Thayer Consultancy

ABN # 65 648 097 123

Background Briefing: Laos: Decision Time for Xayaburi Dam Project Carlyle A. Thayer April 17-20, 2011

[client name deleted], April 17, 2011  From what I understand Vietnam is openly against Laos’ project, Thailand is neutral  or implicitly supportive and Cambodia is concerned and wants more information, but  has not stated it is against the dam.  1. What is your impression of the MRC’s countries’ most recent positions and what  do  you  think  is  the  most  likely  outcome  of  the  MRC’s  decision  Tuesday?  Does  an  extension of the MRC's decision‐making process seem likely?  ANSWER: Decisions of the Mekong River Commission’s (MRC) Joint Committee must  be unanimous. This week’s meeting (April 19‐22) will consider the views of the four  member  states.  Laos  has  given  every  indication  that  it  will  continue  with  the  Xayaburi  dam  project.  Thailand  is  likely  to  play  a  low‐key  role  supporting  Laos.  Vietnam and Cambodia are likely to table their concerns and reservations and even  push for a moratorium on construction.  Ch.  Kamchang  PCL  signed  a  Memorandum  of  Understanding  with  the  Lao  government  in  May  2007  to  build  the  Xayaburi  dam.  Ch.  Kamchang  then  entered  into an agreement with the EGAT in June 2007 for the sale of ninety‐five percent of  the  electricity  to  be  generated.  In  November  2008,  Ch.  Kamchang  and  the  Lao  government signed a Project Development Agreement. This was followed by a MOU  on Power Purchase Agreement between EGAT and the Lao government in July 2010.  In  December  2010,  Thailand’s  National  Energy  Policy  Committee  approved  the  electricity  purchase  agreement  thus  permitting  EGAT  to  sign  a  formal  contract.  Major road works to support this project are already underway. In sum, the Xayaburi  dam  is  the  most  advanced  dam  project  of  eleven  Mekong  dams  currently  under  consideration.  There are two possible outcomes of this week’s meeting. The least likely is that all  four  countries  will  reach  agreement  to  defer  the  Xayaburi  project  for  ten  years  in  order  to  carry  out  further  technical  studies.  This  is  the  recommendation  of  the  Strategic  Environmental  Assessment  commissioned  by  the  Mekong  River  Commission’s submitted in October 2010.   It is my assessment that the most likely outcome will be some sort of agreement to  permit Laos to continue with construction but at the same time take additional steps  to meet the concerns of Cambodia and Vietnam. In other words, the decision‐making 

2 process  is  likely  to  be  extended.  During  this  period  Cambodia  and  Vietnam  can  request  further  information  from  and  consultations  with  Laos.  as  well  as  request a  field visit to the project site to make their own evaluation.  Laos  is  powerfully  motivated  to  continue  with  the  Xayaburi  project  because  it  is  viewed  as  a  major  source  of  income  and  investment  that  will  spur  economic  development.  Thailand  needs  electricity  from  Laos,  especially  because  of  domestic  opposition  to  dam  projects  within  Thailand.  Powerful  commercial  and  bureaucratic  interests  support  the  Xayaburi  project.  In  addition  to  Ch.  Kamchang  PCL,  the  second  largest  public  construction  company  in  Thailand,  The  Thai  Ministry  of  Energy  and  the  Electricity  Generating  Authority  of  Thailand  (EGAT)  both  support  the  Xayaburi  project.  Four  major  Thai  banks  are  considering  finance  for  the  project:  Siam  Commercial  Bank,  Krung  Thai  Bank,  Bangkok  Bank  and  Kasikorn  Bank.  As  noted,  Thailand’s  National  Energy  Policy  Committee  has  already  approved  the  electricity  purchase agreement.  2. How important will Tuesday’ decision be as a precedent for the way the Mekong  will  be  developed  in  the  coming  years?  Do  you  think  if  this  dam  goes  ahead,  the  chances  are  more  dams  will  follow,  or  alternatively  a  halt  to  Xayaburi  now  would  shelve all other proposed Mekong dams indefinitely?  ANSWER: Tuesday’s decision will be historic because the Xayaburi project is the first  Mekong  River  dam  project  to  be  submitted  for  approval  under  the  Procedures  for  Notification,  Prior  Consultation  and  Agreement  adopted  by  the  MRC  in  2003.  This  document  states  “the  time  frame  for  Prior  Consultations  shall  be  six  months  from  the date of receiving documents on Prior Consultation” or April 22nd. The Procedures  also  state,  “if  necessary,  an  extended  period  shall  be  permitted  by  the  decision  of  the [Mekong River Commission Joint Committee].”  A  decision  to  halt  construction  at  Xayaburi  now  would  definitely  shelve  all  other  proposals  to  construct  dams  on  the  mainstream  of  the  Mekong  River.  This  would  result  in  a  number  of  high  intensity  studies  to  study  the  full  range  of  technical  concerns  that  have  been  raised.  During  this  ten  year  period  alternate  sources  of  energy will be investigated.  All members of the Mekong River Commission are members of ASEAN where the key  norms  of  decision‐making  include  respect  for  national  sovereignty,  consensus  and  decision‐making  that  is  at  a  pace  comfortable  to  all.  The  MRC’s  1995  founding  agreement,  and  subsequent  Procedures  for  Notification,  Prior  Consultation  and  Agreement,  both  include  provisions  underling  the  need  to  respect  national  sovereignty. Both documents require unanimous consent for a decision to be made.  This is balanced by the injunction that “prior consultation is neither a right to veto  the use nor unilateral right to use water by any riparian without taking into account  other riparian’s rights.” The inevitable result, it seems to me, will be a compromise.   Even it Laos goes ahead with the Xayaburi dam, this will not necessarily result in the  construction  of  up  to  eleven  more  dams.  Laos  will  be  closely  watched  and  any  ecological  or  environmental  shortcomings  will  be  raised  by  the  international  community. The United States, which launched the Lower Mekong Initiative, is likely 

3 to  play  a  stronger  role  in  promoting  sustainable  development.  Secretary  of  State  Hillary  Clinton  reportedly  backed  a  ten  year  moratorium  on  Mekong  River  dam  construction.  And  influential  Senator  James  Webb,  chairman  of  the  Subcommittee  on  East  Asian  and  Pacific  Affairs  of  the  Senate  Foreign  Relations  Committee,  is  on  record as opposing the Xayaburi dam project.  It  is  also  possible  that  if  disputes  among  the  four  riparian  states  intensify,  ASEAN  itself could become involved under its dispute settlement mechanism.  3.  Do  you  think  Vietnam  will  be  also  using  its  close  relations  with  Cambodia  to  pressure  behind  the  scenes  it  to  oppose  too?  How  important  will  Cambodia’s  position in this decision process, does it play a key role?  ANSWER:  I  do  not  think  Vietnam  will  need  to  pressure  Cambodia  too  much.  Cambodia  stands  to  lose  a  great  deal  if  the  Xayaburi  dam  is  an  environmental  disaster and impacts negatively on Cambodia’s food security. Cambodia will make its  concerns  known  at  the  meeting.  It  is  more  likely  that  Vietnam  has  already  lobbied  Cambodia to develop a strategy to advance their concerns. The reality is that even if  Cambodia and Vietnam object, they cannot prevent Laos from proceeding with the  Xayaburi  dam.  The  long  lead  time  from  commencement  of  construction  to  completion,  estimated  at  eight  years,  will  provide  Laos  the  opportunity  to  argue  it  will conduct technical studies and make appropriate modifications if necessary. Laos  has already suggested that studies be carried out into fish biology, peak biomass and  fish  swimming  performance  to  assist  in  refining  fish  facilities  associated  with  dam  construction and design.  4.  What  can  the  MRC  really  do  ultimately  in  regulating  Mekong  mainstream  development, as it is only a technical advisory body? Can Laos ignore its fellow MRC  members wishes if it wants to? Do you think this is in any way likely?  ANSWER: The MRC Secretariat operates at the behest of its four members. It takes  its direction from the Mekong River Council. The MRC Secretariat has already come  under  criticism  from  Laos  for  exceeding  its  authority  in  commissioning  a  technical  report  critical  of  the  Xayaburi  project.  In  my  view,  the  way  the  politics  of  the  Xayaburi  dam  will  play  out  is  that  Laos  will  take  on  board  the  concerns  by  downstream states and offer to further investigate the issues raised. But these will  be considered technical issues  amenable to resolution. Vietnam and Cambodia  will  table  their  concerns,  even  push  for  a  moratorium,  but  are  unlikely  at  this  stage  to  take  any  stronger  action.  They  will  continue  to  monitor  the  situation  and  make  interventions as necessary including at MRC Council level.  The  bottom  line  is  that  Laos  has  already  announced  that  it  will  proceed  despite  criticism. In February, for example, Laos announced that the Xayaburi project would  be  the  “first  environmentally  friendly  hydroelectric  project  on  the  Mekong…  [and  will] not have any significant impact on the Mekong mainstream.”   [client name deleted], April 18, 2011:  Questions on the Xayaburi dam construction:   

4 1. Why is Laos so determined to approve the Xayaburi dam project? What can  the  land‐locked  country  benefit  from  the  building  of  the  dam,  other  than  selling power to Thailand?  ANSWER:  Selling  electricity  is  the  main  export  earner  for  Laos.  Laos  is  therefore  mainly  motivated  to  continue  with  the  Xayaburi  project  because  it  is  viewed  as  a  major source of income and investment that will spur economic development for the  entire country. Also, its leaders have committed their prestige to this project.  Laotian  officials  do  not  seem  convinced  by  the  arguments  of  NGOs  and  other  opponents  of  the  project.  In  February,  for  example,  Laos  announced  that  the  Xayaburi  project  would  be  the  “first  environmentally  friendly  hydroelectric  project  on  the  Mekong…  [and  will]  not  have  any  significant  impact  on  the  Mekong  mainstream.”   It is not certain that Laos is so determined to continue with this project that it will  not  take  some  of  the  concerns  by  downstream  states  into  account.  For  example,  Laos  has  already  suggested  that  studies  be  carried  out  into  fish  biology,  peak  biomass and fish swimming performance to assist in refining fish facilities associated  with dam construction and design. It will take eight years for the Xayaburi dam to be  completed  and  Laos  argues  this  is  plenty  of  time  to  conduct  technical  studies  and  make appropriate modifications if necessary.  2. Why  is  Thailand  so  steadfast  to  the  project, given  that  the dam  builder  is  a  Thai company and the dam financers are four Thai banks?  Experts say that  Thailand has more power than it knows what to do with and there is thus no  need  to  buy  power  from  the  Xayaburi  dam.  What  is  your  position  on  this  argument?  ANSWER:   Thai  government officials have been largely silent on their position  with  respect  to  the  Xayaburi  dam.  Powerful  commercial  and  bureaucratic  interests  support  the  Xayaburi  project.  In  addition  to  Ch.  Kamchang  PCL,  the  second  largest  public  construction  company  in  Thailand,  The  Thai  Ministry  of  Energy  and  the  Electricity  Generating  Authority  of  Thailand  (EGAT)  both  support  the  Xayaburi  project.  Four  major  Thai  banks  are  considering  finance  for  the  project:  Siam  Commercial  Bank,  Krung  Thai  Bank,  Bangkok  Bank  and  Kasikorn  Bank.  Thailand’s  National  Energy  Policy  Committee  has  already  approved  the  electricity  purchase  agreement.  Thailand’s  northeast  needs  electricity  from  Laos,  especially  because  of  domestic  opposition  to  dam  projects  within  Thailand.  Thailand  is  considering  developing  nuclear power for energy generation because its forecasts indicate a power shortage  in future year.   3. Other than Thailand and Laos, do you think there might be another “hidden  hand” behind the continued push for the Xayaburi project? Why has the US  been  so  vocal  in  opposing  the  project?  What  role  the  US  can  play  in  this  regard?  ANSWER: The Xayaburi Dam project is one of eleven proposed dam projects on the  mainstream  of  the  Mekong  River.  There  are  thus  powerful  commercial  interests  in  seeing  that Xayaburi  Dam  goes  ahead  as  planned.  These  commercial  interests  may 

5 represent the “hidden hand” you refer to. But I do not see countries, such as China,  operating behind the scenes.  Secretary of State Hillary Clinton expressed the view that the Xayaburi dam decision  should  be  postponed  for  ten  years.  This  is  in  line  with  a  technical  report  commissioned  by  the  Mekong  River  Commission.  The  Obama  Administration  launched  the  Lower  Mekong  Initiative  to  address  development  concerns  of  the  mainland downstream states. U.S. interest in developing the Mekong can be traced  back  to  the  1950s.  Of  course,  because  downstream  states  are  concerned  about  Chinese dam construction, the United States can attempt to win sympathy though its  initiative.  The  U.S.  government  has  a  mix  of  motives.  Note  that  influential  U.S.  Senator  James  Webb,  chairman  of  the  Subcommittee  on  East  Asian  and  Pacific  Affairs  of  the  Senate  Foreign  Relations  Committee,  is  on  record  as  opposing  the  Xayaburi dam project on environmental grounds.  4. If  Laos  is  determined  to  move  forward  with  the  project  despite  the  protest  from  the  other  three  countries,  do  you  think  is  there  any  other  chance  for  them to stall the construction of the Xayaburi dam? In what way?  ANSWER: Earlier you mentioned that Thailand was a supporter of the project. Only  Vietnam and Cambodia are likely to oppose the Xayaburi proposal.  Tuesday’s decision will be historic because the Xayaburi project is the first Mekong  River  dam  project  to  be  submitted  for  approval  under  the  Procedures  for  Notification,  Prior  Consultation  and  Agreement  adopted  by  the  Mekong  River  Commission  in 2003. This document states “the time frame for Prior Consultations  shall be six months from the date of receiving documents on Prior Consultation” or  April  22nd.  The  Procedures  also  state,  “if  necessary,  an  extended  period  shall  be  permitted  by  the  decision  of  the  [Mekong  River  Commission  Joint  Committee].”  Cambodia and Vietnam should push strongly for this extension.  If the dam construction goes ahead and the evidence mounts of its negative impact  on  the  ecology,  environment  and  food  security,  individual  states  such  as  Vietnam  and Cambodia could take their complaints to ASEAN for resolution under the dispute  settlement mechanism.  5. Your added comments would be appreciated.  ANSWER: The MRC Secretariat operates at the behest of its four members. It takes  its direction from the Mekong River Council. This is the venue where the leaders of  Cambodia and Vietnam should have made their concerns very clear.   All  members  of  the  Mekong  River  Commission  are  members  of  ASEAN  where  the  key  norms  of  decision‐making  include  respect  for  national  sovereignty,  consensus  and decision‐making that is at a pace comfortable to all. The MRC’s 1995 founding  agreement,  and  subsequent  Procedures  for  Notification,  Prior  Consultation  and  Agreement,  both  include  provisions  underling  the  need  to  respect  national  sovereignty. Both documents require unanimous consent for a decision to be made.  This is balanced by the injunction that “prior consultation is neither a right to veto  the use nor unilateral right to use water by any riparian without taking into account  other riparian’s rights.” The inevitable result, it seems to me, will be a compromise. 

6 It is my assessment that the most likely outcome will be some sort of agreement to  permit Laos to continue with construction but at the same time take additional steps  to meet the concerns of Cambodia and Vietnam. In other words, the decision‐making  process  is  likely  to  be  extended.  During  this  period  Cambodia  and  Vietnam  can  request  further  information  from  and  consultations  with  Laos.  as  well  as  request a  field visit to the project site to make their own evaluation.  [client name deleted], April 19, 2011:  1.  What  do  you  think  of  the  decision  by  the  Mekong  River  Commission  Joint  Committee  to  pass  this  issue  to  the  Mekong  River  Commission’s  Council?  Is  it  surprising that no agreement was reached?  ANSWER:  The  decision  is  not  surprising  because  the  rules  stipulate  it  must  be  unanimous. The meeting clarified that there are stark differences between the four  countries.   2. Does this now mean that the 4 water resources minister in the MRC Council will  decide on the issue, or does it mean various ministries will meet to decide?  ANSWER:  The  four  ministers  responsible  for  water  resources  will  decide.  The  question is one of timing and what decision the four ministers reach. The tendency  will be to seek the middle ground.  3. What has now changed with the situation before?  ANSWER: The MRC Joint Committee has not made a decision on whether the prior  consultation  period  has ended  or  will  be  extended.  There  is  now  more  uncertainty  over the timing of this project.   4. What do you think of the account of the meeting, and the fact Laos seems more  isolated? Do you think this lowers the chances of the Xayaburi dam going ahead?  ANSWER:  Laos  will  come  under  powerful  pressures  to  compromise.  Vietnam’s  ten  year moratorium proposal is at one extreme. The Ministers might decide to conduct  further studies and put a time lime on this process.  [client name deleted], April 20, 2011:  Do  you  think  that  after  yesterday's  meeting  of  the  Mekong  River  Commission  the  most likely end result will still be, as you described earlier, that Laos will be allowed  to  slowly  continue  developing  the  project,  while  it  addresses  Cambodian,  Vietnamese and now also Thai concerns during the long project implementation?  ANSWER: In answer to your question: I cannot see Laos going it alone and ignoring  the concerns of Cambodia, Thailand and Vietnam. If Laos sticks to its present line the  ministerial meeting will also be unable to reach an agreement. And the ministers are  also unlikely to reach a unanimous decision to postpone construction for ten years. It  is my assessment that Laos will make some concessions to assuage the concerns of  Cambodia, Thailand and Vietnam without giving up its right to proceed with a project  that  it  feels  is  in  Laos'  national  interest.  A  compromise  is  likely  in  which  Laos  proceeds with construction while technical and other environmental impact studies  are  carried  out.  The  compromise  may  take  some  time  so  the  ministerial  meeting  could be followed by other meetings.