CHATHAM HIGH SCHOOL

PROGRAM OF STUDIES 2011-2012

TABLE OF CONTENTS

GENERAL INFORMATION……………………………………........................... Graduation Requirements……………................................................................ Course Selection……………………………….................................................... Entrance and Withdrawal from Courses………………........................................ Selection for Special Courses ……………………................................................ Alternative Study Options….……………………………………………………... Athletic Eligibility………………………...………………………………………. College Admission Requirements………….……………………………………. Grading System……………….......................................................................... Pupil Records……………………………………………………………………. Affirmative Action…………..………………………………………………….. COURSE DESCRIPTIONS Comprehensive Health and Physical Education………………………………. Computer Education….………………………………………………………… English ……………………….…………………………………………………. English as a Second Language ………………………………………………… Mathematics…………………………………………………………………..... Science ………………………………………………………………………… Social Studies ……………………………………………………………......... 21 -Century Life and Careers……................................................................ Visual and Performing Arts…………………………………………………… World Languages……………………………………………………………...... SCHOOL COUNSELING ASSISTANCE Mrs. Julie M. Patterson, Director of School Counseling Please call the School Counseling office at 973-457-2533 to contact a counselor if you have questions regarding course content or academic planning.
st

2 2 4 5 7 7 8 9 9 10 11

11 12 13 21 22 28 34 40 46 55

1

GENERAL INFORMATION This booklet contains a description of courses offered for the 2011-2012 academic year. It also includes information about graduation requirements, college admission requirements, guidelines for entrance and withdrawal from courses, standards for special class placement, athletic-eligibility rules, the method of computing overall grade point average, and pupil records. Students and parents should become familiar with this information and should consult with a school counselor to develop an appropriate academic program. GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS Graduation, as used herein, refers to the satisfactory completion of a program of studies at Chatham High School under the policies of the Board of Education of the School District of the Chathams. In order to earn a state-endorsed Chatham High School diploma, students must demonstrate proficiency in the Core Curriculum Content Standards, including the credit and testing requirements outlined below. A. Requirements for Graduation A student must meet each of the following requirements to be eligible for graduation: 1. 2. Participate in a local program of study of not fewer than 120 credits; Demonstrate proficiency in all sections of the High School Proficiency Assessment or designated Alternative High School Assessment process applicable to the class graduating in the year the student meets all other graduation requirements; Successfully complete one (1) year of comprehensive health and physical education for each year of enrollment; Demonstrate attainment of minimum curricular proficiencies through successful completion of courses, including but not limited to, credit hours in the following distribution: a. b. At least 20 credits in language arts literacy, aligned to grade 9 through 12 standards, effective with the graduating class of 2013; At least 15 credits in mathematics, including algebra I or the content equivalent effective with the graduating class of 2012, including geometry or the content equivalent effective with the class of 2014, and including a third year of mathematics that builds on concepts and skills of algebra and geometry and that prepares students for college and 21st century careers effective with the graduating class of 2016; At least 15 credits in science, including at least 5 credits in laboratory biology/life science or the content equivalent effective with the graduating class of 2012, including one additional

3.

4.

c.

2

d.

e. f. g. h.

laboratory/inquiry-based science course which shall include chemistry, environmental science, or physics effective with the graduating class of 2014, and including one additional laboratory/inquiry-based science course effective with the graduating class of 2016 ; At least 15 credits in social studies, including United States History 1 and 2; five credits in world history; and the integration of civics, economics, geography and global content in all course offerings; At least 2.5 credits in financial, economic, business, and entrepreneurial literacy, effective with the graduating class of 2014; At least 5 credits in visual and performing arts; At least 10 credits in world languages or student demonstration of proficiency; and At least 5 credits in 21st century life and careers, or career-technical education.

Technological literacy, consistent with the Core Curriculum Standards, is integrated throughout the curriculum. *Please refer to Social Studies Section for the new course sequence. B. Transfer Students Transfer students who enroll in Chatham High School may receive credit toward graduation for courses taken in properly accredited high schools outside the school district. However, they must meet the same local and state requirements for graduation as students who complete their entire high school program in the district. C. Classified Students The graduation requirements of a classified, educationally challenged student are prescribed by an Individualized Educational Program determined by the Child Study Team. Successful completion of these requirements, in keeping with state and local requirements, will make the student eligible for graduation. D. Early Graduation In exceptional circumstances, a student may be permitted to graduate in fewer than four years provided: 1. The student’s parents forward a written request to the high school principal at least two years prior to the anticipated graduation date, The request is approved by the principal and endorsed by the superintendent of schools, and The student meets all appropriate requirements outlined in Board of Education Policy.

2.

3.

3

E.

Commencement A commencement will be conducted each June to honor and recognize students who have become eligible to graduate from high school since the commencement program of the previous year.

F.

Notification of Students and Parents Copies of graduation requirements are distributed annually to students, parents of incoming ninth-grade students, and to all transfer students at the time they enroll. They are based upon Board of Education Policy 6146 (Graduation Requirements/Early Graduation), which is available in the school office.

COURSE SELECTION A. Guidelines Student scheduling begins in the spring, and class schedules generally are finalized before the school year ends. Course choices related to one’s particular interests and plans for the future need to be made with the following guidelines in mind. 1. The minimum program must include six subjects, including physical education, during each quarter of the four years. Teacher recommendations are based on progress up through the end of the first semester. The master schedule is created based on this data and cannot be adjusted to accommodate additional students beyond maximum available seating. Students registered for more than 30 credits may be allowed to withdraw from a course in accordance with the guidelines listed in the ENTRANCE AND WITHDRAWAL FROM COURSES section of this book. Where courses are sequential, one may pursue a higher level only after adequately mastering the previous level as determined by departmental recommendation. All requests for changes in a student’s recommended level of instruction must be submitted no later than July 15th. Partial credit is not given. For a student to earn credit for a course in which he/she is enrolled, the entire course must be completed successfully.

2.

3.

4.

5.

B. Course Offerings In the pages that follow, courses are grouped by subject areas, which are organized alphabetically. Students and parents should pay careful attention to grade-level limits, course prerequisites, and descriptions of course content. Requests to enroll in specific courses when stated guidelines are not fully met

4

A. When this happens. parent. b. and parent/guardian. 5 . a student who wants to make a change in schedule must complete all steps listed below. Guidelines 1. administrator. The following guidelines and procedures are used in dealing with requests for change in a student’s schedule after the school year has begun. Counseling Services Because of the breadth of curricular offerings and the variety of possible program sequences. A teacher may defer an initial request for change and ask for a conference with the student. the only changes that will be allowed are those caused by mechanical scheduling errors or initiated by a classroom teacher and approved by the parents and counselor. (Class-size caps are established in the previous spring based on staffing and budgetary considerations. Schedule changes require approval from all of the following: school counselor. a. A course will be cancelled when there is insufficient enrollment. teacher. School Counseling department. Speak with a school counselor to ensure that there are available seats in the class and that another class will not be overloaded in the move. Members of the School Counseling staff are available to answer questions that students or parents have and to help with long-range program planning. 2. During the second rotation of any class. 3. the counselor will prepare forms for teacher and parent approval. If the change is feasible. students who have requested that course will be asked to make an alternative selection.) Meet again with the counselor to establish whether teacher and parent approval has been secured. C. Because student success. and school counselor to reach a decision in the best educational interest of the student. pride in achievement. and high school principal. every student is encouraged to meet with a school counselor before finalizing course requests. students will benefit from discussing options with teachers and counselors. During the first full rotational cycle of any semester. and personal satisfaction relate strongly to proper academic placement. ENTRANCE AND WITHDRAWAL FROM COURSES Changing a student’s academic program once classes have started disrupts the learning and teaching processes and is strongly discouraged.will be reviewed by the academic department.

A student may withdraw from a subject until the 15th class day with no notation made on his/her transcript. 7. This grade will be calculated as a failure in the student’s overall grade point average. and Record of Schedule Changes 1. b. changes that involve dropping one course without adding another but leave the student enrolled in the requisite six courses per semester may be approved without administrative authorization. Semester courses may not be entered after the completion of the second rotation of the course. 3. 4. one of the following notations will be entered on the transcript: a. Withdrawn Passing (WP) if the student’s total average for the course to date is a passing one. a. Withdrawn Failing (W4) if the student is removed from a course due to class cuts. The student earns a full year of credit for the new course upon successful completion. 5. c. After the 15th day. Credit. 6 ..c. Except as noted below. a student may not enter a full-year course after the first three rotations. Unique situations caused by transfer from another district will be resolved by the student’s counselor and the teachers involved. Continue to attend all classes previously scheduled until final approval is received from all involved teachers. A student may change levels within a subject (e. B. Grading. b. Honors Geometry to Geometry) only until the end of the first semester unless the change is recommended by the teacher and is approved by the department supervisor. 6. 2.) Second-semester courses may not be dropped after the first Monday in December. No credit is given for a course from which a student withdraws. or if the student’s total average for the course to date is a failing one and the withdrawal is within the last quarter of the course. Upon parent request and after the first full rotation. (The exceptions indicated above apply. A student may not withdraw from a course within the ten school days immediately preceding the final assessment/examination in that course.g. Withdrawn Failing (WF) if the student’s total average for the course to date is a failing one and the withdrawal occurs within the first three quarters of the course.

College Coursework – Students enroll in local colleges for advanced work unavailable in the high school. Performance on achievement and proficiency tests. English to Honors English. 4.g. 4. Admission and continued enrollment are dependent upon the student’s meeting all the following criteria: 1. SELECTION FOR SPECIAL COURSES A. 3. B. Admission is based upon: 1. Department recommendation. and School counselor approval. When a student changes from one course to a similar higher or lower level course (e. academically advanced students. Performance in previous coursework in that subject area. 2. These options include the following: A. Independent study opportunities will not be granted if they substantially duplicate existing courses in the Program of Studies. the student’s grade to date will transfer to the new course and be averaged with the grades subsequently earned in that new course. 3. B. Courses designated as “Honors” or “Advanced Placement” are intended to serve the needs of highly motivated. ALTERNATIVE STUDY OPTIONS A variety of learning opportunities exists for students who want to study or work in areas not covered in the formal school curriculum or who are gifted or talented in particular areas.. Department recommendation. Honors Physics to Physics). School counselor approval.4. “Concepts” courses are offered to help students develop proficiencies required for successful completion of all graduation requirements and further academic study. 7 . Independent Study – A student and a supervising teacher develop a program as an alternative or addition to regular coursework. 2. Honors credit is not given for independent study. Superior ability and/or achievement in previous coursework in the subject area. and Evidence of continued effort and achievement commensurate with honorslevel work.

accounting. law enforcement. but not limited to. the other half at Chatham High School. B. Students must apply and be interviewed in order to be considered. Announcements will be made during the first semester. Rutgers. To be eligible for a spring team. Work Experience – Students are placed in supervised work settings for part of each school day. Proposals for full-year or first-semester independent study opportunities must be finalized by the second Monday in June. Senior Internship Program (SIP) – This four-week.) One half of the school day is spent at the technical school. D. A student must have earned at least 27. career-oriented courses from the offerings of Morris County School of Technology. and hotel/restaurant management. E. (See course offerings under 21st Century Life and Careers.5 credits (30 credits effective with the 2010-11 grade-nine class) in the previous academic year to be eligible to participate on a fall or winter interscholastic athletic team.75 credits (15 credits effective with the 2010-11 grade-nine class) in the preceding semester. the student must have successfully completed 13. Prior approval from the Director of School Counseling is required. H. including.Prior approval from the Principal and Director of School Counseling is required. C. education. provided the student is satisfying all district graduation requirements and passing all courses. Summer School – Students pursue work for enrichment or remediation at stateapproved summer schools. (School counselors can provide the program information. Second-semester course proposals need to be finalized by the end of the first marking period. Lab Assistantship – A student assists a teacher in one of the school’s laboratory courses. The program feasibility will be revisited each year with respect to staffing. law. First-semester freshman students have no credit requirements.75 credit requirement.) ATHLETIC ELIGIBILITY A. A senior student who has followed an accelerated academic program during the first three years of high school may be eligible in the second semester without meeting the 13. Vocational Education – Students select specific. F. medicine. Options are available for students with interests in office work or industry. non-credit internship allows seniors to participate in a work experience selected from a variety of fields. investments. The State University of New Jersey Partnership – Students take a Rutgers University class at Chatham High School. G. 8 .

but generally expect students to have completed at least sixteen (16) full-year academic courses in the disciplines of English. Students are responsible for consulting the publications of specific colleges for definitive requirements. Many colleges have very demanding admission standards. mathematics. as computed by the student database management system. PASS. computer. EXEMPT.COLLEGE ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS Colleges differ significantly in their admission requirements. To be eligible for selection as valedictorian or salutatorian. The GPA formula is: Sum (grade quality points x course credits) Cum Course Credits D. Students should work with a counselor to develop a four-year program that will not only satisfy general distribution requirements. The grade point average for this calculation. world languages. especially if these relate to an intended college major. Continued high class standing will be confirmed by the school administration. Courses taken prior to enrollment in Chatham High School are not counted in GPA tabulations. The scale uses a five (5) credit. MEDICAL. FAIL. A valedictorian and salutatorian will be recognized in each graduating class. and social studies. a student must have attended Chatham High School for at least four full semesters and must have completed a minimum of sixty (60) credits in Chatham High School. WP. E. are used in computing grade point average (GPA). Often they have several applications for every opening. will be completed after the seventh semester. and WF. C. Some institutions may accept courses within the fine and practical arts. business. B. The grading scale outlined below is used in reporting student progress. These colleges expect a student’s high school academic background to be more extensive than the sixteen-course program. NG (no grade). Grades for all subjects completed in Chatham High School or an approved summer school program while enrolled in Chatham High School. and technology fields. Grade point average is obtained by multiplying grade quality points by the credits and dividing this sum by the total number of course credits attempted. full-year course as its basis for calculating quality points. but also address personal goals. science. except those designated AUDIT. GRADING SYSTEM A. 9 .

occupational.50 2.91 2. although any adult pupil or parent may request in writing to be excused from participating in all recruitment programs or having the pupil’s name appear in student information directories for all recruitment purposes.33 3. These include.66 1.67 2.00 2.84 ______ 0.25 .GRADING SCALE QUALITY POINTS REGULAR COURSES HONORS COURSES 4. Copies of applicable state and federal law and local policies are available to parents upon request. The parent of a pupil under the age of 18 and the pupil who has the written permission of such parent.09 _______ 1. are permitted and by law are available to educational.00 1. among others: 1. 2. or persons have access to pupil records.16 3. 3. except that the parent shall have access without consent of the pupil as long as the pupil is financially dependent on the parent and enrolled in the public school system or if the pupil has been declared legally incompetent by a court of appropriate jurisdiction. Pupil records are subject to challenge by parents and adult pupils.33 2. The adult pupil and the pupil’s parent who has the written permission of such pupil.00 97-100 = A+ 93-96 = A 90-92 = A87-89 = B+ 83-86 = B 80-82 = B77-79 = C+ 73-76 = C 70-72 = C67-69 = D+ 63-66 = D 60-62 = D0-59 = F (FAIL) PUPIL RECORDS Only authorized organizations. and date of birth. grade level.41 5.75 3. 10 . and military recruiters.67 0. telephone number.59 _______ 4. address.33 4.34 _______ 2.00 4. Student information directories. it is the responsibility of the person or agency having legal custody to provide a copy of the court order to the district indicating that the right to review pupil records should be denied the person whose rights have been terminated. Pupils at least 16 years of age who are terminating their education in the district because they will graduate from secondary school at the end of the term or no longer plan to continue their education. Should the parental rights of one or the other parent or guardian be terminated by a court of appropriate jurisdiction.00 5.00 3.33 1. which include information such as student name.00 .67 1. agencies.67 3.

active lifestyle. national origin. all students participate in a comprehensive health and physical education program during their four years at the high school. and participate in sports such as field hockey. and other medicines. students learn how to promote and support a healthy. flag football. engage in yoga and dance. safety.and high-challenge courses. Twelfth-grade students take physical education classes throughout the year. test their physical fitness through weightlifting and aerobic exercises. character development. Students meet the requirement of 30 classroom hours of instruction and are given the actual written portion of the New Jersey driver’s test at 11 .AFFIRMATIVE ACTION The Board of Education of the School District of the Chathams affirms its responsibility to ensure equal educational opportunity to all students in its public schools regardless of ancestry.5 Credits Grade 12 (3140) . lacrosse. The students gain knowledge of safe practices. nutrition. Eleventh-grade students are in health class for one quarter and physical education for three. floor hockey. and social or economic status. and students learn about human relationships and sexuality.5 Credits Grade 11 (3130) .5 Credits Grade 10 (3120) . badminton. and social and emotional health. sex. active lifestyle by studying such topics as personal growth and development. Tenth-grade students also take Driver Education. Students also develop personal and interpersonal skills by examining such topics as communication. religion. rules. In health class. a classroom-based program that focuses on the laws governing driving and safety as outlined in the New Jersey State Drivers’ Manual. which encourage students to develop the skills necessary for participating in lifetime physical activities and for supporting a healthy. eleventh-.5 Credits Full Year Prerequisite: None Consistent with the state standards. The curriculum also covers alcohol. driver education for one quarter. _________________________________________ COMPREHENSIVE HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION Grade 9 (3110) . color. Tenth-. and physical education for two quarters of the year. volleyball. drugs. and team handball. Frisbee. The curriculum specifically provides opportunities for students to navigate the low. softball. race. soccer. diseases and health conditions. tobacco. decision-making. goal setting. creed. and twelfth-grade students participate in physical education classes. Tenth-grade students participate in health class for one quarter. Ninthgrade students have a full year of classroom-based health and wellness education. basketball. strategies. and health services. and basic principles of individual and team sports and activities.

students are presented with a NJ Secondary School Driver Exam Certificate. and user-defined methods. The work in this course is devoted to programming in Java and is presented at a typical first-year college level. Part 1 and is a prerequisite for Advanced Placement Computer Science AB. The course emphasizes the concept of object-oriented programming using the Java language. Topics include computing devices (hardware and software).5 Credits Prerequisite: Algebra 2 and department recommendation This course provides an introduction to the field of computer science and is a prerequisite for Advanced Placement Computer Science AB. and user-defined methods. recursion. classes. 12 Full Year: 5 Credits Prerequisite: Department recommendation and successful completion of Algebra 2 and Introduction to Computer Science. It also covers general material on the discipline of computer science. _______________________________________ COMPUTER EDUCATION INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER SCIENCE. The curriculum has been approved by the College Board’s Advanced Placement Program and prepares students for the AP Computer Science: A Exam. aggregation. applets. and programming language features. problem solving. control flow statements. It continues the coverage of general material on the discipline of computer science. classes. algorithms. Parts 1 and 2. PART 2 (1649) Grades 10. object-oriented programming techniques. data types. input/output commands. The course emphasizes the concept of object-oriented programming using the Java language. ADVANCED PLACEMENT COMPUTER SCIENCE (1650) Grades 11.5 Credits Prerequisite: Algebra 2. structured programming. Part 1 and department recommendation This course provides a continuation of Introduction to Computer Science. Topics include computing devices (hardware and software). 12 . Introduction to Computer Science. control flow statements. These include identifiers. introduction to the software development process. 11. and programming language features. 12 Half Year: 2. The requirements are exceptionally demanding with emphasis on programming. INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER SCIENCE. structured programming. These include identifiers. input/output commands. introduction to the software development process. inheritance. 11. and stream properties. methodology. problem solving. classes. top-down design. polymorphism. After earning an 80% or higher on the test. arrays. data types.the end of the course. 12 Half Year: 2. PART 1 (1647) Grades 10. top-down design.

Barrett’s Lilies of the Field. vocabulary development. and Maxine Hong Kingston. and Satrapi’s Persepolis. The course is designed to help students in their quest to become highly critical readers. Shakespeare’s Midsummer Night’s Dream or Romeo and Juliet. students closely examine classical mythology and study a range of short stories by Edwidge Danticat. and study skills are areas of emphasis throughout the course. The initial unit of study focuses on the humanities with Plato’s Cave as the core selection. writing. They also complete several short research projects. Shakespeare’s Romeo and 13 . as well as active class participation. Shakespeare’s Midsummer Night’s Dream and Romeo and Juliet. This course meets the state graduation requirement for English 9. Homer’s Odyssey. HONORS ENGLISH 9 (1118) Grade 9 Full Year: 5 Credits Prerequisite: Department recommendation Honors English 9 is a rigorous academic program that requires advanced reading. and independent researchers. major core texts include Homer’s Odyssey. build their vocabularies. They also study world mythology in order to understand classical allusions and recognize basic similarities and differences in cultural stories of the world. novels. and vocabulary skills. in abridged and adapted forms when necessary. In addition. Reading comprehension. In the units that follow. ENGLISH 9 (1116) Grade 9 Full Year: 5 Credits Prerequisite: Department recommendation English 9 is designed to help students develop their critical reading and analytic writing skills. Major texts include Wiesel’s Night.ENGLISH CONCEPTS IN ENGLISH 9 (1112) Grade 9 Full Year: 5 Credits Prerequisite: Department recommendation and successful completion of eighthgrade English This course is designed to help students improve their language arts skills and develop a stronger understanding of the elements of fiction through the analysis of short stories. Barrett’s Lilies of the Field. They begin the course with a humanities unit before moving to major core works that include Homer’s Odyssey. sophisticated speakers and writers. Jhumpa Lahiri. In addition. Wiesel’s Night. students read and analyze poetry and nonfiction and study a humanities unit. This course meets the state graduation requirement for English 9. and broaden their research skills. enhance their understanding of grammar. as well as poetry and nonfiction from around the world. writing skills. and plays. Satrapi’s Persepolis.

Juliet. and essays. students continue to develop their language arts skills with an emphasis on inferential reading. This course meets the state graduation requirement for English 9. CONCEPTS IN ENGLISH 10 (1122) Grade 10 Full Year: 5 Credits Prerequisite: Department recommendation and successful completion of freshman English Structured to strengthen students’ language arts skills. poetry. this course focuses on literature that explores ideas of individualism and identity. In addition. as well as essays. vocabulary. further develop their reading comprehension and writing skills. and nonfiction. This course meets the state graduation requirement for English 10. This course meets the state graduation requirement for English 10. Students also engage in several research projects throughout the year. students strive to increase their vocabularies. short stories. and research. which are supplemented with units on related poetry. grammar. and Shelley’s Frankenstein. Miller’s Crucible. Students complete a research project that connects literature and history to the students’ own growing awareness of the world. Wiesel’s Night. and improve their ability to complete independent research throughout the course. Major works include London’s Call of the Wild. The literature focuses on the struggle of the individual in society. ENGLISH 10 (1126) Grade 10 Full Year: 5 Credits Prerequisite: Department recommendation and successful completion of freshman English In English 10. Salinger’s Catcher in the Rye. and Alexie’s Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven. Wolff’s This Boy’s Life. analytical writing. Gaines’s A Lesson Before Dying. short stories. Achebe’s Things Fall Apart. Students also read Shakespeare’s Macbeth and study poetry. and Alexie’s Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven. Salinger’s Catcher in the Rye. Shakespeare’s Macbeth. Through the study of this literature. Students study Hesse’s Siddhartha. 14 . and short stories that are representative of the Transcendental and Romantic movements. students may select from a list of contemporary works that offer insight into the timeless nature of the individual’s struggle in society. Hemingway’s Old Man and the Sea.

Poe. and the stamina to write lengthy analytical compositions are the essential skills required of the successful Honors English 10 student. Thoreau. such as Salinger’s Catcher in the Rye. The core works include. but are not limited to. or topics studied in the classroom. Wilson’s Fences. letters. which includes such selections as Twain’s Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Students are expected to regularly contribute to class discussions and participate in class activities. The literature. Hawthorne. the ability to write complex and varied sentences. and Fitzgerald’s Great Gatsby. The literature of the course is primarily early American nonfiction and fiction: speeches. Kesey’s One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest. short stories. CONCEPTS IN ENGLISH 11 (1132) Grade 11 Full Year: 5 Credits Prerequisite: Department recommendation and successful completion of sophomore English This course helps students strengthen their language arts skills within the context of an American literature curriculum. This course meets the state graduation requirement for English 10. as well as poetry. Irving. sophomores read and study Macbeth. Also included are modern American novels and plays. and Miller’s Crucible. Representative writers include Emerson. biography. journals. This course meets the state graduation requirement for English 11. O’Brien’s Things They Carried. and develop their research and writing skills. titles. which mainly focuses on twentiethcentury writers. and novels. Students also build their vocabularies. but also may read and study Shakespeare’s Othello in adapted form. ENGLISH 11 (1136) Grade 11 Full Year: 5 Credits Prerequisite: Department recommendation and successful completion of sophomore English English 11 is an American literature course. Students study the basic elements and structure of fiction and nonfiction written by American authors. and autobiography. and Dickinson.HONORS ENGLISH 10 (1128) Grade 10 Full Year: 5 Credits Prerequisite: Department recommendation and successful completion of freshman English Well-developed inferential reading skills. Students also complete a substantial research paper. is taught with a focus on inferential reading skills and literary analysis. strengthen their knowledge of grammar and usage. bearing some connection to the authors. Twain’s Adventures 15 . essays. because the English teachers believe that students at each grade level should have exposure to Shakespeare’s works. In addition. excellent diction.

Hemingway’s Sun Also Rises. and discussion skills to succeed in this course. historical. including Faulkner’s As I Lay Dying. Students explore literature through biographical. Students also complete a research paper. Because the English teachers believe that students at each grade level should have exposure to Shakespeare’s works. Conrad’s Heart of Darkness. A research paper is required. O’Brien’s Things They Carried. which explores several of the ideas studied in the English 11 curriculum. the texts include Austen’s Emma. is designed for highly motivated students who have well-developed language arts skills. In addition. writing. students read and study poetry. have been selected to develop advanced critical-reading and analyticwriting skills and to expose students to a wide range of literature that goes beyond the American literature curriculum found at the honors level. O’Brien’s Things They Carried. Students analyze poetry and prose and study a number of core texts. This course meets the state graduation requirement for English 11. and Fitzgerald’s Great Gatsby. Because the English teachers believe that students at each grade level should have exposure to Shakespeare’s works. O’Brien’s Things They Carried.of Huckleberry Finn. and Fitzgerald’s Great Gatsby. especially as it applies to the writing process. listening. which are sophisticated and challenging. Demanding reading and writing requirements enhance analytical skills and prepare students for college-level work. McCarthy’s All the Pretty Horses. HONORS ENGLISH 11 (1138) Grade 11 Full Year: 5 Credits Prerequisite: Department recommendation and successful completion of sophomore English Honors English 11. This course satisfies the state graduation requirement for English 11. short stories. Faulkner’s Sound and the Fury. The curriculum has been approved by the College Board’s Advanced Placement 16 . and Wilson’s Fences. Students must have excellent reading. Fitzgerald’s Great Gatsby. Twain’s Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. juniors read and study Shakespeare’s Othello. juniors read and analyze Othello. ADVANCED PLACEMENT ENGLISH LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION (1130) Grade 11 Full Year: 5 Credits Prerequisite: Department recommendation and successful completion of sophomore English AP English is equivalent to an introductory college English course in the study of literature and composition. McCarthy’s All the Pretty Horses. and nonfiction. Hurston’s Their Eyes Were Watching God. Shakespeare’s Richard II. James’s Washington Square. James’s Washington Square. Hemingway’s Sun Also Rises. which presents several of the themes explored in the honors curriculum. Miller’s Death of a Salesman. Hemingway’s Sun Also Rises. Students also undertake an in-depth critical study of poetry and regularly write analytic essays. Among others. a rigorous American literature course. Texts. and sociological perspectives and view it with an eye to usage and diction. Bronte’s Wuthering Heights.

Students engage in the analysis of language—diction and syntax in particular—as it is used within a variety of genres. Voices of the Holocaust. 17 . students explore representative works of classical and modern British and world literature. Students engage in several research projects and use technology to enhance their literacy skills. drama. but also study rhetoric in the context of those works and nonfiction selections. comprehension. Schlosser’s Fast Food Nation. students write reader responses and compose analytic essays. but also use technology to create authentic contexts for studying literature and language. Literature and Law. and Levitt and Dubner’s Freakonomics. Twelve Angry Men. General English elective courses do not meet this requirement. HONORS ENGLISH 12 (1148) Grade 12 Full Year: 5 Credits Prerequisite: Department recommendation and successful completion of junior English In this course. students work on the development of their reading. SENIOR ENGLISH COURSES Please note: Students may satisfy the senior English requirement by completing one of the full-year courses listed below. and nonfiction. This course meets the state graduation requirement for English 12. writing. Core works include such texts as Sophocles’ Antigone. Throughout the course. and speaking skills through a sampling of texts studied in the senior semester courses: The Literature of Holocaust and Genocide. short fiction. drama. an adapted version of Shakespeare’s Hamlet. Shakespeare’s Hamlet. including poetry. This course meets the state graduation requirement for English 11. Ehrenreich’s Nickel and Dimed. and Contemporary Nonfiction. Research informs several projects throughout the year. novels. Modern Drama. This course meets the state graduation requirement for English 12. Camus’s Stranger. and other poetry. listening. Texts include The Devil’s Arithmetic.Program and prepares students for the AP English Literature and Composition Exam. which they are strongly encouraged to take. as well as essays such as Camus’s Myth of Sisyphus and King’s Letter from Birmingham Jail. and Kafka’s Metamorphosis. and nonfiction selections. ENGLISH 12: A SAMPLER (1140) Grade 12 Full Year: 5 Credits Prerequisite: Department recommendation and successful completion of junior English Throughout the year. Literature of Immigration.

students develop into sophisticated critical readers and analytic writers who understand rhetoric and its varied effects. but students also explore narrative nonfiction and other modes of writing for a variety of purposes. Hillenbrand’s Seabiscuit. Camus’s Stranger. which provide opportunities for interdisciplinary study. Harr’s A Civil Action. through literary and rhetorical lenses. Each paired option meets the state graduation requirement for English 12. and King’s Letter from Birmingham Jail. Students also study a wide range of poetry and fiction. including Sophocles’ Antigone. five-credit courses. The current available pairings include the following: LITERATURE AND LAW/CONTEMPORARY NONFICTION (1184) LITERATURE OF IMMIGRATION/LITERATURE OF HOLOCAUST AND GENOCIDE (1186) LITERATURE OF HOLOCAUST AND GENOCIDE/MODERN DRAMA (1188) LITERATURE AND LAW In this interdisciplinary English course. and Ehrenreich’s Nickel and Dimed and essays such as Aristotle’s Poetics. The curriculum has been approved by the College Board’s Advanced Placement Program. The texts. Shakespeare’s Hamlet. The core works may include Guterson’s Snow Falling on Cedars. students read texts through literary and rhetorical lenses as they explore how law permeates society. This course meets the state graduation requirement for English 12. Studying challenging works of prose from a wide range of time periods and contexts. Rose’s Twelve Angry Men. ENGLISH 12: PAIRED OPTIONS (FULL-YEAR COURSES) Grade 12 Full year: 5 Credits Prerequisite: Department recommendation and successful completion of junior English The five semester-length courses described below are paired and offered as full-year. Camus’s Myth of Sisyphus. and Sophocles’ Antigone. include nonfiction books such as Harr’s Civil Action Schlosser’s Fast Food Nation. and students are strongly encouraged to take the AP English Language and Composition Exam in the spring.ADVANCED PLACEMENT ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION (1160) Grade 12 Full Year: 5 Credits Prerequisite: Department recommendation and successful completion of junior English AP English provides students with an opportunity to experience an entry-level college composition course. Garcia Marquez’s Chronicle of a Death Foretold. Films and popular 18 . Frequent writing assignments are chiefly analytic and expository. Camus’s Stranger. and Kafka’s Metamorphosis. Shakespeare’s Merchant of Venice.

music. Students write analytic papers. provide opportunities for students to read closely and synthesize textual ideas with research. complete reader-response journals. past and present. Major works may include such titles as the Definitive Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank. The course is designed to further students’ understanding of the basic conventions of drama while introducing them to more mature thematic and symbolic threads the aforementioned dramatists spent. They also may conduct mock trials. Edward Albee. which provide opportunities for interdisciplinary study in the fields of history. create projects that connect their personal experiences with immigration to the literature. and Gish Jen. A research paper is required. and study Supreme Court opinions to enhance their understanding of the connections between literature and law. Jhumpa Lahiri. Short works of fiction by contemporary writers from different backgrounds and cultures. Anton Chekov’s Cherry Orchard. as well as poetry. study. which provide opportunities for interdisciplinary study in the fields of business and economics. By examining texts closely. LITERATURE OF HOLOCAUST AND GENOCIDE Students read. participate in moot court arguments. Core selections may include Tennessee Williams’s Cat on a Hot Tin Roof. such as Bharati Mukherjee. Harold Pinter’s The Dumb Waiter. and other related materials. First They Killed My Father by Luong Ung. Enrique’s Journey. A research paper is required. may include such nonfiction works as Fast Food Nation. students experience an entry-level college composition course that is designed to improve their critical reading and analytic writing. The texts. and participate in class discussions. or have been spending. students study literature that explores a range of perspectives on the American immigration experience. short stories. Students discover philosophical approaches to readings.media are used to debunk myths and explore our culture’s fascination with the practice of law. students learn to read with a writer’s eye and write with a reader’s ear. songs. and essays. MODERN DRAMA Modern Drama exposes students to such preeminent dramatists of the twentieth century as Tennessee Williams. and Black Dog of Fate by Peter Balakian. and Friday Night Lights. Students complete analytic 19 . Students maintain a journal in response to the readings and complete analytic papers. as well as modern and contemporary essays and speeches. Seabiscuit. including diaries. autobiographies. The texts. memoirs. and discuss full-length selections and excerpts of literature written by Holocaust and genocide victims and survivors. and Arthur Miller. and politics. Edward Albee’s Zoo Story. among others. their careers exploring. may include such fiction and nonfiction works as How the Garcia Girls Lost Their Accents. Nickel and Dimed. Survival in Auschwitz by Primo Levi. and philosophy. sports. poetry. LITERATURE OF IMMIGRATION In this course. CONTEMPORARY NONFICTION In this course. Samuel Beckett’s Waiting for Godot. and Arthur Miller’s All My Sons. Writing assignments range from the analytic and expository to the narrative and creative. and American Born Chinese. Freakonomics. Luigi Pirandello’s Six Characters in Search of an Author. Edwidge Danticat. and write analytical papers.

and scripts. 12 Half Year: 2. as well as contemporary full-length texts read together as a class. and reproduction processes used in producing printed. Each paired option (full-year course) meets the state graduation requirement for English 12. The course provides a foundation for students 20 . 10. Students who have not demonstrated proficiency in language arts appropriate to grade level and necessary for graduation. peer edit. and publish creative descriptions. students learn grammar. vocabulary. layout. 11. Through the writing-process approach.5 Credits Prerequisite: Department recommendation This course concentrates on the development and reinforcement of language arts skills. and participate generously in class during discussions and readings of plays. setup. Students keep a writing portfolio and are encouraged to submit polished works to the school literary magazine for possible publication. and video-recorded information. punctuation. 12 Half Year: 2. read an outside work by one playwright. including news and sports reporting and editorial and feature writing. share. revise.5 Credits Prerequisite: Student interest and successful completion of freshman English This course introduces students to the various elements of journalism. LANGUAGE ARTS WORKSHOP (1090) Grades 9. short stories. including literal and inferential reading comprehension. 12 Half Year: 2. 11. broadcast.5 Credits Prerequisite: Student interest and successful completion of freshman English Creative Writing is designed for students who enjoy writing and would like an opportunity to write. 11. JOURNALISM (1165) Grades 10. character sketches. poems. are required to take this course. Emphasis is placed on copy. It may be repeated with department approval. CREATIVE WRITING (1161) Grades 10. ENGLISH ELECTIVES Please note: The following courses do not satisfy the state graduation requirement for any grade level of English study. and writing. A research paper is required. The process approach to writing is taught and encouraged.papers exploring each playwright. and capitalization in the context of their own writing. Frequent in-class writing assignments are based on excerpts from fiction and nonfiction. spelling. as indicated by their performance in their English courses and on standardized tests.

or advertising. analytic reviews of films. Students sharpen their analytic skills by learning how producers and directors create films and use cinematic techniques. students are expected to become discriminating critics who can write informed. Instruction targets the educational needs of the group. In addition to preparing and delivering formal and informal speeches. There is an additional focus on mastery of vocabulary. They learn how to evaluate their own performance and the performances of other speakers. as they would read a text. As a result. to create mood. PUBLIC SPEAKING (1167) Grades 10. The role of the media in contemporary life also is examined. This course may be repeated for credit. 11. or other school publications or for those who may pursue a career in publishing. 21 .involved in newspaper. school counselor recommendation This course is designed to support student acquisition of study skills and student learning of basic skills in content areas. FILM CRITICISM (1175) Grades 10. The course also is designed to help students assimilate into the school culture while preserving their own cultural identity. journalism. 10. but is highly individualized. 11. 11. grammar. Students research a variety of topics in order to write speeches designed for different purposes.5 Credits Prerequisite: Successful completion of freshman English Public Speaking serves students who want to understand the communication process and improve their speaking ability and listening skills. theme. and character. _______________________________________ ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE ESL (1107) Grades: 9. yearbook. 12 Full Year: 5 credits Prerequisite: ESL student. students learn how to participate effectively as speakers and listeners in group discussions and in interview situations. public relations. 12 Half Year: 2. much like writers use literary conventions.5 Credits Prerequisite: Student interest and successful completion of freshman English Film Criticism introduces students to the elements of film and teaches them to view a film. and writing skills. 12 Half Year: 2.

students will learn to comprehend spoken English in social and school settings.ESL ENGLISH (1109) Grades: 9. variables. 22 . It is designed for those who need a review of math operations and number properties before undertaking the study of algebra. fractions. graphing. 10. Students. quadratic functions. and radicals. 12 Full Year: 5 Credits Prerequisite: Department Recommendation and successful completion of Concepts in Algebra 1: Part A This is the second course in a two-year sequence dealing with the fundamentals of algebra. school counselor recommendation This course is designed to meet the needs of students whose English language proficiency is limited. 11. The course focuses on the properties and structure of the real number system. Mastery of academic language that supports student learning in other content areas is an essential component of this course. 11. 12 Full Year: 5 credits Prerequisite: ESL student. Specifically. It also includes a brief review of the skills from Concepts of Algebra 1: Part A before moving into such topics as solving systems of equations. may repeat the course for credit. CONCEPTS IN ALGEBRA 1: PART A (1510) Grades 9. polynomials. MATHEMATICS Please Note: Department recommendation is required for all level changes. The course may be required for students with demonstrated deficiencies in computation skills as identified by the math department or by performance on standardized tests. and percents. CONCEPTS IN ALGEBRA 1: PART B (1512) Grades 9. and to read and write for recreational and academic purposes. speaking. reading and writing skills. Through a variety of instructional methods. therefore. 10. 10. 12 Full Year: 5 Credits Prerequisite: Department recommendation This is the first course in a two-year sequence dealing with the fundamentals of algebra. decimals. The course meets the state graduation requirements for language arts literacy. The level of difficulty is adjusted for the individual as he or she demonstrates increased proficiency. 11. solving equations and inequalities. students will develop their listening. integers. and polynomials. Some topics included are arithmetic operations with whole numbers. to use English in socially and culturally appropriate ways.

11. GEOMETRY (1524) Grades 9. problem solving. and irrational numbers are covered using all the arithmetic operations. and volumes. and discoveries in analytic geometry. other polygons. rational numbers. areas and volumes of plane figures. 10. 12 Full Year: 5 Credits Prerequisite: Department recommendation and successful completion of Algebra 1 This course provides an understanding of the practical uses of geometry and the application of deductive reasoning in proofs. CONCEPTS IN GEOMETRY (1522) Grades 10. equations of a line. Skills are developed in the traditional topics of Euclidean geometry. Problem-solving aspects of this course call upon the skills developed in Algebra 1. 11. 11. 12 Full Year: 5 Credits Prerequisite: Department recommendation Algebra 1 consists of a study of the properties and structure of the real number system. This course integrates arithmetic and algebraic procedures in the solutions of geometric problems. which includes studies in similarity. congruence. 10 Full Year: 5 Credits Prerequisite: Department recommendation and successful completion of Algebra 1 This rigorous course deals with plane and solid Euclidean geometry and analytic geometry. and circles. Other topics include graphing. and similarity. circles. 10.ALGEBRA 1 (1514) Grades 9. and transformations. applications in areas and volumes. A major emphasis is placed on deductive proofs. and set theory. 12 Full Year: 5 Credits Prerequisite: Department recommendation This college preparatory course in Euclidean (plane) geometry emphasizes the properties of geometric figures and geometric applications. exercises with constructions and loci. 23 . areas. It is intended for highly motivated students who have been very successful in Algebra 1 or eighth-grade algebra. congruence. polynomials. Sets of integers. solving equations and inequalities. Topics include properties of similarity and congruence. HONORS GEOMETRY (1526) Grades 9. properties of triangles. Topics include parallel and perpendicular lines.

11 Full Year: 5 Credits Prerequisite: Department recommendation and successful completion of Honors Geometry Topics include all that is taught in Algebra 2 plus a thorough introduction to trigonometry. polynomials. 11. graphing. More specifically. 12 Full Year: 5 Credits Prerequisite: Department recommendation and successful completion of Geometry Algebra 2. The concept of mathematical function is developed and refined through the study of real numbers. Students can expect to begin with a brief review of Algebra 1 skills before moving into topics that include real numbers. complex numbers. ALGEBRA 2 (1534) Grades 10. This course includes an emphasis on essential algebraic skills as 24 . introduces the system of complex numbers. This demanding course puts a premium on reasoning and problem-solving skills. 12 Full Year: 5 Credits Prerequisite: Department recommendation and successful completion of Algebra 2 or Concepts of Algebra 2 This course is an option for juniors who wish to take Precalculus during their senior year and for college-bound seniors who desire additional mathematical knowledge beyond Algebra 2. trigonometry. equations and inequalities. logarithms. radical expressions. Other topics include variation. and complex numbers. and logarithms. the course provides a continuation of the real number system and introduces the complex number system. and sequences and series. Enrolled students are required to complete an assignment during the summer preceding the start of this course. a continuation of the study of the real number system. HONORS ALGEBRA 2 (1536) Grades 10. matrices. conic sections.CONCEPTS IN ALGEBRA 2 (1532) Grades 11. Students work with operations on and simplifications of polynomials and rational expressions and learn to create solutions to systems of linear/quadratic equations and inequalities. ALGEBRA 3/ TRIGONOMETRY (1538) Grades 11. 12 Full Year: 5 Credits Prerequisite: Department recommendation This college preparatory course in Algebra 2 focuses on the applications of algebra and the concepts and skills necessary for future success in mathematics. solving equations and inequalities. radicals. polynomials. exponents.

the mean value theorem.well as the study of functions. and surfaces in 3-space. properties of limits. coordinate geometry. vectors. Rolles theorem. In addition to the topics covered in non-honors Precalculus. CALCULUS (1552) Grade 12 Full Year: 5 Credits Prerequisite: Department recommendation and successful completion of Precalculus This course is an introductory study of calculus. sequences. differential and integral calculus. derivatives of algebraic functions. Topics include properties of continuity and limits. the scope is broad and the work exceptionally demanding. extrema. and differentiation of trigonometric and 25 . ADVANCED PLACEMENT CALCULUS/AB (1556) Grade 12 Full Year: 5 Credits Prerequisite: Department recommendation and successful completion of Honors Precalculus In this typical first-year college-level course. minima. parametric equations. polar coordinates. extrema. polar coordinates. and complex numbers. Topics include the slope of a curve. and Geometry. the derivative. the mean value theorem. exponential. area. and volume. sequences and series. providing a more in-depth treatment of the topics covered in Precalculus. and logarithmic functions. the rate of change of a function. Algebra 2. and applications of the above. integration. matrices. function graphing. 12 Full Year: 5 Credits Prerequisite: Department recommendation and successful completion of Honors Algebra 2 This rigorous Precalculus course provides a bridge between intermediate algebra and calculus. This course does not prepare students for an AP examination in calculus. the trapezoidal rule. PRECALCULUS (1544) Grades 11. Students study limits. HONORS PRECALCULUS (1546) Grades 11. DeMoivre’s theorem. series. 12 Full Year: 5 Credits Prerequisite: Department recommendation and successful completion of Algebra 2 This course emphasizes application of the concepts learned in Algebra 1. maxima. techniques for finding derivatives of algebraic and trigonometric functions. the rate of change of a function. students also study limits. conics. introductory trigonometry. integration. the slope of a curve. The course includes a thorough treatment of trigonometry as well as polynomial.

). wave phenomena (primarily electromagnetic waves). students are enrolled in both AP Calculus and AP Physics. The course is taught during a two-period block of time that is used at the discretion of the teachers. topics are covered in one subject that supplement. and engineering. emphasizes problemsolving skills. parametric equations. build on. modern. and extend topics in the other. enhance. ADVANCED PLACEMENT STATISTICS (1564) Grades 11. properties of limits. specifically the mechanics exam. and some of the classes are team-taught. sampling and experimentation by planning and conducting studies. geometric optics. derivatives of algebraic functions. The curriculum has been approved by the College Board’s Advanced Placement Program and prepares students for the AP Physics C Exam. 12 Full Year: 5 credits Prerequisite: Department recommendation and successful completion of Algebra 2 The purpose of the Advanced Placement Statistics course is to introduce the students to the major concepts and tools for collecting.exponential functions. the trapezoidal rule. the rate of change of a function. maxima. Students will be exposed to four broad conceptual themes: exploring data by describing patterns and departures from patterns. The curriculum has been approved by the College Board’s Advanced Placement Program and prepares students for the AP Calculus AB Exam. and requires high-level critical thinking. dynamics. and nuclear physics. Students receive grades for each class that appear separately on the transcript. analyzing. electricity and magnetism. equipping them for further study in advanced sciences. The course is algebra and calculus based. introduce. thermodynamics. momentum energy. The curriculum has been approved by the College Board’s Advanced Placement Program and prepares students for the AP Calculus BC Exam. Calculus instruction is typically demanding and covers a broad range of topics. Physics instruction provides a systematic treatment of all topics required and recommended by the national AP curriculum committee. Throughout the year. including the slope of a curve. ADVANCED PLACEMENT CALCULUS/BC AND PHYSICS C: MECHANICS (1560-AP Calculus/BC. anticipating patterns by 26 . minima. Specifically. polar coordinates. 1460-AP Physics C) Grade 12 Full Year: 5 Credits Calculus and 6 Credits Physics Prerequisite: Department recommendation and successful completion of Honors Precalculus In this integrated program. the major topics of study include mechanics (statics. and drawing conclusions from data. reinforce. Rolles theorem. This program provides a solid base for college-bound students. It involves much hands-on work and an exposure to computer-based labs. etc. integration. applied sciences. and differentiation of trigonometric and exponential functions. the mean value theorem. relativity. Some tests are combined. if time permits. and.

graph theory and its applications. Certain project-based themes may include mathematical models using Excel. It includes. efficient scheduling. MATHEMATICAL APPLICATIONS IN SOCIETY (1547) Grade 12 Half Year: 2. spanning trees. mathematical patterns. 11. 12 Half Year: 2. and problem-solving skills. 27 . and engineering. MATHEMATICS SEMESTER ELECTIVES DISCRETE MATH (1541) Grades 11. 10. sports. and mathematics in such areas as finance.exploring random phenomena using probabilities and simulations. topics from Algebra 1. and Geometry. and it also reinforces test-taking strategies.5 credits Prerequisite: Department recommendation and successful completion in Concepts of Algebra II This semester course is designed for seniors who want to continue to improve their mathematical knowledge while exploring the ways in which mathematics is used in life. Students will strengthen their skills by applying them in real world situations.5 Credits Prerequisite: Department recommendation This course provides instruction for students who have not demonstrated proficiency in mathematics skills appropriate to age or grade level and necessary for graduation. MATH WORKSHOP (1507) Grades 9. Students will use the language of mathematics in writing about their results and discoveries. Problem solving is emphasized and algorithmic solutions suited to computer programming are developed and analyzed. 12 Half Year: 2. This course may be taken in conjunction with another mathematics course and may be repeated. This course offers the study of such topics as mathematical codes. using statistical inference by estimating population parameters and testing hypotheses. reasoning. combinatorial problems and optimization. real world statistics. The curriculum has been approved by the College Board’s Advanced Placement Program and prepares students for the AP Statistics Exam.5 Credits Prerequisite: Department recommendation and successful completion of Algebra 2 Discrete mathematics is a rapidly expanding area of mathematics with many practical and relevant applications in a variety of fields. and mathematical concepts of fairness. Algebra 2. It may be required for those with demonstrated deficiencies as identified by the mathematics department or by performance on standardized tests. but is not limited to.

processes. EARTH SCIENCE (1414) Grades 9. and exosphere (universe). 10. oceanography. 11. numerical methods of analyzing data. The areas of geology. statistical distributions. and meteorology are covered in an interdisciplinary. geophysics. probability. discovery. modeling and data analysis. linear correlation. atmosphere. A lecture/laboratory strategy. 12 Full Year: 6 Credits Prerequisite: Department recommendation and satisfactory completion of both Algebra 1 and previous science course This rigorous course represents the first course of the honors science sequence. hands-on manner. It is devoted to studying all aspects of the Earth system. It is an integrated. Application of earth science topics to everyday life are stressed throughout the course. principles of counting. Astronomy.PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS (1543) Grades 11. 10. interdisciplinary course built on the background of science acquired in the earlier grades. HONORS EARTH SCIENCE (1416) Grades 9. 12 Half Year: 2. 12 Full Year: 6 Credits Prerequisite: Department recommendation and satisfactory completion of previous science course This course focuses on the earth. including interactions among the geosphere. coupled with the Earth Science curriculum-project approach. and meteorology are the major components of the program. geology. as well as real world events and issues. and additional subject matter areas are covered as well. Some computer use may be included. oceanography. This course utilizes a variety of inquiry approaches such as experiments.5 Credits Prerequisite: Department recommendation and successful completion of Algebra 2 This course involves the collection and analysis of statistical data as used in business and scientific research. and interpretation of student-obtained data. Geochemistry. hydrosphere. 11. 10 Full Year: 6 Credits Prerequisite: Department recommendation Students are introduced to a survey of major earth science topics. and hypothesis testing. and environment in space. space science. astronomy. As students integrate the content 28 . Technology-based tools are used to deepen student understanding of the course concepts. emphasizes inquiry. SCIENCE CONCEPTS IN EARTH SCIENCE (1410) Grades 9. Topics include data collection. history. its materials.

regional. evolution. Topics include atomic theory. cell structure and function. It is especially recommended as the second year of a four-year honors sequence in science. bonding. cell structure and function. ecology and evolution. this rigorous laboratory course stresses in-depth comprehension of important concepts in cellular biology and biochemistry. cell division. and local Earth systems. they will develop their abilities to problem solve issues related to the global. HONORS BIOLOGY (1426) Grades 9. A strong emphasis on laboratory investigations and data analysis supports the course content. transport mechanisms. Topics of study include biochemistry. CONCEPTS IN BIOLOGY (1422) Grades 10. metabolism. 12 Full Year: 6 Credits Prerequisite: Department recommendation This course provides students with a general understanding of major biological concepts. Ninth-grade enrollment in Honors Biology affords students multiple opportunities for Advanced Placement science study in subsequent years. and bioethical issues using hands-on learning settings and laboratory investigations. chemical reactions. human genetics. Eighth-grade students entering Honors Biology as freshmen must complete a summer assignment in preparation for an earth science proficiency exam to be given in September. 12 Full Year: 6 Credits Prerequisite: Department recommendation This course introduces students to the fundamental principles of chemistry and demonstrates how chemistry applies to everyday life and society. 11. Students explore such topics as biochemistry. A strong math background is preferred. genetics.and processes of the Earth system. heredity. 12 Full Year: 6 Credits Prerequisites: Department recommendation and satisfactory completion of Accelerated Algebra 1 (for grade 8) For students desiring deeper knowledge of biology. 12 Full Year: 6 Credits Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of previous science course This course provides students with a comprehensive understanding of the molecular and cellular composition of living organisms. 11. and evolutionary trends. environmental 29 . BIOLOGY (1424) Grades 10. CONCEPTS IN CHEMISTRY (1432) Grades 11. 11. energy transformations. 10. acids and bases.

and use metric measurement. rates of chemical reactions. atomic theory and its application to chemical reactions and chemical properties are explored. interdisciplinary manner. satisfactory completion of previous science course. simple machines. The first semester presents an overview of the properties of matter and chemical reactions. 12 Full Year: 6 Credits Prerequisites: Department recommendation. Students develop an understanding of matter in terms of composition and changes in composition. Fundamental principles are emphasized.) Lab work is emphasized in this course. Applications to everyday life are stressed throughout the course. and satisfactory completion of Algebra 2 (Algebra 2 may be taken concurrently. light. 30 . students are introduced to more detailed study of energy effects of chemical reactions. Unifying principles are developed by means of observation and experimentation with the development of explanatory models. matter. 11. including acid-base. satisfactory completion of previous honors-level science course. and satisfactory completion of Honors Algebra 2 (Honors Algebra 2 may be taken concurrently. Finally. as well as relevant topics in physics technology. 12 Full Year: 6 Credits Prerequisite: Department recommendation. The areas of scientific method. using mathematics at the introductory algebraic level. precipitation. sound. 11. and various types of equilibrium conditions in chemical reactions. and electricity. use and write chemical formulae. are explored. HONORS CHEMISTRY (1436) Grades 10. and become able to solve scientific problems logically. write and balance chemical equations.chemistry.) This course deals with major concepts and theories of chemistry. With this background. The course provides relevant problem-solving activities through the use of a laboratory-oriented approach. CONCEPTS IN PHYSICS (1440) Grades 11. and oxidation-reduction. energy. 12 Full Year: 6 Credits Prerequisite: Department recommendation This course presents physics and related physical science topics in a highly concrete. and consumer chemistry. motion. CHEMISTRY (1434) Grades 10.

momentum. and extend topics in the other.PHYSICS (1444) Grades 11. acceleration. heat energy. electricity and magnetism. integration. optics. Demonstrations and visual materials augment the many laboratory activities. Students receive grades for each class that appear separately on the transcript. if time permits. work and power. equipping them for further study in the life and medical sciences. minima. derivatives of algebraic functions. various applied sciences. Throughout the year. and. parametric equations. the mean value theorem. wave phenomena (primarily electromagnetic waves). Some tests are combined. HONORS PHYSICS (1446) Grades 11. topics are covered in one subject that supplement. acceleration. etc. and satisfactory completion of Algebra 2 After a brief review of the mathematical concepts used in physics. velocity. 12 Full Year: 6 Credits Prerequisites: Department recommendation and satisfactory completion of previous honors-level science course and satisfactory completion of Honors Algebra 2 This course provides a systematic treatment of the main principles of physics and emphasizes the development of problem-solving skills. and satisfactory completion of Honors Precalculus In this integrated program. Students are challenged to reason and to apply scientific principles. introduce. if time permits. The course provides a solid foundation in physics for college-bound students. maxima. the trapezoidal rule. including the slope of a curve. Rolles theorem. ADVANCED PLACEMENT CALCULUS/BC AND ADVANCED PLACEMENT PHYSICS C: MECHANICS (1560-AP Calculus/BC. 1460-AP Physics C) Grade 12 Full Year: 5 Credits Calculus and 6 Credits Physics Prerequisites: Department recommendation. polar coordinates. and some of the classes are team-taught. It focuses on mechanics (forces. energy and its conservation. electricity and magnetism. students are enrolled in both AP Calculus and AP Physics. and engineering. build on. and. The curriculum has 31 . and differentiation of trigonometric and exponential functions. properties of limits. satisfactory completion of previous science course. this inquiryoriented course deals with motion (velocity. satisfactory completion of Honors Chemistry. the rate of change of a function. wave motions. reinforce. The course is taught during a two-period block of time that is used at the discretion of the teachers. Calculus instruction is typically demanding and covers a broad range of topics. momentum). 12 Full Year: 6 Credits Prerequisites: Department recommendation. enhance.).

equipping them for further study in advanced sciences. the major topics of study include mechanics (statics. interpret. thermodynamics. Enrolled students are required to complete an assignment during the summer preceding the start of this course. This program provides a solid base for college-bound students. momentum energy. college-level biology program. 32 . geometric optics. Physics instruction provides a systematic treatment of all topics required and recommended by the national AP curriculum committee. It is appropriate for a student intending a career in any of the allied health sciences. ADVANCED PLACEMENT CHEMISTRY (1458) Grades 11. 12 Full Year: 6 Credits Prerequisites: Department recommendation and satisfactory completion of chemistry This is a second-year high school chemistry course. emphasizes problemsolving skills. dynamics. ADVANCED PLACEMENT BIOLOGY (1448) Grades 11. 12 Full Year 6 Credits Prerequisites: Department recommendation and satisfactory completion of biology and chemistry This rigorous course duplicates an introductory. electricity and magnetism. specifically the mechanics exam. The curriculum has been approved by the College Board’s Advanced Placement Program and prepares students for the AP Biology Exam. Structure and content are typical of a first-year college general chemistry course. and. The curriculum has been approved by the College Board’s Advanced Placement Program and prepares students for the AP Chemistry Exam. and nuclear physics. The curriculum has been approved by the College Board’s Advanced Placement Program and prepares students for the AP Physics C Exam. if time permits. Topics that are studied in Honors Chemistry will be examined in greater detail. and communicate about basic biological concepts and ethical issues. and requires high-level critical thinking. wave phenomena (primarily electromagnetic waves). modern. and engineering.been approved by the College Board’s Advanced Placement Program and prepares students for the AP Calculus BC Exam. Specifically.). The work is exceptionally demanding and incorporates a strong laboratory component to this course. applied sciences. The course is algebra and calculus based. Enrolled students are required to complete an assignment during the summer preceding the start of this course. Emphasis is placed on scientific thinking skills and the ability to critically read. relativity. etc. It involves much hands-on work and an exposure to computer-based labs.

evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems. 12 Half Year with Laboratory: 3 credits Prerequisites: Department recommendation and successful completion of biology and chemistry This semester course is an extensive biological study that includes topics such as biochemistry. The curriculum has been approved by the College Board’s Advanced Placement Program and prepares students for the AP Environmental Science Exam. Students in the course analyze environmental problems both natural and human-made. and examine alternative solutions for resolving and/or preventing them. animal cell structure and differentiation. weather and climate. Emphasis is on interrelationships among these phenomena. seniors at Chatham High School may enroll in this college class that carries 3 college credits while also earning 6 credits at Chatham High School. and mammalian organs. the hydrologic cycle. and organ systems.ADVANCED PLACEMENT ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE (1468) Grades 11. tissue complexity. students successfully completing this course will receive a Rutgers University transcript. Students complete extensive laboratory work. HONORS EARTH SYSTEMS (1470) Grade 12 Full Year: 6 credits at CHS Prerequisites: Department recommendation and successful completion of biology and chemistry In partnership with Rutgers University. 33 . Earth Systems is a systematic introduction to physical processes on earth. including earth-sun relations. Be advised that the discounted Rutgers tuition and fees for this course are the responsibility of the student. 12 Full Year: 6 Credits Prerequisites: Department recommendation and successful completion of biology and chemistry This exciting course integrates concepts from biology. Students learn the structure and function of individual body systems and the integration of these different systems. Enrolled students are required to complete an assignment during the summer preceding the start of this course. The course is collaborative and inquiry-based. including a required mammalian dissection. and landforms. As well as receiving credits for their CHS diploma. chemistry and the social sciences to examine the interrelationships of the natural world. Credits may be transferrable to their college as science or geography credits. SCIENCE SEMESTER ELECTIVES (*) ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY (1477) Grades 11. earth materials. ecology.

and physics in understanding forensic science. movements. US History I develops information processing skills. biotechnology. The course emphasizes the development of basic social studies skills to accommodate students with special academic needs. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------(*)These elective courses are not necessarily offered each year. It emphasizes how the United States was influenced by its diverse culture and ethnic groups. US History I introduces students to the key concepts. cultural. PHYSICAL OCEANOGRAPHY (1479) ______________________________________ SOCIAL STUDIES CONCEPTS IN UNITED STATES HISTORY I (1222) Grade 9 Full Year: 5 Credits Prerequisite: Department recommendation Concepts in US History I is a chronological survey from the pre-colonial period through the late 1800s. The course involves case studies and inquiry-based activities. and methods commonly used during forensic investigations of crime scenes. with an emphasis on improving the ability of students to find. depending upon student interest and teacher availability. and personalities of the history of the United States from the pre-colonial period to the closing of the frontier in the late 19th century. political. They may be replaced by the course listed below. and diplomatic perspectives. 12 Half Year with Laboratory: 3 Credits Prerequisite: Successful completion of two high school laboratory sciences This multidisciplinary course uses biology. Although the course explores history within a chronological framework. chromatography. and laws of physics. microscopy. serology. chemistry. events. DNA fingerprinting with Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR). critically analyze. The course exposes students to the various laboratory skills. UNITED STATES HISTORY I (1227) Grade 9 Full Year: 5 Credits Prerequisite: None Using a multi-faceted approach that includes sociological. and evaluate the significance of facts and 34 . Students learn observation. This course meets the state graduation requirements for United States History I. economic.(*) FORENSIC SCIENCE (1481) Grades 11. techniques.

US History II requires students to investigate the key concepts. and historiography. Extensive and intensive reading and writing assignments make it vital that students read above grade level and demonstrate welldeveloped writing skills. is a survey of United States history from the late 1800s to the present. political. 35 . This course meets the state graduation requirements for United States History I. this course provides students with the analytical skills and factual knowledge necessary to assess various interpretations of US history and construct their own understanding. the second half of the state requirement. economic. This course is strongly recommended for students preparing to take Advanced Placement United States History. interpretation. With an emphasis on critical thinking. Students enrolled in this course will complete a variety of assessments including a short research project and/or paper. and effectively communicate their own understandings of United States history. It emphasizes continued development of social studies skills to accommodate students with special academic needs. HONORS UNITED STATES HISTORY I (1228) Grade 9 Full Year: 5 Credits Prerequisite: Department recommendation Honors US History 1 is a study of the socio-intellectual and political history of the United States from pre-colonial times to the late 1800s. and diplomatic perspectives. This course meets the state graduation requirements for United States History I. UNITED STATES HISTORY II (1234) Grade 10 Full Year: 5 Credits Prerequisite: Department recommendation and successful completion of United States History I Using a multi-faceted approach that includes sociological. movements. Students are expected to complete a research/term paper. events. and personalities of the history of the United States from the late 19th century through the 1980s. CONCEPTS IN UNITED STATES HISTORY II (1232) Grade 10 Full Year: 5 Credits Prerequisite: Department recommendation This course. cultural. analysis. support. defend. The course also requires students to build.ideas.

Europe. The major themes to be studied are: 1) Interaction between humans and the environment. the course highlights changes in global societies and their causes and consequences. and. is intended for highly motivated students. to the present. expansion. Through exercises related to historical content from approximately 8000 b. and interact with diverse sources of information and technologies.c. and conflict. expansion. World Studies trains students to effectively access and analyze information. 36 . Asia. Using historical inquiry of the past as a tool to develop critical-thinking skills and as a foundation to comprehend the present. Offering balanced global coverage. ADVANCED PLACEMENT WORLD HISTORY (1219) Grade 11 Full Year: 5 Credits Prerequisite: Department recommendation and successful completion of United States History II Advanced Placement World History is the secondary school equivalent of an introductory college course in world history and as such. develop their own informed perspectives. This course meets the state graduation requirements for World History/Cultures. The purpose of the AP World History is to develop greater understanding of the evolution of global processes and contacts in different human societies.CONCEPTS IN WORLD STUDIES (1212) Grade 11 Full Year: 5 Credits Prerequisite: Department recommendation Concepts in World Studies is a survey course that allows students to study the major historical developments of the past three centuries. 2) Development and interaction of cultures.e. This course emphasizes the development of basic social studies skills to accommodate students with special academic needs. This course meets the state graduation requirement for World History/Cultures. and formulate realistic and responsible plans in response to complex global issues. the Americas. with coverage of European history amounting to less than 30 percent of the total course. WORLD STUDIES (1217) Grade 11 Full Year: 5 Credits Prerequisite: None Preparing students to engage the global challenges of the 21st century. and interaction of economic systems. The curriculum has been approved by the College Board’s Advanced Placement Program and prepares students for the AP World History Exam. this course provides students with an opportunity to thoroughly examine issues. Africa. design and test solutions to problems. 3) State-building. and Oceania are represented in balance. 5) Development and transformation of social structures. 4) Creation.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT UNITED STATES HISTORY (1238) Grades 10 Full Year: 5 Credits Prerequisite: Department recommendation and successful completion of United States History I This course meets the second half of the state graduation requirement in United States History. The curriculum has been approved by the College Board’s Advanced Placement Program and prepares students for the AP United States History Exam. ADVANCED PLACEMENT GOVERNMENT & POLITICS: UNITED STATES (1258) Grades 11. 12 Full Year: 5 Credits Prerequisite: Department recommendation and successful completion of U. They also become acquainted with a variety of theoretical perspectives and explanations for various 37 . Essay writing is emphasized. and responsibility for learning. introductory college course. beliefs and ideas that constitute U. The course also focuses on economic history and the role of industrialization by reviewing the development of commercial practices and changing economic structures to recognize Europe’s influence on the world.S. The curriculum has been approved by the College Board’s Advanced Placement Program and prepares students for the AP European History Exam. Students learn to assess historical materials and their relevance to a given interpretive problem. and to weigh the evidence and analysis presented by historical scholarship. writing. History I and current Social Studies course The purpose of this full-year course is to give students an analytical perspective on government and politics in the United States. politics. As events in history can only be understood in terms of their social context. and students may be expected to complete a research/term paper or its equivalent. and the arts. Students investigate the broad themes of intellectual. Students become familiar with various institutions. groups. The program prepares students for intermediate and advanced college courses by making demands equivalent to those of a full-year. It prepares students for the demands of a college education by providing experience in college-level reading.S. 12 Full Year: 5 Credits Prerequisite: Department recommendation and successful completion of World Studies and United States History II This rigorous academic course furnishes a basic narrative of events and movements in European history from 1450 to the present. popular literature. It is designed to help students develop analytical skills and provides the factual information necessary to deal critically with the problems of American history. cultural and political history and appreciate how those ideas are reflected in trends of philosophy. this course examines demographics and the influences of social classes and gender roles on history. ADVANCED PLACEMENT EUROPEAN HISTORY (1248) Grades 11.

political beliefs and behaviors. and the power of political parties. such topics as the slave trade. to a lesser extent. students gain a better understanding of the global challenges and choices facing their 38 . The major goal is to ascertain the factors and influences that impact upon the processes that drive the operations of government. 12 Half Year: 2. interest groups and mass media. Those enrolled also read extensively in primary and secondary sources. 12 Half Year: 2. 12 Full Year: 5 credits Prerequisite: Department recommendation and successful completion of United States History I and biology The purpose of this full-year course is to introduce students to the scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of humans and. Those enrolled also read extensively in primary and secondary sources. civil rights and civil liberties.5 credits Prerequisite: Department recommendation and successful completion of United States History I This course examines the basic concepts. stress. but is not limited to. and individuals who enroll are expected to engage in debates and simulations. The curriculum has been approved by the College Board’s Advanced Placement Program and prepares students for the AP United States Government and Politics Exam. theories and experiments of biopsychology. ADVANCED PLACEMENT PSYCHOLOGY (1250) Grades 11.5 Credits Prerequisite: Department recommendation and successful completion of U. By studying the historical roots of many of the world’s current conflicts. development personality. the Harlem Renaissance. Students learn the major vocabulary. cognitive psychology. the Civil Rights Movement. the institution of slavery. and contemporary issues in the African-American community. They have the opportunity to examine ethical issues in research and conduct their own research projects. (*) INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS (1245) Grades 11. other animals. intelligence. behaviorism. and issues of international relations. The course includes. as well as complete a significant writing component. History I This course familiarizes students with African-American history from the African diaspora to the present. social psychology. SOCIAL STUDIES SEMESTER ELECTIVES (*) AFRICAN-AMERICAN STUDIES (1241) Grades 11. mental illness. structures. The curriculum has been approved by the College Board’s Advanced Placement Program and prepares students for the AP Psychology Exam.behaviors and outcomes. Several themes highlight the course of study: constitutional underpinnings of the United States government. The class is student centered. development of public policy. and psychological testing.S.

and genocide. 12 Half Year: 2. Cambodian genocide. their impact on history. students focus primarily on the influence of social relationships on people’s attitudes and behavior and on how societies are established and change. views of prejudice. (*) HOLOCAUST AND GENOCIDE (1257) Grades 11. In this course. and social movements. They may be replaced by the courses listed below. (*) SOCIOLOGY (1255) Grades 11. The course stresses student involvement and interaction. interaction. LAW AND SOCIETY (1233) MIDDLE EASTERN STUDIES (1247) PSYCHOLOGY (1251) 39 . ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------(*) These elective courses are not necessarily offered each year. social stratification and inequities. globalization.5 Credits Prerequisite: Department recommendation Sociology is the systematic study of social behavior and human groups. Students are expected to engage in discussions and debates and to conduct their own sociological research.5 Credits Prerequisite: Departmental recommendation and successful completion of United States History I Students in this course examine the nature of human behavior. Armenian massacre. students come to understand causes of such catastrophes. and devastation of the American Indian. Participation. 12 Half Year: 2. Among the subjects to be addressed are political power and decision making. By studying events such as the Nazi holocaust. economic development. nation building. and how they might be avoided.generation. Bosnian crisis. the workplace. and writing are heavily emphasized. They explore such topics as families. nuclear politics. causes of war and peace. and the United States’ relationship with international organizations. gangs and social deviants. trade (mis)management.

and professional-level work. and entrepreneurial literacy (effective with the 2010-11 grade-nine class). protecting assets and various types of insurance. ECONOMIC. cost-benefit analysis. 11. Major life events such as buying or leasing a car. including Word. checking accounts. 10.5 Credits Prerequisite: None This course is designed to give students an introduction to the world of business. COMPUTER APPLICATIONS (2221) Grades 9. Students work on a variety of individual and group assignments that raise their awareness and competency in the use of credit/debit cards. 10.5 credits Prerequisite: None This course introduces students to a variety of money management concepts. Students also have opportunities to develop presentation and self-expression skills through various assignments that prepare them for college. management decision-making and business ethics. renting an apartment. The course also includes units on effective Internet research techniques. saving and investing. Students learn practical skills that enhance their personal financial goals and interests. 11. 12 Half Year: 2. PRINCIPLES OF BUSINESS (2231) Grades 10. BUSINESS AND ENTREPRENEURIAL LITERACY FINANCIAL LITERACY (2237) Grades 9. and acceptable computer use policies. 11. budgeting expenses. Students also work with Microsoft Photo Story and create multimedia slideshows with their own voice recordings and music soundtracks. Excel. 12 Half Year: 2. PowerPoint and Publisher. the influence of advertising. the marketing 40 . The course includes units on the profit motive. career planning. identity theft and predatory lending. buying a home. Students learn and improve skills in the use of Microsoft Office software programs. financial-statement analysis. and saving for retirement are also covered. and credit and debt management. digital citizenship. Individual and group projects are assigned throughout the term.21st-CENTURY LIFE AND CAREERS FINANCIAL. financial responsibility and decision making.5 Credits Prerequisite: None Computer Applications is a one-semester course that covers a wide array of computer and Internet-related programs. and etiquette in the workplace. The course includes units on budgeting and money management. 12 Half Year: 2. economic. income and taxation. as well as topics and skills transferable to many fields. This course meets the state graduation requirement for financial. business.

record keeping and accounting. the central banking system and the role of government. A 41 . capital markets. The Wall Street Journal Classroom Edition and other web-based resources are used to enhance classroom instruction. Students also participate in a National Stock Market Game as a means of analyzing companies and industries. Students initially create an idea for a business. 12 Half Year: 2. obtaining financing and insurance. and corporate law and structure.5 Credits Prerequisite: Principles of Business Entrepreneurship is a one-semester course that focuses on the step-by-step process of forming a business. The balance of the semester is devoted to writing a comprehensive business plan. The course also includes units on leadership and profiles of successful entrepreneurs.5 credits Prerequisite: None This course introduces students to a variety of advanced economic and investment concepts. Students may also participate in a National Stock Market Game as a means of analyzing companies and industries. and analyzing movies and documentaries. Students complete a variety of team and individual assignments dealing with the concepts of supply and demand. and the need to balance the manufacturing and services sectors. 11. 11. 12 Half Year: 7. international business dynamics.5 Credits Full Year: 15 credits Prerequisite: By special arrangement through school counselor The COE program offers students placement in retail. and factors of production. development of alternative energy sources. and investment portfolio management. or industrial settings in positions such as clerk. 12 Half Year: 2. Students prepare a final report and PowerPoint presentation intended for an audience of potential investors and lenders. The course includes units on the business cycle and circular flow of our economy. corporate. INTRODUCTION TO FINANCE AND ECONOMICS (2239) Grades 10. Students are supervised by a COE teacher and advised on how to carry out individual job responsibilities. developing a new product or service.mix. hiring and managing employees. interest rates and inflation. conduct secondary market research. ENTREPRENEURSHIP (2235) Grades 10. foreign trade and currency. COOPERATIVE OFFICE EDUCATION (4303/4300) (Work Experience Program) Grades 11. and profit projections. which includes sections on product development and marketing. and develop preliminary marketing and financial plans. Students complete a variety of individual and team projects that include opening a franchise. Students gain a greater awareness of current economic themes such as globalization. receptionist. interpreting business news. researching global expansion plans. or secretary.

11. Satisfactory completion of this course fulfills the state graduation requirement in career education. They may be rotated in for a given year depending upon student interest and teacher availability. assembly drawings. INTRODUCTION TO ACCOUNTING (2241) ADVANCED ACCOUNTING PRACTICES (2243) _____________________________________ DESIGN AND MEDIA TECHNOLOGY Please note: All technology courses teach and require students to use computer skills including the production of graphically enhanced documents and projects. rendering techniques. This program is offered at Madison High School. COMPUTER AIDED DRAFTING AND DESIGN I (2613) Grades 9.5 Credits Prerequisite: None This course is an introduction to the use of 3-D design programs being used to solve technical challenges in professional settings. Students must arrange their own transportation to and from classes and the work site. and prototyping with software used by professionals. 12 Half Year: 2. students explore the world of architecture through 3-D design programs such as Google Sketch-Up and Chief Architect. Students gather their completed activities and other artifacts into a portfolio they can use on college and job interviews within the technical and engineering fields. The class work includes animations. Architects must listen to the needs and expectations of their clients. in-school class is a required part of this experience. 10. They must consider the purpose of a structure while balancing a client’s aesthetic vision with the limitations of construction materials to create a building that is artistic and functional. they learn project design and modeling techniques used in professional architectural firms. 12 Full Year: 5 Credits Prerequisite: None The field of architecture is more than just designing buildings. In this course. 42 . 11. ARCHITECTURAL FUNDAMENTALS (2624) Grades 9. 10. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------The following elective courses are not offered each year.regularly scheduled. In addition.

including video and still cameras. other high school classes.COMPUTER AIDED DRAFTING AND DESIGN II (2616) Grades 10. 43 . DESIGN IN TECHNOLOGY (2601) Grades 9. 10. 11. MULTIMEDIA APPLICATIONS (2635) Grades 9.5 Credits Prerequisite: None Technology is the process and product of applying resources to satisfy human wants and needs. Models go through rigorous tests and evaluations as students develop innovative solutions for redesign. 10. 10. and college studies. photo and video editing equipment linked to computers and the Internet. 12 Full Year: 5 Credits Prerequisite: Department recommendation and successful completion of CADD I This course continues the study of computer design with an advanced industryproven program called Pro Engineer. Students learn to use materials-processing tools and machines alongside computer design applications. Students are responsible for completing all of the fieldwork in order to successfully meet course requirements. audio mixing programs. This course takes students through an in-depth study and application of technological processes to solve real world challenges. 12 Half Year: 2. Students interested in pursuing a career in an engineering field would benefit from the experience this program provides. This program is used by engineering majors and industry engineers. This course builds on life skills that can be applied in alternate assessments. 11. 12 Half Year: 2. which may be completed by the students outside of the scheduled class timeslot.5 Credits Prerequisite: None Students use the Adobe Master Collection of software as critical tools to solve various problems and strengthen communication skills. Assignments are project based and presented to the group for critique sessions. This course has a fieldwork portion. 11. Students design and build devices that simulate real world robotic movements and tasks. The use of the computer and construction materials such as Legos helps students explore various design options to create and build real world robots that solve real world problems. such as bridge building and vehicle construction. ROBOTICS (2625) Grades 9. 11.5 Credits Prerequisite: None This course engages students in computer and hands-on modeling projects involving animatronics and robotics. Each student experiences design through computer applications and hands-on modeling. Students also use all of the technology available to them. 12 Half Year: 2.

11. which may be completed by the students outside of the scheduled class timeslot. Students study the art of live TV. including director. WEB SITE DESIGN (2629) Grades 9. VIDEO PRODUCTION (2631) Grades 10. This course has a fieldwork component. As a result. Students gain a working knowledge in videoediting software that may benefit them in completing alternate assessments in other classes.5 Credits Prerequisite: None This course is an exploration into the art and business of video production. 12 Half Year: 2. Peer and self-critiques are forms of assessment. especially for applicants who have skills in designing and supporting the Internet. which may be completed by the students outside of the scheduled class timeslot. This course has a fieldwork component. and lighting techs. and relevancy of content. Students are responsible for completing all of the fieldwork in order to successfully meet course requirements. equipment. directing.TV PRODUCTION (2634) Grades 11. Students interested in the Internet and web creation are invited to enroll. and create websites using state-ofthe-art technology. 10. for the school district’s cable channel and independent projects. Students produce work for the video yearbook. Students gain a working knowledge in video-editing software. which may benefit them in completing alternate assessments in the future. and software. and set development. video projects. which may be completed by the students outside of the scheduled class timeslot. In this course. Students participate in various contests. producer. Students learn each of the positions incorporated in a typical event. to name a few. lighting.5 Credits Prerequisite: None Practical uses of the Internet have grown in epic proportions in the last few years. on location. Students participate in hands-on projects using state-of-the-art cameras. participating in live shoots in the TV studio. employment opportunities in some of the fastest growing industries continue to rise. and editing equipment. and workshops in house and on location. script writing. Activities include idea generation. shows. design. This course has a fieldwork portion. lighting. and through collaborative projects with other departments in the school. Emphasis is placed on visual literacy. 12 Half Year: 2. The skills 44 . design concepts. storyboard development. Students are responsible for completing all of the fieldwork in order to successfully meet course requirements. 11. 12 Full year: 5 Credits Prerequisite: Department recommendation and successful completion of Video Production This course builds upon the foundation set by video production. students research. Students are responsible for completing all of the fieldwork in order to successfully meet course requirements.

in-school class is a required part of this experience. The curriculum includes topics in food science. and consumer education. 12 Half Year: 2. food labeling. 12 Half Year: 2. Enrollment may be limited due to space availability. weight. Enrollment may be limited due to space availability.5 Credits Prerequisite: Foods and Nutrition Students in this course build upon the fundamentals of Foods and Nutrition to develop more advanced skills and use specialized techniques in food preparation. Students must arrange their own transportation to and from classes and the work site. and digestion. Consumer skills that assist students in making wise food choices based on nutritional knowledge is stressed. Satisfactory completion of this course fulfills the state graduation requirement in career education. other high school classes.5 Credits Prerequisite: None This course focuses on the fundamentals of food preparation. 12 Half Year: 7. This program is offered at Madison High School.learned are relevant to career opportunities and can be applied in alternate assessments. and college studies. Students are supervised by a CIE teacher and are advised on how to carry out their individual job responsibilities. Meal preparation is based on a variety of regional and world cuisines. ADVANCED FOODS AND NUTRITION (2313) Grades 11. in positions such as skilled laborer. or industrial settings. and athletics is also covered. Artistic food presentation and food planning for specialty entertaining is included. nutrition. 45 . corporate.5 Credits (4323) Full Year: 15 Credits (4320) Prerequisite: By special arrangement through school counselor The CIE program offers students opportunities to be placed in retail. In the foods laboratory. students actively experience a variety of practical cooking skills and techniques. COOPERATIVE INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION (4323/4320) (Work Experience Program) Grades 11. mechanic. A regularly scheduled. meal planning. _______________________________________ FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCE FOODS AND NUTRITION (2311) Grades 11. nutrition and fitness. or drafter. Nutrition as it relates to health.

5 credits Prerequisite: None Introduction to Studio Art was created for students with no previous high school art experience. and other “non-visual arts” courses. Projects are designed to highlight the connections to concepts from other disciplines such as math. Projects provide students with opportunities to work with businesses in the Chatham community. writing lesson plans. which gives an introduction to early childhood behavior. This cross-curricular approach allows students with academic strengths to bring new perspectives to the art-making process. 12 Half Year: 2. 10. The course aims to integrate the visual arts across the curriculum.5 credits Prerequisite: Introduction to Studio Art (previously Experiencing Art) In this course. and resources that are available on the high school level. social studies. These real-world design challenges offer students the opportunities to apply their skills in meaningful contexts. provides theoretical and practical knowledge about the development. and reach wider audiences. work for real purposes. and developing interactive skills with children. 46 . Students are exposed to art media. which is operated by the students. The academic content focuses on appropriate curriculum planning for a pre-school program based on creativity and developmental theories. painting. 12 Half Year: 2. 11. 10. enter design contests. Students are responsible for exploring creative ideas. 12 Full Year: 5 Credits Prerequisite: None This course. _______________________________________ VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS ART INTRODUCTION TO STUDIO ART (2111) Grade Level: 9. science. as well as to introduce techniques. and education of the young child. materials. sculpture. language arts. parenting. including drawing. among others. 11.THE YOUNG CHILD (2340) Grades 11. students learn the fundamentals of graphic design and gain experience using Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator. The course includes a laboratory pre-school. GRAPHIC DESIGN (2123) Grades 9. and paper processes. or serve the school with its design needs.

DRAWING (2115) Grades 9. Using wire. 10. enameling on metal. including paper crafts and textiles. Research about contemporary artists provides inspiration for concepts. art history. 10. as well as the production of art. leather-working. staining. thematic series. 10. and the development of wearable art. 12 Half Year: 2.5 credits Prerequisite: Introduction to Studio Art (previously Experiencing Art) This course provides an overview of drawing. and painting. stone. and art criticism. 12 Half Year: 2. small-found components. Through the creation of jewelry and small objects. 11. including development of visual perception and 47 . 11.5 credits Prerequisite: Introduction to Studio Art (previously Experiencing Art) In this course. clay. students learn techniques of hand-built and wheel-thrown pottery and explore the different aesthetic finishing methods of glazing. techniques. and materials. and plaster. and more. and studio arts. Instruction is based upon the components of arts education. paper. which students use to create their own original pieces. 12 Half Year: 2. tape. Subtractive sculptures may be created using traditional and alternative techniques and media such as wood. and subject matter. Projects include silk screening on fabric. masks. subject matter. SCULPTURE (2133) Grades 9. Assignments explore aesthetics. Students also gain experience with the fiber arts.METAL AND FIBER ARTS (2139) Grades 9. CERAMICS (2135) Grades 9. and various decorative pieces. 11. creative book-binding techniques. etching. Typical projects invite students to create functional vessels. Upon mastery of the basic techniques. students explore these ideas in greater depth and begin work on sitespecific installations. 10. 12 Half Year: 2. riveting. 11. mediums. design. engraving. students are introduced to the metal-working techniques of cutting with a jeweler’s saw.5 credits Prerequisite: Introduction to Studio Art (previously Experiencing Art) This course exposes students to unique art materials.5 credits Prerequisite: Introduction to Studio Art (previously Experiencing Art) Additive and subtractive sculpture techniques in multiple media are taught in this course. and found-object and larger-scale sculptures. commercial art. and plaster. wax. figurative art. soap. students learn the techniques of additive sculpture and delve into the third dimension. The course offers students the opportunity to broaden their understanding of drawing as an art form by introducing a variety of methods.

5 credits Prerequisite: Drawing (previously 2D: Drawing and Painting) This course provides an introduction to the fundamentals of painting. Painting media may include watercolor. and tempura. acrylics. as well as those who wish to learn about unique art techniques not explored in previous courses. woodcut. A number of projects explore the possibilities and cultural significance of prints and printmaking. This course is recommended for students that enjoy image making and designing. Design and compositional concepts as well as art criticism and history are part of instruction. PAINTING (2113) Grades 10. ADVANCED PLACEMENT STUDIO ART Please note: Course numbers for the two yearlong components of this program follow the overall course description immediately below. Ink is used in addition to other painting-related media. linocut. 11. personal effort. craftsmanship. and offer feedback on the work of other artists. creative expression in original art works. and mat and exhibit prints. and artworks that incorporate multiple images. create an edition. breadth. 12 Half Year: 2. 12 Half Year: 2. In order to succeed in this class. printed editions. which combine computer-assisted image making and digital photography with more traditional printmaking techniques. The curriculum has been approved by the College Board’s Advanced Placement Program and prepares students for the AP Studio Art Drawing Portfolio. be prepared to question and critique their own work. critical thinking. Creativity. students must meet the required criteria given for all projects. and an area of concentration. mono-print. A survey of the work of traditional and contemporary printmakers and basic guidelines for creating well-designed images create a solid foundation upon which students can develop new techniques and ideas. PRINTMAKING (2117) Grades 10.and multiple-plate images. etching. students are familiar with the following techniques: silkscreen. Beginning and more-advanced students may take this course. Each assignment should be approached with an open mind and positive attitude. with emphasis on quality. Specific subjects are assigned for each medium and technique. and monthly homework assignments are all included in the grading process. Upon completing the course. multi-media and experimental printmaking. Students learn how to print single. Instruction and demonstration precede each painting activity.illusionistic control. collagraph. 48 . 11. sketchbooks.5 credits Prerequisite: Drawing (previously 2D: Drawing and Painting) Printmaking explores a variety of materials and techniques in the making of single prints. AP Art is a two-year program that requires production of an extensive portfolio. and development of aesthetic critical judgment in the visual arts.

pop.Admission to this AP program is based on demonstrated interest. 12 Full Year: 5 Credits Prerequisite: Department recommendation and high-school-level proficiency on a band instrument Symphonic Band allows the instrumentalist to perform in an ensemble of 50-60 members. Select Choir. sight-reading. students interested in taking this program begin their portfolio in their junior year. and department recommendation. and additional course requirements. Painting. ability. The ensemble focuses on instrumental technique. students may begin the portfolio as seniors. Because of the strenuous requirements of the AP curriculum. Region and All-State Bands are selected from participants in this course. Students study and examine various levels of band music including standard repertoire. HONORS MUSICAL ACCOMPANIMENT (2444) See above INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC SYMPHONIC BAND (2462) Grades 9. Chatham Voices. Experience in 3-D art is also desirable. Students should see a music department faculty member for application. 10. PRE-AP STUDIO ART (2148) Grade 11 Full Year: 5 Credits Prerequisite: Introduction to Studio Art (previously Experiencing Art). and Chamber Orchestra. and contemporary literature. Students who audition for Area. listening and critiquing. Drawing (previously 2-D Art: Painting and Drawing). and department recommendation ADVANCED PLACEMENT STUDIO ART (2150) Grade 12 Full Year: 5 Credits Prerequisite: Pre-AP Studio Art and department recommendation _______________________________________ MUSIC HONORS MUSIC PROGRAM Students in grades 11 and 12 may apply and audition to elect the following classes for weighted credit: Wind Ensemble. with teacher recommendation. In unique cases. and scale development. Students in grades 11 and 12 who are full-time accompanists for Concert Choir and Choraliers are also eligible for honors credit. 11. Students should have already taken Introduction to Studio Art. audition. Drawing. 49 . The application process must be completed by May of the preceding year. and Painting.

Students study string orchestra repertoire from the 1600s to the present day. Selected wind and percussion students may also perform as part of the orchestra as needed. including 20th century works and orchestral transcriptions. rehearsal. cello. students must participate in all scheduled performances. The ensemble focuses on advanced instrumental technique. musical form. Chamber Orchestra students also may have the opportunity (if scheduling allows) to collaborate with Symphonic Band or Wind Ensemble students to perform music from the symphony orchestra repertoire. This class may be repeated for credit. 11. Students also have the opportunity for small ensemble work. score analysis. which includes classical and standard repertoire from all eras. and efficient rehearsal techniques. viola. 11. critical analysis. 50 . This class may be repeated for credit. students must participate in all scheduled performances. WIND ENSEMBLE (2464/2465) Grades 10. This class may be repeated for credit. Students who audition for Area. Region. 12 Full Year: 5 credits Prerequisite: Departmental recommendation and advanced high-school-level proficiency on a bowed string instrument Chamber Orchestra allows advanced students of string instruments (violin. Senior members write and compose original or transcribed music for the band idiom. small chamber ensembles such as quartets or trios. Enrichment activities to develop leadership skills are provided for students including CHS Pops Orchestra. and the Pit Orchestra for the CHS musical. Students study and examine advanced music literature.To earn maximum credit. To earn maximum credit. Students who audition for Region and All-State Orchestras are selected from participants in this course. and conducting techniques. In order to earn maximum credit. It emphasizes performance. study of the musical score. and All-State Bands are selected from participants in this course. students must participate in all scheduled performances. CHAMBER ORCHESTRA (2470/2472) Grades 10. 12 Full Year: 5 Credits Prerequisite: Department recommendation and proficiency on a band instrument advanced high-school-level Wind Ensemble allows advanced instrumentalists to perform in an ensemble of 4550 members. listening and critiquing. or double bass) to perform in an ensemble of 20-30 members. covering a wide range of musical styles. The ensemble focuses on advanced instrumental technique and musicianship skills such as listening.

ORCHESTRA (2466) Grades 9. this chorus allows the experienced treble singer to perform in a small ensemble. 11. including scales. Classical. 20th century. and Jazz. left hand shifting. vocal production. students must participate in all scheduled performances. VOCAL MUSIC CHORALIERS (2440) Grades 9. Folk. In order to earn maximum credit. cello. and department recommendation Primarily an a capella ensemble. Students who audition for Region and All-State Orchestras are selected from participants in this course. 11. It covers a wide variety of musical styles. Broadway. popular. folk. Romantic. Students develop their technical skills and musicianship through the study of a wide range of new and established string orchestra repertoire from the 1600s to the present day. CHATHAM VOICES (2436/2437) Grades 10. This class may be repeated for credit. or double bass. 12 Full Year: 5 credits Prerequisites: A treble voice. Musical styles explored include Baroque. Orchestra students also may have the opportunity (if scheduling allows) to collaborate with Symphonic Band or Wind Ensemble students to perform music from the symphony orchestra repertoire. and the Pit Orchestra for the CHS musical. 10. and contemporary literature. 10 Full Year: 5 Credits Prerequisite: A treble voice This course is for students with treble voices who enjoy singing and want to develop their skills. and sight singing/ear training. small chamber ensembles such as quartets or trios. Popular. diction. viola. sacred. including standard. diatonic/chromatic scales. Enrichment activities are provided for students including CHS Pops Orchestra. In order to earn maximum credit. students must participate in all scheduled performances. jazz. rock. This class may be repeated for credit. Students recommended for this ensemble will study 51 . 12 Full Year: 5 Credits Prerequisite: Department recommendation and high-school-level proficiency on a bowed stringed instrument This course is performance based and includes students who play the violin. Students who audition for Region and All-State Choral ensembles are selected from participants in this class. 1 year of vocal ensemble experience at the high school level. patriotic. Contemporary. and bowing styles. The ensemble focuses on many aspects of instrumental technique. secular. Voice building and vocal technique are taught through the study of breath control. Sight-reading and listening skills are emphasized.

vocal production. 11. and contemporary works. secular. PIANO LAB (2471) Grades 9. Students also have opportunities for small group ensemble work. This class may be repeated for credit. This class may be repeated for credit. Freshman treble singers should elect Choraliers. Students study and prepare advanced choral literature of many styles.5 credits Prerequisite: None This course affords students with limited or no background in music a “hands on” practical study of the digital piano. Students may be considered to audition for Regional and All-State Chorus. this course allows the advanced singer to perform in a small ensemble. using the CHS MIDI (Musical Instrument Digital Interface) piano lab. and vocal jazz. diction. 12 Full Year: 5 Credits Prerequisite: 1 year of vocal ensemble experience at the high school plus satisfactory audition or department recommendation Primarily an a capella ensemble. and popular. 11. patriotic. and sight singing/ear training. including sacred. Members are encouraged to pursue opportunities in Region and All-State Choral ensembles. Voice building and vocal technique are taught through the study of breath control. This class may be repeated for credit. Reading and interpreting standard music notation are explored at various levels. secular. Members of the Select Choir are strongly encouraged to pursue opportunities in Regional and All-State Choral ensembles. no formal audition is required.and prepare advanced choral literature of many styles including sacred. 12 Half Year: 2. The course focuses on individual playing and includes private 52 . SELECT CHOIR (2450/2452) Grades 10. pop. Students also may have opportunities to prepare and perform solo/small ensemble pieces. patriotic. diatonic/chromatic scales. 10. CONCERT CHOIR (2446) Grades (See requirements below) Full Year: 5 credits Prerequisite: None Concert Choir is open to any student who would like to sing. barbershop. patriotic. Students must participate in all scheduled performances in order to earn maximum credit. advanced choral literature. Students must participate in all scheduled performances in order to earn maximum credit. Students must participate in all scheduled performances in order to earn maximum credit. and vocal jazz. The course covers standard sacred and secular repertoire.

conflict. chord progressions. key signatures. This self-paced course may be repeated for credit. and vocal expressions. 10. 12 Full Year: 5 Credits Prerequisite: None This course is designed to introduce students to the vast world of theater. and teacher recommendation This course introduces students to MIDI (Musical Instrument Digital Interface) technology. The main focus of Theater Arts 1 is building self-esteem through the acting process and becoming aware of each student’s physical. 10. and printing. and vocal work. 12 Half Year: 2. 11. monologues.5 Credits Semester Elective Prerequisite: Theater Arts 1 or theater teacher permission The main focus of Theater Arts 2 is the advanced development of the acting process and script analysis as it pertains to the actor. and the process of mounting a production. In order to fully understand and develop believable characters.5 credits Prerequisite: Basic piano skills. MUSIC THEORY/TECHNOLOGY (2473) Grades 9. Students also become familiar with the basics of technical theater by learning stage geography. music dictation. A careful examination of scene elements such as structure. The students explore self-expression through characters in participatory exercises. 11. THEATER ARTS 2 (2501) Grades 10. Ear training. processing. _______________________________________ THEATER THEATER ARTS 1 (2500) Grades 9. theater games. 12 Half Year: 2.evaluation of student class projects. students examine play structure and analyze characters. setting. character. Finally. and melodic/harmonic form. dialogue. Students explore the fundamentals of music through the study of scales. space permitting. and basic composition skills are part of the coursework designed to enhance student musicianship. scene work. 11. Students explore the differences between representational and presentational character development through intensive monologue work. students have greater social and global awareness by learning the history of the theater and how it has evolved to its presentday form. Also included are individual projects in composing. and subtext provides students with a full understanding of the scene-building and writing processes. proficiency in reading music. emotional. Using Stanislavski’s 53 . movement. common theater terminology. improvisations. all through the use of MIDI computer software in the CHS multi-level keyboard lab.

11. Theatre Arts Studio allows students to explore their interests at a deeper personal level. Some classes may participate in the annual Shakespeare festival. using improvisations. students find the works of Shakespeare more accessible and feel comfortable tackling complex classical characters. students experience a new venue of performance as they create improvisation-based characters in a student-produced film. executing design. Several plays are studied in this course. SHAKEPEARE’S DRAMA (2525) Grades 10. Whether the area of focus is acting. By exploring the meaning. dramatic writing. and poetry of Shakespeare’s characters through performance. students discover the power and fun in Shakespeare’s language. ………………………………………………………………………………………… (*)The Board of Education has approved the following elective courses that may be offered in subsequent years depending upon teacher availability and student interest: ACTING AND DIRECTING FOR FILM (2517) MUSICAL THEATER (2515) ____________________________________ 54 . or technical theatre. (*)THEATER ARTS STUDIO (2503) Grades 11. and a variety of performance-based activities. By approaching Shakespeare from an actor’s point of view. performing at the Bucks County Playhouse Competition.5 Credits Prerequisite: English 9 This theatre course is based on the belief that the best way to understand and to experience Shakespeare’s plays is to perform them. 12 Half Year: 2. especially. sponsored jointly by the Shakespeare Theatre of NJ and the Folger Shakespeare Library. both comedic and tragic. students obtain a deeper understanding of his characters. directing a scene or play. Shakesperience. games. but there is a particular focus on Twelfth Night. themes. or producing a short fictional film. psychology.5 Credits Prerequisite: Theater Arts 1 and 2 The Theatre Arts Studio class is designed for serious theatre students who are looking to deepen their understanding of the acting process and explore new forms of characterization and theatre performance. his language. and. directing. design. Examples of such projects include writing and performing a oneact play. 12 Half Year – 2. Students approach scenes from a number of Shakespeare’s plays. Students also apply what they have learned in previous courses and expand that knowledge by designing their own projects to execute either individually or with group members. The units in this course are designed for individuals who are focused and willing to be active participants.methods of acting. After completing this course.

students begin to develop basic skills in listening. GERMAN 1. FRENCH 1. Through additional exposure to the Spanish language. listen to Spanish songs and conversations. These materials also provide 55 . Students also expand their functional knowledge of basic elements of language. song. 12 Full Year: 5 Credits Prerequisite: Spanish Language and Culture 1 This course is the second part of a two-year sequence and is designed for students who have not studied a world language prior to high school. correspondence. 12 Full Year: 5 Credits Prerequisite: None This course is designed for true beginning students or for those who have experienced little previous success in the study of a world language. writing dialogues. students read and write dialogues and short stories. and writing. and writing. In addition. speaking. and create projects in Spanish. 10. The curriculum employs variety in instruction and assessment to help students develop basic language proficiency. and structure. 11 Full Year: 5 Credits Prerequisite: None As the first part of a two-year sequence. creative dramatics. Students are evaluated by a variety of assessment types. audiotapes. employing a variety of approaches such as Total Physical Response. working with language tapes. They also develop functional knowledge of basic elements of language. this course is designed for those students who have had no previous experience in the study of a world language. reading. 11. Videos. and deductive and inductive approaches to understanding language in context. 10. Instruction is multi-modal.WORLD LANGUAGES SPANISH LANGUAGE AND CULTURE 1(1328) Grades 9. vocabulary. reading. and structure. and electronic media are used. Students are expected to use the target language in all appropriate situations in the classroom. Their cultural awareness also continues to grow and develop as they deepen their study of various aspects of life in Spanish-speaking countries. Through exposure to Spanish language. participate in oral drills and skits. SPANISH 1 (1301) / (1311) / (1321) / Grades 9. vocabulary. students continue to develop basic skills in listening. often in connection with the language laboratory. 11. Reading. and participating in oral drills and classroom discussions enable students to carry on elementary conversations and write basic compositions. SPANISH LANGUAGE AND CULTURE 2 (1330) Grades 10. students gain cultural awareness through the study of various aspects of life in the Spanish-speaking world. Specifically. to facilitate the development of communicative skills. and notes. speaking.

short stories. Students are expected to use only the target language in all appropriate classroom situations. 12 Full Year: 5 Credits Prerequisite: Department recommendation The level 2 courses continue to stress the skills of language interpretation and production and aim to heighten cultural awareness through literature. FRENCH 3. short stories. Reading assignments increase comprehension and stimulate discussion. 10. SPANISH 4 (1304) / (1314) / (1324) / Grades 11. Students are expected to use the target language in all appropriate situations. GERMAN 4. biographical portraits. historical writings. and poetry. Student enrollment will affect the offering of all introductory level language classes. media. 12 Full Year: 5 Credits Prerequisite: Department recommendation and successful completion of level 3 This course is designed to develop accurate and fluent oral use of the language and to increase knowledge of the finer points of expression through the study of vocabulary (including idioms) and advanced grammatical constructions. Various other materials dealing with everyday life are used to stimulate conversation and written assignments. and communicative tasks undertaken in the language lab. Grammar study is more formalized than it is in level 1. GERMAN 2. oral presentations. Readings include novels. In addition to the communicative tasks they perform in the language laboratory. FRENCH 2. students are expected to use the target language in all appropriate classroom situations. oral participation. and authentic journalism seeks to further develop the language interpretation abilities of students. and practices of target cultures. geography. 11. 12 Full Year: 5 Credits Prerequisite: Department recommendation and successful completion of level 2 Through frequent class discussions. Students are expected to use the target language in all appropriate situations in the classroom.insight into the history. and presentations give students opportunities to express themselves in everyday situations and to discuss topics that interest them. SPANISH 2 (1302) / (1312) / (1322) / Grades 9. students improve their speaking abilities and listening comprehension skills. 11. SPANISH 3 (1303) / (1313) / (1323) / Grades 10. 56 . and authentic experiences. Compositions. GERMAN 3. Writing skills are emphasized through the study of advanced grammar and the writing of compositions on a variety of everyday topics. FRENCH 4. as well as contemporary and historical articles of cultural interest. The reading of novels.

Students communicate almost exclusively in the target language in the classroom. and newspaper and magazine articles. Instruction is organized around thematic units for everyday communication. 12 Full Year: 5 Credits Prerequisite: Department recommendation and successful completion of Spanish 3 This course provides students opportunities to enhance their understanding of Hispanic culture while focusing on the continued development of their communication skills. Discrete grammar points beyond those presented in Spanish 3 are reviewed to bolster comprehension and to teach students idiomatic expressions. reading. Students survey Hispanic history and examine elements of traditional and contemporary Hispanic culture. GERMAN LANGUAGE. The curriculum has been approved by the College Board’s Advanced Placement Program and prepares students for the AP language exam. and presentational.ADVANCED PLACEMENT FRENCH. Readings include novels. as well as social customs and common expressions that aid in travel and tourism. short stories. 10. activities. Grammar is studied through mini-lessons and in context during literary analysis and classroom conversation. 57 . 12 Full Year: 5 Credits Prerequisite: None This course is designed for beginning students who would like to learn Chinese. Because the course does not focus on grammar. and assessment of each unit reflect the three modes of communication and culture: interpersonal. SPANISH (1305) / (1315) / (1325) / Grade 12 Full Year: 5 Credits Prerequisite: Department recommendation and successful completion of level 4 This course offers intensive development of listening. and commonly used characters are taught for reading and writing. and language activities simulating daily life situations are conducted to enhance student interest and to encourage application of skills. it is not designed to prepare students for the AP language exam. ADVANCED STUDIES IN SPANISH: CULTURE AND COMMUNICATION (1327) Grades 11. speaking. In addition to an emphasis on listening and speaking. Students are expected to use only the target language in all appropriate classroom situations. These readings serve as the basis for class discussion and written work. and writing skills. the basic elements of the pinyin system are introduced. Such study is also reinforced through the editing and rewriting of student compositions. Games. plays. This course also has been designed to encourage students to pursue further exploration of the Chinese language and to develop an appreciation of Chinese culture. songs. The planning. interpretive. 11. CHINESE 1 (1361) Grades 9.

Each unit of study is designed to address the three modes of communication and culture: interpersonal. 11. ask and answer questions. 12 Full Year: 5 Credits Prerequisite: Chinese 1 In Chinese 2. and to develop their language skills in reading. exchange opinions. In addition. and class participation. interpretive. 58 . identify themes related to their personal experiences. and presentational. write simple text. listening. the units have been created to engage students. students read authentic materials. discuss ideas. and create presentations based on learned material.CHINESE 2 (1362) Grades: 10. and speaking. Throughout the course. writing. Students continue to learn new vocabulary structures by using both the pinyin (simplified) form and the traditional Chinese characters. Assessments include quizzes. students continue their study of the Chinese language and culture at the intermediate range of the ACTFL proficiency guidelines. follow directions. to increase their understanding and retention of vocabulary structures. tests. projects. homework.

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful