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Published by Macmillan/McGraw-Hill, of McGraw-Hill Education, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., Two Penn Plaza,
New York, New York 10121.
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Photography Credits
192: Steve Mason/Getty Images. 193: PunchStock/PhotoDisc.
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Decodable Passages
Contents ..................................................................................2
Directions ................................................................................4
Passages ................................................................................5
Word Study
Contents ................................................................................65
Letter Cards ..........................................................................66
Spelling Word Cards .............................................................68
Vocabulary Word Cards ........................................................98
Sound Boxes .......................................................................128
Games.................................................................................130
Additional Literacy Support
Contents ..............................................................................143
Rhymes and Chimes ...........................................................144
Reader Response Sheets ...................................................174
Writer’s Checklists ..............................................................177
Proofreading Marks .............................................................179
Writing Rubrics ....................................................................180
Picture Prompts...................................................................187
Handwriting .........................................................................194
Classroom Behavior Checklist .............................................206
Decodable Passages
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Unit 1 Week 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
At Bat
Tag!
Week 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Tom Gets a Pet
Les Is on a Jet
Week 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Dad Saves a Cat
Ned in the Lake
Week 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Bike Ride!
Game Time
Week 5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Jove and Hope
A New Time Zone
Unit 2 Week 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
A Pine for Luke
Jude’s Tune
Week 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
A Slug on a Slope
Spike’s Slip
Week 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Gail Is in Pain!
Rain on a Sail
Week 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Light in a Hole
Mike and Meg
Week 5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23
Joe Rows a Boat
Moe Mows
Unit 3 Week 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25
Lee Tells Silly Tales
Lady the Seal
Week 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Good Rules
Bad Jude
Week 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29
A Shell on the Shore
Sheep and Goats
Week 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Rich the Chick
Jill’s Sash
Week 5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33
Chicks Can Scratch!
The Scared Cat
2 Decodable Passages
Decodable Passages
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Unit 4 Week 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35
An Ape Named Marty
Bart Gets a Pet
Week 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Arthur the Goat
Burt’s Perch
Week 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39
Should Brooke Cook?
A Look by the Brook
Week 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
The Storm That Blew
Stew’s Bruise
Week 5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43
Paul and Dawn
Tawny’s Paw
Unit 5 Week 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45
Scowl the Owl
Howling Sounds
Week 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Mr. Moy’s Toys
Troy Joins Joy
Week 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .49
Alissa’s Job
Yucca and Bananas for
Pamela
Week 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Gnalla and the Wren
Mr. Wrago’s Wrench
Week 5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53
Regis and Cindy’s Spacecraft
Brice in Space
Unit 6 Week 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55
A Smudge for Smidge
Midge’s Picnic
Week 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Princess Flair
Sar’s Tar
Week 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59
Homer and Ameer
Paneer Hears Thunder
Week 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
Dora’s Wings
Blair’s Corn Planter
Week 5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .63
The Sire’s Crier
Kire’s Tires
Decodable Passages 3
Decodable Passages
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Directions
The decodable passages that follow are divided by unit and week.
Each passage contains words based on the phonics introduced in
that particular week, and is at least 75% decodable. Vocabulary
words are also used in the passages to provide students with
additional practice at identifying and reading the words.
An activity is provided at the bottom of each page. After students
have read the passage(s) on the page, you may have students
complete the activity to extend their reading, writing, and phonics
comprehension.
4 Decodable Passages
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Unit 1 • Week 1 5 Decodable Passages
Name
Phonics
At Bat
Pam is at bat.
Pam hits the ball.
Pam will carefully pass the bat to Bill.
Bill will bat.
Bill hits the ball.
Where is it?
Sam has to bat.
Will Sam hit the ball?
Pam whispers to Bill, “Can Sam hit
it far?”
Sam hits it far.
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Circle the words
that have a short a
sound.
short a and i
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Unit 1 • Week 1 6 Decodable Passages
Name
Phonics
Tag!
Jan ran to tag Tim.
Tim ran to tag Dan.
Tim is excited. He did not miss!
Jan, Tim, and Dan sat on a mat.
“Did I win?” asks Tim.
“You did!” says Jan.
Tim wins a pin as big as a pan!
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Underline the words
that have a short i
sound.
short a and i
Unit 1 • Week 2 7 Decodable Passages
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Name
Phonics
Tom Gets a Pet
Tom met six hens.
Tom met six pigs.
Tom met six pups.
The hens sit in the sun.
The pigs sit in the mud.
The pups sit on a rug.
Tom gets a pup for a pet.
The pup runs and hops.
Tom enjoys his pet pup.
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Underline the words
that have a short e
sound.
short e, o, and u
Unit 1 • Week 2 8 Decodable Passages
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Phonics
Les Is on a Jet
Les gets on a jet.
He has a pen and a top.
Les sits with Jill. Jill has a bag with a pin.
Jill has a pin for Les.
Les shares his top with Jill.
He lets her spin the top.
The jet is hot. Jill gets a fan.
It is a lot less hot!
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Underline the words
that have a short o or
u sound.
short e, o, and u
Unit 1 • Week 3 9 Decodable Passages
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Phonics
Dad Saves a Cat
Jake’s dad is in bed.
Jake has to wake him. A cat is in a well!
“Wake up! Wake up!” says Jake to his dad.
His dad is a firefighter. He can save it.
His dad runs to the well.
He will use a rake to save the cat.
The cat is safe. Jake lets it sit in his lap.
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Write a sentence
about Jake’s cat.
short a, / a /a_e
Unit 1 • Week 3 10 Decodable Passages
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Phonics
Ned in the Lake
Ned sits by a big lake.
The sun is very hot.
Ned can jump in the lake.
Ned can take his pet pup.
The pup can swim in the lake.
Ned and Pup jump and swim.
Ned can see Dave and Kate.
Dave and Kate jump in the lake.
Ned and Pup swim with Dave
and Kate.
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Make a list of words
that rhyme with lake.
short a, / a /a_e
Unit 1 • Week 4 11 Decodable Passages
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Name
Phonics
Bike Ride!
Mike likes to ride his bike.
He will ride to his home on the lake.
Mike will ride up a hill. The ride is five miles.
It will take Mike a long time.
“Time to ride!” Mike yells.
Mike rides well and is not late.
His mom has her arms open wide. She gives him
a hug.
“I made pancakes!” Mom says. “Time to dine!”
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Write a story about
Mike’s bike.
i, / ı /i_e
Unit 1 • Week 4 12 Decodable Passages
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Name
Phonics
Game Time
Miles has a game with tiles. He likes this game.
He smiles.
It is a language game. His mom and dad sit on
a mat.
They will play his game.
His game has lots of tiles. His mom takes tiles.
His dad takes tiles. Then he takes tiles.
Miles lines his tiles up on the mat.
Miles can not win all the time.
He is nice when he does not win.
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Underline the words
that are spelled with
an i.
i, / ı /i_e
Unit 1 • Week 5 13 Decodable Passages
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Name
Phonics
Jove and Hope
Jove is a pup.
Hope is his mom.
Jove sits on Hope’s lap.
Jove likes Hope a lot!
Hope takes a long nap.
Jove pokes Hope with his big nose.
Hope gets up and gives Jove a
big hug!
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Circle the words
that have a short
o sound.
o, / o /o_e
Unit 1 • Week 5 14 Decodable Passages
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Name
Phonics
A New Time Zone
Jan’s home is in Rome. He will take a jet to
America.
He will be in an earlier time zone. He thinks he
will like it.
Jan will ride a bike to a big lake.
He will take a cap, mitt, and bat.
Jan will play games like other kids.
“I will like it!” says Jan. “It will not be
a bore. I will have fun.”
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Write about other
things Jan might do
in America.
o, /o/o_e
Unit 2 • Week 1 15 Decodable Passages
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Name
Phonics
A Pine for Luke
Luke has a pine tree. It is big and wide.
It makes cones that hide its seeds.
Tom has a rose. It has six buds.
Tom gives it water so it will get big.
Tom ties his rose to a tube so it can stay up.
A pine and a rose like lots of water and sun.
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Write about another
kind of tree or flower.
˘ u /u, / u /u_e
Unit 2 • Week 1 16 Decodable Passages
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Phonics
Jude’s Tune
Jude’s dad lets him play in the mud.
Jude has a tune he hums as he has fun in the
mud.
“Can I make a tune about mud?” asked Jude.
“Yes, Jude, that is fine,” his dad said.
Jude has a neighbor named Bud. He likes to
hum, too.
Bud hums Jude’s tune to his dad.
“I like Jude’s tune,” said Bud.
“It is Jude’s mud tune,” said Dad.
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Write your own
words to a tune.
˘ u /u, / u /u_e
Unit 2 • Week 2 17 Decodable Passages
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Name
Phonics
A Slug on a Slope
Stan sat on a slope. He dug a hole in the
wet mud.
“I see a slug—a big slug! It is a slug in the mud!”
cried Stan.
His mom slid down the slope. She gave Stan
a tube.
“Rescue the slug!” she yelled.
Stan put the tube in the mud. The slug slid in.
“The slug will not get wet!” said Stan.
“I rescued him!”
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Tell how you would
rescue an animal
stuck in the mud.
sl/sl, /dr/dr, /sk/sk,
/sp/sp, /st/st
Unit 2 • Week 2 18 Decodable Passages
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Name
Phonics
Spike’s Slip
Drake is on a sled. A young pup slips and
takes a spill.
Drake puts the pup on the sled. He gets a rope.
“I can pull the sled with the rope,” says Drake.
“I will take him home and name him Spike.”
Spike and Drake skip home. Drake’s dad
pets Spike.
“I will give you a bone. Then I will get
a vet!” says his dad.
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Tell how Drake might
have told his dad
about Spike.
sl/sl, /dr/dr, /sk/sk,
/sp/sp, /st/st
Unit 2 • Week 3 19 Decodable Passages
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Name
Phonics
Gail Is in Pain!
Gail is in bed. Gail is in pain! She may have a
broken bone. She fell in a hole and cut her leg.
“Gail will be fine,” said Dr. May. “But she must
stay in bed and rest up.”
“Stay still,” said Gail’s mom. “Stop! Do not slide
your leg in bed!”
Gail gets lots and lots of mail.
Gail will stay in bed and rest.
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Write about a time
you had to stay in
bed.
a /ay, ai
Unit 2 • Week 3 20 Decodable Passages
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Name
Phonics
Rain on a Sail
Fay’s home is on a bay. She likes to sail with Dad
in May and June.
On a Sunday in May, they set sail. Then the rain
came.
Then the wind came. The wind cut the sail.
Dad had to tug on a rope.
Dad got them back to the bay.
Fay and Dad stay safe!
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Make a list of words
that are spelled with
ay or ai.
a /ay, ai
Unit 2 • Week 4 21 Decodable Passages
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Phonics
Light in a Hole
Ty spots a mole. It is in a hole. It does not like
the light.
Ty will sit right by the hole. Might the mole come
out at night?
Ty will rest. He will lie by the hole and wait for
the mole.
“The mole peered out of its hole!” yells Ty. “It was
such a sight!”
Ty ties a light on a rope. He drops the rope
in the hole.
“I do not spot the mole,” he sighs.
“It may not like my light.”
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Write about why a
mole might not like
light.
ı /i, igh, ie, y
Unit 2 • Week 4 22 Decodable Passages
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Phonics
Mike and Meg
High on a hill is a red fox named Mike.
Every fox recognizes Mike as a bright fox.
A fox might like Mike, but at night Mike
likes to fight.
His mom, Meg, likes to lie in the sunlight. “Stop,
Mike!” cried Meg. “Try not to fight. Stay by Mom
and lie in the sun!”
“Right,” sighs Mike, “I will not
fight. Then I might be liked!”
ı /i, igh, ie, y
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Write about why you
think Mike is not
liked.
Unit 2 • Week 5 23 Decodable Passages
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Name
Phonics
Joe Rows a Boat
Joe has a boat at home. He likes to row his boat
in the moat around his home. His friend Bo will
row with him. Dad will watch.
Joe puts on a uniform to row. “I row a lot,” Joe
tells Bo. “I row five times a day!”
Bo gets in the boat to help Joe row.
“I know if I row I can stay fit,” Joe tells
Bo. Joe and Bo get in the boat and
row in the moat.
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Write about what you
would do if you had a
moat by your home.
o /o, oa, ow, oe
Unit 2 • Week 5 24 Decodable Passages
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Phonics
Moe Mows
Moe has a job. He mows grass. Moe starts on the
right and mows until the grass is low. “I mow day
and night,” says Moe.
Moe knows a girl named Jo who mows grass. Jo
mows fast but does not mow at night. She mows
a lot on Sunday.
Jo calls Moe. “Moe, I broke my toe!” Jo tells Moe.
“Can you mow for me?”
“Oh, no!” cries Moe. “I hope you get well fast. I
will mow for you!”
Jo sits as Moe mows.
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Write about why Moe
helped Jo.
o /o, oa, ow, oe
Unit 3 • Week 1 25 Decodable Passages
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Name
Phonics
Lee Tells Silly Tales
Lee likes to tell funny, silly tales. He tells tales
about his dreams. Lee had a silly dream of
a queen.
Nineteen green beans got stuck deep in the mud.
A queen sees the green beans and tries to free
them from the mud. But the hill is too steep, and
she cannot get to them. The queen tells a bee to
get the beans. But the bee will not speak.
“Please, bee. I am too weak,” weeps the queen.
The bee tells three fleas to help.
The queen, bee, and fleas get the
beans. They eat the beans at a feast.
The beans are a yummy treat!
A
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Write another tale
that Lee would tell.
e /e, ee, ea, y
Unit 3 • Week 1 26 Decodable Passages
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Name
Phonics
Lady the Seal
Sally likes to sail on the sea. Sally plays with a
seal named Lady. Lady’s coat is wet and sleek.
Sally and Lady like to play hide-and-seek.
Lady can leap high. Then she can dive deep into
the sea to hide in the reeds.
Sally can see Lady float up to the top to breathe.
Sally waits until Lady peeks her nose up out of
the reeds and squeaks a funny seal tune.
“You do like to put on a show!” Sally says.
“You make it easy to play and
have fun.”
A
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Make up a funny seal
tune that Sally might
squeak.
e /e, ee, ea, y
Unit 3 • Week 2 27 Decodable Passages
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Phonics
Good Rules
Rules are made to keep us safe. Staying out of the
street is a good rule. Using a floating tube in the
water is safe, too. Do not assume that a rule is
made to make you mad.
When you are in someone else’s home, try to
follow the rules. You do not want to be rude! It
is a good idea to follow rules in class, too. Your
teacher wants you to keep safe. What rules must
you follow?
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Make a list of rules
you should follow in
the classroom.
u /u, u_e
Unit 3 • Week 2 28 Decodable Passages
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Phonics
Bad Jude
Jude fell and cut his hand. His mom had
told him to be careful. She even repeated the
swimming rule: “Do not run on the deck.” Jude
did not listen. He ran. The deck was wet and he
cut his hand.
Dr. June told Jude, “I am going to put a bit of
cream from this tube on your hand.”
Jude was upset. “Will I be able to swim?” he
asked.
“Yes, Jude. But not until you use
up all the cream in this tube,”
said Dr. June.
Jude was not happy. But he will
follow the rules from now on!
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Write about rules you
should follow at the
pool.
u /u, u_e
Unit 3 • Week 3 29 Decodable Passages
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Phonics
A Shell on the Shore
Thad found a big, thin shell. He got it on the
shore. There is a chip in it.
“Who lived in this shell?” Thad asks. “I will share
this with Jeff.”
Thad runs to see Jeff. He shows Jeff the shell.
“Did it come from a ship?” asks Jeff. “No, I do not
think so,” says Thad.
Unable to tell when the shell came to the shore,
Thad takes a guess.
“It has a chip in it but it is still white. I do not
think it is ancient. Did a clam live
in it?” Thad asks.
“Yes, I think so,” says Jeff.
ch/ch; /sh/sh;
/th/th; /wh/wh
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Write about a shell
you have seen.
Unit 3 • Week 3 30 Decodable Passages
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Sheep and Goats
Chad likes to go to the farm. He can see a lot of
sheep and goats. Dogs chase the sheep on the
farm. That is their job.
Pat has a job at the farm. “I own nine sheep and
five goats. I raise goats. I make cheese from the
goat’s milk,” Pat tells Chad.
Chad thinks it’s fun to have a job with sheep and
goats. “Which job can I do?” asks Chad.
Pat tells Chad that he can help shear the sheep’s
hair. The sheep’s hair can be used to make sheets
and coats. Chad stays and helps Pat.
A
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Write about other
jobs you might like to
have on a farm.
ch/ch; /sh/sh;
/th/th; /wh/wh
Unit 3 • Week 4 31 Decodable Passages
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3
RICH THE CHICK
SHOW
4

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Name
Phonics
Rich the Chick
Seth will perform in a show. “You will see a chick
that can do math!” yells Seth. “It is a play about
a chick named Rich!”
Seth will be Rich the chick in the play. Rich is an
odd chick. He lives by the lake with lots of fish.
He likes to play ball and pitch. The chick can
also do math. “Math is not bad,” Rich the chick
likes to say. “I do it each day!”
Rich must take a bath and dash up the path.
Rich sees a ranch with lots of sad chicks!
Rich must help these chicks. He must
chicks and cut the chain. They will
be free in a flash!
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Write a short play.
ch/ch, tch; /sh/sh;
/th/th; /f/ph
Unit 3 • Week 4 32 Decodable Passages
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Jill’s Sash
Mitch makes clothes for shows. He gets cash to
buy cloth.
Mitch is in a rush. He has to dash to a show. Jill
has lost her red sash! “What a shame,”
says Mitch. “I ran out of red! I will make Jill a
white sash.”
But Mitch can not remember how to make the
sash. “Just my luck!” he moans. “Did I stitch this
up or down? I did not take notes!”
Mitch must rush the white sash to Jill. “I hope Jill
will like it,” he says. “I hope it will match.”
Jill hugs Mitch when he ties on
the sash. “This does match!” she cries.
“What a day!” sighs Mitch.
A
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Write about the show
that Jill is doing.
ch/ch, tch; /sh/sh;
/th/th; /f/ph
Unit 3 • Week 5 33 Decodable Passages
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Chicks Can Scratch!
Stretch lives on Spring Street. He has dogs, cats,
pigs, and chicks. Each day, Stretch puts a leash
on his dogs, cats, and pigs. He takes them for a
walk on Spring Street.
Stretch can not put his chicks on a leash. They
get mad and scratch him! The chicks stay at
home and strut around.
By ten, the dogs, cats, and pigs are home. So is
Stretch. He then sprays the pens to clean them.
“Is it time for lunch yet?” asks
Stretch impatiently. He feeds his
animals scraps. Then he goes to his
home to eat.
A
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Draw what happens
if Stretch puts his
chicks on a leash.
skr/scr-, /spr/spr-,
/str/str-
Unit 3 • Week 5 34 Decodable Passages
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The Scared Cat
Will has to paint the back steps. He scrapes the
sides and then paints white stripes. As he paints,
a stray cat snoops around the steps. Will sees that
the cat is not walking well.
“Oh my!” yells Will. “Did you sprain your leg?
Can I pick you up?” The cat is nearly out of Will’s
reach. The cat is scared. “Do not scratch,” begs
Will. “I will save you!”
Will strains to keep the cat in his arms. He takes
the cat to the steps and feeds it milk. The cat laps
it up and demands more. “Not yet, cat,” says
Will. “You need to rest!” Then Will and the cat
take a nap.
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Write about what
happens to the
cat next.
skr/scr-, /spr/spr-,
/str/str-
Unit 4 • Week 1 35 Decodable Passages
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An Ape Named Marty
Marty is an ape. He needs to eat each day. Marty
can go far from his home to seek food. He eats
fruit and leaves seeds or a core. He also nibbles
on corn.
For Marty, it is a bore to just sit. He likes to sort
sticks and run. He likes to swing from his arm.
Marty likes to lie under the stars. He likes to play
and see the night sky. Marty likes to have fun!
Marty must stay far from cars. He needs to live in
the forest where it is warm and safe. Marty is a
kind ape!
A
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Write about another
animal that eats fruit
or leaves.
är/ar, /ôr/or
Unit 4 • Week 1 36 Decodable Passages
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Bart Gets a Pet
Bart wants to have a pet. He will go and find a
pet. But he needs to learn more about what kind
of pet he can get.
After he reads about pets, Bart gets an idea. “I
want a python!” he screams. “It can slide on my
carpet.” He will go and get this pet.
Bart darts out and sees Ned. Ned asks, “Bart,
what pet will you get?”
“I will get a snake!” Bart tells Ned.
“Bart!” Ned cries. “Pythons hiss and hiss!”
Bart starts to think. “I think I will
get a hamster instead!”
A
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Write about a pet you
would like to have.
är/ar, ôr/or
Unit 4 • Week 2 37 Decodable Passages
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Arthur the Goat
Arthur is a goat. He was deserted by his herd.
“I do not need to go with a herd!” thinks Arthur.
“I will be fine without them.”
He finds five yaks. He lives with them. Their
names are Fern, Kurt, Bert, Wes, and Fay. Arthur
likes to eat wheat. He has a lot of fur but runs
and hides when it freezes outside.
“I hate the snow!” Arthur moans. “I leave when
the snow falls.”
“Yes, Arthur, it is true. That is what you do!”
say the yaks.
The yaks do not feel bad for Arthur.
His fur is soft and keeps him
very warm!
A
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Write about how
Arthur might
feel about being
deserted.
ûr/ er, ir, ur
Unit 4 • Week 2 38 Decodable Passages
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Burt’s Perch
Tate has a bird named Burt. Burt is red and lives
with a cat named Sir. Sir likes to bother Burt. Tate
will make a perch for Burt. That way, Burt will
not get hurt.
“I will make you a red perch, Burt,” says Tate.
“Do you like red?”
“I really like red!” yells Burt.
“Fine,” says Tate. “I will get red paint and a stick
and make you a perch.”
Tate went shopping. He got paint and a stick. He
made a perch for Burt.
“Nice perch, nice perch!” yells Burt. “Ha, ha, Sir!”
“I am happy you like it,” says Tate.
Sir is not so happy!
A
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Write about how
Tate might have
made the perch.
ûr/ er, ir, ur
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Unit 4 • Week 3 39 Decodable Passages
Name
Phonics
Should Brooke Cook?
Brooke stood by the stove. It was her turn to cook.
Her sister did not think Brooke was a good cook.
Brooke would show her! The hardest part so far
had to be reading the cookbook.
So she took a fish from the brook and shook off
the water. She had seen her dad cook a fish on a
piece of wood. She took the wood and fish to
the stove.
Then Brooke’s sister ran into the house. “Did
you cook?” she asked. Then she looked at what
Brooke had made for dinner. Would she like the
fish? She took a bit of it. Then she
yelled, “Brooke can cook!”
A
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Write about your
favorite meal and
who cooks it.
º
u /oo, ou
Unit 4 • Week 3 40 Decodable Passages
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A Look by the Brook
Ryan and his dad went to a brook and took
a look.
“I see a hook!” yelled Ryan. “What can we do
with it?”
They stood by the brook and looked at the hook.
“We can look for hidden treasures in
nooks!” said Ryan.
“We can put the hook in the brook to
look,” said Dad.
Dad put one foot in the brook. He gave Ryan the
hook. Ryan put it in the water and remained still.
“I got something!” he said. He had to
tug, but the hook came up. A book
was on the hook.
“That is a good book!” said Dad. “It
looks like you own a lucky hook!”
A
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Write your own tale
about what Ryan
finds on the hook.
º
u /oo, ou
Unit 4 • Week 4 41 Decodable Passages
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The Storm That Blew
Sue was chewing the stew that her mom made.
There was a big boom in the back room!
“Oh my!” said Sue. “The window blew shut.
There must be a lot of wind!”
Sue went to the back room and peered outside.
The sky was blue. Sue went back to eat the rest
of her stew and drink her fruit juice. After she
finished eating, she went to the back room again.
She peered outside. The sky was gray.
“Will it rain?” Sue thought. “I had better close
the windows. If there is a storm, it will not
destroy my home!”
Sue closed the windows just in time.
The rain started to fall hard when
she closed the last one!
A
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Write directions
to follow during a
storm.
ü/oo, ui, ew, oe, ue
Unit 4 • Week 4 42 Decodable Passages
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Stew’s Bruise
Stew has a new blue bruise on his arm. How did
he get it? Stew’s new car got stuck in the mud
after a flood.
He did his best to move the car. His arm got stuck
in the car’s window. It just would not move! Then
Stew’s new car ran out of fuel. “I will have to
push it!” exclaimed Stew. “The mud is preventing
it from moving.”
Stew got out of his car. He waded in the water.
“Oh, no!” said Stew. “Why did it have to flood
today?”
Stew pushed and pushed until his car was home.
“My arm hurts from pushing,” he said. Stew
spotted a blue mark on his arm. “I got a bruise,”
he sighed. “I do not want to push
my car again. That was no fun
at all!”
A
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Write about how
Stew got a bruise on
his arm.
ü/oo, ui, ew, oe, ue
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Unit 4 • Week 5 43 Decodable Passages
Name
Phonics
Paul and Dawn
Paul is a hawk. He lives in a tree near Mr. and
Mrs. Sawtaw’s home.
One day, Paul saw creatures crawl in the grass.
Suddenly, he saw his daughter, Dawn, on the
grass.
“Why are you down there?” asked Paul.
“I had time to explore!” said Dawn.
He swooped down and took her in his claws.
“You must not sit on the lawn,” yelled Paul. “You
are a hawk,” he said. “You need to stay in the
trees!”
“I am sorry, Dad,” said Dawn.
“You are a noble hawk,” Paul said, “so you must
not squeak and squawk on the lawn. Do not
cause me to get mad!”
A
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Write about what
Dawn did next.
ô/au, aw
Unit 4 • Week 5 44 Decodable Passages
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Tawny’s Paw
In the city of Gawtin, there is a law about pets.
Cats and dogs can not be outside without
their owners.
Tawny is a cat and belongs to Mrs. Pautil. Tawny
likes to tiptoe out of the yard when Mrs. Pam
isn’t watching!
Mrs. Pautil spotted Tawny outside this morning.
“Bad cat!” said Mrs. Pautil. Then she saw that
Tawny’s claw was bleeding. “You hurt your paw,
you bad cat,” said Mrs. Pautil.
She lifted Tawny up, and he wiggled to get loose.
She set him on the floor inside. “You are an
indoor cat, Tawny!” she explained. “You can get
hurt outside. You must be careful!”
With that, Mrs. Pautil cleaned Tawny’s
paw and let him go. Tawny lay
down for a long nap!
A
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Write about how to
keep pets safe.
ô/au, aw
Unit 5 • Week 1 45 Decodable Passages
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Scowl the Owl
The town of Thousand Owls is dry. It has not
rained in Thousand Owls for five years! There is
not a flower anywhere in the town. But there are
lots of owls! They sit outside the town hall.
One owl named Scowl always has a frown on his
face. That is how he got his name. Scowl does
not like Thousand Owls. “It is too dry!” he loudly
complained one day. “I want to get out of here.”
Scowl flew beyond Thousand Owls. It was wet
and rainy. “I don’t like it here either!” said Scowl.
“It’s too wet!”
Scowl flew to tell his mom. “Mom,”
he said, “let’s get out of town. Let’s
go where it is wet part of the time
and dry part of the time. We will
have the best of both worlds!”
A
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Write about Scowl’s
next trip.
ou/ow, ou
Unit 5 • Week 1 46 Decodable Passages
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Howling Sounds
Lisa lives in New York. Her dad just took her to
Arizona. It is warm there all year round. When
she came home, she told her classmates about
her trip.
“It was very hot and dry there,” said Lisa. “Some
animals howl at night. They make loud sounds.”
“Did you see snakes?” asked Ted. “Oh, yes!”
exclaimed Lisa. “I saw lots of snakes. They are
such outstanding creatures!”
Lisa’s class asked to hear more. Just then, the bell
sounded outside the school. “Not now,” begged
Lisa. “We’ll be late for class! But after class, I will
tell you what I found on my trip!”
Lisa and her classmates ran to school.
They made it just in time!
A
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Write about what
Lisa might have
found on her trip.
ou/ow, ou
Unit 5 • Week 2 47 Decodable Passages
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Mr. Moy’s Toys
Mr. Moy makes toys. He has a toy shop on Boyer
Street. Boys and girls like to visit Mr. Moy and see
what he is making. A boy named Roy helps
Mr. Moy make toys.
“It is a joy to make toys!” says Roy. “What are we
making today, Mr. Moy?” he asks.
Mr. Moy grins. “How about a toy king?” he asks
Roy. “We can gather foil and start to make him!”
Mr. Moy and Roy are happy. They set the king
out in the shop for sale. “Will others know what
it is?” asks Roy.
The boys and girls see the king and
say, “That is such a royal king!”
Mr. Moy and Roy grin. “It is indeed
a royal king!” yells Roy with joy.
A
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Write about a toy you
would make with
Mr. Moy.
oi/oi, oy
Unit 5 • Week 2 48 Decodable Passages
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Troy Joins Joy
Joy is playing with her friends outside. Her
brother, Troy, wants to join them. “Can I play
with you?” he whines.
“Don’t be so annoying!” says Joy. “You don’t
need to whine. We agree that you can join us. We
are playing tag.”
Troy jumps up and down. “I like tag! Can I be
it?” he asks Joy. Jake says, “I want to be it, too.”
Joy spots a coin. “We can flip a coin to see who
will be it!” she says. Joy flips the coin and
Troy wins.
Joy, Jake, and Troy play tag. Roy sees them
playing and wants to join them. “Can I play,
too?” asks Roy.
“Yes, you can! Join us!” says Joy. Joy,
Jake, Troy, and Roy play tag late into
the day.
A
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Create a new game
to play outside.
oi/oi, oy
Unit 5 • Week 3 49 Decodable Passages
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Alissa’s Job
Alissa is learning about jobs. She likes the idea
that she can pick her job.
Alissa’s teacher has asked the class to tell what
job they want. It is Alissa’s turn. “Alissa, what
would you like to do?” asks Mrs. Rebba.
“I would like to travel!” exclaims Alissa. “I
will go to China.” Mrs. Rebba grins. “Alissa, a
voyage is a good idea but China is so far away.
Who will go with you?”
“I will go alone,” says Alissa. “Then I will return
to America and make cakes in a bakery.”
Her class claps and claps. They like that idea!
“That is good, Alissa! And I will go visit
you in the bakery and watch you
make cakes,” says Mrs. Rebba.
ә/a
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Write about a job you
would like to have.
Unit 5 • Week 3 50 Decodable Passages
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Yucca and Bananas for Pamela
Pamela likes plants. She is most interested in
plants that she eats.
“Why don’t you study about them?” asked
Pamela’s mom yesterday. “You can visit a farm
or a library to learn more.”
“That is a good idea!” said Pamela. “I can read
about plants and then see them.”
Pamela’s mom called a farm nearby while
Pamela went to the library. “There are so many
books about plants!” Pamela exclaimed. She
read about alfalfa, yucca, and bananas. When
Pamela got home, she had a lot to tell her mom.
Today, Pamela’s mom is taking her to the nearby
farm. The farm has vast fields for growing plants.
She will see bananas, yucca, and other plants,
too. Maybe she will even get to
eat them!
A
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Write about other
plants that we eat.
ә/a
Unit 5 • Week 4 51 Decodable Passages
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Gnalla and the Wren
Gnalla has a garden. Yesterday, Gnalla worked
in her garden. She kneeled to cut plants and trim
blooming flowers.
Suddenly, a wren swooped down and landed
in the garden. “Little wren, what are you doing
here?” asked Gnalla.
The wren stopped and looked at Gnalla. Then
it began pecking at the dirt. “I know what you
are doing!” exclaimed Gnalla. “You are eating
gnats!” The wren looked at Gnalla again.
Gnalla got some seeds. She took the seeds and
dropped them on the ground. “Here, little wren,”
she said. “Come and eat the seeds!”
Then Gnalla gave the wren some
crumbs. “Tweet!” yelled the wren as
it flew away. Gnalla grinned. “It is a
sign that it will be a good day!”
she said.
A
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Write directions for
feeding crumbs to
birds.
n/gn, kn; /r/wr;
/m/mb
Unit 5 • Week 4 52 Decodable Passages
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Mr. Wrago’s Wrench
Mr. Wrago owns a plumbing company. He helps
people when the pipes around their homes
don’t work.
The phone rang. “Wrago Plumbing,” he said
when he picked up the phone.
“This is Mrs. Knop. I need help!” she wailed. “My
sprinkler is leaking! I worked hard to stop it, but
my thumb got numb and my muscles started
to hurt.”
“Don’t fret, Mrs. Knop,” he said. “I will be right
there!” Mr. Wrago got into his plumbing van and
drove to Mrs. Knop’s house. Mrs. Knop met him
in the driveway.
Mr. Wrago got his wrench and started to work.
He put a rag over the sprinkler while he worked.
The rag got so wet, he had to wring it out!
When Mr. Wrago finished,
Mrs. Knop exclaimed,
“Mr. Wrago’s wrench
saved the day!”
A
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Write about another
problem that
Mr. Wrago fixes.
n/gn, kn; /r/wr;
/m/mb
Unit 5 • Week 5 53 Decodable Passages
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Regis and Cindy’s Spacecraft
Regis and Cindy like to play. “Let’s make a fancy
electric car that can fly to the moon!” said Cindy.
“Good!” exclaimed Regis. “First, use this pen to
sketch the car. Then we can use the drawing to
make a model of the car.”
Cindy took the pen and began to draw. Since
Regis wasn’t drawing, she went to get supplies.
“We need paper for the body of the car. We also
need four circles for the wheels,” he whined.
“Can you help me?”
“Yes, I will help,” said Cindy. She found a pile of
round rocks. “These are circles. We can use these
for the wheels.”
Regis got red paint for Cindy. She painted
the fancy electric car red and put
the wheels on it.
“Let’s go!” said Regis, jumping
into the car. “To the moon
we go!” Cindy yelled.
A
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Write about what
Regis and Cindy do
on the moon.
k/c, /g/g, /s/c, /j/g
Unit 5 • Week 5 54 Decodable Passages
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Phonics
Brice in Space
When Brice gets older, he wants to be an
astronaut. “I want to go to space,” he told
his teacher.
“That is a very good idea, Brice,” said Mrs. Price.
“But you must study a lot before you can go to
the moon! It is important to work hard now.”
Brice grinned as he thought about what he does
every day. He always listens in class and does
his homework. He really enjoys reading books.
He even visits a science center on weekends.
He dreams of placing his feet on the moon and
making footprints.
“Yes, it is important to study,” Brice
said to Mrs. Price. “But I do not
mind. I like to study, and
someday I will walk on
the moon!”
A
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Write about a place
you want to explore.
k/c, /g/g, /s/c, /j/g
Unit 6 • Week 1 55 Decodable Passages
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Phonics
A Smudge for Smidge
Marge is making fudge for a party. Marge needs
a large amount since the party will be huge.
Marge went to fetch chocolate this morning. She
came home to make the fudge. When she went
to her pantry, she saw something strange. There
had been a smudge of chocolate inside in the
morning. Now, the chocolate was missing!
Shocked, Marge leaned on a ledge. “I put it in
there just a while ago,” she explained. “It should
not have budged! Without the chocolate, there
can be no fudge!”
Marge felt behind a ridge in the pantry.
“Oh, no!” she yelled. Her dog,
Smidge, snuck out of the pantry. His
face was full of chocolate. Smidge
licked Marge’s face. “I forgive you.
But what about my fudge?”
she moaned.
A
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ivity
Write about a new
flavor of fudge you
would like to eat.
j/dge, ge, lge,
nge, rge
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Unit 6 • Week 1 56 Decodable Passages
Name
Phonics
Midge’s Picnic
“Let’s have a picnic in the park by the bridge,”
said Midge. “We can get a whole range of food!”
Midge’s mom liked his idea.
“I will go to the market to get food,” said his
mom. “I can put it in the fridge at home until the
party.”
Midge stayed by the bridge to plan the picnic. He
cleaned the picnic ledges and set out games. He
arranged placemats on the ledges for a change of
color. Then he called his friends.
His mom brought food and put it on the picnic
ledges. “The rest is in the fridge at home. I will
get it.”
When her mom returned, Midge had finished
setting up for the picnic. His friends came. “It is
time to judge who can make their
tummy bulge the most!” declared
Midge, and they devoured
the food!
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Draw and write about
a party you want
to have.
j/dge, ge, lge,
nge, rge
Unit 6 • Week 2 57 Decodable Passages
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Phonics
Princess Flair
Claire is writing a story about a princess named
Flair.
Princess Flair had long hair. She spent most
of her days sitting in a chair. She ruled the
kingdom of Udair from her chair. Her large pair
of princess slippers didn’t fit well.
She had a magic wand in the shape of a star.
One day, Princess Flair tripped on her princess
slippers and fell down the stairs. “Oh, no!” she
wailed. “I dare say I have a big cut on my arm!”
She was far from a doctor, so she waved her
magic wand. “I wish for no scar and princess
slippers that fit!” she whispered.
Suddenly, Princess Flair’s slippers were just
right, and her cut had vanished! The
princess was so happy, she…
Claire stopped writing. “What
should Princess Flair do next?”
she wondered.
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Write an ending to
Claire’s story.
ar/ar; /ar/are, air
Unit 6 • Week 2 58 Decodable Passages
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Phonics
Sar’s Tar
Mark was given a journal. In it, he wrote about a
make-believe city called Par.
In the land of Par, tar was rare. Every year, the
people of Par searched for tar. Those who found
tar made great things. Those who did not find tar
had to wait until the next year.
The best tar finder was Sar. He found tar in
strange places, like a lion’s lair. Sar would put a
jar by each place he went to look for tar. When
he found tar, he would put it in the jar. Sar
had searched for tar since he was little. He had
memories of finding tar as a child.
He even remembered where he had
found the tar!
Sar built roads with the tar. The
people from Par loved Sar because
he shared!
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Create your own
make-believe city
and write a story
about it.
ar/ar; /ar/are, air
Unit 6 • Week 3 59 Decodable Passages
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Phonics
Homer and Ameer
Homer and Ameer are peers in the same class.
Homer and Ameer like to pretend that they lived
long ago. “What do you think cavemen did?”
asked Homer.
“I think they worked hard and played here and
there,” said Ameer.
Homer shook his head. “I think so, too. Let’s
pretend we are cavemen!” he said.
Homer and Ameer set up a cave in Homer’s
room. Then they began to play.
“Oh, dear!” exclaimed Ameer. “I am in fear! I see
a big herd of animals headed this way.”
Homer peered out of the cave they had made.
“Yes, I see the herd!” he said. “Let’s run to the
rear of the cave to stay safe.”
Homer and Ameer went to the back
of the cave. “Do you hear the herd
on its way?” asked Homer.
“No,” said Ameer. “I think that
noise is my tummy. I am hungry!”
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Circle the words that
end in er.
ûr/er; /îr/eer, ere,
ear
Unit 6 • Week 3 60 Decodable Passages
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Phonics
Paneer Hears Thunder
Paneer is studying how people made music
years ago. He has been reading about drums.
Paneer has learned that some people played
tambourines. These instruments make a sound
like thunder.
Long ago, tambourines were made by stretching
animal skin over a rim and stitching it in place.
Then disks were put on the sides by the rim. The
tiny disks hit each other when the tambourine
was shaken. People still play the tambourine
today. Tambourines can help keep the beat
for singers.
Paneer wants to hear a tambourine.
His music teacher shows him one.
He watches her shake the
tambourine. Paneer taps it
near his ear. It does sound
like thunder!
A
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Write about how
thunder sounds
to you.
ûr/er; /îr/eer, ere,
ear
Unit 6 • Week 4 61 Decodable Passages
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Phonics
Dora’s Wings
Dora likes to make things. She thinks of a thing
to make and then she puts it together. Today,
Dora was at the park. She saw a bird open its
wings and soar.
Seeing this made Dora want wings, too. She went
home and drew a pair of wings. Then she got
more paper and drew herself soaring. “I will soar
today!” said Dora.
It was time to make the wings. Dora used
feathers for the tops of the wings. She used more
feathers on the tips. Dora put on the wings and
ran. She flapped her wings until she
felt like she was soaring. “I am not
a bore!” she yelled. “I can make
wings and soar!”
A
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ivity
Write three words
that end in ore.
ôr/or, ore, oar
©

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Unit 6 • Week 4 62 Decodable Passages
Name
Phonics
Blair’s Corn Planter
Henry Blair lived over one hundred years ago. He
was an inventor, which means that he made new
things. One thing he made was a corn planter.
Before Blair invented the corn planter, farmers
had to put each seed in the ground. Blair thought
it would be nice to have a machine do this fast.
That is why he made a corn planter. He got a
patent in 1834 for the corn planter.
The planter planted more than just corn. It also
planted other seeds. Once farmers started using
the corn planter, they did not have to lean over.
Their backs were not sore!
Henry Blair was an important
inventor. His corn planter has
changed over the years. It has
helped many farmers. Planters are
used more and more every day!
A
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ivity
Write a story about
another inventor
or invention.
ôr/or, ore, oar
Unit 6 • Week 5 63 Decodable Passages
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Phonics
The Sire’s Crier
“Sire! Sire, there is a fire!” yelled Yire. The king
rolled out of bed. He was still sleepy.
“Tug on that wire, Yire,” said the king as he
pointed at the window. “Tell the town crier about
the fire. Ask him to alert the town!”
“Yes, sire,” said Yire. He tugged on the wire. The
town crier came to the window.
“Crier, there is a fire. Tell the town this dire
news!” yelled Yire.
The town crier ran to the hill and screamed. “A
fire is in our town! Leave now!”
Many left right away. Others had to be
lured out. They had wanted to stay.
Soon, the town was empty. The king,
Yire, and the town crier stood on the
hill. The fire was put out quickly.
Before long, the town was as good as
new. The crier had saved the day!
ır/ire, ier; /ûr/ure
A
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ivity
Write about a day
in the life of the
king, Yire, or the
town crier.
Unit 6 • Week 5 64 Decodable Passages
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Phonics
Kire’s Tires
Kire has a tire shop. The name of the shop is
Kire’s Tires.
Kire can fix almost any tire problem. He can
patch holes in tires. He can also pump air
into them.
Lots of people bring their bikes and cars to Kire’s
Tires. Kire can fix any tire.
But Kire has too many tires to fix. He needs to
hire a tire helper! He cannot endure so much
work by himself!
Kire will make fliers to hand out about the job.
Then he will talk to those who want to be his tire
helper. Kire will look for people who can fix tires
fast. He needs a good helper.
Kire hopes to hire a helper soon!
A
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ivity
Write about Kire’s
tire helper.
ır/ire, ier; /ûr/ure
Word Study
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Use the pages in this section to offer further practice
with phonics, spelling, and word meanings.
Alphabet Letter Cards .................................................................. 66
• lowercase and capital letter cards
• use for phonics and spelling games and activities
Spelling Word Cards ...................................................................... 68
• reproducible cards for each week’s words
• tested, review, and challenge words
• key words for sorting activities
Vocabulary Word Cards .............................................................. 98
• reproducible cards for each week’s tested words
• blank cards for additional words
Sound Boxes .................................................................................... 128
• three- and four-part boxes
• use with letter cards for phonics and spelling practice
Games ................................................................................................. 130
• Learning with Games – suggestions for games that
support word study strategies, dictionary skills, and
comprehension skills
• boards, grids, spinners, and other ideas to customize
for your class
©

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a b c d e
f g h i j
k l m n o
p q r s t
u v w x y
z
66 Letter Cards
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A B C D E
F G H I J
K L M N O
P Q R S T
U V W X Y
Z
Letter Cards 67
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cat pig oddballs
has sat wag
had bad fix
six him will
if can hit
blue even study
68 Unit 1 • David’s New Friends Spelling Word Cards
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bed hog cup
oddballs went tell
pet job fog
not tug hut
tub bun fix
has another move
year
Spelling Word Cards Unit 1 • Mr. Putter & Tabby Pour the Tea 69
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a a_e oddballs
bag mad cap
back ham cape
bake made ate
rake fog tug
different number other
70 Unit 1 • Fighting the Fire Spelling Word Cards
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pig kite oddballs
did rip fin
mix pick five
nine side pipe
hike cape made
because off picture
Spelling Word Cards Unit 1 • Meet Rosina 71
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sock bone oddballs
box fox dog
lock pot cone
hope rose poke
rope side nine
America country world
72 Unit 1 • My Name Is Yoon Spelling Word Cards
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cup tube oddballs
sun bud duck
bump cup cube
dude fume rule
rude vote hope
food together through
Spelling Word Cards Unit 2 • The Tiny Seed 73
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sl dr sk
st sp oddballs
slide slips dress
drop skin task
still must crisp
spell cube fuse
below city own
74 Unit 2 • A Harbor Seal Pup Grows Up Spelling Word Cards
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day mail oddballs
main wait sail
tail train jay
pay stay hay
may must spell
follow near paper
Spelling Word Cards Unit 2 • A Trip to the Emergency Room 75
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kind might fly
pie oddballs light
high sight wild
mind dry cry
try tie lie
stay wait group
important only
76 Unit 2 • Farfallina and Marcel Spelling Word Cards
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post boat snow
Joe oddballs grow
mow crow toe
goes toast soap
foam told most
night find between
example few
Spelling Word Cards Unit 2 • There’s Nothing Like Baseball 77
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me green heat
pretty oddballs eat
leaf mean queen
need seek baby
pony he we
foam told family
four hear
78 Unit 3 • Head, Body, Legs: A Story from Liberia Spelling Word Cards
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tube human oddballs
use duke dune
flute music fuse
mule bugle June
tune pony leaf
above color song
Spelling Word Cards Unit 3 • Officer Buckle and Gloria 79
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th sh wh
ch oddballs chest
chill chase shape
sheep thing think
white while wheat
mule fuse idea
often second
80 Unit 3 • Meet the Super Croc Spelling Word Cards
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th sh ch
tch oddballs each
which teaching path
teeth fishing wishbone
watch matching dish
white chase body
pretty young
Spelling Word Cards Unit 3 • The Alvin Ailey Kids: Dancing As a Team 81
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scr str spr
oddballs screen scream
scrape stripe struck
strict sprain spring
spruce strap path
wishbone carry once
talk
82 Unit 3 • Click, Clack, Moo: Cows That Type Spelling Word Cards
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car corn oddballs
part start park
farm dark sort
storm short for
horse scream stripe
area money piece
Spelling Word Cards Unit 4 • Splish! Splash! Animal Baths 83
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hen third curl
oddballs clerk term
herd skirt sir
stir churn burst
hurt turn shark
storm hours problem
usually
84 Unit 4 • Goose’s Story Spelling Word Cards
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oo ou oddballs
shook stood hook
brook crook foot
soot could should
would clerk stir
during sure whole
Spelling Word Cards Unit 4 • A Way to Help Planet Earth 85
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food juice few
due shoe oddballs
flew new boot
shoe clue root
canoe fruit glue
suit cook could
complete measure questions
86 Unit 4 • Super Storms Spelling Word Cards
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caught saw oddballs
pause draw launch
law fault jaw
fawn hawk raw
crawl cool flew
door order remember
Spelling Word Cards 87 Unit 4 • Nut ik, the Wolf Pup
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brown out oddballs
clown growl howl
brown crown round
loud cloud house
sound pause fault
listen several wind (noun)
88 Unit 5 • Dig Wait Listen: A Desert Toad’s Tale Spelling Word Cards
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coin boy oddballs
soil broil moist
point boil oil
toy joy soy
royal down house
pulled travel voice
Spelling Word Cards Unit 5 • Pushing Up the Sky 89
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beginning middle end
oddballs alone ago
again away alike
agree above awake
idea comma noise
broil finally notice
morning
90 Unit 5 • Columbus Explores New Lands Spelling Word Cards
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gnat know write
crumb oddballs knee
knife knot gnaw
sign wrist wren
thumb lamb debt
alone idea certain
field hundred
Spelling Word Cards Unit 5 • The Ugly Vegetables 91
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cow circle gate
giraffe oddballs camp
cave cent face
girl wagon gift
gym gem germ
knot wrist against
half true
92 Unit 5 • The Moon Spelling Word Cards
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edge stage bilge
large fringe oddballs
cage page judge
lodge large barge
bulge change range
hinge face germ
among bought decided
Spelling Word Cards Unit 6 • Mice and Beans 93
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car share air
oddballs star shark
care stare rare
dare hair pair
chair fair judge
range believe built
material
94 Unit 6 • Stirring Up Memories Spelling Word Cards
her sneer mere
clear oddballs near
dear ear deer
steer queer verb
perch here where
chair care heavy
region system
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Spelling Word Cards Unit 6 • Music of the Stone Age 95
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corn store soar
oddballs more tore
wore store oar
roar board port
north fort dear
here building machine
scientist
96 Unit 6 • African-American Inventors Spelling Word Cards
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tired lure drier
oddballs fire wire
hire tire drier
flier crier sure
cure pure north
wore island special
though
Spelling Word Cards Unit 6 • Babu’s Song 97
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carefully
different
excited
groan
tomorrow
whisper
98 Unit 1 • David’s New Friends Vocabulary Word Cards
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company
delighted
enjoyed
share
thinning
wonderful
Vocabulary Word Cards Unit 1 • Mr. Putter & Tabby Pour the Tea 99
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flames
forest
heat
safe
tell
100 Unit 1 • Fighting the Fire Vocabulary Word Cards
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celebrate
cultures
deaf
language
relatives
signing
Vocabulary Word Cards Unit 1 • Meet Rosina 101
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favorite
patient
practiced
settled
wrinkled
102 Unit 1 • My Name Is Yoon Vocabulary Word Cards
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burst
desert
drifts
drowns
gently
neighbor
Vocabulary Word Cards Unit 2 • The Tiny Seed 103
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examines
hunger
mammal
normal
rescued
young
104 Unit 2 • A Harbor Seal Pup Grows Up Vocabulary Word Cards
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broken
heal
informs
personal
serious
Vocabulary Word Cards Unit 2 • A Trip to the Emergency Room 105
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fluttered
giggled
peered
recognized
snuggled
vanished
106 Unit 2 • Farfallina and Marcel Vocabulary Word Cards
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coach
imaginary
practices
starting
tryouts
uniform
Vocabulary Word Cards Unit 2 • There’s Nothing Like Baseball 107
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attached
breathe
delicious
frantically
gasped
swung
108 Unit 3 • Head, Body, Legs: A Story from Liberia Vocabulary Word Cards
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accident
attention
buddy
enormous
obeys
tips
Vocabulary Word Cards Unit 3 • Officer Buckle and Gloria 109
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ancient
confirm
hopeful
unable
valid
110 Unit 3 • Meet the Super Croc Vocabulary Word Cards
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effort
mood
perform
proud
remember
students
Unit 3 •
The Alvin Ailey Kids:
Dancing As a Team
Vocabulary Word Cards 111
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demand
emergency
furious
impatient
sincerely
snoop
112 Unit 3 • Click, Clack, Moo: Cows That Type Vocabulary Word Cards
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beasts
handy
itches
nibble
preen
puddles
Vocabulary Word Cards Unit 4 • Splish! Splash! Animal Baths 113
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balance
deserted
freezes
imagine
saddest
wider
114 Unit 4 • Goose’s Story Vocabulary Word Cards
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conservation
extinct
hardest
remains
trouble
Vocabulary Word Cards Unit 4 • A Way to Help Planet Earth 115
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beware
destroy
grasslands
prevent
uprooted
violent
116 Unit 4 • Super Storms Vocabulary Word Cards
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beloved
glanced
gleamed
noble
promised
wiggled
Vocabulary Word Cards Unit 4 • Nutik, the Wolf Pup 117
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beyond
burrow
distant
lengthy
ranger’s
warning
118 Unit 5 • Dig Wait Listen: A Desert Toad’s Tale Vocabulary Word Cards
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agreed
gathered
jabbing
randomly
signal
Vocabulary Word Cards Unit 5 • Pushing Up the Sky 119
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areas
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planet
vast
voyage
120 Unit 5 • Columbus Explores New Lands Vocabulary Word Cards
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aroma
blooming
muscles
prickly
scent
trade
Vocabulary Word Cards Unit 5 • The Ugly Vegetables 121
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discovered
footprint
lunar
spacecraft
surface
visible
122 Unit 5 • The Moon Vocabulary Word Cards
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assembled
devoured
fetch
forgetting
menu
simmered
Vocabulary Word Cards Unit 6 • Mice and Beans 123
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creating
familiar
glamorous
imagination
memories
occasions
124 Unit 6 • Stirring Up Memories Vocabulary Word Cards
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impossible
pleasant
talent
treasures
watch
Vocabulary Word Cards Unit 6 • Music of the Stone Age 125
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allowed
design
instrument
invented
powerful
products
126 Unit 6 • African-American Inventors Vocabulary Word Cards
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collection
concern
exclaimed
figure
goalie
vendors
Vocabulary Word Cards Unit 6 • Babu’s Song 127
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128 Three-part Sound Boxes
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Sound Boxes Four-part 129
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Learning with Games
What’s the Ending?
Materials
S-shaped board (p. 135)
Cards (p. 137)
4-part spinner (p. 133)
game markers
pencils
Skill: word endings
Prepare: This game is for two players.
Use the S-shaped board. Write begin in the
frst square and end in the last square. In
the remaining squares, alternate writing the
endings -s, -ed, and -ing.
Write spelling words on the cards. Use
verbs, such as chase, watch, and carry.
Players also use the four-part spinner.
Write in the numbers 0, 1, 2, and 3.
Play: The frst player spins the spinner
and moves his or her marker that number
of spaces. Then that player chooses a word
card and says, then spells, the word with
the ending the marker landed on. Players
miss a turn by spinning a 0 or by spelling
the word and ending incorrectly. The frst
player to get to the end is the winner.
Time for Order
Materials
old magazines and newspapers
Cards (p. 137)
scissors
glue
timer
Skill: alphabetical order
Prepare: This game is for two players.
Have players fnd and cut out interesting
words from old magazines and newspapers.
Have players glue each word on a card.
Each player needs eight words.
Play: The frst player must put all of the
word cards in alphabetical order. The
second player times the frst as he or she
organizes the words. The players then
switch roles. They compete to alphabetize
the words the fastest.
Antonym Tic-Tac-Toe
Materials
Tic-Tac-Toe grid (p. 138)
pencils
Skill: antonyms
Prepare: This game is for two players. Use a Tic-Tac-Toe grid.
Have players fll in the grid with vocabulary words.
Play: To begin, a player reads one word on the grid and names an antonym for that word.
If correct, the player writes an X or an O in the space on top of the word. Players take turns
until one player gets three Xs or Os in a row horizontally, vertically, or diagonally.
differenf hunger wrinkled
dncienf cdlm hunger
whisper sdfe dcfive
130 Games
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Word Maker
Materials
Word Wheel or Slip Strips (p. 136,
p. 141)
Cards (p. 137)
paper bag
pencils
Skill: prefxes
Prepare: Write the following prefxes on
word cards: anti-, dis-, in-, im-, over-, mis-,
pre-, re-, and un-. Fold the cards and place
them in a paper bag.
Give each player a word wheel or slip
strips. (If using slip strips, copy the squares
several times so that players can construct
strips with eight or twelve squares.)
Play: Each player chooses one prefx from
the bag and writes it on the inside circle
of their word wheel. On the outside of the
wheel, have players come up with as many
root words as possible that work with their
chosen prefx. Players may want to refer to
a dictionary for more word suggestions. (For
Slip Strips, write the prefx on the rectangular
card and root words on the squares.)
Same and Different
Materials
4-part spinner (p. 133)
pencil
crayons
paper
Skill: compare and contrast
Prepare: Two players are needed for this
game. Give each pair a blank spinner. Ask
them to color each part a different color then
alternately label Compare or Contrast.
Play: Explain to players that they will be
comparing and contrasting themselves in
this game. The frst player spins the spinner.
If he or she lands on Compare, then the
two players talk together to fnd something
they have in common. If he or she lands
on Contrast, then they talk to fnd how they
are different. Have players record their
discoveries on paper.
For a more advanced version of the
game, choose topics from stories and
literature for players to compare and
contrast.
Put It Together
Materials
Puzzle Pieces, two pieces (p. 142)
plastic bags
timer
Skill: compound words
Prepare: Players need fve copies each of the puzzle pieces with two interlocking pieces.
Ask them to write fve different compound words with the frst part of the word on the frst
puzzle piece, and the second part of the word on the second puzzle piece. You may want
to suggest compound words to use, such as schoolhouse, dollhouse, grasshopper, uproot,
grassland, rainforest, and inchworm.
Players then cut out their puzzle pieces and place them in plastic bags.
Play: Have players exchange their bag with another player.
Set the timer at one minute. Challenge players to build all fve
of their partner’s compound words in a minute. Continue by
having players exchange with other players in the classroom.
rdin foresf
Games 131
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Medial Sound Bingo
Materials
5 x 5 grid (p. 140)
Spelling Word Cards (pp. 68 –97)
game markers
Skill: listening for long vowel medial
sounds
Prepare: Each player needs a 5 x 5
grid. Above the frst row, players write
the following medial sounds:
Players create their own bingo card by
listing spelling words that have the same
medial sound under each column. Have
available the Spelling Word Cards for
reference.
Play: Use the Spelling Word Cards to play
bingo once players have flled in their grids.
Remind children that the winner is the frst
player to get fve game markers in a row
vertically, horizontally, or diagonally. For a
shorter game, use the 4 x 4 grid and four
medial sounds.
What Do You Mean?
Materials
Oval or S-shaped board (p. 134, p. 135)
4-part spinner (p. 133)
game markers
dictionary
Skill: multiple meaning words
Prepare: Organize players into groups
of four. Give each group a copy of the oval
board, which may be copied at a larger size
if desired, and a 4-part spinner numbered 0,
1, 2, and 3.
First place a star in one of the squares
to mark the beginning and ending. Have
the group fll in the remaining squares
with multiple meaning words such as
scratch, beam, signing, uniform, coach,
watch, principal, trust, safe, foreign,
patient, settled, burst, stage, peer, figure,
enclosure.
Play: The frst player begins the game
by spinning the spinner to see how many
spaces to go. The player reads the word he
or she landed on and names one meaning
of the word. As the game continues, if other
players land on the same word, they must
give another meaning for the same word.
Players may want to keep a dictionary at
hand to check defnitions. The frst player to
reach the star is the winner.
The S-shaped board can also be used
for this game. Write begin in the frst square
and end in the last square, and then write
multiple meaning words in the remaining
squares.
132 Games
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Spinners
1. Cut out and
complete a
spinner.
2. Mount it on
heavy paper.
3. Attach arrow
with brad.
Games 133
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Oval Game Board
134 Games
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S-shaped Game Board
Games 135
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Word Wheel
1. Cut out and complete
each wheel.
2. Attach small wheel on
top of large wheel with
a brad.
136 Games
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Cards
Games 137
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Tic-Tac-Toe
138 Games
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4x4 Grid
Games 139
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5x5 Grid
140 Games
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Slip Strips
Games 141
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Puzzle Pieces
142 Games
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Additional Literacy Support
Use the pages in this section to support reading, writing,
handwriting, listening, and speaking activities.
Rhymes and Chimes ................................................................... 144
• illustrated poems that support phonemic awareness
Reader Response Sheets .......................................................... 174
• forms for fiction, non-fiction, and poetry
Writer’s Checklists ......................................................................... 177
• checklists for use with fiction and nonfiction writing
Proofreading Marks ..................................................................... 179
• common proofreading marks to post or hand out
Writing Rubrics ............................................................................... 180
• four-point rubrics specific to Unit Writing activities
• rubric to customize with the class
Picture Prompts .............................................................................. 187
• Writing to Picture Prompts – tips on using the prompts
for writing and test preparation
• prompts with illustrations and photos
Handwriting ..................................................................................... 194
• information on mechanics and grasp patterns
• evaluation checklist
• reproducible practice pages and models
Classroom Behavior Checklist ............................................... 206
• list of listening and speaking behaviors to post
©

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144 Rhymes and Chimes
©

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Name
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Rhymes and Chimes 145
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Name
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146 Rhymes and Chimes
©

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Rhymes and Chimes 147
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t
o

s
c
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l
.
H
i
s

f
r
i
e
n
d

C
h
i
p
m
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n
k

w
e
n
t
,

t
o
o
.
T
e
a
c
h
e
r

s
a
i
d
,


T
o
m
o
r
r
o
w

s

o
u
r

t
e
s
t
.
W
h
a
t

w
i
l
l

y
o
u

a
l
l

d
o
?

L
i
t
t
l
e

S
k
u
n
k

r
a
i
s
e
d

h
i
s

h
a
n
d
A
n
d

s
a
i
d
,


I

l
l

p
a
s
s

t
h
e

t
e
s
t
!

H
e

a
n
d

C
h
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p
m
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k

s
t
u
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d

h
a
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S
o

t
h
e
y

w
o
u
l
d

d
o

t
h
e
i
r

b
e
s
t
.
148 Rhymes and Chimes
©

M
a
c
m
i
l
l
a
n
/
M
c
G
r
a
w
-
H
i
l
l
Name
H
o
t

S
p
o
t
!
H
o
t

s
p
o
t
!

H
o
t

s
p
o
t
!
C
a
n

y
o
u

r
h
y
m
e
,

o
r

c
a
n

y
o
u

n
o
t
?
I

c
a
n

r
h
y
m
e
,

b
u
t

I

f
o
r
g
o
t
.
H
e
l
p

m
e

m
a
k
e

a

r
h
y
m
e

f
o
r

s
p
o
t
.
P
h
o
n
e
m
i
c

A
w
a
r
e
n
e
s
s
:


s
h
o
r
t

/
o
/
Rhymes and Chimes 149
©

M
a
c
m
i
l
l
a
n
/
M
c
G
r
a
w
-
H
i
l
l
Name
P
h
o
n
e
m
i
c

A
w
a
r
e
n
e
s
s
:


s
h
o
r
t

/
e
/
N
e
d

a
n
d

F
r
e
d
N
e
d

g
o
t

u
p

a
n
d

o
u
t

o
f

b
e
d
.
T
h
e
n

h
e

w
e
n
t

t
o

g
e
t

h
i
s

s
l
e
d
.

T
h
e

s
n
o
w

f
e
l
l
!


h
e

c
a
l
l
e
d

t
o

F
r
e
d
.

G
e
t

u
p

n
o
w
,

y
o
u

s
l
e
e
p
y

h
e
a
d
!

150 Rhymes and Chimes
©

M
a
c
m
i
l
l
a
n
/
M
c
G
r
a
w
-
H
i
l
l
Name
A

C
u
b

S
c
o
u
t

s

B
i
r
t
h
d
a
y
S
h
o
u
t
,

s
h
o
u
t
,
S
h
o
u
t

i
t

o
u
t
!
T
o
d
a
y

i
s

t
h
e

b
i
r
t
h
d
a
y
O
f

t
h
i
s

C
u
b

S
c
o
u
t
.
H
i
s

f
a
c
e

h
a
s

a

s
m
i
l
e
,
N
o
t

a

p
o
u
t
!
P
h
o
n
e
m
i
c

A
w
a
r
e
n
e
s
s
:


/
s
h
/

a
n
d

/
t
h
/
Rhymes and Chimes 151
©

M
a
c
m
i
l
l
a
n
/
M
c
G
r
a
w
-
H
i
l
l
Name
T
h
e

B
u
g

a
n
d

t
h
e

S
l
u
g
L
o
o
k

a
t

t
h
e

b
u
g
.
L
o
o
k

a
t

t
h
e

s
l
u
g
.
R
u
n
,

r
u
n
,

r
u
n
.
T
h
e

s
l
u
g

r
a
n

o
n

a

r
u
g
.
C
h
u
g
,

c
h
u
g
,

c
h
u
g
.
T
h
e

b
u
g

d
u
g

a
n
d

d
u
g
.
P
h
o
n
e
m
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c

A
w
a
r
e
n
e
s
s
:


r
h
y
m
e

a
n
d

s
h
o
r
t

/
u
/
152 Rhymes and Chimes
©

M
a
c
m
i
l
l
a
n
/
M
c
G
r
a
w
-
H
i
l
l
Name
P
h
o
n
e
m
i
c

A
w
a
r
e
n
e
s
s
:


r
h
y
m
e
,

b
l
e
n
d
s

/
s
l
/

a
n
d

/
p
l
/
P
l
e
a
s
e
,

M
a
y

I
?

M
a
y

I
?

P
l
e
a
s
e
?
M
a
y

I

g
o

w
i
t
h

D
a
d

i
n

t
h
e

v
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n
?
M
a
y

I

s
l
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e
p

t
o
n
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g
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t

a
t

D
a
n

s
?
M
a
y

I

b
a
k
e

a

g
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n
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b
r
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a
d

m
a
n
?
M
a
y

I
?

M
a
y

I
?

M
a
y

I
?

P
L
E
A
S
E
?
Rhymes and Chimes 153
©

M
a
c
m
i
l
l
a
n
/
M
c
G
r
a
w
-
H
i
l
l
Name
J
a
k
e

t
h
e

S
n
a
k
e
J
a
k
e

t
h
e

S
n
a
k
e
W
a
s

n
o
t

q
u
i
t
e

a
w
a
k
e
,
W
h
e
n

h
e

m
a
d
e

a

m
i
s
t
a
k
e
A
n
d

c
u
r
l
e
d

u
p

a
r
o
u
n
d

a

r
a
k
e
.
P
h
o
n
e
m
i
c

A
w
a
r
e
n
e
s
s
:


l
o
n
g

/
¯
a
/
154 Rhymes and Chimes
©

M
a
c
m
i
l
l
a
n
/
M
c
G
r
a
w
-
H
i
l
l
Name
M
y

H
o
u
n
d

D
o
g
S
n
i
f
f
,

s
n
i
f
f
,

t
h
a
t

s

m
y

h
o
u
n
d
W
i
t
h

h
i
s

n
o
s
e

t
o

t
h
e

g
r
o
u
n
d
.
S
n
i
f
f
,

s
n
i
f
f
,

w
h
a
t

s

h
e

f
o
u
n
d
?
I
t

s

v
e
r
y

b
r
i
s
t
l
y

a
n
d

r
o
u
n
d
.
P
h
o
n
e
m
i
c

A
w
a
r
e
n
e
s
s
:


/
s
n
/
s
n
-
Rhymes and Chimes 155
©

M
a
c
m
i
l
l
a
n
/
M
c
G
r
a
w
-
H
i
l
l
Name
M
o
m

s

S
o
c
k
s
W
h
e
n

M
o
m

s
e
w
e
d

w
h
i
t
e

s
o
c
k
s
,
s
t
i
t
c
h
,

s
t
i
t
c
h
,

s
t
i
t
c
h
,
t
h
e
y

m
a
d
e

h
e
r

t
w
o

f
e
e
t
i
t
c
h
,

i
t
c
h
,

i
t
c
h
.
W
h
e
n

M
o
m

s
e
w
e
d

o
n

a
p
a
t
c
h
,

p
a
t
c
h
,

p
a
t
c
h
,
h
e
r

w
h
i
t
e

s
o
c
k
s

d
i
d
n

t
m
a
t
c
h
,

m
a
t
c
h
,

m
a
t
c
h
.
P
h
o
n
e
m
i
c

A
w
a
r
e
n
e
s
s
:


r
h
y
m
e
,

/
c
h
/
,

a
n
d

/
h
w
/

156 Rhymes and Chimes
©

M
a
c
m
i
l
l
a
n
/
M
c
G
r
a
w
-
H
i
l
l
Name
T
h
e

M
i
s
s
i
n
g

D
i
m
e
W
h
o

s
t
o
l
e

t
h
e

g
o
o
s
e

s

d
i
m
e
?
W
h
e
n

w
a
s

i
t

t
a
k
e
n
?
W
h
a
t

w
a
s

t
h
e

t
i
m
e
?
G
o
o
d
n
e
s
s
!

G
r
a
c
i
o
u
s
!
W
h
a
t

a

c
r
i
m
e
!
P
h
o
n
e
m
i
c

A
w
a
r
e
n
e
s
s
:


l
o
n
g

/
/
Rhymes and Chimes 157
©

M
a
c
m
i
l
l
a
n
/
M
c
G
r
a
w
-
H
i
l
l
Name
I
t

s

S
p
r
i
n
g
I

s
a
y
,


I
t

s

s
p
r
i
n
g
!
L
e
t

s

g
o

t
o

t
h
e

s
t
r
e
a
m
!
L
e
t

s

j
u
m
p

a
n
d

s
p
l
a
s
h
a
n
d

s
c
r
e
a
m
!

P
h
o
n
e
m
i
c

A
w
a
r
e
n
e
s
s
:


t
r
i
p
l
e
-
c
o
n
s
o
n
a
n
t

b
l
e
n
d
s

/
s
k
r
/
,

/
s
p
l
/
,

/
s
p
r
/
,

a
n
d

/
s
t
r
/
158 Rhymes and Chimes
©

M
a
c
m
i
l
l
a
n
/
M
c
G
r
a
w
-
H
i
l
l
Name
T
h
e

D
r
a
g
o
n

S
p
o
k
e
W
i
t
h

a

p
u
f
f

o
f

s
m
o
k
e
,
T
h
e

D
r
a
g
o
n

s
p
o
k
e
.

T
e
l
l

m
e

a

s
t
o
r
y
!
T
e
l
l

m
e

a

j
o
k
e
!

P
h
o
n
e
m
i
c

A
w
a
r
e
n
e
s
s
:


/
¯
o
/

o
_
e
Rhymes and Chimes 159
©

M
a
c
m
i
l
l
a
n
/
M
c
G
r
a
w
-
H
i
l
l
Name
A

T
u
n
e

i
n

J
u
n
e

O
n
e

d
a
y

i
n

s
u
n
n
y

J
u
n
e
,
I

l
e
a
r
n
e
d

t
o

p
l
a
y

t
h
e

f
l
u
t
e
.
I

p
l
a
y
e
d

a

h
a
p
p
y

t
u
n
e
W
h
i
l
e

m
y

t
e
a
c
h
e
r

p
l
a
y
e
d

t
h
e

l
u
t
e
.
P
h
o
n
e
m
i
c

A
w
a
r
e
n
e
s
s
:


l
o
n
g

/
¯
u
/
160 Rhymes and Chimes
©

M
a
c
m
i
l
l
a
n
/
M
c
G
r
a
w
-
H
i
l
l
Name
F
i
s
h
i
n
g

T
o
d
a
y
T
o
d
a
y

w
e

r
e

g
o
i
n
g

f
i
s
h
i
n
g
.
W
e

r
e

g
o
i
n
g

t
o

t
h
e

l
a
k
e
.
I

w
i
l
l

t
a
k
e

t
h
e

p
o
l
e
s

a
n
d
J
o
e

w
i
l
l

b
r
i
n
g

t
h
e

b
a
i
t
.
Y
e
s
,

t
o
d
a
y

w
e

r
e

g
o
i
n
g

f
i
s
h
i
n
g
,
A
n
d

I

c
a
n

h
a
r
d
l
y

w
a
i
t
!

P
h
o
n
e
m
i
c

A
w
a
r
e
n
e
s
s
:


l
o
n
g

/
a

/
Rhymes and Chimes 161
©

M
a
c
m
i
l
l
a
n
/
M
c
G
r
a
w
-
H
i
l
l
Name
M
y

C
a
r
e
f
r
e
e

D
o
g
M
y

d
o
g

i
s

v
e
r
y

c
a
r
e
f
r
e
e
.
H
e

g
r
e
e
t
s

e
v
e
r
y
o
n
e
,

y
o
u

s
e
e
.
S
o

d
o
n

t

s
c
r
e
a
m

w
h
e
n

y
o
u

m
e
e
t

H
e

i
s

r
e
a
l
l
y

s
o

s
w
e
e
t

A
n
d

h
e

l
l

s
o
o
n

l
e
t

y
o
u

u
p

o
f
f

t
h
e

s
t
r
e
e
t
!
P
h
o
n
e
m
i
c

A
w
a
r
e
n
e
s
s
:


l
o
n
g

/
¯
e
/
162 Rhymes and Chimes
©

M
a
c
m
i
l
l
a
n
/
M
c
G
r
a
w
-
H
i
l
l
Name
P
u
p
p
y

o
r

G
u
p
p
y
?
W
o
u
l
d

y
o
u

b
e

h
a
p
p
y
I
f

y
o
u

w
a
n
t
e
d

a

p
u
p
p
y
,
B
u
t

y
o
u
r

m
o
m
m
y

o
r

d
a
d
d
y
G
o
t

y
o
u

a

g
u
p
p
y
?
P
h
o
n
e
m
i
c

A
w
a
r
e
n
e
s
s
:


f
i
n
a
l

l
o
n
g

/
¯
e
/
Rhymes and Chimes 163
©

M
a
c
m
i
l
l
a
n
/
M
c
G
r
a
w
-
H
i
l
l
Name
O
u
t

i
n

t
h
e

C
o
l
d
I

g
o

o
u
t

i
n

t
h
e

c
o
l
d
T
o

w
a
t
c
h

t
h
e

s
n
o
w
f
l
a
k
e
s

f
l
o
a
t
.
I

h
o
l
d

o
u
t

b
o
t
h

m
y

h
a
n
d
s
,
B
u
t

t
h
e
y

l
a
n
d

u
p
o
n

m
y

c
o
a
t
!
P
h
o
n
e
m
i
c

A
w
a
r
e
n
e
s
s
:


l
o
n
g


/
o

/
164 Rhymes and Chimes
©

M
a
c
m
i
l
l
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Rhymes and Chimes 165
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166 Rhymes and Chimes
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Rhymes and Chimes 167
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168 Rhymes and Chimes
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Rhymes and Chimes 169
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170 Rhymes and Chimes
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Rhymes and Chimes 171
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Rhymes and Chimes 173
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Name
Reader Response
Title of Book:
Author:
How did you like this book? Circle a face.
Liked Okay Disliked

Response: Draw a picture of a new cover for this book.
Include the story title and author on the cover.
174 Reader Response: Fiction
©

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Name
Reader Response
Title of Book:
Author:
How did you like this book? Circle a face.
Liked Okay Disliked

Response: Draw a picture of what you learned. Label your
picture.
Reader Response: Nonfiction 175
©

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Name
Reader Response
Title of Book:
Author:
How did you like this book? Circle a face.
Liked Okay Disliked

Response: Choose three words that you liked in the poem.
Draw a picture of how you feel those words look.
176 Reader Response: Poetry
©

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My Writer’s Checklist
Fiction

Put a check by the items you completed.
Do I have a main character?
Do I tell about interesting events?
Do I use descriptive words?
Do I have a beginning, middle, and end?
Did I check my punctuation and spelling?
What did I do well in my writing?
1.
2.
What will I change when I revise this work?
1.
2.
Teacher: The main character can be the child in first person. See also Proofreading
Marks, page 179, and Writing Rubrics, pages 180 –186.
Writer’s Checklists 177
Name
©

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My Writer’s Checklist
Nonfiction

Put a check by the items you completed.
Do I have a main idea?
Do I have details that tell more about my main idea?
Do I start with a sentence that tells what my topic is?
Do I clearly explain my topic for my reader?
Did I check my punctuation and spelling?
What did I do well in my writing?
1.
2.
What will I change when I revise this work?
1.
2.
Teacher: See also Proofreading Marks, page 179, and Writing Rubrics, pages 180 –186.
178 Writer’s Checklists
Name
Proofreading Marks
Make a capital letter. we went to the park.
Make a small letter. We walked by the Lake.
Add a period. The fish were jumping
Check spelling. The sky was beuatiful.
Add. Then ate lunch.
Take out. The tall trees were very tall.
New paragraph The town seemed busy and noisy
after our day at the park.
©

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180 Unit 1 • Personal Narrative Writing Rubrics



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Writing Rubrics Unit 2 • How-To Article 181



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182 Unit 3 • Persuasive Letter Writing Rubrics



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d
Writing Rubrics Unit 4 • Expository Writing 183



E
x
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o
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d







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4
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184 Unit 5 • Fictional Narrative Writing Rubrics



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Writing Rubrics Unit 6 • Compare and Contrast Article 185



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186 Writing Rubrics
Writing to a Picture Prompt
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Children are sometimes asked to write about
a picture instead of just responding to a writing
prompt. The child will either tell about what they see
in the picture, or write about something related to
the picture. The form of the writing is usually a story
or an essay.
Use the picture prompts as additional writing
practice or to help children prepare for writing tasks
on standardized tests.
Instruct children to do the following:
Before Writing
1. Look closely at the picture. Think about what is happening in the
picture.
2. Ask yourself questions about the picture:
• Where and when are the events shown in the picture taking place?
• Who or what is in the picture? What are they doing?
• Can you tell what is happening? What event may have happened
prior to this one? What do you think might happen next?
3. You can use a graphic organizer to organize your ideas before you
begin to write. You can also make an outline, create an idea web, or do
other prewriting work.
During Writing
Use a graphic organizer, or other prewriting work, to write about what is
happening in the picture.
After Writing
1. Use the Writer’s Checklists, pages 177–178, to help you check your
writing.
2. Proofread your writing using Proofreading Marks, page 179.
Picture Prompts 187
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Name
Write to a picture prompt. Look at the picture of three firemen.
Write a story about what might be happening.
Writing Tips
• Use a graphic organizer to organize your thoughts.
• Write your story on lined paper.
• Proofread your story.
188 Unit 1 • Fighting the Fire Picture Prompts
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Write to a picture prompt. Look at the picture below. Write a
story about going to the doctor.
Writing Tips
• Use a graphic organizer to organize your thoughts.
• Write your story on lined paper.
• Proofread your story.
Picture Prompts Unit 2 • A Trip to the Emergency Room 189
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Write to a picture prompt. Look at the picture of people finding
fossils. Write a story about what might be happening.
Writing Tips
• Use a graphic organizer to organize your thoughts.
• Write your story on lined paper.
• Proofread your story.
190 Unit 3 • Meet the Super Croc Picture Prompts
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Write to a picture prompt. Look at the picture below. Write a
story about helping to keep Earth clean.

Writing Tips
• Use a graphic organizer to organize your thoughts.
• Write your story on lined paper.
• Proofread your story.
Picture Prompts Unit 4 • A Way to Help Planet Earth 191
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Write to a picture prompt. Look at the photograph. What might it
be like to explore a new place? Write a story about it.
Writing Tips
• Use a graphic organizer to organize your thoughts.
• Write your story on lined paper.
• Proofread your story.
192 Unit 5 • Columbus Explores New Lands Picture Prompts
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Write to a picture prompt. Look at the photograph below. The
girl is about to start painting. If you were the painter, what would
you paint? Write about your painting.
Writing Tips
• Use a graphic organizer to organize your thoughts.
• Write your story on lined paper.
• Proofread your story.
Picture Prompts Unit 6 • Music of the Stone Age 193
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Handwriting
A Communication TooI
Although computers are available, many
tasks require handwriting. Keeping journals,
completing forms, taking notes, making
shopping or organizational lists, and reading
handwriting are practical uses of this skill.
Writing Readiness
Before children begin to write, they need to
develop certain fine motor skills. These are
examples of warm-up activities:
• Play “Simon Says” using fingers only.
• Sing finger plays such as “Where Is Thumb-
kin?” and “The Eensie Weensie Spider,”
or sing songs that use Signed English or
American Sign Language.
• Use mazes that require children to move
their writing instruments from left to right.
Determining Handedness
Keys to determining handedness in a
child:
• With which hand does the child eat? This
hand is likely to become the dominant
hand.
• Does the child start coloring with one hand
and then switch to the other? This may be
due to fatigue or lack of hand preference.
• Does the child cross midline to pick things
up? Place items directly in front of the child
to see if one hand is preferred.
• Does the child do better with one hand or
the other?
The Mechanics of Writing
Desk and Chair
• Chair height should allow feet to rest flat
on the floor.
• Desk height should be two inches above
the level of the elbows when the child is
sitting.
• There should be an inch between the child
and the desk.
• The child should sit erect with elbows rest-
ing on the desk.
• Models of letters should be on the desk or
at eye level.

Paper Position
• Right-handed children should
turn the paper so that the lower
left-hand corner of the paper
points to the abdomen.
• Left-handed children should
turn the paper so that the lower
right-hand corner of the paper
points to the abdomen.
• The nondominant hand should
anchor the paper near the top so that the
paper doesn’t slide.
• The child should move the paper up as
he or she nears the bottom of the paper.
Many children do not think of this.
The Writing Instrument Grasp
The writing instrument must be held in
a way that allows for fluid dynamic
movement.
Functional Grasp Patterns
• Tripod Grasp The writing
instrument is held with the tip
of the thumb and the index
finger and rests against the
side of the third finger. The
thumb and index finger form a circle.
194 Handwriting Basics
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• Quadrupod Grasp The writing
instrument is held with the
tip of the thumb and index
finger and rests against the
fourth finger. The thumb and
index finger form a circle.
Incorrect Grasp Patterns
• Fisted Grasp The writing
instrument is held in a
fisted hand.
• Pronated Grasp The writ-
ing instrument is held
diagonally within the
hand with the tips of the
thumb and index finger on
the writing instrument but
with no support from other
fingers.
• Five-Finger Grasp The writing
instrument is held with the
tips of all five fingers.
• Flexed or Hooked Wrist A
flexed or bent wrist is typical
with left-handed writers and
is also present in some right-
handed writers.
Correcting Grasp Patterns
• Have children play counting games with an
eye dropper and water.
• Have children pick up small objects with
a tweezer.
• Have children pick up small coins using just
the thumb and index finger.
• To correct wrist position, have children
check their posture and paper placement.
Evaluation Checklist
Functional handwriting is made up of two
elements, legibility and functional speed.
Legibility in Writing
Formation and Strokes


Do circular shapes close?


Are downstrokes parallel?


Do circular shapes and downstrokes
touch?


Are the heights of capital letters equal?


Are the heights of lowercase letters
equal?


Are the lengths of the extenders and
descenders the same for all letters?


Do cursive letters that finish at the top
join the next letter? ( b, o, v, w )


Do cursive letters that finish at the bottom
join the next letter? ( a, c, d, e, h, i,
k, l, m, n, r, s, t, u, x )


Do cursive letters with descenders join the
next letter? ( f, g, j, p, q, y, z )


Is the vertical slant of all letters
consistent?


Do all letters rest on the line?
Directionality


Are letters and words formed from left to
right?


Are letters and words formed from top to
bottom?
Spacing


Are the spaces between letters equal?


Are the spaces between words equal?


Are spaces between sentences equal?


Are top, bottom, and side margins even?
Speed
The prettiest handwriting is not functional if
it takes students too long to complete their
work. After introducing students to writing
individual letters, add time limits to copying
or writing assignments. Check for legibility.
Handwriting Basics 195
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A a
B b
C c
D d
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196 Handwriting Practice
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Handwriting Practice 197
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N n
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R r
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198 Handwriting Practice
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Write the Alphabet
T t
U u
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W w
X x
Y y
Z z














Handwriting Practice 199
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A a
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C c
D d
E e
F f




200 Handwriting Practice
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Handwriting Practice 201
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202 Handwriting Practice
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Handwriting Practice 203
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Handwriting Models—Slant
A B C D E F G H
I J K L M N O
P Q R S T U V
W X Y Z
a b c d e f g h
i j k l m n o p
q r s t u v w
x y z
204 Handwriting Models
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Handwriting Practice
Handwriting Models 205
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Good Listening and
Speaking Habits
In our classroom we:
• Follow class procedures and rules
• Respect other people’s feelings and ideas
• Speak clearly so that others can understand
• Listen to one another thoughtfully
• Take turns speaking
• Do not criticize people because of their ideas
• Ask good questions
• Answer questions thoughtfully
• Do our best and encourage others to do their best
206 Classroom Behavior Checklist

Photography Credits
192: Steve Mason/Getty Images. 193: PunchStock/PhotoDisc.

A

Published by Macmillan/McGraw-Hill, of McGraw-Hill Education, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., Two Penn Plaza, New York, New York 10121. Copyright © by Macmillan/McGraw-Hill. All rights reserved. The contents, or parts thereof, may be reproduced in print form for non-profit educational use with Treasures, provided such reproductions bear copyright notice, but may not be reproduced in any form for any other purpose without the prior written consent of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., including, but not limited to, network storage or transmission, or broadcast for distance learning. Printed in the United States of America 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 071 11 10 09 08 07

Decodable Passages
Contents..................................................................................2 Directions ................................................................................4 Passages ................................................................................5

Word Study
Contents................................................................................65 Letter Cards ..........................................................................66 Spelling Word Cards .............................................................68 Vocabulary Word Cards ........................................................98 Sound Boxes.......................................................................128 Games.................................................................................130

Additional Literacy Support
Contents..............................................................................143 Rhymes and Chimes ...........................................................144 Reader Response Sheets ...................................................174
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Writer’s Checklists ..............................................................177 Proofreading Marks.............................................................179 Writing Rubrics....................................................................180 Picture Prompts...................................................................187 Handwriting .........................................................................194 Classroom Behavior Checklist.............................................206

Decodable Passages
Unit 1 Week 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
At Bat Tag! Week 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Tom Gets a Pet Les Is on a Jet Week 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Dad Saves a Cat Ned in the Lake Week 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Bike Ride! Game Time Week 5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Jove and Hope A New Time Zone Week 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Light in a Hole Mike and Meg Week 5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Joe Rows a Boat Moe Mows

Unit 3 Week 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Lee Tells Silly Tales Lady the Seal Week 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Good Rules Bad Jude Week 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 A Shell on the Shore Sheep and Goats Week 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Rich the Chick Jill’s Sash Week 5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Chicks Can Scratch! The Scared Cat
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Unit 2 Week 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
A Pine for Luke Jude’s Tune Week 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 A Slug on a Slope Spike’s Slip Week 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Gail Is in Pain! Rain on a Sail

2

Decodable Passages

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Paul and Dawn Tawny’s Paw Week 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 An Ape Named Marty Bart Gets a Pet Week 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 Homer and Ameer Paneer Hears Thunder Week 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Scowl the Owl Howling Sounds © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill Week 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Gnalla and the Wren Mr. . . . . . . Moy’s Toys Troy Joins Joy Week 3 . . . . . . . . . . . Wrago’s Wrench Week 5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Arthur the Goat Burt’s Perch Week 3 . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Mr. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Decodable Passages Unit 4 Week 1 . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Should Brooke Cook? A Look by the Brook Week 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 The Sire’s Crier Kire’s Tires Unit 5 Week 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Regis and Cindy’s Spacecraft Brice in Space Unit 6 Week 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Princess Flair Sar’s Tar Week 3 . . . . . . . . . 41 The Storm That Blew Stew’s Bruise Week 5 . 55 A Smudge for Smidge Midge’s Picnic Week 2 . . . . . . 61 Dora’s Wings Blair’s Corn Planter Week 5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Alissa’s Job Yucca and Bananas for Pamela Decodable Passages 3 . . .

Each passage contains words based on the phonics introduced in that particular week. writing. and phonics comprehension. you may have students complete the activity to extend their reading. Vocabulary words are also used in the passages to provide students with additional practice at identifying and reading the words. An activity is provided at the bottom of each page. and is at least 75% decodable. After students have read the passage(s) on the page. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 4 Decodable Passages .Decodable Passages Directions The decodable passages that follow are divided by unit and week.

Decodable Passages Unit 1 • Week 1 5 . Where is it? © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill Sam has to bat. Pam hits the ball. “Can Sam hit it far?” Sam hits it far.Phonics Name short a and i At Bat Pam is at bat. Bill will bat. Bill hits the ball. Activity Circle the words that have a short a sound. Will Sam hit the ball? Pam whispers to Bill. Pam will carefully pass the bat to Bill.

Tim wins a pin as big as a pan! Activity Underline the words that have a short i sound. He did not miss! Jan. “Did I win?” asks Tim. Tim is excited. 6 Unit 1 • Week 1 Decodable Passages © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill . Tim.Phonics Name short a and i Tag! Jan ran to tag Tim. and Dan sat on a mat. Tim ran to tag Dan. “You did!” says Jan.

Tom enjoys his pet pup. The pups sit on a rug. The pup runs and hops. Tom met six pigs. Tom met six pups. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill Activity Underline the words that have a short e sound. Decodable Passages Unit 1 • Week 2 7 . The hens sit in the sun. Tom gets a pup for a pet. o. and u Tom Gets a Pet Tom met six hens. The pigs sit in the mud.Phonics Name short e.

He has a pen and a top. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill The jet is hot. Jill has a bag with a pin. He lets her spin the top. Les shares his top with Jill. and u Les Is on a Jet Les gets on a jet.Phonics Name short e. o. Jill gets a fan. It is a lot less hot! Activity Underline the words that have a short o or u sound. Jill has a pin for Les. Les sits with Jill. 8 Unit 1 • Week 2 Decodable Passages .

Decodable Passages Unit 1 • Week 3 9 . A cat is in a well! “Wake up! Wake up!” says Jake to his dad. Activity Write a sentence about Jake’s cat. His dad runs to the well.Phonics Name short a. / a /a_e Dad Saves a Cat Jake’s dad is in bed. Jake has to wake him. He will use a rake to save the cat. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill The cat is safe. He can save it. Jake lets it sit in his lap. His dad is a firefighter.

The sun is very hot. Ned and Pup jump and swim. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill Ned can see Dave and Kate.Phonics Name short a. / a /a_e Ned in the Lake Ned sits by a big lake. Ned can take his pet pup. Ned and Pup swim with Dave and Kate. Dave and Kate jump in the lake. 10 Unit 1 • Week 3 Decodable Passages . Activity Make a list of words that rhyme with lake. Ned can jump in the lake. The pup can swim in the lake.

Mike rides well and is not late. His mom has her arms open wide. She gives him a hug. Mike will ride up a hill. “Time to dine!” © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill Activity Write a story about Mike’s bike. Decodable Passages Unit 1 • Week 4 11 . It will take Mike a long time.Phonics Name i. “Time to ride!” Mike yells. He will ride to his home on the lake. / ı /i_e Bike Ride! Mike likes to ride his bike. The ride is five miles. “I made pancakes!” Mom says.

He likes this game. / ı /i_e Game Time Miles has a game with tiles.Phonics Name i. Miles lines his tiles up on the mat. His dad takes tiles. He is nice when he does not win. His game has lots of tiles. Miles can not win all the time. They will play his game. Activity Underline the words that are spelled with an i. 12 Unit 1 • Week 4 Decodable Passages © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill . His mom and dad sit on a mat. Then he takes tiles. It is a language game. His mom takes tiles. He smiles.

Phonics Name o. Jove likes Hope a lot! © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill Hope takes a long nap. Jove sits on Hope’s lap. / o /o_e Jove and Hope Jove is a pup. Hope gets up and gives Jove a big hug! Activity Circle the words that have a short o sound. Decodable Passages Unit 1 • Week 5 13 . Hope is his mom. Jove pokes Hope with his big nose.

14 Unit 1 • Week 5 Decodable Passages © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill . and bat.” Activity Write about other things Jan might do in America. /o/o_e A New Time Zone Jan’s home is in Rome. mitt. “It will not be a bore. He thinks he will like it. He will be in an earlier time zone. He will take a jet to America. Jan will play games like other kids.Phonics Name o. Jan will ride a bike to a big lake. “I will like it!” says Jan. I will have fun. He will take a cap.

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill Tom has a rose. Activity Write about another kind of tree or flower. Decodable Passages Unit 2 • Week 1 15 . It is big and wide. Tom ties his rose to a tube so it can stay up. It has six buds.Phonics Name ˘ u /u. Tom gives it water so it will get big. A pine and a rose like lots of water and sun. It makes cones that hide its seeds. / u /u_e A Pine for Luke Luke has a pine tree.

” said Bud.” said Dad.Phonics Name ˘ u /u.” his dad said. Activity Write your own words to a tune. Jude has a tune he hums as he has fun in the mud. Jude. He likes to hum. / u /u_e Jude’s Tune Jude’s dad lets him play in the mud. Bud hums Jude’s tune to his dad. too. “Yes. “Can I make a tune about mud?” asked Jude. that is fine. “I like Jude’s tune. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill Jude has a neighbor named Bud. “It is Jude’s mud tune. 16 Unit 2 • Week 1 Decodable Passages .

She gave Stan a tube. /sp/sp. /sk/sk. The slug slid in. His mom slid down the slope. /st/st A Slug on a Slope Stan sat on a slope. Decodable Passages Unit 2 • Week 2 17 . “I rescued him!” Activity Tell how you would rescue an animal stuck in the mud. “I see a slug—a big slug! It is a slug in the mud!” cried Stan.Phonics Name sl/sl. “The slug will not get wet!” said Stan. “Rescue the slug!” she yelled. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill Stan put the tube in the mud. He dug a hole in the wet mud. /dr/dr.

“I will give you a bone. He gets a rope. /dr/dr. Activity Tell how Drake might have told his dad about Spike. /sk/sk. Then I will get a vet!” says his dad. “I can pull the sled with the rope. A young pup slips and takes a spill. 18 Unit 2 • Week 2 Decodable Passages © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill . Drake puts the pup on the sled.Phonics Name sl/sl.” says Drake. “I will take him home and name him Spike.” Spike and Drake skip home. /st/st Spike’s Slip Drake is on a sled. /sp/sp. Drake’s dad pets Spike.

Decodable Passages Unit 2 • Week 3 19 . Gail will stay in bed and rest. Activity Write about a time you had to stay in bed.Phonics Name a /ay.” © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill “Stay still. ai Gail Is in Pain! Gail is in bed. She fell in a hole and cut her leg. May. “But she must stay in bed and rest up.” said Gail’s mom. “Gail will be fine. “Stop! Do not slide your leg in bed!” Gail gets lots and lots of mail. Gail is in pain! She may have a broken bone.” said Dr.

20 Unit 2 • Week 3 Decodable Passages © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill . ai Rain on a Sail Fay’s home is on a bay. Fay and Dad stay safe! Activity Make a list of words that are spelled with ay or ai.Phonics Name a /ay. On a Sunday in May. Dad got them back to the bay. they set sail. The wind cut the sail. Then the rain came. Then the wind came. She likes to sail with Dad in May and June. Dad had to tug on a rope.

” he sighs. ie. “It may not like my light.” Activity Write about why a mole might not like light. It is in a hole. He will lie by the hole and wait for the mole. He drops the rope in the hole. “It was such a sight!” Ty ties a light on a rope. Might the mole come out at night? Ty will rest.Phonics Name ı /i. Decodable Passages Unit 2 • Week 4 21 . igh. Ty will sit right by the hole. It does not like the light. “The mole peered out of its hole!” yells Ty. y Light in a Hole Ty spots a mole. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill “I do not spot the mole.

but at night Mike likes to fight. Then I might be liked!” Activity Write about why you think Mike is not liked. “Stop. Every fox recognizes Mike as a bright fox. likes to lie in the sunlight. “I will not fight. Mike!” cried Meg.Phonics Name ı /i. Stay by Mom and lie in the sun!” “Right. igh. His mom.” sighs Mike. Meg. A fox might like Mike. ie. y Mike and Meg High on a hill is a red fox named Mike. “Try not to fight. 22 Unit 2 • Week 4 Decodable Passages © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill .

Joe and Bo get in the boat and row in the moat. He likes to row his boat in the moat around his home. “I row five times a day!” Bo gets in the boat to help Joe row.” Joe tells Bo. “I know if I row I can stay fit. His friend Bo will row with him.” Joe tells Bo. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill Activity Write about what you would do if you had a moat by your home. Joe puts on a uniform to row. oe Joe Rows a Boat Joe has a boat at home.Phonics Name o /o. ow. oa. Decodable Passages Unit 2 • Week 5 23 . “I row a lot. Dad will watch.

ow.Phonics Name o /o. “Moe. oa.” says Moe. Moe knows a girl named Jo who mows grass. Activity Write about why Moe helped Jo. “Can you mow for me?” “Oh. “I mow day and night. no!” cries Moe. Jo calls Moe. He mows grass. I will mow for you!” Jo sits as Moe mows. 24 Unit 2 • Week 5 Decodable Passages © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill . Jo mows fast but does not mow at night. She mows a lot on Sunday. oe Moe Mows Moe has a job. I broke my toe!” Jo tells Moe. “I hope you get well fast. Moe starts on the right and mows until the grass is low.

bee. silly tales. Lee had a silly dream of a queen.” weeps the queen. They eat the beans at a feast. The queen. and fleas get the beans. ea. But the hill is too steep. A queen sees the green beans and tries to free them from the mud. I am too weak. ee.Phonics Name e /e. He tells tales about his dreams. But the bee will not speak. “Please. y Lee Tells Silly Tales Lee likes to tell funny. The queen tells a bee to get the beans. Nineteen green beans got stuck deep in the mud. Decodable Passages Unit 3 • Week 1 25 . bee. The beans are a yummy treat! © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill Activity Write another tale that Lee would tell. and she cannot get to them. The bee tells three fleas to help.

” Activity Make up a funny seal tune that Sally might squeak. “You do like to put on a show!” Sally says. ee. ea. Sally plays with a seal named Lady. “You make it easy to play and have fun. Sally waits until Lady peeks her nose up out of the reeds and squeaks a funny seal tune. Sally and Lady like to play hide-and-seek. Then she can dive deep into the sea to hide in the reeds. Sally can see Lady float up to the top to breathe. 26 Unit 3 • Week 1 Decodable Passages © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill . Lady can leap high. y Lady the Seal Sally likes to sail on the sea.Phonics Name e /e. Lady’s coat is wet and sleek.

try to follow the rules. Using a floating tube in the water is safe.Phonics Name u /u. too. Your teacher wants you to keep safe. Do not assume that a rule is made to make you mad. When you are in someone else’s home. What rules must you follow? © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill Activity Make a list of rules you should follow in the classroom. Staying out of the street is a good rule. too. You do not want to be rude! It is a good idea to follow rules in class. Decodable Passages Unit 3 • Week 2 27 . u_e Good Rules Rules are made to keep us safe.

She even repeated the swimming rule: “Do not run on the deck. The deck was wet and he cut his hand.Phonics Name u /u. “I am going to put a bit of cream from this tube on your hand. “Will I be able to swim?” he asked. “Yes. His mom had told him to be careful. 28 Unit 3 • Week 2 Decodable Passages © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill . But he will follow the rules from now on! Activity Write about rules you should follow at the pool. He ran. Dr. June told Jude. Jude.” Jude was upset. Jude was not happy. June. u_e Bad Jude Jude fell and cut his hand.” said Dr.” Jude did not listen. But not until you use up all the cream in this tube.

Unable to tell when the shell came to the shore. There is a chip in it. thin shell. I do not think so. Did a clam live in it?” Thad asks. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill Activity Write about a shell you have seen. Decodable Passages Unit 3 • Week 3 29 . “I will share this with Jeff. /th/th.Phonics Name ch/ch. He got it on the shore. “Who lived in this shell?” Thad asks. He shows Jeff the shell.” says Jeff. “No. Thad takes a guess. /wh/wh A Shell on the Shore Thad found a big. “It has a chip in it but it is still white. “Yes. “Did it come from a ship?” asks Jeff. I think so. I do not think it is ancient.” says Thad. /sh/sh.” Thad runs to see Jeff.

I make cheese from the goat’s milk. I raise goats. Dogs chase the sheep on the farm. “I own nine sheep and five goats. That is their job.Phonics Name ch/ch. 30 Unit 3 • Week 3 Decodable Passages © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill . /wh/wh Sheep and Goats Chad likes to go to the farm. Activity Write about other jobs you might like to have on a farm. “Which job can I do?” asks Chad. /sh/sh. The sheep’s hair can be used to make sheets and coats. /th/th.” Pat tells Chad. Chad stays and helps Pat. Pat has a job at the farm. Pat tells Chad that he can help shear the sheep’s hair. He can see a lot of sheep and goats. Chad thinks it’s fun to have a job with sheep and goats.

“You will see a chick that can do math!” yells Seth. /f/ph RICH THE CHICK SHOW Rich the Chick Seth will perform in a show. He must chicks and cut the chain. “It is a play about a chick named Rich!” Seth will be Rich the chick in the play. Decodable Passages Unit 3 • Week 4 31 . /sh/sh. “I do it each day!” © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill Rich must take a bath and dash up the path.Phonics Name ch/ch. Rich is an odd chick. He lives by the lake with lots of fish. Rich sees a ranch with lots of sad chicks! Rich must help these chicks. He likes to play ball and pitch. “Math is not bad. /th/th. tch. The chick can also do math. They will be free in a flash! 2+ 1 1= 4- 3= 3 Activity Write a short play.” Rich the chick likes to say.

“This does match!” she cries.” says Mitch. “What a day!” sighs Mitch. Jill has lost her red sash! “What a shame. Mitch is in a rush. /f/ph Jill’s Sash Mitch makes clothes for shows.” Jill hugs Mitch when he ties on the sash. 32 Unit 3 • Week 4 Decodable Passages © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill .Phonics Name ch/ch. He has to dash to a show. tch. /th/th. “Did I stitch this up or down? I did not take notes!” Mitch must rush the white sash to Jill. Activity Write about the show that Jill is doing. “I hope it will match. /sh/sh. “I ran out of red! I will make Jill a white sash. “I hope Jill will like it. “Just my luck!” he moans.” he says.” But Mitch can not remember how to make the sash. He gets cash to buy cloth.

He has dogs. Activity Draw what happens if Stretch puts his chicks on a leash. Stretch puts a leash on his dogs. He feeds his animals scraps. Decodable Passages Unit 3 • Week 5 33 . Then he goes to his home to eat. Each day. pigs. /str/str- Chicks Can Scratch! Stretch lives on Spring Street. and pigs. So is Stretch. He takes them for a walk on Spring Street. They get mad and scratch him! The chicks stay at home and strut around. cats. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill “Is it time for lunch yet?” asks Stretch impatiently.Phonics Name skr/scr-. and chicks. cats. /spr/spr-. He then sprays the pens to clean them. and pigs are home. the dogs. By ten. cats. Stretch can not put his chicks on a leash.

He takes the cat to the steps and feeds it milk. “You need to rest!” Then Will and the cat take a nap. “Did you sprain your leg? Can I pick you up?” The cat is nearly out of Will’s reach.” says Will. “Do not scratch. cat. “I will save you!” Will strains to keep the cat in his arms. /spr/spr-. Activity Write about what happens to the cat next.” begs Will. “Not yet. Will sees that the cat is not walking well. The cat is scared. “Oh my!” yells Will. He scrapes the sides and then paints white stripes. 34 Unit 3 • Week 5 Decodable Passages © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill . As he paints. /str/str- The Scared Cat Will has to paint the back steps.Phonics Name skr/scr-. The cat laps it up and demands more. a stray cat snoops around the steps.

He needs to eat each day. Marty is a kind ape! © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill Activity Write about another animal that eats fruit or leaves. He eats fruit and leaves seeds or a core. it is a bore to just sit. Marty likes to have fun! Marty must stay far from cars. He likes to sort sticks and run. Decodable Passages Unit 4 • Week 1 35 . He needs to live in the forest where it is warm and safe. He likes to play and see the night sky. He also nibbles on corn. Marty likes to lie under the stars. For Marty.Phonics Name är/ar. He likes to swing from his arm. Marty can go far from his home to seek food. /ôr/or An Ape Named Marty Marty is an ape.

“Pythons hiss and hiss!” © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill Bart starts to think. He will go and find a pet. But he needs to learn more about what kind of pet he can get. Ned asks. what pet will you get?” “I will get a snake!” Bart tells Ned. ôr/or Bart Gets a Pet Bart wants to have a pet. “Bart. Bart gets an idea. “It can slide on my carpet. “I want a python!” he screams. Bart darts out and sees Ned. 36 Unit 4 • Week 1 Decodable Passages .Phonics Name är/ar. After he reads about pets. “I think I will get a hamster instead!” Activity Write about a pet you would like to have. “Bart!” Ned cries.” He will go and get this pet.

He lives with them. Kurt. That is what you do!” say the yaks.” He finds five yaks. Bert. Arthur likes to eat wheat. He was deserted by his herd. Decodable Passages Unit 4 • Week 2 37 . Their names are Fern. He has a lot of fur but runs and hides when it freezes outside. “I do not need to go with a herd!” thinks Arthur.Phonics Name ûr/ er. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill The yaks do not feel bad for Arthur.” “Yes. Wes. ir. His fur is soft and keeps him very warm! Activity Write about how Arthur might feel about being deserted. Arthur. “I will be fine without them. it is true. “I hate the snow!” Arthur moans. and Fay. “I leave when the snow falls. ur Arthur the Goat Arthur is a goat.

ur Burt’s Perch Tate has a bird named Burt. “Ha. That way.” Tate went shopping. Burt.Phonics Name ûr/ er. 38 Unit 4 • Week 2 Decodable Passages © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill . “I will get red paint and a stick and make you a perch. nice perch!” yells Burt. ha.” says Tate. Sir!” “I am happy you like it. Tate will make a perch for Burt. Burt is red and lives with a cat named Sir. “Nice perch. “I will make you a red perch. “Fine. Sir likes to bother Burt. He made a perch for Burt. He got paint and a stick.” says Tate. Sir is not so happy! Activity Write about how Tate might have made the perch.” says Tate. Burt will not get hurt. ir. “Do you like red?” “I really like red!” yells Burt.

Then she looked at what Brooke had made for dinner. It was her turn to cook. Brooke would show her! The hardest part so far had to be reading the cookbook. “Brooke can cook!” © Macmillan/McGraw–Hill Activity Write about your favorite meal and who cooks it. Decodable Passages Unit 4 • Week 3 39 . Would she like the fish? She took a bit of it. So she took a fish from the brook and shook off the water. Then Brooke’s sister ran into the house. She took the wood and fish to the stove. ou Should Brooke Cook? Brooke stood by the stove. She had seen her dad cook a fish on a piece of wood. “Did you cook?” she asked. Her sister did not think Brooke was a good cook. Then she yelled.Phonics Name º u /oo.

“It looks like you own a lucky hook!” Activity Write your own tale about what Ryan finds on the hook. “We can look for hidden treasures in nooks!” said Ryan.” said Dad. “That is a good book!” said Dad. He had to tug. He gave Ryan the hook. “I see a hook!” yelled Ryan. Ryan put it in the water and remained still.Phonics Name º u /oo. “I got something!” he said. “We can put the hook in the brook to look. “What can we do with it?” They stood by the brook and looked at the hook. 40 Unit 4 • Week 3 Decodable Passages © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill . ou A Look by the Brook Ryan and his dad went to a brook and took a look. but the hook came up. Dad put one foot in the brook. A book was on the hook.

Phonics Name ü/oo. “I had better close the windows. ue The Storm That Blew Sue was chewing the stew that her mom made. it will not destroy my home!” Sue closed the windows just in time. ew. There was a big boom in the back room! “Oh my!” said Sue. “Will it rain?” Sue thought. ui. The sky was blue. There must be a lot of wind!” Sue went to the back room and peered outside. The rain started to fall hard when she closed the last one! © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill Activity Write directions to follow during a storm. The sky was gray. If there is a storm. She peered outside. she went to the back room again. “The window blew shut. oe. Decodable Passages Unit 4 • Week 4 41 . After she finished eating. Sue went back to eat the rest of her stew and drink her fruit juice.

That was no fun at all!” Write about how Stew got a bruise on his arm. “Why did it have to flood today?” Stew pushed and pushed until his car was home.” he sighed. He did his best to move the car. Stew spotted a blue mark on his arm. Activity 42 Unit 4 • Week 4 Decodable Passages © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill . “The mud is preventing it from moving. oe. “Oh. It just would not move! Then Stew’s new car ran out of fuel. ue Stew’s Bruise Stew has a new blue bruise on his arm. “My arm hurts from pushing. “I do not want to push my car again. “I will have to push it!” exclaimed Stew. How did he get it? Stew’s new car got stuck in the mud after a flood.” Stew got out of his car. “I got a bruise. ui. no!” said Stew. He waded in the water. His arm got stuck in the car’s window.Phonics Name ü/oo.” he said. ew.

“You need to stay in the trees!” “I am sorry. One day. Suddenly. Decodable Passages Unit 4 • Week 5 43 .” he said. he saw his daughter. on the grass.” said Dawn. Dawn. “Why are you down there?” asked Paul. “You must not sit on the lawn.Phonics Name ô/au. “so you must not squeak and squawk on the lawn. aw Paul and Dawn Paul is a hawk. Dad. He swooped down and took her in his claws. Paul saw creatures crawl in the grass. Do not cause me to get mad!” Activity Write about what Dawn did next.” yelled Paul. He lives in a tree near Mr. “You are a hawk. Sawtaw’s home. and Mrs. “I had time to explore!” said Dawn. © Macmillan/McGraw–Hill “You are a noble hawk.” Paul said.

you bad cat.Phonics Name ô/au. Pam isn’t watching! Mrs. “You hurt your paw. Pautil. Then she saw that Tawny’s claw was bleeding. She lifted Tawny up. “You can get hurt outside. Mrs. Pautil. Pautil cleaned Tawny’s paw and let him go. Tawny is a cat and belongs to Mrs. and he wiggled to get loose. You must be careful!” With that. 44 Unit 4 • Week 5 Decodable Passages . there is a law about pets.” said Mrs. Tawny likes to tiptoe out of the yard when Mrs. aw Tawny’s Paw In the city of Gawtin. She set him on the floor inside. Cats and dogs can not be outside without their owners. “You are an indoor cat. Pautil. Pautil spotted Tawny outside this morning. Tawny!” she explained. “Bad cat!” said Mrs. Tawny lay down for a long nap! © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill Activity Write about how to keep pets safe.

“It is too dry!” he loudly complained one day. “let’s get out of town.Phonics Name ou/ow. It was wet and rainy. “It’s too wet!” © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill Scowl flew to tell his mom. ou Scowl the Owl The town of Thousand Owls is dry.” he said.” Scowl flew beyond Thousand Owls. One owl named Scowl always has a frown on his face. “I don’t like it here either!” said Scowl. But there are lots of owls! They sit outside the town hall. Scowl does not like Thousand Owls. It has not rained in Thousand Owls for five years! There is not a flower anywhere in the town. “Mom. Decodable Passages Unit 5 • Week 1 45 . Let’s go where it is wet part of the time and dry part of the time. We will have the best of both worlds!” Activity Write about Scowl’s next trip. “I want to get out of here. That is how he got his name.

When she came home. she told her classmates about her trip. yes!” exclaimed Lisa. ou Howling Sounds Lisa lives in New York. “It was very hot and dry there. 46 Unit 5 • Week 1 Decodable Passages © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill . It is warm there all year round. They are such outstanding creatures!” Lisa’s class asked to hear more. I will tell you what I found on my trip!” Lisa and her classmates ran to school. the bell sounded outside the school. “We’ll be late for class! But after class. “Oh.Phonics Name ou/ow. “Not now. They make loud sounds. “Some animals howl at night. Her dad just took her to Arizona. They made it just in time! Activity Write about what Lisa might have found on her trip.” said Lisa. Just then. “I saw lots of snakes.” “Did you see snakes?” asked Ted.” begged Lisa.

Moy?” he asks. “How about a toy king?” he asks Roy.Phonics Name oi/oi. Moy’s Toys Mr. He has a toy shop on Boyer Street. Moy and Roy grin. Mr. Moy make toys. oy Mr. Decodable Passages Unit 5 • Week 2 47 . Moy and Roy are happy. Moy. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill The boys and girls see the king and say. “It is indeed a royal king!” yells Roy with joy. They set the king out in the shop for sale. Boys and girls like to visit Mr. “Will others know what it is?” asks Roy. Mr. Activity Write about a toy you would make with Mr. Moy grins. Moy makes toys. “It is a joy to make toys!” says Roy. A boy named Roy helps Mr. “That is such a royal king!” Mr. “We can gather foil and start to make him!” Mr. Moy and see what he is making. “What are we making today.

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill Activity Create a new game to play outside. Jake says.” Joy spots a coin. oy Troy Joins Joy Joy is playing with her friends outside. Roy sees them playing and wants to join them. Jake. and Troy play tag. you can! Join us!” says Joy. We agree that you can join us. Jake.Phonics Name oi/oi. “Can I play. Troy. Joy.” Troy jumps up and down. Joy. Her brother. “Don’t be so annoying!” says Joy. 48 Unit 5 • Week 2 Decodable Passages . Troy. and Roy play tag late into the day. too?” asks Roy. “Yes. “Can I play with you?” he whines. “I want to be it. We are playing tag. “I like tag! Can I be it?” he asks Joy. too. wants to join them. Joy flips the coin and Troy wins. “We can flip a coin to see who will be it!” she says. “You don’t need to whine.

Decodable Passages Unit 5 • Week 3 49 . Rebba grins. Alissa’s teacher has asked the class to tell what job they want. Rebba.” Mrs.Phonics Name ә/a Alissa’s Job Alissa is learning about jobs. “Then I will return to America and make cakes in a bakery. It is Alissa’s turn. Who will go with you?” “I will go alone. She likes the idea that she can pick her job. “Alissa. what would you like to do?” asks Mrs.” says Mrs. Alissa! And I will go visit you in the bakery and watch you make cakes. Rebba. Activity Write about a job you would like to have. “I will go to China.” © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill Her class claps and claps. “I would like to travel!” exclaims Alissa.” says Alissa. They like that idea! “That is good. “Alissa. a voyage is a good idea but China is so far away.

When Pamela got home. 50 Unit 5 • Week 3 Decodable Passages © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill . and bananas. “You can visit a farm or a library to learn more. too. Maybe she will even get to eat them! Activity Write about other plants that we eat.” Pamela’s mom called a farm nearby while Pamela went to the library. The farm has vast fields for growing plants. “There are so many books about plants!” Pamela exclaimed. Today. She will see bananas. she had a lot to tell her mom.Phonics Name ә/a Yucca and Bananas for Pamela Pamela likes plants. yucca. “I can read about plants and then see them.” “That is a good idea!” said Pamela. She read about alfalfa. Pamela’s mom is taking her to the nearby farm. She is most interested in plants that she eats. yucca. “Why don’t you study about them?” asked Pamela’s mom yesterday. and other plants.

kn. “I know what you are doing!” exclaimed Gnalla. She took the seeds and dropped them on the ground. Decodable Passages Unit 5 • Week 4 51 . She kneeled to cut plants and trim blooming flowers. The wren stopped and looked at Gnalla. “Come and eat the seeds!” © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill Then Gnalla gave the wren some crumbs. /m/mb Gnalla and the Wren Gnalla has a garden. “It is a sign that it will be a good day!” she said. Suddenly. /r/wr.Phonics Name n/gn. Yesterday. a wren swooped down and landed in the garden. Gnalla grinned. Gnalla got some seeds. “Tweet!” yelled the wren as it flew away. “Here. what are you doing here?” asked Gnalla. Gnalla worked in her garden. Then it began pecking at the dirt. “Little wren. little wren. “You are eating gnats!” The wren looked at Gnalla again. Activity Write directions for feeding crumbs to birds.” she said.

“My sprinkler is leaking! I worked hard to stop it. Wrago got into his plumbing van and drove to Mrs. Knop exclaimed. Knop. he had to wring it out! When Mr. “I will be right there!” Mr.” he said. Mrs. kn. “Mr. He helps people when the pipes around their homes don’t work. Wrago’s Wrench Mr. “Wrago Plumbing. The phone rang.” “Don’t fret.Phonics Name n/gn. Wrago owns a plumbing company.” he said when he picked up the phone. Wrago fixes. 52 Unit 5 • Week 4 Decodable Passages © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill . The rag got so wet. Wrago’s wrench Write about another saved the day!” problem that Activity Mr. Mr. Wrago finished. Knop. Knop met him in the driveway. /r/wr. Knop’s house. He put a rag over the sprinkler while he worked. Mrs. Mrs. but my thumb got numb and my muscles started to hurt. I need help!” she wailed. “This is Mrs. Wrago got his wrench and started to work. /m/mb Mr.

” he whined.” said Cindy. “To the moon we go!” Cindy yelled. “Can you help me?” “Yes. she went to get supplies. jumping into the car. We can use these for the wheels. “Let’s make a fancy electric car that can fly to the moon!” said Cindy. “Good!” exclaimed Regis. use this pen to sketch the car. Decodable Passages Unit 5 • Week 5 53 . We also need four circles for the wheels. She found a pile of round rocks.” Cindy took the pen and began to draw. I will help. /j/g Regis and Cindy’s Spacecraft Regis and Cindy like to play. “First.” © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill Regis got red paint for Cindy. She painted the fancy electric car red and put the wheels on it. “Let’s go!” said Regis. Since Regis wasn’t drawing. “We need paper for the body of the car. Activity Write about what Regis and Cindy do on the moon. “These are circles. Then we can use the drawing to make a model of the car. /g/g.Phonics Name k/c. /s/c.

and someday I will walk on the moon!” © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill Activity Write about a place you want to explore. /g/g.” said Mrs.” Brice said to Mrs. Brice. He really enjoys reading books. “That is a very good idea.” Brice grinned as he thought about what he does every day. 54 Unit 5 • Week 5 Decodable Passages .Phonics Name k/c. Price. He even visits a science center on weekends. He always listens in class and does his homework. Price. /j/g Brice in Space When Brice gets older. /s/c. he wants to be an astronaut. it is important to study. “But I do not mind. I like to study. He dreams of placing his feet on the moon and making footprints. “I want to go to space.” he told his teacher. “Yes. “But you must study a lot before you can go to the moon! It is important to work hard now.

Smidge. She came home to make the fudge. lge. rge A Smudge for Smidge Marge is making fudge for a party. no!” she yelled. “I forgive you. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill Activity Decodable Passages Unit 6 • Week 1 55 . “I put it in there just a while ago. Marge needs a large amount since the party will be huge. ge. Marge went to fetch chocolate this morning. But what about my fudge?” Write about a new she moaned.Phonics Name j/dge. she saw something strange. snuck out of the pantry.” she explained. there can be no fudge!” Marge felt behind a ridge in the pantry. His face was full of chocolate. “Oh. nge. Her dog. “It should not have budged! Without the chocolate. When she went to her pantry. Marge leaned on a ledge. the chocolate was missing! Shocked. There had been a smudge of chocolate inside in the morning. flavor of fudge you would like to eat. Smidge licked Marge’s face. Now.

Phonics Name j/dge. “The rest is in the fridge at home. Then he called his friends.” said Midge. rge Midge’s Picnic “Let’s have a picnic in the park by the bridge. 56 Unit 6 • Week 1 Decodable Passages . His mom brought food and put it on the picnic ledges. His friends came. “It is time to judge who can make their tummy bulge the most!” declared Midge. ge. “I can put it in the fridge at home until the party.” When her mom returned. He arranged placemats on the ledges for a change of color.” said his mom. nge. and they devoured Draw and write about the food! a party you want © Macmillan/McGraw–Hill Activity to have. I will get it. “I will go to the market to get food. lge. “We can get a whole range of food!” Midge’s mom liked his idea. He cleaned the picnic ledges and set out games.” Midge stayed by the bridge to plan the picnic. Midge had finished setting up for the picnic.

no!” she wailed. One day. “What should Princess Flair do next?” she wondered. “I dare say I have a big cut on my arm!” She was far from a doctor. Princess Flair’s slippers were just right. She spent most of her days sitting in a chair. Her large pair of princess slippers didn’t fit well. “I wish for no scar and princess slippers that fit!” she whispered.Phonics Name ar/ar. /ar/are. “Oh. and her cut had vanished! The princess was so happy. Activity Write an ending to Claire’s story. Decodable Passages Unit 6 • Week 2 57 . She had a magic wand in the shape of a star. so she waved her magic wand. she… Claire stopped writing. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill Suddenly. air Princess Flair Claire is writing a story about a princess named Flair. Princess Flair tripped on her princess slippers and fell down the stairs. She ruled the kingdom of Udair from her chair. Princess Flair had long hair.

air Sar’s Tar Mark was given a journal.Phonics Name ar/ar. In it. Every year. He had memories of finding tar as a child. he wrote about a make-believe city called Par. When he found tar. The people from Par loved Sar because he shared! Activity Create your own make-believe city and write a story about it. The best tar finder was Sar. Sar would put a jar by each place he went to look for tar. Those who did not find tar had to wait until the next year. Those who found tar made great things. In the land of Par. He even remembered where he had found the tar! Sar built roads with the tar. the people of Par searched for tar. He found tar in strange places. Sar had searched for tar since he was little. he would put it in the jar. like a lion’s lair. /ar/are. 58 Unit 6 • Week 2 Decodable Passages © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill . tar was rare.

“No.” said Ameer.Phonics Name ûr/er. I see the herd!” he said. “I think so. “I am in fear! I see a big herd of animals headed this way.” Homer peered out of the cave they had made. ere. Let’s pretend we are cavemen!” he said. “What do you think cavemen did?” asked Homer. ear Homer and Ameer Homer and Ameer are peers in the same class. Homer shook his head. too.” said Ameer. Homer and Ameer like to pretend that they lived long ago. Decodable Passages Unit 6 • Week 3 59 . “Oh. /îr/eer. Then they began to play. dear!” exclaimed Ameer. “Let’s run to the rear of the cave to stay safe.” © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill Homer and Ameer went to the back of the cave. I am hungry!” Activity Circle the words that end in er. Homer and Ameer set up a cave in Homer’s room. “Yes. “I think that noise is my tummy. “I think they worked hard and played here and there. “Do you hear the herd on its way?” asked Homer.

tambourines were made by stretching animal skin over a rim and stitching it in place. These instruments make a sound like thunder. Paneer taps it near his ear. The tiny disks hit each other when the tambourine was shaken. Paneer wants to hear a tambourine. ear Paneer Hears Thunder Paneer is studying how people made music years ago. Tambourines can help keep the beat for singers. Long ago. He watches her shake the tambourine.Phonics Name ûr/er. He has been reading about drums. /îr/eer. People still play the tambourine today. ere. Paneer has learned that some people played tambourines. His music teacher shows him one. It does sound like thunder! © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill Activity Write about how thunder sounds to you. 60 Unit 6 • Week 3 Decodable Passages . Then disks were put on the sides by the rim.

oar Dora’s Wings Dora likes to make things. “I am not a bore!” she yelled. She used more feathers on the tips. She went home and drew a pair of wings. “I can make wings and soar!” © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill Activity Write three words that end in ore. She thinks of a thing to make and then she puts it together. ore. Dora was at the park.Phonics Name ôr/or. She flapped her wings until she felt like she was soaring. Decodable Passages Unit 6 • Week 4 61 . too. Today. “I will soar today!” said Dora. Dora put on the wings and ran. Seeing this made Dora want wings. Dora used feathers for the tops of the wings. It was time to make the wings. Then she got more paper and drew herself soaring. She saw a bird open its wings and soar.

oar Blair’s Corn Planter Henry Blair lived over one hundred years ago. which means that he made new things. It also planted other seeds. One thing he made was a corn planter. they did not have to lean over. That is why he made a corn planter. Their backs were not sore! © Macmillan/McGraw–Hill Henry Blair was an important inventor. It has helped many farmers. He got a patent in 1834 for the corn planter. The planter planted more than just corn. Before Blair invented the corn planter. farmers had to put each seed in the ground.Phonics Name ôr/or. He was an inventor. Blair thought it would be nice to have a machine do this fast. Planters are used more and more every day! Activity Write a story about another inventor or invention. His corn planter has changed over the years. 62 Unit 6 • Week 4 Decodable Passages . ore. Once farmers started using the corn planter.

Before long. Yire. or the town crier. /ûr/ure The Sire’s Crier “Sire! Sire. Decodable Passages Unit 6 • Week 5 63 . He tugged on the wire. The fire was put out quickly.” said Yire. ier. Soon. They had wanted to stay. The town crier came to the window. “Tug on that wire. there is a fire. “A fire is in our town! Leave now!” Many left right away. sire. Yire. The king. The town crier ran to the hill and screamed. Ask him to alert the town!” “Yes. there is a fire!” yelled Yire. Others had to be lured out. The king rolled out of bed.” said the king as he pointed at the window. He was still sleepy. “Tell the town crier about the fire. and the town crier stood on the hill. The crier had saved the day! © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill Activity Write about a day in the life of the king. “Crier. the town was as good as new. Tell the town this dire news!” yelled Yire. the town was empty.Phonics Name ır/ire. Yire.

Then he will talk to those who want to be his tire helper. He needs to hire a tire helper! He cannot endure so much work by himself! Kire will make fliers to hand out about the job.Phonics Name ır/ire. Kire will look for people who can fix tires fast. He can patch holes in tires. The name of the shop is Kire’s Tires. Lots of people bring their bikes and cars to Kire’s Tires. He can also pump air into them. He needs a good helper. 64 Unit 6 • Week 5 Decodable Passages © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill . Kire can fix almost any tire problem. Kire can fix any tire. ier. Kire hopes to hire a helper soon! Activity Write about Kire’s tire helper. /ûr/ure Kire’s Tires Kire has a tire shop. But Kire has too many tires to fix.

Word Study
Use the pages in this section to offer further practice with phonics, spelling, and word meanings.

Alphabet Letter Cards .................................................................. 66
• lowercase and capital letter cards • use for phonics and spelling games and activities

Spelling Word Cards...................................................................... 68
• reproducible cards for each week’s words • tested, review, and challenge words • key words for sorting activities

Vocabulary Word Cards .............................................................. 98
• reproducible cards for each week’s tested words • blank cards for additional words

Sound Boxes .................................................................................... 128
• three- and four-part boxes • use with letter cards for phonics and spelling practice

Games ................................................................................................. 130
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

• Learning with Games – suggestions for games that support word study strategies, dictionary skills, and comprehension skills • boards, grids, spinners, and other ideas to customize for your class

a f k p u z
66

b g l q v

c h m r w

d i n s x

e j o t y
Letter Cards

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

A F K P U Z
Letter Cards

B G L Q V

C H M R W

D I N S X

E J O T Y
67

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

cat has had six if blue

pig sat bad him can even

oddballs wag fix will hit
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

study

68

Unit 1 • David’s New Friends

Spelling Word Cards

Putter & Tabby Pour the Tea 69 .bed oddballs pet not tub © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill hog went job tug bun another cup tell fog hut fix move has year Spelling Word Cards Unit 1 • Mr.

a bag back bake rake different a_e mad ham made fog number oddballs cap cape ate tug © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill other 70 Unit 1 • Fighting the Fire Spelling Word Cards .

pig did mix nine hike © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill kite rip pick side cape off oddballs fin five pipe made picture because Spelling Word Cards Unit 1 • Meet Rosina 71 .

sock box lock hope rope America bone fox pot rose side country oddballs dog cone poke nine © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill world 72 Unit 1 • My Name Is Yoon Spelling Word Cards .

cup sun bump dude rude © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill tube bud cup fume vote together oddballs duck cube rule hope through food Spelling Word Cards Unit 2 • The Tiny Seed 73 .

sl st slide drop still spell below 74 dr sp slips skin must cube city sk oddballs dress task crisp © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill fuse own Spelling Word Cards Unit 2 • A Harbor Seal Pup Grows Up .

day main tail pay may © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill mail wait train stay must near oddballs sail jay hay spell paper follow Spelling Word Cards Unit 2 • A Trip to the Emergency Room 75 .

kind pie high mind try stay important 76 might oddballs sight dry tie wait only fly light wild cry lie © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill group Unit 2 • Farfallina and Marcel Spelling Word Cards .

post Joe mow goes foam © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill boat oddballs crow toast told find few snow grow toe soap most between night example Spelling Word Cards Unit 2 • There’s Nothing Like Baseball 77 .

me pretty leaf need pony foam four 78 green oddballs mean seek he told hear heat eat queen baby we © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill family Unit 3 • Head. Legs: A Story from Liberia Spelling Word Cards . Body.

tube use flute mule tune © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill human duke music bugle pony color oddballs dune fuse June leaf song above Spelling Word Cards Unit 3 • Officer Buckle and Gloria 79 .

th ch chill sheep white mule often 80 sh oddballs chase thing while fuse second wh chest shape think wheat © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill idea Unit 3 • Meet the Super Croc Spelling Word Cards .

th tch which teeth watch © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill sh oddballs teaching fishing matching chase young ch each path wishbone dish body white pretty Spelling Word Cards Unit 3 • The Alvin Ailey Kids: Dancing As a Team 81 .

scr oddballs scrape strict spruce wishbone talk 82 str screen stripe sprain strap carry spr scream struck spring path © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill once Unit 3 • Click. Moo: Cows That Type Spelling Word Cards . Clack.

car part farm storm horse © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill corn start dark short scream money oddballs park sort for stripe piece area Spelling Word Cards Unit 4 • Splish! Splash! Animal Baths 83 .

hen oddballs herd stir hurt storm usually 84 Unit 4 • Goose’s Story third clerk skirt churn turn hours curl term sir burst shark © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill problem Spelling Word Cards .

oo shook brook soot would © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill ou stood crook could clerk sure oddballs hook foot should stir whole during Spelling Word Cards Unit 4 • A Way to Help Planet Earth 85 .

food due flew shoe canoe suit complete 86 Unit 4 • Super Storms juice shoe new clue fruit cook measure few oddballs boot root glue © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill could questions Spelling Word Cards .

the Wolf Pup 87 .caught pause law fawn crawl © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill saw draw fault hawk cool order oddballs launch jaw raw flew remember door Spelling Word Cards Unit 4 • Nut ik.

brown clown brown loud sound listen out growl crown cloud pause several oddballs howl round house fault © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill wind (noun) 88 Unit 5 • Dig Wait Listen: A Desert Toad’s Tale Spelling Word Cards .

coin soil point toy royal © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill boy broil boil joy down travel oddballs moist oil soy house voice pulled Spelling Word Cards Unit 5 • Pushing Up the Sky 89 .

beginning oddballs again agree idea broil morning 90 middle alone away above comma finally end ago alike awake noise © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill notice Unit 5 • Columbus Explores New Lands Spelling Word Cards .

gnat crumb knife sign thumb © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill know oddballs knot wrist lamb idea hundred write knee gnaw wren debt certain alone field Spelling Word Cards Unit 5 • The Ugly Vegetables 91 .

cow giraffe cave girl gym knot half 92 Unit 5 • The Moon circle oddballs cent wagon gem wrist true gate camp face gift germ © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill against Spelling Word Cards .

edge large cage lodge bulge © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill stage fringe page large change face bought bilge oddballs judge barge range germ decided Unit 6 • Mice and Beans 93 hinge among Spelling Word Cards .

car oddballs care dare chair range material 94 share star stare hair fair believe air shark rare pair judge © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill built Unit 6 • Stirring Up Memories Spelling Word Cards .

her clear dear steer perch © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill sneer oddballs ear queer here care system mere near deer verb where heavy chair region Spelling Word Cards Unit 6 • Music of the Stone Age 95 .

corn oddballs wore roar north here scientist 96 store more store board fort building soar tore oar port dear © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill machine Unit 6 • African-American Inventors Spelling Word Cards .

tired oddballs hire flier cure © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill lure fire tire crier pure island drier wire drier sure north special wore though Spelling Word Cards Unit 6 • Babu’s Song 97 .

carefully different excited groan tomorrow whisper © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 98 Unit 1 • David’s New Friends Vocabulary Word Cards .

company delighted enjoyed © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill share thinning wonderful Vocabulary Word Cards Unit 1 • Mr. Putter & Tabby Pour the Tea 99 .

flames forest heat safe tell © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 100 Unit 1 • Fighting the Fire Vocabulary Word Cards .

celebrate cultures deaf © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill language relatives signing Vocabulary Word Cards Unit 1 • Meet Rosina 101 .

cuddle favorite patient practiced settled wrinkled © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 102 Unit 1 • My Name Is Yoon Vocabulary Word Cards .

burst desert drifts © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill drowns gently neighbor Vocabulary Word Cards Unit 2 • The Tiny Seed 103 .

examines hunger mammal normal rescued young © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 104 Unit 2 • A Harbor Seal Pup Grows Up Vocabulary Word Cards .

broken heal informs © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill personal serious Vocabulary Word Cards Unit 2 • A Trip to the Emergency Room 105 .

fluttered giggled peered recognized snuggled vanished © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 106 Unit 2 • Farfallina and Marcel Vocabulary Word Cards .

coach imaginary practices © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill starting tryouts uniform Vocabulary Word Cards Unit 2 • There’s Nothing Like Baseball 107 .

Body.attached breathe delicious frantically gasped swung © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 108 Unit 3 • Head. Legs: A Story from Liberia Vocabulary Word Cards .

accident attention buddy © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill enormous obeys tips Vocabulary Word Cards Unit 3 • Officer Buckle and Gloria 109 .

ancient confirm hopeful unable valid © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 110 Unit 3 • Meet the Super Croc Vocabulary Word Cards .

effort mood perform © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill proud remember students Vocabulary Word Cards Unit 3 • The Alvin Ailey Kids: Dancing As a Team 111 .

demand emergency furious impatient sincerely snoop © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 112 Unit 3 • Click. Clack. Moo: Cows That Type Vocabulary Word Cards .

beasts handy itches © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill nibble preen puddles Vocabulary Word Cards Unit 4 • Splish! Splash! Animal Baths 113 .

balance deserted freezes

imagine saddest wider
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

114

Unit 4 • Goose’s Story

Vocabulary Word Cards

conservation extinct hardest
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

remains trouble

Vocabulary Word Cards

Unit 4 • A Way to Help Planet Earth

115

beware destroy grasslands

prevent uprooted violent
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

116

Unit 4 • Super Storms

Vocabulary Word Cards

beloved glanced gleamed
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

noble promised wiggled

Vocabulary Word Cards

Unit 4 • Nutik, the Wolf Pup

117

beyond burrow distant lengthy ranger’s warning © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 118 Unit 5 • Dig Wait Listen: A Desert Toad’s Tale Vocabulary Word Cards .

agreed gathered jabbing © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill randomly signal Vocabulary Word Cards Unit 5 • Pushing Up the Sky 119 .

areas oceans planet vast voyage © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 120 Unit 5 • Columbus Explores New Lands Vocabulary Word Cards .

aroma blooming muscles © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill prickly scent trade Vocabulary Word Cards Unit 5 • The Ugly Vegetables 121 .

discovered footprint lunar spacecraft surface visible © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 122 Unit 5 • The Moon Vocabulary Word Cards .

assembled devoured fetch © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill forgetting menu simmered Vocabulary Word Cards Unit 6 • Mice and Beans 123 .

creating familiar glamorous imagination memories occasions © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 124 Unit 6 • Stirring Up Memories Vocabulary Word Cards .

impossible pleasant talent © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill treasures watch Vocabulary Word Cards Unit 6 • Music of the Stone Age 125 .

allowed design instrument invented powerful products © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 126 Unit 6 • African-American Inventors Vocabulary Word Cards .

collection concern exclaimed © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill figure goalie vendors Vocabulary Word Cards Unit 6 • Babu’s Song 127 .

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 128 Three-part Sound Boxes .

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill Sound Boxes Four-part 129 .

Play: The first player spins the spinner and moves his or her marker that number of spaces. then spells. the player writes an X or an O in the space on top of the word. Have players glue each word on a card. 1. 130 Games . Write in the numbers 0. 135) Cards (p. the word with the ending the marker landed on. alternate writing the endings -s. They compete to alphabetize the words the fastest. If correct. or diagonally. a player reads one word on the grid and names an antonym for that word. The players then switch roles. 2. 137) scissors glue timer Skill: alphabetical order Prepare: This game is for two players. watch. and 3. -ed. Write spelling words on the cards. Players miss a turn by spinning a 0 or by spelling the word and ending incorrectly. Then that player chooses a word card and says. 138) pencils Skill: antonyms Prepare: This game is for two players. Time for Order Materials old magazines and newspapers Cards (p. such as chase. Players also use the four-part spinner. Write begin in the first square and end in the last square. vertically. Have players fill in the grid with vocabulary words. Use a Tic-Tac-Toe grid. Have players find and cut out interesting words from old magazines and newspapers. Each player needs eight words.Learning with Games What’s the Ending? Materials S-shaped board (p. Use verbs. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill Antonym Tic-Tac-Toe Materials Tic-Tac-Toe grid (p. Play: To begin. The first player to get to the end is the winner. In the remaining squares. and carry. 133) game markers pencils Skill: word endings Prepare: This game is for two players. 137) 4-part spinner (p. The second player times the first as he or she organizes the words. Play: The first player must put all of the word cards in alphabetical order. Use the S-shaped board. and -ing. Players take turns until one player gets three Xs or Os in a row horizontally.

Players may want to refer to a dictionary for more word suggestions. pre-. 133) pencil crayons paper Skill: compare and contrast Prepare: Two players are needed for this game. Give each player a word wheel or slip strips. dollhouse. You may want to suggest compound words to use. im-. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill Games 131 . Put It Together Materials Puzzle Pieces. Have players record their discoveries on paper. two pieces (p. 136. choose topics from stories and literature for players to compare and contrast. (For Slip Strips. Players then cut out their puzzle pieces and place them in plastic bags. mis-. If he or she lands on Contrast. Continue by having players exchange with other players in the classroom. in-. such as schoolhouse. dis-. then the two players talk together to find something they have in common. The first player spins the spinner. re-. copy the squares several times so that players can construct strips with eight or twelve squares. and inchworm.) Same and Different Materials 4-part spinner (p. and un-. over-. Play: Explain to players that they will be comparing and contrasting themselves in this game. grassland. 137) paper bag pencils Skill: prefixes Prepare: Write the following prefixes on word cards: anti-. p. Set the timer at one minute. write the prefix on the rectangular card and root words on the squares. 141) Cards (p. Play: Have players exchange their bag with another player.Word Maker Materials Word Wheel or Slip Strips (p. Ask them to color each part a different color then alternately label Compare or Contrast. (If using slip strips. Ask them to write five different compound words with the first part of the word on the first puzzle piece. On the outside of the wheel. Give each pair a blank spinner. Challenge players to build all five of their partner’s compound words in a minute. and the second part of the word on the second puzzle piece.) Play: Each player chooses one prefix from the bag and writes it on the inside circle of their word wheel. then they talk to find how they are different. grasshopper. rainforest. Fold the cards and place them in a paper bag. 142) plastic bags timer Skill: compound words Prepare: Players need five copies each of the puzzle pieces with two interlocking pieces. If he or she lands on Compare. have players come up with as many root words as possible that work with their chosen prefix. uproot. For a more advanced version of the game.

peer. which may be copied at a larger size if desired. and then write multiple meaning words in the remaining squares. principal. 1. As the game continues. The S-shaped board can also be used for this game. coach. Play: Use the Spelling Word Cards to play bingo once players have filled in their grids. 133) game markers dictionary Skill: multiple meaning words Prepare: Organize players into groups of four. they must give another meaning for the same word. safe. or diagonally. Give each group a copy of the oval board. players write the following medial sounds: Players create their own bingo card by listing spelling words that have the same medial sound under each column. uniform. use the 4 x 4 grid and four medial sounds. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 132 Games . stage. Write begin in the first square and end in the last square. enclosure. First place a star in one of the squares to mark the beginning and ending. 2. Remind children that the winner is the first player to get five game markers in a row vertically. 134. foreign. Have available the Spelling Word Cards for reference. trust. patient. Play: The first player begins the game by spinning the spinner to see how many spaces to go. What Do You Mean? Materials Oval or S-shaped board (p. 68 –97) game markers Skill: listening for long vowel medial sounds Prepare: Each player needs a 5 x 5 grid. watch. settled. signing. 140) Spelling Word Cards (pp. Above the first row. beam. 135) 4-part spinner (p. and 3. and a 4-part spinner numbered 0. Players may want to keep a dictionary at hand to check definitions. The player reads the word he or she landed on and names one meaning of the word. p. figure. The first player to reach the star is the winner. if other players land on the same word.Medial Sound Bingo Materials 5 x 5 grid (p. Have the group fill in the remaining squares with multiple meaning words such as scratch. horizontally. burst. For a shorter game.

Attach arrow with brad. 3. Cut out and complete a spinner.Spinners 1. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill Games 133 . 2. Mount it on heavy paper.

Oval Game Board © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 134 Games .

S-shaped Game Board © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill Games 135 .

Attach small wheel on top of large wheel with a brad.Word Wheel 1. Cut out and complete each wheel. 2. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 136 Games .

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill Games Cards 137 .

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill Tic-Tac-Toe 138 Games .

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill Games 4x4 Grid 139 .

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 5x5 Grid 140 Games .

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill Games Slip Strips 141 .

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill Puzzle Pieces 142 Games .

..... 179 • common proofreading marks to post or hand out Writing Rubrics ............................................................. writing................................. and speaking activities.............. 177 • checklists for use with fiction and nonfiction writing Proofreading Marks............... 180 • four-point rubrics specific to Unit Writing activities • rubric to customize with the class Picture Prompts ...................................................................................................................................................................... and poetry Writer’s Checklists ......Additional Literacy Support Use the pages in this section to support reading...... handwriting.............................. 206 • list of listening and speaking behaviors to post ..................................... 144 • illustrated poems that support phonemic awareness Reader Response Sheets ............................ 187 • Writing to Picture Prompts – tips on using the prompts for writing and test preparation © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill • prompts with illustrations and photos Handwriting ................ non-fiction....................... 174 • forms for fiction...................... 194 • information on mechanics and grasp patterns • evaluation checklist • reproducible practice pages and models Classroom Behavior Checklist.......................................... listening.......................... Rhymes and Chimes ..................................

It’s a dog with a hat.© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 144 Who Is That? Name Who is that? It’s a very fat cat. It’s a very big bat! Who is that? It’s Mom and Dad! Rhymes and Chimes Phonemic Awareness: short /a/ .

What does she like? 145 Phonemic Awareness: short /a/ .© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill Name Rhymes and Chimes Mary Pat My best friend Is Mary Pat. She likes things That rhyme with cat.

Rhymes and Chimes Phonemic Awareness: short /i/ .© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 146 Name Here Is Little Pig Here is Little Pig. She can dig and dig. Here is Little Pig. She can do the jig.

When I grab for Brad the Crab. /kr/. He grabs right back at me.© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill My Pet’s Trick Name Rhymes and Chimes Brad the Crab has just one trick. and /tr/ . And that’s okay with me. /gr/. 147 Phonemic Awareness: blends /br/.

Rhymes and Chimes Phonemic Awareness: blends /nd/.© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 148 Name Skunk and Chipmunk Little Skunk went to school. “I’ll pass the test!” He and Chipmunk studied hard So they would do their best. and /nk/ . What will you all do?” Little Skunk raised his hand And said. His friend Chipmunk went. “Tomorrow’s our test. too. Teacher said. /nt/. /st/.

but I forgot. or can you not? I can rhyme.© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill Name Rhymes and Chimes Hot Spot! Hot spot! Hot spot! Can you rhyme. Help me make a rhyme for spot. 149 Phonemic Awareness: short /o/ .

“Get up now. you sleepy head!” Rhymes and Chimes Phonemic Awareness: short /e/ .© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 150 Ned and Fred Name Ned got up and out of bed. Then he went to get his sled. “The snow fell!” he called to Fred.

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill Name Rhymes and Chimes A Cub Scout’s Birthday Shout. shout. Not a pout! 151 Phonemic Awareness: /sh/ and /th/ . Shout it out! Today is the birthday Of this Cub Scout. His face has a smile.

Run. chug. The bug dug and dug. run. The slug ran on a rug. Look at the slug. run.© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 152 Name The Bug and the Slug Look at the bug. Rhymes and Chimes Phonemic Awareness: rhyme and short /u/ . chug. Chug.

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill Please. blends /sl/ and /pl/ . May I? Name Rhymes and Chimes May I? Please? May I go with Dad in the van? May I sleep tonight at Dan’s? May I bake a gingerbread man? May I? May I? May I? PLEASE? 153 Phonemic Awareness: rhyme.

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 154 Name Jake the Snake Jake the Snake Was not quite awake. Rhymes and Chimes Phonemic Awareness: long /a/ ¯ . When he made a mistake And curled up around a rake.

sniff. 155 Phonemic Awareness: /sn/sn- . Sniff.© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill Name Rhymes and Chimes My Hound Dog Sniff. sniff. what’s he found? It’s very bristly and round. that’s my hound With his nose to the ground.

match. stitch. patch. itch. itch. /ch/. match. patch. her white socks didn’t match. they made her two feet itch. Rhymes and Chimes Phonemic Awareness: rhyme. stitch. When Mom sewed on a patch. and /hw/ .© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 156 Mom’s Socks Name When Mom sewed white socks. stitch.

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill Name Rhymes and Chimes The Missing Dime Who stole the goose’s dime? When was it taken? What was the time? Goodness! Gracious! What a crime! 157 Phonemic Awareness: long / / .

/spr/. /spl/. and /str/ . “It’s spring! Let’s go to the stream! Let’s jump and splash and scream!” Rhymes and Chimes Phonemic Awareness: triple-consonant blends /skr/.© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 158 Name It’s Spring I say.

“Tell me a story! Tell me a joke!” 159 Phonemic Awareness: /o/ o_e ¯ .© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill The Dragon Spoke Name Rhymes and Chimes With a puff of smoke. The Dragon spoke.

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 160 Name A Tune in June One day in sunny June. I learned to play the flute. Rhymes and Chimes Phonemic Awareness: long /¯ u/ . I played a happy tune While my teacher played the lute.

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Name

Rhymes and Chimes

Fishing Today

Today we’re going fishing. We’re going to the lake. I will take the poles and Joe will bring the bait. Yes, today we’re going fishing, And I can hardly wait!

161

– Phonemic Awareness: long /a /

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

162

My Carefree Dog

Name

My dog is very carefree. He greets everyone, you see. So don’t scream when you meet— He is really so sweet— And he’ll soon let you up off the street!

Rhymes and Chimes

Phonemic Awareness: long /e/ ¯

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Name

Rhymes and Chimes

Puppy or Guppy?

Would you be happy If you wanted a puppy, But your mommy or daddy Got you a guppy?

163

Phonemic Awareness: final long /¯ e/

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

164

Name

Out in the Cold

I go out in the cold To watch the snowflakes float. I hold out both my hands, But they land upon my coat!

Rhymes and Chimes

– Phonemic Awareness: long /o /

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill Dwight the Knight Name Rhymes and Chimes Dwight the Knight Was afraid he might Meet a wild monster And have to fight. Did he try one night? 165 Phonemic Awareness: long / / .

If I saw an alligator With teeth so sharp. I’d say I was busy And quickly depart! Rhymes and Chimes Phonemic Awareness: r-controlled vowel /är/ .© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 166 Name If I Saw an Alligator For my part.

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill Name Rhymes and Chimes Old North Farm At Old North Farm. Chickens scratch in the yard. And a bay horse lives in the barn. 167 Phonemic Awareness: /ôr/ . The red rooster crows. Dogs bark on the porch. And Marla and Lori plant corn.

Now. Rhymes and Chimes Phonemic Awareness: /ûr/ . we fell in a puddle.© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 168 Covered with Dirt Name Look at my shirt! Look at your skirt! First. we’re covered with dirt.

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill Name Rhymes and Chimes No Water to Be Found The river is down To a muddy brown. How is water to be found? No water in any house! No water in any town! How is water to be found? 169 Phonemic Awareness: /ou/ .

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 170 Name A Little Look My teacher says I’m good. you see. So now I’ll take a little look Inside this book in which I could Draw pictures of my family! Rhymes and Chimes Phonemic Awareness: /˙ u/ .

Ate ice cream by the scoop. And each got A big red balloon! 171 Phonemic Awareness: variant vowel /ü/ . We rode the Loop-the-Loop.© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill Name Rhymes and Chimes At the Fair We went to the fair at noon.

he likes to yawn And pause for a nap on the shady lawn. After running around. cannot be taught That toys are to be chased and caught. Rhymes and Chimes Phonemic Awareness: variant vowel /ô/ .© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 172 Name My Pup Paul My pup. Paul.

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill Birthday Boy Name Rhymes and Chimes Point him out. Happy birthday. Edward Roy! 173 Phonemic Awareness: rhyme and /oi/ . The birthday boy! We all brought gifts We hope he’ll enjoy.

Name Reader Response Title of Book: Author: How did you like this book? Circle a face. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 174 Reader Response: Fiction . Include the story title and author on the cover. Liked Okay Disliked Response: Draw a picture of a new cover for this book.

Liked Okay Disliked Response: Draw a picture of what you learned. Label your picture.Name Reader Response Title of Book: Author: How did you like this book? Circle a face. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill Reader Response: Nonfiction 175 .

Liked Okay Disliked Response: Choose three words that you liked in the poem. Draw a picture of how you feel those words look. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 176 Reader Response: Poetry .Name Reader Response Title of Book: Author: How did you like this book? Circle a face.

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill Writer’s Checklists 177 . What will I change when I revise this work? 1. and Writing Rubrics. 2. page 179. Do I have a main character? Do I tell about interesting events? Do I use descriptive words? Do I have a beginning.Name My Writer’s Checklist Fiction ✔ Put a check by the items you completed. pages 180 –186. and end? Did I check my punctuation and spelling? What did I do well in my writing? 1. See also Proofreading Marks. Teacher: The main character can be the child in first person. middle. 2.

and Writing Rubrics. 2. What will I change when I revise this work? 1.Name My Writer’s Checklist Nonf iction ✔ Put a check by the items you completed. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 178 Writer’s Checklists . pages 180 –186. Do I have a main idea? Do I have details that tell more about my main idea? Do I start with a sentence that tells what my topic is? Do I clearly explain my topic for my reader? Did I check my punctuation and spelling? What did I do well in my writing? 1. Teacher: See also Proofreading Marks. 2. page 179.

Add a period. Take out. Then ate lunch. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill The tall trees were very tall. sp The fish were jumping sp Check spelling. We walked by the Lake. The sky was beuatiful. we Add. we went to the park.Proofreading Marks Make a capital letter. Proofreading Marks 179 . ¶ New paragraph ¶ The town seemed busy and noisy after our day at the park. Make a small letter.

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 180 Writing Rubric 3 • tells about a personal experience • 4 Excellent Good 2 Fair 1 Unsatisfactory • uses feelings to tell about personal experience Unit 1 • Personal Narrative • tells events in correct • order • • • uses an original. consistent tone • uses words correctly and naturally • • • uses complete sentences that flow • is free or almost free of errors • is easy to read • tells about a • does not share a personal experience personal experience but loses focus tells events in order • is hard to follow uses first person and • includes events out • does not share of order a consistent tone thoughts and feelings uses words correctly • does not have a personal tone • uses words not uses complete • uses words that connected to the sentences that do not create clear purpose mostly flow images • uses run-on has minor errors • uses awkward or sentences and is mostly easy to incomplete sentences sentence fragments read • has many errors • makes many serious errors • has some areas that are hard to read • is very hard to read Writing Rubrics .

but lacks details Writing Rubrics 4 Excellent Good 2 Fair 1 Unsatisfactory • does not provide an explanation • is not organized • offers clear. easyto-follow how-to instructions • explains steps in a logical order that flows • presents steps out of • is confusing and order • connects with does not connect to readers • does not connect readers • is clear and connects • uses words correctly with readers • uses many words with readers • uses words incorrectly • uses complete • uses effective words incorrectly sentences that • has incomplete and mostly flow • has minor errors • uses complete sentences • has many errors run-on sentences • makes many serious errors • has some areas that • is very hard to read are hard to read • uses complete sentences that flow Unit 2 • How-To Article • is free or almost free • is mostly easy to of errors read • is easy to read 181 .© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill Writing Rubric 3 • offers clear instructions • explains steps in a logical order • attempts an explanation.

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 182 Writing Rubric 3 • presents an opinion with supporting details • is organized • uses a persuasive voice • tries to present an opinion but lacks details 4 Excellent Good 2 Fair 1 Unsatisfactory • does not present an opinion • is poorly organized Unit 3 • Persuasive Letter • presents a strong opinion with supporting details • has a logical organization • is not well organized • is confusing and not • is not persuasive persuasive • misuses some words • misuses words and and does not use does not use opinion opinion words words • uses mostly complete sentences • has many errors • uses incomplete or run-on sentences • connects strongly to readers • includes persuasive • uses words correctly words and includes opinion • uses complete words sentences that mostly flow • has minor errors • uses complete sentences that flow • is free or almost free • is mostly easy to of errors read • is easy to read • makes many serious errors • has some areas that are hard to read • is very hard to read Writing Rubrics .

factual tone • expresses ideas clearly • uses complete sentences that flow read • expresses ideas well • does not have a • misuses many words factual tone • uses complete • uses incomplete or • misuses some words sentences that run-on sentences mostly flow • has some incomplete • makes many serious sentences • has minor errors errors • has many errors • is mostly easy to • is very hard to read • has some areas that are hard to read Unit 4 • Expository Writing • is free or almost free of errors • is easy to read 183 .© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill Writing Rubric 3 • has facts that support a main idea • presents the main idea and supporting details • has a factual tone Writing Rubrics 4 Excellent Good 2 Fair 1 Unsatisfactory • has detailed facts that support a main idea • clearly presents the main idea and supporting details • attempts to state a • does not have a main idea with some main idea or details details • is organized poorly • is weakly organized and is hard to follow with sentences out • is not convincing and of order confusing • has a convincing.

and end • has a clear beginning. middle. and end • keeps the interest of the reader • shows a weak • uses incomplete or connection with • uses words correctly run-on sentences readers • uses words correctly • uses complete • makes many serious and naturally • misuses some words sentences that errors • uses complete mostly flow • uses complete • is very hard to read sentences that flow • has minor errors sentences • is free or almost free • is mostly easy to • has many errors of errors read • has some areas that are hard to read Writing Rubrics • is easy to read . middle. middle. and end • is confusing • misuses many words Unit 5 • Fictional Narrative • tells a story with a clear problem and a solution • has an unclear beginning. middle. and end • shows a connection to readers • attempts to tell a story with a problem and solution 4 Excellent Good 2 Fair 1 Unsatisfactory • does not tell a story • does not have a beginning.© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 184 Writing Rubric 3 • tells a story with a problem and a solution • has a beginning.

informative comparison • organizes the comparison well • has a lively tone that • has a tone that shows interest shows interest • uses comparison words • uses a variety of comparison words • includes complete sentences that flow • includes complete sentences that mostly flow • is free or almost free of errors • has minor errors • is mostly easy to read Unit 6 • Compare and Contrast Article • is easy to read • presents a • does not present a comparison with few comparison details • is unorganized • is organized but • shows no interest in some details are out the subject of order • misuses words and • shows little interest uses no comparison in the subject words • misuses some • uses incomplete or words and uses few run-on sentences comparison words • makes many serious • includes complete errors sentences • is very hard to read • has many errors • has some areas that are hard to read 185 .© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill Writing Rubric 3 • presents an informative comparison • organizes the comparison Writing Rubrics 4 Excellent Good 2 Fair 1 Unsatisfactory • presents a detailed.

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 186 Writing Rubric 3 Good 4 Excellent 2 Fair 1 Unsatisfactory Writing Rubrics .

Writing to a Picture Prompt Children are sometimes asked to write about a picture instead of just responding to a writing prompt. to help you check your writing. You can use a graphic organizer to organize your ideas before you begin to write. The child will either tell about what they see in the picture. create an idea web. Instruct children to do the following: Before Writing 1. Picture Prompts 187 . You can also make an outline. Think about what is happening in the picture. After Writing 1. The form of the writing is usually a story or an essay. or other prewriting work. Proofread your writing using Proofreading Marks. Use the picture prompts as additional writing practice or to help children prepare for writing tasks on standardized tests. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill During Writing Use a graphic organizer. or write about something related to the picture. page 179. to write about what is happening in the picture. Look closely at the picture. 2. Use the Writer’s Checklists. 2. or do other prewriting work. pages 177–178. Ask yourself questions about the picture: • Where and when are the events shown in the picture taking place? • Who or what is in the picture? What are they doing? • Can you tell what is happening? What event may have happened prior to this one? What do you think might happen next? 3.

188 Unit 1 • Fighting the Fire Picture Prompts . Write a story about what might be happening. Look at the picture of three firemen. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill Writing Tips • Use a graphic organizer to organize your thoughts. • Write your story on lined paper.Name Write to a picture prompt. • Proofread your story.

Picture Prompts Unit 2 • A Trip to the Emergency Room 189 . Look at the picture below. • Write your story on lined paper. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill Writing Tips • Use a graphic organizer to organize your thoughts.Name Write to a picture prompt. Write a story about going to the doctor. • Proofread your story.

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill Writing Tips • Use a graphic organizer to organize your thoughts. 190 Unit 3 • Meet the Super Croc Picture Prompts . Look at the picture of people finding fossils.Name Write to a picture prompt. Write a story about what might be happening. • Proofread your story. • Write your story on lined paper.

Write a story about helping to keep Earth clean. Look at the picture below. Picture Prompts Unit 4 • A Way to Help Planet Earth 191 . Writing Tips © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill • Use a graphic organizer to organize your thoughts. • Write your story on lined paper. • Proofread your story.Name Write to a picture prompt.

• Proofread your story. Writing Tips © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill • Use a graphic organizer to organize your thoughts. 192 Unit 5 • Columbus Explores New Lands Picture Prompts . Look at the photograph. What might it be like to explore a new place? Write a story about it. • Write your story on lined paper.Name Write to a picture prompt.

If you were the painter.Name Write to a picture prompt. • Proofread your story. • Write your story on lined paper. Look at the photograph below. Picture Prompts Unit 6 • Music of the Stone Age 193 . The girl is about to start painting. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill Writing Tips • Use a graphic organizer to organize your thoughts. what would you paint? Write about your painting.

Keeping journals. • There should be an inch between the child and the desk. completing forms. taking notes. many tasks require handwriting. These are examples of warm-up activities: • Play “Simon Says” using fingers only. • Use mazes that require children to move their writing instruments from left to right. • Does the child do better with one hand or the other? © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill The Writing Instrument Grasp The writing instrument must be held in a way that allows for fluid dynamic movement. • The nondominant hand should anchor the paper near the top so that the paper doesn’t slide. The Mechanics of Writing Desk and Chair • Chair height should allow feet to rest flat on the floor. • Left-handed children should turn the paper so that the lower right-hand corner of the paper points to the abdomen. making shopping or organizational lists. • Does the child start coloring with one hand and then switch to the other? This may be due to fatigue or lack of hand preference. Functional Grasp Patterns • Tripod Grasp The writing instrument is held with the tip of the thumb and the index finger and rests against the side of the third finger. Many children do not think of this. • Does the child cross midline to pick things up? Place items directly in front of the child to see if one hand is preferred. Determining Handedness Keys to determining handedness in a child: • With which hand does the child eat? This hand is likely to become the dominant hand.” or sing songs that use Signed English or American Sign Language. • Models of letters should be on the desk or at eye level. • Desk height should be two inches above the level of the elbows when the child is sitting. • The child should sit erect with elbows resting on the desk. 194 Handwriting Basics . Paper Position • Right-handed children should turn the paper so that the lower left-hand corner of the paper points to the abdomen. Writing Readiness Before children begin to write. • Sing finger plays such as “Where Is Thumbkin?” and “The Eensie Weensie Spider.Handwriting A Communication TooI Although computers are available. • The child should move the paper up as he or she nears the bottom of the paper. they need to develop certain fine motor skills. and reading handwriting are practical uses of this skill. The thumb and index finger form a circle.

t. bottom. • Have children pick up small objects with a tweezer. • To correct wrist position. Correcting Grasp Patterns • Have children play counting games with an eye dropper and water. h. legibility and functional speed. e. add time limits to copying or writing assignments. z ) Directionality ✓ ❑ Are letters and words formed from left to right? ✓ Are letters and words formed from top to ❑ bottom? © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill Spacing ✓ ❑ ✓ ❑ ✓ ❑ ✓ ❑ Are the spaces between letters equal? Are the spaces between words equal? Are spaces between sentences equal? Are top. After introducing students to writing individual letters. • Five-Finger Grasp The writing instrument is held with the tips of all five fingers. u. y. q. have children check their posture and paper placement. o.• Quadrupod Grasp The writing instrument is held with the tip of the thumb and index finger and rests against the fourth finger. g. v. i. n. k. Legibility in Writing ✓ ❑ Is the vertical slant of all letters consistent? ✓ Do all letters rest on the line? ❑ Formation and Strokes ✓ ❑ Do circular shapes close? ✓ ❑ Are downstrokes parallel? ✓ ❑ Do circular shapes and downstrokes touch? ✓ Are the heights of capital letters equal? ❑ ✓ ❑ Are the heights of lowercase letters equal? ✓ ❑ Are the lengths of the extenders and descenders the same for all letters? ✓ Do cursive letters that finish at the top ❑ join the next letter? ( b. Evaluation Checklist Functional handwriting is made up of two elements. l. and side margins even? Speed The prettiest handwriting is not functional if it takes students too long to complete their work. d. s. Incorrect Grasp Patterns • Fisted Grasp The writing instrument is held in a fisted hand. • Flexed or Hooked Wrist A flexed or bent wrist is typical with left-handed writers and is also present in some righthanded writers. Handwriting Basics 195 . p. • Pronated Grasp The writing instrument is held diagonally within the hand with the tips of the thumb and index finger on the writing instrument but with no support from other fingers. r. m. The thumb and index finger form a circle. Check for legibility. w ) ✓ ❑ Do cursive letters that finish at the bottom join the next letter? ( a. j. • Have children pick up small coins using just the thumb and index finger. x ) ✓ ❑ Do cursive letters with descenders join the next letter? ( f. c.

Name Write the Alphabet A A A B B B C C C D D D E E E F F F 196 a a a b b b c c c d d d e e e f f f Handwriting Practice © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill .

Name Write the Alphabet G G G H H H I I I J J J K K K L L L M M M Handwriting Practice g g g h h h iii jjj k k k lll m m m 197 © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill .

Name Write the Alphabet N N N O O O P P P Q Q Q R R R S S S 198 n n n o o o p p p q q q r r r s s s Handwriting Practice © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill .

Name Write the Alphabet T T T U U U V V V W W W X X X Y Y Y Z Z Z Handwriting Practice t t t u u u v v v w w w x x x y y y z z z 199 © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill .

Name Write the Alphabet A A B B C C D D E E F F a a b b c c d d e e f f © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 200 Handwriting Practice .

Name

Write the Alphabet

G G H H I I J J K K L L M M
Handwriting Practice

g g h h i i j j k k l l m m
201

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Name

Write the Alphabet

N N O O P P Q Q R R S S

n n o o p p q q r r s s

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

202

Handwriting Practice

Name

Write the Alphabet

T T U U V V W W X X Y Y Z Z
Handwriting Practice

t t u u v v w w x x y y z z
203

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Name

Handwriting Models—Slant

ABCDEFGH IJKLMNO PQRSTUV WXYZ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z
204 Handwriting Models

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Name Handwriting Practice © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill Handwriting Models 205 .

Good Listening and Speaking Habits In our classroom we: • Follow class procedures and rules • Respect other people’s feelings and ideas • Speak clearly so that others can understand • Listen to one another thoughtfully • Take turns speaking • Do not criticize people because of their ideas • Ask good questions • Answer questions thoughtfully • Do our best and encourage others to do their best © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 206 Classroom Behavior Checklist .

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