted. speak or produce extended writing when taking TKT: CLIL. TKT: CLIL may also be taken by: • pre-service teachers • teachers involved in training programmes • candidates studying for teaching qualifications who may have non-native learners in their classrooms. Candidates taking the CLIL module are expected to be familiar with the language of teaching as represented in the separate TKT glossary as well as the terminology related to the description of language. from the following sources may feature in the CLIL module: • CLIL coursebooks. subject vocabulary and concepts for TKT: CLIL. These are found in the syllabus description on pages 5–7. ■ Test format The CLIL module consists of 80 questions in two parts. Knowledge of communicative and other approaches to teaching is expected. candidates are not required to listen. • English as an Additional Language (EAL) teachers who work with non-native speaker learners (often from minority language groups) in mainstream classes. A summary of the entry requirements and content of Cambridge ESOL’s Teaching Awards and tests for teachers can be found on page 3. However. ■ TKT: Content and Language Integrated Learning candidature TKT: CLIL is suitable for: • subject teachers who need to teach their subjects in English and who want to add language teaching to their portfolio of skills • English language teachers who teach curricular subjects in a second. 4 TKT: CLIL HANDBOOK | OV E R V I E W . activity books or supplementary materials including CLIL materials found on the web • articles relating to CLIL from journals. which is prepared and delivered to international standards. proficiency in the English language or their performance in classroom situations. third or fourth language • classroom assistants working in CLIL contexts • classroom teachers who teach curriculum subjects ■ Sources and text types used in TKT: CLIL Extracts. As it tests candidates’ knowledge of concepts related to a CLIL approach rather than their subject knowledge.

It also focuses on teachers’ awareness of learning demands (content. 3/4/5-option matching. odd one out Title Assessment Number of items 10 Areas of knowledge • focus: content. odd one out. 3-option multiplechoice. language. 3/4/5-option matching. cognitive. 1-1 matching. odd one out SYLLABUS TKT: CLIL is an examination for both subject teachers and English language teachers involved in CLIL programmes.TKT: CONTENT AND LANGUAGE INTEGRATED LEARNING GENERAL DESCRIPTION PART 2 Title Lesson Preparation Number of items 25 Areas of knowledge • planning a lesson or a series of lessons • language demands of subject content and accompanying tasks • resources including multi-media and visual organisers • materials selection and adaptation • activity types Task types 4 tasks of 5–8 items each: 1-1 matching. odd one out. It tests knowledge of the aims and rationale of a CLIL approach and knowledge of CLIL from a teaching perspective: the planning. ordering. communication. sequencing Examination format Timing TKT: CLIL consists of two parts 1 hour 20 minutes Number of items 80 Task types 3-option multiple choice. Marks Each item carries one mark. Answer format PART 2 Title Lesson Delivery Number of items 20 Areas of knowledge • classroom language • scaffolding content and language learning • methods to help learners develop learning strategies • consolidating learning and differentiation Task types 3 tasks of 5–8 items each 1-1 matching. odd one out TKT: CLIL HANDBOOK | CO N T E N T A N D L A N G U A G E I N T EG R AT E D L E A R N I N G 5 . 3/4/5-option matching. teaching and assessment of CLIL. sequencing For all parts. cognition) and support strategies for learners in CLIL programmes. Candidates should use an eraser to rub out any answer they wish to change. learning and communication skills • types of assessment • support strategies Task types 2 tasks of 5 items each: 1-1 matching. Candidates should use a pencil and mark their answers firmly. 3/4/5-option matching. 3-option multiplechoice. candidates indicate their answers by shading the correct lozenges on their answer sheets. PART 2 PART 1 Title Knowledge of CLIL and Principles of CLIL Number of items 25 Areas of knowledge • aims of and rationale for CLIL • language across the curriculum • communication skills across the curriculum • cognitive skills across the curriculum • learning skills across the curriculum Task types 4 tasks of 5–8 items each: 1-1 matching. 3-option multiplechoice. ordering. 3-option multiplechoice. content and language.

speaking. sort). (How many classes of X are there? classify. locating. plan. evaluating (What do you think about X? assess. reasoning (Why X? What causes X? What comes as a result of X? What justifies X to do Y? choose. clarifying what has been said. layout. outline. produce. giving information. synonyms opposites use of specialist subject vocabulary • Communication skills across the curriculum e. cognitive. rate. evaluating work (self and others). design. explain. predicting and justifying predictions. instructing. invent. give opinion. . processing and using knowledge. BICS and CALP (Cummins) – Differences in cognitive demands of teaching materials (see separate CLIL glossary) CLIL aims to: introduce learners to new ideas and concepts in curriculum subjects improve learners’ performance in both content subjects and the target language encourage stronger links with the citizenship curriculum increase learners’ confidence in the target language make the content subject the primary focus of classroom materials enable learners to access content subjects by modifying lesson plans to take into account pupils’ ability in the target language provide cognitively challenging materials from the beginning • Language across the curriculum – the language demands of curriculum subjects so that learners can participate (listening. certainty. investigate). stating facts and opinions. build. language and communication skills across the curriculum. identify. organise. hypothesise). describe. speculating conditionals passive forms imperatives questions reported speech personal and impersonal pronouns time expressions connectors (and. show. justify. organising and interpreting information. reading and writing). categorise. name. drafting. guessing from context. Communication. hypothesising. past and future forms (but not in any more detail e. understanding – to understand. recite. summarising ■ Part 2 This part of the CLIL module tests candidates’ knowledge of planning. what’s the value of . creative thinking (What if . relate spell. skimming and scanning skills. carrying out investigations. editing. think about . awareness – to be aware of). classifying. or. . expressing ideas. compose. define. possibility. prove. transferring information. • Learning across the curriculum e. rank). persuading. guess. decide which group. . obligation. comparing and contrasting. statement of 6 TKT: CLIL HANDBOOK | CO N T E N T A N D L A N G U A G E I N T EG R AT E D L E A R N I N G . describing a process. recognise. interpreting data. defining (What is X? What is the function of . share. agreeing or disagreeing. put into). ?) ■ Syllabus area ■ Possible testing focus Knowledge of CLIL and Principles of CLIL • CLIL aims: The 4 Cs – Content. explain. ordering (What happens next? order. change. generalising. recording results. state. . These include features such as: the use of: present. suggesting • Cognitive skills across the curriculum e. separate. distinguish. make up.■ Part 1 This part of the CLIL module tests candidates’ knowledge of a CLIL approach and knowledge of the learning. note taking. ? imagine. because) collocations See details in the CLIL glossary and the list at the end of this handbook. preference. recommend. comparing – contrasting (What is X and what is not X? similarities and differences. presenting work. explaining a point of view. permission.g. . describing cause and effect. . .g. recall. decide. predicting (What will / would / could happen to X? predict. deduction. probability. compare. . contrast. presenting solutions. demonstrating. teaching and assessing curriculum subjects taught through the medium of English.g. present perfect continuous) comparative / superlative forms ‘will’ prediction modal verbs for expressing: ability. dividing (What does X belong to? divide. tell). suppose). asking questions. remembering (list. ■ Syllabus area ■ Possible testing focus Lesson Preparation • Planning a lesson and a series of lessons: learning outcomes (knowledge – to know. judge. translate). Activating prior knowledge.g.? analyse. giving examples. ability – to be able to. sequence. reviewing. Cognition and Culture (the 4th C is sometimes called Citizenship or Community). prohibition. but. solve). conclude..

setting learning goals. directing to further practice. drafting. sentence completion. dictation. Assessment ■ Part 2 ■ Syllabus area ■ Possible testing focus • Classroom language Use of questions to scaffold and promote thinking: lower order talk (what. instruction. table completion. cloze. encouraging risk taking. summative. biography. glossaries. first sentences and visuals. repeating. • Types: formative. article. text. activities. web searches. multiple choice. skimming. ways of adapting native speaker materials and web pages: adding visuals. self. diagrams. using spreadsheets to collate information and plot graphs. song • Resources required: multimedia. feature identification. using. use of language frames. freeze frames (drama ‘stills’). encouraging peer feedback. use ‘draw’ or ‘paint’ software. including word banks. questionnaires. using a database to sort. Genre texts: advertisements. content and language cognitive skills. reviewing work. language. discussion. key concept maps (to show relationships between ideas) description. explaining results. explaining. argument. simplify language structures. additional visual support. task based learning. giving practical demonstrations. autobiography. classroom interaction. ‘Can Do’ statements. word completion. summarising. graphs. • Materials selection and adaptation: ways of using materials. learning skills. peer and group feedback. group presentations. classification. questioning Ways of encouraging student talking time: pair work. information / data transfer. providing glossaries (L1 / target language) reordering to accommodate syllabus. gap-fill. matching. plenary. • Consolidating learning: reminding. flow charts. teaching study skills: note taking. ordering words.?) Lesson Delivery instructions read aloud. creating interest. question and present information. word puzzles and word searches. glossaries in L1 and target language. true – false. portfolio. • Activity types: classification. questions from learners in L1. underlining key words. • Scaffolding content and language: breaking down tasks into small steps. • Identifying ways to integrate ICT in the curriculum: PowerPoint presentations. organising. modify test instructions. review.goals. time sequence (see CLIL glossary). • Methods to help learners develop learning strategies: developing predicting skills. to develop enquiry skills. add visuals. modelling. extra time. maps. visual / graphic organisers such as time lines. to encourage learner autonomy. The purposes for using resources and ICT: to encourage student talking time (STT) – exchanging and sharing information. syllabus fit. what do you think of . report. directing learners to help others. titles. planning. identifying key content vocabulary. word banks. proposal. design activities. providing constructive feedback. oral instructions repeated in L1. persuasion. additional examples. poem. relaying knowledge. performance. scanning. personal teaching aims. recount. to handle data. do extension activities. simplified texts (modified output) answering fewer questions. to provide learning support. word banks. word processing. Differentiation: least advanced learners – (modified input) provide additional language frames. using a variety of layout and print designs: font sizes and styles. producing shorter texts most advanced learners – check own work. peer. how. omitting unnecessary detail. recasting. . use of models for production of language. description. paraphrasing language. poster presentations. adding graphics. generalisation. sentence and text levels. some use of L1 or target language glossaries. TKT: CLIL HANDBOOK | CO N T E N T A N D L A N G U A G E I N T EG R AT E D L E A R N I N G 7 . essays. communication skills. personalisation. letters. process. narrative. . labelling. simplifying. what is the evidence. to present and revisit subject vocabulary. where. sentences. interpreting and manipulating digital images. use of visual prompts to aid memory. substitution tables. notices. help peers. to be creative. role play. • Language needed to deliver subject content at word. cause-effect. charts. tables. designing a database. when. instructions explained. use of L1. Purpose – developing communicative skills. explanation. • Support strategies: change vocabulary. predicting from words. ■ Part 2 ■ Syllabus area ■ Possible testing focus • Focus of assessment: content. process. interviews. making associations. re-demonstrating. who) → higher order talk (why. text completion. instructing.

the number of tasks in each section and the task types that could be used in each section. 8 TKT: CLIL HANDBOOK | P R E PA R AT I O N . lesson preparation. Look too at the sample paper on pages 10–17 of this handbook. This would include awareness of the use of target language in the classroom by both the teacher and the learners at different stages of teaching a lesson e. ■ Check that you can complete the questions in the given time limit (80 minutes) and make sure you know how to record your answers on the answer sheet. what needs to be omitted and what needs to be inserted? Do the learners need to know all the information given? What aspects of the material are difficult for my learners to understand and use? Why? Do I need to teach my learners all the language for this lesson or is it unnecessary for them to understand every word? ■ Become fully familiar with the exam format and task types for TKT: CLIL.g.) Remember that all answers must be given on the answer sheet by lozenging the correct letter. when and how the learners communicate with each other • can study the cognitive demands of the curriculum and consult websites on different types of thinking skills • can become aware of the range of learning skills needed and used while learners study particular curriculum subjects. candidates could: • activate prior knowledge by asking some general questions about the lesson content before the learners start reading or writing • use a selection of different types of visual support to help learners understand new lesson content • note the conceptual difficulties learners are having with learning new subject content • note what kinds of problems learners are having in using key content vocabulary • note the use of L1 and target language when learners are involved in pair or group work. See page 5 for details of the number of sections the test contains. read them carefully and always do as instructed. note key words needed for the lesson. The task types used are: • 1-1 matching (See sample paper page 11 for example) • 3/4/5/-option matching (See sample paper pages 2 and 12 for example) • 3-option multiple choice • odd one out (See sample paper page 3 for example) • ordering • sequencing Notice the instructions for each task. ■ Make use of subject material written in English. By part ■ Part 1: Knowledge of CLIL and Principles of CLIL Candidates • can build up their awareness of different language features mentioned in the syllabus by noting these features in the materials used in the classroom • can develop an awareness of what. There are many useful materials available for teachers both in book form and on the web. delivery and assessment of their subjects in English. They could use every opportunity to become aware of issues arising from the planning. for example: • examine the subject material. After a lesson. At the preparation stage candidates could. practise saying them. evaluation of work as well as during classroom interaction. When looking at these materials it would be useful to think about how the learner can access them by asking questions such as: What needs to be adapted. when and how they communicate with their learners and what. It would therefore be useful for candidates to exploit their teaching situation for opportunities to prepare for the test. lesson delivery. teachers could: • note the achievements made by the learners • note problems learners have with content and language • think about possible reasons for those problems • consider learner feedback for whole class as well as for individuals.Preparation General ■ TKT: CLIL is concerned with knowledge about teaching curriculum subjects in English. (See page 21 for a sample answer sheet. decide how they will be presented and how the learners will incorporate them into their active vocabulary • look at the language demands of the lesson and decide what kind of support is needed so that learners can produce the language in spoken and written English • notice any particular difficulties and include additional support for the least able learners • think about extension activities for the most able learners • write lesson objectives and key subject vocabulary on the board • plan a plenary question at the end of the lesson so learners can reflect on the learning outcome. While delivering a lesson.

TKT: CLIL HANDBOOK | P R E PA R AT I O N 9 .■ Part 2: Lesson Preparation Candidates • can look at what has to be planned before delivering a lesson and a series of lessons in a CLIL context • can look at the language demands of their subject materials and check these with the features mentioned in the syllabus • can study the types of resources used in the classroom and become familiar with the use of multimedia and visual organisers for supporting the delivery of subject content • can consult books and websites on a range of subject materials and activities written in English. ■ Part 2: Lesson Delivery Candidates • can take advantage of their teaching to raise awareness of their own classroom language and that of their learners • can note how and why they use support materials or graded language to help learners understand the content of their curriculum subjects • can analyse methods used to encourage learners to develop and use different learning strategies • can become aware of how learning is consolidated and how materials and outcomes can be differentiated (adjusted) for the least able and most able learners. • can consult reference books and materials in websites to know about different types of assessment • can become aware of a range of strategies to support learners who are assessed through the target language. ■ Part 2: Assessment Candidates • can look at assessment used in school then analyse what is being assessed.

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#0-:. !%<6 2* *2'86-1+ 21 '217)17 . )6.7:.-*773 TKT: CLIL HANDBOOK ):3 <0. ")6<144)6) .77.<--<0 .):. +)616-. !1+0576.-@)584-. ). .)8<-.):. .77.<0:-. .?-: . . • )616-.:1.0--< 2856)&22.7: 6 ).77.:75 ) +7=:.=4< 0).<-. 16+1.<A8-.  7:  5)<+0 <0.5)<-:1)4.:75 "+1-6+.)584. 7. . <--<0 ):<0-:-E #0-.7+=. | C L I L SA M P L E T E S T • 74):. . .16/ 76 +76<-6< ?1<0 <0.?)A.. )6. ). 7. 574):.. • 6+1.7:. <--<0 &0)< 316.%03/)6  D&0)< ):. 41.+7::-+< 4-<<-:  7:  76 A7=: )6.

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0-)4<01-.<-58-:)<=:-.7 ?1<0 <0..-..8:-).  /1>16/ . .16. 76.7:5)<176 .16/ 74=56 /:)80 ?:1<.?.16.. 7=: :-.7 1.-. )++=:)<. =/=.8:-).< .7: 8:-. ) <1<4- )%'.-:-6< ?)A.7:5)<176 16<7 ) .1) =< <0.1:. <7 ?7:3 7=< <0.:75 A7=: /:)80 TKT: CLIL HANDBOOK )6=):A ?).6E< (((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((( 576<0 $.< ?-:. 1. ?144 *.<  !1/0< ?. 41+3 161. 76.)<) 1.< 5)3.16/ ) 4)6/=)/.+=. <0.<0.<0:-.< .)<)*). =.:)?6 ..16/ @+-4 '7=E>. 773 )< <0.367?6 ).< 4)6/=)/-  8:.0):< &1B):..7:5)<176 #0-.?-E>.77.. 1.)>-.):. <0. #0. +74=56 /:)80. 7>-5*-: ?).<0. 7=< ) +74=56 76 A7=: .5=.)5=6 /%1+8%+) -<E..-6<16/ )>-:)/.((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((( 576<0.?-)<0-: 5)8 ?.  -@84)16 8-6 @+-4 41+3 76 <0.0)>.0--< *-.3144. 1..57.1. 7.:)5- #0.=887:< .-) 1.< <016/ ?.-6<1.CC -6+7=:)/16/ =.1:.-.16/ <0. 67< <0..+0):<E.->-47816/ +755=61+)<1>.)<)*).76 &0)< ?.-6<-6+-.576<04A <-58-:)<=:-.?0)< 1< 1.8:-).51.16/ ) +)4+=4)<7: "7 <0.<:76/-.0--< =.<7 ..*=< A7= 6--. <0.0--< 773 )< 1< )/)16 )6. *:)16. 76 <0..16..=:.+:--6 ).-.7:.):....07=4. 16 <?7 +1<1-...=4<.-+<1>.. ?1<0 ) 8):<6-: ?01+0 7.0-)4<01-../7 76 75.:)+<176.. ?1<0 7=: 075-?7:3 &.0 <7 .< -.<0-.)>-:)/. ((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((( 576<0 =4A )6.)6.16 . :-)44A 0-48 =. #01.6--.+)44-.7.--. <-44 5. <7 ).. <7 .>.16 =:78.A <0.0)>. | C L I L SA M P L E T E S T $851 29)5 15 .<0.16/ 16...1. @+-4 #0-. *=<<76 )6. :-+7:. ...16<-:6-< <7 .<-)+016/ >7+)*=4):A  ./:)80 7? A7= <:A 7584-<.16.<7:5 <7/-<0-: .. #0. 7=< ?01+0 5)<-:1)4 1.77.<0.<7 ..81. ?1<07=< =.576<04A <-58-:)<=:-.*)+3  8:7>1. =..

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| C L I L SA M P L E T E S T  . ?:1<..?:1<<-6 . +76+4=. 16<7 .. <7 =.-@<:) 78<176 ?01+0 A7= . =6. .<7:1+)4 ->-6<.1.3 .9=1B 9=-.7:5)<176  :1. $851 29)5 7: 9=-.E =6.-.1>1.<-)+0-: 1.. 0).16/ 7. 5)316/ ) 67<. ?01+0 <0.=)4 8:758<. <7 <0.=+<176 )6.<A8-. ).67< =6.0--< #0-:.16/ 4-):616/  . 4)6/=)/. 0)>.)+141<)<16/ )=.-@<:) 78<176 ?01+0 A7= .. ) +4-): 16<:7. .16/ 1< 16 <7 <0. -):6-:.A16/ 3-A 16. )..3144.-.1+)<176 )%'.).16.<-)+0-: 1. <-:5 ..6-? ?7:...:-). ..<0.?-: ..76E< 367? )*7=< 878=4)<176 /:7?<0 #0.16/ >1.  <0)< <0-A ):3 <0.<-.. )*7=< ?0)< <0-A .16/ <0.

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Each question carries one mark. Candidates must fill in all their answers within the time allowed for the test. which are scanned by computer in Cambridge. TKT: CLIL is available throughout the year and Centres contact Cambridge ESOL to arrange a test date. ■ Notification of results Certificates are despatched to Centres approximately two weeks after receipt of answer sheets by Cambridge ESOL. Please note that despatch of candidates’ results will be delayed if they need special consideration or are suspected of malpractice (see below). Copies of the Regulations and more details on entry procedure.g. Special consideration can be given where an BAND A candidate at this level demonstrates application is sent through the Centre and is made within 10 working days of the examination date. A list of Cambridge ESOL Examination Centres is available from Cambridge ESOL from the address on page 1. decisions relating to results and decisions relating to irregular conduct. Enquiries on results may be made through Cambridge ESOL Centre Exams Managers within a month of the issue of certificates. Results may be withheld because further investigation is needed or because of extensive knowledge of CLIL content areas infringement of regulations. etc. collusion or breaking the examination regulations in some other way. ■ Special consideration Cambridge ESOL will give special consideration to candidates affected by adverse circumstances before or during an examination. Candidate details must be submitted to Cambridge ESOL at least six weeks prior to running the session. Our trialling research indicates that for a candidate to achieve Band 3. on behalf of candidates. Examples of acceptable reasons for giving special consideration are cases of illness or other unexpected events. you must contact the Cambridge ESOL Centre Exams Manager in your area as soon as possible so that the application can be sent to Cambridge ESOL in time (usually 8–12 weeks before the examination. e. and it is useful for candidates to practise filling in an OMR sheet before taking the examination so that they are familiar with the procedure. They may include extra time. but systematic knowledge of CLIL content areas ■ Malpractice The Malpractice Committee will consider cases where breadth and depth of knowledge of CLIL content areas candidates are suspected of copying. Candidate performance is reported using four bands. Institutions wishing to become Cambridge ESOL Examination Centres should contact the Centre Registration Unit at Cambridge ESOL. separate accommodation or equipment. Special Circumstances Special Circumstances cover three main areas: special arrangements. ■ Special arrangements These are available for candidates with disabilities. depending on what is required). Grading and results ■ Grading Candidates receive a certificate for TKT: CLIL.CambridgeESOL. current fees and further information about this and other Cambridge ESOL examinations can be obtained from the Cambridge ESOL Centre Exams Manager in your area. Braille versions of question papers. special consideration and malpractice. Candidates should first contact their Cambridge ESOL Centre Exams Manager for advice. TKT: CLIL HANDBOOK | T E S T A D M I N I S T R AT I O N . or from the address on page 1. 1 2 3 4 18 limited knowledge of CLIL content areas basic. Further guidance on the interpretation of results will be issued in the future.TKT: Content and Language Integrated Learning test administration ■ Entry procedure Candidates must enter through an authorised Cambridge ESOL Centre. so the maximum mark for the CLIL module is 80. Please note that more notice may be necessary if candidates have special requirements and therefore need special arrangements (see below). The reporting of results for TKT: CLIL is subject to ongoing research. A sample OMR answer sheet can be found on page 21 of this Handbook. If you think you may need special arrangements. Further information about the appeals procedure can be found at www. Centres are notified if a candidate’s results are being investigated. ■ Appeals procedure Cambridge ESOL provides a service to enable Centres to appeal. a score of at least 45–50 marks (out of 80) is required. against assessment decisions that affect grades awarded to candidates.org/support ■ Answer sheet completion Candidates mark all their answers on OMR (Optical Mark Reader) answer sheets.

The production of TKT: Content and Language Integrated Learning Cambridge ESOL is committed to providing examinations of the highest possible quality. please contact the Pretesting Unit TKT Administrator on + 44 (0) 1223 552998 or TKTpretesting@CambridgeESOL. Contact Cambridge ESOL Information for further details by emailing: ESOLhelpdesk@CambridgeESOL. TKT: CLIL HANDBOOK | P R O D U C T I O N A N D S U P P O RT 19 . can be found by visiting www. If your Centre or institution would like to be involved in the pretesting of materials for the CLIL module. the CLIL glossary and sample materials.CambridgeESOL.org. and by continuous monitoring of the marking and grading of all Cambridge ESOL examinations. It begins with the commissioning of materials and ends with the printing of question papers. The production process for TKT: CLIL is the same as that for the Cambridge ESOL language examinations. Pretesting is also useful for Centres or institutions as it gives candidates the opportunity to familiarise themselves with the standard task-types under test conditions and to receive feedback on areas of strength and weakness.CambridgeESOL. There are five main stages in the production process: • commissioning • pre-editing and editing • pretesting • analysis and banking of materials • question paper construction Support for TKT: Content and Language Integrated Learning candidates and course providers General information on TKT: CLIL.org Commissioning of material for question papers Pre-editing and editing of material Pretest construction Pretesting Item analysis Live materials bank Revision Rejection Question paper construction ■ Question paper production cycle Pretesting of CLIL test material provides Cambridge ESOL with valuable information about candidates’ performance on particular tasks.org/CLIL Support material for teacher trainers will be available on the Teaching Resources website www. This commitment is underpinned by an extensive programme of research and evaluation.org/teach/CLIL Further support is also available in the form of seminar programmes in different countries. Of particular importance is the rigorous set of procedures which are used in the production and pretesting of question papers. including administration details and downloadable versions of this Handbook.

There is no pass or fail. Answer sheets marked in pen cannot be read by computer. Candidates must complete an answer sheet. Is the use of dictionaries allowed? No. Where can candidates enrol? Your Cambridge ESOL Centre Exams Manager can give you information about Centres where the examination is taken. and not through the Cambridge ESOL office in Cambridge. Does it matter if candidates write in pen or pencil? Candidates must use a pencil to mark their answers on the answer sheet. The CLIL module is free-standing. taking into account local needs and conditions. Sample test answer key 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 B D A B C C D C A 45 E 46 C 47 G 48 A 49 F 50 B 51 C 52 C 53 F 14 A 15 A 16 C 17 B 18 B 19 C 20 C 21 A 22 B 23 B 24 A 25 C 65 F 26 C 27 E 28 G 29 A 30 B 31 D 71 D 32 G 33 H 34 D 35 C 36 F 37 B 38 E 39 B 40 A 76 D 77 F 78 A 79 C 80 E 72 A 73 E 74 C 75 F 66 B 67 G 68 A 69 E 70 C 58 B 59 A 60 C 61 C 62 B 63 C 64 A 54 A 55 H 56 B 57 G 41 C 42 C 43 B 44 A 10 A 11 A 12 B 13 C 20 TKT: CLIL HANDBOOK | FAQS AND ANSWER KEY . Candidates enrol through local Centres. However. which is then scanned. What kind of teaching terminology will be tested in TKT: CLIL? See guidelines on pages 6–7 and the wordlist on page 22. Candidates receive a certificate stating which band has been achieved. What is the mark allocation? One mark is given for each correct answer. Do candidates have to take the other TKT modules? No. What is the pass mark? Results are reported in four bands. 2 and 3 in addition to TKT: CLIL. How do candidates get their results? TKT: CLIL certificates are issued to Centres approximately two weeks after receipt of answer sheets by Cambridge ESOL. it is advisable for candidates to have a minimum language level of Council of Europe Framework level B1. but their notes will not be marked. Candidates are expected to be familiar with the contents of the TKT glossary and the CLIL glossary. Do candidates need to have taken a particular English language examination before taking TKT: CLIL? No. Candidates are not required to take TKT Modules 1. What is the date of the TKT: CLIL examination? Dates are set by Centres in consultation with Cambridge ESOL.Common questions and answers Can candidates make notes on the question paper? Candidates may write on the question paper during the examination. Fees are payable to the local Centre.

TKT: Content and Language Integrated Learning sample OMR answer sheet TKT: CLIL HANDBOOK | SA M P L E O M R A N S W E R S H E E T 21 .

(For definitions see separate TKT: CLIL glossary.TKT: Content and Language Integrated Learning Wordlist ■ TKT: CLIL candidates are expected to be familiar with the language of teaching as represented in the separate TKT glossary. activating previous / prior knowledge animated BICS (Basic Interpersonal Communicative Skills) CALP (Cognitive Academic Language Proficiency) category citizenship classify closed questions code switching cognitive skills combine / combination compare and contrast compose concept maps content words / content obligatory creative thinking criteria critical thinking cue culture diagram: Carroll / Venn / tree differentiation enable enquiry evidence expand fair test findings flow diagram frames (speaking and writing) genre based teaching grid higher order thinking skills (HOTS) and lower order thinking skills (LOTS) hot seat ICT / IT skills immersion programme information processing investigate justify keys (binary) L1: first language L2: second language learn by heart learning outcome list (v) loop / domino game majority language management questions matching modify / modification open questions oracy partial immersion performance assessment pie charts plenary primary language puzzle pyramid discussion quadrants query questions: open / closed / display ranking rate reasoning recite response partners revisit scaffolding sentence builder sentence stems sequencing shared writing smiley face sort specialist vocabulary speech bubbles story board structure (v) substitution tables support synthesis target language technical terms thought bubbles trans-languaging treasure hunt unbelievable visual organisers / graphic organisers volunteer wait time whiteboard / interactive whiteboard (IWB) 22 TKT: CLIL HANDBOOK | CO N T E N T A N D L A N G U A G E I N T EG R AT E D L E A R N I N G W O R D L I S T .) Other terms may also be used in TKT: CLIL. The list below is indicative only.

TKT: Content and Language Integrated Learning subject-specific vocabulary The list is indicative only. ■ Environment / Geography adapted archipelago atmospheric pressure biodegradable carbon footprint climate change compass ecology / ecological endangered energy efficient equator erosion flooding fossil fuel glacier / glaciated global warming GM (genetically modified) crops greenhouse effect habitat hail hurricane infrastructure lava natural disaster organic ozone layer packaging pond recycling rural settlement tornado typhoon urban volcano weather fronts windmill wind farm wind turbines ■ Art and Craft / Design abstract carve collage complementary colour composition decorate dye engraving fabric foreground impressionist (mixed) media mould ornamental painting pastel perspective portrait primary colours secondary colours sketch still life texture tone watercolour ■ Economics / Business Studies cash flow commerce corporate debt earnings economy funding global market inflation interest rate loss manufacture marketing mass produce negotiate overheads peak process profit retail revenue shares takeover trends workforce ■ History / Politics ancient archaeologist archaeology campaign capitalism civilisation community conflict constitution coronation democracy era expansion expedition hunters independence legislation Middle Ages monarchy Prehistoric Times rebellion TKT: CLIL HANDBOOK | S U B J EC T-S P EC I F I C VO C A B U L A R Y 23 . Other subject related vocabulary may also be used in TKT: CLIL. Candidates will not be tested on these items.

reform reign republic revolution Roman Empire source treaty ■ ICT application bullet points click and drag column computer controlled database download Excel folder font size grammar-check graphic hardware icon image input / output layout malware modem motherboard multimedia operating system output paste PowerPoint processor row scanner search engine server sentence builder Skype software spell-check spreadsheet spyware surf the net toolbar upload URL (Uniform Resource Locator) USB (Universal Serial Bus) / memory stick virus web search Word facts fantasy genre glossary identify image initials motive myth narrative non-fiction opinions playscript procedure proposal recount repetition rhyme setting ■ Mathematics algebra angle axis (axes) bar graph calculate calculator chart circumference column graph compasses coordinates cube equation estimate formula fractions geometry grid line graph parallel percentage perimeter pie chart protractor quadrilateral rectangle rhombus set statistics symmetry / symmetrical ■ Music Baroque beat brass choir chord clef crotchet harmony lyrics march ■ Literacy alphabetical order anthology autobiography chant chronological dialogue distinguish extracts 24 TKT: CLIL HANDBOOK | S U B J EC T-S P EC I F I C VO C A B U L A R Y .

melody notes percussion pitch rap rhythm Romantic scale score tango tempo tune vocal waltz woodwind ■ PE (Physical Education) aerobic anaerobic apparatus badminton beanbag bounce circuit training coordination dodge footwork intercept keep fit league momentum physical pitch racket rope shot (e. tennis / golf / football) sit-ups sprint stamina stretch tactic tournament twist cocoon conductor digest / digestion / digestive system dissolve ecosystem electrical circuit element evaporate evolution flammable flexible friction gas genes germinate / germination gravity hydro-electric inherited life cycle liquid magnet / magnetic attraction micro-organisms microscope mineral molecules mould nutrition organ organism oxygen penicillin Periodic table photosynthesis precipitation predator prey receiver reflect respiration / respiratory system ribs rodent skeleton skull socket solid source surface transmitter transparent vacuum veins vibrate / vibration vitamin waterproof water vapour yeast ■ Science absorb / absorbent acceleration acid alkali arachnid artery bacteria beaker blood cell butterfly cartilage caterpillar chemical TKT: CLIL HANDBOOK | S U B J EC T-S P EC I F I C VO C A B U L A R Y 25 .g.

J (2001) Classroom Young Learners. CLIL at School in Europe. C (2007) Teaching Other Subjects Through Instruction that Works. Deller.References Calabrese. Johnstone. Gibbons. D (2008) Uncovering CLIL. Oxford: Oxford University Press. John Benjamin Publishing Company. VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. the Dutch bilingual model. Dalton-Puffer. 26 TKT: CLIL HANDBOOK | REFERENCES . Macmillan. P. Pickering D and Pollock. K. R (2008) Evaluation of Early Primary Partial Immersion (EPPI). Eurydice (2006) Coleman. and Price. I and Rampone. R (2008) Cross-curricular Resources for Rerences Hall. Alexandria. S. Fisher.pdf Marzano. www. Portsmouth.pdf (Vienna English Working Papers Vol. P.stir. Frigols.univie. R (2005) Teaching Children to Learn.ac. RJ. Y (2008) Why and How CLIL Works. Allain. NH: Heinemann.uk/ projects/evaluationwr/documents/EPPI_Book. Van de Craen. IATEFL YLSIG Journal. 16) English (CLIL). M-J and Marsh.ac. Cheltenham: Nelson Thornes.scilt. P (2002) Scaffolding Language Scaffolding Learning. London: David Fulton Publishers. Mondt. L (2006) CLIL behind the dykes. Oxford: Oxford University Press. R and McKinstry. www. L and Gao. D (2001) Assessing the Needs of Bilingual Pupils. C (2008) Discourse in Content and Language Integrated Learning.at/Anglistik/Views_0703. Mehisto.

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