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kee settlers who brought with
them the state religion of the
colonyof Connecticut, Congre-
gationalism.
“When they built their first
meeting houses, they were …
to be jointly used by various
Protestant denominations as
those denominations grew
over time,” Brooks said.
Roman Catholics first ap-
peared on the scene with Eu-
ropean immigrants who came
here in the 1830s and 1840s to
work in the coal industry. They
T
he majority of Luzerne
County residents who
practice a religion are
celebrating their most sacred
holy day today – Easter Sun-
day. Most are Catholics.
But that wasn’t always the
case in a county that is home to
nearly 400 congregations com-
prised of at least eight different
general faith denominations.
At one time, the area was
overwhelmingly Protestant,
said Tony Brooks, executive di-
rector of the Luzerne County
Historical Society.
The Wyoming Valley was
founded by Connecticut Yan-
Denominations have changed,
but faith in area stays strong
By STEVE MOCARSKY smocarsky@timesleader.com
See RELIGION, Page 9A
Good Shepherd Lutheran Church – the oldest standing church building in Wilkes-Barre – was built in 1845 on South Main Street. In inset, the 1911 Record Book and Alma-
nac of the city of Wilkes-Barre, one of the many documents containing information on religious denominations housed at the Luzerne County Historical Society.
Many people have lamented
that Christmas, a Christian holy
day, has becometoocommercial-
ized, with retailers capitalizing
onthe givingof gifts andfamilies
focusing too heavily on secular
aspects such as Santa Claus rath-
er than celebrating the birth of
Christ.
But what about Easter?
The most sacred of holy days
in Christianity, the predominant
religion in the United States, is
the fifth-highest grossing holi-
day for retail sales in the nation,
said Anthony Liuzzo, professor
of business and economics at
Wilkes University.
Easter-related sales are ex-
pected to bring in about $14 bil-
lion in gross receipts for retailers
nationally this year, with Easter
candy alone nettingnearly $2bil-
lion, Liuzzo said.
Does all this attention to the
Easter Bunny and candy bother
religious leaders, with some of
the focus perhaps being shifted
from the celebration of their be-
lief in the resurrection from the
dead of Jesus Christ?
“Honoring the gift of faith that
comes from God should always
be the focus of our observance.
That is truly the reason to cele-
brate,” said Bill Genello, execu-
tive director of communications
for the Diocese of Scranton.
Down through the centuries,
people of all cultures have em-
braced various traditions in con-
junction with the celebration of
religious holidays, Genello said.
“These observances typically
involve special meals, gatherings
with family and friends, perhaps
exchanging gifts, and other fes-
tive activities. These activities
can enhance the observance of a
religious feast, as long as they do
not take the place of or obscure
the real meaning of the day,” he
said.
Family meals are obviously a
major part of Easter tradition, as
foodwas the topexpectedEaster
expense, according to a National
Retail Association survey. The
Santa’s still in commercial lead, but Bunny’s moving up
Despite a powerful religious
basis, Easter has become a
major spending holiday.
By STEVE MOCARSKY
smocarsky@timesleader.com
See SPENDING, Page 9A
HARRISBURG — Ready, set
and ... introduce your Marcellus
Shale severance tax bill (or local
impact fee bill or whatever you
want to call it).
TwoRepublicans,
Senate President
Pro Tempore Joe
Scarnati of Jeffer-
son County and
Rep. Kate Harper of
Montgomery Coun-
ty, are preparing to introduce
bills on top of at least six others
already kicking around the GOP-
controlled Legislature, adding
fuel to what could be one of Har-
See TAX, Page 14A
Shale-tax
debate
heats up
One big unknown is whether
House Republican leaders will
allow a floor vote.
By MARC LEVY
Associated Press
INSIDE
A NEWS: Local 3A
Nation & World 5A
Obituaries 10A
B PEOPLE: Birthdays 6B
C SPORTS: Scoreboard 2C
Outdoors 12C
D BUSINESS: Stocks 6D
E VIEWS: Editorial 2E
F ETC.: Puzzles 2F
Books 7F
Travel 8F
G CLASSIFIED
WEATHER
Lucas Phillips
Showers.
High 65. Low 48.
Details, Page 14C
At age 67, Eugene Kelleher re-
members the day when “friends”
were people you hung around
with and “likes” were, well,
things you liked.
As recently as a year ago, the
retired teacher had never heard
the term “Facebook.” He had a
computer, but used it mostly for
word processing and e-mail.
That changed this year, when
Kelleher decided to run for the
newly formed Luzerne County
Council and began searching for
ways to get his message out.
See SOCIAL, Page 14A
Social media
have rewritten
political rules
By TERRIE MORGAN-BESECKER
tmorgan@timesleader.com
K

PAGE 2A SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Cumbo, Millie
Dougherty, Mary
Klebon, Maryann
Lutkowski, Margaret
Lutz, Ralph
Morgan, Roberta
Perrin, Betty
Rossick, John
Smith, Darl
OBITUARIES
Page 10A
BUILDING
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Issue No. 2011-114
PITTSTON – Police arrested
an alleged drug dealer Friday at
Stephanie’s Bar, 80 S. Main St.
Police responded to a report
of a man selling drugs inside the
bar who goes by the name Ron
at 5 p.m., and upon arrival
found Ronald Loughney, no age
or address given. Police said
Loughney matched the descrip-
tion provided by the complai-
nant.
Police said Loughney fled
from the bar but that officers
chased him down about a block
later. He was found to be in
possession of a plastic bag con-
taining a green leafy substance,
31 small baggies filled with a
rock like substance, 10 small
baggies filled with a white
powder, one packet of empty
baggies and $164 cash, police
said.
Police said Loughney was
charged with two counts of
possession with intent to deliver
a controlled substance, one
count of possession of marijua-
na, one count of possession of
drug paraphernalia and one
count of resisting arrest.
Loughney was arraigned
Friday before Magistrate Daniel
O’Donnell, Sugarloaf Township,
and lodged at Luzerne County
Correctional Facility in lieu of
$20,000 bail.
A preliminary hearing has
been scheduled for Wednesday
at 1 p.m.
WILKES-BARRE – City po-
lice reported the following in-
cidents:
• Barbara Mains of North
Washington Street said some-
one removed prescription medi-
cation from her purse at 800 N.
Washington St. on Friday.
• Sara Rodriguez of Charles
Street said Wilfredo Ramirez,
27, of Charles Street, verbally
harassed her and threw rocks at
her window at 6:08 a.m. Sat-
urday at 144 Midland Ct. Rami-
rez will be cited for harassment,
police said.
• Sam Marzouch reported
that someone broke a window at
466 N. Main St. Saturday.
• Police said they will file
simple assault charges against
Jackson Doulliard, no age or
address give. Police said Doul-
liard struck Denise Robichaux
in her face with his hands and
fist, causing injuries, at 140
Midland Court Thursday.
• Police arrested Lawrence
Warner, 52, no address given,
and cited him with public
drunkenness and disorderly
conduct after police allegedly
found Warner intoxicated Sat-
urday and Warner allegedly
fought with police at the corner
of South Main and Ross streets.
• Police cited Daniel Rakow-
ski, 24, no address given, on
public drunkenness charges
Saturday on North River Street
near North Street.
• Pamela Schoonover of
North Penn Avenue said some-
one stole $40 belonging to her
from 50 N. Penn Ave. Friday.
• A17-year-old male said his
wallet was stolen Friday at 5:46
p.m. at 355 E. Main St.
• Mark Benjamin of Loomis
Street said a drill was stolen
from his vehicle while it was
parked at 70 George Ave. Friday.
• Andrea Kotulski of Hanover
Township said her cell phone
was stolen from her vehicle at
357 S. Main St. Friday.
• Police arrested Stanley
DiPasquale, 21, of Parrish St., on
possession of drug parapherna-
lia charges at 9:44 a.m. Friday at
275 Parrish St. Police said they
encountered DiPisquale while
investigating a reported domes-
tic disturbance and found him in
possession of drug parapherna-
lia.
• Marek Wyszynski of Wilkes-
Barre was taken to a hospital for
treatment of apparently non-life-
threatening injuries Friday after
he was struck by a vehicle at the
intersection of East Northamp-
ton Street and South Main
Street, police said.
Police said they found Wys-
zynski lying on the sidewalk,
bleeding from his right leg, and
that he suffered a compound
fracture of his lower right leg.
He was taken to Geisinger
Wyoming Valley Medical Center
for treatment, police said.
Police said Martin Serafin of
Hanover Township was the
driver of the vehicle that struck
Wyszynski. Police did not in-
dicate whether charges will be
filed against Serafin.
HAZLE TWP. – State police
arrested Jose A. Diaz-Garcia, 30,
of West Hazleton, on suspicion
of driving while intoxicated at
12:37 a.m. Saturday on Airport
Road near the Laurel Mall. State
police said Garcia was stopped
for failing to yield while turning
left onto Laurel Mall Road from
Airport Road and exhibited
signs of intoxication as he spoke
with police.
POLICE BLOTTER
LONDON — David Beckham,
Elton John and Mr. Bean actor
Rowan Atkinson will mingle
with dozens of royal guests at
Prince William and Kate Mid-
dleton’s wedding, according to
an official guest list released Sat-
urday that includes one uncom-
fortable presence — the Bahrai-
ni crown prince accused of a
brutal crackdown on protesters.
St. James’s Palace also re-
leased the seating plan at West-
minster Abbey, which showed
that relatives of William’s moth-
er Princess Diana are sitting
across the aisle from the royal
family, joining the Middletons in
an exception to the traditional
division of a church into a
bride’s side and groom’s side.
There was no explanation of
the seating arrangement, but
the Spencers have not had a
good relationship with the royal
family, especially after Diana’s
brother Charles Spencer at-
tacked the royals during a
speech at her 1997 funeral.
More than 46 foreign royals
are seated behind the British
royals. They include Bahrain’s
Crown Prince Salman bin Ha-
mad Al Khalifa, an invitation
that could prove awkward in
light of his government’s rough
treatment of mainly Shiite pro-
democracy protesters.
Some human rights cam-
paigners have started to petition
Foreign Secretary William
Hague to revoke the invitation,
saying the prince should not be
allowed to attend the occasion.
At least 30 people have died in
Bahrain since mid-February, in-
cluding four who died while in
official custody, and many well-
known activists and lawyers
have been imprisoned.
Other foreign royals who are
attending include those from
Denmark, Norway, Spain, Saudi
Arabia, Thailand and Morocco.
Only a handful of celebrities are
invited, including the Beck-
hams, director Guy Ritchie, soul
singer Joss Stone, and Atkinson
— a close friend of William’s fa-
ther Prince Charles.
Although about 1,900 guests
have been invited to the couple’s
wedding ceremony at Westmin-
ster Abbey, half of them will sit
in the section of the abbey
where views of the altar are re-
stricted, and they will have to
rely upon video screens to fol-
low the service.
Queen Elizabeth II and other
royal family members will sit in
the front row across the aisle
from Middleton’s parents and
brother James. They will be
closest to the abbey’s sanctuary,
where William and his bride will
stand.
Foreign dignitaries, the Mid-
dletons’ family friends, British
government and defense offi-
cials, families of British soldiers
killed in Iraq and Afghanistan,
William’s army colleagues, and
people who work for William’s
charities will be seated around
the abbey.
Palace officials said that only
crowned heads of states are tra-
ditionally invited to royal wed-
dings, and that political leaders
who are not from the 54-mem-
ber Commonwealth of nations,
such as President Barack Oba-
ma or French President Nicolas
Sarkozy, weren’t sent invita-
tions.
Beckham, Elton John and Mr. Bean make the list
MCT PHOTO
Engagement portrait of Prince
William and Kate Middleton.
Buckingham Palace releases
official guest list for Prince
William’s wedding.
By SYLVIA HUI
Associated Press
MULLAN, Idaho —Rescue ef-
forts have reached a section of a
collapsed tunnel where they had
hoped to find an Idaho silver
miner who has been missing un-
derground for more than a week,
a Hecla Mining Co. official said
Saturday.
But crews using bore holes
and probes found only sand and
rubble where they had been
searching for an open section of
mine, saidspokeswomanMelan-
ie Hennessey.
Finding collapsed material
here could mean the entire 75
feet of tunnel where 53-year-old
Larry Marek had been working
has collapsed.
"We wouldhope not, but that’s
the indication," Hennessey said.
There still couldbe openareas
elsewhere inside the mine, she
said. Crews won’t knowwhether
to expect to find voids without
more digging. And since there is
no way to know for certain Ma-
rek’s location, search efforts will
continue.
"We’re still 100 percent fo-
cused on rescue efforts," Hen-
nessey said.
Marek and his brother, Mike,
had just finished watering down
blasted-out rock and ore in an ar-
ea called Stope 15, which has
been mined for 14 years, Hecla
said. The ceilingcollapsedabout
75 feet from the rock face of the
6,150-foot deep tunnel, the com-
pany said.
Mine rescuers find rubble
The Associated Press
THE BIRD WITH THE WORD
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
N
icole Guest of Plains Township pets Amidala, a 10-year-old palm cockatoo at Movies
14 in Wilkes-Barre on Saturday. The Woody Acres Avian Conservation Eco-Center
brought tropical birds to coincide with Disney’s ’Rio,’ a film dealing with endangered bird
species.
HILLSBOROUGH, N.H. —
Standing in a brightly lit bingo
hall off a wooded road, a space
that doubles as the dining room
for Danny’s Friday night fish fry,
Republican Rep. Charles Bass
should have felt a long way from
the pressure-cooker of budget
politics in Washington.
But as he opened a town hall
meeting here last week, it was
clear the pressure had followed
himto AmericanLegionPost No.
59.
What is his rationale for want-
ing to change Medicare to a
voucher system, questioners de-
manded to know. How is this go-
ingtolowerpremiums?If theidea
is to cut the deficit, why does the
Republican budget plan offer tax
breaks for the wealthy?
Congress is on its first recess
since Republican leaders un-
veiled a plan to end the federal
deficit by dramatically changing
Medicare, cutting other govern-
ment programs and reducing tax-
es. Withmembersof theHousere-
turning home to meet with con-
stituents, politicians have been
anxiously looking for signs of
trouble.
On both sides, strategists re-
member that nearly two years
ago, town hall meetings revealed
thefirst stirringsof aconservative
rebellion against President Ba-
rack Obama’s health care plan.
That uprising eventually helped
sweep a GOP majority into con-
trol of the House.
The signs over the last week
have been mixed. Republicans
heard their core supporters urg-
ing them to take strong stands
and hold fast on the next big bud-
get fight — the debate over rais-
ing the federal debt limit.
In Illinois, freshman Rep.
Adam Kinzinger was cheered for
his hard-line stance on that de-
bate. "If it cametometoraiseit to-
day, I wouldvote no," he tolda se-
nior center 50 miles south of Chi-
cago.
But inmany places, Democrats
turned out to express their oppo-
sition, much as Republicans had
done in the health care debate. In
a Pennsylvania coal town, a man
outragedby the GOPbudget plan
was escortedout of a townhall by
police. InWisconsin, Rep. Paul D.
Ryan, the architect of the Repub-
lican plan, was booed in his own
district as he outlinedthe propos-
al.
Democrats hope that vote will
prove costly for the GOP, particu-
larly for the 61 Republicans from
districts Obama won in 2008. For
those Republicans, their home-
workfor thebreakwas urgent: de-
fine the Ryan plan before Demo-
crats did it for them.
Shortly after freshman Repub-
lican Rep. Lou Barletta fired up
his slide show in an aging pocket
of hisDemocratic-leaningeastern
Pennsylvaniadistrict, 64-year-old
Linda Christman rose and inter-
rupted him.
"You seem to think that be-
cause I’m not affected, I won’t
careif myniece, mygrandson, my
child is affected. I do care," she
said. "You said nothing in the
campaign about ’I’m going to
changeMedicare.’ Nowyouvoted
for a plan that will destroy Medi-
care."
"I won’t destroy Medicare,"
Barletta replied. "Medicare is go-
ing to be destroyed by itself."
Christman talked over the con-
gressman, telling him to pay for
Medicare by taxing the wealthy.
A similar argument broke out
among voters at a knitting circle
intheSouthernCaliforniadistrict
of Rep. Mary Bono Mack, R-Calif.
House Republicans facing backlash at home over federal budget plan
Women tells Barletta at town
meeting to pay for Medicare
by taxing the wealthy.
By KATHLEEN HENNESSEY
Tribune Washington Bureau
Lottery summary
Daily Number, Midday
Sunday: 8-9-5
Monday: 0-4-1
Tuesday: 5-9-0
Wednesday: 1-9-4
Thursday: 6-1-1
Friday: 7-8-1
Saturday: 4-2-2
Big Four, Midday
Sunday: 6-5-3-0
Monday: 6-6-5-1
Tuesday: 3-2-1-1
Wednesday: 5-3-8-8
Thursday: 6-1-3-1
Friday: 6-1-4-0
Saturday: 4-3-2-3
Quinto, Midday
Sunday: 0-5-2-6-8
Monday: 5-8-7-9-9
Tuesday: 3-7-2-7-2
Wednesday: 5-4-0-8-4
Thursday: 1-6-1-8-1
Friday: 3-2-2-3-9
Saturday: 7-6-0-6-4
Treasure Hunt
Sunday: 03-04-09-23-27
Monday: 05-16-23-27-30
Tuesday: 07-12-14-16-29
Wednesday: 07-10-19-27-30
Thursday: 04-08-11-15-26
Friday: 12-15-21-29-30
Saturday: 01-17-18-24-25
Daily Number, 7 p.m.
Sunday: 0-1-3
Monday: 4-0-1
Tuesday: 2-5-5
Wednesday: 5-4-1
Thursday: 4-7-0
Friday: 3-8-6
Saturday: 2-3-8
Big Four, 7 p.m.
Sunday: 5-6-5-2
Monday: 0-9-8-9
Tuesday: 3-4-4-2
Wednesday: 1-2-0-8
Thursday: 7-6-9-8
Friday: 4-3-1-2
Saturday: 4-3-5-1
Quinto, 7 p.m.
Sunday: 8-9-7-5-5
Monday: 2-9-2-3-4
Tuesday: 9-3-4-7-8
Wednesday: 5-0-2-9-0
Thursday: 8-9-4-3-3
Friday: 1-9-2-9-0
Saturday: 2-4-4-7-8
Cash 5
Sunday: 21-27-29-35-38
Monday: 11-34-35-36-39
Tuesday: 10-27-31-32-38
Wednesday: 06-21-23-31-33
Thursday: 09-15-17-35-43
Friday: 20-24-28-33-42
Saturday: 03-14-17-23-36
Match 6 Lotto
Monday: 03-04-15-22-24-45
Thursday: 04-11-13-15-17-20
Powerball
Wednesday: 09-24-34-36-43
powerball: 27
powerplay: 03
Saturday: 03-11-47-48-58
powerball: 19
powerplay: 03
Mega Millions
Tuesday: 20-24-32-45-51
Megaball: 43
Megaplier: 04
Friday: 03-18-46-51-53
Megaball: 17
Megaplier: 03
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2011 PAGE 3A
LOCAL
➛ timesleader.com
WILKES-BARRE
Owner of business offers
free flags to veterans
Moved by the theft of more than 125
veteran grave markers from three area
cemeteries last week, James Gatrell,
owner of Jim’s Flags and Banners in
Wilkes-Barre, is of-
fering free flags to any
veteran who asks.
Brass medallions
were reported stolen
from flag holders at St.
Adalbert’s, St. Mi-
chael’s and the Italian
Independent cemeter-
ies in Newport Town-
ship last week. The
American flags once held by the mark-
ers were left lying in the mud. The
standard size or miniature American
flags are free to any American armed
services veteran and may be picked up
at Jim’s Flag’s and Banners, 5 Airy St.
between 10 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday
through Friday.
Gatrell said he also sells plastic
grave markers, which cost half the
price of brass markers and are less
likely to be stolen.
WILKES-BARRE
Constitutional hearing here
The Pennsylvania Bar Association
will sponsor a Pa. Constitutional Con-
vention Hearing on Wednesday at
Wilkes University.
The public hearings are a chance to
examine the Pennsylvania legislation
reappointment process and Pennsylva-
nia’s judiciary.
The event will be held from10 a.m.
to 4:30 p.m. in the
college’s Henry Stu-
dent Center Ballroom.
The hearings are
part of a thorough
review of the state’s
Constitution, the bar
association said in a
press release, and will
be held in Erie, Har-
risburg, Mercer County, Philadelphia,
Pittsburgh, State College and Wilkes-
Barre.
“These hearings are valuable oppor-
tunities for citizens to provide informa-
tion that will help shape the commit-
tee’s recommendations to improve the
structure and operation of government
in the commonwealth,” Pennsylvania
Bar Association President Gretchen A.
Mundorff previously said. “If the mem-
bers of the commission’s committees
conclude that changes are needed
based on public input and members’
own findings, they will offer suggesti-
ons for enacting legislation, amending
the state’s Constitution or convening a
constitutional convention.”
DUNMORE
Shale gas workshop set
The Penn State Cooperative Exten-
sion in Lackawanna County will host a
Marcellus Shale natural gas workshop
on Tuesday from 6:30 to 9 p.m. at the
Penn State Worthington Scranton
Campus in Dunmore.
Speakers will include extension,
legal and financial management ex-
perts who will discuss Marcellus Shale
economics, royalty payments and mon-
ey management. Topics will also in-
clude how to read a royalty check,
financial arrangements to optimize
retained income and investment plan-
ning. Pre-registration is required. Con-
tact the Lackawanna County Extension
Office at 963-6842.
LAPLUME
Keystone a green college
For the second consecutive year,
Keystone College has been named one
of the most environmentally responsib-
le institutions of higher learning in the
nation by The Princeton Review.
Keystone was one of a select group
of colleges and universities listed in the
Review’s second annual edition of “The
Princeton Review’s Guide to 311 Green
Colleges” compiled in partnership with
the U.S. Green Building Council.
The guide profiles higher education
institutions that demonstrate notable
commitments to sustainability in their
academic offerings, campus infrastruc-
ture, activities and career prep. The
Princeton Review chose the schools for
this guide based on a survey of admin-
istrators at hundreds of colleges that
were polled in 2010 about their school’s
sustainability initiatives.
Keystone is the only college or uni-
versity in Northeastern Pennsylvania
to be included in the listing and one of
only 20 in the state.
I N B R I E F
Gatrell
Mundorff
WILKES-BARRE – In a place where
children go to tell their stories of sex-
ual and physical abuse, Shannon Pedu-
to had a room full of people dancing.
Peduto, a victim witness coordinator
for the Special Victims Unit in the Lu-
zerne County District Attorney’s Office,
was trying to make a young girl feel
better about going to the Child Ad-
vocacy Center and retelling a story of
sexual abuse to law enforcement.
The girl was quiet, and unsure, Pedu-
to said and wasn’t trusting of the peo-
ple around her.
Peduto said she began asking the girl
about school, things she liked to do,
and her interests. Peduto shared that
she teaches Irish dancing, and learned
the girl had a passion for it.
“So she asked if I would teach her
some steps … She said, ‘Please, please,
please!’ I gladly agreed and taught her
(and other family members) a few
steps and she grinned from ear to ear,”
Peduto said.
When the interview was over, the
girl smiled and her family said it was
time to go.
“She said she didn’t want to leave
and she hugged me,” Peduto said.
“That hug meant so much to me be-
cause I knew that that scared and timid
girl who stared at the ground and
didn’t want to talk to anyone when she
initially came in, left with a smile on
her face.”
Peduto’s story is one that plays out
every day at the Child Advocacy Cen-
ter and puts a face on the cases the
Special Victims Unit handles in court.
It’s of the 112 cases the Special Vic-
CHI L D ADVOCACY CENTER
DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER
Child Advocacy Center in Wilkes-Barre is now operating five days a week, where the SVU and Children and Youth services
evaluate cases and decide how to prosecute them, if they are prosecuted.
Special care for victims
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By SHEENA DELAZIO
sdelazio@timesleader.com
See VICTIMS, Page 11A
SCRANTON – A federal judge
has agreed to allowa couple who
sued the city over the sale of the
Old River Road bakery to seek to
file an amended complaint.
U.S. District Judge A. Richard
Caputo issued an order Friday
that reopens the case filed by Tyl-
er and Antonia Hammond.
The Hammonds filed suit in
2009 against the city, Mayor Tom
Leighton and city attorney Wil-
liam Vinsko, alleging they con-
spired to remove the defunct bak-
ery from a tax sale to pave the
way for the sale to a person who
was a private
client of Leight-
on’s real estate
business and
Vinsko’s law
firm.
Caputo dis-
missed the suit
in its entirety in March, saying
the Hammonds’ claims did not
constitute a legally recognizable
claim under federal law. That de-
cision was based in part on the
fact that the Hammonds did not
identify or name the person who
stoodtobenefit fromthe city’s ac-
tions as a defendant in the suit.
Caputo’s ruling closed the
case, but left open the opportuni-
ty for the Hammonds to file an
amended complaint to cure de-
fects in the original suit that led
to its dismissal.
The Hammonds’ attorney,
Cynthia Pollick, filed the amend-
ed complaint on April 15 that
identifies the personas Leo Glod-
zik III. The complaint has not yet
been accepted by the court.
In his order issued Friday, Ca-
puto directs Pollick to file a legal
brief explaining why the filing of
an amended complaint would
not be futile. Attorneys for the
city will have an opportunity to
respond to the brief. The judge
will issue a ruling at a later date.
Lawsuit
vs. W-B
revived
by judge
Couple alleging city officials
conspired to remove defunct
bakery from a tax sale.
By TERRIE MORGAN-BESECKER
tmorgan@timesleader.com
The judge will
issue a ruling
at a later
date.
WILKES-BARRE TWP. – Roughly
150 children and their families packed
into the Wilkes-Barre Township Volun-
teer Fire Hall on Saturday for an Easter
egg hunt.
The traditional site for the hunt is at
Al Karaska Park, but the rain chased ev-
eryone inside.
Despite change in location, the chil-
dren were excited to receive gifts and
for a chance to win one of the 40 bicy-
cles being raffled off.
Township council member Mike
Wildes was postednear the park to redi-
rect families to the fire hall.
Wildes, who has attended the Easter
egg hunt since childhood and has been
involved in its organization for the past
Egg-cited children
enjoy Easter event
NIKO J. KALLIANIOTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
The Easter Bunny gives Sara Knapko, who is homebound, a hug during a visit
to her home Saturday as part of Wilkes-Barre Township’s Easter festivities.
Wilkes-Barre Township holds annual
egg hunt, which includes visits to
homebound township citizens.
By B. GARRET ROGAN
Times Leader Correspondent
See EGG, Page 11A
WILKES-BARRE TWP. –
Max Biela crouches before his
pile of eggs.
He opens them one at a
time, carefully depositing the
treasure inside into his Easter
basket.
Max doesn’t run around
scooping up eggs with the oth-
er children, they bring the
treasures back to him, but he
is enjoying the hunt in his
own way.
Max and his twin sister
Gwen, who twirls grinning
from ear-to-ear by his side,
have autism.
At another Easter egg hunt,
Max and Gwen might be
pushed to the margins, unable
to keep up with the other kids
and perhaps stigmatized by
their parents, their mother,
Laiana Biela, of Stroudsburg,
said.
On Saturday, Max, Gwen
and more than 20 other area
children with special needs
had their own Easter egg
hunt, just for kids like them.
The Logan Foundation, of
Dallas, hosted a Special Needs
Easter Egg Hunt Saturday at
the Wyoming Valley Sports
Dome. Children with special
Special delivery treats
HARP HEFFERNAN/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Eighteen-
month-old Sage
Williams, Pitt-
ston, shows off
Easter eggs she
found with the
help of her aunt
Tara Perry, of
Pittston, Sat-
urday morning
at a Special
Needs Easter
Egg Hunt at the
Wyoming Valley
Sports Dome.
See SPECIAL, Page 11A
Children with special needs
enjoy their own customized
Easter egg hunt.
By MATT HUGHES
mhughes@timesleader.com
K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2011 PAGE 5A
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FREIGHT TOOLS
PESHAWAR, PAKISTAN
NATO shipments halted
P
akistan halted NATO supply ship-
ments to Afghanistan on Saturday
after thousands of protesters rallied on
the main road to the border to demand
Washington stop firing missiles against
militants sheltering inside the country.
The stoppage was temporary and the
demonstration was held by a small
political party seeking a populist boost,
but the events highlighted the vul-
nerability of the supply route running
through Pakistan at a time of tensions
between Washington and Islamabad.
Much of the non-lethal supplies for
foreign troops in landlocked Afghan-
istan come through Pakistan after
arriving at the port in the southern city
of Karachi. Militants often attack the
convoys, and last September Pakistan
closed the border for 20 days to protest
a NATO helicopter strike inside its
borders.
SANAA, YEMEN
President will step down
Yemen’s embattled president agreed
Saturday to a proposal by Gulf Arab
mediators to step down within 30 days
and hand power to his deputy in ex-
change for immunity from prosecution,
a major about-face for the autocratic
leader who has ruled for 32 years.
The protest movement demanding
President Ali Abdullah Saleh’s immedi-
ate departure said Saturday that it also
accepted the latest draft of the deal but
with reservations.
A day earlier, protesters staged the
largest of two months of demonstra-
tions, filling a five-lane boulevard
across the capital with a sea of hun-
dreds of thousands of people. A deadly
crackdown by government forces and
Saleh supporters has killed more than
130 people and prompted key allies to
abandon the president and join the
protesters.
WASHINGTON
Obama: Energy sources key
President Barack Obama says one
answer to high gasoline prices is to
spend money developing renewable
energy sources.
"That’s the key to helping families at
the pump and reducing our depend-
ence on foreign oil" in the long term,
he said Saturday in his weekly radio
and Internet address.
Obama raises the issue of rising fuel
prices during almost every public ap-
pearance and says that he understands
the strain higher fuel costs are putting
on some family budgets.
He announced Thursday during an
event in Reno, Nev., that the Justice
Department will begin looking for
cases of fraud or manipulation in the
oil markets, even though Attorney
General Eric Holder suggested a varie-
ty of legal reasons may be behind the
surging gas prices.
SAN FRANCISCO
Span speed irks cyclists
Plans to put the brakes on bicyclists
riding across the Golden Gate Bridge
has cycling enthusiasts crying foul in
this urban center of two-wheeled activ-
ism.
Thousands of commuters, residents
and tourists ride the bridge’s stately
span each day, and occasionally there is
a smash-up when bikers collide with
tourists drinking in the views or run
into each other.
Still, the city was taken by surprise
this week when bridge officials pro-
posed speed limits as a way to lower
the accident rate on San Francisco’s
signature landmark.
I N B R I E F
AP PHOTO
Easter services on the same day
Russian Orthodox Patriarch Kirill
conducts an Easter service in the
Christ the Savior Cathedral in Moscow,
Russia, early Sunday. Orthodox Easter
and Catholic Easter coincide this year.
Syrian security forces fired at tens of
thousands of people joining funeral
processions Saturday after the blood-
iest day of the monthlong uprising
against President Bashar Assad, bring-
ing the death toll from two days of vio-
lence to more than 120 and prompting
two lawmakers and a local religious
leader to resign in disgust over the kill-
ings.
The resignations were a possible sign
of cracks developing in the regime’s
base in a nation where nearly all opposi-
tion figures have been either jailed or
exiled during the 40-year dynasty of the
Assad family.
“I cannot tolerate the blood of our in-
nocent sons and children being shed,”
Sheikh Rizq Abdul-Rahim Abazeid told
The Associated Press after stepping
down from his post as the mufti of the
Daraa region in southern Syria.
The lawmakers, Nasser Hariri and
Khalil Rifai, also are from Daraa, which
has become the epicenter of the protest
movement after a group of teenagers
were arrested there for scrawling anti-
regime graffiti on a wall in mid-March.
Since then, the relentless crackdown
on demonstrations has only served to
invigorate protesters whose rage over
the bloodshed has all but eclipsed their
earlier demands for modest reforms.
Now, many are seeking Assad’s down-
fall.
EachFriday, growingnumbers of peo-
ple in cities across the country have tak-
en to the streets despite swift attacks
from security forces and shadowy pro-
government gunmen known as “shabi-
ha.”
Toll from Syria unrest hits 120
Processions for victims
from Friday fired upon
AP PHOTO
In this image by a citizen, a Syrian anti-government protester holds up a
bloodied hand during a funeral procession Saturday in Izraa, Syria.
By BASSEMMROUE
and ELIZABETH A. KENNEDY
Associated Press
HOUSTON — While some parents
clamor for stricter security measures at a
Houston elementary school where a kin-
dergartner accidentally fired a gun that
injured three students, school security and
national security experts say the rarity of
such incidents among younger students
make spending limited resources on such
things as metal detectors impractical.
Experts say more effective prevention
efforts include working directly with par-
ents and students on gun safety, better
training of faculty and staff and building
better trust between teachers and stu-
dents.
Police say an unidentified 6-year-old boy
took a semi-automatic pistol in his back-
pack to Ross Elementary on Tuesday. Lat-
er that morning as he and more than 40
other kindergartners were having lunch in
a crowded cafeteria, the boy accidentally
fired the gun as he was showing it off to
friends.
The boy, as well as another 6-year-old
boy and a 5-year-old girl were injured. All
have since been released from a Houston
hospital.
Boy, 6, fires gun
in Texas school;
debate renewed
By JUAN A. LOZANO
Associated Press
ST. LOUIS — Debris from splin-
tered homes covered the ground in
neighborhoods around St. Louis,
while topped trees and overturned
cars littered lawns and driveways.
From the air, one home looked like a
dollhouse that had had its roof lifted
off. Looking down, the dining room
table and other contents could be
seen, damp in lingering rain.
Amid such devastation, officials ap-
peared awed that a tornado that
roared through the area Friday night,
striking the airport and several near-
by suburbs, hadn’t seriously injured
anyone.
"It was horrific. For that muchdam-
age to be done and no one lost their
life, it is simply a blessing,” said Char-
lie Dooley, St. Louis County’s execu-
tive.
Cleanup swung into full gear Satur-
day. With the din of chain saws and
pounding hammers in the back-
ground, homeowners sifted through
wreckage while crews scrambled to
restore power to the 31,700 custom-
ers still without it.
At Lambert, workers boarded up
windows and swept up glass in the
main terminal, where the twister had
torn off part of the roof and blown out
half of the large, plate-glass windows.
The domed design of the main termi-
nal, dating to the mid-1950s, was the
handiwork of Minoru Yamasaki, the
Modernist architect of New York
City’s World Trade Center twin tow-
ers toppled in the Sept. 11terrorist at-
tacks.
St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay said
officials hoped to reopen the airport
at about three-fourths capacity Sun-
day if they could get power restored.
Insurance adjusters converged in
nearby MarylandHeights andBridge-
ton, where roofers were going door to
door to offer free temporary repairs.
“It’s crazy — like something you’d
see in a movie,” TimKreitler, 27, said
as he helped a neighbor clean up in
Bridgeton.
Vivi Magana, 17, and her parents
Quick cleanup after tornado
AP PHOTO
Krista Huckleberry of Metropolis, Ill., looks out the storm door of the
home of her mother, Debbie Riddle, and stepfather, David, after storm.
Officials are amazed that no one
seriously injured in St. Louis after
destruction shuts airport.
By JIMSALTER and JIMSUHR
Associated Press
MUDDER’S DAY
AP PHOTO
D
irt and mud are kicked into the air as runners participate in the Muddy Mayhem 8K run sponsored
by The Athlete’s Foot on Saturday, in San Antonio, Texas. Runners dealt with several obstacles,
including a giant, muddy water hole near the finish. More than 1,000 runners participated in the fun
yet mucky mess. Proceeds went to Wounded Warrior Project, which provides support to severely in-
jured service members as they transition to civilian life.
TRIPOLI, Libya — Government troops
retreated to the outskirts of Misrata under
rebel fire Saturday and the opposition
claimed victory after officials in Tripoli de-
cided to pull back forces loyal to Moammar
Gadhafi following nearly two months of lay-
ing siege to the western city.
The Pentagon, meanwhile, said the U.S.
Air Force carried out its first Predator mis-
sile strike in Libya on Saturday, but gave no
details. Libyan government officials
showed evidence of an airstrike near Gad-
hafi’s compound in Tripoli that it said
caused no injuries, but it was not clear if
that site was the Predator’s target.
Opposition forces in Libya’s third-largest
city had held firm after being pounded by
the government’s heavy weapons for weeks.
On Friday, a top Libyan official said troops
would be withdrawn and local tribes would
take up the fight — a notion scoffed at by
rebels.
Arebel activist in the Misrata questioned
how much support Moammar Gadhafi had
among the local tribes.
Troops retreat as
Libyan rebels claim
victory in Misrata
By KARIN LAUB and DIAA HADID
Associated Press
C M Y K
PAGE 6A SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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WASHINGTON—The United
States has never defaulted on its
debt and Democrats and Repub-
licans say they don’t want it to
happen now. But with partisan
acrimony running at fever pitch,
and Democrats and Republicans
so far apart on how to tame the
deficit, the unthinkable is sud-
denly being pondered.
The government now borrows
about 42 cents of every dollar it
spends. Imagine that one day
soon, the borrowing slams up
against the current debt limit
ceiling of $14.3 trillion and Con-
gress fails to raise it. The damage
would ripple across the entire
economy, eventually affecting
nearly every American, and rock-
ing global markets inthe process.
A default would come if the
government actually failed to ful-
fill a financial obligation, includ-
ing repaying a loan or interest on
that loan. The government bor-
rows mostly by selling bonds to
individuals and governments,
with a promise to pay back the
amount of the bond in a certain
time period and agreeing to pay
regular interest on that bond in
the meantime.
Among the first directly affect-
ed would likely be money-market
funds holding government secu-
rities, banks that buy bonds di-
rectly from the Federal Reserve
and resell themto consumers, in-
cluding pension and mutual
funds; and the foreign investor
community, which holds nearly
half of all Treasury securities.
If the U.S. starts missing inter-
est or principal payments, bor-
rowers would demand higher
andhigher rates onnewbonds, as
they did with Greece, Portugal
and other heavily indebted na-
tions. Who wants to keep loaning
money to a deadbeat nation that
can’t pay its bills?
At some point, the government
would have to slash spending in
other areas to make roomfor any
further sales of Treasury bills and
bonds. That could squeeze pay-
ments to federal contractors, and
eventually even affect Social Se-
curity and other government
benefit payments, as well as fed-
eral workers’ paychecks.
A default would likely trigger
another financial panic like the
one in 2008 and plunge an econo-
my still reeling fromhigh jobless-
ness and a battered housing mar-
ket back into recession. Federal
Reserve ChairmanBenBernanke
calls failure to raise the debt limit
"a recovery-ending event." U.S.
stock markets would likely tank
— devastating roughly half of
U.S. households that own stocks,
either individually or through
401(k) type retirement pro-
grams.
Eventually, the cost of most
credit would rise — from busi-
ness and consumer loans to
home mortgages, auto financing
and credit cards.
Continued stalemate could al-
sofurther depress thevalueof the
dollar and challenge the green-
back’s status as the world’s prime
"reserve currency."
China and other countries that
now hold about 50 percent of all
U.S. Treasury securities could
start dumping them, further
pushing up interest rates and
swelling the national debt. It
wouldbe a vicious cycle of higher
and higher interest rates and
more and more debt.
The U.S. has long been the
global standard for financial sta-
bility and creditworthiness, with
Treasury securities seen as a fail-
safe investment. But after the
near-shutdown of the U.S. gov-
ernment and a new credit-rating
report this week questioning the
country’s fiscal health, Treasury
bills and bonds are losing luster.
If thereis adebt limit deadlock,
the government by this summer
could find itself legally unable to
borrow more money to pay its
bills, beginning with interest on
its debt and gradually extending
to day-to-day federal operations.
At some point, the government
would have to decide which bills
to pay and which to put aside.
The debt ceiling will be hit on
or around May 16, the Treasury
Department says. Unlike the
threatened government shut-
down, the impact would start
slowly, but then build mightily
until thedamagewouldbesodire
that fewpolitical leaders or econ-
omists even want to contemplate
it. The day of reckoning could
likely be delayed at least until
early July with creative book-
keeping.
When the House first rejected
the Bush administration’s $600-
billionbankbailout inSeptember
2008, the Dow Jones industrials
went into a dizzying 778-point
tailspin. Awhiff of a possible sim-
ilar stock market collapse came
onMondaywithasharpselloff on
Wall Street when the Standard &
Poors lowered its outlook on U.S.
debt to "negative" from "stable,"
possibly a first step toward a pos-
sible downgrade of America’s
coveted AAA credit rating.
"Wehaven’t downgradedit. We
just said, if nothing happens, we
may have to," said S&P chief
economist David Wyss. He said a
government default remains un-
charted territory, "which is one
reason why it’s not a good idea to
hit the debt ceiling."
"There’s reason to worry," said
Wyss. "But my best guess is that
we sort of muddle through this.
Cuts will be made, they’ll be too
little too late, but at least they
will be enough to maintain a tri-
ple-A rating."
"It’s another game of chicken.
And this time there are Mack
trucks going at each other, not
bumper cars. This is a biggie,"
said American University politi-
cal scientist James Thurber. But
he predicted that, as in the past,
"there will be an accommoda-
tion. They will avoid a crash."
Investment bank J.P. Morgan
Chase recently concluded that
anydelayinmakinganinterest or
principal payments by the Trea-
sury "even for a very short period
of time" would have large "long-
term adverse consequences for
Treasury finances and the U.S.
economy." The analysis is being
circulated on Capitol Hill by sup-
porters of raising the debt limit.
"If anyone wants to push that
button, which I think would be
catastrophic and unpredictable, I
think they’re crazy," JP Morgan
CEO Jaime Dimon said recently
of those seeking to block raising
the debt limit.
House Speaker John Boehner
and most other GOP leaders
agree on the need to raise the
debt limit —anddon’t want to be
held responsible for a new finan-
cial meltdown. Still, they want
Obama to make more conces-
sions on spending cuts than he
has done thus far. That isn’t sit-
ting well with liberal Democrats,
who think Obama has already
given too much ground.
One reason the two parties
can’t find common ground: they
can’t even agree on what’s caus-
ing high deficits. Democrats
mostly blame it on policies of Ge-
orge W. Bush: two wars, tax cuts
that continue to benefit the
wealthy and an expensive pre-
scription drug program. Republi-
cans see government spending as
the culprit, particularly on Oba-
ma’s watch.
In fact, the main reason is the
deep recession, which slashed
tax revenues and led to hundreds
of billions of dollars in recession-
fighting spending by both Bush
and Obama. The debt was $9 tril-
lion in late 2007 before the start
of the Great Recession, and it’s
just a sliver under the $14.3 tril-
lion limit today.
Even though GOP leaders say
they want to avoid more econom-
ic chaos, there is a large crop of
tea-party aligned Republicans
threatening to refuse to raise the
cap under almost any circum-
stance. Polls suggest a large per-
centage of Americans oppose
raising the debt limit.
The debt limit has been raised
ten times over the past decade.
Obama voted against Bush’s
debt-limit increase in 2006 as a
senator, accusing Bush of "a lead-
ership failure." Obama recently
apologized for "making what is a
political vote as opposedtodoing
what was important for the coun-
try.”
Default could be doomsday for U.S. economy
A default would come if the
government actually failed to
fulfill a financial obligation.
By TOMRAUM
Associated Press
AP PHOTO
House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan, R-Wis., declares on April 13 that he was "disappoint-
ed" in President Obama’s speech on a federal spending plan, during a news conference at the Capitol
in Washington.
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2011 PAGE 7A

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EASTER EGG HUNT
IN WILKES-BARRE
PLAINS SENIOR CITIZENS
HOST HEAD START
HUGHESTOWN HOSE CO.
GOOD FRIDAY FISH FRY
NIKO J. KALLIANIOTIS PHOTOS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Ryan Deeney, left, Christopher Grude and Simon Tkach
CHARLOTTE BARTIZEK PHOTOS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Marge Burko, Plains Township, and Peter Drodz, Miners Mills, at the
senior center
PETE G. WILCOX PHOTOS/THE TIMES LEADER
Joanie Sarti, left, Alex Sarti, 9, both of Pittston and
Gerri Sarti, of Hughestown
Brittini Milbrodt, left, and Caitlin Husar
Robert Liskavage, Wilkes-Barre, and Rosalie Kaminski, Wilkes-
Barre
Wayne Quick, Hughestown Council president, left, and
Beth Canfield and EMS Lt. William Hontz II of Hugh-
estown Hose Company
Ginny Welby with granddaughter Giana
Sisters Virginia, left, and Vera Cimino, Parsons
Nancy, left, and Stanley Matys of Duryea and Sheila
Kelly of Pittston
Erin McLaughlin, left, and Kaiti McCann
Joe Esposito, Plains Township, and Carol Mimnaugh, Plains Town-
ship
Ken, left, A.J., 5, and Don Scialpi of Hughestown
Janet Hall, left, Don Armstrong and Pat Barks
Patty Cunningham, Forty Fort, left, and Audrey Smith, Plains Town-
ship
Hughestown Hose Company members Joe Meranti, left,
and Bill Aruscavage
C M Y K
PAGE 8A SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ N E W S
Luzerne County Council can-
didate Michael Giamber was fa-
miliar with home rule govern-
ment because he lived most of
his adult life in Fairfax County,
Va., which has a council-man-
ager formof government, he re-
cently told a Times Leader en-
dorsement panel.
“It has one of the best qual-
ities of lives in the United
States. It was anexcellent place
to live,” said Giamber, a Pitt-
ston native who decided to re-
turn to the area when he re-
tired.
Giamber start-
ed faithfully at-
tending the coun-
ty’s home rule
charter planning
meetings. He later
formed the Friends of Home
Rule political actioncommittee
to urge voters to support the
charter and now serves on two
home rule transition subcom-
mittees.
That intimate involvement
in the county’s movement to
home rule from the beginning
distinguishes himfromthe oth-
er 32 Democratic council con-
tenders, he said.
“NowI’mrunning for council
because I want to continue that
effort to try to improve county
government,” said the Fair-
mount Township resident.
His more than three decades
of management experience in
the federal government has
prepared him to serve on coun-
cil, he said.
He worked for the Navy for
23 years, managing operations
at several naval installations in
Maryland and Washington,
D.C., and worked for the Naval
Facilities Engineering Com-
mand in Washington, D.C.,
conducting efficiency reviews,
and teaching contract manage-
ment classes.
Before retiring, he worked
the last seven years of his ca-
reer at the National Gallery of
Art, Washington, D.C., as depu-
ty chief of facilities and oper-
ations.
Giamber said he supports a
national search for the new
county manager and would
look for applicants who have
managed organizations that
have gone through consolida-
tions. He also wants someone
who can handle a lot of pres-
sure and multitask.
Creating jobs and attracting
new businesses would get the
county of its financial mess, he
said.
“I believe we need to bring
more revenue into this county,
and it’s not by taxing these
homes over and over again. By
creating more jobs, we’re bring-
ing more revenue in,” Giamber
said, identifying government
corruption as one of the area’s
main stumbling blocks in at-
tracting businesses.
He also wants to explore
privatization of more govern-
ment services, similar to the
county’s outsourcing of the tax
claim office.
“I’m a big proponent of rely-
ing more on the private sector
and privatization as long as we
have strong contracts in place,”
Giamber said.
Giamber familiar
with home rule
CLARK VAN ORDEN/THE TIMES LEADER
Age: 57
Political party: Democrat
Residence: Fairmount Township
Education: Bachelor’s degree in
business management from
National-Louis University, Chica-
go.
Work experience: Twenty-three
years with the U.S. Navy, manag-
ing operations at several naval
facilities in Washington, D.C.;
taught contract management
classes; seven years as deputy
chief of facilities and operations
at the National Gallery of Art,
Washington, D.C.
Family: Married to Yelena; two
children; one grandchild
MI CHAE L S.
GI AMBE R
By JENNIFER LEARN-ANDES
jandes@timesleader.com
to do things their way,” he said.
He doesn’t expect other county
council candidatestoteamupwith
him.
“I don’t think you’re getting
many people to stand with me be-
cause I seemto be standing on my
own,” he said. “I’m amazed more
people aren’t outraged at some of
thethings that occur inthesesmall
towns.”
Fiorucci said he’s been scouring
thecountybudget tocomeupwith
ideas to reduce spending, particu-
larly in court branches and the
county prison.
He supports a 3-percent spend-
ing cut to help fund a voluntary re-
tirement program to reduce per-
sonnel costs.
“I think we’d have to tailor this
program to court and prison per-
sonnel rather than just general
countyemployees likeinthepast,”
Fiorucci said.
Implementing more technology
couldalsoreducemanpower inthe
county, he said.
Fiorucci said he’d rely on the
manager to make recommenda-
tions onunioncontracts that come
up for negotiation.
“There may have to be across-
the-board cuts like in the auto in-
dustry. That’s what I thinkit’s com-
ing down to for these local govern-
Luzerne County Council candi-
dateMarioJ. Fiorucci saidhe’s pro-
venthat hewill let thepublicknow
what’s happening in county gov-
ernment if he’s elected.
Fiorucci, a Sugar Notch Bor-
ough Council member, regularly
writes letters to local newspapers,
has published free newsletters
about local govern-
ment affairs andisn’t
shy about challeng-
ing or questioning
government officials
at public meetings.
He also started the “State of the
World,” a public affairs event at-
tracting guest speakers, in 2000.
“I’d like to be on that council to
makesureI’mawatchdog,”Fioruc-
ci recently told a Times Leader en-
dorsement panel.
Fiorucci said his willingness to
speak out has prompted some to
try to discredit himor portray him
as a radical, but he said he can’t
look the other way when elected
officials ignore laws governing
open meetings and spending.
“For some reason a lot of these
towns – the experience I’ve had ei-
ther going to council meetings as
anactivist andwritingabout issues
or actually being on council – like
ments. Wecan’t affordI don’t think
a county workforce our size,” he
said.
Fiorucci votedforhomeruleand
said he also helped get the previ-
ous home rule charter on the bal-
lot, thoughit was defeatedin2004.
He supports a countywide
search for the new manager or a
statewide one if there aren’t
enough viable applicants. He
doesn’t want to target candidates
nationally because he believes
some of these applicants would
take too long to understand the lo-
cal government structure and use
the county post as a “stepping
stone to try to further their ca-
reers.”
Experience with technology is a
must for the manager, he said.
“I’d be more comfortable with
someone fromthe county because
their learning curve will be short-
er,” said Fiorucci, who also wants
to create a countywide environ-
mental advisory panel.
Fiorucci promises to inform public
CLARK VAN ORDEN/THE TIMES LEADER
Age: 53
Political party: Democrat
Residence: Sugar Notch
Education: Associate’s degree,
Luzerne County Community Col-
lege; bachelor’s degree in history
and law, College Misericordia;
master’s degree in political sci-
ence, Georgetown University,
Washington, D.C.
Work experience: 1982-1989, VMS
Realty and Integrated Resources,
assistant national marketing man-
ager for public real estate syn-
dications; 1989-1993, Friedberg
Mercantile and London Investment
Trust, futures desk and floor trad-
er; 1993-2002, Christensen and
Associates and CitiStreet/Citibank,
investor relations consultant and
retirement specialist; 2002-2010,
Diversified Information Tech-
nologies, medical records proc-
essor/specialist; 2010 to present,
PA mentor for adults with devel-
opmental disorders.
Family: Single
MARI O J.
F I ORUCCI
By JENNIFER LEARN-ANDES
jandes@timesleader.com
Luzerne County Council candi-
date Joseph Gorko describes him-
self as a“Republicanhero” andthe
corruptionfighter inhis campaign
handouts.
“I am the individual that first
identified corruption in Luzerne
County. I canprovethat, andI was
actually prosecuted for it to keep
me quiet,” Gorko recently told a
TimesLeaderendorsement panel.
The Wilkes-Barre
veterinary medicine
consultant served
seven years in pris-
on on a 2002 convic-
tion for sending
threatening letters
to then-county District Attorney
Peter Paul Olszewski Jr.
Gorkocontinuestodenythat he
sent the letters and maintains he
was implicated because he was in-
vestigating sports betting, orga-
nized crime and corruption in-
volving local officials and was pre-
paring to write a book about his
findings.
He said during the recent panel
interview that he has his own
“ideas” of the identity of the per-
sonwhosent theletter andsaidhe
was in possession of some of the
material involvedinthecasewhen
he was arrested because someone
sent it tohimas part of his ownin-
vestigation.
The state Constitutionsays citi-
zens may be barred from serving
in public office if they have com-
mitted a felony.
Gorko said he’s been showing
voters his documentation about
corruption as he goes door-to-
door campaigning. He sometimes
pullsout astuffedmonkeytoshow
the children of voters he encoun-
ters on the campaign trail.
“There’s a lot of monkey busi-
ness in Luzerne County. We’re go-
ing to fix that,” Gorko said.
Gorko said he voted for home
rule and believes the new council
should include people from var-
ying backgrounds. He said he’s
traveled the world as a veterinary
medicine consultant, is multilin-
gual and has run a business.
“I’mable to deal with many dif-
ferent kinds of people and situa-
tions,” Gorko said.
A “top to bottom” examination
of the county is needed to identify
problems and overspending, he
said. He said he would eliminate
redundant services and “dead
weight” and institute bulk pur-
chasing of more items to save
money. While he believes many
elected tax collectors do a good
job, he supports a central tax col-
lection operation and elimination
of the local collectors, saying it
would save money.
“You must get to the root of all
the bad stuff before you can begin
over, do a housecleaning, make
thing more efficient, make things
better. That restores pride among
all the people inthe WyomingVal-
ley and our area in general in Lu-
zerne County,” he said, noting
that many people outside the area
view the county as a “laughing-
stock.”
He wants a manager with gov-
ernment and finance experience
who is “above reproach” and not a
“prima donna type.”
If money becomes available,
Gorko said he’d like to create an
ombudsman office to field con-
cerns andquestions of countyresi-
dents.
Gorko vows to
fight corruption
CLARK VAN ORDEN/THE TIMES LEADER
Age: 50
Political party: Republican
Residence: Wilkes-Barre
Education: Bachelor’s degree in
biology from Wilkes University
and Doctor of Veterinary Medicine
from Pedro Henriquez Urena
University in the Dominican Re-
public.
Work experience: Self-employed
veterinary and medical consult-
ant.
Family: Single
J OS E PH A.
GORKO J R.
By JENNIFER LEARN-ANDES
jandes@timesleader.com
they’re out of jobs. It’s not a very
nice picture you have of every-
thing, so I don’t think we should
burden the taxpayers anymore. It
really is overburdening them,” she
said.
Sorokas said she won’t take any
campaigncontributions.
“This way I have nobody to be
obligated to but the public,” she
said.
She has an associate’s degree in
horticulture and served on the
DemocraticStateCommitteefrom
1982 to1994.
Now retired, her employment
was in factories. She worked after
school in a belt and buckle factory
and was later employed in a cigar
factory.
“At that time, you’ve got to re-
member, jobs weren’t like they are
now. Wedidn’t havetheopportuni-
tiesbeforethatwehavenowhere. If
you got a job anywhere you were
just happy, and so I worked in a ci-
gar factory,” Sorokas said.
Sorokas has also wrapped and
priced meat for ACME Markets
Eileen Sorokas decided to run
for Luzerne County Council be-
causeshewantedtohelpshapethe
county’sswitchtoanewhomerule
government inJanuary.
“That’sreallywhyI got involved.
It’s a newformof government, and
I’m excited about it,
and I want it to
work,” the Wilkes-
Barre resident re-
cently told a Times
Leader endorsement
panel.
“I couldsit homeanddonothing
and criticize, or I could put my
name on the ballot and try to do
good,” she said.
Sorokas said she would look for
ways to “cut corners” because she
is campaigningona pledge tohold
the line on county taxes. She said
she does not have any specifics on
howshe wouldreduce spendingat
this time.
“Inthis day andage, the way the
economyis, peoplearehurtingand
and worked at Leslie Fay and then
the Lord & Taylor Distribution
Centeruntilherretirementin1999.
She was an active volunteer for
several organizations beforeher re-
tirement and said her only mem-
bership at the moment is in the
Wyoming Valley Mushroom Club,
where she learns what kinds of
mushrooms may be picked in the
wild.
“I’mreally interestedinthat one
now,” saidSorokas, whois rebuild-
ing a farm in Hunlock Township
withher husband, Richard.
Sorokas saidshe wants a nation-
al search for the new county man-
ager andwouldsupport temporari-
ly appointing current county Chief
Clerk/Manager Doug Pape as act-
ingmanager whilethenewcouncil
hunts for a permanent hire.
Sorokas eager to become involved
CLARK VAN ORDEN/THE TIMES LEADER
Age: 63
Political party: Democrat
Residence: Wilkes-Barre
Education: Wilkes-Barre Township
High School graduate; associate’s
degree in horticulture from Lu-
zerne County Community College.
Work experience: Factory worker
at Leslie Fay from1974 to 1995 and
at the Lord & Taylor Distribution
Center from1997 to 1999 until
retirement.
Family: Married to Richard Soro-
kas
E I L E E N SOROKAS By JENNIFER LEARN-ANDES
jandes@timesleader.com
Luzerne County Council can-
didate TimMcGinley became in-
terested in county leadership
post when he applied for Greg
Skrepenak’s vacant commission-
er seat in 2009.
The Kingston man was among
the finalists chosen for the seat,
which was ultimately filled by
Thomas Cooney.
“I realized that the county gov-
ernment was sort of
incrisis andneeded
somepeopletostep
up,” McGinley re-
cently told a Times
Leader endorse-
ment panel.
McGinley said his four dec-
ades of professional experience
would be an asset in the council
post.
He worked 30 years in public
education and10 at the Commis-
sion on Economic Opportunity
(CEO), where he works as ad-
ministration director. The agen-
cy covers social service needs in
the county.
“I get a look at all of Luzerne
County and see the needs our
people are experiencing there,”
said McGinley, who supervises
the agency’s programs and
roughly260employees. He’s also
involved in the organization’s
contracts, bidding, $20-plus mil-
lion budget and facilities.
McGinley said he’s also stud-
ied leadership and organization
administrationas part of his mas-
ter’s degree and post-graduation
classes.
“I thinkbetweenmyeducation
and work experience, I bring a
lot to the table,” McGinley said.
Decisions, including high-
pressure ones, don’t scare
McGinley, hesaid. He’s hadthou-
sands of eyes judging his calls as
a wrestling official and has made
decisions as a school administra-
tor that impacted the lives of
children and their families.
“You really need to have all the
information present in order to
make quality decisions,” he said.
McGinley said the search for a
new county manager should be
“wide enoughtoget a goodfield”
of applicants, though he doesn’t
think it has to be national. In ad-
dition to leadership experience,
the manager should be energetic
and detail-oriented, he said.
“I thinkwe’veseenalot of that,
where people were not attentive
to detail, and things slip by, and
then you have a problem to deal
with,” he said.
Whittling down the county’s
$460 million debt “to a realistic
number” would be his primary
focus, he said.
McGinley, who plans to resign
from his CEO position if he’s
elected, said he’s already inter-
viewed roughly 25 county work-
ers at all levels to obtain their
views on what’s needed in coun-
ty government.
“I’d like to see the whole pic-
ture,” he said.
McGinley says
county in crisis
CLARK VAN ORDEN/THE TIMES LEADER
Age: 64
Political party: Democrat
Residence: Kingston
Education: Bachelor’s degree in
chemistry, Wilkes University;
master’s degree in secondary
education, University of Scranton;
continuing graduate studies in
chemistry and educational lead-
ership at both of those universi-
ties in addition to Lehigh Uni-
versity, Penn State University and
Temple University.
Work experience: 1969-1985,
Wilkes-Barre Area School District,
chemistry teacher, wrestling
coach, athletic director; 1985-
1999, Wyoming Valley West School
District, high school and ele-
mentary school administrator;
1999-present, Commission on
Economic Opportunity, adminis-
tration director; PIAA wrestling
official for more than 40 years.
Family: Wife, the former Mary
Maloney; two children, Michael
and Erin
T I M MCGI NL EY
By JENNIFER LEARN-ANDES
jandes@timesleader.com
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2011 PAGE 9A
➛ N E W S
average buyer expected to
spend about $47 on food this
Easter, which would rack up
gross sales of about $4.1billion
nationally.
Still, Easter candy is by far
the most popular holidayitem,
with 90 percent of those sur-
veyed expecting to buy some.
And that has meant long
hours for candy makers such
as Neil Edley and his mom,
Frann Edley, who owns the
Sugar Plum confectionary
shop in Forty Fort.
“We’re going crazy for East-
er,” Neil Edley said last week.
Easter is the third biggest
holiday selling season for the
Edleys, with Christmas and
Valentines Day coming in first
and second. And Neil attri-
butes creative offerings for the
popularity the shop enjoys.
“People don’t just want the
same old peanut butter egg.
Now that people are being
educatedabout foodfromfood
blogs on the Internet to The
Food Network on TV, they re-
ally want to see creativity in
their candy and pastry,” Edley
said.
Edley said online sales are
the store’s major source of
business.
Liuzzo said online sales will
probably increase about 15
percent for Easter this year.
Edley said Sugar Plumhas seen
growth in sales of about 12 per-
cent annually in the store’s 16
years. And he and his mother
want to use the popularity to help
better society. Every purchase of
Outrageous Alphabet gummy let-
ters benefits a pro-literacy pro-
gram sponsored by proliteracy-
.com.
“It’s our gift to the community,”
Edley said.
SPENDING
Continued from Page 1A
formed their first church, St. Ma-
ry’s of the Immaculate Concep-
tion in Wilkes-Barre, in 1845.
But the first places of worship
in the Wyoming Valley were not
churches, per se, Brooks said.
“In the early days with
the pioneers, they had
Methodist circuit riders
come through town and
they would meet at a
house,” Brooks said, add-
ing that when a congre-
gation had grown
enough, members could
establish their own build-
ing.
The first church build-
ing in the Wyoming Valley – and
NortheasternPennsylvania –was
the Forty Fort Meeting House,
built in1812 and still standing to-
day.
The area’s second church, built
on Public Square in1812, was the
Wilkes-Barre Meeting House. All
that remains of it today is the bell
on Public Square, Brooks said.
A font of knowledge about lo-
cal religion, Brooks said a major
interest of his is tracking reli-
gious denominations. Much of
the Wyoming Valley’s religious
historycanbefoundintomes and
files at the society on South Fran-
klin Street in Wilkes-Barre.
“Here’s the history of St. Ste-
phen’s, the very first Episcopal
church, organized in
1817, in the area,”
Brooks said as he re-
moved the churches’
history books from a
shelf. “The Presbyter-
ian church down the
corner is the oldest of
all churches in the area,
organized in 1772,” he
said, referring to the
First Presbyterian
Church on South Franklin Street.
By the1820s, the majority of wor-
shipers in the Wyoming Valley
were Presbyterians, Episcopa-
lians, Methodists and Baptists –
the predominant denominations
of what are called the Mainline
Protestant religions.
Other Mainline Protestants
now include Lutherans, Congre-
gationalists/United Church of
Christ and Northern Baptists.
So, how did Catholicism
achieve dominance here?
“It looks like the 1910s is when
the Protestants andthe Catholics
startedtogoonpar,” Brooks said.
But it was after World War II
and by the 1950s, when Protes-
tant congregations had shrunk
considerably. Coal production
declined in the region, and many
college-age students who went to
school out of the area never re-
turned, Brooks said.
“The most disproportionate
outward migration was of the
Jewish people, who are kind of
disproportionately more educat-
ed to begin with, so it would have
hit them the hardest,” Brooks
said. “I wouldcall it economic mi-
gration for better jobs, which has
been happening around here
since the closing of the mines.”
Jews, who first came to the ar-
ea with German immigrants in
the 1830s and1840s and built the
first synagogue here in 1850,
B’nai B’rith, saw their county
numbers drop from
about 7,000 in 1958 to
about 3,500 today.
And now, Catholic
churches are seeing pop-
ulation declines. Bishop
Joseph Bambera and his
predecessor have closed
numerous churches in
the Diocese of Scranton
and consolidated their
congregations, many of
which had established deep eth-
nic roots – Polish, Italian, Slovak,
German, Lithuanian and others –
after forming churches decades
ago where they could worship in
their native languages.
“Now the challenge is how
they have tocombine again. …It’s
very sadto watchthe elderly pop-
ulation, who is so committed to
their traditions, and see it slip
away from them,” Brooks said.
“Some people have seen their
whole neighborhoods dramat-
ically change. They’re used to go-
ing to the Lithuanian church and
having a Lithuanian shop down
the street. Well, that’s gone and
now their church is taken away
from them, their neighbors are
gone and their friends are dying.
It must be very tough to be Bish-
op Bambera,” Brooks said
Still, some religions continue
to grow in Luzerne County.
The Association of Religious
Data Archives didn’t even have a
count of Muslims in Luzerne
County in1990, but the report for
2000 estimated the
number of Muslims at
609.
Linda Trompetter, ex-
ecutive director of the
Luzerne CountyDiversi-
ty Commission, has said
that most Muslims – un-
like most Eastern Eu-
ropean immigrants,
who came here with lit-
tle education and fewfi-
nancial resources – came here to
further their educations and, as
such, are well-educated and
come with financial resources.
And despite an overall loss in
members, the county’s Catholic
population has seen a boost from
the influx of Latinos. St. Nicholas
Church in Wilkes-Barre has a sig-
nificant Latino population.
“What I think is a wonderful
statement of St. Nick’s, the first
ethnic church in Wilkes-Barre as
a German church, is that they ful-
ly embraced the latest group, the
Hispanic ministries. So now you
have this wonderful congrega-
tionthat has formed. We have the
first and the latest within Roman
Catholicism come together for
worship,” Brooks said.
PHOTO COURTESY OF THE LUZERNE COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY
Forty Fort Meeting House – the first and oldest church edifice in Northeastern Pennsylvania – was used for worship by Methodists and
Presbyterians from1807 to the 1840s.
PHOTO COURTESY OF THE LUZERNE COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY
St. Casimir’s Church, in the Lyndwood section of Hanover Town-
ship, was the first Lithuanian Roman Catholic parish in America.
PHOTO COURTESY OF THE LUZERNE COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY
The original St. Mary’s Church of the Immaculate Conception in
1845 on Canal Street, now Pennsylvania Boulevard.
RELIGION
Continued from Page 1A
PHOTO COURTESY OF THE LUZERNE COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY
St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church in Wilkes-Barre, seen in this 1886
photo, was destroyed in the Christmas Fire of 1896 and rebuilt the
following year.
PHOTO COURTESY OF THE LUZERNE COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY
An 1856 photo of the Wilkes-Barre Meeting House (Old Ship Zion)
– the first church building in Wilkes-Barre – was built on Public
Square and was used by Congregationalists, Presbyterians, Epis-
copalians, Baptists and Methodists.
PHOTO COURTESY OF THE LUZERNE COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY
The original B’nai B’rith Synagogue, built in 1850 on South Wash-
ington Street in Wilkes-Barre.
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Luzerne County Historical
Society Executive Director
Tony Brooks looks up historical
data on religious denomina-
tions in the area at the socie-
ty’s library in Wilkes-Barre.
Father Joseph
Murgas
Hon. David
Scott
CLARK VAN ORDEN/THE TIMES LEADER
Easter candy abounds at Sugar Plum in Forty Fort. Neil Edley
says customers look for the creative.
K
PAGE 10A SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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In Loving Memory Of
Debbie Parrish
Beautiful memories are
treasured forever,
Of happy days when we
were together.
With Love,
Bob, Jennifer, Jeff, Lauren
and Family
Became An Angel 3Yrs. AgoToday
Brandyn T. Robbins
12/14/90 ~ 4/24/08
“B-Robbs”
I know you’re somewhere out there
Somewhere far away.
I want you back, I want you back.
My neighbors think I’m crazy
But they don’t understand,
You’re all I have,
At night when the stars light up
my room, I sit by myself.
Talking to the moon
Trying to get to you
in hopes you’re on the other side
talking to me too!
“Forever In Our Hearts”
Love & Missed by,
Mom, Dad, Madison, Gram, Pop, “Cole”
& All Your Friends
COLE – Albina, graveside memorial,
1 p.m. Saturday, April 30, at Or-
cutt’s Cemetery (new section),
Noxen, Pa.
CZEKALSKI – Elizabeth, blessing
services Monday 10 a.m. in the
Chapel at Mount Olivet Cemetery
in Carverton, with interment to
follow.
FARRELL – Mary, funeral 10 a.m.
Monday with Mass of Christian
Burial at Sacred Heart Church,
Stephenson Street, Duryea.
GALLAGHER – Thomas J., funeral
Monday 10:30 a.m. from E. Blake
Collins Funeral Home, 159 George
Avenue, Wilkes-Barre. Mass of
Christian Burial 11 a.m. in St.
Benedict’s Church, Wilkes-Barre.
Friends may call today from 5 to
8 p.m.
KASSAB – Peter Sr., funeral 10 a.m.
Tuesday from St. George Maro-
nite Chapel, 79 Loomis St.,
Wilkes-Barre.
KITCHEN – Raymond Jr., memorial
service Saturday, April 30, at 10
a.m. in the Bennett Welsh Presby-
terian Church, Bennett Street,
Luzerne. There are no calling
hours.
KRAFCHAK – The Rev. John,
friends may call Monday from 3
to 6:30 p.m. at Saint Mary of
Czestochowa Church, now a part
of St. Faustina Parish, 1030 S.
Hanover St., Nanticoke. Vigil
Mass 7 p.m. at Saint Mary of
Czestochowa Church, Nanticoke.
Pontifical Mass of Christian Burial
Tuesday 11 a.m. in Saint Mary of
Czestochowa Church, Nanticoke.
Viewing Tuesday prior to the 11
a.m. funeral Mass.
LEWIS – Steven, funeral Mass 11 a.m.
Monday in St. Anthony’s Maronite
Catholic Church, Park Avenue,
Wilkes-Barre. There will be no
viewing.
MALYNDZIAK- Frances, funeral 9
a.m. Monday from the Mark V.
Yanaitis Funeral Home, 55 Stark
St., Plains Township. Mass of
Christian Burial 9:30 a.m. in Ss.
Peter & Paul Church, Plains
Township. Friends may call from 2
to 4 p.m. today.
MATUSEK – Frank, funeral 9:30
a.m. Tuesday at the Mayo Funeral
Home Inc., 77 N. Main St., Shick-
shinny. Mass of Christian Burial
10:30 a.m. in Holy Spirit Parish/St.
Martha’s Church, Fairmount
Springs. Burial in St. Martha’s
Cemetery with military honors
provided by the Shickshinny
American Legion Post. Friends
may call from 5 to 8 p.m. Monday.
O’KONSKI – John, funeral Tuesday
10:30 a.m. from the S.J. Gront-
kowski Funeral Home, 530 W.
Main St., Plymouth. Mass of
Christian Burial 11 a.m. in St. John
the Baptist Church, Larksville.
Friends may call Monday from 5
to 7 p.m.
PERRIN – Betty, funeral service
Monday 7 p.m. at the E. Blake
Collins Funeral Home, 159 George
Avenue, Wilkes-Barre. Friends
may call Monday from 5 p.m. until
the time of the service.
REILLY – Timothy, memorial Mass,
6 p.m. Tuesday in the Resurrec-
tion of the Lord Polish National
Church, Zerby Avenue, Edwards-
ville. The family will receive
friends from 4 to 6 p.m. at the
church.
SHUPP – Leland, funeral 11 a.m.
Tuesday from the Sheldon-Ku-
kuchka Funeral Home, 73 W.
Tioga St, Tunkhannock. Friends
may call at the funeral home
from 6 to 8 p.m. Monday.
FUNERALS
MARYANN KLEBON, 84, of
Scranton, passed away April 22,
2011 in the hospice unit at Mercy
Hospital, Scranton. She is sur-
vived by sons, John Peter Klebon
and wife, Mary Ann, Phoenixville,
Pa., Richard and wife, Ann Marie,
Moosic; grandson, Paul Klebon,
Indiana; sisters, Pauline Kotchick,
Geraldine Hafner, Josephine Or-
zel, Loretta Gerrity, all of Scran-
ton; and several nieces and neph-
ews.
Friends and family are invited
to attend the Mass of Christian
Burial on Tuesday at 11 a.m. in Ss.
Peter & Paul Church, Avoca, with
Father Phillip J. Sladicka officiat-
ing. Interment will be in Ss. Peter
and Paul Cemetery, Moosic. Fu-
neral services are entrusted to
Kniffen O’Malley Funeral Home,
Inc., 728 Main Street, Avoca.
B
etty M. Perrin, 87, of Plains
Township, passed away on
Wednesday, April 20, 2011 at her
home.
She was born August 18, 1923 in
Wilkes-Barre, a daughter of the
late Francis andGrace StarkWillis.
She was a graduate of Plains High
School and was a long-time and ac-
tive member of the Parsons Welsh
Baptist Church.
In addition to her parents, she
was preceded in death by her hus-
band, PhillipE. Perrin; infant great
granddaughter, Kellie Harmon;
and brother, Francis Willis Jr.
Surviving are her children,
Charles Perrin and his wife, Diane,
West Wyoming; Bonnie Kell, El Pa-
so, Texas; Peggy Silberg, Plains
Township; Barry Perrin and his
wife, Lena, Wilkes-Barre; Jan
Johns and her husband, Ron, Prin-
gle; 10 grandchildren, 12 great
grandchildren; nieces and neph-
ews, Nancy, Sandy and Francis III.
The funeral service will be held
Monday at 7 p.m. at the E. Blake
Collins Funeral Home, 159 George
Avenue, Wilkes-Barre. Services
will be conducted by Rev. Wayne
Nickol, Pastor of Parsons Welsh
Baptist Church. Friends may call
Monday from5 p.m. until the time
of the service.
Memorial donations can be
made to Erwine’s Home Health
and Hospice, 270 Pierce Street,
Suite 101, Kingston, PA 18704.
Condolences can be sent to the
family at: www.eblakecollins.com.
Betty M. Perrin
April 20, 2011
R
alph S. Lutz Sr., 79, of East En-
terprise Street, Glen Lyon, died
unexpectedly Thursday at Wilkes-
Barre General Hospital.
Ralph was born in Shickshinny,
on February 4, 1932. He was the son
of the late Beach and Emma
(Meade) Lutz.
Ralph graduated from Shickshin-
ny High School and attended Wil-
liamsport Technical School. He was
honorably discharged from the Air
Force of the United States, Airman
Second Class. He was employed by
A. Rifkin Company in Hanover
Township as an art supervisor for
many years, retiring in1997. He was
a member of Holy Spirit Parish in
Glen Lyon and a member of the
American Legion.
Ralphwas a talentedartist whose
oil paintings have been sold
throughout the area. His family will
cherish the portraits he painted of
each of them. He was also an avid
gardener whose flowers and garden
were admired by the whole neigh-
borhood.
Ralph was preceded in death by a
sister, Evelyn Picylinski, and broth-
ers, Chester, Leroy and Howard
Lutz.
A devoted and caring husband,
father, grandfather and great grand-
father, Ralph is survived by his lov-
ing wife, the former Constance
“Connie” Samulevich. They were to
celebrate their 60th wedding anni-
versary on June 1, 2011.
Also surviving are daughters,
Deborah Okonieski and her hus-
band, Ralph; Rebecca Nash and her
husband, William; Suzette Lutz;
Barbara Farrall; Lisa Pashinski; Ja-
net Gowand her husband, Thomas,
Maria Naholnik and her husband,
Michael; sons, AndrewLutz and his
wife, Mary Jo, RalphLutz Jr. andhis
wife, Patricia. Also surviving are sis-
ters, Jean Augustine and Erma Wil-
son, brother, Edgar Lutz; and nu-
merous nieces and nephews. Ralph
was blessed with 16 grandchildren
and six great-grandchildren.
He will be sadly missed by all
who knew and loved him.
Private funeral services will
be held from the George A.
Strish Inc. Funeral Home, 211 West
Main Street, Glen Lyon. Private in-
terment will be held in St. Mary’s
Cemetery, Wanamie.
Ralph S. Lutz Sr.
April 21, 2011
R
oberta Ann “Bobbi Ann” Mor-
gan, age 68, of Bloomingdale,
passedawayFriday, April 22, 2011at
the Bonham Nursing Center, Still-
water (Huntington Twp.).
She was born December 6, 1942
in Wilkes-Barre, and was the daugh-
ter of Harriet Culver Morgan of
Bloomingdale and the late Stewart
R. Morgan.
Bobbi Ann graduated from Lake-
Lehman High School in 1960 and
was employed by the Pennsylvania
State Unemployment Offices in
Tunkhannock and Pittston. She re-
tired fromthe State Correctional In-
stitution at Dallas, where she
worked as a secretary.
She loved to crochet and shared
the many beautiful items that she
made with her family and friends.
She was also an avid race car fan.
She was known and loved by many
for her charmingly unforgettable
and unique personality.
Her daughter, Raedyne K. Mor-
gan, died in1993.
Surviving, in addition to her
mother, are her granddaughter Ga-
ryann Pollock and her husband,
James of Hunlock Creek; great-
granddaughters, Cheyenne and Da-
kota; brothers, Gary D. Morgan and
his wife, Kay of Fort Pierce, Fla., Er-
nie Morgan and his wife, Brenda, of
Bloomingdale, Craig Morgan and
his wife, Melissa, of Bloomingdale,
Daryl Morgan and his wife, Bernie,
of Hunlock Creek; sister Debra
Remley andher husband, Jay, of Cu-
pertino, Calif.
A memorial service will be held
inAugust at a timetobeannounced.
Interment will be in the Blooming-
dale Cemetery, Ross Township.Th-
ere will be no calling hours.
The family requests that memo-
rial contributions be sent to the
Bloomingdale Bible Church, 236 Si-
lo Road, Shickshinny, PA18655
Arrangements are by the Curtis
L. Swanson Funeral Home Inc., cor-
ner of routes 29 &118, Pikes Creek.
Roberta Morgan
April 22, 2011
Tough
“Ombre,” John
“Jake” Ray-
mond Rossick,
Chevalier,
crossed over
onApril 7, 2011
at the CT Hos-
pice, Branford,
Conn. following a courageous bat-
tle with cancer.
Born August 7, 1922, baptized
Ja `n Racik at Saint Anthony of Pa-
dua, Slovak Roman Catholic
Church, Jake was the eldest son of
George J. and Anna C. Jorda Ros-
sickof Larksville. Upongraduation
from Edwardsville High School in
1940, Jake was the proud recipient
of their 12 years of perfect attend-
ance medal. At 17, he entered the
U.S. C.C.C. Co. 2335 in Waynesbo-
ro, Pa., as the Assistant Education-
al Advisor. He then worked as a cy-
lindrical grinder operator at Auto-
matic Manufacturing Co., Bridge-
port, Conn.
From 1942 to 1945, Jake served
honorably as Sergeant, Squad
Leader &MP, and was the last sur-
viving original member of the
“Tough Ombres,” HQS & HQS
Co., K Company, 3rd Battalion,
358th Regiment, 90th Infantry Di-
vision, U.S. Army. Jake fought,
while combat wounded, from D-
Day landing on the shores of Utah
Beach, Normandie, through
Northern France, Ardennes, Belgi-
um, Rhineland & Czechoslovakia.
Jake received several citations and
numerous medals, including the
Purple Heart with Oak Leaf Clus-
ter, five Bronze Stars, one Bronze
Arrowhead, Presidential Citation,
and the French Croix de Guerre.
John was an engineer with Amer-
ican Steel & Wire in New Haven,
Conn. for 30 years. He served with
distinction as treasurer of Steel-
workers UnionLocal 2141. In1992, he
regretfully retiredafter10 years of be-
loved service with the U.S.P.S. of Ma-
dison, Conn. Jake was a member of
the American Legion Griswold Post
#79, the D.A.V. Commanders Club,
the V.F.W., the 90th Division Associ-
ation, the Association of Veterans of
the Battle of the Bulge and was a par-
ishioner at Our Lady of Pompeii R.C.
Church.
On October 21, 2010, Mr. Nicolas
Sarkozy, President of the French Re-
public, appointed John as a Chevalier
of the Ordre national de la Le‘gion
d‘honneur for which John was deco-
rated on November 11, 2010 in New
York City.
John was predeceased by his par-
ents, infant sister, nephew Joseph;
brothers, William P. and Joseph A.;
and sister-in-law, Phyllis (Ferrence).
Jake’s surviving family includes
Evelyn Narkoff Rossick; their daugh-
ters, Deborah (Stetson A. Jr. “Skip”)
Bray of North Branford and Carolyn
Rossick of East Haven; beloved
grandson Stetson A. Bray III of North
Branford and his buddies, brothers
George J. Jr. (Mary) of New Bright-
on, PA, & Michael T. (Agnes) of Ed-
wardsville, nieces and nephews.
John was laid to rest April 13,
2011withfull military honors at
the Connecticut Veterans Cemetery
in Middletown, Conn. The Keenan
Funeral Home, 330 Notch Hill Road,
North Branford, had care of the ar-
rangements.
Donations in “Jake’s” memory can
be made to CT Hospice, 100 Double
Beach Road, Branford, CT 06405.
Please share your condolences, me-
mories andphotos withhis family via
ToughOmbreJAKE@aol.com. A me-
morial service (details pending) cele-
brating his life will be held on August
7, 2011. Please sign the online guest-
book at Keenan’s website, www.kee-
nanfuneralhome.com
John Rossick
April 7, 2011
D
arl Smith, 78, a resident of
Swamp Road, Hunlock Creek,
passed away at his home Friday,
April 22, 2011.
He was born on May 25, 1932, in
Hunlock Creek, the son of the late
Clifford E. and Edna Benscoter
Smith.
Darl attended the Oakdale Unit-
edMethodist Churchandwas a 25-
year member of Sylvania Masonic
Lodge 354, F&AM, Shickshinny,
serving 13 years as treasurer.
Mr. Smith was the owner and
operator of an auto and truck ga-
rage in Hunlock Creek for 50 years
and was employed for nine years
on the maintenance staff at North-
west Area High Schol, Shickshin-
ny.
Surviving are his wife of 57
years, the former Iola Dodson;
daughters, Ruth Ann Gutenkunst
and husband, Rodney; Barbara
Griego and husband, Mark, all of
Hunlock Creek, and Janice Petri-
ga, Larksville; eight grandchil-
dren; and four great-grandchil-
dren.
Memorial services will be held
at a date and time to be an-
nounced.
The family wishes to thank Hos-
pice of the Sacred Heart for their
special care to Darl and also to his
caregiver Mary Lou Hines. Memo-
rial contributions may be made to
Hospice of the Sacred Heart, 600
Baltimore Drive, Wilkes-Barre, PA
18702.
Arrangements are by the Clarke
Piatt Funeral Home Inc., 6 Sunset
Lake Road, Hunlock Creek.
Darl Smith
April 22, 2011
Mary Ham-
lin Dougherty,
91, of Hughes-
town, died Fri-
day morning at
the home of
her daughter
Joyce Corco-
ran.
Born in Hughestown, she was
the daughter of the late Josephand
Anna (Roche) Hamlin.
Mary attended Hughestown
High School and was employed as
a Machine Operator for Pittston
Apparel until her retirement. Dur-
ing World War II, she aided in the
war effort by working as a finisher
in New Jersey for the Department
of Defense. She was a member of
Our Lady of the Eucharist Church,
Pittston, and formerly of Blessed
Sacrament Church, Hughestown.
She was preceded in death by
her husband of 49 years, Joseph
Dougherty, on May 23, 1993;
brother, Joseph Hamlin; sisters,
Madelyn Hurrey, Anna Boos and
Genevieve McDermott.
Surviving are her daughter Joyce
Corcoran and her husband, Ray-
mond, Harrisburg; grandsons, Jef-
frey Corcoran and his wife, Carlen,
Harrisburg, andSeanCorcoran, Her-
shey; great-grandsons, Aiden and
Liam; sisters, Kathryn Ratchford,
Duryea; Germaine McGuire, Dick-
son City, and Carol Hobbs, Jenkins
Township; nephews and nieces.
Funeral will be held Tuesday at
8:45 a.m. from the Corcoran Funeral
Home Inc., 20 S. Main St., Plains
Township, with a Mass of Christian
Burial at 9:30 a.m. inOur Lady of the
Eucharist Church, Pittston. Inter-
ment will be in Indiantown Gap Na-
tional Cemetery, Annville, Pa.
Friends may call Monday from 5
to 7 p.m.
The family requests that flowers
be omitted and memorial donations,
if desired, be made to St. Ann’s Bas-
ilica, 1229 Saint Ann Street, Scran-
ton, Pa 18504.
Online condolences may be made
at www.corcoranfuneralhome.com.
Mary Dougherty
April 22, 2011
MARGARET A. “GRAMMIE’’
LUTKOWSKI, 84, of Old Forge,
died Saturday, April 23, 2011, at
VNA Hospice at CMC . She was
the widowof the late Leonard Lut-
kowski whodiedJan. 12, 2010. Sur-
viving are a daughter, Lorraine A.
Holt and husband Robert, Old
Forge, twogranddaughters, Nicole
VanLuvender and husband Bruce,
Jessica Nemetz, Old Forge, four
great-grandchildren, Aiden Paul,
Avery Leonard, Olivia Ann VanLu-
vender, and Alexis Margaret
Tayoun.
The funeral will be Tuesday at
9:30 a.m. fromthe Louis V. Ciuccio
Funeral Home, 145 Moosic Road,
Old Forge, followed by a 10 a.m.
Mass at thePrinceof PeaceParish-
St. Mary’s Church, West Grace and
Lawrence streets, Old Forge.
Friends may call Monday from5 to
8 p.m.
M
illie B. Cumbo, 93, of West Pitt-
ston, passed away peacefully
on Saturday morning, April 23,
2011, inthe lovingcare of her daugh-
ter and at her home in Harding.
Born in Pittston, on October 8,
1917, she was the daughter of the
late Salvatore and Josephine Bur-
gio.
She was a graduate of Pittston
High School and was employed in
the local garment industry. She was
a member of Corpus Christi Parish,
Immaculate Conception Church,
West Pittston, and its Altar and Ros-
ary Society and the Morning Prayer
Group. She was also a member of
the ILGWU.
She was a loving and devoted
mother, grandmother and great-
grandmother. Her passion was her
family and cooking.
She was preceded in death by her
husband, Michael Cumbo; son-in-
law, JosephVavrek; brothers, David,
Angelo, Joseph, Michael and Leo-
nard; sisters, Rose, Mary, Lena,
Connie and Nina.
Surviving are her daughter, Phyl-
lis Vavrek, Harding; son, Pat Cumbo
and his wife, Joyce, Virginia; grand-
children, Pat Cumbo, Gina Wind-
ham, Sam Cumbo, Joseph Vavrek,
Michele Ondish and Michael Vav-
rek; great-grandchildren, Devan,
Rachel, James, Joseph, Matthew,
Diane, Andrew, Nicholas, Jacob,
Haley and Alexa; numerous nieces
and nephews.
The family would like to thank
Hospice Community Care for the
exceptional care they provided to
Millie.
Funeral services will be Tues-
day, April 26, 2011, at 9:30 a.m. from
the Peter J. AdonizioFuneral Home,
802 Susquehanna Avenue, West
Pittston, with a Mass of Christian
Burial at 10 a.m. in Corpus Christi
Parish, Immaculate Conception
Church, Luzerne Avenue, West Pitt-
ston. Interment will be in Mt.Olivet
Cemetery, Carverton. Friends may
call Tuesdayfrom8a.m. to9:30a.m.
at the funeral home. On-line condo-
lences may be made at www.peter-
jadoniziofuneralhome.com.
Millie B. Cumbo
April 23, 2011
WASHINGTON—Hazel Dick-
ens, a folk singer and bluegrass
musician who advocated for coal
miners, has died at age 75.
Dickens died Friday morning
at a Washington hospice of com-
plications from pneumonia. Her
death was confirmed by Ken Ir-
win, a founder of Rounder Re-
cords, her label for about 40
years.
Dickens, a vocalist and double-
bassist, became a fixture in the
bluegrass circuit in the1960s and
1970s with her musical partner,
Alice Gerrard. The duo perform-
ed as Hazel & Alice and released
several albums, emerging as
some of the earliest prominent
women in bluegrass and paving
the way for other female folk
singers.
Dickens’s music was later fea-
tured in "Harlan County, USA,"
Barbara Kopple’s1976 Oscar-win-
ning documentary about Ken-
tucky coal miners.
"She cared a great deal for
working people and the down-
trodden and wrote about issues
that generally were not ad-
dressed in bluegrass or country,"
Irwin said.
Among her honors was a 2008
induction into the West Virginia
Music Hall of Fame and a Nation-
al Heritage Fellowship from the
National Endowment for the
Arts.
Singer
and coal
advocate
is dead
The Associated Press
C M Y K
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tims Unit and Luzerne County
Child Advocacy Center, on Ha-
nover Street in Wilkes-Barre,
have handled since the center’s
opening in August.
“These children are going
through a trauma that can affect
them for the rest of their lives,”
District Attorney Jackie Musto
Carroll said. “At first, the center
was handling cases four days a
week … now the center is func-
tioning five days a week. That
solidified the (Special Victims)
unit.”
SVU formation
In the 1980s as an assistant
district attorney, Musto Carroll
prosecuted sexual assault cases,
and when she became district
attorney in 2008, she had a
dream to form a specialized
unit, and eventually a center, to
handle each case.
The district attorney’s office
has always had a special group
that handled sexual assault
cases, she said, and any crime
committed against children for
the past 20 years.
Musto Carroll decided to
make the group official, and
now calls four detectives, five
assistant district attorneys and
two victims/witness members
the Special Victims Unit, who
primarily utilize the Child Ad-
vocacy Center to investigate
cases.
“There was a stigma before
about coming forward to pro-
tect the children,” Musto Car-
roll said. “There is more of an
awareness now. There are expe-
rienced professionals in the
county that can handle cases
and treat children with the care
they should be treated with.”
“I wanted to be part of a
team, a collaborative effort,
where we could provide essen-
tial services to victims of abuse
and their families….” said Bri-
gid Casey-Godfrey, a member of
the SVU and victims/witness
worker. “We provide support to
victims and their families, help-
ing guide them through a very
emotional, difficult time.”
Assistant District Attorney
Jenny Roberts said when she
began working in the DA’s of-
fice, she requested to prosecute
special victim cases.
“I find this area of prosecu-
tion, although at times heart-
ing-wrenching and stressful, to
be highly fulfilling,” Roberts
said. “…I specifically requested
to prosecute special victim
cases with hopes of making a
small difference in the lives of
child abuse victims.”
Safe place for children
The Child Advocacy Center
opened on Aug. 12 at its present
location in Wilkes-Barre with
the expectation of providing a
friendly, safe and non-threaten-
ing place where children could
tell their stories.
“What bothered me the most,
was that children were being
interviewed at a police station,”
Musto Carroll said. “It’s so
scary for a child to begin with.
Then they have to go to the
hospital (for instance) or the
DA’s office. The center is a very
child-friendly atmosphere. It’s
quiet, not intimidating, and yet,
not a circus.”
At first the center was oper-
ating four days a week, but with
an increase in cases, the center
now runs five days a week,
where the SVU and Children
and Youth services evaluate
cases and decide how to prose-
cute them, if they are prose-
cuted.
Detectives investigate and in-
terview witnesses and review
any evidence in each specific
case, whether it be cell phone
records or computer hard drive.
Assistant district attorneys
will then handle legal issues,
and are involved from the pre-
liminary hearing through a trial,
if necessary, Musto Carroll said.
“The center is a non-threat-
ening, comfortable environment
where victims and their families
can feel safe while being inter-
viewed by a team of profession-
als, eliminating the need for
multiple interviews with multi-
ple agencies,” Casey-Godfrey
said. “Consequently, there is a
reduction of stress and re-victi-
mization.”
Assistant District Attorney
Molly Hanlon Mirabito, she
said no two cases are ali-
ke.“…These are not just cases,
they are lives. For each person
walking thorough those doors,
whether as a victim or a family
member, this is the most devas-
tating and life-altering experi-
ence of these young lives,” Mi-
rabito said. “It is our hope, in
some small way, the unit’s in-
volvement helps them on the
path to recovery.”
Road to recovery
That path to recovery begins
with reporting a crime, contin-
ues with interviews and ends
with either the case being
brought to trial, a guilty plea
being entered or charges drop-
ped.
Musto Carroll said that not
all cases brought to the unit’s
attention are prosecuted. Some
are hard to go through with, are
fragile and require a lot of work.
Sometimes there is not
enough evidence or the age of
the victim is a factor. Some-
times there is a not guilty ver-
dict in a case.
“But, the unit is always fair
and if a case cannot be made,
it’s dropped,” Musto Carroll
said.
A Hanover Township man
was recently arraigned on
charges he raped a pre-teen, an-
other was recently found guilty
for sexually assaulting a teen
for a two-year period. A Nanti-
coke man was acquitted on
charges of raping an 11-year-old.
The center has come a long
way, Musto Carroll said, and
hopes that the center becomes
a model for other counties to
follow.
But, the more cases the cen-
ter sees, the more help the SVU
will need.
Musto Carroll said she is
looking for grants to obtain a
forensic interviewer, because
right now the center is utilizing
Children and Youth and law en-
forcement to do interviews.
The district attorney would
also like to use that funding to
get a staff secretary, since the
DA’s office is manning the cen-
ter, filing and scheduling every-
thing.
“The center has not cost the
county any money,” Musto Car-
roll said, citing the $1 a year for
rent the office pays to use the
building, which is a home built
in 1896 owned by Geisinger
Health Systems.
“I believe that the Luzerne
County Children’s Advocacy
Center is fast becoming a mod-
el for others in the common-
wealth to follow,” Mirabito said.
“I am very proud to be a part of
this process. I am confident that
our center will continue to uti-
lize the most up-to-date re-
sources available to assist our
most vulnerable victims.”
VICTIMS
Continued from Page 3A
DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER
The Child Advocacy Center opened on Aug. 12 at its present loca-
tion in Wilkes-Barre.
eight years, pointed to the smiling
children as the main reason for his
involvement.
Easter egg hunt chairman and
organizer Bob Delescavage point-
ed to the same reason for some of
his motivation.
The lifelong resident originally
helped with organizing when his
children were young. In 1964, he
was asked to be the chairman, a
post whichhe still holds.
Theevent isadrawfor manylife-
long residents of Wilkes-Barre
Township. Judge Tina Polachek
Gartley, who sponsored one of the
bicycles raffled off, actually served
as the Easter Bunny in1980.
Former Coughlin High School
basketball coach and current
Wilkes-Barre Area School Board
candidate John Quinn, who also
sponsored a bicycle, reminisced
about his youth when the Easter
egg hunt was held at what was for-
merly the Settlement House Field.
“You had to work pretty hard to
make sure you were coming home
with something back then,” Quinn
said. “This is a great event. We’ve
always taken care of the kids up
here.”
Afterthefestivities, Delescavage
and several organizers joined the
Easter Bunny on a trip to visit sev-
eral homebound people who were
never able to attendthe hunt.
Around 10 disabled persons,
ranging in age from 19 through
their 80s, are visited by township
officials because, “we’ve never for-
gotten about them,” Delescavage
pointedout.
Nineteen-year-old Sara Knapko
has been sightless since birth. She
has, however, been visited by De-
lescavageandtheEaster Bunnyfor
every Easter weekendof her life.
“I loveEaster,” shesaid. “But not
GoodFriday. It’s too sad.”
Sara, whois alsovisitedbytown-
shipofficials withSanta Claus dur-
ing the Christmas season, looks
forwardtoher visit eachyear asthe
highlight of the holiday weekend.
Sponsors of the Wilkes-Barre
Township Easter Egg Hunt in-
clude: Wilkes-Barre Township
American Legion Post 8154, Sons
of the American Legion, Friars
Club, Georgetown Conservation
Club, Wilkes-Barre Township Li-
ons Club, Warsaw Sportsmen’s
Club, Wilkes-Barre Township Rod
and Gun Club and Wilkes-Barre
Township Volunteer Fire Depart-
ment.
EGG
Continued from Page 3A
NIKO J. KALLIANIOTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Luzerne County Judge
William Amesbury sits on
a bike he donated for the
Easter egg hunt, Saturday
at the Wilkes-Barre Town-
ship Fire Hall. Announcing
the winner of the bike at
left is Robert Delescavage,
Easter egg hunt chairman
and organizer. Forty bi-
cyles were raffled off as
part of the Easter egg hunt
activities in Wilkes-Barre
Township, which 150 chil-
dren and their families
attended. The event is
usually held outside, but
was forced inside by rain.
needs of all ages gathered
eggs, met the Easter bunny,
played games, danced and,
perhaps most importantly,
socialized.
The kids helped one an-
other gather eggs, and min-
gled, played and danced the
Hokey-Pokey with members
of the West Side All Stars
Cheer and Dance group who
don’t have special needs.
Logan Foundation founder
Gina Masters said her 8-
year-old son Logan, who suf-
fers from a chromosomal
disorder known as Smith
Magenis syndrome that af-
fects his mobility and behav-
ior, benefits from the “social-
ization, and just the sense of
community that the kids
with special needs don’t al-
ways get,” that the event
provides.
Masters and her husband
Gary, of Dallas, started The
Logan Foundation four years
ago to give their son and
others like him increased op-
portunities to socialize and
play in a comfortable, family
environment.
Gina Masters also had the
idea to host an Easter egg
hunt four years ago, after
she felt Logan was pushed to
the side at another event.
She bought 400 eggs and put
the event together in a week.
Four years later, the event
had grown to 1,000 eggs
with sponsors, prizes, music
and performances by the
West Side All Stars Cheer
and Dance and their special-
needs group Guided Stars.
“It’s great to have an event
for the kids with special
needs,” said Paula Jump, of
Plains Township, whose son
T.J. is affected by the same
syndrome as Logan Masters.
“So many times at a tradi-
tional Easter egg hunt they
would be in the background
and not get to participate.”
T.J. mostly watched this
year’s hunt from the side-
lines, but said he had a great
time. His favorite part?
Watching the cheerleaders.
SPECIAL
Continued from Page 3A
C M Y K
PAGE 12A SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ N E W S
2
8
4
2
1
3
2
8
4
2
4
1
mostly construction. None of
them are county employees. He
also has experience dealing with
pensions and labor issues and
serves as a trustee for the Heavy
Highway Health Pension, Ap-
prenticeship andAnnuity Plans.
“I have a lot of experience with
contracts and everyday running
of these different types of busi-
nesses,” Padavansaid.
He opposes privatization and
outsourcing of county govern-
ment work but said he has no
problemmaking workers “work a
little harder” if warranted.
“I think we can build our work-
force here if we make sure that ev-
erybody has to earn their job, ev-
erybodyhastodotheirjob,”Pada-
van said. “They have to earn the
taxpayers’ trust, and I’ll do what-
ever has to be done to make that
LuzerneCountyCouncil candi-
date Joseph Padavan makes it
clear that he’s all for preserving
jobsincountygovernment, buthe
also says he’ll do what’s best for
taxpayers.
“I’m not an ex-
pert, never been a
politician, but I’m
willingsit downand
work on anything
that wecansothewedon’t haveto
raise taxes and don’t hurt the el-
derly,” the Bear Creek Township
resident recently told a Times
Leader endorsement panel.
“My father’s 85 and lives in
Pringle Hill. It’s hard for people,”
saidPadavan, whohas beenpresi-
dent of the United Steel Workers
of America Local 11458 for more
than a decade. “I’m not going to
hurt the taxpayers, so I’ll make
thedecisionsthatIneedtomake.”
Padavan, who is running on a
Democratic union slate with 10
others, said he believes there’s
plenty of “wasteful” spending
that couldbecut tohelpthecoun-
ty financially.
For example, Padavan said
there may be room for spending
reductions in the county court
system. He also wants to bring
more county offices under the
same roof.
“Why do we have to have so
many different buildings with
separate rent? I think there’s a lot
of money goingout inrent andin-
surance. Let’s bring it together,”
Padavansaid.
Padavan said he represents
about 1,200 workers in his union,
happen.”
Padavan said he wants to make
sure the county workforce is “sol-
id” and that jobs are “secure,” but
he stressed that he will represent
all county residents.
“I livedinthis countymywhole
life. I knowwe’re in trouble finan-
cially, andthere’salot of toughde-
cisions that need to be made,” he
said.
Padavan said he supported
home rule because he thought a
changeinstructurecouldhelpthe
county in light of the federal cor-
ruptionprobe arrests.
Padavan looks at spending cuts
CLARK VAN ORDEN/THE TIMES LEADER
Age: 58
Political party: Democrat
Residence: Bear Creek Township
Education: Attended Luzerne
County Community College.
Work experience: Construction
worker, crane and heavy equip-
ment operator, Occupational Safe-
ty and Health Administration
trainer, hazardous materials train-
er, president of the United Steel
Workers of America Local 11458,
since 2001.
Family: Married to Maureen (Ca-
saia); two children, David and
Lindsay; two grandchildren.
J OS E PH M.
PADAVAN
By JENNIFER LEARN-ANDES
jandes@timesleader.com
er.”
“Unions are vital to the county,
but I also think they have to give
like everybody else,” he said.
Rovinski has experience work-
ing for the county as an assistant
county recreation director for 10
years in the 1980s. He said he had
been stationed in the county
throughthe federallyfundedCom-
prehensive Employment and
Training Act and became unem-
ployed when the programwas cut.
The county administrationoffered
him the opportunity to interview
for the assistant recreation direc-
tor job, and he did not knowif that
job was publicly advertised.
Rovinski said he voted for home
rule and believes the new county
manager should have common
sense and experience running a
business or government. He said
county levels is “too big,” he said.
“There’s a lot of people that are
extra in offices that don’t do their
work. There’s only certain people
incertainoffices that do work, and
I think you’ve got to look at that,”
Rovinski said.
He wouldn’t immediately elimi-
nate positions or resort to layoffs,
saying he’d consider cutting posi-
tions as workers leave or retire.
Rovinski said he would support
the completion of “desk audits” in
the county, inwhichthe humanre-
sources department assesses the
job duties of each worker to deter-
mine which employees are hand-
ling sufficient workloads.
Unioncontracts alsomust be as-
sessed said Rovinski, noting that
he had “no problem” with a three-
year freeze on his salary with the
state because he was a “teamplay-
Luzerne County Council candi-
date Thomas Rovinski said he
wouldtry to change public percep-
tion about politicians if he’s elect-
ed.
“People are
soured about politic-
ians,” theDallasman
recentlytoldaTimes
Leader endorsement
panel. “That’s a sad
thing because we did have a lot of
trust in our politicians at one
time.”
Rovinski has no experience in
publicofficeanddecidedtorunbe-
cause he recently retired after 20
years as a Pennsylvania Depart-
ment of Corrections activities
manager.
Government at the state and
he would not rule out qualified lo-
cal candidates andsaidthe manag-
er’s responsibilities will be “daunt-
ing.”
“I think it’s going to be a hard
search to find someone who’s go-
ingtobequalifiedenoughtodothe
whole thing,” he said.
Thepublicwouldbeheardif he’s
elected, he said.
“I’m a good listener, and one of
thethingsthat wehaveI thinkwith
the political realm is that people
look at you, but they don’t listen,”
Rovinski said.
Rovinski hopes to restore faith
CLARK VAN ORDEN/THE TIMES LEADER
Age: 62
Political party: Democrat
Residence: Dallas
Education: Bachelor’s degree in
business administration manage-
ment and industrial relations, with
a minor in marketing, Wilkes Col-
lege (now university).
Work experience: Served four
years in the Coast Guard 1970-
1974; 1977-1980, sales representa-
tive; 1980-1989, Luzerne County
Assistant Recreation Director;
1990-2010, Pennsylvania Depart-
ment of Corrections, activities
manager.
Family: Single
T HOMAS
ROVI NS KI
By JENNIFER LEARN-ANDES
jandes@timesleader.com
DETROIT — Shocked and
outraged, the Rev. Terry Jones
said he intends to return to
Dearborn, Mich., this week to
protest outside City Hall
against the denial of his First
Amendment rights.
The Quran-burning pastor
from Florida was briefly hand-
cuffed and jailed by Dearborn
police Friday after a trial stem-
ming from an unusual com-
plaint filed by Wayne County
prosecutors.
“It was a total violation of
our Constitutional rights,”
Jones told the Free Press Sat-
urday in an interview from De-
troit Metro airport, where he
waited for a flight back to Flor-
ida. “It was a mockery of the ju-
dicial process.”
Earlier, Jones saidhe was go-
ing to rally at a Dearborn
mosque.
Jones said he changed his
mind about going to the
mosque because of potential li-
tigation.
Jones also saidhe’s consider-
ing filing a lawsuit against
Wayne County and Dearborn
authorities and he plans to ral-
ly at 5 p.m. Friday. County
prosecutors had filed a com-
plaint to make Jones stay away
fromthe mosque for a planned
rally because they saidit would
breach the peace. A jury sided
Friday with prosecutors and
Jones was led to jail.
“I was shocked,” Jones said.
“I was horrified.”
He’s concerned about a sys-
tem where “you arrest people
who have committed absolute-
ly no crimes.”
Dearborn Mayor John
O’Reilly Jr. saidlate Friday that
the city respects the constitu-
tion but said the right to free
speech can’t interfere with
public safety and the rights of
others. He said the city had se-
rious concerns about public
safety, which is why they did
not want him to protest at the
mosque.
Minister
raps ban
on protest
The Rev. Terry Jones
recently made headlines for
burning copies of the Quran.
By NIRAJ WARIKOO
Detroit Free Press
C M Y K
PAGE 14A SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ N E W S
risburg’s liveliest debates this
spring.
Nearly every Democrat, a ma-
jority of Republican senators and
at least a dozen House Republi-
cans are expected to support
some type of tax or fee on the
booming natural gas industry.
That makes it seem that some-
thing might actually pass, more
than two years after then-Gov. Ed
Rendell raised the prospect of a
tax.
Still, the debate is likely to ex-
pose divides, especially among
Republicans.
For instance, some Republi-
cans, particularly in moderate
southeastern Pennsylvania
where there is no drilling, want
natural gas money to help under-
write the state’s environmental
protection, cleanup and enforce-
ment efforts. But other GOP
members want the money to re-
main in drilling communities,
and some oppose a tax or fee out-
right.
"In my area, you have all of the
anxiety (over drilling pollution)
and very little of the benefit and
that makes for a difficult situa-
tion in the Republican caucus,"
Harper said.
It also seems clear that any tax
or fee that passes would have a
lighter touch on the wallets of
major international energy com-
panies, including Chevron Corp.
and Exxon Mobil Corp., than in
most other states. Right now,
Pennsylvania is the nation’s large-
st natural gas-producing state
that does not tax the activity.
One big unknown is whether
House Republican leaders will al-
lowa floor vote on such a propos-
al.
"Right now, our goal is an on-
time, no-tax budget," said Steve
Miskin, a spokesman for House
Speaker Sam Smith, R-Jefferson,
and House Majority Leader Mike
Turzai, R-Allegheny. "We’re not
looking at any newtaxes or fees."
Miskin acknowledged that a
number of House Republicans
are interested in a tax or fee.
"But if it means Harrisburgdol-
ing it out one way or another,
there are concerns," he said.
Another unknown is whether
Gov. Tom Corbett would even
sign a bill that taps natural gas
money to pay for anything more
than a locally managed program
that addresses the cost of dam-
aged roads or contaminated wa-
ter.
Efforts to impose a tax or fee to
help statewide environmental
causes may hit a brick wall if Cor-
bett insists that, in keeping with
his campaign pledge not to raise
taxes or fees, none of the natural
gas revenue may migrate to Har-
risburg.
He has said that he will listen
to proposals for a local impact
fee, and otherwise is letting the
discussion happen in the Legisla-
ture and on a task force he ap-
pointedtoassess a range of shale-
related issues.
"I believe that people are all
over the board on what (a local
impact fee) means," Corbett said
Thursday. "But in my mind, you
donot bringthe money toHarris-
burg."
Sen. Charles McIlhinney, R-
Bucks, is a co-sponsor of a bill in-
troduced by Democratic Sen.
John Yudichak of Luzerne Coun-
ty, saying it is a fee-based ap-
proach that he believes should
meet muster with the governor
because it pays for the state’s
costs to deal with natural gas-re-
lated damage and regulation that
otherwise is borne, in part, by
taxpayers in his district.
"Why is my constituents’ tax
dollar paying for cleanups in
Cambria County or Tioga Coun-
ty?" McIlhinney questioned. "I’m
not saying take tax money out of
there and send it to other places
in the state, but we should tax it
there and make it pay for the
damage it causes."
Yudichak’s bill would assess a
severance tax of 2 percent on the
shale gas, rising to5 percent after
three years.
Four bills introducedby Demo-
crats — two in the House, two in
the Senate — would assess high-
er tax rates, making them less
likely to win support. Another
bill, introduced by Republican
Sen. Gene Yaw of Lycoming
County, would allow property
taxes to be assessed on the value
of Marcellus Shale wells, as it is
on coal and limestone.
Scarnati is revealing little de-
tail about his bill. Harper’s bill
would divide money mainly be-
tween education, environmental
causes and drilling communities.
It would assess a severance tax of
1.5 percent for five years, before
rising to 5 percent.
"Everybody wants fair taxation
and everybody understands that
if you let one group off, some-
body else has to pick it up," she
said. "The industry, by the way, is
paying this tax in every other
state and I think they’re expect-
ing it" in Pennsylvania.
She acknowledged that her bill
would carry a lower tax rate than
some of her allies want, but she
said she crafted it that way to gar-
ner a veto-proof majority should
Corbett try to reject it. And if
House Republican leaders refuse
to hold a floor vote on it, she said
she will trytoworkwithanallyto
attach it as an amendment to an-
other bill.
"I’ve beeninthe Legislature for
11 years," Harper said. "One
thing you learn is there is more
than one way to get to a goal."
TAX
Continued from Page 1A
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Drilling specialists perform operations on the Salansky 1H gas
well in Lake Township Tuesday night to prepare for hydraulic frac-
turing later this week.
Kelleher, of Dallas Township,
is among dozens of candidates
seeking countywide political of-
fices who have turned to Face-
book, the popular social network-
ing site on the Internet, to reach
out to voters.
Each of the 16 judicial candi-
dates andat least 23of the 49can-
didates for Luzerne County
council has a page or group on
Facebook, according to a scan of
the site recently con-
ducted by a reporter.
The amount of infor-
mation on the sites va-
ries greatly, with some
candidates having nu-
merous posts andvideos,
while others have per-
sonal information, but
little to no information
about their candidacy.
Electioneering tool
Ed Mitchell, a local po-
litical consultant, said it
would behoove those
who are not actively us-
ing the sites to get on
board.
Facebook and other
similar sites, such as YouTube,
which allows users to post vid-
eos, and Twitter, which allows
users to send text messages to
thousands of cell phones simulta-
neously, are changing the face of
elections both nationally and lo-
cally, Mitchell said.
“Social media is probably go-
ing to be, by the next election in
2012, the equivalent to direct
mail, and almost as important as
television in communicating
with voters,” said Mitchell, who
represents judicial candidate Mi-
chael Vough. “It’s a burgeoning
field of communication and peo-
ple who do it well will reap great
benefits.”
Facebook, whichallows people
worldwide toinstantly communi-
cate andshare photos andvideos,
has been particularly beneficial
for politicians because it lets
them quickly communicate with
a limitless base of voters.
“It gives youthe opportunityto
reach out to a lot of voters you
might otherwise not be able to
meet personally,” said judicial
candidate Molly Han-
lon Mirabito. “It really
complements the per-
sonal contact you have
and gives people the op-
portunity to learn more
about you.”
Christian Wenzel of
Old Forge, an Internet
advertising consultant,
likened Facebook posts
to putting a sign in your
yard announcing your
support for a particular
candidate – except it’s
seen by hundreds or
thousands of people,
not just those drivingby
your house.
“Facebookis all about
word of mouth. It’s a place you
can go to communicate with
friends and see what interests
they have with you,” he said.
“They will look at that and say
‘What does my friend see in that
candidate?’ Maybe I should
check them out.”
Wenzel has been hired by sev-
eral candidates, including judi-
cial candidate Lesa Gelb, to man-
age their Facebook pages. He’s
continuallyupdatingGelb’s page,
posting messages about meet-
and-greets as well as photos and
videos of events she’s attended.
‘Friends’ redefined
Users of Facebook connect
with each other by becoming
“friends.” They express approval
about posts each other make by
hitting a “like” tab.
That’s key information for po-
litical candidates because it lets
them know if their constituents
approve of their message.
“What we’re trying to do is
turn ‘likes’ into votes,” said Joe
Florencio, a computer/Internet
consultant and friend of Kelleh-
er’s who is helping to update his
page.
Kelleher has been getting a
crash course in “Facebookology”
from Florencio and several teen-
agers from his church, including
15-year-old Taylor Hodle, who
boasts of having 1,039 Facebook
friends.
On Friday afternoon, Hodle
was showing Kelleher, who just
recently started his page, how
quickly his number of friends,
then a paltry 78, could com-
pound exponentially in a short
time.
“There are a lot of people at
our church on Facebook,” Hodle
said.
“That’s great. If I hit 40 people,
and they go to 10 people, then
they goto10 people, we couldget
thousands,” he said.
Like many of the other candi-
dates, Kelleher also has a sepa-
rate website that details his
views. That’s important, but re-
search has shown that social net-
working sites are more effective
in reaching and influencing vot-
ers, said Dr. Paul Haridakis, a
professor of communications
studies at Kent State University
in Ohio.
Haridakis studied the impact
of social networking sites on the
2008 general election. President
Barack Obama’s astute use of the
sites is credited with helping him
win the election, he said.
Haridakis saidthe sites are cru-
cial to candidates because re-
search has also shown that voters
are most influenced by opinions
of people within their social cir-
cles.
“The average person is not go-
ingtogoout of their way tovisit a
candidate’s website, but they will
discuss politics on a social media
site and may be influenced that
way,” Haridakis said.
Free exposure
The sites also have one other
major benefit: They’re free.
That’s been a campaign saver
for judicial candidate Vito DeLu-
ca, who said his campaign is be-
ing financed mostly by himself
and his family.
“It’s really important for me to
use some of the most inexpensive
ways to get my message out,” he
said.
DeLuca said Facebook has
been effective for him. He noted
he had more than 150 people at
his announcement. Nearly all of
them were contacted via Face-
book or e-mail.
Judicial candidate Dick
Hughes said he can also attest to
the draw of social networking.
Hughes ran for judge in 2009.
He said he’s seen a dramatic in-
crease in the number of hits on
his website and “friends” on his
Facebook page compared to the
last election.
“It’s becoming more important
every year,” Hughes said.
He and the other candidates
stress they’re not forgoing other
traditional forms of campaign-
ing, however.
“Getting out into the commu-
nity andgoingdoor todoor is cer-
tainly the key,” said Susan Kole-
sar of Artemis Media Group, who
is working for Gelb’s campaign.
“What makes it work is the syn-
ergy of using multiple media
forms. It’s a combination of all
that.”
SOCIAL
Continued from Page 1A
S. JOHN WILKIN/THE TIMES LEADER
Christian Wenzel, Internet advertising consultant, is helping several political candidates create and
update their presence on Internet-based social networking sites such as Facebook and Twitter. More
candidates are utilizing social media to get their messages out to voters.
“It’s a bur-
geoning
field of
communi-
cation and
people who
do it well
will reap
great ben-
efits.”
Michael Vough
Judge candidate
FORT PIERCE, Fla. — Dono-
van the chimp transformed from
a friendly ape who "adapts well
to peers" to one who beat his fe-
male cage-mate so aggressively
they had to be separated.
Lira became a "chronic hair
plucker," with large barren patch-
es on her body.
Bobby bit and mutilated his
own arm, leaving permanent
scars. He was so depressed that
he slept sitting up, facing the wall
of his cage.
The debate about medical test-
ing on chimpanzees often revolv-
es around the physical impact on
the chimps —week after week of
liver biopsies or year after year of
being infected with HIV or hepa-
titis.
But an examination by
McClatchy Newspapers of the
chimp-research world found
that, inadditionto a physical toll,
the testing life can have a signif-
icant impact on a chimp’s mental
state.
For the roughly 180 chimpan-
zees that live at the Alamogordo
Primate Facility, on an Air Force
base in NewMexico, the world of
research looms large: For the
past 10 years, they’ve been kept
out of research; nowthe National
Institutes of Health is trying to
move them to a research facility
in Texas, where they’d be used in
studies on hepatitis and possibly
other ailments.
The science of chimp research
is dicey. The United States is vir-
tually alone inthe worldinpursu-
ing it, and many scientists say
the chimps’ value as a medical
model is declining. Chimps are
among humans’ closest genetic
cousins, and given their range of
emotions and their level of un-
derstanding, researchers them-
selves afford chimps special pro-
tections that other research ani-
mals don’t get, even monkeys.
According to the National Re-
search Council, the public "ex-
pects a high level of respect for
the animals," given the "special
connection of chimpanzees to
humans."
For the chimps, research can
be lonely and debilitating; some
end up with mental ailments in-
cluding post-traumatic stress dis-
order or depression. Sometimes
the symptoms will ease once the
testing ends, but sometimes they
stick with a chimp for life.
"Chimpanzees depend on
close physical contact. They love
their comforts, andlike to stretch
out on a nice soft bed of grass.
They make their own choices all
the time," famed chimp research-
er Jane Goodall said. "None of
these things can in any possible
way be experienced by a labora-
tory chimp. I’ve been in quite a
lot of medical research labs, and
the truth is I wish I hadn’t, be-
cause they haunt me."
The researchers who handle
the chimps disagree. They say
the chimps are treated well and
humanely, oversight panels en-
sure that only necessary research
is performed on them, and
they’re given space to move and
play.
John VandeBerg, who oversees
the primate facility at the Texas
Biomedical Research Institute,
said the chimps were treated
compassionately and that life in
the lab was good.
The chimps, he said, even have
televisions. They like to watch
animal movies.
The effort to understand the
chimps’ minds has grown in the
past decade. One chimp who
helped illustrate the impact of re-
search was Billy; his story was
chronicled in the medical journal
Developmental Psychology in
2009.
Raised as an entertainer —
working the birthday party cir-
cuit — Billy lived compatibly
with humans and had a strong
bond with his owners before he
was given over to researchers at
age 15.
At a chimp lab in NewYork, he
was caged alone, except when
paired with Sue Ellen for breed-
ing; he attacked her instead. For
14 years, he was used for research
into hepatitis, HIV, measles and
polio. During that time, he turn-
ed hostile, uncooperative, ag-
gressive and depressive; he
wouldn’t interact normally with
other chimps.
Even when he left the lab for
retirement at a sanctuary, Billy
remained fearful and agitated.
He screamed if the door to his
cage was left open, and he
couldn’t go to sleep until he him-
self had tested that the door was
locked.
Billy had an impressive memo-
ry andhe interactedwell withhu-
mans, even mimicking them at
times, by spooning cream and
sugar into his coffee, for exam-
ple.
One day, Billy became excited
while he was watching televi-
sion. He gestured wildly for the
facility director to come look. On
the TVscreen: Goodall. Billy had
met her years before. The direc-
tor turned up the TV volume,
and Billy sat to watch the pro-
gram.
Many of the animals in New
Mexico saw the same kinds of
changes in their personalities
that Billy did.
Their stories emerge from
medical records that an advocacy
group, InDefense of Animals, un-
earthed after a lengthy legal fight
with the NIH. The records were
provided to McClatchy with no
strings attached, for review.
"I think everybody recognizes
that if we hadanalternative mod-
el we would be using it," said Sal-
ly Rockey, a deputy director at
the NIH who oversees animal
testing. "Since it is the only mod-
el we have now, it’s crucial that
we continue."
Many scientists disagree, say-
ing the knowledge once gained
only by examining a live animal
now can be learned in a petri
dish, and that chimpanzees don’t
work as human fill-ins, as once
had been hoped.
Some chimps never recover from research stress
MCT PHOTO
Sanctuary director of communications Triana Romero, right, talks
to from left, Millie, Scarlett and Thoto, outside Ft. Pierce, Fla.
Testing can have a significant
impact on a chimp’s mental
state, investigation shows.
By CHRIS ADAMS
McClatchy Newspapers
C M Y K
SPORTS S E C T I O N C
THE TIMES LEADER SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2011
timesleader.com
WILKES-BARRE TWP. – The
Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Penguins
needed to break a trend if they
wanted to advance to the second
round of the Calder Cup playoffs
on Saturday.
Duringthefirst fivegames of the
series against the Norfolk Admi-
rals, the road team won each
game. That workedout well for the
Penguins, who won the last three
in Norfolk. But the pattern needed
to change in Game 6 at the Mohe-
gan Sun Arena.
“We didn’t have much of a
choice,’’ said center Zach Sill. “We
knewwe had to get one at home if
we wanted to win the series.”
Steve Wagner made sure the
Penguins did just that.
Thanks to Wagner’s first-period
natural hat trick and Joe Vitale’s
one-timer in the third period, the
Penguins won Game 6, at home,
bya scoreof 6-3andeliminatedthe
Admirals. The Penguins will face
the winner of the Hershey-Char-
lotte series in the second round.
The series clincher completed a
dramatic turnaround for the Pen-
guins, who dropped the first two
games at home and won the next
three on the road.
“We took it in stride and got bet-
ter as theseries went on,” saidPen-
guins head coach John Hynes. “I
knew with the type of guys we
have in the room that we’d make a
push.”
Wagner’s first goal at 2:13 came
after he blasted a slap shot from
the point through traffic in front
and beat Norfolk goaltender Dust-
in Tokarski.
So did his second, at 3:38, to put
the Penguins up 2-0 and give them
a 2-for-2 start on the power play.
Wagner completed his natural
hat trick with less than two min-
utes left inthe first periodwhenhe
once again ripped a slap shot from
the point.
“I went back to the bench think-
ing I only had five goals all year
and nowI got three in one period,”
Wagner said. “I’ll take it.”
C A L D E R C U P P L AYO F F S
Pens come home, oust Ads
TOMVENESKY
tvenesky@timesleader.com
See PENS, Page 7C
What his brother doesn’t understand
about the bone-crushing sport is the
brotherhood – the fraternal reason that
magnetized Hawley and his 25 so-
called brothers to relentlessly put their
unprotected bodies in peril.
If there was a match to exemplify the
gritty, no-holds-barred nature of the
game, then the recent contest between
the Wilkes-Barre Breakers and the
Montclair (N.J.) Rugby Club summed
up howruthlessly authentic it is. Amid
torrential downpour, 40-mph winds and
a field caked in mud, the two teams ran
and mauled each other continuously for
two 40-minute halves, with no play
clocks, no first downs and no huddles --
with only stoppages for injuries. By the
final whistle, both teams were well-
covered fromhead to toe in mud.
“To be honest with you, I was a little
busy being completely soaked in mud
to knowwhat the score was at the
time,” said Hawley, the Breakers’ club
president. “It was an absolute mud fest.
It was driving rain. It doesn’t get much
worse.”
The Wilkes-Barre Breakers, named
after the Wyoming Valley’s ill-fated coal
industry, practice twice weekly on
Tuesdays and Thursdays at Wilkes-
Barre’s Kirby Park, perched in the open
grass somewhere between the geese
that grace the park’s pond and the adult
softball fields. They play three distinct
seasons in the spring, summer and fall,
RUGBY
Bone-crushing sport tests and bonds players
S. JOHN WILKIN/THE TIMES LEADER
Members of the Wilkes-Barre Breakers (in red and black uniforms) battle against the Monclair (N.J.) Rugby Club
during a league game April 16 at Kirby Park.
Physical brotherhood
By JAY MONAHAN | For The Times Leader
6
PENGUINS
3
ADMIRALS
WILKES-BARRE– DrewHawley’s younger brother –
his actual brother, not one of the 25 members of the
Wilkes-Barre Breakers rugby teamwho happen to share
the title – doesn’t understand why there aren’t fistfights
on the pitch.
See RUGBY , Page 6C
MOOSIC – Kevin Millwood appears
readytojointheNewYorkYankees start-
ing rotation.
The 36-year-old
pitcher, who signed a
minor league deal with
New York last month,
pitched his second sev-
en-inning, complete
game in as many minor
league starts when he
helped Scranton/
Wilkes-Barre winGame
1 of Saturday’s double-
header against Syra-
cuse, 4-2, at PNC Field.
The Yankees split the
twin bill with the
Chiefs, who won the
second game, 2-0.
Comingoff aseven-inningshutout last
weekend for Double-A Trenton, the
right-hander allowed seven hits and one
walk while striking out four on Saturday
afternoon. Inhis seveninnings, he threw
95 pitches, with 60 of them for strikes.
His fastball was clockedat reaching89
mph, and Millwood showed good side-
I L B A S E B A L L
Millwood
makes pitch
for call-up
Veteran, who signed minor league
deal in March, is sharp in victory.
By DAVE ROSENGRANT
drosengrant@timesleader.com
4 - 0
YANKEES
2 - 2
CHIEFS
See MILWOOD , Page 7C
PITTSBURGH — Tampa Bay Light-
ning coachGuy Boucher was convincedit
was just a matter of time
before Steven Stamkos
becamea dynamic offen-
sive force in the NHL
playoffs.
His postseason com-
ing-out party came just
intimetokeeptheLight-
ning alive in their first-
round playoff series
against the Pittsburgh
Penguins.
Stamkos scored his
first two NHL playoff
goals and the Lightning
emphatically avoided
elimination with an 8-2
victory over the Pen-
guins on Saturday in
Game5of thefirst-round
series.
“This kid has figured out what the play-
offsareall about,”Bouchersaid. “I knewat
some point he would because he’s got
N H L P L AYO F F S
Pittsburgh
a big flop
as eliminator
With chance to oust Tampa Bay, Pens
crushed. Game 6 is Monday in Fla.
See PITTSBURGH , Page 11C
8
LIGHTNING
2
PENGUINS
The Associated Press
T
he picture became the cover of
the official magazine of the
Philadelphia Phillies during the
final months of 2003, honoring Kevin
Millwood’s no-hitter earlier that year.
It showed a grinning Millwood with
both arms stretched high at old Veter-
ans Stadium, celebrating a rare feat in
Phillies baseball history, and his own.
And it sure was something to com-
memorate with a memory worthy to
celebrate.
Because Millwood isn’t that pitcher
anymore.
“No,” Millwood said Saturday, after
making a Triple-A start for the Scran-
ton/Wilkes-Barre Yankees. “I’m a differ-
ent pitcher than that. I’m not a guy
who just rears back and tries to throw
it by people anymore.”
What Millwood tries to do these
days is throw the ball well enough and
long enough to be a factor in the major
leagues again.
“I try to locate, get pitches up, get
people out a different way,” Millwood
said.
It is very different than the some-
times-dominant pitcher Millwood used
to be.
Maybe he can’t be as big of a star as
he was when he first came up with the
Atlanta Braves in the late 1990s, and
then as the ace of the Phillies staff in
2003 and ’04. But if he has enough left,
Millwood can become the difference
between the New York Yankees making
the playoffs or watching someone else
play in the postseason.
“I don’t think he’d be here if he didn’t
have much left,” said SWB Yankees
outfielder Greg Golson, who was in the
farm systems of Philadelphia, Texas
and now the Yankees when Millwood
pitched for those teams. “Strike one
seems to be his biggest success. He
pitches ahead of guys and doesn’t let
them get too comfortable.”
The Baltimore Orioles seemed
downright fidgety when Millwood took
the mound last year.
He was signed to be their No. 1 start-
er last offseason, and wound up fin-
ishing 4-16 for the Orioles in 2010 - the
most losses by any big league starting
pitcher.
“I don’t know what the problem
was,” Millwood said. “The first two
months and my last two months, I
threw the ball really well. That middle
two months was probably the worst
two months I’ve had in my career.”
It was nearly a career-killer for Mill-
wood.
The highlight of his 406 big league
games over 15 seasons was that no-
hitter he pitched for the Phillies on
April 27 - NFL draft day - of the 2003
season.
But nobody was fighting to become
first in line to pick up Millwood this
year, not after all those losses, coupled
with a career-high 5.10 ERA, he com-
piled for the Orioles.
But the Yankees facing so much
uncertainty in their starting rotation
after C.C. Sabathia, they became bar-
gain basement hunters for former All-
Star pitchers on the downside of their
careers.
So the Yankees signed Millwood, 36,
near the end of spring training, hoping
to catch some of his old magic in a
bottle.
Millwood pretty much bottled up the
Syracuse Chiefs in his second minor
league start Saturday, keeping damage
against him to a minimum while pitch-
ing Scranton/Wilkes-Barre to a 4-2
victory in the first game of a double-
header.
“Obviously, he knows how to pitch,”
SWB Yankees manager Dave Miley
said. “He used all his pitches ... threw
the ball well.”
Not that well.
Millwood surrendered a moonshot of
a solo homer to someone named Jeff
Frazier in the second inning. And he
struggled in the seventh and final in-
ning of the doubleheader game, allow-
ing one more run before finishing it
with a foul pop just before his 100-pitch
limit was up.
“He doesn’t know this,” Miley said,
“but the guy he faced that popped up,
that would have been his last hitter.”
PAUL SOKOLOSKI
O P I N I O N
His MLB ticket:
Dependability
over dominance
See SOKOLOSKI , Page 7C
Penguins win
series, 4-2
K
PAGE 2C SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ S C O R E B O A R D
LOCAL
WRESTLING
Ex-Mohawk triumphs
Steve Mytych, a former stand-
out wrestler at Meyers High
School and Drexel University,
won the 60 KG (132.25 pounds)
division in the freestyle compe-
tition at the University Nation-
als in Akron, Ohio, on Saturday.
Mytych, wrestling for the
NYAC-Excel team, defeated
Iowa’s Ty Clark, 1-0, to take the
championship. He advances to
tthe World Trials, where he will
compete for a spot on the U.S.
Olympic team.
E X T R A I N N I N G S
S P ORT S I N B RI E F
GOLF
Wyoming Valley Chapter of credit
Unions will hold its 25th Annual
Charities Golf Outing and Western
Bar-B-Q on Friday June 3, with a 10
a.m. shot gun start. This year’s
charities are: The Blind Associ-
ation of Wyoming Valley, Domestic
Violence Service Center, The
Gabriel House, Kingston and Moun-
tain Top Volunteer Fire Depart-
ments, The Pennsylvania Credit
Union Foundation, Volunteers of
America, Wyoming Valley Chil-
dren’s Association, Wyoming Valley
Alcohol and Drug Services, and
Geisinger Children’s Hospital. For
information on golfing or dona-
tions, contact Bob Alescyk, 823-
6151, ext. 1; or mail contributions to:
Corner Post FCU P.O. Box 1172
Wilkes-Barre, PA18703-1172, Attn.
Bob Alescyk.
REGISTRATIONS/TRYOUTS
Plains American Legion Baseball
will be conducting tryouts as
follows: Junior tryouts will be at 4
p.m. May 7 and May 14 and at 1 p.m.
on May 15. Senior Legion tryouts
will be at 5 p.m. May 7, 14, and 15.
All tryouts will be held at Hilldale
Baseball Field. Players must attend
at least two tryouts to be consid-
ered. Players ages 13 through 19
who reside in Plains, Laflin, Bear
Creek, Parsons, Miners Mills, North
End, East End, Avoca, Dupont,
Jenkins Township and Pittston
Township east of the Pittston
By-pass are eligible to try out. Any
questions concerning juniors, call
819-0408, or for seniors, call Don
at 822-0537.
UPCOMING EVENTS
Hazleton City View BMX will hold its
first local BMX race of the season
on Sunday, May 1, at 2 p.m. at Louis
Schiavo Park, on South Poplar
Street, Hazleton. Practice will be
held from noon to 2 p.m., with race
registration from1-145. New riders
are welcome. First time at the
track is free. Bring your bike,
long-sleeve shirt, long pants and
helmet. Some equipment may be
available at the track. Other local
races in May are scheduled for
May 8, 15, 22 and 26, weather
permitting. Open House will be
held on Saturday, May 21, from
noon-5 p.m. For information about
City View BMX, email bmx@hazle-
toncityview.com, visit www.hazle-
toncityview.com, call Track Direc-
tor, Jack Longo at 956-3747, or
visit facebook.com/HazletonBMX.
Mountain Top Baseball and Softball
will hold opening ceremonies at
noon Saturday at the new field
complex located off Alberdeen
Road in Wright Township. A parade
will proceed the ceremonies. The
route will go over Washington Park
Drive to Alberdeen Road and into
the new complex. All players and
their coaches will be required to
arrive at the staging area, Majsa,
no earlier than 11 a.m. The parade
will start at 11:30. Parents are asked
to drop their chidlren off on Morio
Drive in front of the Sewer Author-
ity, and pick them up after the
opening ceremonies. T-ball partici-
pants are allowed to march in the
parade provided a parent or guard-
ian marches with them.
Valley Regional Girls Softball
League is hosting a 14U Open
Fast-Pitch tournament May 21-22 at
the Freedom Park Softball Com-
plex situated in Butler Township
near the junction of interstates 80
and 81 in the town of Drums. The
complex features a fully stocked
concession stand, modern res-
trooms and ample space for park-
ing and pre-game practices. Valley
Regional Warriors 14U travel team
coach Bill Corra says teams in all
classifications are welcome to
enter. For information, contact
Corra at570-578-1774.
Bulletin Board items will not be
accepted over the telephone. Items
may be faxed to 831-7319, emailed to
tlsports@timesleader.com or dropped
off at the Times Leader or mailed to
Times Leader, c/o Sports, 15 N, Main
St., Wilkes-Barre, PA18711-0250.
BUL L E T I N BOARD
BASEBALL
Favorite Odds Underdog
American League
TIGERS ( 8.0 ) White Sox
BLUE JAYS ( 8.0 ) Rays
Yankees ( 9.5 ) ORIOLES
TWINS ( 8.5 ) Indians
RANGERS ( 9.5 ) Royals
Red Sox ( 9.0 ) ANGELS
A’s ( 6.5 ) MARINERS
National League
MARLINS ( 7.0 ) Rockies
METS ( 8.5 ) D’backs
PIRATES ( 8.0 ) Nationals
BREWERS ( 8.0 ) Astros
CUBS ( NL ) Dodgers
Phillies ( 6.5 ) PADRES
GIANTS ( 7.5 ) Braves
CARDS ( 8.5 ) Reds
NBA
Favorite Points Underdog
Heat 6 76ERS
Celtics 3.5 KNICKS
Magic 2 HAWKS
Lakers 5.5 HORNETS
NHL
Favorite Odds Underdog
SABRES -$125/
+$105
Flyers
PREDATORS -$145/
+$125
Ducks
BLACKHAWKS -$125/
+$105
Canucks
Home Teams in Capital Letters
AME RI C A’ S L I NE
By ROXY ROXBOROUGH
CIRCULAR REPORT: On the NBA board, the Knicks - Celtics circle is for New York
forward Amare Stoudemire (questionable) and guard Chauncey Billups (doubtful).
BOXING REPORT: In the WBO welterweight title fight on May 7 in Las Vegas,
Nevada, Manny Pacquiao is -$800 vs. at Shane Mosley +$550.
L O C A L
C A L E N D A R
Sunday, April 24
No Events
Monday, April 25
H.S. BASEBALL
(4:15 p.m.)
Dallas at Holy Redeemer
Pittston Area at Wyoming Area
Berwick at Coughlin
Wyoming Valley West at Nanticoke
Tunkhannock at Hazleton Area
West Side Tech at Hanover Area
H.S. SOFTBALL
(4:15 p.m.)
Dallas at Holy Redeemer
Pittston Area at Wyoming Area
Berwick at Coughlin
Wyoming Valley West at Nanticoke
Tunkhannock at Hazleton Area
H.S. BOYS VOLLEYBALL
(5:45 p.m.)
Pittston Area at Crestwood
West Side Tech at Holy Redeemer
Wyoming Valley West at Tunkhannock
Hanover Area at Lake-Lehman
Delaware Valley at Abington Heights
H.S. GIRLS SOCCER
Nanticoke at Holy Redeemer, 4:15 p.m.
H.S. BOYS TENNIS
Wyoming Area at Hazleton Area, 4:15 p.m.
COLLEGE BASEBALL
King’s at FDU-Florham, 3:30 p.m.
Wilkes at Keuka, 1 p.m.
Delaware Valley at Misericordia, noon
Tuesday, April 26
H.S. BASEBALL
(4:15 p.m.)
GAR at Meyers
MMI at Northwest
Wyoming Seminary at Hanover Area
West Side TECH at Lake-Lehman
H.S. SOFTBALL
(4:15 p.m.)
GAR at Meyers
MMI at Northwest
Wyoming Seminary at Hanover Area
West Side TECH at Lake-Lehman
H.S. BOYS VOLLEYBALL
(5:45 p.m.)
Coughlin at Nanticoke
Meyers at Wyoming Area
North Pocono at Dallas
Hazleton Area at Berwick
H.S. BOYS TENNIS
(4:15 p.m.)
Pittston Area at Wyoming Seminary
Tunkhannock at Wyoming Area
Berwick at Meyers
GAR at Dallas
Hazleton Area at Crestwood
Holy Redeemer at Coughlin
MMI at Wyoming Valley West
H.S. GIRLS SOCCER
(4:15 p.m.)
Honesdale at Tunkhannock
Hanover Area at MMI
Pittston Area at Meyers
Wyoming Seminary at GAR
North Pocono at Wyoming Area
COLLEGE BASEBALL
Marywood at King’s, 4 p.m.
COLLEGE SOFTBALL
King’s at Muhlenberg, 3:30 p.m.
COLLEGE WOMEN'S LACROSSE
(4 p.m.)
Manhattanville at King’s
Wilkes at Misericordia
COLLEGE MEN'S LACROSSE
Misericordia at FDU-Florham, 7 p.m.
COLLEGE GOLF
Scranton at Wilkes, 1 p.m.
William Paterson at Wilkes, 1 p.m.
Misericordia at Messiah, 12 p.m.
Wednesday, April 27
H.S. BASEBALL
(4:15 p.m.)
Crestwood at Berwick
Holy Redeemer at Wyoming Valley West
Pittston Area at Tunkhannock
Nanticoke at Dallas
Hazleton Area at Wyoming Area
H.S. SOFTBALL
(4:15 p.m.)
Crestwood at Berwick
GAR at Lake-Lehman
Holy Redeemer at Wyoming Valley West
MMI Prep at Hanover Area
Pittston Area at Tunkhannock
Nanticoke at Dallas
Hazleton Area at Wyoming Area
H.S. BOYS TENNIS
(4:15 p.m.)
Coughlin at Wyoming Seminary
Pittston Area at Holy Redeemer
H.S. BOYS VOLLEYBALL
(5:45 p.m.)
Crestwood at West Side Tech
Pittston Area at Wyoming Valley West
Holy Redeemer at Hanover Area
Tunkhannock at Delaware Valley
H.S. TRACK
(4:15 p.m.)
Meyers at Wyoming Area
Lake-Lehman at Northwest
Holy Redeemer at GAR
Nanticoke at Hanover Area
H.S. GIRLS SOCCER
(4:15 p.m. unless noted)
Holy Redeemer at Hazleton Area
Crestwood at Nanticoke
Dallas at Delaware Valley
Berwick at Wyoming Valley West
Coughlin at Lake-Lehman, 6:30 p.m.
COLLEGE BASEBALL
Scranton at Wilkes, 4 p.m.
COLLEGE SOFTBALL
Misericordia at Neumann, 3 p.m.
COLLEGE MEN'S LACROSSE
King’s at Manhattanville, 4 p.m.
T R A N S A C T I O N S
BASEBALL
American League
TEXAS RANGERS — Placed RHP Neftali Feliz on
the 15-day DL, retroactive to April 21. Selected the
contract of RHP Cody Eppley from Round Rock
(PCL). Recalled RHPEric Hurley fromRound Rock
and placed him on the 60-day DL.
TORONTO BLUE JAYS — Placed INF Jayson Nix
on the 15-day DL. Recalled INF Mike McCoy from
Las Vegas (PCL).
National League
CHICAGO CUBS — Recalled RHP Justin Berg
fromIowa (PCL). Optioned RHP Jeff Stevens to Io-
wa.
CINCINNATI REDS—Optioned INFPedro Ciriaco
andLHPMatt Maloney toIndianapolis (IL). Recalled
RHP Carlos Fisher from Indianapolis.
WASHINGTON NATIONALS — Selected the con-
tract of INF Brian Bixler from Syracuse (IL). Desig-
nated LHP Lee Hyde for assignment.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
NBA — Suspended Atlanta C Zaza Pachulia and
Orlando G-F Jason Richardson one game their ac-
tions during Friday’s game.
HOCKEY
ECHL
ECHL — Fined the Greenville and Wheeling orga-
nizations an undisclosed amount and suspended
Greenville D T.J. Reynolds two games and fined
him an undisclosed amount, Greenville F Brendan
Connolly one game and fined him an undisclosed
amount and Wheeling F Doug Rogers one game
and fined him an undisclosed amount for their ac-
tions at the conclusion of Friday’s game between
the teams.
COLLEGE
INDIANA—Suspended RBDarius Willis one game
for conduct detrimental to the team.
B A S E B A L L
International League
All Times EDT
North Division
W L Pct. GB
Scranton/Wilkes-Barre
(Yankees) ................................. 10 6 .625 —
Pawtucket (Red Sox) .............. 10 7 .588
1
⁄2
Lehigh Valley (Phillies) ........... 8 8 .500 2
Rochester (Twins) ................... 7 9 .438 3
Syracuse (Nationals)............... 7 9 .438 3
Buffalo (Mets)........................... 7 10 .412 3
1
⁄2
South Division
W L Pct. GB
Gwinnett (Braves) ................... 11 5 .688 —
Durham (Rays)......................... 10 6 .625 1
Charlotte (White Sox) ............. 7 8 .467 3
1
⁄2
Norfolk (Orioles) ...................... 3 12 .200 7
1
⁄2
West Division
W L Pct. GB
Louisville (Reds) ...................... 11 5 .688 —
Columbus (Indians) ................. 10 5 .667
1
⁄2
Toledo (Tigers) ........................ 6 11 .353 5
1
⁄2
Indianapolis (Pirates)............... 5 11 .313 6
Saturday's Games
Lehigh Valley 7, Buffalo 5
Rochester 9, Pawtucket 7
Scranton/Wilkes-Barre 4, Syracuse 2, 1st game
Syracuse 2, Scranton/Wilkes-Barre 0, 2nd game
Indianapolis at Columbus, ppd., rain
Louisville 6, Toledo 4
Gwinnett 3, Charlotte 1
Durham at Norfolk, (n)
Sunday's Games
Syracuse at Scranton/Wilkes-Barre, 1:05 p.m.
Lehigh Valley at Buffalo, 1:05 p.m.
Pawtucket at Rochester, 1:05 p.m.
Durham at Norfolk, 1:15 p.m.
Louisville at Toledo, 2 p.m.
Gwinnett at Charlotte, 2:15 p.m.
Indianapolis at Columbus, 4:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
Durham at Norfolk, 12:15 p.m.
Syracuse at Scranton/Wilkes-Barre, 1:05 p.m.
Lehigh Valley at Buffalo, 1:05 p.m.
Indianapolis at Columbus, 5:05 p.m., 1st game
Louisville at Toledo, 6:30 p.m.
Pawtucket at Rochester, 7:05 p.m.
Gwinnett at Charlotte, 7:15 p.m.
Indianapolis at Columbus, 7:35 p.m., 2nd game
B A S K E T B A L L
NBA
Daily Playoff Glance
All Times EDT
FIRST ROUND
(Best-of-7)
(x-if necessary)
Saturday, April 16
Chicago 104, Indiana 99
Miami 97, Philadelphia 89
Atlanta 103, Orlando 93
Dallas 89, Portland 81
Sunday, April 17
Memphis 101, San Antonio 98
New Orleans 109, L.A. Lakers 100
Boston 87, New York 85
Oklahoma City 107, Denver 103
Monday, April 18
Miami 94, Philadelphia 73
Chicago 96, Indiana 90
Tuesday, April 19
Boston 96, New York 93
Orlando 88, Atlanta 82
Dallas 101, Portland 89
Wednesday, April 20
Oklahoma City 106, Denver 89, Oklahoma City
leads series 2-0
San Antonio 93, Memphis 87
L.A. Lakers 87, New Orleans 78
Thursday, April 21
Chicago 88, Indiana 84
Miami 100, Philadelphia 94, Miami leads series 3-0
Portland 97, Dallas 92
Friday, April 22
Boston 113, New York 96, Boston leads series 3-0
Atlanta 88, Orlando 84, Atlanta leads series 2-1
L.A. Lakers 100, New Orleans 86, Los Angeles
leads series 2-1
Saturday, April 23
Indiana 89, Chicago 84, Chicago leads series 3-1
Portland 84, Dallas 82, series tied 2-2
Memphis 91, San Antonio 88, Memphis leads se-
ries 2-1
Oklahoma City at Denver, 10 p.m.
Sunday, April 24
Miami at Philadelphia, 1 p.m.
Boston at New York, 3:30 p.m.
Orlando at Atlanta, 7 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at New Orleans, 9:30 p.m.
Monday, April 25
San Antonio at Memphis, 8 p.m.
Portland at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Denver, 10:30 p.m.
Tuesday, April 26
Indiana at Chicago, 8 or 9:30 p.m.
x-New York at Boston, TBA
Atlanta at Orlando, TBA
New Orleans at L.A. Lakers, 10:30 p.m.
Wednesday, April 27
x-Philadelphia at Miami, 7 or 8 p.m.
Memphis at San Antonio, TBA
x-Denver at Oklahoma City, 8 or 9:30 p.m.
Thursday, April 28
x-Chicago at Indiana, 7 p.m.
x-Orlando at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
x-L.A. Lakers at New Orleans, 9:30 p.m.
Dallas at Portland, 10 p.m.
Friday, April 29
x-Miami at Philadelphia, 6 p.m.
x-Boston at New York, 8:30 p.m.
x-San Antonio at Memphis, 8 p.m.
x-Oklahoma City at Denver, 10:30 p.m.
Saturday, April 30
x-Indiana at Chicago, TBA
x-Atlanta at Orlando, TBA
x-New Orleans at L.A. Lakers, TBA
x-Portland at Dallas, TBA
Sunday, May 1
x-Philadelphia at Miami, TBA
x-New York at Boston, TBA
x-Memphis at San Antonio, TBA
x-Denver at Oklahoma City, TBA
Bulls-Pacers, Box
CHICAGO (84)
Deng 5-14 5-6 16, Boozer 6-15 3-3 15, Noah 8-13
5-7 21, Rose 6-22 2-415, Bogans 0-10-0 0, Gibson
0-5 0-0 0, Brewer 1-10-0 2, Thomas 2-2 0-0 4, Wat-
son 0-1 2-2 2, Asik 0-0 0-0 0, Korver 3-8 2-2 9. To-
tals 31-82 19-24 84.
INDIANA (89)
Granger 9-196-724, Hansbrough2-80-04, Hibbert
6-12 4-5 16, Collison 2-11 1-2 6, George 4-7 0-0 9,
D.Jones 1-4 3-4 5, McRoberts 2-6 2-4 6, Foster 1-2
0-22, Price3-62-210, Rush0-20-00, Dunleavy1-2
4-8 7. Totals 31-79 22-34 89.
Chicago ..............................................19142328—84
Indiana ................................................23261822—89
3-Point Goals—Chicago 3-20 (Korver 1-2, Deng
1-5, Rose 1-9, Gibson 0-1, Boozer 0-1, Bogans 0-1,
Watson 0-1), Indiana 5-16 (Price 2-4, Dunleavy 1-2,
Collison 1-2, George 1-3, D.Jones 0-1, Granger
0-4).
W H A T ’ S O N T V
COLLEGE BASEBALL
3 p.m.
ESPN2 — LSU at Vanderbilt
COLLEGE SOFTBALL
1 p.m.
ESPN — Alabama at Florida
CYCLING
1 a.m.
VERSUS — Liege-Bastogne-Liege, Liege to Bas-
togne to Ans, Belgium (delayed tape)
GOLF
9:30 a.m.
TGC — European PGA Tour, China Open, final
round, at Chengdu, China (same-day tape)
1 p.m.
CBS — Champions Tour, Legends of Golf, final
round, at Savannah, Ga.
TGC—PGATour, The Heritage, final round, at Hil-
ton Head Island, S.C.
3 p.m.
CBS —PGA Tour, The Heritage, final round, at Hil-
ton Head Island, S.C.
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
1 p.m.
WGN — Chicago White Sox at Detroit
SNY – Arizona at N.Y. Mets
1:35 p.m.
YES -- N.Y.Yankees at Baltimore
ROOT – Washington at Pittsburgh
2:15 p.m.
TBS — L.A. Dodgers at Chicago Cubs
4:05 p.m.
CSN – Philadelphia at San Diego
8 p.m.
ESPN — Cincinnati at St. Louis
NBA
1 p.m.
ABC—Playoffs, first round, game 4, Miami at Phila-
delphia
3:30 p.m.
ABC—Playoffs, first round, game 4, Boston at New
York
7 p.m.
TNT — Playoffs, first round, game 4, Orlando at At-
lanta
9:30 p.m.
TNT — Playoffs, first round, game 4, L.A. Lakers at
New Orleans
NBA DL BASKETBALL
10:30 p.m.
VERSUS — Playoffs, finals, game 1, Iowa at Rio
Grande Valley
NHL
3 p.m.
NBC — Playoffs, Eastern Conference first round,
game 6, Philadelphia at Buffalo
7:30 p.m.
VERSUS—Playoffs, Conference first round, game
6, Vancouver at Chicago
H O C K E Y
National Hockey League
Daily Playoff Glance
All Times EDT
FIRST ROUND
(Best-of-7)
(x-if necessary)
Wednesday, April 13
Detroit 4, Phoenix 2
Pittsburgh 3, Tampa Bay 0
Washington 2, N.Y. Rangers 1, OT
Vancouver 2, Chicago 0
Nashville 4, Anaheim1
Thursday, April 14
Montreal 2, Boston 0
Buffalo 1, Philadelphia 0
San Jose 3, Los Angeles 2, OT
Friday, April 15
Tampa Bay 5, Pittsburgh 1
Washington 2, N.Y. Rangers 0
Vancouver 4, Chicago 3
Anaheim 5, Nashville 3
Saturday, April 16
Detroit 4, Phoenix 3
Philadelphia 5, Buffalo 4
Montreal 3, Boston 1
Los Angeles 4, San Jose 0
Sunday, April 17
N.Y. Rangers 3, Washington 2
Nashville 4, Anaheim 3
Vancouver 3, Chicago 2
Monday, April 18
Philadelphia 4, Buffalo 2
Boston 4, Montreal 2
Pittsburgh 3, Tampa Bay 2
Detroit 4, Phoenix 2
Tuesday, April 19
Chicago 7, Vancouver 2
San Jose 6, Los Angeles 5, OT
Wednesday, April 20
Washington 4, N.Y. Rangers 3, 2OT
Pittsburgh 3, Tampa Bay 2, 2OT
Buffalo 1, Philadelphia 0
Anaheim 6, Nashville 3
Detroit 6, Phoenix 3, Detroit wins series 4-0
Thursday, April 21
Boston 5, Montreal 4, OT, series tied 2-2
Chicago 5, Vancouver 0, Vancouver leads series
3-2
San Jose 6, Los Angeles 3, San Jose leads series
3-1
Friday, April 22
Buffalo 4, Philadelphia 3, Buffalo leads series 3-2
Nashville 4, Anaheim3, OT, Nashville leads series
3-2
Saturday, April 23
Tampa Bay 8, Pittsburgh 2, Pittsburgh leads series
3-2
Washington 3, N.Y. Rangers 1, Washington wins
series 4-1
Montreal at Boston, (n)
Los Angeles at San Jose, (n)
Sunday, April 24
Philadelphia at Buffalo, 3 p.m.
Anaheim at Nashville, 6 p.m.
Vancouver at Chicago, 7:30 p.m.
Monday, April 25
Pittsburgh at Tampa Bay, TBA
x-San Jose at Los Angeles, TBA
Tuesday, April 26
x-Buffalo at Philadelphia, 7:30 p.m.
Boston at Montreal, 7 p.m.
x-Chicago at Vancouver, 10 p.m.
x-Nashville at Anaheim, 10:30 p.m.
Wednesday, April 27
x-Montreal at Boston TBA
x-Tampa Bay at Pittsburgh, TBA
x-Los Angeles at San Jose, TBA
Lightning-Penguins Sum
Tampa Bay ...................................... 2 3 3 — 8
Pittsburgh........................................ 0 0 2 — 2
First Period—1, Tampa Bay, Gagne 1 (Purcell, Le-
cavalier), 16:57. 2, Tampa Bay, Stamkos1(Downie,
Hall), 17:43.
Second Period—3, Tampa Bay, Lecavalier 2
(Stamkos, St. Louis), 1:55. 4, Tampa Bay, Gagne 2
(Moore, Lundin), 5:31. 5, Tampa Bay, Stamkos 2
(Brewer, St. Louis), 7:00 (pp).
Rangers-Capitals Sums
N.Y. Rangers .................................. 0 0 1 — 1
Washington..................................... 1 1 1 — 3
First Period—1, Washington, Green 1 (Ovechkin,
Laich), 5:59 (pp). Penalties—McCabe, NYR (trip-
ping), 5:42;Drury, NYR (roughing), 5:59;Dubinsky,
NYR (roughing), 5:59;New York bench, served by
Prospal (unsportsmanlike conduct), 5:59;Semin,
Was (roughing), 5:59;Laich, Was (roughing), 5:59.
AHL
Playoff Glance
All Times EDT
(x-if necessary)
FIRST ROUND
BEST OF 7
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Portland 4, Connecticut 2
Thursday, April 14: Portland 3, Connecticut 2
Saturday, April 16: Portland 3, Connecticut 2, OT
Sunday, April 17: Connecticut 3, Portland 1
Tuesday, April 19: Connecticut 3, Portland 1
Thursday, April 21: Portland 5, Connecticut 4
Saturday, April 23: Portland 6, Connecticut 4
x-Monday, April 25: Connecticut at Portland, 7 p.m.
Binghamton 4, Manchester 3
Thursday, April 14: Manchester 2, Binghamton 1
Friday, April 15: Binghamton 4, Manchester 3, OT
Sunday, April 17: Manchester 5, Binghamton 4, OT
Tuesday, April 19: Manchester 6, Binghamton 3
Wednesday, April 20: Binghamton5, Manchester 4,
OT
Friday, April 22: Binghamton 2, Manchester 1, 2OT
Saturday, April 23: Binghamton 6, Manchester 5,
OT
Wilkes-Barre/Scranton 4, Norfolk 2
Friday, April 15: Norfolk 2, Wilkes-Barre/Scranton 1
Saturday, April 16: Norfolk2, Wilkes-Barre/Scranton
0
Tuesday, April 19: Wilkes-Barre/Scranton2, Norfolk
1
Wednesday, April 20: Wilkes-Barre/Scranton 4,
Norfolk 2
Friday, April 22: Wilkes-Barre/Scranton 2, Norfolk 1
Saturday, April 23: Wilkes-Barre/Scranton 6, Nor-
folk 3
x-Monday, April 25: Norfolk at Wilkes-Barre/Scran-
ton, 7:05 p.m.
Charlotte 3, Hershey 2
Thursday, April 14: Charlotte 5, Hershey 4
Sunday, April 17: Hershey 4, Charlotte 2
Tuesday, April 19: Hershey 3, Charlotte 2
Wednesday, April 20: Charlotte 3, Hershey 2
Friday, April 22: Charlotte 5, Hershey 3
Sunday, April 24: Charlotte at Hershey, 5 p.m.
x-Monday, April 25: Charlotte at Hershey, 7 p.m.
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Lake Erie 3, Manitoba 2
Saturday, April 16: Lake Erie 6, Manitoba 4
Sunday, April 17: Manitoba 3, Lake Erie 2, OT
Tuesday, April 19: Lake Erie 2, Manitoba 1
Thursday, April 21: Lake Erie 6, Manitoba 3
Friday, April 22: Manitoba 2, Lake Erie 0
Sunday, April 24: Manitoba at Lake Erie, 4 p.m.
x-Tuesday, April 26: Manitoba at Lake Erie, 7 p.m.
Hamilton 3, Oklahoma City 2
Thursday, April 14: Hamilton 5, Oklahoma City 2
Saturday, April 16: Hamilton 2, Oklahoma City 1
Tuesday, April 19: Oklahoma City 2, Hamilton 0
Wednesday, April 20: Oklahoma City 5, Hamilton 2
Friday, April 22: Hamilton 2, Oklahoma City 0
Sunday, April 24: OklahomaCity at Hamilton, 4p.m.
x-Monday, April 25: Oklahoma City at Hamilton,
7:30 p.m.
Houston 4, Peoria 0
Wednesday, April 13: Houston 4, Peoria 1
Friday, April 15: Houston 3, Peoria 2, OT
Monday, April 18: Houston 5, Peoria 3
Tuesday, April 19: Houston 2, Peoria 1
Milwaukee 3, Texas 2
Thursday, April 14: Milwaukee 5, Texas 2
Saturday, April 16: Texas 3, Milwaukee 1
Tuesday, April 19: Texas 3, Milwaukee 2, OT
Wednesday, April 20: Milwaukee 3, Texas 2
Friday, April 22: Milwaukee 2, Texas 1, OT
Monday, April 25: Texas at Milwaukee, 8 p.m.
x-Tuesday, April 26: Texas at Milwaukee, 8 p.m.
N A S C A R
Nationwide Series
Nashville 300
Results
Saturday
At Nashville Superspeedway
Lebanon, Tenn.
(Start position in parentheses)
1. (7) Carl Edwards, Ford, 225 laps, 150 rating, 0
points, $41,950.
2. (6) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 225, 128.5, 0, $29,000.
3. (9) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 225, 115.4, 0,
$22,425.
4. (1) Joey Logano, Toyota, 225, 119.2, 0, $22,675.
5. (4) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 225, 110.6, 39,
$27,068.
6. (2) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 225, 104.4, 39, $20,618.
7. (3) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 225, 106.5, 0,
$21,418.
8. (13) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, 225, 100.5, 36,
$18,718.
9. (12) Josh Wise, Chevrolet, 225, 89.1, 36,
$18,443.
10. (16) Aric Almirola, Chevrolet, 225, 91.3, 35,
$19,043.
11. (14) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 225, 96.7, 33,
$18,443.
12. (11) Kenny Wallace, Toyota, 225, 83.8, 32,
$17,993.
13. (8) Elliott Sadler, Chevrolet, 225, 90.2, 31,
$18,343.
14. (5) David Reutimann, Toyota, 225, 89, 0,
$11,350.
15. (19) Jason Leffler, Chevrolet, 225, 79.2, 29,
$18,368.
16. (20) Ryan Truex, Toyota, 225, 75, 28, $19,168.
17. (15) Steve Wallace, Toyota, 224, 79.1, 27,
$17,593.
18. (26) Mike Wallace, Chevrolet, 224, 70.9, 26,
$19,193.
19. (17) Michael Annett, Toyota, 224, 77.5, 25,
$17,418.
20. (25) David Stremme, Chevrolet, 223, 69.5, 0,
$12,375.
21. (29) Scott Wimmer, Chevrolet, 223, 64.9, 23,
$17,293.
22. (10) Brian Scott, Toyota, 223, 82, 22, $17,258.
23. (28) Jeremy Clements, Chevrolet, 223, 62.2,
21, $17,623.
24. (24) KevinConway, Toyota, 222, 57, 0, $17,163.
25. (30) Blake Koch, Dodge, 222, 56.6, 19, $17,718.
26. (23) Danny O’Quinn Jr., Ford, 222, 57.8, 18,
$17,043.
27. (21) J.R. Fitzpatrick, Ford, 221, 61.1, 17,
$10,935.
28. (37) Morgan Shepherd, Chevrolet, 220, 45.4,
16, $10,500.
29. (22) Mikey Kile, Chevrolet, 220, 51.7, 15,
$16,933.
30. (36) Derrike Cope, Dodge, 218, 38.7, 14,
$17,198.
31. (18) Mike Bliss, Chevrolet, 218, 51.1, 13,
$16,863.
32. (34) Eric McClure, Chevrolet, 217, 41.3, 12,
$16,818.
33. (27) Timmy Hill, Ford, 215, 43.4, 11, $16,753.
34. (42) Robert Richardson Jr., Dodge, engine,
143, 35.1, 10, $10,265.
35. (35) TimSchendel, Chevrolet, brakes, 32, 39.5,
9, $10,245.
36. (31) Tim Andrews, Ford, brakes, 29, 47, 8,
$10,225.
37. (40) Dennis Setzer, Chevrolet, brakes, 10, 36.7,
7, $10,205.
38. (43) Mike Harmon, Chevrolet, overheating, 6,
34, 6, $10,185.
39. (32) Matthew Carter, Chevrolet, electrical, 4,
35.1, 5, $10,155.
40. (39) Carl Long, Ford, overheating, 3, 35.4, 4,
$10,060.
41. (41) Willie Allen, Chevrolet, brakes, 3, 33.8, 3,
$10,025.
42. (33) Jeff Green, Chevrolet, vibration, 1, 32.5, 2,
$10,005.
43. (38) Johnny Chapman, Ford, vibration, 1, 30.9,
1, $9,921.
Race Statistics
Average Speed of Race Winner: 125.375 mph.
Time of Race: 2 hours, 23 minutes, 32 seconds.
Margin of Victory: 0.521 seconds.
Caution Flags: 6 for 25 laps.
Lead Changes: 16 among 7 drivers.
Lap Leaders: J.Logano 1-18;
C.Edwards 19-50;
J.Logano 51;
C.Edwards 52-115;
J.Logano 116;
T.Bayne 117;
A.Almirola 118;
C.Edwards 119-134;
B.Keselowski 135;
J.Logano 136-144;
K.Busch 145-169;
J.Logano 170;
J.Wise 171-175;
K.Busch 176-188;
C.Edwards 189;
K.Busch 190;
C.Edwards 191-225.
Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps Led):
C.Edwards, 5 times for 148 laps;K.Busch, 3 times
for 39 laps;J.Logano, 5 times for 30 laps;J.Wise, 1
time for 5 laps;B.Keselowski, 1 time for 1 lap;T-
.Bayne, 1 time for 1 lap;A.Almirola, 1 time for 1 lap.
Top 10 in Points: 1. J.Allgaier, 264;2. R.Stenhouse
Jr., 264;3. J.Leffler, 262;4. R.Sorenson, 260;5.
T.Bayne, 260;6. E.Sadler, 259;7. A.Almirola, 257;8.
B.Scott, 228;9. K.Wallace, 216;10. M.Annett, 184.
NASCAR Driver Rating Formula
A maximum of 150 points can be attained in a race.
The formula combines the following categories:
Wins, Finishes, Top-15 Finishes, Average Running
Position While on Lead Lap, Average Speed Under
Green, Fastest Lap, Led Most Laps, Lead-Lap Fin-
ish.
G O L F
PGA Tour
The Heritage Scores
Saturday
At Harbour Town Golf Links
Hilton Head Island, S.C.
Third Round
Luke Donald ......................................67-65-70—202
Jim Furyk ...........................................68-66-69—203
Brendon de Jonge ............................67-71-66—204
Scott Verplank...................................67-70-67—204
Ricky Barnes......................................71-67-67—205
Tommy Gainey..................................71-67-67—205
Jason Day ..........................................69-65-71—205
Pat Perez............................................71-67-68—206
Jason Dufner .....................................67-71-68—206
Chris Couch.......................................68-68-70—206
Ben Crane..........................................69-66-71—206
Aaron Baddeley.................................70-68-69—207
Tim Herron.........................................65-71-71—207
Mark Wilson.......................................66-70-71—207
Chad Campbell .................................65-69-73—207
Garrett Willis......................................64-69-74—207
Michael Bradley ................................71-71-66—208
Jeff Klauk ...........................................69-71-68—208
Matt Bettencourt ................................65-73-70—208
Spencer Levin ...................................68-69-71—208
Nick O’Hern .......................................70-66-72—208
Brandt Snedeker ...............................69-67-72—208
Camilo Villegas .................................66-68-74—208
Kevin Streelman................................73-69-67—209
Carl Pettersson .................................71-69-69—209
Tim Petrovic.......................................68-72-69—209
Bill Haas.............................................70-70-69—209
Matt Kuchar........................................68-72-69—209
Stephen Ames...................................72-68-69—209
Brian Gay............................................66-73-70—209
Boo Weekley .....................................69-70-70—209
Paul Goydos ......................................72-67-70—209
Blake Adams .....................................67-71-71—209
J.P. Hayes..........................................70-67-72—209
D.J. Trahan........................................69-67-73—209
Brian Davis.........................................68-74-68—210
Chris DiMarco ...................................73-69-68—210
Ryuji Imada........................................70-71-69—210
Ben Martin .........................................67-72-71—210
Greg Chalmers..................................74-65-71—210
Arjun Atwal.........................................65-73-72—210
Webb Simpson..................................69-69-72—210
Brendan Steele .................................70-68-72—210
Ian Poulter..........................................69-66-75—210
David Hearn.......................................72-70-69—211
Steve Flesch......................................72-70-69—211
Trevor Immelman..............................69-71-71—211
James Driscoll ...................................70-70-71—211
Fredrik Jacobson..............................69-71-71—211
Billy Mayfair........................................70-68-73—211
Kevin Na.............................................70-68-73—211
Chris Riley .........................................67-71-73—211
Graeme McDowell ............................68-69-74—211
Alex Cejka..........................................69-73-70—212
Daniel Summerhays .........................73-66-73—212
Jerry Kelly ..........................................68-71-73—212
Heath Slocum....................................71-68-73—212
Nathan Green ....................................69-69-74—212
Josh Teater ........................................68-74-71—213
Ben Curtis ..........................................71-71-71—213
Stewart Cink ......................................72-68-73—213
Jason Bohn........................................73-69-72—214
Troy Merritt ........................................71-70-73—214
Kris Blanks.........................................71-69-74—214
Steve Elkington.................................68-72-74—214
Bio Kim...............................................71-69-74—214
Robert Garrigus ................................68-70-76—214
Charlie Wi ..........................................72-70-73—215
Lee Janzen ........................................70-71-74—215
John Daly...........................................70-72-74—216
Chad Collins ......................................71-70-75—216
Kent Jones.........................................73-68-76—217
Will MacKenzie .................................71-69-77—217
Champions Tour
Liberty Mutual Legends of Golf
Par Scores
Saturday
At Westin Savannah Harbor Golf Resort & Spa
Savannah, Ga.
Second Round
Fergus/Levi ........................................64-60—124-20
Senior/Lyle.........................................63-61—124-20
Hoch/Perry.........................................63-62—125-19
Kite/Morgan .......................................62-63—125-19
Ozaki/Baker-Finch ............................64-62—126-18
Pernice Jr./Tway ...............................64-62—126-18
Lehman/Pavin ...................................64-62—126-18
Hallberg/Schulz.................................62-64—126-18
North/T.Watson.................................65-62—127-17
Mize/Sutton........................................63-64—127-17
Eger/McNulty.....................................64-64—128-16
Glasson/Peoples ..............................66-62—128-16
Allen/Frost..........................................63-65—128-16
O’Meara/Price....................................64-65—129-15
Goodes/Spittle ..................................68-61—129-15
Roberts/Simpson..............................64-66—130-14
Doyle/Vaughan..................................65-65—130-14
Forsman/Reid....................................66-64—130-14
Cochran/Wiebe .................................66-64—130-14
Fleisher/Jenkins................................66-64—130-14
Bean/Lu..............................................64-66—130-14
Hatalsky/Pooley ................................67-63—130-14
Bryant/Gallagher Jr. .........................64-67—131-13
Armour III/Brooks..............................67-64—131-13
Irwin/Nelson.......................................68-63—131-13
Haas/Rutledge ..................................65-67—132-12
Jacobsen/Weibring...........................65-67—132-12
Gilder/Romero...................................67-65—132-12
Jacobs/Zoeller...................................67-65—132-12
Calcavecchia/K.Green .....................68-65—133-11
Sluman/Stadler..................................66-68—134-10
Browne/Purtzer .................................65-71—136 -8
H.Green/Thompson..........................68-70—138 -6
Wadkins/Wadkins.............................70-70—140 -4
PGA European Tour
Volvo China Open
Leading Scores
Saturday
At Luxehills International Country Club
Chengdu, China
Third Round
Nicolas Colsaerts, Belgium.............65-67-66—198
Han Chang-won, South Korea........64-70-65—199
Peter Lawrie, Ireland.........................68-64-68—199
Gregory Havret, France...................66-66-68—200
Jamie Donaldson, Wales.................70-61-70—201
Soren Kjeldsen, Denmark ...............65-71-66—202
Aaron Townsend, Australia.............68-66-68—202
Keith Horne, South Africa................63-69-70—202
Andre Stolz, Australia.......................68-68-67—203
Danny Lee, New Zealand ................66-68-69—203
James Morrison, England................65-69-69—203
Jeev Milkha Singh, India..................66-66-71—203
Choi Ho-sung, South Korea............36-67-66—169
Daniel Gaunt, Australia.....................68-68-68—204
Tano Goya, Argentina......................71-64-69—204
Bradley Dredge, Wales....................65-70-69—204
Richie Ramsay, Scotland.................66-69-69—204
Michael Jonzon, Sweden ................67-68-69—204
Joost Luiten, Netherlands................66-67-71—204
Steven Alker, New Zealand.............66-67-71—204
Fredrik Andersson Hed, Sweden ...66-67-71—204
Gareth Maybin, Northern Ireland....65-67-72—204
Michael Hendry, New Zealand........70-69-66—205
Anthony Brown, Australia ................67-71-67—205
Pablo Martin, Spain..........................70-68-67—205
Danny Willett, England.....................70-66-69—205
Christian Nilsson, Sweden ..............70-65-70—205
Peter Whiteford, Scotland................67-68-70—205
Rafael Cabrera B, Spain..................68-66-71—205
Sergio Garcia, Spain........................66-67-72—206
Paul Waring, England.......................73-66-67—206
Damien McGrane, Ireland................70-68-68—206
James Kingston, South Africa.........70-67-69—206
Liang Wenchong, China ..................68-66-72—206
Jeppe Huldahl, Denmark.................67-65-74—206
Indonesian Masters
Leading Scores
Saturday
At Royale Jakarta Golf Club
Jakarta, Indonesia
Third Round
Lee Westwood, England..................68-66-66—200
Thitiphun Chuayprakong, Thailand 68-68-69—205
Park Hyun-bin, South Korea ...........67-68-70—205
Prayad Marksaeng, Thailand ..........67-70-69—206
Thongchai Jaidee, Thailand............67-70-70—207
Siddikur, Bangladesh........................66-72-69—207
Prom Meesawat, Thailand................70-68-69—207
Antonio Lascuna, Philippines..........67-70-70—207
Lin Wen-tang, Taiwan.......................71-67-70—208
Kiradech Aphibarnrat, Thailand.......69-68-71—208
Marcus Both, Australia.....................70-70-69—209
Mardan Mamat, Singapore ..............72-70-67—209
S O C C E R
Major League Soccer
All Times EDT
EASTERN CONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
New York........................ 3 1 2 11 9 2
Philadelphia ................... 3 1 1 10 4 2
Columbus....................... 2 1 3 9 5 4
New England.................. 2 2 3 9 8 9
Houston.......................... 2 1 2 8 6 4
D.C. ................................. 2 3 1 7 9 12
Toronto FC..................... 1 2 4 7 7 10
Chicago .......................... 1 3 1 4 8 11
Sporting Kansas City.... 1 3 1 4 10 12
WESTERN CONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
Real Salt Lake ............... 4 0 0 12 8 1
Los Angeles................... 3 1 3 12 7 7
Seattle............................. 2 2 3 9 7 7
Colorado......................... 3 3 0 9 8 7
Portland .......................... 2 2 1 7 9 10
FC Dallas........................ 2 3 1 7 8 9
Chivas USA.................... 1 2 3 6 5 6
Vancouver ...................... 1 3 3 6 10 12
San Jose......................... 1 3 2 5 6 9
NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie.
Thursday's Games
New York 4, D.C. United 0
Friday's Games
Seattle FC1, Colorado 0
Saturday's Games
Toronto FC1, Columbus 1, tie
Chivas USA 2, San Jose 1
FC Dallas 2, Vancouver 1
New England 3, Sporting Kansas City 2
Houston at Chicago, (n)
Portland at Los Angeles, (n)
Friday, April 29
D.C. United at Houston, 8:30 p.m.
Saturday, April 30
San Jose at Philadelphia, 4 p.m.
Sporting Kansas City at New York, 7:30 p.m.
Vancouver at Columbus, 7:30 p.m.
Chicago at Colorado, 9 p.m.
Toronto FC at Seattle FC, 10 p.m.
Real Salt Lake at Portland, 10:30 p.m.
New England at Chivas USA, 10:30 p.m.
Sunday, May 1
Los Angeles at FC Dallas, 5 p.m.
T E N N I S
WTA Tour
Porsche Grand Prix
Results
Saturday
Stuttgart, Germany
Singles
Semifinals
Julia Goerges, Germany, def. SamStosur (5), Aus-
tralia, 6-4, 3-6, 7-5.
Caroline Wozniacki (1), Denmark, def. Agnieszka
Radwanska, Poland, 7-5, 6-3.
Doubles
Semifinals
Kristina Barrois and Jasmin Woehr, Germany, def.
Katalin Marosi, Hungary, and Kathrin Woerle, Ger-
many, 6-2, 5-7, 10-7 tiebreak.
Sabine Lisicki, Germany, and Sam Stosur, Austra-
lia, def. Vitalia Diatchenko, Russia, and Mariya Ko-
ryttseva, Ukraine, 6-2, 6-4.
Grand Prix de SAR La Princesse Lalla Meryem
Results
At Royal Tennis Club de Fes
Fez, Morocco
Singles
Semifinals
Simona Halep (7), Romania, def. Kirsten Flipkens,
Belgium, 7-5, 6-4.
Alberta Brianti, Italy, def. Dinara Safina, Russia,
walkover.
Doubles
Semifinals
Nina Bratchikova, Russia, and Sandra Klemen-
schits, Austria, def. DinaraSafina, Russia, andGali-
na Voskoboeva, Kazakhstan, walkover.
ATP World Tour
Barcelona Open BancSabadell
Results
Saturday
At Real Club de Tenis Barcelona
Barcelona, Spain
Singles
Semifinals
David Ferrer (4), Spain, def. Nicolas Almagro (8),
Spain, 6-3, 6-4.
Rafael Nadal (1), Spain, def. Ivan Dodig, Croatia,
6-3, 6-2.
Doubles
Semifinals
Bob and Mike Bryan (1), United States, def. Lukasz
Kubot, Poland, and Oliver Marach (4), Austria, 6-3,
6-4.
Santiago Gonzalez, Mexico, and Scott Lipsky, Unit-
edStates, def. Max Mirnyi, Belarus, andDaniel Nes-
tor (2), Canada, 7-6 (4), 6-4.
B O X I N G
Fight Schedule
April 30
At Buenos Aires, Luis Lazarte vs. Ulises Solis, 12,
for Lazarte’s IBF junior flyweight title; Roberto Bo-
lonti vs. Isidro Prieto, 10, heavyweights.
At Panama City, Panama, Rafael Concepcion, vs.
Hugo Ruiz, 12, for the interim WBA World bantam-
weight title.
At MexicoCity, Raul Garciavs. Rommel Asenjo, 12,
for Garcia’s WBOstrawweight title; Jesus Geles vs.
Ramon Garcia Hirales, 12, for Geles’ WBO interim
junior flyweight title.
At Texcoco, Mexico, Gilberto Keb Baas vs. Adrian
Hernandez, 12, for Baas’ WBC light flyweight title.
May 1
At TBA, Thailand, Drian Francisco, vs. Tepparith
Singwancha, 12, for the interim WBA World super
flyweight title.
May 6
At Mandalay Bay Resort & Casino, Las Vegas
(ESPN2), Diego Magdaleno vs. Gilberto Sanchez
Leon, 10, junior lightweights.
May 7
At Osaka, Japan, Koki Kameda vs. Daniel Diaz, 12,
for Kameda’s WBA World bantamweight title.
At Copenhagen, Denmark, Evander Holyfield vs.
Brian Nielsen, 12, heavyweights.
At Neubrandenburg, Germany, Sebastian Sylves-
ter vs. Daniel Geale, 12, for Sylvester’s IBF middle-
weight title; Karo Murat vs. Otis Griffin, 12, for the
vacant IBF Inter-Continental light heavyweight title;
Danny McIntosh vs. Eduard Gutknecht, 12, for
McIntosh’s European light heavyweight.
At MGMGrand, Las Vegas (PPV), Manny Pacquiao
vs. Shane Mosley, 12, for Pacquiao’s WBO welter-
weight title; WilfredoVazquez Jr. vs. JorgeArce, 12,
for Vazquez’s WBO junior featherweight title; Mike
Alvaradovs. Ray Narh, 12, for thevacant WBCCon-
tinental Americas light welterweight title; Kelly Pav-
lik vs. Alfonso Lopez, 10, super middleweights.
May 13
At Chumash Casino, Santa Ynez, Calif. (ESPN2),
Kendall Holt vs. Julio Diaz, 10, light welterweights.
At Primm, Nev. (SHO), Sharif Bogere vs. Raymun-
do Beltran, 10, lightweights.
May 14
At Sonora, Mexico, Cristian Mijares vs. Malik Bou-
ziane, 12, for Mijares’ IBF super flyweight title.
At Home Depot Center, Carson, Calif. (SHO),
Andre Ward vs. Arthur Abraham, 12, for Ward’s
WBA Super World super middleweight title; Cristo-
bal Arreola vs. Nagy Aguilera, 10, heavyweights.
May 20
At Prudential Center, Newark, N.J. (ESPN2), Ant-
wone Smith vs. Joel Julio, 10, light middleweights.
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2011 PAGE 3C
Times Leader’s WVC All-Stars
CHELSEA CORNELIUS
Crestwood, Senior
The 6-foot Cornelius helped lead the Comets to
their first Wyoming Valley Conference Division 1
championship and was one of the most versa-
tile players in the league. Cornelius was pri-
marily a guard, but also was a power forward
and center. She led Crestwood with a 14.1 point
scoring average and finished sixth in the
league with 26 three-point baskets. “Chelsea
played a really big part in the overall success
of the team,” coach Isiah Walker said. “She’s a
four-year player who had the will and desire to
succeed.”
OLIVIA FRANCISCO
Holy Redeemer, Senior
Francisco was the driving force behind Holy
Redeemer’s march to the WVC Division 2 title
and the second-round of the PIAA state tourna-
ment. The 5-6 sharpshooter was the best pure
shooter in the league, and was virtually un-
stoppable in the clutch. She led the Royals with
a 14-point average and shot 87 percent from
the free throw line. She was fourth in the WVC
in three-point baskets with 41. Francisco has
made a verbal commitment to King’s College.
SAMMY GOW
Nanticoke Area, Junior
The 5-6 shooting guard helped the Trojans post
a 12-2 record in WVC Division 3 action and a
runner-up finish to Lake-Lehman. Gow aver-
aged 8.5 points and was one of the most
hard-nosed players in the league. She was an
excellent defender and had a knack of coming
up with big baskets. “She was our best player
down the stretch,” said coach Alan Yendrzeiw-
ski. “She played great on both ends of the
court.” Gow was a deadly three-point shooter,
and also attacked the basket with reckless
abandon.
SELENA ADAMSHICK
Lake-Lehman, Senior
Adamshick was the most dominant player in
the WVC. The 6-foot power forward led the
league in scoring with a 21.5 average, including
three straight 30-plus point games late in the
season. The Times Leader Player of the Year
also was an outstanding defensive player,
leading the Black Knights in rebounds and
steals. She also led Lake-Lehman to a 14-0
league mark and its second consecutive trip to
the state tournament. Adamshick signed with
Division II California (Pa.) University.
MIA HOPKINS
Pittston Area, Sophomore
Despite being double-teamed and sometimes
triple-teamed, the 5-9 Hopkins averaged 18.1
points, second best in the WVC. The power
forward specialized in taking the ball to the
basket with a unique scoring touch that made
her virtually impossible to stop. “She has a
great knowledge of the game and where peo-
ple are, and knows how to get to the basket by
using a lot of good angles.” Pittston Area
coach Kathy Healey said. “She did a phenom-
enal job by scoring 398 points this year.”
SARA KNEAL
Dallas, Senior
The 5-7 guard was the catalyst behind the
Mountaineers’ 17-4 season that resulted in a
runner-up finish to Holy Redeemer in WVC
Division 2. Kneal led a balanced attack with a
10.6 scoring average, and served as the go-to
player at crunch time. “She was definitely
someone we could count on,” coach Mary Jo
Hromchak said. “She was extremely tough
mentally and physically. She could make what
you needed to happen happen.”A three-year
starter, Neal was a threat from both the inside
and outside, from where she converted 15
three-point shots.
MADDIE LAVERY
Meyers, Senior
A four-year starter, the 6-2 Lavery was one of
the best post players in the WVC. She made a
fine art of posting up in the paint and driving
to the basket. She was equally adept at hitting
mid-range jump shots and averaged 14.8
points—fifth best in the league. “For the first
time in her career, she really found the balance
between the outside and inside,” coach Chris
Gray said. “She was able to get herself inside
and put points on the board when her jump
shot wasn’t falling.” Lavery has signed with
Division III Montclair State.
TARA ZDANCEWICZ
Wyoming Valley West, Junior
The 5-10 forward combined with shooting guard
Jamie Swaboski to provide the Spartans with a
dangerous 1-2 punch. A two-year all-star, Zdan-
cewicz consistently took the ball to the basket
with determination, and led the Spartans with a
13.3 scoring average. She scored a career-high
30 points against Williamsport. “She was our
go-to player,” said coach Curt Lloyd. “She was
able to put the ball on the floor and attack the
basket.”
Some people will tell you that
Selena Adamshick’s most important
contribution to the Lake-Lehman
girls basketball team in her senior
season was an uncanny ability to
score in bunches.
Others probably would refer to
her fierce rebounding. After all, the
6-foot forward was a beast on the
offensive and defensive boards. And
some fans would say it was her
competitive spirit, which put any-
body who dared to step into her
path in harm’s way.
Truth is, her most impressive
feat this winter was the mere fact
that she was able to play.
“In the past two years, she had
to overcome two major injuries
that would have been career-ending
for a lot of players,” Lake-Lehman
coach Jim Spencer said. “She had
to overcome a lot of stuff. She
worked hard, and I’m very pleased.
She had a fantastic year.’’
Adamshick, who is The Times
Leader Player of the Year, led the
Wyoming Valley Conference in
scoring with a 21.5 point average.
She also led Lake-Lehman (22-4) to
the WVC Division 3 championship
with a 14-0 mark and a second-
consecutive trip to the PIAA Class
2A state tournament
She was named third team all-
state by the Pennsylvania Basket-
ball Writers Association. Adamshick
had three consecutive 30-plus point
performances down the stretch.
Adamshick finished her career
with more than 1,000 points and
1,500 rebounds.
Her accomplishments are magni-
fied when you consider that Adam-
shick seemingly was double and
triple teamed every time she tou-
ched the ball in the post. But as
things turned out, her greatest
opponent was physical adversity.
Midway through her sophomore
season, Adamshick suffered a torn
ACL during a game against
Meyers.
“I was playing defense and a girl
crossed over in front of me,”
Adamshick said. “I went after her
and my right knee popped out. I
pushed it (the bone) back in, but I
knew it was serious.”
She underwent several months of
agonizing therapy, but never once
thought about letting the injury
end her basketball career.
“The hardest part was getting to
where I could bend my knee
again,” she added. “Each day I had
to stretch my leg. Each time I tore
my ligaments, but it was necessary
to be able to play again.”
Then, after knee surgery, Adam-
shick underwent another intense
physical therapy program.
She returned to the basketball
court for her junior season, and
despite wearing a knee brace, won
the WVC scoring championship
with a 21-point average.
However, in the spring of last
year, Adamshick was dealt another
setback. She suffered a broken leg
in a soccer game after colliding
with an opponent.
Once again, the rehab was a
tedious process. She had surgery
that resulted in a titanium rod and
four screws being placed in her leg.
She was forced to forgo her senior
season of field hockey, but was able
to get ready for the 2010-11 basket-
ball season.
“I wanted to come back for field
hockey, but I knew I had to work
hard rehabbing my knee in order
to be cleared to play basketball,”
said Adamshick, a three-sport ath-
lete.
She received several field hockey
scholarship offers from Division I
colleges, but recently signed to
play basketball at Division II Cali-
fornia (Pa.) University.
“I love basketball,” she said. “It’s
a fast-paced team sport, but you
can also do things by yourself.”
According to Spencer, Adamshick
is the most courageous player he’s
ever coached.
“I’ve never had a kid who’s
worked harder, on and off the
court. She gets around double- and
triple-team defenses with ease, but
she did that in practice every day.
“She thrives on basketball,” Spen-
cer added. “She’s taken us to new
heights that our team has never
been. I don’t remember a (Lake-
Lehman) boys or girls team that
was this successful.”
PL AYER OF THE YEAR: SEL ENA ADAMSHI CK
S. JOHN WILKIN/THE TIMES LEADER
Lake-Lehman’s Selena Adamshick, who led the WVC in scoring this past season, received several field hockey
scholarship offers from Division I colleges, but recently signed to play basketball at Division II California (Pa.).
Rising high from adversity
By VAN ROSE
vrose@timesleader.com
Age: 18
Hometown: Harveys Lake
Parents: Paul and Patricia
When did you start playing
sports: “I played ice hockey when
I was 6.”
Best thing about playing basket-
ball: “Probably scoring and having
fun.”
Toughest thing about playing
basketball: “Playing defense.”
Most memorable thing about
this season: “When I got my
1,500th point and 1,000th rebound
— and also being undefeated in
league play.”
Toughest opposition you faced
this season: “Dunmore. They
played some really good defense.
We weren’t used to that, so we
stood around. They were just an
overall good basketball team.”
Favorite sports team: Wilkes-
Barre/Scranton Penguins.
What’s on your mp3 player:
“Country music and some ACDC.”
Favorite movie: “Slapshot”
Favorite book: “Slam”
Three people — living or deceased
— who you’d like to have dinner
with: “My dad’s parents and my
pop pop, Gerard Harris.”
Most exciting place you’ve vis-
ited: “Jamaica”
Most scary memory: “When I was
in the seventh grade, I was sleep-
ing outside in a tent with my
friends. A car kept driving by,
searching through mailboxes. We
thought the person was going to
kidnap us, but we went into the
house.”
Something about you that oth-
ers would be surprised to hear: “I
don’t have a Facebook.”
M O R E A B O U T S E L E N A
➛ G I R L S B A S K E T B A L L
Michelle Bugonowicz ......................................Hanover Area
Kayla Gegaris .........................................................Crestwood
Sydney Myers................................................Holy Redeemer
Kayley Schinski .............................................Nanticoke Area
Courtney Shields........................................................Berwick
Lauren Skudalski ..................................Wyoming Seminary
Nikki Sutliff........................................................Lake-Lehman
Jamie Swaboski..................................Wyoming Valley West
SECOND TEAM
“I’ve never had a kid who’s worked harder, on and off the court.
She gets around double- and triple-team defenses
with ease, but she did that in practice every day.”
Lake-Lehman coach Jim Spencer
On Selena Adamshick
C M Y K
PAGE 4C SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ M A J O R L E A G U E B A S E B A L L
NEW YORK — Jason Bay
homered and drove in three
runs, Ike Davis went deep for
the third straight game and the
peppy New York Mets held off
the Arizona Diamondbacks 6-4
on Saturday for their third
straight win.
Dillon Gee (2-0) went six
innings and allowed two
earned runs, an RBI triple by
Stephen Drew and a solo
homer by Miguel Montero that
tied the game in the sixth.
Daniel Murphy made his
young teammate a winner,
though, atoning for an error
that led to two unearned runs
for Arizona with a go-ahead
single later in the sixth inning.
Murphy then gave the New
York bullpen a bit of breathing
room with another RBI single
in the eighth.
Cubs 10, Dodgers 8
CHICAGO — Jeff Baker hit a
tiebreaking two-run double in
the eighth inning and the Chi-
cago Cubs got a banner day
from the top of their lineup in a
wild 10-8 victory over the Los
Angeles Dodgers on Saturday.
Starlin Castro, Darwin Bar-
ney and Marlon Byrd com-
bined for nine hits, six RBIs
and four runs as Chicago
roughed up Ted Lilly in his
return to Wrigley Field. Castro
tied a career high with four
hits and Reed Johnson went 2
for 3 and scored twice.
Braves 5, Giants 2
SAN FRANCISCO — Tim
Hudson outdueled Tim Lince-
cum and came within one out
of his first complete game this
year, leadoff man Martin Prado
drove in Atlanta’s first three
runs and the Braves secured
just their third series win of the
season.
Reds 5, Cardinals 3
ST. LOUIS — Miguel Cairo
hit a two-out, two-run, go-
ahead single in the eighth
inning to lift Cincinnati past
St. Louis.
Pirates 7, Nationals 2
PITTSBURGH — Andrew
McCutchen scored three runs,
stole two bases and singled to
spark a five-run first inning
Saturday night and the Pitts-
burgh Pirates beat the Wash-
ington Nationals.
Rockies 3, Marlins 1
MIAMI — Jason Hammel
pitched a season-high 6 2-3
innings and bunted home a run
to give the Colorado Rockies’
sputtering offense a boost and
help them beat the Florida
Marlins.
The NL West-leading Rock-
ies snapped Florida’s four-game
winning streak and improved
to 8-2 on the road.
Astros 9, Brewers 6
MILWAUKEE — Humberto
Quintero hit a two-out, two-
run double in the 10th inning
to lift the Houston Astros over
the Milwaukee Brewers.
Quintero’s big hit off Sean
Green (0-1) came the inning
after he couldn’t tag Ryan
Braun quickly enough in a play
at the plate that completed
Milwaukee’s rally from a three-
run deficit.
N AT I O N A L L E A G U E R O U N D U P
Mets streak hits 3
with win vs. D’backs
The Associated Press
AP PHOTO
New York Mets relief pitcher
Francisco Rodriguez (75)
reacts after striking out Ari-
zona Diamondbacks’ Chris
Young to end the game, Sat-
urday at CitiField in New York.
BALTIMORE — Alex Rodri-
guez hit a milestone grand
slam and drove in six runs, CC
Sabathia earned his first win of
the season and the New York
Yankees pounded the Balti-
more Orioles 15-3 on Saturday
night.
Rodriguez connected with
the bases full against Josh
Rupe in a seven-run eighth
inning. It was his 22nd career
slam, pushing him past Manny
Ramirez into second place on
the career list behind only Lou
Gehrig (23).
The six RBIs also lifted Ro-
driguez past Carl Yastrzemski
into 10th place on the career
RBI list (1,847), according to
Elias Sports Bureau.
Russell Martin homered
twice, and Jorge Posada and
Brett Gardner also connected
for the Yankees, who lead the
majors with 35 home runs.
Sabathia (1-1) allowed three
runs and six hits in eight in-
nings, striking out seven and
walking one.
Tigers 9, White Sox 0
DETROIT — Brad Penny
had a no-hit bid broken up on
an infield single in the sixth
and the Tigers scored five in
the fifth inning in their eighth
straight win over the White
Sox, 9-0 Saturday.
With one-out in the sixth
inning, Brent Morel hit a chop-
per down the third-base line.
Brandon Inge backhanded it
behind the bag and made a
throw in the dirt that first
baseman Miguel Cabrera
couldn’t field cleanly to at-
tempt a tag on Morel.
Official scorer Ron Kleinfel-
ter called it a hit, not an error
that would’ve kept the no-
hitter intact, after watching the
replay.
Penny (1-2) pitched seven
innings, allowing a hit and
walking two.
Edwin Jackson (2-2) gave up
eight runs — seven earned —
on 12 hits and four walks over
5 2-3 innings.
Twins 10, Indians 3
MINNEAPOLIS (AP) —
Justin Morneau had a big two-
run single in his return from a
five-game absence and Minne-
sota broke out of a season-long
offensive slump against Cleve-
land.
Brian Duensing (2-0) gave
up one run on five hits in seven
innings. The Twins scored
more than five runs in a game
for the first time this season.
Fausto Carmona (1-3) gave
up six runs on seven hits and
walked four in five innings for
the Indians. Grady Sizemore
hit a two-run homer in the
eighth.
Rays 6, Blue Jays 4
TORONTO — Ben Zobrist
hit a three-run home run, Da-
vid Price remained perfect
against Toronto and the Tampa
Bay beat the Blue Jays.
Johnny Damon also went
deep for the Rays, who
snapped a two-game skid.
Rangers 3, Royals 1
ARLINGTON, Texas —
Alexi Ogando allowed only one
run pitching into the seventh
inning, Michael Young extend-
ed his hitting streak to 13
games and the Texas Rangers
defeated the Kansas City Roy-
als.
Ogando (3-0) held the Royals
scoreless until Kila Ka’aihue
led off the seventh with a
homer on the right-hander’s
14th and final pitch. He struck
out five, walked one and al-
lowed five hits.
A M E R I C A N L E A G U E R O U N D U P
Rodriguez, Yankees
slam Orioles, 15-3
The Associated Press
STANDINGS/STATS
F R I D A Y ’ S
L A T E B O X E S
Phillies 2, Padres 0
Philadelphia San Diego
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Victorn cf 3 1 1 0 Bartlett ss 4 0 0 0
Polanc 3b 3 1 1 0 OHudsn 2b 4 0 1 0
Rollins ss 3 0 0 0 Cantu 1b 4 0 0 0
Howard 1b 4 0 2 2 Hundly c 4 0 0 0
BFrncs rf 4 0 0 0 Ludwck lf 3 0 0 0
Ibanez lf 4 0 0 0 Maybin cf 4 0 1 0
Ruiz c 3 0 0 0 Venale rf 2 0 1 0
WValdz 2b 4 0 0 0 AlGnzlz 3b 2 0 0 0
Hamels p 3 0 2 0 Frieri p 0 0 0 0
Gload ph 1 0 0 0 Richrd p 2 0 0 0
Madson p 0 0 0 0 Headly 3b 1 0 1 0
Totals 32 2 6 2 Totals 30 0 4 0
Philadelphia....................... 002 000 000 — 2
San Diego.......................... 000 000 000 — 0
DP—Philadelphia 1. LOB—Philadelphia 7, San
Diego 6. 2B—Maybin (4). 3B—Howard (1). CS—
Hamels (1).
IP H R ER BB SO
Philadelphia
Hamels W,2-1.......... 8 4 0 0 3 8
Madson S,1-1.......... 1 0 0 0 0 1
San Diego
Richard L,1-1........... 7
1
⁄3 6 2 2 4 4
Frieri ......................... 1
2
⁄3 0 0 0 0 1
WP—Richard.
Braves 4, Giants 1
Atlanta San Francisco
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Prado lf 3 1 1 0 Rownd cf 3 0 0 0
Heywrd rf 4 1 2 1 FSnchz 2b 4 0 0 0
C.Jones 3b 4 1 1 2 Huff 1b 4 0 0 0
McCnn c 4 0 0 0 Posey c 4 0 0 0
Uggla 2b 4 0 0 0 PSndvl 3b 3 1 1 0
Fremn 1b 3 0 2 1 Burrell lf 3 0 1 1
AlGnzlz ss 4 0 0 0 C.Ross rf 3 0 0 0
McLoth cf 3 1 0 0 Tejada ss 3 0 1 0
Hanson p 2 0 0 0 Bmgrn p 0 0 0 0
Venters p 0 0 0 0 Vglsng p 1 0 0 0
Kimrel p 0 0 0 0 Fontent ph 1 0 0 0
Mota p 0 0 0 0
Runzler p 0 0 0 0
DeRosa ph 1 0 0 0
Romo p 0 0 0 0
Totals 31 4 6 4 Totals 30 1 3 1
Atlanta ................................ 004 000 000 — 4
San Francisco.................... 000 000 100 — 1
E—Tejada (4). DP—San Francisco 1. LOB—Atlan-
ta4, SanFrancisco3. 2B—C.Jones (5), P.Sandoval
(2). CS—Freeman (1). S—Hanson.
IP H R ER BB SO
Atlanta
Hanson W,2-3 ......... 7 3 1 1 1 7
Venters H,6.............. 1 0 0 0 0 1
Kimbrel S,5-6 .......... 1 0 0 0 0 0
San Francisco
Bumgarner L,0-3..... 2
2
⁄3 4 4 3 2 2
Vogelsong................ 3
1
⁄3 2 0 0 0 2
Mota.......................... 1 0 0 0 0 1
Runzler..................... 1 0 0 0 0 2
Romo........................ 1 0 0 0 1 1
WP—Hanson 2.
Cardinals 4, Reds 2
Cincinnati St. Louis
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Stubbs cf 4 0 2 0 Theriot ss 4 2 3 0
Phillips 2b 5 1 2 1 Rasms cf 3 0 1 0
Votto 1b 4 0 0 0 MBggs p 0 0 0 0
Gomes lf 3 0 1 1 Pujols 1b 3 0 1 2
Bruce rf 4 0 1 0 Hollidy lf 3 0 1 0
Renteri ss 4 0 1 0 Brkmn rf 4 2 2 0
Cairo 3b 3 0 2 0 Freese 3b 4 0 2 0
RHrndz c 3 0 0 0 YMolin c 4 0 1 1
Masset p 0 0 0 0 Descals 2b 3 0 0 0
Heisey ph 1 0 1 0 Batista p 0 0 0 0
Bray p 0 0 0 0 McCllln p 3 0 1 0
Volquez p 0 0 0 0 ESnchz p 0 0 0 0
Malony p 1 0 0 0 Motte p 0 0 0 0
JrSmth p 1 0 0 0 Jay cf 0 0 0 0
Hanign c 1 1 0 0
Totals 34 210 2 Totals 31 412 3
Cincinnati ........................... 000 010 100 — 2
St. Louis............................. 111 010 00x — 4
E—Bruce (2). DP—Cincinnati 2, St. Louis1. LOB—
Cincinnati 11, St. Louis 6. 2B—Theriot (4), Berkman
(4). HR—Phillips (2). SB—Stubbs (6), Gomes (4).
CS—Cairo (1), Y.Molina (1). SF—Gomes, Pujols.
IP H R ER BB SO
Cincinnati
Volquez .................... 0 0 0 0 0 0
Maloney L,0-1 ......... 2 8 3 3 1 1
Jor.Smith.................. 3 4 1 1 0 0
Masset...................... 2 0 0 0 0 1
Bray........................... 1 0 0 0 0 0
St. Louis
Batista....................... 0 0 0 0 1 0
McClellan W,3-0...... 6 7 2 2 3 2
E.Sanchez H,2 ........ 1 0 0 0 1 0
Motte H,3 .................
2
⁄3 2 0 0 0 1
M.Boggs S,2-2 ........ 1
1
⁄3 1 0 0 0 0
Batista pitched to 1 batter in the 1st.
McClellan pitched to 2 batters in the 7th.
Maloney pitched to 2 batters in the 3rd.
HBP—by Jor.Smith (Holliday). WP—Jor.Smith,
E.Sanchez 2.
Brewers 14, Astros 7
Houston Milwaukee
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Bourn cf 5 1 3 1 Weeks 2b 1 2 0 0
AngSnc ss 4 1 2 1 Counsll 2b 1 1 1 0
Pence rf 5 0 1 2 CGomz cf 5 2 3 3
Ca.Lee lf 5 1 1 1 Braun lf 4 2 3 3
Melncn p 0 0 0 0 Hwkns p 0 0 0 0
Wallac 1b 5 1 3 1 Estrad p 0 0 0 0
CJhnsn 3b 3 0 0 0 Fielder 1b 3 3 0 0
Abad p 0 0 0 0 Almont 1b 0 0 0 0
JValdz p 0 0 0 0 McGeh 3b 4 2 3 2
Fulchin p 0 0 0 0 Kotsay rf 5 0 3 2
Inglett ph-2b 2 0 0 0 YBtncr ss 5 0 2 2
Hall 2b 3 1 1 0 Lucroy c 5 1 1 1
DelRsr p 0 0 0 0 Gallard p 3 1 1 1
Bourgs lf 1 0 0 0 Green p 0 0 0 0
Quinter c 3 2 3 1
BBoggs
ph-lf 2 0 0 0
Figuero p 1 0 0 0
MDwns 3b 2 0 0 0
Totals 39 714 7 Totals 38141714
Houston ........................... 002 110 210 — 7
Milwaukee........................ 013 124 30x — 14
E—Ca.Lee (1), Hall (1). DP—Houston 2. LOB—
Houston 9, Milwaukee 9. 2B—Bourn (7), Ca.Lee
(3), McGehee (4), Y.Betancourt (5). 3B—Hall (2).
HR—C.Gomez (2), Braun (6), Gallardo (1). SB—
Bourn (9), Weeks (1). S—Figueroa. SF—Ang.San-
chez.
IP H R ER BB SO
Houston
Figueroa L,0-3......... 4 6 6 6 5 2
Abad .........................
2
⁄3 2 1 0 0 0
J.Valdez ................... 1 3 4 4 2 2
Fulchino ...................
1
⁄3 0 0 0 0 0
Del Rosario.............. 1 4 3 3 0 1
Melancon ................. 1 2 0 0 1 1
Milwaukee
Gallardo W,2-1........ 6 8 4 4 1 7
Green ....................... 1 3 2 2 0 1
Hawkins.................... 1 3 1 1 0 0
Estrada..................... 1 0 0 0 0 1
Figueroa pitched to 1 batter in the 5th.
HBP—by J.Valdez (Weeks), by Gallardo (Quinte-
ro). WP—Gallardo.
Red Sox 4, Angels 3
Boston Los Angeles
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Ellsury cf 4 0 1 1 Bourjos cf 5 0 1 0
Pedroia 2b 4 0 0 0 HKndrc 2b 4 1 1 0
AdGnzl 1b 5 0 0 0 Abreu dh 4 1 1 1
Ortiz dh 4 0 0 0 TrHntr rf 4 0 1 0
Lowrie 3b 3 2 1 0 V.Wells lf 4 0 1 0
J.Drew rf 3 1 2 1 Callasp 3b 2 0 0 0
Crwfrd lf 4 0 0 0 Willits pr 0 0 0 0
Sltlmch c 3 1 1 0 BoWlsn 1b 0 0 0 0
Scutaro ss 3 0 0 0 Trumo 1b 3 0 0 0
MIzturs
ph-3b 1 0 0 0
Aybar ss 4 1 2 0
Mathis c 3 0 1 1
Conger ph 1 0 1 0
Totals 33 4 5 2 Totals 35 3 9 2
Boston................................ 001 201 000 — 4
Los Angeles....................... 000 000 120 — 3
E—V.Wells (2), Bourjos (1). DP—Boston 1. LOB—
Boston 8, Los Angeles 8. 2B—Ellsbury (2), Lowrie
(3), J.Drew (2), Saltalamacchia (2), Bourjos (5),
H.Kendrick (4). SB—Crawford (4), Bourjos (2),
H.Kendrick (1), Aybar (2).
IP H R ER BB SO
Boston
Lester W,2-1............ 6 4 0 0 2 8
Albers....................... 1 2 1 1 0 0
Jenks H,2................. 1 2 2 1 1 0
Papelbon S,5-5....... 1 1 0 0 0 1
Los Angeles
Haren L,4-1.............. 6 5 4 2 3 6
F.Rodriguez............. 1 0 0 0 1 1
T.Bell ........................ 2 0 0 0 2 1
WP—Lester, Jenks, T.Bell. PB—Saltalamacchia,
Mathis.
Umpires—Home, Larry Vanover;First, Tony Ran-
dazzo;Second, Dan Bellino;Third, Brian Gorman.
Mariners 4, Athletics 0
Oakland Seattle
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Crisp cf 4 0 0 0 ISuzuki rf 4 0 2 0
Barton 1b 4 0 0 0 Figgins 3b 3 1 0 0
DeJess rf 4 0 1 0 Bradly lf 0 0 0 0
Wlngh lf 4 0 1 0 MSndrs lf 2 1 0 0
Matsui dh 3 0 1 0 Cust dh 2 0 0 1
KSuzuk c 3 0 2 0 AKndy 1b 4 1 2 2
M.Ellis 2b 4 0 1 0 Olivo c 4 0 0 0
Kzmnff 3b 3 0 1 0 Lngrhn cf 2 0 1 0
Sweeny ph 0 0 0 0 Ryan ss 4 0 0 0
Pnngtn ss 2 0 0 0 JWilson 2b 4 1 2 1
CJcksn ph 1 0 0 0
Totals 32 0 7 0 Totals 29 4 7 4
Oakland.............................. 000 000 000 — 0
Seattle ................................ 010 030 00x — 4
DP—Oakland 1, Seattle 2. LOB—Oakland 9, Seat-
tle 8. SB—I.Suzuki (7). CS—Langerhans (1).
IP H R ER BB SO
Oakland
T.Ross L,1-2............ 4
1
⁄3 4 3 3 4 0
Blevins...................... 0 1 1 1 2 0
Ziegler ...................... 1
1
⁄3 1 0 0 0 2
Purcey ...................... 1
1
⁄3 0 0 0 1 1
Breslow.................... 1 1 0 0 0 1
Seattle
Pineda W,3-1 .......... 6 5 0 0 2 5
Pauley.......................
1
⁄3 0 0 0 1 0
Laffey........................ 1
2
⁄3 0 0 0 0 0
J.Wright ....................
1
⁄3 2 0 0 1 1
League S,5-5...........
2
⁄3 0 0 0 0 0
Blevins pitched to 3 batters in the 5th.
WP—Pineda. PB—K.Suzuki.
S T A N D I N G S
AMERICAN LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
New York ....................................... 11 6 .647 — — 7-3 W-2 8-3 3-3
Tampa Bay..................................... 10 11 .476 3 2
1
⁄2 7-3 W-1 6-7 4-4
Toronto........................................... 9 11 .450 3
1
⁄2 3 4-6 L-1 6-4 3-7
Baltimore........................................ 8 11 .421 4 3
1
⁄2 2-8 L-2 5-6 3-5
Boston............................................ 8 11 .421 4 3
1
⁄2 6-4 W-3 5-4 3-7
Central Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Cleveland....................................... 13 7 .650 — — 5-5 L-2 7-2 6-5
Kansas City ................................... 12 9 .571 1
1
⁄2
1
⁄2 5-5 L-2 9-5 3-4
Detroit............................................. 11 10 .524 2
1
⁄2 1
1
⁄2 7-3 W-3 5-3 6-7
Minnesota...................................... 8 12 .400 5 4 4-6 W-2 3-3 5-9
Chicago.......................................... 8 13 .381 5
1
⁄2 4
1
⁄2 1-9 L-2 4-6 4-7
West Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Texas ............................................. 13 7 .650 — — 4-6 W-2 9-2 4-5
Los Angeles .................................. 12 8 .600 1 — 7-3 L-2 4-4 8-4
Oakland.......................................... 9 11 .450 4 3 4-6 L-3 4-5 5-6
Seattle ............................................ 8 13 .381 5
1
⁄2 4
1
⁄2 4-6 W-2 5-6 3-7
NATIONAL LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Philadelphia................................... 13 6 .684 — — 6-4 W-3 7-4 6-2
Florida............................................ 12 7 .632 1 — 7-3 L-1 7-4 5-3
Washington ................................... 9 10 .474 4 3 5-5 L-3 5-4 4-6
Atlanta............................................ 10 12 .455 4
1
⁄2 3
1
⁄2 5-5 W-2 4-5 6-7
New York ....................................... 8 13 .381 6 5 4-6 W-3 4-8 4-5
Central Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Cincinnati ....................................... 11 10 .524 — 2 3-7 W-1 7-6 4-4
St. Louis......................................... 11 10 .524 — 2 7-3 L-1 5-6 6-4
Chicago.......................................... 10 10 .500
1
⁄2 2
1
⁄2 5-5 W-1 6-5 4-5
Milwaukee...................................... 10 10 .500
1
⁄2 2
1
⁄2 5-5 L-1 6-3 4-7
Pittsburgh ...................................... 9 11 .450 1
1
⁄2 3
1
⁄2 4-6 W-1 2-5 7-6
Houston ......................................... 8 13 .381 3 5 5-5 W-1 4-6 4-7
West Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Colorado........................................ 14 6 .700 — — 6-4 W-1 6-4 8-2
Los Angeles .................................. 11 11 .500 4 2
1
⁄2 5-5 L-1 7-5 4-6
San Francisco ............................... 10 10 .500 4 2
1
⁄2 6-4 L-3 4-4 6-6
Arizona........................................... 8 11 .421 5
1
⁄2 4 4-6 L-3 4-5 4-6
San Diego...................................... 8 12 .400 6 4
1
⁄2 4-6 L-2 3-7 5-5
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Friday's Games
Detroit 9, Chicago White Sox 3
N.Y. Yankees at Baltimore, ppd., rain
Toronto 6, Tampa Bay 4, 11 innings
Texas 11, Kansas City 6
Cleveland at Minnesota, ppd., rain
Boston 4, L.A. Angels 3
Seattle 4, Oakland 0
Saturday's Games
Tampa Bay 6, Toronto 4
Minnesota 10, Cleveland 3
Detroit 9, Chicago White Sox 0
N.Y. Yankees 15, Baltimore 3
Texas 3, Kansas City 1
Boston at L.A. Angels, (n)
Oakland at Seattle(n)
Sunday's Games
ChicagoWhiteSox (Danks 0-2) at Detroit (Scherzer
3-0), 1:05 p.m.
TampaBay (Shields1-1) at Toronto(R.Romero1-2),
1:07 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees (F.Garcia 1-0) at Baltimore (Arrieta
2-1), 1:35 p.m.
Cleveland (C.Carrasco 1-1) at Minnesota (Pavano
1-2), 2:10 p.m.
Kansas City (Chen 3-0) at Texas (C.Wilson 2-0),
3:05 p.m.
Boston (Lackey 1-2) at L.A. Angels (Palmer 1-0),
3:35 p.m.
Oakland (Anderson 1-1) at Seattle (Fister 1-3), 4:10
p.m.
Monday's Games
Chicago White Sox at N.Y. Yankees, 7:05 p.m.
Toronto at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
Oakland at L.A. Angels, 10:05 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Friday's Games
L.A. Dodgers 12, Chicago Cubs 2
Washington at Pittsburgh, ppd., rain
N.Y. Mets 4, Arizona 1
Florida 4, Colorado 1
Milwaukee 14, Houston 7
St. Louis 4, Cincinnati 2
Philadelphia 2, San Diego 0
Atlanta 4, San Francisco 1
Saturday's Games
Chicago Cubs 10, L.A. Dodgers 8
N.Y. Mets 6, Arizona 4
Atlanta 5, San Francisco 2
Cincinnati 5, St. Louis 3
Pittsburgh 7, Washington 2
Colorado 3, Florida 1
Houston 9, Milwaukee 6, 10 innings
Philadelphia at San Diego, (n)
Sunday's Games
Arizona (Galarraga 3-0) at N.Y. Mets (Niese 0-3),
1:10 p.m.
Colorado(Jimenez 0-1) at Florida(Jo.Johnson3-0),
1:10 p.m.
Washington (Marquis 1-0) at Pittsburgh (Correia
3-1), 1:35 p.m.
Houston (W.Rodriguez 1-2) at Milwaukee (Wolf
2-2), 2:10 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Kuroda 2-2) at Chicago Cubs (Zam-
brano 2-0), 2:20 p.m.
Atlanta (Beachy 1-1) at San Francisco (J.Sanchez
2-1), 4:05 p.m.
Philadelphia (Halladay 2-1) at San Diego (LeBlanc
0-0), 4:05 p.m.
Cincinnati (LeCure 0-1) at St. Louis (Westbrook
1-2), 8:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
Washington at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers at Florida, 7:10 p.m.
Colorado at Chicago Cubs, 8:05 p.m.
Cincinnati at Milwaukee, 8:10 p.m.
Philadelphia at Arizona, 9:40 p.m.
Atlanta at San Diego, 10:05 p.m.
A L B O X E S
Rays 6, Blue Jays 4
Tampa Bay Toronto
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Fuld lf 3 2 1 0 YEscor ss 4 0 1 0
Damon dh 4 1 1 3 CPttrsn cf 4 0 0 0
Joyce rf 3 1 0 0 Bautist rf 3 3 3 2
Zobrist 2b 4 1 1 3 Lind 1b 4 1 1 1
BUpton cf 4 0 2 0 JMolin c 4 0 2 0
Ktchm 1b 4 0 1 0 JRiver dh 4 0 1 1
Jaso c 4 0 0 0 Wdwrd pr 0 0 0 0
SRdrgz 3b 3 1 0 0 Snider lf 3 0 0 0
Brignc ss 3 0 0 0 JMcDnl 3b 4 0 0 0
McCoy 2b 3 0 1 0
Totals 32 6 6 6 Totals 33 4 9 4
Tampa Bay......................... 200 003 100 — 6
Toronto............................... 100 100 002 — 4
E—Janssen (1). DP—Tampa Bay 2. LOB—Tampa
Bay 4, Toronto 5. 2B—Lind (5). HR—Damon (4),
Zobrist (4), Bautista 2 (7). SB—Fuld (10), B.Upton
(5). CS—Kotchman (1). S—Brignac, Snider.
IP H R ER BB SO
Tampa Bay
Price W,3-2.............. 8 8 4 4 2 5
Farnsworth S,5-5.... 1 1 0 0 0 0
Toronto
Morrow L,0-1........... 5
1
⁄3 3 3 3 2 10
Villanueva ................
2
⁄3 2 2 2 1 0
Janssen.................... 2 1 1 0 0 0
Dotel ......................... 1 0 0 0 0 0
Price pitched to 3 batters in the 9th.
HBP—by Janssen (S.Rodriguez). PB—J.Molina.
Umpires—Home, Mike Winters;First, Mike Everitt-
;Second, Mark Wegner;Third, Chris Guccione.
T—2:46. A—21,826 (49,260).
Tigers 9, White Sox 0
Chicago Detroit
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Pierre lf 2 0 0 0 AJcksn cf 5 1 2 0
Teahen ph-lf 1 0 0 0 Rhyms 2b 3 0 0 0
AlRmrz ss 4 0 0 0 Ordonz dh 4 1 1 1
Quentin rf 3 0 0 0 MiCarr 1b 5 2 2 1
Konerk 1b 4 0 0 0 Boesch rf 3 1 1 0
A.Dunn dh 3 0 0 0 C.Wells rf 1 0 0 0
Rios cf 3 0 0 0 Raburn lf 3 1 2 3
RCastr ph 1 0 1 0 JhPerlt ss 5 1 2 1
Przyns c 4 0 1 0 Avila c 4 1 3 2
Bckhm 2b 2 0 0 0 Inge 3b 4 1 2 1
Lillirdg ph-2b 1 0 1 0
Morel 3b 4 0 2 0
Totals 32 0 5 0 Totals 37 915 9
Chicago.............................. 000 000 000 — 0
Detroit................................. 000 503 01x — 9
E—Pierre (4). DP—Chicago 2. LOB—Chicago 9,
Detroit 10. 2B—Mi.Cabrera 2 (6), Boesch (7).
3B—Avila (1). S—Rhymes. SF—Raburn.
IP H R ER BB SO
Chicago
E.Jackson L,2-2...... 5
2
⁄3 12 8 7 4 3
Ohman......................
1
⁄3 0 0 0 0 1
Gray .......................... 2 3 1 1 0 0
Detroit
Penny W,1-2............ 7 1 0 0 2 3
Perry......................... 1 2 0 0 0 2
Alburquerque........... 1 2 0 0 1 2
HBP—by Penny (Quentin). WP—E.Jackson.
Umpires—Home, Adrian Johnson;First, Gary Ce-
derstrom;Second, Lance Barksdale;Third, Fieldin
Culbreth.
T—3:01. A—35,227 (41,255).
Twins 10, Indians 3
Cleveland Minnesota
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Sizemr cf 4 1 1 2 Span cf 4 3 2 0
ACarer ss 4 1 1 0 Repko lf 3 1 2 2
Choo rf 4 0 1 0 Kubel rf 3 1 2 3
CSantn c 3 0 0 1 Mornea 1b 5 0 2 2
Hafner dh 4 0 1 0 Cuddyr 2b 5 0 0 1
OCarer 2b 4 0 1 0 Thome dh 2 0 1 0
Brantly lf 4 0 0 0
Tolbert
pr-dh 0 1 0 0
LaPort 1b 3 0 0 0 Valenci 3b 4 1 1 2
Hannhn 3b 2 1 1 0 Butera c 4 1 1 0
ACasill ss 4 2 2 0
Totals 32 3 6 3 Totals 34101310
Cleveland......................... 000 100 020 — 3
Minnesota........................ 003 032 20x — 10
DP—Cleveland1, Minnesota1. LOB—Cleveland 4,
Minnesota 7. 2B—A.Cabrera (3), Kubel (6), Butera
(2). HR—Sizemore (2), Valencia (2). SB—O.Ca-
brera (1), Span (2), Cuddyer (1). S—Repko. SF—
Kubel.
IP H R ER BB SO
Cleveland
Carmona L,1-3........ 5 7 6 6 4 1
Durbin....................... 2 4 4 4 1 2
Germano.................. 1 2 0 0 0 1
Minnesota
Duensing W,2-0...... 7 5 1 1 1 3
D.Hughes................. 1 1 2 2 1 0
Nathan ...................... 1 0 0 0 0 2
WP—Carmona.
Umpires—Home, James Hoye;First, Tom Hallion-
;Second, Bill Miller;Third, Alan Porter.
T—2:23. A—39,459 (39,500).
Yankees 15, Orioles 3
New York Baltimore
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Jeter ss 4 2 1 0 BRorts 2b 4 0 1 0
ENunez ss 1 0 0 0
CIzturs
pr-ss 0 0 0 0
Grndrs cf 5 1 1 0 Markks rf 3 1 1 0
Teixeir 1b 3 2 2 0 D.Lee 1b 4 1 2 0
AlRdrg 3b 5 2 2 6 Guerrr dh 4 0 0 0
Chavez 3b 0 0 0 0 AdJons cf 4 1 1 3
Cano 2b 5 2 3 1 MrRynl 3b 3 0 0 0
Swisher rf 4 1 0 0 Wieters c 3 0 0 0
Posada dh 5 1 1 2 Pie lf 1 0 0 0
Martin c 3 3 2 4 Fox lf-c 3 0 0 0
Gardnr lf 5 1 2 2
Andino
ss-2b 3 0 1 0
Totals 40151415 Totals 32 3 6 3
New York......................... 300 003 072 — 15
Baltimore.......................... 000 000 300 — 3
DP—New York 1, Baltimore 1. LOB—New York 4,
Baltimore 4. 2B—Teixeira (5), Al.Rodriguez (6),
Gardner (2). HR—Al.Rodriguez (5), Posada (6),
Martin 2 (6), Gardner (1), Ad.Jones (4).
IP H R ER BB SO
New York
Sabathia W,1-1........ 8 6 3 3 1 7
Carlyle...................... 1 0 0 0 1 0
Baltimore
Bergesen L,0-3 ....... 6 8 6 6 2 4
Berken...................... 1
1
⁄3 3 3 3 1 0
Rapada.....................
1
⁄3 1 3 3 2 0
Rupe......................... 1
1
⁄3 2 3 3 0 2
HBP—by Rupe (Martin).
Umpires—Home, Brian Runge;First, Angel Cam-
pos;Second, Marvin Hudson;Third, Ted Barrett.
T—2:43. A—39,054 (45,438).
Cubs 10, Dodgers 8
Los Angeles Chicago
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Miles 2b 5 1 1 0 SCastro ss 5 2 4 3
Blake 3b 3 3 2 2 Barney 2b 5 2 3 3
Ethier rf 4 0 1 2 Byrd cf 5 0 2 0
Kemp cf 5 1 2 2 ArRmr 3b 4 1 1 1
Sands lf 4 1 1 0 JeBakr 1b 5 0 2 2
Loney 1b 5 0 0 0 Marml p 0 0 0 0
Barajs c 5 1 1 2 Soto c 3 1 1 0
Carroll ss 4 0 2 0 ASorin lf 4 1 1 0
Lilly p 2 0 0 0 RJhnsn rf 3 2 2 1
MacDgl p 0 0 0 0 Dmpstr p 3 0 0 0
GwynJ ph 1 1 1 0 Marshll p 0 0 0 0
Padilla p 0 0 0 0 Smrdzj p 0 0 0 0
Thams ph 1 0 0 0 Fukdm ph 0 1 0 0
Guerrir p 0 0 0 0 C.Pena 1b 0 0 0 0
Hwksw p 0 0 0 0
Totals 39 811 8 Totals 37101610
Los Angeles .................... 001 033 100 — 8
Chicago............................ 101 300 05x — 10
E—Loney (1), Kemp (2), Soto (2). DP—Los An-
geles 1. LOB—Los Angeles 8, Chicago 8.
2B—Ethier (8), S.Castro (5), Barney (4), Je.Baker
(3), Re.Johnson (3). 3B—Gwynn Jr. (1). HR—
Blake (2), Kemp (5), Barajas (4). SB—Sands (1),
S.Castro (3), Barney (1), Byrd (1). SF—Ar.Ramirez.
IP H R ER BB SO
Los Angeles
Lilly............................ 4
1
⁄3 11 5 5 1 3
MacDougal ..............
2
⁄3 0 0 0 2 2
Padilla H,1 ............... 1 0 0 0 0 1
Guerrier L,1-1
BS,1-1 ...................... 1
2
⁄3 4 5 5 1 2
Hawksworth .............
1
⁄3 1 0 0 0 0
Chicago
Dempster ................. 5
2
⁄3 9 7 7 3 3
Marshall ................... 1 2 1 0 0 1
Samardzija W,2-0... 1
1
⁄3 0 0 0 0 3
Marmol S,5-7........... 1 0 0 0 1 1
WP—Lilly.
Braves 5, Giants 2
Atlanta San Francisco
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Prado 3b-lf 4 1 2 3 Rownd cf 3 0 0 0
Heywrd rf 3 0 2 0 FSnchz 2b 4 0 1 0
Fremn 1b 5 0 1 0 Huff 1b 4 0 0 0
McCnn c 5 0 1 2 PSndvl 3b 4 0 0 0
Uggla 2b 4 0 0 0 Burrell lf 4 2 3 0
Hinske lf 4 0 1 0 C.Ross rf 4 0 2 1
Hicks 3b 0 0 0 0 Tejada ss 3 0 1 1
AlGnzlz ss 4 1 1 0 Whitsd c 3 0 1 0
McLoth cf 2 3 1 0 Schrhlt ph 1 0 0 0
THudsn p 1 0 0 0 Linccm p 2 0 1 0
Kimrel p 0 0 0 0 JaLopz p 0 0 0 0
Fontent ph 1 0 0 0
Affeldt p 0 0 0 0
RRmrz p 0 0 0 0
Posey ph 1 0 0 0
Totals 32 5 9 5 Totals 34 2 9 2
Atlanta ................................ 001 010 300 — 5
San Francisco.................... 010 000 001 — 2
E—Prado (2). DP—Atlanta 2, San Francisco 1.
LOB—Atlanta 8, San Francisco 7.
2B—Ale.Gonzalez (4), Burrell 2(2). CS—Prado(1).
S—T.Hudson 2. SF—Tejada.
IP H R ER BB SO
Atlanta
T.Hudson W,3-2...... 8
2
⁄3 9 2 2 0 4
Kimbrel S,6-7 ..........
1
⁄3 0 0 0 0 0
San Francisco
Lincecum L,2-2 ....... 6
1
⁄3 6 5 5 6 6
Ja.Lopez ..................
2
⁄3 1 0 0 0 0
Affeldt ....................... 1 0 0 0 0 0
R.Ramirez................ 1 2 0 0 0 2
HBP—by T.Hudson (Rowand). WP—T.Hudson.
Umpires—Home, Jim Joyce;First, Ron Kulpa;Se-
cond, Jim Wolf;Third, Derryl Cousins.
T—2:41. A—42,395 (41,915).
Rangers 3, Royals 1
Kansas City Texas
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Getz 2b 4 0 0 0 Kinsler 2b 4 0 0 0
MeCarr cf 4 0 3 0 Andrus ss 3 1 0 0
Gordon lf 3 0 1 0 MiYong dh 4 1 2 0
Butler dh 4 0 0 0 ABeltre 3b 3 0 0 1
Francr rf 4 0 1 0 N.Cruz lf-rf 3 0 1 1
Betemt 3b 4 0 0 0 DvMrp cf-lf 3 1 0 0
Kaaihu 1b 3 1 1 1 Torreal c 3 0 0 0
Treanr c 4 0 0 0 Morlnd rf 3 0 1 1
AEscor ss 4 0 1 0 Borbon cf 0 0 0 0
C.Davis 1b 2 0 0 0
Totals 34 1 7 1 Totals 28 3 4 3
Kansas City ....................... 000 000 100 — 1
Texas.................................. 012 000 00x — 3
E—Getz (3), Andrus (4). DP—Texas1. LOB—Kan-
sas City 8, Texas 4. 2B—Me.Cabrera (7), Fran-
coeur (6), Moreland (8). HR—Ka’aihue (2). SB—
A.Escobar (5), Mi.Young (3). SF—A.Beltre.
IP H R ER BB SO
Kansas City
Davies L,1-2 ............ 6 4 3 2 1 3
Collins....................... 1 0 0 0 1 1
L.Coleman ............... 1 0 0 0 0 2
Texas
Ogando W,3-0......... 6 5 1 1 1 5
Eppley H,1............... 2 2 0 0 0 1
Oliver S,1-2.............. 1 0 0 0 0 1
Ogando pitched to 1 batter in the 7th.
HBP—by Ogando (Gordon).
Umpires—Home, Vic Carapazza;First, Brian
Knight;Second, Jerry Meals;Third, Hunter Wendel-
stedt.
T—2:50. A—45,506 (49,170).
N L B O X E S
Mets 6, Diamondbacks 4
Arizona New York
ab r h bi ab r h bi
CYoung cf 5 0 0 0 JosRys ss 4 2 2 0
KJhnsn 2b 4 0 0 0 DnMrp 2b 5 0 2 2
J.Upton rf 4 1 2 0 DWrght 3b 5 1 2 0
S.Drew ss 3 1 1 1 Beltran rf 4 0 1 0
Monter c 4 2 1 1 Bay lf 4 1 2 3
RRorts 3b 4 0 1 1 I.Davis 1b 4 1 2 1
Mirand 1b 4 0 1 0 Thole c 4 0 1 0
GParra lf 4 0 2 1 Pridie cf 4 0 1 0
Enright p 2 0 0 0 Gee p 1 0 1 0
Demel p 0 0 0 0 Turner ph 1 1 1 0
Branyn ph 1 0 0 0 Beato p 0 0 0 0
Vasquz p 0 0 0 0 Isrnghs p 0 0 0 0
Patersn p 0 0 0 0 Hairstn ph 0 0 0 0
DHrndz p 0 0 0 0 Harris ph 1 0 0 0
Nady ph 1 0 0 0 FRdrgz p 0 0 0 0
Totals 36 4 8 4 Totals 37 615 6
Arizona............................... 100 201 000 — 4
New York ........................... 202 001 01x — 6
E—Dan.Murphy (1). DP—Arizona1. LOB—Arizona
6, New York 9. 2B—Thole (2), Turner (1).
3B—S.Drew (2). HR—Montero (3), Bay (1), I.Davis
(4). SB—J.Upton(3), G.Parra(2), D.Wright (4). S—
Gee.
IP H R ER BB SO
Arizona
Enright L,0-2............ 5
2
⁄3 12 5 5 1 2
Demel .......................
1
⁄3 1 0 0 0 0
Vasquez...................
1
⁄3 0 0 0 0 0
Paterson................... 1 0 0 0 0 1
D.Hernandez ...........
2
⁄3 2 1 1 0 1
New York
Gee W,2-0 ............... 6 5 4 2 1 5
Beato H,1 ................. 1 0 0 0 0 1
Isringhausen H,3..... 1 1 0 0 0 2
F.Rodriguez S,4-5 .. 1 2 0 0 0 3
Balk—D.Hernandez.
Astros 9, Brewers 6
Houston Milwaukee
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Bourn cf 6 1 1 0 Counsll 2b 6 2 2 0
AngSnc ss 5 2 2 1 CGomz cf 5 1 1 0
Pence rf 4 1 2 2 Braun lf 5 2 2 3
Ca.Lee lf 4 1 1 2 Fielder 1b 5 1 3 2
Bourgs lf 1 0 0 0 McGeh 3b 5 0 1 0
Wallac 1b 4 2 2 0 Kotsay rf 4 0 2 0
Hall 2b 4 1 3 1 YBtncr ss 3 0 2 1
CJhnsn 3b 5 0 0 0 Lucroy c 4 0 2 0
Quinter c 5 1 2 2 Marcm p 2 0 0 0
Myers p 3 0 0 0 BBoggs ph 1 0 0 0
Abad p 0 0 0 0 Kintzlr p 0 0 0 0
Fulchin p 0 0 0 0 Brddck p 0 0 0 0
Inglett ph 1 0 0 0 Loe p 0 0 0 0
Melncn p 0 0 0 0 Almont ph 1 0 0 0
Lyon p 1 0 1 1 Axford p 0 0 0 0
Green p 0 0 0 0
Stetter p 0 0 0 0
Nieves ph 1 0 0 0
Totals 43 914 9 Totals 42 615 6
Houston........................ 301 000 200 3 — 9
Milwaukee .................... 012 000 201 0 — 6
E—Pence (2), Wallace (1). DP—Houston 1, Mil-
waukee 1. LOB—Houston 7, Milwaukee 11.
2B—Ang.Sanchez 2 (4), Wallace 2 (6), Quintero
(4), Lyon (1), Fielder (8), McGehee (5). HR—Pence
(3), Ca.Lee (2), Braun (7). SB—Quintero (1), C.Go-
mez (5). S—C.Gomez. SF—Y.Betancourt.
IP H R ER BB SO
Houston
Myers........................ 6
1
⁄3 10 5 5 1 4
Abad H,4 ..................
1
⁄3 0 0 0 0 1
Fulchino H,2 ............
1
⁄3 1 0 0 0 0
Melancon H,2 .......... 1 2 0 0 0 0
Lyon W,1-1 BS,2-6. 2 2 1 1 2 1
Milwaukee
Marcum.................... 6 7 4 4 1 8
Kintzler ..................... 1 3 2 2 0 2
Braddock.................. 0 0 0 0 0 0
Loe............................ 1 1 0 0 0 1
Axford....................... 1 0 0 0 0 2
Green L,0-1 .............
2
⁄3 3 3 3 1 0
Stetter.......................
1
⁄3 0 0 0 0 1
Braddock pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.
HBP—by Braddock (Wallace). WP—Myers, Loe.
Umpires—Home, Mike Muchlinski;First, Joe West-
;Second, Angel Hernandez;Third, Paul Schrieber.
T—3:54. A—37,065 (41,900).
Reds 5, Cardinals 3
Cincinnati St. Louis
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Stubbs cf 4 1 0 0 Theriot ss 3 0 0 0
Phillips 2b 4 1 0 0 Rasms cf 3 0 1 1
Votto 1b 3 2 1 2 Pujols 1b 4 1 1 1
Gomes lf 3 1 0 0 Hollidy lf 4 0 0 0
Bruce rf 3 0 0 1 Brkmn rf 3 1 2 0
Cairo 3b 4 0 1 2 Freese 3b 4 0 2 1
RHrndz c 3 0 0 0 YMolin c 4 0 1 0
Chpmn p 0 0 0 0 Punto 2b 2 0 0 0
Hermid ph 1 0 0 0 Carpntr p 2 1 1 0
Ondrsk p 0 0 0 0 Salas p 0 0 0 0
Corder p 0 0 0 0 Greene ph 1 0 0 0
Janish ss 4 0 1 0 Batista p 0 0 0 0
T.Wood p 2 0 0 0 Miller p 0 0 0 0
Hanign c 2 0 1 0 Frnkln p 0 0 0 0
Totals 33 5 4 5 Totals 30 3 8 3
Cincinnati ........................... 000 002 030 — 5
St. Louis............................. 011 001 000 — 3
E—Theriot (6), Freese (1). DP—Cincinnati 1.
LOB—Cincinnati 7, St. Louis 4. 2B—Hanigan (2),
Berkman (5), Y.Molina (6), Carpenter (1). HR—Vot-
to (4), Pujols (7). SB—Rasmus (2). CS—Berkman
(1). S—Theriot, Punto. SF—Rasmus.
IP H R ER BB SO
Cincinnati
T.Wood..................... 6
1
⁄3 8 3 3 1 5
Chapman W,1-0......
2
⁄3 0 0 0 0 1
Ondrusek H,2.......... 1 0 0 0 0 0
Cordero S,3-3.......... 1 0 0 0 0 0
St. Louis
Carpenter................. 6 2 2 2 3 6
Salas H,1 ................. 1 0 0 0 0 1
Batista L,1-1 H,2......
2
⁄3 0 3 0 1 1
Miller ......................... 0 0 0 0 1 0
Franklin..................... 1
1
⁄3 2 0 0 0 0
Miller pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.
HBP—by Batista (Gomes).
Umpires—Home, Scott Barry;First, John Hirsch-
beck;Second, Wally Bell;Third, Laz Diaz.
T—2:52 (Rain delay: 0:42). A—41,877 (43,975).
Rockies 3, Marlins 1
Colorado Florida
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Fowler cf 3 1 0 0 Coghln cf 3 0 1 1
Herrer 2b 4 0 2 0 Infante 2b 4 0 1 0
CGnzlz lf 3 0 0 0 HRmrz ss 4 0 0 0
Tlwtzk ss 4 0 2 1 GSnchz 1b 4 0 0 0
Helton 1b 4 1 1 0 Dobbs 3b 3 0 0 0
S.Smith rf 4 1 1 0 Stanton rf 4 0 2 0
Wggntn 3b 3 0 0 1 J.Buck c 4 1 1 0
JMorls c 3 0 0 0 Bonifac lf 4 0 1 0
Hamml p 2 0 0 1 Vazquz p 1 0 1 0
Lndstr p 0 0 0 0 R.Webb p 0 0 0 0
RBtncr p 0 0 0 0 OMrtnz ph 1 0 0 0
Splrghs ph 1 0 0 0 Sanchs p 0 0 0 0
Street p 0 0 0 0
Totals 31 3 6 3 Totals 32 1 7 1
Colorado ............................ 100 002 000 — 3
Florida ................................ 001 000 000 — 1
E—H.Ramirez (5). DP—Florida 1. LOB—Colorado
8, Florida 7. 2B—Helton (5), S.Smith (8), J.Buck
(5). 3B—Coghlan (1). SB—Tulowitzki (2). S—Ham-
mel, Vazquez. SF—Wigginton, Coghlan.
IP H R ER BB SO
Colorado
Hammel W,2-1 ........ 6
2
⁄3 7 1 1 1 4
Lindstrom H,4..........
1
⁄3 0 0 0 0 0
R.Betancourt H,5 .... 1 0 0 0 0 1
Street S,7-7 ............. 1 0 0 0 0 1
Florida
Vazquez L,1-2......... 6 4 3 3 5 5
R.Webb.................... 1 2 0 0 0 1
Sanches ................... 2 0 0 0 0 2
Umpires—Home, Dan Iassogna;First, Dale Scott-
;Second, John Tumpane;Third, C.B. Bucknor.
T—2:54. A—37,381 (38,560).
Pirates 7, Nationals 2
Washington Pittsburgh
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Espinos 2b 4 0 0 0 AMcCt cf 2 3 1 0
Ankiel cf 3 0 1 0 Tabata lf 2 1 2 1
Werth rf 3 1 1 1 Overay 1b 4 1 2 2
AdLRc 1b 4 1 1 0 Walker 2b 3 0 0 0
WRams c 4 0 1 0 GJones rf 4 1 1 1
Morse lf 4 0 2 1 Doumit c 4 1 1 1
Dsmnd ss 3 0 0 0 Alvarez 3b 4 0 0 1
HrstnJr 3b 4 0 0 0 Cedeno ss 4 0 2 1
LHrndz p 2 0 0 0 Karstns p 3 0 0 0
Stairs ph 1 0 0 0 Resop p 0 0 0 0
Brdrck p 0 0 0 0 Beimel p 0 0 0 0
Balestr p 0 0 0 0 Bowker ph 1 0 0 0
Meek p 0 0 0 0
Totals 32 2 6 2 Totals 31 7 9 7
Washington ....................... 010 100 000 — 2
Pittsburgh .......................... 510 001 00x — 7
E—Desmond 2 (6), W.Ramos (2). LOB—Washing-
ton6, Pittsburgh5. 2B—Ad.LaRoche(1), W.Ramos
(3), Tabata (5), G.Jones (1), Cedeno (2). HR—
Werth (3). SB—Desmond (8), A.McCutchen 2 (3),
Tabata (9). CS—Doumit (1). SF—Tabata.
IP H R ER BB SO
Washington
L.Hernandez L,2-2.. 6 9 7 4 4 2
Broderick.................. 1 0 0 0 0 0
Balester .................... 1 0 0 0 0 1
Pittsburgh
Karstens W,2-0....... 6 6 2 2 1 3
Resop....................... 1 0 0 0 0 2
Beimel ...................... 1 0 0 0 1 0
Meek......................... 1 0 0 0 1 2
Karstens pitched to 2 batters in the 7th.
WP—Karstens, Meek.
Umpires—Home, Dana DeMuth;First, Kerwin Dan-
ley;Second, Paul Nauert;Third, Doug Eddings.
T—2:30. A—18,262 (38,362).
T H I S D A T E I N
B A S E B A L L
April 24
1901 – Chicago defeated Cleveland 8-2 in the first
American League game. Three other scheduled
games were rained out. The game lasted1hour, 30
minutes in front of a reported crowd of 14,000 at the
Chicago Cricket Club.
1911 – Battle Creek of the South Michigan League
turnedtwotripleplays inthefirst twoinnings against
Grand Rapids.
1917 – George Mogridge of the New York Yankees
pitched a no-hitter against the Red Sox in Boston,
winning 2-1.
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2011 PAGE 5C
➛ S P O R T S
GLADEVILLE, Tenn. — Carl Ed-
wards was coming in for his postrace
news conference when a race official re-
marked that he now has enough guitars
to start a band.
Edwards certainly hit all the right
notes Saturday to capture his fifthcareer
victory at Nashville Superspeedway,
holding off Kyle Busch to win the Nash-
ville 300 and receive another of the gui-
tars given to winners at the track.
“We’ll need a drummer,” Edwards
joked.
Edwards set the pace for much of the
Nationwide race at the track, where he
has wonfour Nationwide events andone
Trucks Series race. He
led 148 of the 225 laps
and passed Busch on
lap 191 to take the lead
for good. On the final
lap, Edwards weaved
past a slower car and
held Busch at bay as he
took the checkered
flag.
Edwards saidthe fin-
ishwas moreof astrug-
gle than it appeared.
“Early in the race,
our car was really su-
perior,” he said. “I
could kind of stretch
out a lead whenever I
wanted to, but at the
end of the race, I was
really pedaling for all I
had. The guys in the18
(Busch) ... did a good
job of adjusting their
car.
“It was kind of excit-
ing at the beginning of
the race. I thought we
were going to run off
with this thing, it’s go-
ing to be easy, but (at
the end) that was
white-knuckling, driv-
ing as hard as I could
drive, racing him and
Brad (Keselowski).”
Keselowski, a two-time winner in
Nashville, finished third, edging polesit-
ter Joey Logano in fourth, and Ricky
Stenhouse Jr. in fifth.
Edwards finished his victory with his
trademarkbackflipanda brief triptothe
edge of the grandstands to acknowledge
cheering fans. It was Edwards’ 31st Na-
tionwide win overall and second of the
season, having won two weeks ago at
Texas.
Edwards plans to auction the trophy
guitar on eBay with the proceeds going
to the family of Roush-Fenway Racing
employee Jonathan Bunting, who died
earlier this week in North Carolina.
Edwards’ victory kept Busch from
pulling off the first back-to-back wins at
the track. Busch had dominated in win-
ning the Trucks race Friday night.
“It was a good race for us. (The car)
was fast, just not fast enough. It was off
just alittlebit ineveryarea, andwecould
only muster a secondtoday,” Buschsaid.
A U T O R A C I N G
AP PHOTO
Carl Edwards celebrates with his gui-
tar trophy after winning the NASCAR
Nationwide Series Nashville 300 on
Saturday in Gladeville, Tenn.
Edwards
savoring
Nashville
His fifth career victory at the track
is in Nationwide race, where he
holds off Kyle Busch.
The Associated Press
“Early in
the race,
our car
was really
superior. I
could kind
of stretch
out a lead
whenever I
wanted to,
but at the
end of the
race, I was
really ped-
aling for
all I had.
The guys in
the 18
(Busch) ...
did a good
job of ad-
justing
their car.”
Carl Edwards
LEXINGTON, Ky. —Ken Ramsey ad-
mits there was a bit of hopefulness in-
volvedwhenhe dubbedone of his prom-
ising colts Derby Kitten.
The longtime owner, a Kentucky na-
tive, has long dreamed of winning the
Run for the Roses.
Turns out, he’ll have to wait at least
another year thanks to Derby Kitten’s
slowdevelopment. Thenagain, Ramsey
says Preakness Kitten has a nice ring to
it too.
Ramseyandhis buddingstar will like-
ly get their chance next month after the
3-year-old colt roared to victory in the
$200,000 Lexington Stakes on Saturday
at Keeneland.
“The Preakness couldbe onour agen-
da,” Ramsey said with a laugh after his
horserompedthroughtherainover Kee-
neland’s synthetic surface.
Why not? Derby Kitten made it look
easy. Hestrolledalonginlast for thefirst
half of the race until jockey Julien Lep-
aroux asked him to go as they entered
the deep stretch. With a little nudge,
DerbyKittentookoff toracebythelead-
ers and beat Prime Cut by1
1
⁄2 lengths.
“Julien is the best guy out there on a
come-from-behindhorse,” Ramsey said.
“He sits there andtimes it just right, just
perfect.”
Leparoux gave most of the credit to
his mount, which had finished a solid
second in each of his last two starts.
“We had a good trip,” Leparoux said.
“I had a lot of horse and I knewI was go-
ing to get there.”
Derby Kitten paid $20.40, $6.60 and
$3.60 while picking up his first stakes
winfor trainer MikeMaker. Despiteare-
sumethat’scomprisedalmost entirelyof
turf races, Ramsey says he’ll happily
take a crack at the second jewel of the
Triple Crown on May 21.
TheownerwassooverjoyedafterDer-
by Kitten covered the 1 1-16-mile in
1:42.03that heboltedthroughtherainto
the infield winner’s circle even though
track officials planned to have the cere-
monyintheusual winner’s circletokeep
time spent in the elements to a mini-
mum.
“I like the view over there better,”
Ramsey said with a laugh.
PrimeCut stalkedthepaceall theway
around but didn’t have an answer in the
final yards and paid $4.40 and $3.
“He was right there,” said jockey Ed-
gar Prado. “I think (the turns) were a lit-
tle too sharp for him but he really came
back. He kept ontryingandjust got beat
today. I thought the winner ran big.”
Casper’s Touch led early and held on
for third while paying $3.
The Lexington has served as the last
gasp for owners still trying to crack the
Derby field. Only favorite Silver Medal-
lionhada shot, but neededtowintocol-
lect enough graded stakes earnings to
reserve a spot under the twin spires on
May 7.
Instead he finished fourth and looked
a bit tired two weeks after a disappoint-
ing fourth in the Santa Anita Derby.
Trainer Steve Asmussen brushed off
questions afterward, though jockey Ja-
vier Castellano offered no excuses for
the horse’s so-so performance.
“I thought things were setting up per-
fectly,” Castellano said. “But when I
asked himhe just didn’t fire.”
The defeat means Charismatic re-
mains the last horse to sweep the Lex-
ington and the Derby, winning both in
1999.
H O R S E R A C I N G
Derby Kitten wins; Preakness likely
By WILL GRAVES
AP Sports Writer
BARCELONA, Spain — Ra-
fael Nadal and fellow Spaniard
David Ferrer will meet in their
second final in two weeks at the
Barcelona Open.
Both cruised through their
semifinals Saturday, Nadal beat-
ing the only non-Spaniard in the
last four, Ivan Dodig of Croatia
6-3, 6-2, and Ferrer topping
Nicolas Almagro 6-3, 6-4.
Nadal won his 28th straight
match in Barcelona, including
five straight titles from 2005-09.
He missed last year because of
injury.
He defeated Ferrer in the
Barcelona finals of 2008 and
2009, and in last weekend’s final
of the Monte Carlo Masters.
Nadal leads their career se-
ries 12-4.
“I like to look at stats that
favor me,” Nadal said. “But
every game is different and
David is having a great begin-
ning to the year.”
A Spaniard will feature in the
Barcelona final for the 15th
straight year, and win it for an
eighth year in a row. Ferrer,
Spain’s second highest-ranked
player behind Nadal, hopes to
add his name to the honor roll.
“I am very happy (to be in the
finals),” Ferrer said. “Barcelona
is the tournament that most
motivates me, it is the tourna-
ment I most want to win.
“I know that it is going to be
complicated with Nadal there,
but I am in the final and I want
to enjoy it.”
Nadal made a commanding
start when he slapped Dodig’s
approach shot down the middle
as he reeled off eight straight
points to break his unseeded
challenger.
Dodig, who upset Robin So-
derling in the second round,
broke Nadal back in the fourth
game when the Spaniard’s fore-
hand sailed long, and then held
his serve to go ahead 3-2.
Nadal forced the Croat into
hitting wide with a deep cross
to record his second service
break in the seventh game, and
Dodig then hit a pair of double-
faults as Nadal closed out the
first set.
Wozniacki, Goerges reach
Stuttgart final
STUTTGART, Germany —
Top-ranked Caroline Wozniacki
beat Agnieszka Radwanska 7-5,
6-3 to advance to the final of the
Porsche Grand Prix on Saturday
and a shot at her fourth title of
the year.
For the title and the Porsche
sports car that goes with it,
Wozniacki will play Julia Goerg-
es, who upset last year’s runner-
up, Sam Stosur, 6-4, 3-6, 7-5 to
play for her second career WTA
title.
Wozniacki fell behind by a
break but rallied with her pow-
erful groundstrokes to over-
come Radwanska in the first
set.
The Dane needed seven
match points over two games to
close out the Pole.
P R O T E N N I S
Nadal, Ferrer
in Barcelona
title match
The Associated Press
HILTON HEAD ISLAND, S.C. —
Luke Donald is a round away from
owning golf’s No. 1 ranking after a
1-under 70 on Saturday left him one-
stroke in front of defending champion
Jim Furyk through three rounds of
The Heritage.
Donald overcame a double bogey
and bogey on the front nine to catch
Furyk with birdie on the 16th hole.
The Englishman finished 11-under
202.
Furyk held the lead for much of his
back nine at Harbour Town Golf
Links, but made bogey on the closing
lighthouse hole for a 69 to drop back.
Brendan de Jonge (66) and Scott
Verplank (67) are two shots behind at
9-under. Masters runner-up Jason Day
(71), Ricky Barnes (67) and Tommy
Gainey (67) are a stroke further back
at 8-under.
Donald is third in the world behind
top-rated Martin Kaymer and No. 2
Lee Westwood. But Donald would
claim the top spot with a victory at
Harbour Town, no matter how coun-
tryman Westwood fares at the In-
donesian Masters where he holds a
five-stroke lead.
Kaymer is not playing this week.
Donald has finished second and
third here the past two years, yet it
appeared the talk of No. 1 may have
finally gotten to him on the second
hole. Donald put his approach shot to
the par-5 hole out of bounds left, lead-
ing to a double bogey and giving up
the lead.
But Donald, who won the Match
Play Championship, called on the
steady, focused style that made him
one of the world’s best to move back
to the top with birdies on the fifth and
seventh holes.
Donald’s put his approach on the
16th hole to 3 feet for his final birdie
to reach 11-under.
Furyk had his chance to hold on to a
share of the lead, but sent his second
shot on the 18th hole into a bunker
behind the green, and could not make
the 16-footer for par after blasting out.
Furyk and Donald will be paired in
Sunday’s final group for what sets up
as a fabulous finish in what might be
the final Heritage. A PGA Tour fixture
since 1969, the tournament is without
a title sponsor which tour and event
leaders say is essential for returning
in 2012.
No matter the order, Donald and
Furyk have had some memorable
duels on the golf course.
Furyk saved par from the bunker on
the 72nd hole of last year’s Tour
Championship to beat Donald by a
stroke and win the $10 million FedEx
Cup. A week later, Donald beat Furyk
1-up in Ryder Cup singles to help
bring Europe to victory.
Both have become Harbour Town
masters, combining for 14 rounds in
the 60s over the past three tourna-
ments.
Legends of Golf
SAVANNAH, Ga. — Wayne Levi and
Keith Fergus shot a 12-under 60 in
better-ball play for a share of the sec-
ond-round lead with Peter Senior and
Sandy Lyle in the Champions Tour’s
Legends of Golf.
Senior and Lyle combined for a 61
to match Levi and Fergus at 20-under
124 at The Club at Savannah Harbor.
The teams of Kenny Perry-Scott
Hoch (62— and Tom Kite-Gil Morgan
(63) were tied for third at 19 under.
Ireland’s Des Smyth and England’s
Mark James shot 63 to win the 36-
hole Raphael Division at 9-under 126.
The teams of Ben Crenshaw-Curtis
Strange (64) and Gary Koch-Roger
Maltbie (63) tied for second at 8 un-
der.
Indonesian Masters
JAKARTA, Indonesia — Second-
ranked Lee Westwood took a five-
stroke lead in the Indonesian Masters,
shooting his second straight 6-under
66 in the Asian Tour event.
Westwood can reclaim the No. 1
ranking from Martin Kaymer with a
victory if Luke Donald fails to win
The Heritage at Hilton Head Island,
S.C. Donald had a one-stroke lead in
the PGA Tour event.
Westwood had a 16-under 200 total
at Royale Jakarta.
Thailand’s Thitiphun Chuayprakong
(69) and South Korea’s Park Hyun-bin
(70) were tied for second.
China Open
CHENGDU, China — Belgium’s
Nicolas Colsaerts eagled the first hole
and went on to shoot a 6-under 66 to
take a one-stroke lead after the third
round of the China Open.
Colsaerts had an 18-under 198 total
on the Luxehills International course.
South Korea’s Han Chang-won (65)
was second in the event sanctioned by
the European Tour, China Golf Associ-
ation and OneAsia Tour.
P R O G O L F
AP PHOTO
Luke Donald, of England, hits out of the bunker on the eighth green during the third round of The Heritage in Hilton Head
Island, S.C., Saturday. Donald is the 54-hole tournament leader, a shot ahead of defending champion Jim Furyk.
Donald a round away from No. 1
The Associated Press
AP PHOTO
Tournament leader Luke Donald tosses
his ball to his caddie on the 17th green
during the third round of The Heritage
in Hilton Head Island, S.C.
C M Y K
PAGE 6C SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ S P O R T S
and their games are Saturdays at 1
p.m.
The Breakers consist of players
who range from18 to 38 years old.
Most players are in their mid-to-
upper 20s and hold down full-time
jobs away fromthe pitch. Six
members are active-duty military
men. Two players, including the
coach’s son, are still in high
school.
“My schedule is pretty lax, so
generally I amable to make the
evening practices during the
week,” said Rafael Castillo, a
member of the Navy fromTren-
ton, N.J., who is stationed in Forty
Fort. “Sometimes it’s difficult for
me to make some of the games on
the weekend.”
Because rugby isn’t widely
played in Northeastern Pennsylva-
nia – the University of Scranton is
the only area college to field a
team– the Breakers depend on
transitional players fromsoccer
and football.
Hawley said that soccer players
are generally better equipped to
play the sport that features long
stretches of continuous running
and no protection other than
scrumcaps and mouth pieces.
He said, “Alot of people are
quick to assume football, but my
experience is that a lot of football
players aren’t used to getting hit
like that without pads on.”
Rugby is similar to American
football in that it’s played on a
similar sized field with h-shaped
goal posts and with a ball that’s
slightly more rounded than a
pigskin football. Instead of 11men
on the field, each teamcarries 15
people on the pitch.
Because there are no downs,
forward momentumcomes in the
formof rushing and kicking the
ball, and passing is limited to
sideways and backwards. Scoring
occurs when the ball is carried
into the end zone for a touchdown
(followed by a conversion kick) or
a player kicks a drop-kick field
goal, which can occur at any time.
The most frequent penalties are
for forward progression plays,
with referees rarely calling in-
fractions for unsportsmanlike
play.
“It’s certainly not for everyone. I
call it the ultimate black-and-
white sport,” said Hawley, of
Kingston. “It’s not like tennis or
golf. No one plays it to play it; you
have to love it to play it.”
With the amount of hitting that
comes naturally to the sport,
Hawley said that all animosity at
Breakers’ games is squashed at
the final whistle. After the games,
both teams attend social parties
together and sing along to well-
known rugby songs, which range
“between mildly offensive and
comedic.” Each teamhas its own
song – the Breakers’ called “The
Wilkes-Barre Lament.”
“It’s a hooligans’ sport played
by gentlemen,” said Castillo.
No sport matches rugby’s dedi-
cation for bonding. There is no
sport that both teams migrate to
social parties to sing “Swing Low,
Sweet Chariot” together. The
forged brotherhood and traditions
are what keep Hawley to stay
with the sport for his 10th year.
“If I didn’t continue to come
out, I feel like I would be letting
my brothers down. We’re a family.
We’re a very tight-knit group. It’s a
tough sport; there’s no way get-
ting around it. It’s why we do
things together: why we practice
together, why we play together,
why we do events together.”
Hawley stated that the cam-
araderie is so close between the
teams that each squad knows
another on a first name basis. To
give an idea of howtight-knit the
rugby community is a member of
the Hatboro (Pa.) teamwas get-
ting married and invited the
entire Wilkes-Barre rugby club to
his wedding because it was being
held in the Wyoming Valley.
With only 26 men on the team,
the Breakers have little roomfor
injuries. At the Montclair match,
Castillo suffered a season-ending
broken ankle that required sur-
gery to keep his leg in place.
Hawley admits to having his third
cortisone shot for a torn rotator
cuff.
Playing with pain is as much a
part of rugby as the hitting, sing-
ing or drinking. In rugby, Hawley
says, there is a fine line between
being injured and being hurt.
“We have a saying, ‘Are you
injured or are you hurt?’ If you’re
injured, you could keep playing. If
you’re hurt, you have to come off.
“Everyone plays with pain. It’s
what we do.”
The Wilkes-Barre Rugby Foot-
ball Club, which was established
in1973, plays three seasons. The
Breakers play in the Eastern Penn-
sylvania Rugby League in the fall.
The winner of the EPRLcontin-
ues to the Middle Atlantic Rugby
Football Union, which is part of
the national USARugby cham-
pionships. The Breakers have not
won their division since1996.
In the summer, Wilkes-Barre
plays in rugby sevens – a short-
ened, seven-man version of the
sport that will make its Olympic
debut at the 2016 Summer
Games. The Breakers host their
first sevens tournament called
Break ’Emin Sevens, an eight-
teamevent that takes place May
21at Kirby Park.
The Breakers’ next home game
is May 7 against the team’s alum-
ni club at 1p.m.
Interested players, regardless of
experience, are welcome to attend
open training sessions on Tues-
days and Thursdays at 6 p.m. at
Kirby Park.
“I could walk frommy house in
Kingston across the river to
Wilkes-Barre and not run into a
single person who knewthere
was a rugby teamin Wilkes-
Barre,” said Hawley. “Our biggest
adversity is getting our name
out.”
S. JOHN WILKIN PHOTOS/THE TIMES LEADER
The Wilkes-Barre Breakers scrum with Monclair (N.J). Interested players, regardless of experience, are welcome to attend open training sessions on Tuesdays and Thursdays at 6 p.m. at Kirby Park.
Members of the Wilkes-Barre Breakers are seen in game action. The Breakers’ next home game at Kirby Park is May 7 at 1 p.m. against
the rugby team’s alumni club.
The Wilkes-Barre Breakers and
Monclair (N.J.) compete in a rugby
game at Kirby Park. Because rugby
isn’t widely played in Northeastern
Pennsylvania – the University of
Scranton is the only area college to
field a team – the Breakers depend
on players with backgrounds in
soccer and football. Drew Hawley,
club president of the Breakers, said
soccer players are generally better
equipped to play rugby, a sport
that features long stretches of
continuous running and no protec-
tion other than scrum caps and
mouth pieces. “My experience is
that a lot of football players aren’t
used to getting hit like that with-
out pads on,’’ said Hawley.
A Wilkes-Barre Breakers player kick passes the ball against Mon-
clair (N.J.) at Kirby Park.
A Wilkes-Barre Breakers player passes the ball while under pres-
sure from a Montclair (N.J.) player.
RUGBY
Continued from Page 1C
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2011 PAGE 7C
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Allabaugh’s Baits
to-side movement on all his
pitches and located the ball well.
He allowed a run in the second
inning on a home run by Jeff Fra-
zier. The other run he allowed
came in the top of the seventh
when Syracuse’s Corey Brown
led off with a single, stole second
and scored on a single by Alex
Valdez.
“I feel like I’ve got back to a
high pitch count at least and I’m
ready for whatever they want,”
said Millwood, who has an opt-
out clause in his minor league
deal if he’s not in the big leagues
on May 1. “That’s part of the
game. I got to try to move the ball
around and change speeds, get
some sink, get some cut instead
of just trying to rare back and
blow guys away.”
Millwood, who couldpitchone
more time in the minors before
his clause kicks in, wasn’t the on-
ly story for the Yankees in the
opener.
Greg Golson went 3-for-3 with
three runs scored.
He helped SWBopen a1-0 lead
in the first inning when he led off
with a single and came around to
score on a single by Jorge Vaz-
quez.
After the Chiefs evened the
score at 1-1, Golson gave the Yan-
kees a 2-1 lead in the third when
he smacked his third home run of
the year, a blast over the left-field
wall.
Vazquez knocked in Golson
again in the fifth with a single to
put the Yankees up 3-1.
The final runfor the Yankees in
the first game was Justin Max-
well scoring on a groundout by
Brandon Laird in the sixth.
“That’s what we like to see out
of Gollie,” SWB manager Dave
Miley said. “Get on base some-
how. He’s a guy that can steal
some bases andscore runs. When
guys like (Jesus Montero) and
Vazquez are driving him in, then
we’re usually having a pretty
good day.”
D.J. Mitchell matched Mill-
wood’s performance in the night-
cap with a complete game, but
didn’t get any run support as the
game was highlighted by the bril-
liant pitching of Chiefs starter
Craig Stammen, who sawtime in
the majors with the Nationals in
2009 and 2010. The righty held
SWB hitters at bay, fanning six
and not giving up a walk.
The Yankees didn’t get a hit un-
til two outs in the fourth when
Vazquez singled. Scranton/
Wilkes-Barre only advanced one
runner past second base when
Jordan Parraz doubled in the sev-
enth and moved to third on a fly-
ball. Dan Brewer doubled in the
fifth for the only other extra-base
hit for the team.
“Stammen, you got to tip your
hat to him. He threw a heck of a
game and no walks,” Miley
noted.
Mitchell’s lone flaws of the
game were back-to-back leadoff
walks followed by a wild pitch in
the fourth; one of those walks
came across to score for Syra-
cuse.
“I felt good. I think everything
was good except for that one in-
ning with the leadoff walks,”
Mitchell said. “Other than that I
think I pitched really well.”
Notes: The scoreless streak for
Yankees pitchers ended at 211/3
innings after Frazier’s home run
in the second inning of the first
game. The franchise record is 32
straight innings not allowing a
run when it was accomplished in
June 2007 …Vazquez in on a tear
early on with seven home runs
and 21RBI. He’s nearing the fran-
chise record for a month in both
categories. Red Barons Gary
Alexander (August 1991) and
Wendell Magee Jr. (July 1998)
holdthe teammarkwith10blasts
in one month. The franchise re-
cord for RBI in a month is held by
another former Red Baron, Jeff
Manto, who picked up a whop-
ping 39 in August 1993 … Mill-
wood has two Major League
home runs. His first came in1999
and was served up by Buddy Car-
lyle, who was promoted to New
York on Friday from SWB …
When Syracuse pitcher Tom Mi-
lone walked Kevin Russo in
Game 1, it was the first he issued
this seasonin18 innings …Chiefs
relief pitcher HenryRodriguez al-
lowed one unearned run in an in-
ning of work in the first game. In
that inning, he reached 100 mph
on four pitches with his highest
velocity being reached at 101.
HOWTHEY SCORED
GAME 1
YANKEES FIRST: Greg Golson singled. Kevin
Russo flied out. Jesus Montero singled, moving Gol-
son to third. Jorge Vazquez singled scoring Golson
and moving Montero to second. Chris Dickerson
grounded into a 5-4-3 double-play to end the inning.
YANKEES 1-0
CHIEFSSECOND: Jeff Frazier homered. Corey
Brown flied out. Jhonatan Solano grounded out. Alex
Valdez flied out. TIED 1-1
YANKEES THIRD: Greg Golson hit a home run.
Kevin Russo struck out. Jesus Montero singled.
Jorge Vazquez grounded into a 4-6-3 double-play to
end the inning. YANKEES 2-1
YANKEES FIFTH: Ramiro Pena struck out
swinging. Greg Golson singled. Kevin Russo walk-
ed. Jesus Montero flied out. Jorge Vazquez singled,
scoring Golson and moving Russo to second. Chris
Dickerson struck out looking. YANKEES 3-1
YANKEES SIXTH: Justin Maxwell walked, stole
secondandmovedtothirdonathrowingerror by Sy-
racuse catcher Jhonatan Solano. Jordan Parraz
struck out looking. Brandon Laird grounded out,
scoring Maxwell. Ramiro Pena flied out. YANKEES
4-1
CHIEFS SEVENTH: Jeff Frazier flied out. Corey
Brown singled and stole second. Jhonatan Solano
groundedout andBrownmovedtothird. Alex Valdez
singledknockinginBrown. Chris McConnell popped
out. YANKEES 4-2
GAME 2
CHIEFS FOURTH: Seth Bynum walked. Roger
Bernadina walked, Bynum moved to second. Wild
pitch by D.J. Mitchell advanced Bynumand Bernadi-
na to third and second. Chris Marrero grounded out.
Michael Aubrey grounded out, scoring Bynum. Jeff
Frazier was hit by a pitch. Carlos Maldonado flied
out. CHIEFS 1-0
CHIEFS FIFTH: Tug Hulett singled. Chris
McConnell grounded out; Hulett moved to second.
Boomer Whiting grounded out; Hulett moved to
third. Seth Bynum singled scoring Hulett. Bynum
stole second. Roger Bernadina struck out. CHIEFS
2-0
NIKO J. KALLIANIOTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Yankees shortstop Ramiro Pena gets positioned to retire Syracuse Chiefs baserunner Alex Valdez
during Game 1 of an International League doubleheader Saturday at PNC Field.
MILWOOD
Continued from Page 1C
NIKO J. KALLIANIOTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
The Yankees’ Greg Golson is en route to scoring a run during Sat-
urday’s opening game of a twin bill against the Syracuse Chiefs.
Looking Ahead
Next Game: 1:05 p.m. today
versus the Syracuse Chiefs at
PNC Field.
Probable Pitchers: Yankees
RHP Andrew Brackman (1-0,
6.30) vs. Chiefs RHP Yunesky
Maya (0-1, 5.51)
On Deck: The four-game set
with the Chiefs wraps up
Monday afternoon before the
Yankees begin an eight-game
road trip, which starts in
Charlotte. The next game at
PNC Field after Monday is
Thursday, May 5.
Radio: All games can be heard
on THE GAME (1340-AM) with
Mike Vander Woude
Yankees 4, Chiefs 2
GAME1
Chiefs Yankees
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Bernadina lf 3 0 0 0 Golson cf 3 3 3 1
Bynum 2b 3 0 2 0 Russo 2b 2 0 0 0
Marrero 1b 3 0 0 0 Montero c 3 0 2 0
Aubrey dh 3 0 0 0 Vazquez 1b 3 0 2 2
Frazier rf 3 1 2 1
Dickerson
dh 3 0 0 0
Brown cf 3 1 1 0 Maxwell lf 2 1 0 0
Solano c 3 0 1 0 Parraz rf 3 0 1 0
Valdez 3b 3 0 1 1 Laird 3 0 1 1
McConnell ss 2 0 0 0 Pena ss 3 0 0 0
Totals 26 1 7 2 Totals 25 4 9 4
Chiefs...................................... 010 000 1 — 2
Yankees.................................. 101 011 x — 4
2B – SYR: Bynum; 3B – HR – SYR: Frazier; SWB:
Golson.
IP H R ER BB SO
Chiefs
Milone, L .................. 5 9 3 3 1 6
Rodriguez ................ 1 0 1 0 1 1
Yankees
Milwood, W.............. 7 7 2 2 1 3
Umpires: HP: Lance Barrett. 1B: Chad Whitson. 2B:
. 3B: Brad Myers.
T: 2:05
Chiefs 2, Yankees 0
GAME 2
Chiefs Yankees
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Whiting lf 4 0 0 0 Golson lf 3 0 0 0
Bymun 2b 2 1 1 1 Russo 2b 3 0 0 0
Bernadina cf 2 0 1 0 Vazquez 3b 3 0 1 0
Marrero 1b 3 0 0 0
Dickerson
cf 3 0 0 0
Aubrey dh 3 0 1 1 Parraz dh 3 0 1 0
Frazier rf 2 0 0 0 Brewer rf 3 0 1 0
Maldonado c 3 0 0 0 Laird 1b 3 0 0 0
Hulett 3b 2 1 1 0 Gil c 2 0 0 0
McConnell ss 3 0 0 0 Bernier ss 2 0 1 0
Totals 24 2 4 1 Totals 25 0 4 0
Syracuse ............................ 000 110 0xx — 2
S/W-b.................................. 000 000 0xx — 0
2B – SYR: Bernadina; SWB: Brewer, Parraz.
IP H R ER BB SO
Chiefs
Stammen, W............ 7 4 0 0 0 7
Home
Mitchell, L................. 7 4 2 2 2 6
Umpires: HP: Lance Barrett. 1B: Chad Whitson. 2B:
. 3B: Brad Myers.Weather: 54 degrees, cloud-
y.Wind: 5 mph, L to R.T: 1:45.Att: 2,499.
Yet, Millwood might have
taken his first true steps to-
ward going back to the big
leagues and helping the Yan-
kees.
His biggest value right now?
“Innings,” Millwood said.
“I’m thinking you want a guy in
the rotation to rest the bullpen.
I feel like I can win ballgames
in the big leagues.”
That is exactly what the
Yankees might need right now,
a dependable starting pitcher
who can give them a chance in
games and get them past a
long, grinding season. Even if
that guy’s no-hit stuff was long
ago left in the past.
SOKOLOSKI
Continued from Page 1C
Paul Sokoloski is a columnist for
The Times Leader.
That made it 3-0 with two pe-
riods to go, and the Penguins
were well on their way to clinch-
ing the first-round AHL series.
Or so it seemed.
Norfolk chipped away at the
Penguins lead when Marc-An-
toine Pouliot redirected a Mat-
tias Ritola pass down low to
make it 3-1at 14:18 of the second
period. The goal was Pouliot’s
fourth of the postseason.
Less than two minutes later,
Blair Jones lifted a backhand
over Penguins netminder Brad
Thiessen from the corner of the
net to cut the deficit to 3-2 with
one period remaining.
“(Norfolk) is a proud team
and we knewthey would make a
hard push,” Hynes said. “They
got momentum in the second
and took it to us, but we at least
held them.”
The Penguins missed an op-
portunity for a two-goal lead
early in the third period when
Norfolk’s Troy Milamhooked Vi-
tale on a breakaway. Vitale’s shot
hit Tokarski’s right pad and
glanced off the post.
Vitale did find the back of the
net later in the period – one-tim-
ing a Tim Wallace pass through
the slot to put Norfolk down 4-2
with 12 minutes remaining.
“I was a little bummed when I
got back to the bench (after the
penalty shot). I let them down a
little bit,” Vitale said. “But it felt
good to get it back and get the
boys going.”
Norfolk refused to surrender
and once again came within one
whenJames Wright pokedhome
a loose puck in front during a
power play to cut the Penguins
lead to 4-3 with nine minutes
left.
Duringthe final sixminutes of
the game, Norfolk skated into
the Penguins end and applied re-
lentless pressure in front of the
net. Jones came close with a
backhand at the crease that
Thiessen narrowly prevented
form crossing the goal line.
Hynes was pleased with
Thiessen’s steady play late inthe
period.
“He was much like our team,
he got better as the series went
on,” Hynes said.
The Penguins put the game
away in the last minute with
empty-net goals from Wallace
and Sill to make it 6-3.
The Penguins will get back to
work on Tuesday to prepare for
Game 1 of their next series,
which begins Thursday against
either Hershey or Charlotte.
“We’ll pay real close attention.
Those are two quality teams and
one will be our next opponent,
so we’ll be watching,” Hynes
said of the second-round series.
NOTES
• The Penguins will play
Games 1 and 2 of the East Divi-
sion Final at home. Both games
will start at 7:05 p.m. Tickets are
on sale for Game 1.
• Defenseman Corey Potter
had three assists on the night
and finished the series as the
Penguins leading scorer with six
points.
Norfolk................................................ 0 2 1 - 3
WBS Pens ......................................... 3 0 3 - 6
First Period: Scoring – 1. WBS, Steve Wagner 1
(Walker, Potter) power play 2:13. 2. WBS, Steve
Wagner 2 (Potter, Walker) power play 3:58. 3.
WBS, SteveWagner 3(Wallace, Potter) 18:36. Pe-
nalties – NOR, Mihalik (interference) :40; NOR,
Vernace(delay of game) 2:38; WBS, Sill (roughing)
6;25; NOR, Angelidis (interference) 9:17.
Second Period: Scoring – 4. NOR, Marc-An-
toine Pouliot 4 (Ritola, Vernace) 14:18. 5. NOR,
Blair Jones 1 (Ritola, Milam) power play 16:03. Pe-
nalties – NOR, Mihailk (high-sticking) :36; NOR,
Wright (hooking) 9:56; WBS, Walker (interference)
15:17; WBS, Craig (holding) 20:00.
Third Period: Scoring – 6. WBS, Joe Vitale 2
(Wallace, Collins) 7:23. 7. NOR, James Wright 1
(Fornataro, Pouliot) power play 10:35. 8. WBS, Tim
Wallace 1 (unassisted) 18:57. 9. WBS, Zach Sill 1
(unassisted) ((Penalties – NOR, Jones (roughing)
3:33; WBS, Vitale (slashing) 9:44.Penalty shot –
WBS, Vitale – NG (NOR, Milam-hooking :48)
Shots on goal: Norfolk – 6-11-14-31. Wilkes-
Barre/Scranton – 13-10-6-29.
Power-play Opportunities: Norfolk – 2 of 4.
Wilkes-Barre/Scranton – 2 of 6.
Goaltenders: Norfolk – Dustin Tokarski 2-4-0
(23 saves - 27 shots). Wilkes-Barre/Scranton –
Brad Thiessen 4-2–0 (28-31)
Starters: Norfolk – GDustin Tokarski, DRadko
Gudas, D Vladimir Mihalik, LW Pierre-Cedric La-
brie, C James Wright, RW Mike Angelidis. Wilkes-
Barre/Scranton – GBrad Thiessen, D Joey Mormi-
na, D Andrew Hutchinson, LW Tim Wallace, C
Zach Sill, RW Chris Collins
Three Stars: 1. WBS, Steve Wagner (hat trick)
2. WBS, Joe Vitale (game-winning goal) 3. NOR,
Marc-Antoine Pouliot (goal, assist)
Referee – Chris Brown, Francis Charron. Li-
nesmen – Jameel Chaudry, Judson Ritter
Attendance – 5,223
Steve Wagner, left, of the Penguins celebrates with teammates
Corey Potter (2) and Keven Veilleux (44) after scoring a goal
during an AHL playoff game Saturday night at Mohegan Sun
Arena. Wagner had a natural hat trick in the first period.
DON CAREY PHOTOS/THE TIMES LEADER
Members of the Norfolk Admirals, in dark uniforms, congratulate the Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Pen-
guins after the Penguins won the first- round AHL playoff series at the Mohegan Sun Arena .
PENS
Continued from Page 1C
PARK RIDGE, Ill. (AP) —
The Fiesta Bowl’s future as a
part of the Bowl Championship
Series could be decided before
the end of May.
Officials for the troubled
game and the BCS met Satur-
day at the Big Ten offices.
“We had a very comprehen-
sive and candid discussion with
the officials of the Fiesta Bowl
and all of us on this review
committee are grateful for the
time they have spent coming
here to meet with us,” Penn
State President Graham Span-
ier said. “Personally, I was very
impressed with the depth of
their presentations and the sin-
cerity of their efforts and the
transparency that they brought
to this discussion.”
The Fiesta Bowl fired its
president, John Junker, last
month after a report commis-
sioned by the Arizona-based
game alleged misuse of funds.
BCS review of Fiesta could conclude in month
C M Y K
PAGE 8C SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ WWW. T I ME S L E ADE R. C OM/ S P ORT S
St. Nick’s-St. Mary’s places first
St. Nicholas-St. Mary’s School 5th and 6th grade boys
basketball team recently won first place in the Holy Re-
deemer Development League. First row, from left: Adam
Pawlowski, Matt Dessoye, Cade Flanley, Cade Fahey and
Nial Vender. Middle row: John Turosky, Justin Casey, Za-
chary Walker, Luke Nealon and Coach Joe Vender. Top row:
Head Coach Don Casey and Coach Paul Pawlowski.
AT PLAY
The Times Leader will accept photos, standings and sto-
ries from readers about youth and adult recreation activ-
ities. Items will not be accepted over the telephone. They
may be e-mailed to tlsports@timesleader.com with “At
Play” in the subject, faxed to 831-7319, dropped off at the
Times Leader or mailed to Times Leader, c/o Sports, 15 N.
Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA18711-0250.
AT P L AY P O L I C Y
Good Shepherd girls take second
The Good Shepherd Academy girls 3-4 grade basketball
team won second place at the Wyoming Area Catholic
March Madness Tournament in the 4th grade division. Pic-
tured are, first row: Katie Cusatis, Kayla Serafin, Alyssa
Texeira, Livia Moore, Samantha Nordmark, Kyra Krzywicki,
Abbey Zim and Cecilia Jakubczyk. Second row: Coach Lisa
Moore, Alyssa Gushka, Gabrielle Drevitch, Jaylyn Fulkersin,
Alesha Pekarovsky and Assistant Coach Alicia Moore.
CYC champs play on PSU court
The Newport Biddy Girls 4th grade CYC champions were
recently invited to play during halftime at the opening
round of the NCAA women’s tournament at the Bryce Jor-
don Center at Penn State. First row, Megan Duda, Katie
King, Brenna Babcock, Amiah Lukowski and Madison Par-
tlow. Second row, Kaylee Simons, Abbie Kotch, Jenna Nie-
winski, Kelsi O’Connor and Trista Babcock.
Comets athlete chooses Lehigh
Crestwood’s Lindsay Metzger has accepted an invitation
to attend Lehigh University and compete on the field hock-
ey team. Pictured, seated, from left: Angie Metzger (moth-
er), Lindsay Metzger and Marvin Metzger (father). Stand-
ing: Tony Mozeleski (Director of Athletics), Bonnie Gregory
(Assistant High School Principal), Patsy Moratori (Assistant
Coach), Elvetta Gemski (Head Coach) and Chris Gegaris
(High School Principal).
Comets’ Leo going to Fairfield
Crestwood’s Emily Leo has accepted an invitation to at-
tend Fairfield University and compete on the field hockey
team. Pictured, seated, from left: Mary Anne Intelicato
(mother), Emily Leo and Bob Leo (father). Standing: Tony
Mozeleski (Director of Athletics), Bonnie Gregory (Assistant
High School Principal), Patsy Moratori (Assistant Coach),
Elvetta Gemski (Head Coach) and Chris Gegaris (High
School Principal).
Crestwood athlete picks Vermont
Crestwood’s Audrey Bruell has accepted an invitation to
attend the University of Vermont and compete on the field
hockey team. Seated, from left: Jeff Bruell (father), Audrey
Bruell and Salli Bruell (mother). Standing: : Bonnie Gregory
(Assistant High School Principal), Lissa Munley and Patsy
Moratori (Assistant Coaches), Elvetta Gemski (Head Coach)
and Tony Mozeleski (Director of Athletics)
Comets’ Davies decides on college
Crestwood’s Hannah Davies has accepted an invitation to
attend West Chester University and compete on the field
hockey team. Pictured, seated, from left: Harry Davies (fa-
ther), Alyssa Davies (sister), Hannah Davies and Ruth Da-
vies (mother). Standing: Tony Mozeleski (Director of Athlet-
ics), Bonnie Gregory (Assistant High School Principal), Pat-
sy Moratori (Assistant Coach), Elvetta Gemski (Head Coach)
and Chris Gegaris (High School Principal)
Comets’ Brown chooses college
Crestwood’s Lindsay Brown has accepted an invitation to
attend Slippery Rock University and compete on the field
hockey team. Pictured, seated, from left: Donna Brown
(mother), Lindsay Brown and David Brown (father). Stand-
ing: Tony Mozeleski (Director of Athletics), Bonnie Gregory
(Assistant High School Principal), Patsy Moratori (Assistant
Coach), Elvetta Gemski (Head Coach) and Chris Gegaris
(High School Principal)
Comets’ Blass picks Lafayette
Crestwood’s Brittany Blass has accepted an invitation to
attend Lafayette College and compete on the field hockey
team. Pictured, seated, from left: Lance Blass (brother),
Nancy Blass (mother), Brittany Blass, Joe Blass (father) and
Bethany Blass (sister). Standing: Standing: Tony Mozeleski
(Director of Athletics), Bonnie Gregory (Assistant Princi-
pal), Patsy Moratori (Assistant Coach), Elvetta Gemski
(Head Coach) and Chris Gegaris (High School Principal)
Comets’ Surdy Kent State-bound
Crestwood’s Samantha Surdy has accepted an invitation
to attend Kent State University and compete on the field
hockey team. Pictured, seated, from left: Sondra Surdy
(mother), Samantha Surdy, Marissa Surdy (sister) and John
Surdy (father). Standing: Tony Mozeleski (Director of Ath-
letics), Bonnie Gregory (Assistant Principal), Patsy Moratori
(Assistant Coach), Elvetta Gemski (Head Coach) and Chris
Gegaris (High School Principal)
Crestwood football players lauded
The Crestwood Football Booster Club honored the high
school’s senior football players at its annual banquet earli-
er this year. Senior football players pictured are, front row:
Nico DiSabatino, captain; Rob West, Bryant Borowski, Ethan
Slembarski, Jimmy Crablo and David Knight. Top row: Jeff
Michaels, Ben Ralston, Casey Martin, Sean Tate, Mitch Hil-
debrand and Zack Fogleman.
Crestwood places third in tourney
The Crestwood Comets 6th grade girls basketball team
recently took third place in the Wyoming Valley West Presi-
dents Day Tournament. Pictured are the team members.
First row: Emily Hons and Autumn Kaminski. Middle row:
Gianna Uhl, Alyssa Cuono, Kaitlin Snipas and Randie Kuhar.
Top row: Marissa Margalis, Allison Knorek, Paige Allen and
Marlee Dillon.
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2011 PAGE 9C
C M Y K
➛ AT P L AY
Area field hockey squad reigns
Kapow India went undefeated in its pool at the 2011 USA
Field Hockey National Indoor Tournament in Virginia
Beach, Va., and did not allow a goal in its seven games.
Competition came from teams representing North Car-
olina, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, New Jersey and Penn-
sylvania. The team is pictured after winning its gold medal.
First row, from left: Isabella Del Priore (Dallas), Rebecca
Weinstock (Jenkins Township), Hunter Pitman (White
Haven), Gabrielle Ator (Sugarloaf), Madison Reed (Sugar-
loaf) and Katrina Mikitish (Jenkins Township). Second row:
Coach Amanda Faust, Brigid Wood (Plains Township), Alexis
Quick (Shavertown), Maddie Ritsick (Mountain Top), Selena
Garzio (McAdoo) and M’kensie Lee (Plains Township).
GAR junior high mat stars
GAR’s junior high wrestlers were recently honered at the
Grenadier wrestling team awards banquet at Bart & Urby’s
Downtown Bistro. The award winners included: first row,
from left: Jamaar Taylor, Ironman Award; Zachary Gon-
zalez, Scholar Athlete; and Rich Sickler, Grenadier Award.
Middle row: Zachary Faust, co-Most Valuable Wrestler; Ko-
rey Welkey, co-Most Valuable Wrestler; and Coach Tony
Loveccio. Top row: Coach Gene Lavelle. Not pictured: Rash-
aun Mathis, Most Improved Wrestler.
GAR senior high mat stars
GAR’s senior high wrestlers were recently honored at the
Grenadier wrestling team awards banquet at Bart & Urby’s
Downtown Bistro in Wilkes-Barre. The award winners in-
cluded: first row, from left: Ray Ashford, Ironman Award;
Joey O’Day, co-Most Valuable Wrestler; and Andrew Bar-
row, Scholar Athlete and Grenadier Award. Second row:
Coach Rick Simon; Elijah Gresham, Most Improved Wres-
tler; and Coach Jay Lavelle. Not pictured: A.J. Luton, co-
Most Valuable Wrestler.
Newport takes basketball title
The Newport 11s recently competed in the In the Zone
basketball tournament, in Bath, and the girls won the team
title. Members of the team are: first row, Jenna Lipowski,
Miranda Dunn, Janine Levandowski, Morgan Briggs and
Taylor Brown. Standing: Coach Bob Richards, Cassie Nova-
kowski, Alexis Pyzia, Riley Klepadlo, Kayla Aufiero, Meghan
Armstrong and Coach Kevin Coughlin.
St. Mary’s girls capture title
The St. Mary’s Assumption 5th and 6th grade girls won
the championship basketball game at the Good Shepherd
Academy League. Pictured, front row: Elana Clancy, Denise
Pitno, Megan Conlon, Ashton Ashby and Vienna Donnelly.
Middle row: Taryn Ashby, Ann Lewis, Madelyn Barnak, Holly
Daveski, Tori McNulty, Genny Frederick, Abby Franklin and
Coach Gene McNulty. Top row: Coaches Bobby Conlon and
Nelson Pinto.
Rampage girls star in tourneys
The NEPA Rampage recently won the AFBE Reading Bas-
ketball Tournament. The 8th grade Rampage squad
bumped up to the 9th grade division to compete. The Ram-
page defeated the Bucktown Bandits in a first-round con-
test, 58-31. In the championship game, the Rampage de-
feated the Pottsville Panthers, 37-30. In another recent
competition, the Rampage Challenge in Hazleton, the NE-
PA Rampage squad finished in second place as it lost the
title game to In The Zone. The NEPA Rampage girls team is
pictured. From left, back row: Ali McCracken (Central Co-
lumbia), Brianna Woznicki (Drums), Bethany Shaud
(Drums), Franchesca Matriccino (Drums) and Ashley Fannik
(North Schuylkill). Front row: Rachel Reznick (Freeland),
Shawna Gardner (Freeland), Mackenzie Yori (Drums) and
Ali Yale (Drums).
Dallas swimming trio honored
Chris Tamanini, McKenzie Kelly and Brandon Harding
have been notified by the National Interscholastic Swim-
ming Coaches Association of America that they have been
accepted as Academic All-American swimmers. The NISCA
is sponsored through SPEEDO. The swimmers were honor-
ed at the annual Dallas Swimming and Diving banquet.
Their All-American certificates will be displayed at the Dal-
las Middle School Natatorium. About 290,000 students are
involved in swimming at the high school level in the nation,
and 2 percent are recognized as high school All-Americans
in swimming and academics. Chris Tamanini is the son of
Tim and Sandy Tamanini, Wyoming. McKenzie Kelly is the
daughter of Mike and Yvonne Kelly, Dallas, and Brandon
Harding is the son of Brian and Dawn Harding, Dallas. From
left: Chris Tamanini, McKenzie Kelly and Brandon Harding
Allied Services fundraiser in July
The 18th annual Allied Services Jack Newman Golf Clas-
sic, set for July 11, will benefit the Jack & Joan Newman
Endowment Fund, which supports Allied’s Vocational Ser-
vices Division. The co-presenting sponsors this year are T-R
Technology Solutions, First National Community Bank and
ParenteBeard. Supported by the Jack and Joan Newman
endowment, the Vocational Services Division helps more
than 500 physically and intellectually disabled people de-
velop work-related skills in a supervised and supportive
environment. For questions, call 348-1407. Pictured, from
left: Mike Avvisato, Senior Vice President/CFO; Thomas
(Tim) Speicher, President, T-R Technology Solutions; Jerry
Champi, President, FNCB; Joseph Earyes, CPA, First Senior
Vice President Retail Banking Officer, FNCB; Mark Ross,
Partner and Practice Leader, Senior Living Services Prac-
tice, ParenteBeard LLC; and Bob Ames, Vice President,
Community Services.
Newport girls reign in tourney
The Newport Biddy 12-year-old all-star team recently won
the Newport Invitational Tournament held at the Nanticoke
Elementary campus. The team’s record for the tournament
was 5-0 and was the second local basketball tournament in
which the team was undefeated. The players are: (first row,
from left) Alexis Cardone, Alexis Seery, Amber Grohowski
and Alexis Selli. Second row: Kassie Schinski, Kay Jeffries,
Abbey Zaykoski, Morgan Mislitski and Gianna Roberts.
Third row: Jack Roberts, head coach; Deric Grohowski,
coach; Ron Zaykoski, coach; and Kevin Schinski, coach.
Third Trivelpiece girl wins title
Marissa Trivelpiece con-
nected on 19 of 25 free
throws to win the State
Championship of the 8-9
year-old Division of the
Pennsylvania Elks Hoop
Shoot in State College. Triv-
elpiece is a third-grade stu-
dent at Valley Elementary
School in Sugarloaf. Marissa
becomes the third Trivel-
piece sister to win a state
championship in free throw
shooting. Maria Trivelpiece
won a state title (12-year-old
division) in 2009, and
Megan Trivelpiece won state
and regional championships
in 2007 (8-9 division), and
finished fourth in the coun-
try.
Tigers set nine swim records
Tunkhannock swimmers closed out the season with nine
school records. On the girls side, records were set by Ste-
phani Halloran in the 200 freestyle, 2:01.18; Stephanie Dy-
mond in the 50 freestyle, 25.38; the 200 medley relay
(Kandis Venn, Ashley Kasmierski, Halloran and Dymond),
1:59.99; and the 400 freestyle relay (Dymond, Venn, Brooke
Sheffler and Halloran), 3:50.60. The boys set five individual
records: Matt Kupchunas in the 100 butterfly, 53.83; David
Novak in the 200 freestyle, 1:47.87 and the 500 freestyle,
4:53.93; and Ben Spencer in the 200 IM, 1:59.13 and the 100
breaststroke, 1:01.18. Pictured, front row: Brooke Sheffler
and Stephani Halloran. Back row: Ashley Kasmierski, Kan-
dis Venn, Stephanie Dymond, Matt Kupchunas, David No-
vak and Ben Spencer.
Dallas 6th-grade girls go 28-0
Dallas Youth Basketball 6th grade girls travel team re-
cently concluded its season. The team participated in the
WVW Sunday League, as well as four separate tourna-
ments: BackCourt Hoops Holiday Tournament, WVW Presi-
dents Weekend Tournament, Mountain Top Youth Tourna-
ment and Newport Invitational Tournament. The Dallas
girls placed first in the Sunday League regular season, the
Sunday League playoffs and in all four tournaments. The
team compiled a record of 28-0. The members of the team
are first row: Maria Bednar, Talia Kosierowski, Sara Lojewski
and Rachel Maniskas. Second row: Breezy Coolbaugh,
Paige Evans, Maddie Kelley, Emma Lehman and Courtney
Devens. The team is coached by Chad Lojewski and Len
Kelley.
412 Autos for Sale
FORD `98 TAURUS
Gold. Good condi-
tion Runs great.
87,000 miles, R-
title, Recently
inspected.
$2,700. Call
(570) 814-6198
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439 Motorcycles
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘10
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A MUST SEE!
Custom Paint.
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call 570-864-2543
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508 Beauty/
Cosmetology
COSMETOLOGIST/
MANICURIST
Exciting opportunity
for licensed cosme-
tologists and nail
technicians to be
part of a nursing
and rehab center in
Wilkes-Barre.
Qualified candidates
should have experi-
ence with a full
complement of hair
and/or nail services
with an upscale
attitude and per-
sonality. Hairstylists
needed for week-
day hours. If you
possess strong
interpersonal skills
and a strong desire
to be part of our
team either apply
online: www.matura
salonandspa.com
or fax resume to
215-701-5934
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518 Customer
Support/Client Care
CALL CENTER REPS
$10/hour.
Raise after training.
Call us. 825-2105
1124 Highway 315
Wilkes-Barre
Save Time,
Apply Online!
www.onesource
staffing.com
522 Education/
Training
BLOOMSBURG
UNIVERSITY OF
PENNSYLVANIA
DEPARTMENT OF
NURSING
AA# 82-0-314
Part-time, tempo-
rary graduate posi-
tion Summer 2011
for FNP clinical
course. This posi-
tion will require
teaching OB/Normal
Newborn content as
well as clinical
supervision of FNP
students. Master’s
degree in Nursing
required. Demon-
strated ability to
work with diverse
populations pre-
ferred. Application
deadline for full con-
sideration: May 15,
2011. For a full posi-
tion description,
including application
procedures, visit
www.bloomu.edu/
jobs.
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UNIVERSITY OF
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DEPARTMENT OF
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AA#82-0-329;
82-0-330;
82-0-331
Three full-time, tem-
porary faculty posi-
tions for the aca-
demic year 2011-
2012 in an under-
graduate BSN Med-
ical/Surgical Nurs-
ing clinical rotation.
Master’s degree in
Nursing required.
Demonstrated abili-
ty to work with
diverse populations
preferred. Applica-
tion deadline for full
consideration: May
15, 2011 For a full
position description,
including application
procedures, visit
www.bloomu.edu/
jobs.
AA/EEO Employer.
527 Food Services/
Hospitality
COMMODITY FOOD
SPECIALIST
A growing frozen
food manufacturer
located in Moosic,
PA. is seeking a
quality individual to
join our team as
Commodity Food
Specialist on a 4 to
6 month temporary
basis with possible
opportunities to a
permanent position
within our company.
In this position you
will be facilitating
the commodity food
program in areas of
inventory control,
customer service,
and interaction with
regulatory bodies.
The successful can-
didate should have
strong communica-
tion skills, very good
computer skills,
experience in mate-
rials management,
an eye for detail,
and a positive atti-
tude. Previous
experience in food
manufacturing, sup-
ply chain manage-
ment and interac-
tion with the USDA
or other state or
federal bodies a
plus. Four-year col-
lege degree in relat-
ed field and the abil-
ity to work in a fast
paced environment
required. Interest-
ed, qualified individ-
uals may send their
resume and salary
history via email to
career45@
hotmail.com
EOE
542 Logistics/
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Drivers - CDL-A:
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877-211-8682
542 Logistics/
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• $1,000/week
minimum earnings
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mile
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• Health and 401K
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3 months OTR
experience.
Don’t miss out.
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548 Medical/Health
Seeking energetic
and personable
candidate to work
with and motivate
residents to partici-
pate in activities.
Prior experience is
a plus.
Complete
Application
395 Middle Rd.,
Nanticoke
Located directly
across from LCCC
on LCTA Bus Route
GREAT PAY &
OPPORTUNITY
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ACTIVITY AIDE
PART TIME EVENINGS
RESIDENTIAL
CARE AIDES
Part time positions
available. Looking
for caring & com-
passionate people
for Alzheimer’s
assisted living facil-
ity. Must be a high
school graduate.
Reliable applicants
need only apply.
No phone calls
please. Apply with-
in.
Keystone
Garden
Estates
100 Narrows Rd
Route 11
Larksville
551 Other
FOSTER PARENTING
“HOST HOME”
Program
$65 per diem.
Call CONCERN
800-654-6180
www.concern4kids.org
566 Sales/Retail/
Business
Development
HOTEL SALES
MANAGER
Requires Bachelor’s
degree in related
field. Requires 2-4
years experience in
hotel setting with
knowledge of
Luzerne County and
surrounding area.
Compensation
based on experi-
ence. Full benefit
package. No phone
calls. Email or Mail
resume to:
gm.pa627@choice
hotels.com or to
Quality Inn & Suites
880 Kidder St.
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18702
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utilities, security,
application & lease.
570-592-1241
Pennsylvania
MENTOR
has an exciting
opportunity for
DIRECT SUPPORT
PROFESSIONAL
in a new group
home opening in
Wilkes-Barre,
PA. Full-Time
Base Pay:
$9.50-
11.00/hour
KEY RESPONSI-
BILITIES: Establish
a relationship with
the individual
receiving services
to ensure effective
guidance, support
and service deliv-
ery •Coordinate,
organize and/or
assist with house-
hold activities such
as light housekeep-
ing and meal
preparation
•Provide trans-
portation for indi-
viduals receiving
services to planned
and/or necessary
activities and
appointments
•Maintains current
progress and con-
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other appropriate
documentation in
accordance with
MENTOR policy,
program standards
or other regulatory
policies
•May assist clients
with medication
administration
•Complete other
duties as needed
JOB
REQUIREMENTS:
•High school diplo-
ma or GED
required; Bache-
lor’s Degree pre-
ferred
•One year service-
delivery experience
preferred
•Ability to apply
common sense
understanding to
carry out instruc-
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•Current driver’s
license, car regis-
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insurance is neces-
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•Full time positions
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Full Time benefits
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570-654-4585
ext 4226
fax 570-654-3733
Randi.Farr@the
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PAGE 10C SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ S P O R T S
COLUMBUS, Ohio — Camo-clad
Jim Tressel declared Ohio State’s
spring game a success while 44,276
scratched their heads trying to figure
out the scoring system.
“We had certain things we wanted to
get done this spring and we got a lot
of those done,” Tressel said.
Each of the four quarterback candi-
dates — Joe Bauserman, Taylor Gra-
ham, Kenny Guiton and Braxton Mill-
er — threw a touchdown pass as the
Buckeyes offense beat the defense
59-27 in a scrimmage that concluded
spring practice.
Ohio State is looking for someone to
take over for three-year starter Terrelle
Pryor, who must sit out the first five
games along with four other top play-
ers the NCAA determined took im-
proper benefits. Tressel, too, is sus-
pended for the first five games while
the NCAA investigates his admission
that he knew about but didn’t report
players trading autographed uniforms
and championship rings for cash and
free tattoos from a Columbus tattoo
parlor owner.
The game, which featured a quirky
scoring system that overwhelmingly
favored the offense, ended early be-
cause of a risk of tornadoes in the area.
Offensive points were awarded in
the usual ways in addition to a point
for each first down, while the defense
scored for forcing punts, forcing turn-
overs and making fourth-down stops.
The offense didn’t score a touch-
down until its ninth possession — its
fourth series beginning at the defense’s
25-yard line. Guiton’s 17-yard scoring
pass went to Verlon Reed.
Gophers spring game is
up-for-grabs competition
MINNEAPOLIS — MarQueis Gray
has a firm grasp on the starting quar-
terback position for Minnesota. Many
of the other spots on coach Jerry Kill’s
first team with the Gophers are still up
for grabs.
The Gophers held their annual
spring intrasquad game on a cold, gray
Saturday afternoon at TCF Bank Stadi-
um, and Kill chose not to keep score
or time. He was more concerned about
avoiding injuries on a roster already
lacking depth in several areas.
Only one touchdown was scored
during the scrimmage, a short run up
the middle by freshman Donnell Kirk-
wood. He’s part of a stiff competition
for time at tailback, with seniors
Duane Bennett and DeLeon Eskridge
leading the pack.
Kill says he’ll need a lot of ball carri-
ers in the Big Ten season and picking a
starter isn’t important.
Defense dominates at Wisconsin
MADISON, Wis. — Quarterback Jon
Budmayr and the rest of the Badgers’
offense were held without a touch-
down as the defense dominated Wis-
consin’s spring football game at Camp
Randall Stadium on Saturday after-
noon.
Budmayr, a redshirt sophomore, is
vying to replace departing starter
Scott Tolzien. Freshman Joel Stave
looked slightly sharper, but none of
Wisconsin’s offensive players truly
stood out as the Badgers’ offense failed
to produce a touchdown drive.
Another quarterback candidate,
redshirt junior Curt Phillips, is reco-
vering from a knee injury.
The White team of defensive players
was credited with a 29-27 victory over
the Cardinal team of offensive players,
under a scoring system that spotted
points to the defense and included
uncontested field goal attempts.
C O L L E G E F O O T B A L L
AP PHOTO
Ohio State quarterback Joe Bauser-
man (14) looks to throws a pass as
linebacker Andrew Sweat gives chase
during the Buckeyes’ annual spring
game Saturday in Columbus, Ohio.
Offense
trumps D
at OSU
The Associated Press
He’s glad to be healthy this offseason
instead of rehabbing fromtwo torn liga-
ments in his knee like last year.
ThefreedomprovidedbytheNFL’s la-
bor dispute even had Welker joking,
“Let’s do a lockout every year.”
“I think once people start losing pay-
checks, it’ll probably be a little bit differ-
ent. But I’m not too concerned right
now,” Welker said. “Hopefully at some
point we get a deal done.
“I just know as players — I can speak
for myself — I just want to play ball.
Hopefully come fall, that’s what we’re
doing.”
He’s also turning attention to helping
out those in need in his hometown. A
fundraiser last month raised more than
$300,000, which will be spent pursuing
his foundation’s mission to help at-risk
children through athletics and positive
role models.
Douglass HighSchool, the host of the
camp this year, has twice received
grants from Welker’s foundation. The
first was used to upgrade decades-old
weight room equipment, and the sec-
ond provided video technology intend-
ed to help get students recruited by Di-
vision I schools.
“We had a lot of kids actually getting
noticed this year that probably would
not have,” Douglass coach Willis Alex-
ander said.
Douglass also won the Class 4A
championship last season, its first state
title since 1976, and several of Alexan-
der’s assistant coaches volunteered
their time to help Welker’s camp.
“We use football tohelpeducate these
kids, to let them grasp hold of some-
thing positive,” Alexander said. “The
sport of football actually goes hand in
hand with helping you prepare for life
because it gives you all the life situa-
tions in a football game.
“The toughest, biggest game of all is
the game of life.”
Following the camp, Welker now
shifts intofiguringout howtodivide the
money from the foundation’s most suc-
cessful fundraiser yet by sifting through
grant applications that can be submit-
ted online.
“The ones that the board and every-
body feels is worthy of those grants,
we’re going to spread that money
around and hopefully do some good
around the Oklahoma City area,” Welk-
er said. “Hopefully, at some point, we’ll
do new fields and things like that and
have our own setup. But that’s on down
the road.
“We’re getting there, it’s growing and
that’s all we could ask for right now.”
OKLAHOMA CITY — New England
Patriots receiver Wes Welker isn’t too
concernedabout theNFLlockout at this
point.
He’s making the most of his down
time, spending some of Saturday with
about 180 kids who attended the free
football camp he holds every year inOk-
lahoma City.
Welker tossed a fewpasses to the par-
ticipants, threw in a few tips during re-
ceiving drills and lined up on defense
during the 3
1
⁄2-hour camp at Douglass
High School.
“You’ve got to get into it a little bit,”
Welker said. “I get bored easily. So, for
me, I’ve got to get active and D one of
these kids up or catch a pass for ’em,
throw to ’em or whatever.
“We have fun with it.”
With more than four months to go be-
fore the season would start, Welker is
comfortable for nowcatching passes off
a machine in Oklahoma City and going
through his own weekly workout rou-
tine.
“It’s awesome because I’mon my own
schedule,” saidWelker, wholedtheNFL
with 123 receptions in 2009. “I don’t
have to talk to anybody; I don’t have to
see anybody. You see some of the same
faces all the time. It’s kind of nice not to
have to look at them anymore and see
them. I’m kind of enjoying it.
“I like being able to train on my own
and be able to do some of my things. It’s
good to be with the team, but it’s kind of
nice.”
Welker said he hadn’t heard of any
plans for Patriots players toget together
for informal offseason work. Some
Browns and Bengals have planned prac-
tice sessions, set upbytheir youngquar-
terbacks.
“For the younger guys, I think it’s a
big thing to try and do that. We haven’t
really put anything together yet,” Welk-
er said.
P R O F O O T B A L L
For now, Welker’s a happy camper
AP PHOTO
Braylon Charlot, 8, of Moore, Okla., runs a route as New England Patriots play-
er Wes Welker defends him during the Welker Football Camp for at-risk youth,
Saturday, at Douglass High School in Oklahoma City.
During labor dispute, Patriots star
enjoys offseason of working out on
his own, helping out at-risk kids.
By JEFF LATZKE
AP Sports Writer
MIAMI —Authorities said the wife
of Brandon Marshall stabbed the Mia-
mi Dolphins wide receiver with a
kitchenknife, andhis agent saidSatur-
day that the player was recovering.
Michi Nogami-Marshall, 26, was ar-
rested Friday evening and charged
with aggravated battery with a deadly
weapon. According
to the Broward
County Sheriff’s Of-
fice arrest report,
Nogami-Marshall
told officers she was
defending herself.
Marshall had earlier
told officers he
slipped and fell onto
a broken glass vase,
but the officers
noted that evidence
at the couple’s home
didn’t substantiate
that claim.
Nogami-Marshall
was released from
jail Saturday on
$7,500 bail. It was
unclear if she had an
attorney.
“Thisisaverydifficult timeforBran-
don and family, thankfully he will
makeafull recovery,”Marshall’sagent,
KennardMcGuire, saidinastatement.
TheNFLlockout restricts teamcon-
tact withplayers. However, ateamdoc-
tor for the Dolphins can see Marshall
and consult with Marshall’s other doc-
tors, and the team can express appro-
priate well wishes, said NFL spokes-
man Greg Aiello.
Marshall married Michi Nogami in
Miami last July. They met while both
werestudents at Central Florida. They
live in Southwest Ranches, which is
near the Dolphins’ complex in Davie.
A year ago last week, Marshall, 27,
was tradedtotheDolphins bytheDen-
ver Broncos for two second-round
draft picks.
Report: Dolphin
recovers after
wife stabs him
Michi
Nogami-Marshall
The Associated Press
Brandon
Marhsall
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2011 PAGE 11C
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WASHINGTON — It was an
early end that was long over-
due. Alex Ovechkin and the
Washington Capitals are on to
the second round of the play-
offs, and they advanced with-
out needing the full seven
games.
With fans emphatically de-
claring that “We are louder”
than those at New York’s Madi-
son Square Garden, the Veri-
zon Center exhorted the Cap-
itals to a Game 5 clincher Sat-
urday, a 3-1 win over the Rang-
ers.
Mike Green scored a first-
period, power-play goal before
taking yet another blow to the
head, Ovechkin scored one of
his highlight-reel goals in the
second, and Alexander Semin
tallied in the third. Michal
Neuvirth made 26 saves and
had a shutout until the final
minute as the top-seeded Cap-
itals allowed only eight goals in
the series — two in three
home wins.
The Capitals are moving on
to the Eastern Conference
semifinals, having won the first
playoff series under Bruce
Boudreau that didn’t go the
distance. He had led Washing-
ton through four seven-game
series — winning only one —
since becoming coach in 2007.
The Capitals hadn’t won a
series in fewer than seven
games since 1998, when they
beat Buffalo 4-2 on the way to
their only appearance in the
Stanley Cup finals. Their last
loss in fewer than seven was to
Tampa Bay in 2003.
While the players were in-
tent on proving they can finish
off an opponent, the fans were
determined to win the shout-
ing match with their New York
counterparts. Rangers fans
serenaded Boudreau with,
“Can you hear us?” in Game 4
after he said the fans were
louder in the nation’s capital.
“Can you hear us?” goes
without saying in the always
sold out din located in the
city’s Chinese quarter, so the
Capitals fans alternated “Let’s
go Caps” with “We are louder”
and held up signs such as “No
MSG in our Chinatown.”
Capitals owner Ted Leonsis’
production crew does videos
well, and the one shown before
the opening faceoff featured
“Friday the 13th” footage and
the words “April 20th: Game
IV — Jason Takes Manhattan,”
a reference to Jason Chimera’s
winning goal in double over-
time of Game 4 in New York on
Wednesday.
Wojtek Wolski scored in the
waning seconds for the Rang-
ers, who ended a season in
which they barely made the
playoffs as the No. 8 seed. New
York’s offense was hardly one
to be feared, and it was further
depleted by the absence of
second-leading scorer Ryan
Callahan, who broke a leg in
the final week of the regular
season.
Game 5 was the genesis of
the Capitals’ downfall a year
ago, when they allowed two
quick goals on the way to blow-
ing a 3-1 series lead and an
eventual first-round elimina-
tion by the Montreal Cana-
diens.
Bruins 2, Canadiens 1
BOSTON — Nathan Horton
scored at 9:03 of the second
overtime to give the Boston
Bruins a 2-1 win and a 3-2 lead
over the Montreal Canadiens
in their first-round playoff
series.
Montreal goalie Carey Price
stopped Andrew Ference’s
wrist shot from 30 feet but
couldn’t control the rebound.
Horton then put his second
goal of the playoffs into the
open right side of the net.
It was Boston’s second over-
time win in three days, in-
cluding a 5-4 victory on Thurs-
day night. It also was the first
win by a home team in the
series.
The Bruins, who have won
three straight games, can end
the series in Game 6 on Tues-
day night in Montreal.
S TA N L E Y C U P P L AYO F F S
AP PHOTO
Washington Capitals center Jason Arnott celebrates after a
goal by Capitals’ Mike Green, not shown, during the first period
in Game 5 of a first-round NHL Stanley Cup playoff series on
Saturday in Washington.
Capitals send
Rangers home
The Associated Press
character. I was just hoping it was
this year.”
The Penguins, who lead the se-
ries3-2, will get asecondchanceto
advance Monday night at Tampa
Bay.
Stamkos’ 96 goals over the past
two seasons led the NHL, but he
had only one assist over the first
four games of the series. He had
three points onSaturday, twodays
after being held without a shot in
the Penguins’ 3-2 double-overtime
victory in Game 4.
Stamkos, whohad21goalsinhis
first 22gamesthisseason, hadonly
fourgoalsinhispast 26games, dat-
ing to the regular season.
“I’m really happy for Stamkos
becausethelast gameI thought he
played a great game,” Boucher
said. “It just didn’t pay off for him,
and today it paid off. Like I always
say, takecareof theprocessandthe
results will come.
“He was a major warrior in this
game.”
He wasn’t the only one.
Simon Gagne and Pavel Kubina
both scored their first two goals of
the series, captainVincent Lecava-
lier added his second, and Domin-
ic Moore also scored late for the
Lightning, who set a franchise re-
cord for goals in a road playoff
game and handed the Penguins
their worst home postseason loss.
DwayneRolosonmade31saves,
including several impressive stops
intheopeningminuteswhenPitts-
burgh controlled play.
“(Roloson)wasgoodforthefirst
17 minutes, and then their team
gave them a couple there,” Pitts-
burgh forward Pascal Dupuis said.
“Things fell apart after that.”
Gagne and Stamkos stunned a
Penguins’ record crowd for an in-
door home game withtwogoals in
a span of 46 seconds beginning
with 3:03 left in the first.
The road teams have won four
consecutive games in the series,
and Tampa Bay’s victory was the
22nd by a visiting teamin 36 NHL
playoff games.
“I think me and the rest of the
NHL coaches in the playoffs right
now are all scratching their heads
tryingtofigureout what’sgoingon
with the home teams,” Boucher
said.
Pittsburgh’s Mike Rupp and
Chris Conner scored in the third
period after Tampa Bay had taken
a 7-0 lead, but by then it was obvi-
ous the Penguins would fail to be-
come the first Eastern Conference
team to advance to the second
round.
The Penguins are 0-5 under
coachDanBylsmawhentheyhave
the chance to eliminate an oppo-
nent at home. The marginof victo-
ry was the largest for any playoff
game this season.
Counting a 5-1 victory in Game
2, the Lightning have won two
straight in Pittsburgh by a com-
bined score of 13-3.
Stamkos’ first goal made it 2-0
just after Gagne opened the scor-
ing. Sevenminutesintothesecond
period, Stamkos scoredhis second
of the game while the Lightning
were onthe power play, extending
their lead to 5-0.
“I wantedto, obviously, beapart
of this team’s success in the play-
offs and prove to myself and my
teammates that I can play in these
pressure situations,” Stamkos
said.
“I just felt eachandeverygame I
was getting better and better,” he
added.
“It wasn’t showing up on the
scoresheet, but I think I noticed it,
the coaching staff noticed it, so it’s
nice to get rewarded, especially in
a game of this magnitude.”
Stamkos’ second goal was the
first of three straight man-advan-
tage goals that pushed the Light-
ning’s lead from4-0 to 7-0.
But the Lightning strikes we-
ren’t limited to the power play.
They came into the game with on-
ly three 5-on-5 goals in the series
but hadfour inthe first 26minutes
on Saturday.
PITTSBURGH
Continued from Page 1C
INDIANAPOLIS — Chicago’s
fans traveled to Indiana by the
thousands, planning to cele-
brate a first-round playoff
sweep.
The Pacers sent the red and
black-clad swarm back home
disappointed. After fourth-
quarter collapses in each of the
first three games, Indiana avoid-
ed elimination by holding off a
furious rally to beat the Bulls
89-84 in Game 4 of the first-
round Eastern Conference se-
ries on Saturday afternoon.
The Pacers not only faced
superstar guard Derrick Rose
and the pressure of a 3-0 deficit
in the series, they dealt with an
unexpected roadblock — a
hostile environment on its
home floor at Conseco Field-
house. The crowd shocked
Pacers center Jeff Foster, who
has played for the Pacers for his
entire 12-year NBA career.
“I have seen every profession-
al game in this arena, and I have
never seen anything like that,”
he said.
The young Pacers maintained
their composure.
“We’ve lost games like this
recently where they have come
back,” Pacers interim coach
Frank Vogel said. “Today we
grew, and we held them off.”
The Bulls still lead the series
3-1 and will have a chance to
close it out at home Tuesday.
Danny Granger led the Pacers
with 24 points, including four
free throws in the final 14.1
seconds while being booed. He
said the team remembered its
earlier failures in the series.
“Maybe there were a few
flashbacks,” he said. “More
importantly, I was just trying to
get my team to calm down. We
lost our poise those last two or
three minutes and I was just
trying to get them calmed down
a little bit.”
Chicago’s Carlos Boozer mis-
sed a 3-pointer that could have
tied the game in the closing
seconds. The Bulls were look-
ing to set up Luol Deng for the
final shot.
“I caught the ball at the el-
bow and I was supposed to set a
backscreen for Luol,” Joakim
Noah, who led the Bulls with 21
points and 14 rebounds, said.
“They played it well, they de-
nied the dribble handoff. Really,
it was a mental mistake. When
you’re in that position, you’ve
got to call timeout, so we learn
from it.”
The Pacers never trailed and
broke through after losing the
first three games by a combined
15 points. The Pacers squan-
dered double-digit leads in the
first two games and a five-point
lead in the fourth quarter of
Game 3.
It was Indiana’s first playoff
win since 2006.
Vogel had been disappointed
that Indiana’s efforts against the
top seed in the East hadn’t been
rewarded with a win.
“I think we deserve to be in
the series,” he said. “I’m still
upset that it’s 1-3. We should be
up in the series.”
Rose, who averaged 32.7
points in the first three games,
finished with 15 points and 10
assists. He sprained his left
ankle late in the first quarter
and scored eight points on
3-for-16 shooting the rest of the
way.
“A sprained ankle is going to
slow you down a little bit, but
all of my shots were on line,” he
said. “They were just short. No
excuses. It’s the playoffs. I’ve
sprained my ankle many times,
you’ve just got to make shots.”
Chicago trailed 84-71 with
2:17 remaining before making a
final rally.
A three-point play by Deng
cut Indiana’s lead to 84-77 with
1:36 to go. A goaltending call
against Roy Hibbert on a shot
by Boozer sliced the deficit to
84-79 with 46.5 seconds remain-
ing, and a steal and dunk by
Rose pulled the Bulls within
84-81.
Mike Dunleavy hit the second
of two free throws with 17.9
seconds left to make it 85-81.
Trail Blazers 84,
Mavericks 82
PORTLAND, Ore. — Bran-
don Roy go-ahead bank shot
with 39.2 seconds left capped
Portland’s 23-point second half
comeback and the Blazers beat
the Dallas Mavericks, evening
the first-round playoff series at
two games apiece.
Roy, who has struggled to
find his place on the team since
undergoing arthroscopic sur-
gery on both knees in January,
had 18 of his 24 points in the
fourth quarter alone.
Both teams have held home
court in their best-of-seven
playoff series, which heads to
Dallas on Monday.
Dirk Nowitzki had 20 points
to lead the Mavericks.
Dallas led 64-41 in the third
quarter before the Blazers start-
ed to rally behind Roy.
Grizzlies 91, Spurs 88
MEMPHIS, Tenn. — Zach
Randolph scored 25 points,
including a rare 3-pointer with
41.9 seconds left, and the Mem-
phis Grizzlies beat the San
Antonio Spurs for the fran-
chise’s first playoff victory on its
home court.
These Grizzlies have been
busy this postseason making
lots of history at the Spurs’
expense. They opened this
series with their first playoff
win, and now the No. 8 seed
has a 2-1 lead over the NBA’s
best team during the regular
season.
Memphis is trying to become
just the fourth team to knock
off the top-seeded team.
Marc Gasol scored 17 points,
Mike Conley had 14 and O.J.
Mayo had 10 off the bench for
Memphis.
N B A P L AYO F F S
Pacers top Bulls to stay alive
AP PHOTO
The Indiana Pacers’ Dahntay Jones reacts during the final sec-
onds of Game 4 of a first-round NBA playoff series against the
Chicago Bulls in Indianapolis Saturday. Indianan won 89-84.
The Associated Press
C M Y K
PAGE 12C SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ S P O R T S
OUTDOORS
The Factoryville Sportsmen Club will hold
its regular monthly meeting on Wednes-
day at 7:30 p.m. in the clubhouse. Presi-
dent Neal Stevenson reminds members
that “Supergun’’ event ticket payments
are due. Also, a limited supply of Fred
Loch Memorial Scholarship raffle tickets
are available. The Scholarship Shoot and
Steak Dinner will be held on Sunday, May
1, at 9 a.m. Call the club at 378-2593 for
information.
Pennsylvania State Parks naturalist Ste-
phanie Strub will lead a 17-mile guided
bike ride on May 14 from10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
along the gently sloped rail trail that
follows the Lehigh Gorge. Riders will take
in the natural sights, watch the white-
water rafters in the river below, and learn
a little bit of local history at points of
interest along the way. The ride will begin
at the Rockport launch area and head
north to White Haven, where riders will
have the opportunity to enjoy a lunch of
Italian food and ice cream before turning
around to ride the slight downhill back to
Rockport. The fee for this program is $5
per person, payable at the event. Riders
must be in good physical condition and
bring their own cycling gear or secure
rentals. Register in advance, as the ride
will be canceled if there is a lack of in-
terest. To register or for information,
contact Stephanie Strub at
sstrub@state.pa.us or 215-453-5015.
The Nescopeck State Park Junior Bird
club is accepting new members. Children
ages 9 and older are invited to join the
club for hands-on activities, adventures
and monthly meetings that include a bald
eagle watch, field trip to Middle Creek
Wildlife Management Area, geocaching at
Boulder Field and owl pellet dissection.
Future meetings include a bird walk and
movie night (May 13), cavity nesting birds
(June 12), orienteering at Hickey Run
(July 28) and kayaking at Nescopeck
State Park (Aug. 12). For information, call
403-2006.
The Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commis-
sion and Cabela’s have partnered to
promote fishing in the state. Cabela’s is
tagging hundreds of fish in selected
waters in states that have Cabela’s retail
stores – including Pennsylvania – and
every one of them is a winner. Among the
winning fish, there are grand prize win-
ners that might qualify for additional
bonuses based on the winning angler
using or wearing sponsors’ products
when they catch a tagged fish.
The PFBC is Cabela’s state partner and will
tag fish in selected waters, which will be
publicly announced on May 14, the official
start of the contest. The contest runs
through July 14. PFBC Executive Director
John Arway said the timing of the contest
is perfect because it will coincide with the
PFBC’s Fish-for-Free Day on Memorial
Day, Monday, May 30, giving vacationing
families more incentive to try fishing.
“The contest creates a fantastic opportunity
to promote all the fishing opportunities
we have in Pennsylvania to first-time
anglers on our Fish-for-Free Day,” he said.
“On this day, we will hold special events
at many of the selected contest waters.
We will have exhibits, fishing instruction
and tips, free publications and more.
“The contest – and in particular the Fish-for-
Free Day – promises to be fun and excit-
ing for all levels of anglers,” Arway added.
“Now when someone is fishing and feels
that tug on their line, they’ll be thinking,
‘I’m reeling in a million dollar prize?’ ”
Fish-for-Free Days allow anyone (Penn-
sylvania resident or non-resident) to
legally fish. No fishing license is required
to fish on these days. All other fishing
regulations apply. The second Fish-for-
Free Day is Labor Day, Monday, Sept. 5.
Winning is as easy as baiting a hook. Go to
the PFBC’s website for contest and Fish-
for-Free information at: http://fishand-
boat.com/fishformillions.htm. Anglers
need to pre-register and hit their local
waters between May 14 and July 14 for
their chance to win a fish worth $2.2
million.
Bulletin Board items will not be accepted
over the telephone. Items may be faxed to
831-7319, dropped off at the Times Leader or
mailed to Times Leader, c/o Sports, 15 N,
Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA18711-0250.
BUL L E T I N BOARD
I
t’s amazing that it took three tries
for the Pennsylvania Fish and Boat
Commission board to pass a life-
saving measure.
And it’s even more shocking that
there are groups out there that actually
opposed it.
During its meeting two weeks ago,
the PFBC board of commissioners
approved a new rule making it manda-
tory for those on boats less than 16 feet
in length to wear life jackets during the
cold weather months from Nov. 1
through April 30.
With the measure receiving unani-
mous backing recently, it’s likely to
receive final approval during the
board’s July meeting and would go into
effect on Nov. 1, 2012.
It should’ve been in effect long ago.
The numbers back it up.
According to statistics from the U.S.
Coast Guard’s Boating Accident Report
Database, the PFBC reported 1,424
accidents in the last 15 years, including
187 fatalities.
Only 8 percent of those accidents, or
117, occurred during the “off” boating
season from Nov. 1 to April 30.
But what makes this rule spot on is
the fact that 45 fatalities resulted from
those “off” season accidents.
That means 24 percent of all boating
accident fatalities during the last 15
years happened during the fall, winter
or early spring.
That’s no surprise.
And there’s more.
From 2000 to 2009, 28 fatalities
occurred in unpowered boats less than
16 feet in length, including canoes,
rowboats, kayaks and small motor-
boats. The reason why is as clear as the
icy waters of winter.
Cold water shock.
It can occur when water temper-
atures are less than 70 degrees, and the
PFBC correctly admits that it’s a major
factor in boating fatalities that occur
between Nov. 1 and April 30. Cold
water shock causes the body to react
differently. Things like gasping un-
controllably, hyperventilation, breath-
lessness and the reduced ability to
control breathing and swim can all
occur after a spill into frigid water.
So can death.
And it happens quickly.
Cold water removes heat from the
body 25 times faster than cold air.
Swimming or even a struggle to do so
increases heat loss. Survival time is
reduced to minutes.
A life jacket can change that.
The proposed rule was passed unani-
mously by the PFBC board, including
commissioner Norm Gavlick, who is a
Kingston resident. Gavlick’s reasoning
for supporting the measure is simple.
“Pennsylvania has a very good record
when it comes to safety and boating
fatalities, but 25 percent of them occur
during the cold weather months and
virtually none of the people involved
were wearing life jackets,” he said. “If
they were, there’s a good chance some
would’ve survived.”
Because the new rule covers those
on boats during the late fall and winter,
I’m sure that waterfowl hunters and
muskie anglers might not have been
too keen on the idea the first few times
the PFBC tried to pass it.
To a certain extent I can understand
their reasoning. After all, who wants to
try to hunt or fish from a boat while
wearing a bulky life jacket?
It’s understandable that hunters and
anglers are hesitant to accept things
that could impede their day afield, but
with today’s technology a life jacket
isn’t one of them.
They are important to wear when
the weather is warm, and even more so
during the cold winter months.
Just ask the PFBC board of commis-
sioners how important they are during
the fall and winter. They’ve tried sever-
al times to get us to wear one.
TOM VENESKY
O U T D O O R S
This mandatory
rule would be
a true life saver
Tom Venesky covers the outdoors for The
Times Leader. Reach him at tvenesky@time-
sleader.com
T
hanks to something that
happened three years ago,
hunters will have in-
creased opportunity to
harvest a trophy-size gob-
bler this season.
The spring gobbler season runs
from April 30 to May 31 and Penn-
sylvania Game Commission officials
said hunters should find an abun-
dance of mature gobblers in the 2-
and 3-year-old range due to excellent
spring reproduction in 2008 and 2009
in many parts of the state.
As a result, PGC wild turkey biol-
ogist Mary Jo Casalena expects this
spring’s harvest to top 40,000 birds
for the third consecutive year.
“The reason for the optimistic out-
look is due to the excellent summer
reproduction in 2008 and 2009, which
has provided for a higher proportion
of adult (2- and 3-year-old) gobblers
in the population,” Casalena said.
Gobbler hunting prospects are
strong in the northeast, particularly in
Wildlife Management Units 4C and
4E, which both maintain two of the
highest spring harvest densities in the
state.
PGC biologist Kevin Wenner said
both of those WMUs have been gob-
bler hunting hotspots for several
years, particularly 4C.
“It has a good mix of forest and
agricultural land, which gives turkeys
food sources and cover. It’s a good
overall scenario,” Wenner said.
With plenty of mature gobblers in
the woods this season, hunters
shouldn’t have a problem hearing
plenty of gobbling. Wenner said he’s
been hearing birds every morning for
the last three weeks.
But that doesn’t mean that hunting
a wary gobbler will be any easier.
With a week left before the season
opener next Saturday, Casalena en-
couraged hunters to start scouting
potential hunting areas to pinpoint a
mature bird.
“Scouting can improve hunters’
chances, especially if they line up
multiple locations for the spring sea-
son,” Casalena said. “Prior to the
season, however, hunters should con-
sider not using turkey calls to locate
gobblers, because it will educate birds
and cause them to be less inclined to
respond to the early-morning calls of
in-season hunters.”
Wenner said the best scouting
method is to listen for birds gobbling
in the morning or early evening be-
fore they roost. During the late morn-
ing and early afternoon, he said, it’s a
good idea to watch fields for strutting
gobblers trying to attract hens.
While there might be more mature
gobblers in the woods this season,
hunters will also have more time to
pursue them thanks to a change in
hunting hours.
Under the change, legal hunting
hours from the opening day of the
spring gobbler season through the
third Saturday (April 30-May 14) will
retain the current one-half hour be-
fore sunrise until noon time frame.
However, the remainder of the season
(May 16-31) will be expanded to run
all day, from one-half hour before
sunrise until one-half hour after sun-
set.
“Although all-day hunting will in-
crease disturbance of nesting hens,
the impact will be minimal because
all-day hours will only cover the last
two weeks of the season,” said the
PGC’s Casalena. “By then, hunting
pressure decreases and most hens are
in their later stages of nest incuba-
tion, at which point they are less
likely to abandon their nest if dis-
turbed.
“We anticipate the many benefits
will far outweigh the minor disturb-
ance of hens, particularly the in-
creased hunting opportunity for all
hunters, such as youth and adults
who attend school or work during the
morning who now will have the op-
tion of a late afternoon hunt.”
Casalena noted that the Game
Commission will monitor the after-
noon harvest in relation to population
trends and age class of gobblers to
gauge the impact of all-day hunting.
Of the 49 states that conduct turkey
seasons, 34 have all-day hunting for
all or part of the season, including
Maryland, Ohio and Virginia.
To further expand opportunity, the
board extended the spring gobbler
season through May 31. This change
was implemented to provide addition-
al recreational hunting without im-
pacting the resource because disturb-
ance of hens would be minimal since
most hens would be in their later
stages of nest incubation, according
to the PGC.
Reproduction in recent years boosts hunting prospects throughout Pa.
PA. GAME COMMISSION SUBMITTED PHOTO
Gobbler hunting prospects are strong in Northeastern Pennsylvania, particularly in Wildlife Management Units 4C and 4E, which both maintain two of the
highest spring harvest densities in the state. The spring gobbler season starts Saturday and runs through May 31.
Spring gobbler season nears
Turkey season facts and figures
• Recent spring and fall harvests are: 44,639 spring gobblers and 20,934 fall
turkeys in 2009; 42,437 spring gobblers and 24,288 fall turkeys in 2008; 37,992
spring gobblers and 25,369 fall turkeys in 2007; and 39,339 spring gobblers and
24,482 fall turkeys in 2006. While the final 2010 harvest estimates won’t be
available until this summer, the preliminary 2010 spring gobbler harvest was
44,788 and the preliminary fall turkey harvest was 18,000.
• Hunters are reminded that it is illegal to stalk turkeys or turkey sounds in the
spring gobbler season.
• While not required by law, hunters are encouraged to wear fluorescent orange
material when moving through the woods, especially during the overlap with
groundhog hunting season. Agency officials also recommend that hunters wrap an
orange alert band around a nearby tree when stationary, especially when calling
and/or using decoys.
• Youths under the age of 12 years may participate in the spring gobbler season
through the Game Commission’s Mentored Youth Hunting Program. Mentored
youths need to obtain a permit ($2.70), and must be accompanied by an adult
mentor who is properly licensed and at least 21 years of age. A field harvest tag is
provided with the mentored youth hunting program permit. Mentored youths also
are required to report their harvest to the Game Commission either online or by
using one of the report card inserts that are part of the Digest.
• Legal sporting arms are: shotguns plugged to three-shell capacity in the
chamber and magazine combined; muzzleloading shotguns; and crossbows and
bows with broadhead bolts or arrows of cutting-edge design.
Shot size must be no larger than No. 4 lead, bismuth-tin and tungsten-iron, or No.
2 steel. Rifle-shotgun combinations also may be used, but no single-projectile
ammunition may be used or carried.
By TOMVENESKY
tvenesky@timesleader.com
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2011 PAGE 13C
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Elko & Sons
American-4/17/11
Standings: 1. Lavelle’s, 286-170;
2. Josie’s café, 257.5-198.5; 3. JK
Consulting, 231.5-224.5; 4. PJ Ado-
nizio’s, 207-249; 5. Howell-Lussi,
199.5-256.5; 6. Kaza Inc, 186.5-
269.5. Top Scorers: Dave Kern,
268; Mark Kulick, 266; John Gro-
howski, 254; Neal Elko, 250; Jerry
Coggins, 248; Rob Miller, 245;
Bruce Rydzy, 244; Tom Spurlin,
242; Edward Collins, 236; Pete La-
tona, 234.
Sunday Night Mixed-4/17/11
Standings: 1. The Mob 4, 26-13;
2. Argenio Chiropractic, 26-13; 3.
Beauties and the Beast, 20-19; 4.
TeamMohawk, 18-21; 5. Team5, 14-
25; 6. Shake-N-Bake, 13-26. Top
Scorers: Men- Joe Argenio, 227;
Paul Chmiel, 220; Bill Yuhas, 214;
Vito Buzzetta, 204; Francis Pupa,
200. Women- Gracelynn William-
son, 171; Marianne Argenio, 168;
Trisha Chmiel, 165; MaryLou Fe-
reck, 145; Hope Wruble, 132.
Dupont Bowlerettes-4/17/11
Standings: 1. PACC, 39-21; 2. Ka-
sa Well & Water, 37.5-22.5; 3. Hy-
Tech Tool, 30.5-29.5; 4. Casey-
Kassa Coal, 30.5-29.5; 5. Cal’s
Gals, 28-32; 6. Twisted Sisters,
14.5-45.5. Top Scorers: Rose
McDade, 188; Gracelynn William-
son, 187; Helen Zapotoski, 185;
Connie Berlinski, 179; Irene Jemio-
la, 170; Donna Kasa, 170; Kim Kish-
el, 162; Ann Alfano, 159; Debbie
Stevens, 151.
Warehouse Mixed League-4/
17/11
Standings: 1. WooooDo!!!, 47.5-
20.5; 2. REF, 34-34; 3. Bud iz Good,
34-34; 4. Team5, 33-35; 5. Big D’s,
32.5-35.5; 6. What Ever, 21-47. Top
Scorers: Men- Scott Schramm,
297; Ron Shaw, 226; John Doran,
220; Matt Charney, 212; Wes Mar-
cincavage, 207. Women- Noel Hor-
wath, 167; Sandra Sands, 154; Mel-
ony Yurek, 153; Ann Kopeck, 118;
Nikki Sands, 106.
Pittston Township VFW-4/17/
11
Standings: 1. Warriors, 40-16; 2.
Giants, 32-24; 3. Cougars, 29-27; 4.
Pioneers, 26-30; 5. Eagles, 25-31;
6. Yankees, 16-40. Top Scorers:
Jack Casper, 236; Phil Jr Gianfar-
caro, 233; Joe Sr Walsh, 213; Bert
Myers, 212; Jody Marranca, 204;
John Blattner, 204; Joe Dalessan-
dro, 203; Larry Jr O’Brien, 202;
Joe Stella, 201; JimChimento, 195.
National-4/17/11
Standings: 1. Howell-Lussi,
291.5-164.5; 2. Atlantic Propane,
257.5-198.5; 3. DeQuevedo Chirop,
255.5-200.5; 4. T-2, 218-238; 5. Ba-
loga Funeral H, 212-244; 6. E-Truck-
ing, 133.5-322.5. Top Scorers: Al-
lyn Jr Ferretti, 288; Edward Col-
lins, 268; Rich Gorzkowski, 267;
Jerry Coggins, 247; John Pisano,
241; Tom Eckroth, 239; Steve See-
ley, 237; Lisa Menichini, 236; Allyn
Sr Ferretti, 234; Joe Burns, 232.
Universal-4/17/11
Standings: 1. Silveri’s Cateri,
262.5-193.5; 2. Elko’s Pro Shop,
255-201; 3. The Taxidermy Studio,
253-203; 4. Doc’s Five, 242.5-
213.5; 5. Marriotti Buildi, 232-224;
6. Wyoming Valley B, 120-333. Top
Scorers: Dan Polerecki, 266; Jer-
ry Coggins, 255; Mike Gotcha, 251;
Edward Collins, 243; Leonard Tro-
lio, 228; Michael Spece, 226; Ri-
chard Arditi, 225; Lowell Stoss,
222; DavidTitton, 222; JimLavelle
III, 222; William Elko, 222.
Magic Circle-4/17/11
Standings: 1. The Sumbitches,
304-176; 2. Craft Oil, 298-182; 3.
One Stop, 262-218; 4. H&N Floor,
237.5-242.5; 5. Renfers, 225.5-
254.5; 6. Koosa, 113-367. Top
Scorers: Kyle Wagner, 247; Ed-
ward Collins, 237; Bill Pupa, 230;
Drew Nicholson, 226; Rich Wagn-
er, 223; John Colarusso, 221; Mi-
chael Rebovich, 218; Greg Brung-
es, 214; Rich Sr Aston, 211; Paul
Chmiel, 204.
Friday Junior/Senior Friday
4PM-4/17/11
Standings: 1. We’re Done Here,
34-11; 2. TheFreshman, 28.5-16.5; 3.
Elko’s Donuts, 26-19; 4. You Mad
Bro?, 22.5-22.5; 5. Split Happens,
21-24; 6. Bye, 0-0. Top Scorers:
Boys- Kyle Berlinski, 221; Nicholas
Maruska, 209; Michael Szumski,
207; Billy Jr Elko, 202; Fred Loku-
ta, 170. Girls- Chantel Cebula, 117.
Dupont Prep Boys 9:00-4/17/
11
Standings: 1. The Super Bow-
lerz, 26.5-15.5; 2. The Golden Pins,
25-17; 3. Weenie Hut Winners, 23-
19; 4. Brothers of Destruction, 9.5-
32.5. Top Scorers: Zachary Gar-
barino, 152; Joey Jones, 145; Mi-
chael Walsh, 135; Charles Kulick,
129; Jesse Carlen, 127; Evan Elko,
122; David Noble, 105; Caden Sut-
cliffe, 100; Bryan Shupp, 99; Nick
Arcarese, 96.
Dupont Bantam/Prep Boys
11:30-4/17/11
Standings: 1. The Strikers, 22-6;
2. The 3rd Grade Strikers, 16-12; 3.
The Curse of 9’s, 15-13; 4. Fireballs,
13-15; 5. Lightning Strikers, 12-16; 6.
The Tigers, 6-22. Top Scorers: An-
thony DePascale, 117; Tyler Cegel-
ka, 100; Joe Wruble, 100; Zachary
Elko, 97; Jeremy Lavelle, 82; Bra-
dley Augenstein, 79; Tommy Des-
soy, 79; Tyler Granahan, 75; Marc
Piechota, 73; Chaz Sciandra, 69.
Dupont Bantam/Prep Girls
1:15-4/17/11
Standings: 1. All Star Bowlers,
16-12; 2. The Strikers, 16-12; 3. Bowl-
ing Tigers, 13-15; 4. Rainbow Girlz,
11-17. Top Scorers: Samantha Pie-
chota, 138; Morgan Mesaris, 122;
Piper Kane, 108; Kayla Hindmarsh,
102; Gabrielle Rose, 100; Nikki
Price, 98; Hannah Maruhnich, 91;
Evelyn Pourmonir, 80; Emily Des-
soye, 63; Madison Mesaris, 56.
Dupont Mixed Boys 6:00-4/
17/11
Standings: 1. Strikes Gone Wild,
32.5-9.5; 2. Brown Cows, 27-15; 3.
Upyour Alley, 24-18; 4. TheHungry
Turtles, 16.5-25.5; 5. The Toasters,
16-26; 6. Put NameHere, 10-32. Top
Scorers: Spencer Saxon, 214; Za-
chary McKitish, 213; Peter Kulick,
191; David Zydko, 188; Andrew Ad-
kins, 179; Jason Roche, 169; Keith
Boone, 167; Michael Minich, 158;
Stephen Yuhas, 158; Dave Pacov-
sky, 155.
Modern Lanes
Wed Mixed-4/13/11
Standings: 1. The Drunken Bass
Tur, 56-12; 2. BUI, 43.5-24.5; 3. San-
tey Builders, 43-25; 4. So Fa-King
Bad, 31-37; 5. For Who For What,
30.5-37.5; 6. Beer Nutz, 29.5-38.5;
7. Outlaws, 28.5-39.5; 8. Bye, 0-0.
Top Scorers: Men- Berny Gober,
279; Don Brennen, 279; Billy Cat-
sterline, 276; Jason Blydenburg,
241; Rich Interwicz, 235. Women-
Tracy Davitt, 228; Sarah Navin,
199; Tracey Carey, 199; Meryl
Wganer, 186; Lisa Tisdel, 161.
Lady Birds-4/13/11
Standings: 1. Parakeets, 45-15;
2. Blue Jays, 38.5-21.5; 3. Seagulls,
31-29; 4. Blue Jays, 29.5-30.5; 5.
Tweety Birds, 29-31; 6. Flamingos,
29-31; 7. Robins, 26-34. Top Score-
rs: Deanna Yonki, 556; Tricia Sur-
villa, 520; Judy Krifka, 492; Mary
Pisano, 490; Evelyn Marsh, 483;
Lee Lawrence, 480; Barbara
Slusser, 478; MariaYonki, 473; Ma-
ry Kay Stetina, 467; Barbara Gra-
nahan, 463.
Stanton Lanes
Dunay Jewelers Women’s
Classic-4/13/11
Standings: 1. Stanton Lanes,
27.5-14.5; 2. Tovon & Co, 23-19; 3.
Burkes Printing, 23-19; 4. King Pin
Lounge, 23-19; 5. Crestwood Phar-
macy, 22.5-19.5; 6. Thunderstorm
Productions, 20-22; 7. Northeast
Auto Credit, 19-23; 8. The Left-
overs, 10-32. Top Scorers: Alice
Gill, 597; Julie Chomicz, 586; Jen-
nifer Mang, 582; Amanda Suda,
558; Terri Vesek, 545; Janice Wat-
son-Holmes, 533; Claire Manzi,
533; Bonnie Eddy, 519; Betsy Suda,
502; Gloria Watson, 502.
B O W L I N G R E S U L T S
C M Y K
PAGE 14C SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ W E A T H E R
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ALMANAC
REGIONAL FORECAST
NATIONAL FORECAST
For more weather
information go to:
www.timesleader.com
National Weather Service
607-729-1597
Forecasts, graphs
and data ©2011
Weather Central, LP
Yesterday 58/38
Average 62/41
Record High 86 in 2001
Record Low 24 in 1930
Yesterday 17
Month to date 410
Year to date 5997
Last year to date 5481
Normal year to date 5871
*Index of fuel consumption, how far the day’s
mean temperature was below 65 degrees.
Precipitation
Yesterday 0.28”
Month to date 3.78”
Normal month to date 2.47”
Year to date 14.22”
Normal year to date 9.70”
Susquehanna Stage Chg. Fld. Stg
Wilkes-Barre 9.32 -1.24 22.0
Towanda 6.21 -0.10 21.0
Lehigh
Bethlehem 4.25 1.93 16.0
Delaware
Port Jervis 5.38 -0.52 18.0
Today’s high/
Tonight’s low
TODAY’S SUMMARY
Highs: 67-73. Lows: 46-53. Showers and
isolated thunderstorms today into
tonight.
The Poconos
Highs: 72-78. Lows: 56-59. Mostly cloudy
with scattered showers today into
tonight.
The Jersey Shore
Highs: 51-62. Lows: 34-45. Showers are
possible today into tonight.
The Finger Lakes
Highs: around 78. Lows: around 59. Areas
of showers and thunderstorms.
Brandywine Valley
Highs: 70-84. Lows: 59-62. Partly to most-
ly cloudy today into tonight.
Delmarva/Ocean City
Anchorage 40/35/.00 49/35/sh 50/34/sh
Atlanta 76/55/.00 87/63/pc 85/62/t
Baltimore 74/44/.07 84/65/t 78/65/pc
Boston 50/39/.40 66/50/sh 57/50/sh
Buffalo 66/44/.58 51/41/pc 57/49/sh
Charlotte 80/49/.02 86/61/pc 84/63/pc
Chicago 64/45/.00 56/44/c 53/48/sh
Cleveland 74/54/.25 55/44/sh 57/56/sh
Dallas 87/73/.00 84/70/t 86/67/t
Denver 50/32/.00 49/40/sh 58/35/sh
Detroit 72/44/.41 57/46/c 55/52/sh
Honolulu 81/72/.02 87/72/pc 85/72/pc
Houston 87/74/.00 88/74/pc 86/74/pc
Indianapolis 70/63/.01 64/54/sh 70/60/t
Las Vegas 76/60/.00 80/63/pc 84/61/s
Los Angeles 64/57/.00 62/54/pc 67/56/s
Miami 85/75/.00 85/75/pc 85/73/t
Milwaukee 60/40/.01 53/41/c 52/42/sh
Minneapolis 48/42/.04 61/41/pc 62/44/c
Myrtle Beach 79/66/.00 80/65/pc 77/64/pc
Nashville 83/68/.00 84/63/pc 85/65/pc
New Orleans 87/69/.00 85/71/pc 86/72/pc
Norfolk 82/55/.01 87/64/pc 84/63/pc
Oklahoma City 71/59/.00 67/60/t 73/51/t
Omaha 54/44/.00 60/42/c 59/48/sh
Orlando 89/63/.00 87/67/pc 87/68/t
Phoenix 86/67/.00 84/63/pc 88/65/s
Pittsburgh 73/48/.11 70/54/sh 76/59/t
Portland, Ore. 66/37/.01 58/46/sh 54/41/sh
St. Louis 70/55/.15 65/58/sh 74/60/t
Salt Lake City 52/36/.00 56/42/sh 58/37/sh
San Antonio 89/73/.00 91/71/pc 86/69/t
San Diego 67/61/.00 64/58/s 67/57/s
San Francisco 61/50/.00 62/50/sh 60/46/pc
Seattle 62/38/.00 56/45/sh 52/46/sh
Tampa 88/70/.00 88/65/pc 89/66/t
Tucson 88/58/.00 84/54/s 87/58/s
Washington, DC 70/45/.05 83/64/t 80/65/pc
City Yesterday Today Tomorrow City Yesterday Today Tomorrow
Amsterdam 77/54/.00 75/48/pc 68/46/pc
Baghdad 86/63/.00 86/65/s 90/64/s
Beijing 68/46/.00 73/49/s 71/48/pc
Berlin 73/54/.00 70/46/s 64/45/pc
Buenos Aires 66/43/.00 71/49/s 72/51/s
Dublin 59/43/.00 61/43/pc 57/41/sh
Frankfurt 79/54/.00 73/50/pc 72/50/pc
Hong Kong 73/68/.00 80/71/s 81/72/pc
Jerusalem 73/48/.02 70/47/s 68/48/s
London 79/50/.00 75/50/pc 73/48/s
Mexico City 82/57/.00 82/56/t 86/57/t
Montreal 50/37/.00 54/38/pc 57/48/c
Moscow 61/39/.00 57/36/s 61/39/pc
Paris 79/50/.00 73/54/c 79/55/pc
Rio de Janeiro 93/77/.00 92/73/pc 91/72/t
Riyadh 97/73/.00 95/76/s 94/73/pc
Rome 64/57/.00 70/50/c 66/52/sh
San Juan 85/75/.00 86/73/pc 84/73/pc
Tokyo 66/59/.00 66/53/s 67/49/s
Warsaw 68/46/.00 61/48/pc 68/45/c
City Yesterday Today Tomorrow City Yesterday Today Tomorrow
WORLD CITIES
River Levels, from 12 p.m. yesterday.
Key: s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sn-snow, sf-snowflurries, i-ice.
Philadelphia
79/59
Reading
76/56
Scranton
Wilkes-Barre
67/50
70/50
Harrisburg
75/55
Atlantic City
74/57
New York City
74/56
Syracuse
61/43
Pottsville
71/52
Albany
63/44
Binghamton
Towanda
62/45
64/46
State College
67/50
Poughkeepsie
70/48
84/70
56/44
49/40
84/56
61/41
62/54
62/52
59/51
62/36
56/45
74/56
57/46
87/63
85/75
88/74
87/72
54/36
49/35
83/64
Sun and Moon
Sunrise Sunset
Today 6:11a 7:53p
Tomorrow 6:10a 7:54p
Moonrise Moonset
Today 1:47a 11:51a
Tomorrow 2:20a 12:53p
Last New First Full
April 24 May 3 May 10 May 17
Easter 2011 will
feature a
changeable fore-
cast as fast-mov-
ing waves of
energy cruise
over the
Commonwealth.
Keeping the
umbrella handy
will be a good
idea. With that
being said, there
should be a peri-
od of dry weath-
er, most likely
around midday
with a few peeks
of sun. Another
round of show-
ers and maybe
even a rumble of
thunder will
arrive later in
the afternoon.
Look for the wet
weather to con-
tinue into the
week with some
form of showers
in the forecast
each day. Even
some thunder-
storms will be
possible mid-
week with some
very warm
weather in tow.
Heavy rain will
develop
Thursday.
- Ryan Coyle
NATIONAL FORECAST: Heavy rain and thunderstorms will continue to affect the middle Mississippi
Valley today. Some thunderstorms could be strong to severe in this region, as well. Rain and storms
will also develop along a long frontal boundary stretching from the Northeast into the Ohio Valley
towards the southern Plains and central Rockies.
Recorded at Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Int’l Airport
Temperatures
Heating Degree Days*
Precipitation
TODAY
Showers, especially
north
MONDAY
Cloudy,
showers
73°
58°
WEDNESDAY
Pårtly
sunny,
T-storm
77°
62°
THURSDAY
Cloudy,
p.m.
rain
70°
43°
FRIDAY
Partly
sunny
62°
40°
SATURDAY
Partly
sunny
68°
40°
TUESDAY
Party
sunny, a
T-storm
80°
59°
65
48
°
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com MONDAY, APRIL 25, 2011 PAGE 1D
CALL TO PLACE 24/7
570.829.7130
800.273.7130
SEARCH: TIMESLEADER.COM/CLASSIFIED
EMAIL: CLASSIFIEDS@TIMESLEADER.COM
MARKETPLACE
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
A Benson Family Dealership
LOADED WITH LOCAL TRADES
PLEASE CALL FOR FULL DESCRIPTION
- Trades Coming in Daily - Don’t Miss These
HOURS:
Monday Thru Thursday
8:00am - 8:00pm
Friday & Saturday
8:00am - 5:00pm
A Benson Family Dealership
All Prices Plus Tax & Tags, Customer Must Qualify for All Rebates. See Salesperson for Details. See dealer for details. Some restrictions apply. Dealer may discontinue program at any time.
NEW 2011
GMC SIERRA 1500
Reg, Ext, Crew Cab 4x4’s, Choose From 20, SLE’s & SLT’s
Save Up To $6,600
NEW 2011 BUICK
LACROSSE CX
Choose From 6, Comfort &
Convenience Package
$
26,256 Priced From
0% Financing
Available
MSRP $28,645
Discount & Rebate -$2,389
2.9% Financing
Available
NEW 2011 BUICK REGAL
CXL & TURBO’S
Moonroofs, Leather, Some with Navigation,
Choose From 5
Save Up To $2,749 Off Sticker
1.9% Financing
Available
NEW 2011 GMC YUKON
SLT & DENALI’S
4X4, Reg & XL’s, Choose From 5, Extra Sharp!
2.9% Financing
Available
Save Up To $6,088 Off Sticker
2003 AUDI ALLROAD
Just Traded, All Wheel Drive, Only
$
9,850
“Limited Package”, Heated Leather Seating,
Moonroof, “Too Many Options To List!”
$
13,995
2009 CHEVY AVEO LT SDN
Choose From 2, Tons of Warranty
$
9,595
2007 BUICK LACROSSE CXL
Local Trade, 48K Miles, Extra Clean!
$
12,995
2003 CHEVY TAHOE LT 4X4
Just Traded, Power Galore, As Traded
$
8,995
2006 FORD F150 CREW CAB 4X4
One Owner, XLT, 5.4L, Tow Pkg, 53K Miles
$
19,995
2010 FORD EXPLORER 4X4 XLT
14K Miles, 7 Passenger Seating
$
24,995
2008 KIA RIO SDN
A Real Gas Miser!
$
8,995
2003 MERCURY GRAND
MARQUIS GS
Just Arrived, 45K Miles, Roadster Roof
$
8,995
2009 KIA SPECTRA EX
Preferred Equipment Pkg, Just 34K Miles
$
9,995
2011 CHEVY SUBURBAN LS 4X4
$
37,995
2006 CHEVY COBALT LT
White Beauty, Local Trade, “Great Starter Car!”
$
8,995
Silver Beauty, Only 14K Miles,
“Can Not Be Told From A New One!”
2007 VW JETTA
Stunning Low Miles
$
11,995
Local One Owner, Moonroof, 52K Miles
$
12,995
2002 CHEVY TAHOE LT 4X4
Local Trade, Leather, Moonroof, Extra Clean!
$
12,995
2006 JEEP LIBERTY SPORT 4X4
2007 INFINITI FX35
This One Must Be Seen, All Wheel Drive
$
23,995
2010 JEEP GRAND
CHEROKEE LAREDO 4X4’S
Choose From 2, Miles As Low As 13K Miles
$
23,995
2010 DODGE DAKOTA
QUAD CAB 4X4
Big Horn Edition, 12K Miles, Power Galore
$
23,995
2007 BUICK LUCERNE
$
16,995
36K Miles, CXL, We Sold It New!
2008 SUBARU OUTBACK WAGON
Just Traded, 43K Miles, “Too Many Options To List!”
$
17,995
2005 CHEVY COLORADO
LS XCAB 4X4
4 Cyl, Economy, Local Trade, Low Low Miles
$
13,995
2006 FORD F150 CREW CAB 4X4
Local Trade, 53K Miles, XLT Equipment
$
19,995
LS Pkg, Z-71 Off Road,
Custom Cap, Just Traded
$
12,995
2008 PONTIAC TORRENT AWD
Local One Owner, Just 43K Miles, Moonroof
$
17,995
2003 CHEVY SILVERADO
XCAB 4X4
From
2005 TOYOTA TUNDRA CREW CAB
4X4
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
821-2772 •1-800-444-7172
MONDAY-THURSDAY 8:30-8:00pm
FRIDAY 8:30-7:00pm
SATURDAY 8:30-5:00pm
601 K IDDE R S T., W IL K E S -BA RRE , P A
S P E C IA L P U R C H A S E S P E C IA L P U R C H A S E S P E C IA L P U R C H A S E
2010 CHEVY HHR
PANEL LS
2.2L Ecotec 4 Spd, Auto.,
Air, Spotter Mirrors, Deluxe
Front Bucket Seats, Lockable
Cargo Area, Traction Control,
OnStar, AM/FM/CD
5
AVAIL.
Starting
At
$
15,850
*
*Price plus tax & tags. Onstar fees applicable. Remainder of Factory
Warranty & GM Certified. See dealer for details. STK#Z2438
LOW
M ILES
32 M PG
(HW Y.)
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
W E M AK E IT EAS Y!
Ca ll M a rc u m M otors
570 - 693- 30 76
w w w .m a rc u m m otors .c om
All Ve hic le s Com e w ith
2YR - 24,0 0 0 M ile W a rra n ty
N e e d a Ca r?
B a d Cre d it
N o Cre d it
2
8
4
4
4
7
197 West End Road, Wilkes-Barre, PA 18706
825-7577
YOMING VALLEY
AUTO SALES INC. AA
SERVICED, INSPECTED, & WARRANTIED
FINANCING AVAILABLE
www.WyomingValleyAutos.com
MANY MORE TO CHOOSE FROM
06 SUZUKI FORENZA
$
7,475
01 FORD ESCORT ZX2
$
4,550
06 CHEVY COBALT
$
6,995
05 DODGE NEON SXT
$
6,550
$
9,450
53K Miles
04 HYUNDAI ELANTRA
$
6,875
06 CHRYSLER PT CRUISER
TOURING EDITION CONVERTIBLE
51K Miles
41K Miles 72K Miles
61K Miles 65K Miles
1339 N. RIVER STREET
PLAINS, PA. 18702
829-2043
www.jo-danmotors.com
JO-DANMOTORS
APRIL SALES EVENT!
* Plus tax, tags, title & doc fees.
10 CHRYSLER
SEBRING LIMITED
Leather, Power Seat, CD, Cruise,
One Owner, Low Miles, XClean
$
14,995
*
05 PONTIAC
MONTANA EXT VAN
DVD Rear Entertainment Center, Rear
A/C, Heat, 7 Pass, Privacy Glass, Nice!
$
8,995
*
08 MITSUBISHI
ECLIPSE GS
5 Speed, CD, Alloys,
Sporty, One Owner
$
12,995
*
09 CHEVY MALIBU
4DR LS
30K, One Owner, CD, Cruise,
Factory Warranty
07 CHEVY ONE
TON DUMP TRUCK
Dual RR Wheels, 14K Miles,
Auto, Excellent Condition
$
21,995
* $
13,995
*
$
14,995
*
6 Mo. Service Contract Included!
09 PONTIAC G6
One Owner, CD, PW, PDL,
Low Miles, XClean
2
7
9
3
9
6
MOTORTWINS
2010 Wyoming Ave., Wyoming
718-4050
CALL STEVE MORENKO
NEW LOW PRICES!
02 Ford Escape
$
6,490
*
‘97 Plymouth
Breeze
$
2,890
*
4 Dr, 4 Cyl, A/C
‘99 Buick
Custom 4Dr
$
4,990
*
59K Miles
03 Ford
Windstar
$
7,890
*
*All Prices Plus Tax & Tags.
2000 GMC
Jimmy 4x4
$
4,990
*
‘02 Hyundai
Elantra GLS 4Dr
$
4,990
*
Loaded!
Loaded w/ 66K Miles
100
ANNOUNCEMENTS
110 Lost
ALL
JUNK
CAR &
TRUCKS
WANTED
Highest Prices
Paid!!!
FREE
REMOVAL
Call V&G
Anytime
288-8995
Line up a place to live
in classified!
110 Lost
LOST, male Jack
Russell Terrier
named Sam. Black
& white. Lost on
Monday April 11 in
Krispin Road Dallas
Area. If seen, please
call 570-718-4050
570-714-1698
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
LOST: White
German Shepherd.
Female. Last seen
in West Wyoming
4/7. Named Secret
or may come to
Puppy. Very shy.
570-864-0739
135 Legals/
Public Notices
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that Letters
Testamentary have
been granted in the
Estate of Florence
Turnack, late of
Noxen, Luzerne
County, Pennsylva-
nia, who died on
March 17, 2011. All
persons indebted to
said Estate are
required to make
payment without
delay, and those
having claims or
demands to present
the same without
delay to the
Executrix, Jean
Kohle, in care of her
attorney.
MICHAEL J.
BENDICK, ESQUIRE
400 Third Avenue
Suite 318
Kingston, PA 18704
Let the Community
Know!
Place your Classified
Ad TODAY!
570-829-7130
135 Legals/
Public Notices
LEGAL NOTICE
DEADLINES
Saturday
12:30 on Friday
Sunday
4:00 pm on
Friday
Monday
4:30 pm on
Friday
Tuesday
4:00 pm on
Monday
Wednesday
4:00 pm on
Tuesday
Thursday
4:00 pm on
Wednesday
Friday
4:00 pm on
Thursday
Holidays
call for deadlines
You may email
your notices to
mpeznowski@
timesleader.com
or fax to
570-831-7312
or mail to
The Times Leader
15 N. Main Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18711
For additional
information or
questions regard-
ing legal notices
you may call
Marti Peznowski
at 570-970-7371
or 570-829-7130
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
We Need Your Help!
Anonymous Tip Line
1-888-796-5519
Luzerne County Sheriff’s Office
Call 828-7130
to Advertise!
PAGE 2D MONDAY, APRIL 25, 2011 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
135 Legals/
Public Notices
135 Legals/
Public Notices
135 Legals/
Public Notices
135 Legals/
Public Notices
135 Legals/
Public Notices
250 General Auction 250 General Auction 250 General Auction 250 General Auction
INVITATION FOR BIDS
The Housing Development Corporation of Northeastern
Pennsylvania will receive Bids for the Courtright Neighborhood
Home Ownership Phase 2 Contract, generally comprised of the
construction of six (6) for-sale homes in a combination of single-
family houses and twin house units and all related lot improve-
ments, including but not limited to sanitary sewer and domestic
water connections, utility services for electric, gas, telephone
and cable TV, bituminous paving of driveways, cement concrete
leadwalks, topsoil, seeding of lawn areas, landscaping, and all
incidental work related thereto. The Owner has purchased all
City of Wilkes-Barre building permits in advance. These permits
are transferable to the winning bidder at no charge, and are valid
without need for renewal for the full extent of the period of this
Contract.
Bids will be received until 3:00P.M. (local time) on the 25th day
of May, 2011 at the offices of the Housing Development
Corporation of Northeastern Pennsylvania, located at 163 Amber
Lane, Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702. The Bids will be publicly opened
and read aloud at that time.
CONTRACT DOCUMENTS, including DRAWINGS and PROJECT
MANUAL, may be examined and obtained at the Housing
Development Corporation of NEPA, 163 Amber Lane, Wilkes-
Barre, PA 18702. CONTRACT DOCUMENTS may also be exam-
ined at the Northeastern Pennsylvania Contractors Association,
Inc., 1075 Oak Street, Suite 3, Pittston, PA 18640.
PROJECT MANUAL is in one binding and DRAWINGS are bound
separately. Bidders may secure DRAWINGS and a PROJECT
MANUAL upon payment of one hundred seventy-five dollars
($175.00). All construction work is included in one Prime
Contract.
Checks shall be made payable to Housing Development
Corporation of NEPA, and will not be refunded. Bidders and Sub-
Bidders, such as Sub-Contractors and Materialmen, may secure
additional CONTRACT DOCUMENTS upon payment of thirty-five
dollars ($35.00) per PROJECT MANUAL and three dollars
($3.00) for each DRAWING.
The Labor Standards, Wage Determination Decision and Anti-
Kickback regulations (29CFR, Part 3) issued by the Secretary of
Labor are included in the contract documents of this project and
govern all work under the contract. The contractor must comply
with the minimum rates for wages for laborers and mechanics as
determined by the Secretary of Labor in accordance with the
provisions of the Davis-Bacon and Related Acts. The Housing
Development Corporation of NEPA will provide training and guid-
ance to the successful bidder in Davis-Bacon compliance.
Non-discrimination in Employment-Bidders on this work will be
required to insure that employees and applicants for employ-
ment are not discriminated against on the basis of their race,
color, national origin, sex, religion, age, disability or familial sta-
tus in employment or the provision of services.
The successful bidder must utilize to the greatest extent feasi-
ble, minority and/or women-owned businesses located in the
municipality, county or general trade area.
The Housing Development Corporation of Northeastern
Pennsylvania does not discriminate on the basis of race, color,
national origin, sex, religion, age, disability or familial status in
employment or the provision of services.
The Housing Development Corporation of Northeastern
Pennsylvania is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action
Employer.
The Housing Development Corporation of Northeastern
Pennsylvania reserves the right to reject any or all Bids and to
waive informalities in the Bidding.
BIDS may be held by OWNER for a period of not to exceed sixty
days (60) from the date of the opening of BIDS for the purpose
of reviewing the BIDS and investigating the qualifications of
Bidders, prior to awarding of the CONTRACT.
Housing Development Corporation of Northeastern Pennsylvania
LEGAL AD
The Crestwood School District will receive
proposals for the demolition of buildings,
and related site work, which are located
adjacent to the Crestwood High
School/Middle School at 281 South Moun-
tain Blvd., Mountain Top, PA 18707,
Luzerne County.
Proposals will be received between 3:30
p.m. and 4:00 p.m. prevailing time on
Thursday, May 5, 2011 in the Crestwood
High School Cafeteria, located at the
above address. Proposals will be publicly
opened and read aloud thereafter begin-
ning at 4:00 p.m. on the same day.
There will be a pre-bid meeting held in the
aforementioned Cafeteria at 3:30 p.m.
prevailing time to answer questions on
Tuesday, April 26, 2011. Attendance is not
mandatory, but is recommended. Tours of
the site and buildings will be available
immediately following the pre-bid meeting.
Sealed proposals will be received for a
single prime contract, which includes all
work indicated on the contract docu-
ments.
Drawings, Specifications, Instructions to
Bidders, Proposal Forms, and other Con-
tract Documents may be examined at the
office of Breslin Ridyard Fadero Architects
(hereinafter ‘Architect’), 1226 Union
Boulevard, Allentown, PA 18109, telephone
610-437-9626; and at the Northeastern PA
Contractors Association, 1075 Oak Street,
Suite 3, Pittston, PA.
Copies of plans and specifications may be
secured by prospective prime bidders by
applying to the Architect named above
upon depositing the amount of $50.00 for
each Contract requested. Cash or checks
made payable to “Breslin Ridyard Fadero
Architects” are acceptable; credit cards
are not accepted. Deposits are non-
refundable.
Proposals must be submitted on forms
included in the Bid Documents or on iden-
tical forms in a sealed envelope and
addressed to the Owner at or before the
time above mentioned.
The Owner reserves the right to reject any
or all proposals or any part thereof or
items therein and to waive non-material
defects as it deems best to protect its
interest.
Eric Aigeldinger
Secretary
Crestwood School Board
LEGAL NOTICE
Notice is hereby given that on September
17, 2010, Carrizo Marcellus, LLC has filed
an “application for approval” (SRBC Pend-
ing No. 2010-011) with the Susquehanna
River Basin Commission (SRBC) for a sur-
face water withdrawal. Carrizo Marcellus,
LLC has proposed to withdrawal up to
0.72 million gallons per day from a stream
known as UNT to Middle Branch Wyalusing
Creek located along State Route 0267 and
Valley Road in Forest Lake Township,
Susquehanna County, Pennsylvania.
The purpose of this project is for the use in
drilling and development of natural gas
wells and related projects. You are receiv-
ing this notice because you have been
identified as an adjacent property owner,
and Commission regulations require that
this letter be sent to you.
There is no action necessary on your part.
Comments referring to the SRBC pending
application number above should be sub-
mitted to the attention of:
Mr. Andrew D. Dehoff; Manager, Project
Review
Susquehanna River Basin Commission
1721 North Front Street, Harrisburg, PA
17102-2391
telephone: 717-238-0423, ext. 221
fax: 717-909-0468
e-mail: adehoff@srbc.net.
LEGAL NOTICE
INSTRUCTIONS TO BIDDERS
Sealed proposals will be received by the
Board of Directors, Wyoming Valley West
School District, at the School Administra-
tion Building, 450 North Maple Avenue,
Kingston, Pennsylvania 18704, not later
than 11: 00 A. M., Wednesday, May 4, 2011,
at which time they will be opened.
Proposals must be submitted on the pre-
scribed form attached. All blank spaces
for bid prices must be filled in, in ink or
typewritten, in both words and figures.
Proposals must be submitted in a sealed
envelope addressed to Mrs. Joanne
Wood, Board Secretary, and plainly
marked:
“Proposal for Technology
Equipment”
For a copy of the RFP or questions related
to this bid, please contact Anthony Waske-
vich via e-mail at awaskevich@wvwsd.org.
Vendors may bid on one, multiple, or all
items.
The District reserves the right to reject any
or all bids or any part thereof, adjust quan-
tities, and to make award in such manner
as it deems right and proper.
COOK AND COOK AUCTIONS
PRESENTS A
C S
2-DAY UPSCALE BOUTIQUE
AND CONTEMPORARY AUCTION
TUESDAY, APRIL 26, 2011
AUCTION BY: COOK & COOK AUCTIONS AH-001892
570-270-9239
Auctioneer of Record: WAYNE STEELE - AU39161
CRYSTAL & GLASS: Many pieces of Heritage Irish crystal including large vases & many other
vases, biscuit jars, footed bowls, tumblers, rose bowls, tumblers, candle lamp and more, Tozai
fancy ruby flash, large bowls, vases, tumblers, Tozai amethyst vases, onyx footed cake stand, lots
of Peggy Karr Glass, Two’s Company large art glass bowls and many other items, Loves glass-
ware, two amber colored perfume bottles and more.
PORCELAIN: Vietri porcelain rooster, Armani wren, Capo-di-Monte centerpieces & potpourri
jars, Two’s Company porcelain urns and more, Weekend East Hampton platters, Juliska Pitcher
& Bowl Set, Casafina Ceramic Platter and so much more.
COLLECTIONS: Over 70 pieces of Lladro including Don Quixote, Dressmaker, Aranjuez &
Little Lady, Chrysanthemum Figure, Sayonara Figure, Love Nest, Nao Baby Figures, Goose
Preening, Skye Terrier & other animal figures, I Love You Truly, Pedro with Jug, many
Christmas bells, Swan Princess, Susan and the Doves, Pensive Clown & others, Sweet Scent
Figure, Charlie the Tramp, Young Mozart, Christmas figures, many angels & much more. Over
100 pieces of Dept. 56 Snow Village, Heritage Village, & Dickens Village including Snow Village
Airport, Rosita’s Cantina, Print Shop & Village News, Landscape & retired North Pole items,
Village Market, Christmas in the City East Harbor Ferry, Mr. & Mrs. Fezziwig Dolls, Skating
Pond, Uncle Sam’ s Fireworks Stand, The Spooky Schooner, Redeemer Church, Grimsly Manor,
Pinewood Log Cabin, Warming House, Sir John Flagstaff Inn and much more.
DECORATOR ITEMS: Wrought iron mirrors, Timeworks South Hampton clocks, Uttermost
pictures & vases, many large pictures, lamps, L’Objet decorative Dualite ice bucket, tiered
serving stand, cake stand & more, L’Objet fancy magnifiers and letter openers, L’Objet 24k gold
plated bamboo Menorahs, Two’s Company Annie’s Collection Christmas ornament and many
other designer Christmas items, Peking Handi-Craft needlepoint Christmas stockings, Karen
Didion Originals figures, plaster bust of woman, Milton Hebald modernist bronze sculptures,
Wallace pewter sculptures, Chilmark Moses sculpture and more.
29 EAST CAREY STREET, PLAINS, PA18705
THIS IS THE PLACE YOU WANT TO BE FOR THIS 2-DAY AUCTION.
LOADS OF DESIGNER MERCHANDISE!
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 27, 2011
FURNITURE: Beveled glass top table with fancy leaf motif pedestal & 4 uph. wrought iron
chairs, multiple beveled top tables with fancy pedestals, Stein World stenciled vanity & chair,
high top bistro table & 2 uph. chairs, uph. plum & tiger stripe side chairs, wood & metal end
tables, multiple Mariposa lighted open display cabinets with glass shelves, other display units,
fancy sideboard with doors and much more.
DESIGNER DINNERWARE: Peggy Karr Glass bowls & large serving dishes, Love pastel col-
ored bowls & plates, Annie Glass ruffled dinnerware, Loads of Piccard china in different pattern,
lots of Vera Bradley, Juliska, Casafina & Vietri stoneware, The Mane Lion Italian dinnerware,
Designer Weekend large serving bowls, Milani stoneware pitchers and fancy teapots and much
more.
PURSES: Collection of designer purses in all sizes by Spartina 449, J.P. Lizzy and Murval.
DECORATOR ITEMS: Many Two’s Company candles, many Thymes bath & body products
incl. fragrances, many lamps, partyware, wine bottle caddies, French table linens and much
more.
PREVIEW 3:00 P.M. AUCTION 5:00 P.M.
UNABLE TO ATTEND THIS AUCTION?
Bid Online at WWW.PROXIBID.COM/COOKANDCOOK
WWW.COOKANDCOOKAUCTIONS.COM or WWW.AUCTIONZIP.COM ID#20298
TERMS: 13% BUYER’S PREMIUM - 3% DISCOUNT WITH CASH OR CHECK, NO PERSONAL
CHECK UNLESS KNOWN BY AUCTION - CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED - VISA, MASTERCARD,
DISCOVER.
FOOD AVAILABLE!
DIRECTIONS: From I-81 Take Exit 170 B Rt. 309 (Cross Valley) To The Plains Exit. Go Towards
Plains & Take Right Turn Onto Maffett St. Continue To Traffic Light. Turn Right Onto E. Carey St.
Watch For The Auction Today Sign!
PREVIEW 3:00 P.M. AUCTION 5:00 P.M.
457 Wanted to Buy
Auto
457 Wanted to Buy
Auto
468 Auto Parts 468 Auto Parts
$$$ HIGHEST PRICE PAID $$$
FOR JUNK
VEHICLES
PICKED UP
570-876-1010
570-346-7673
AS ALWAYS ****HIGHEST PRICES*****
PAID FOR YOUR UNWANTED
VEHICLES!!!
DRIVE IN PRICES
Call for Details (570) 459-9901
Vehicles must be COMPLETE !!
Plus Enter to Win $500.00 Cash!!
DRAWING TO BE HELD APRIL 30
Harry’s U Pull It
www.wegotused.com
BUYING JUNK VEHICLES
$300 and Up
$125 extra if driven,
pulled or pushed in.
NOBODY Pays More
570-760-2035
Monday thru Saturday 6 am-9 pm
Sunday 8 am - 68 pm
AUTO
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
468 Auto Parts
All Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
FREE
PICKUP
570-574-1275
BEST PRICES
IN THE AREA
CA$H ON THE $POT,
Free Anytime
Pickup
570-301-3602
570-301-3602
CALL US!
TO JUNK
YOUR CAR
472 Auto Services
$ WANTED JUNK $
VEHICLES
LISPI TOWING
We pick up 822-0995
VITO’S
&
GINO’S
Like New
Tires
$15 & UP!
Like New
Batteries
$20 & UP!
Carry Out Price
288-8995
Selling your
Camper?
Place an ad and
find a new owner.
570-829-7130
WANTED
Cars & Full Size
Trucks. For prices...
Lamoreaux Auto
Parts 477-2562
Call 829-7130 to Advertise!
135 Legals/
Public Notices
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN, pursuant to
Act No. 93 of 1998,
that the Joint Oper-
ating Committee of
West Side Career
and Technology
Center will hold a
special meeting on
Wednesday, May 4,
2011 at 6:30 P.M. in
the library of the
school, 75 Evans
St., Pringle, PA for
the purpose of con-
ducting all neces-
sary business occa-
sioned by the can-
cellation of the
meeting of April 21,
2011. This is a spe-
cial meeting for
general purposes.
If you are a person
with a disability and
wish to attend this
meeting and require
an auxiliary aid,
service or other
accomodation to
participate in the
proceedings, please
contact the Admin-
istrative Director’s
office at 570-288-
8493 to discuss
how the school may
best accommodate
your needs.
Diane Sklanka,
Secretary
Find Something?
Lose Something?
Get it back where it
belongs
with a Lost/Found ad!
570-829-7130
WYOMING AREA SCHOOL
DISTRICT
INVITATION TO BID
Wyoming Area
School District is
accepting the fol-
lowing bids for the
2011-2012 school
year: Art, Athletic
Medical, Band,
Electrical, General,
Janitorial, Marching
Band, Music, Nurs-
ing, Physical Educa-
tion and science.
Sealed bids will be
received at the
Office of the Secre-
tary, Wyoming Area
School District, 20
Memorial Street,
Exeter, PA., 18643,
no later than Friday,
May 6, 2011, at
10:00 a.m. at which
time bids will be
opened. Bid specifi-
cations and condi-
tions are available
at the District’s
Business Office, 20
Memorial Street,
Exeter, PA. 18643,
Monday through Fri-
day, 8:00 a.m. to
12:00 p.m.
John Bolin, Secre-
tary of the Board
150 Special Notices
ADOPT: Adoring
Mom, Dad, Big
Brother would like
to share a lifetime
of hugs & kisses
in our loving home
with a newborn.
Please Call
Lynda & Dennis
888-688-1422
Expenses Paid
ADOPTING A NEWBORN
is our greatest wish.
Abundance of love,
secure life of family
awaits.
Annie & Mike
1-800-606-5589.
Expenses Paid.
150 Special Notices
ADOPTION
A loving married
teacher couple
with so much to
offer would love
to adopt your
newborn. We
can provide a
lifetime of happi-
ness, security
& educational
opportunities.
Expenses paid.
Nancy/Kevin
1-866-254-3529
www.nancykevin
2adopt.com
April showers
bring May
flowers, Bridal
Shower brings
Oyster Garden
Tea Party!
bridezella.net
DO YOU ENJOY
PREGNANCY ?
Would you like
the emotional
reward of helping
an infertile
couple reach
their dream of
becoming
parents?
Consider being a
surrogate. All
fees allowable by
law will be paid.
Call Central
Pennsylvania
Attorney,
Denise Bierly, at
814-237-6278
ext. 226
ALL
JUNK
CAR &
TRUCKS
WANTED
Highest Prices
Paid!!!
FREE
REMOVAL
Call V&G
Anytime
288-8995
Attorney Joe go
Jets & the wine
is great!
OPENING
APRIL 28
ANTIQUES &
COLLECTIBLES
DBA/JAKE'S
OUTPOST
51 W. UNION ST
SHICKSHINNY
HOURS: THURS-
DAYS & FRIDAYS
9AM-6PM
P PA AYING $500 YING $500
MINIMUM
DRIVEN IN
Full size 4 wheel
drive trucks
ALSO PAYING TOP $$$
for heavy equip-
ment, backhoes,
dump trucks,
bull dozers
HAPPY TRAILS
TRUCK SALES
570-760-2035
542-2277
6am to 8pm
310 Attorney
Services
ADOPTION
DIVORCE
CUSTODY
Estates, DUI
ATTORNEY
MATTHEW LOFTUS
570-255-5503
Bankruptcy $595
Guaranteed LowFees
www.BkyLaw.net
Atty Kurlancheek
825-5252 W-B
310 Attorney
Services
ARD
DUI
TRAFFIC
VIOLATIONS
CRIMINAL
OFFENSES
FREE
CONSULTATION
MACK
LAW OFFICES
EXPERIENCED
AGGRESSIVE
REPRESENTATION
570.287.1388
www.MackLaw
Offices.com
ARE YOU BEING
SUED BY A
CREDIT CARD
COMPANY??
You have a real
chance of winning
& owing nothing if
you are repre-
sented by a good
attorney! Call Atty.
Michael P. Kelly
570-417-5561
or email mike@
mikepkelly.com
BANKRUPTCY
FREE CONSULT
Guaranteed
Low Fees
Payment Plan!
Colleen Metroka
570-592-4796
DIVORCE No Fault
$295 divorce295.com
Atty. Kurlancheek
800-324-9748 W-B
Divorce, Custody,
Support, PFA
FREE Consultation.
Atty. Josianne
Aboutanos
Wilkes-Barre
570-208-1118
Free Bankruptcy
Consultation
Payment plans.
Carol Baltimore
570-822-1959
Attorney
Keith Hunter
Bankruptcies
MAHLER, LOHIN
& ASSOCIATES
(570) 718-1118
MARGIOTTI
LAW OFFICES
BANKRUPTCY
Free Consult
Payment Plans
(570) 970-9977
Wilkes-Barre
(570) 223-2536
Stroudsburg
SOCIAL SECURITY
DISABILITY
Free Consultation.
Contact Atty. Sherry
Dalessandro
570-823-9006
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
350 Elderly Care
Willing to be a care
giver to a loved one
in your home in the
Hanover area. Ref-
erenced available.
570-301-4819
Call between
7 a.m. and 12 noon
380 Travel
SPRING GETAWAYS
Longwood/QVC 4/30
Seneca Lake W/E
4/30 to 5/1
Baltimore
Aquarium 5/14
Sight & Sound -
Joseph 5/14
NYC/World Yacht
5/22
Boston Pop W/E
5/28 to 5/30
1-800-432-8069
Yankees
Home Games
5/1 Blue Jays
5/15 Boston
5/22 Mets
6/26 Rockies
(Old Timers Day)
1-800-432-8069
380 Travel
YANKEES TRIP
TO CINCINNATI
June 20, 21 and 22
(Monday, Tuesday,
Wednesday)
Catch the Yankees
take on the Reds at
The Great American
Ballpark in Cincin-
nati, Ohio
Trip Includes:
*Round trip bus
transportation
*Beer, soda & food
on the bus
*Great box level
seats to two games
(Mon & Tues night)
*Hotel accommoda-
tions at the Millenni-
um Hotel. Just three
blocks from stadium
and walking dis-
tance from Cincin-
nati Zoo and other
downtown attrac-
tions
Price: $350
Call 570-287-9701
for more info.
406 ATVs/Dune
Buggies
QUARTER MIDGET
RACE CAR
76 inch Bull Rider,
Honda 120 motor,
Kirkey seat,
new brake system,
A-Main feature wins
Asphalt/Dirt,
Many Extras,
Value $6,000,
Sell for $2,999
Call (570) 954-2749
SUZUKI ’00
QUAD MASTER
4x4, auto, 520
miles, winch, heat-
ed grips. $4,650.
570-239-2877
YAMAHA`04 RHINO
Excellent condition,
200 hours. Priced
to sell. $6,500 or
best offer. Call
Keith 570-971-4520
409 Autos under
$5000
CADILLAC `94
DEVILLE SEDAN
94,000 miles,
automatic, front
wheel drive, 4
door, air condi-
tioning, air bags,
all power, cruise
control, leather
interior, $3,300.
570-394-9004
CHEVROLET `99
ASTRO VAN
56,000 miles, 4.3
cylinder engine,
automatic. Clean.
$2,500. Call
(570) 829-0549
CHRYSLER `97
SEBRING
Convertible. Gold
with newly installed
navy top/rear win-
dow. 124,000 city
miles. As is. Asking
$2,100. Negotiable.
570-822-2776 or
570 709-9404
Leave Message
FORD ‘01 EXPLORER
2 DOOR SPORT 2 DOOR SPORT. .
Silver, 97,000 miles.
Good condition.
Includes snow tires.
$3,700.
570-313-0462
Call after 5PM
MERCEDES-BENZ `86
190 E
4 cylinder gas
engine. 125,000
miles. Clean, runs
excellent. $2,000
Call 570-328-7370
PONTIAC `00 SUNFIRE
4 door, auto, 87K.
Runs great. $3,300.
DEALER. Call
(570) 868-3914
SATURN ‘99 SC1
3 door coupe. Only
122,000 miles.
Cd player, AC,
Moonroof, leather
interior, alloy rims,
Like New tires.
Fresh detail and Full
of GAS...
ONLY $2,999
For more pics or
information, call
(570) 301-7221
advertisinguy
@gmail.com
VOLKSWAGEN `01
PASSAT GLS WAGON
Satin Silver Metallic.
1.8L 4 cylinder
turbo. Cold weather
package & traction
control. 101,700
miles. Great condi-
tion. Asking $4,300
(570) 417-7678
412 Autos for Sale
ACURA `00 INTEGRA
GS Coupe. 1 owner,
clean title. 106K,
automatic. Leather
interior, all power,
remote start, moon-
roof, alloy wheels
and more! $4,000
570-709-4137
412 Autos for Sale
ACURA `08 RDX
Good Condition.
53,000 miles.
AWD, Full Power,
AM/FM, CD
Changer, Blue
Tooth, XM Radio,
Leather Interior
& Sunroof
$20,500
(570) 814-8398
Call after 9:30 a.m.
AUDI ‘01 A6
2.7 T Quattro, dark
gray with tan leather
interior, automatic
transmission, 135k
highway miles, fully
loaded, well main-
tained, $7900.
570-675-3808
FORD `07 MUSTANG
63,000 highway
miles, silver, runs
great, $11,500.
negotiable.
570-479-2482
412 Autos for Sale
AUDI `02 A4
3.0, V6, AWD
automatic, tiptronic
transmission. Fully
loaded, leather
interior. 92,000
miles. Good condi-
tion. Asking $9,500.
Call (570) 417-3395
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
AUDI `05 A4
Turbo, Navy Blue
with grey leather
interior, fully
loaded automatic.
93,000 miles. All
records. Excellent
condition. 4 new
tires & new
brakes. Asking
$10,000 or best
offer. Call for info
417-2010 Days
779-4325 Nights
412 Autos for Sale
BMW `02 330
CONVERTIBLE
83K miles. Beautiful
condition. Newly
re-done interior
leather & carpeting.
$13,500.
570-313-3337
GET THE WORD OUT
with a Classified Ad.
570-829-7130
BMW `07 328xi
Black with black
interior. Heated
seats. Back up &
navigation sys-
tems. New tires &
brakes. Sunroof.
Garage kept. Many
extras! 46,000
Miles.
Asking $19,500.
570-825-8888 or
626-297-0155
Call Anytime!
412 Autos for Sale
BMW `04 325i
5 Speed. Like New!!
New Tires, tinted
windows, sun roof,
black leather
interior. Only
57,000 Miles!!!
PRICE REDUCED TO
$14,000!!
For more info,
call (570) 762-3714
LINCOLN `00 LS
1 owner. Low miles.
V6, All leather. Ask-
ing $5,800. Call
(570) 819-3140
(570) 709-5677
We Need Your Help!
Anonymous Tip Line
1-888-796-5519
Luzerne County Sheriff’s Office
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com MONDAY, APRIL 25, 2011 PAGE 3D
Special
Fin an cin g
Top
$$$
For
You r
Trade!
AM ERICA’S NEW CAR ALTERNATIVE AM ERICA’S NEW CAR ALTERNATIVE
THIS IS A COMBINED OFFER. MAKE YOUR BEST DEAL ON A PACKAGE PRICE. TAX & TAGS ADDITIONAL. DEALER NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR TYPOGRAPHIC ERRORS.
ARTWORK FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSE ONLY. SALE ENDS 4/30/11. FINANCING MUST BE APPROVED AND QUALIFY WITHIN PROGRAM GUIDELINES.
H U GE S EL ECTION
M on d a y- Frid a y 9a m - 8 p m S a tu rd a y 9a m - 5p m
H U R R Y, H U R R Y,
S AL E EN D S S AL E EN D S
TH IS W EEK EN D ! TH IS W EEK EN D !
B U Y N ATIO N W ID E B U Y N ATIO N W ID E
AN D S AVE AN D S AVE
TH O U S AN D S ! TH O U S AN D S !
GetA GetA
$
400
$
400
GAS CARD GAS CARD
When you p u rc ha s e a When you p u rc ha s e a
P re-Own ed Vehic le P re-Own ed Vehic le
D u rin g This S a le D u rin g This S a le
SU PER
SU PER
SALE
SALE SALE
AT
R ESPO N SE
R ESPO N SE
HASBEEN
HASBEEN
O V ER W HELM IN G
O V ER W HELM IN G
SALE
SALE
ABSO LUTELY ABSO LUTELY
EN DS EN DS
SATUR DAY SATUR DAY
APR IL30TH APR IL30TH
AT5PM AT5PM
N ota m em ber N ota m em ber
n ota n ota
problem ! problem !
FREE FREE
W ith Every W ith Every
Car! Car!
Credit Credit
Un ion Reps Un ion Reps
O n Site! O n Site!
D elivery D elivery
on the on the
Spot! Spot!
20 0 6 H U M M ER H 3 L U X U R Y
Offroa d L ights , N a viga tion ,
L e a the r, S u n roof
S TK #17925A
$17, 9 3 6
$17, 9 3 6 $17, 9 3 6
Au to, Air, CD , S TK #18 0 20
$11,8 53
2 0 0 9 H YU N D AI ACCEN T GL S 2 0 0 9
4 D oor, H a rd top & S ofttop , P W , P L , CD , Alloys ,
S TK #18 0 44
$24,38 6
2 0 0 8 JEEP W R AN GL ER S AH AR A U N L IM ITED 2 0 0 8
S u n roof, Alloys , K e yle s s , P W , P L , S TK #17960
$17,932
2 0 0 8 FOR D ED GE 2 0 0 8
Alloys , AW D , P W , P L , CD , S TK #1790 5
$18 ,926
2 0 0 8 H ON D A ACCOR D EX 2 0 0 8
L ow M ile s , Au to, Air, CD , S TK #18 0 18
$10 ,748
2 0 10 CH EVY AVEO 2 0 10
Alloys , P W , P L , CD , S TK #18 0 13
$14,933
2 0 10 CH EVY IM P AL A LT 2 0 10
AW D , Alloys , P W , P L , CD , S TK #17993A
$9,68 4
S tow & Go, P W , P L , CD , R e a r Air, S TK #18 0 51
$18 ,233
2 0 0 6 S U B AR U FOR ES TER 2 0 0 6
2 0 10 D OD GE GR AN D CAR AVAN 2 0 10
9th An n u al
AS LO W AS
2.49
%
*
APR
Up To 60M os.
ForQ u alified Bu yers
W H Y P AY TH E D IFFER EN CE IF YOU CAN ’T TEL L TH E D IFFER EN CE?
W W W .N ATION W ID ECAR S AL ES .N ET
CAR S • TR U CK S • S U VS • S P OR TS CAR S
Vis it Ou r 2n d L oc a tion :
2 M e re d ith S t,
Ca rb on d a le , P A
290 M U N D Y S TR EET, W IL K ES - B AR R E AT TH E W YOM IN G VAL L EY M AL L CAL L 30 1- CAR S
2 9 0 M U N D Y S TR EET, W I L K ES - B A R R E, P A 2 9 0 M U N D Y S TR EET, W I L K ES - B A R R E, P A 2 9 0 M U N D Y S TR EET, W I L K ES - B A R R E, P A
W ECAN ’TSTO P N O W !
PAGE 4D MONDAY, APRIL 25, 2011 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
24
Mos.
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 4/30/11.
AM/FM WITH 6 DISC CD
POWER WINDOWS
POWER LOCKS
LEATHER SEATS
FOG LAMPS
SIDE AIR CURTAINS
PERSONAL SAFETY WITH
ANTI-THEFT SYSTEM
VIN #3LBR769066
MESSAGE CENTER
COCCIA
CALL NOW 823-8888 or 1-800-817-FORD CALL NOW 823-8888 or 1-800-817-FORD
Overlooking Mohegan Sun Overlooking Mohegan Sun
Just Minutes from Just Minutes from
Scranton or W-B Scranton or W-B
577 East Main St., 577 East Main St.,
Plains, PA Plains, PA
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease
21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 4/30/11.
17” Chrome Wheels, Message Center, SYNC, Side Air Curtains,
AM/FM with 6 Disc CD, Pwr. Windows, Pwr. Door Locks,
Leather Seats, Fog Lamps, Power Moonroof,
Personal Safety with Anti-Theft System
24
Mos.
NEW2011 LINCOLNMKZ FWD
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease
21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 4/30/11.
All Wheel Drive, 3.7L V6, Remote Keyless Entry, HID Headlamps, Reverse Sensing
Sys., THX Sound Sys. w/6 Disc CD, 20” Polished Cast Alum. Wheels, Dual Zone
Electronic Auto. Temp. Control, Pwr. Heat/Cool Leather Seats, SYNC, Personal
Safety Sys., Safety Canopy Sys., Anti-Theft Sys., Navigation Sys.,
Dual Panel Moonroof, Rearview Camera
NEW2011 LINCOLNMKS AWD
VIN #1LBG609563
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease
21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 4/30/11.
All Wheel Drive, 3.7L V6, Premium Pkg., Auto. Temp Control,
18” Alum. Wheels, Advanced Trac, 6 Disc CD, Leather Heated/
Cooled Seats, Keyless Entry w/Keypad, Satellite Radio, Side
Air Curtains, Pwr. Liftgate, HID
Headlamps, Rear Camera,
MyLincoln Touch, SYNC,
Reverse Sensing Sys.,
Remote Start
NEW2011 LINCOLNMKX AWD
VIN #3LBR768027
VIN #2LBBJ16332
24
Mos.
24
Mos.
CALL NOW 823-8888 or 1-800-817-FORD CALL NOW 823-8888 or 1-800-817-FORD
Overlooking Mohegan Sun Overlooking Mohegan Sun
577 East Main St., Plains 577 East Main St., Plains
Just Minutes from Scranton or W-B Just Minutes from Scranton or W-B
*Tax and tags extra. Security Deposit Waived. All factory rebates applied
**Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and
$2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. See salesperson for details. All payments subject to credit
approval by the primary lending source, Tier 0 rate. Special APR financing cannot be combined with Ford cash
rebate. “BUY FOR” prices are based on 72 month at $18.30 per month per $1000 financed with $2,500 down
(cash or trade). Photos of vehicles are for illustration purposes only. Coccia Ford is not responsible for any
typographical errors. No Security Deposit Necessary. See dealer for details. Sale ends
Auto., AM/FM/CD, Anti-Theft Sys., Side
Curtain Air Bags, 16” Steel Wheels, Tilt
Wheel, AC, Instrument Cluster, Message
Center, PL, PW, Keyless Entry, Pwr. Side
Mirrors, Fog Lamps, MyKey, Convenience
Pkg., Cruise, Control, Map Light, Perimeter
Alarm, MyFord, SYNC, Sirius Satellite Radio
**
24
Mos.
MPG
Auto., AC, Pwr. Mirrors, AM/FM/CD, Advanced Trac
with Electronic Stability Control, Side Curtains,
Pwr. Door Locks, Tilt Wheel, SYNC, Sport
Appearance Pkg., Rear Spoiler, 15” Alum.
Wheels, Winter Pkg., Heated Seats,
Keyless Entry w/Keypad, Cruise Control
**
72
Mos.
MPG
**
24
Mos.
Auto., 6 Disc CD, Anti-Theft Sys.,Tilt, Alum.
Wheels, Pwr. Seat, Safety Pkg., Side
Impact Air Bags, Message Center,
Keyless Entry, Sirius Satellite
Radio,
**
72
Mos.
**
24
Mos.
MPG
**
72
Mos.
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease
21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 4/30/11.
**
24
Mos.
MPG
All Wheel Drive, XLT, CD, Safety Canopy, Auto., Side
Impact Safety Pkg., Air, Pwr. Driver’s Seat, Fog
Lamps, Privacy Glass, Roof Rack, Rear
Cargo Convenience Pkg., 16” Alum.
Wheels, Sirius Satellite Radio, PW, PDL,
Keyless Entry,
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease
21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 4/30/11.
All Wheel Drive, SEL, Auto., ABS, V6, PDL, Air, Remote Keyless Entry
w/Keypad, Rear Spoiler, Anti-Theft Sys., CD, PW, Safety
Canopy, Side Impact Air Bags, Personal Safety Sys.,
Reverse Sensing, Auto. Headlamps, 18” Alum.
Wheels, Convenience Group, Sirius Satellite
Radio, Pwr. Seat, MyKey, Dual Elect. Climate
Cont, MyFord LCD Display, Cruise Control
**
72
Mos.
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease
21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 4/30/11.
**
24
Mos.
MPG
**
72
Mos.
Mos.
APR
3.7L V6 Engine, XL Plus Package,
Cruise Control, XL Decor Group,
MyKey System, Pwr.
Equipment Group,
Pwr. Mirrors,
40/20/40 Cloth
Seat, AM/FM/CD
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease
21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 4/30/11.
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease
21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 4/30/11.
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com MONDAY, APRIL 25, 2011 PAGE 5D
412 Autos for Sale
ACME AUTO SALES
343-1959
1009 Penn Ave
Scranton 18509
Across from Scranton Prep
GOOD CREDIT, BAD
CREDIT, NO CREDIT
Call Our Auto Credit
Hot Line to get
Pre-approved for a
Car Loan!
800-825-1609
www.acmecarsales.net
07 CHYSLER 300C
Hemi, AWD, Slate
grey, grey int
06 CHYSLER 300
BLACK, AUTO, V6
06 PONTIAC G-6
Silver, 4dr, auto
05 FORD 500
AWD, grey, 4dr, V6
05JAGUAR X-TYPE
3.0, hunter green,
tan leather (AWD)
03 HYUNDAI ACCENT
White, 4 door, 4cyl.
66,000 miles
01 AUDI S8 QUATRO
Burg./tan lthr.,
Nav., 360 HP, AWD
01 AUDI A8 L
cashmere beige,
tan lthr., nav., AWD
01 AUDI A8 L
green, tan leather
navigation, AWD
Blk, auto, sun roof
00 NISSAN ALTIMA GXE
Blue/grey
leather, auto, 4cyl.
00 MERCEDES-BENZ
S-430 slvr/blck
lthr., 64,000 miles
00 SUBARU OUTBACK
STATION WAGON,
AWD (Burgundy/tan
leather, sunroof)
99 MERCURY COUGAR
Silver, grey leather,
2 door, auto
98 HONDA CIVIC EX,
2 dr, auto, silver
77 Pontiac Firebird
Black V6, T-Tops
73 VW BEETLE CONV.
olympic blu, blck
top, 4 speed
SUVS, VANS,
TRUCKS, 4 X4’s
08 CADILLAC ESCALADE
Blk/Blk leather, 3rd
seat, Navgtn, 4x4
07 CHEVY EQUINOX LT
grey, V6 AWD
07 DODGE NITRO SXT,
garnet red, V6, 4x4
06 JEEP COMMANDER
Slvr, 3rd seat, 4x4
06 DODGE RAM 1500
SLT, quad cab,
hemi, blk, 4 dr., 4x4
06 CHRYSLER TOWN &
COUNTRY TOURING
red, 4 dr., 7 pass.,
mini van
06 DAKOTA QUAD CAB
SLT, silver, auto.,
V6, 4x4
06 JEEP LIBERTY
SPORT white, V6,
4x4
05 MAZDA TRIBUTE S,
green, auto, V6,
4x4
05 GMC SIERRA
X-Cab, blk, auto,
4x4 truck
05 MERCURY MOUNT-
AINEER PREMIUM,
Silver, black leather,
3rd seat, AWD
05 CHEVY EQUINOX
Silver, 4 door, 4x4
05 FORD EXPLORER
XLT, white 4 door
4x4
04 JEEP GRAND
CHEROKEE LAREDO,
Special Edition.
Grey, sunroof, 4x4
04 CHEVY TRAILBLAZ
ER, seafoam
grn/tan lthr., 4x4
04 GMC ENVOY XUV
slvr., 4 dr., V6, 4x4
04 DODGE DURANGO
LIMITED, Sandstone,
tan leather, 3rd
seat, 4x4
04 MERCURY
MOUNTAINEER PREMIUM
Gold tan leather,
3rd seat, 4x4
04 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER
LS, white, V6, 4x4
04 JEEP GRAND
CHEROKEE LAREDO
gold, 4 dr., V6, 4x4
03 CHEVY TAHOE
Grey, 3rd seat, 4x4
03 FORD WINDSTAR
LX, green, 4 door,
entertainment sys.
7 pass. minivan
03 CHEVY 1500, V8,
X-cab, white, 4x4
02 DODGE RAM 1500
Quad Cab, SLT,
Red auto 4x4 truck
02 MERCURY MOUNT-
AINEER PREMIUM,
white, tan leather,
3rd seat, 4x4
02 MAZDA TRIBUTE
White, auto, 4x4
01 DODGE RAM 1500
regular cab, 4x4,
with cap
98 FORD F-150,
regular cab pick up
green, auto 4x4
98 FORD RANGER,
Flairside, reg cap
truck, 5 spd, 4x4
copper
BMW `93 325 IC
Convertible,
Metallic Green
Exterior & Tan
Interior, 5 Speed
Transmission,
Heated Seats. 2nd
Owner, 66k Miles.
Excellent Condition,
Garage Kept,
Excellent Gas
Mileage. Carfax
available. Price
reduced $7,995
or trade for SUV or
other. Beautiful /
Fun Car.
570-388-6669
BMW `93 325 IC
Convertible,
Metallic Green
Exterior & Tan
Interior, 5 Speed
Transmission,
Heated Seats. 2nd
Owner, 66k Miles.
Excellent Condition,
Garage Kept,
Excellent Gas
Mileage. Carfax
available. Price
reduced $7,995
or trade for SUV or
other. Beautiful /
Fun Car.
570-388-6669
BUICK ‘07 LUCERNE
One Owner.
Leather, CD,
Alloy Wheels
$16,450
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
412 Autos for Sale
CADILLAC ‘06 STS
AWD, 6 cylinder, Sil-
ver, 52,600 miles,
sunroof, heated
seats, Bose sound
system, 6 CD
changer, satellite
radio, Onstar, park-
ing assist, remote
keyless entry, elec-
tronic keyless igni-
tion, & more!
$17,600
570-881-2775
CADILLAC `04
SEVILLE SLS
Beige. Fully loaded
Excellent condition.
Runs great. New
rotors, new brakes.
Just serviced.
108,000 miles. Ask-
ing $8,000. (570)
709-8492
CHEVROLET ‘06
CORVETTE
CONVERTIBLE
Silver beauty, 1
Owner, Museum
quality. 4,900
miles, 6 speed. All
possible options
including Naviga-
tion, Power top.
New, paid $62,000
Must sell $45,900
570-299-9370
CHEVROLET `05
TAHOE Z71
Silver birch with
grey leather interior,
3rd row seating,
rear A/C & heat,
4WD automatic with
traction control, 5.3l
engine, moonroof,
rear DVD player.
Bose stereo + many
more options. Imm-
aculate condition.
76,000 adult driven
miles. $15,600. Call
(570) 378-2886 &
ask for Joanne
CHEVROLET `84
CAPRICE CLASSIC
Excellent Condition.
Very Clean. New
Tires. Burgundy red
with vinyl top.
MUST SEE! $2,000
or best offer
(570) 269-0042
Leave Message
CHEVROLET `86
CORVETTE
4x3 manual, 3 over-
drive, 350 engine
with aluminum
heads. LT-1 exhaust
system. White with
red pearls. Custom
flames in flake. New
tires & hubs. 1
owner. 61,000 origi-
nal miles. $8,500
(570) 359-3296
Ask for Les
CHEVROLET `88
MONTE CARLO SS
V8, automatic,
51,267 miles,
MUST SELL
$9,200 OBO
(570) 760-0511
CHEVROLET
2010 CAMARO
V-6 Victory Red,
black interior,
all bells and
whistles.
$25,000
570-706-6489
CHEVY `06 COLORADO
Extended cab. Auto.
Power steering, a/c.
40k miles. 2 wheel
drive.
$12,600, negotiable.
570-678-5040
CHEVY ‘04 MALIBU
Affordable.
With Warranty.
$6,992
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
CHRYSLER ‘06
300C HEMI
Light green, 18,000
miles, loaded,
leather, wood trim,
$24,000.
570-222-4960
leave message
CHRYSLER `02
PT CRUISER
Inferno Red, flame
design. Chrome
wheels. 47,000
miles, one owner.
Looks and runs
great. New inspec-
tion. $5,800
Call (570) 472-1854
CHRYSLER `99
CONCORDE
Sudan with leather
interior. Fully
loaded. Cold air
conditioning.
Inspected. Good
Condition. $1,350.
(570) 299-0772
DODGE `01 STRATUS
SE
4 door, automatic
Power windows,
seats & locks . V6,
Asking $2,900. Call
(570) 819-3140 or
(570) 709-5677
FORD `04 MUSTANG
Mach I, 40th
ANNIVERSARY EDITION
V8, Auto, 1,200
miles, all options,
show room condi-
tion. Call for info.
Asking $24,995
Serious inquiries
only. 570-636-3151
412 Autos for Sale
FORD `07
MUSTANG GT
Premium package,
silver, black leather
interior, 5 speed
manual. 20,000
miles. $18,900
(570) 868-3832
FORD `92 MUSTANG
Convertible,
55,000 original
miles 5.0 auto,
some engine
upgrades. Garaged
showcar. $8200
(570) 283-8235
FORD `98 TAURUS
Gold. Good condi-
tion Runs great.
87,000 miles, R-
title, Recently
inspected.
$2,700. Call
(570) 814-6198
FORD ‘02
FOCUS WAGON
Low mileage,
One owner
$7,984
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
FORD ‘02 MUSTANG
GT CONVERTIBLE
Red with black top.
6,500 miles. One
Owner. Excellent
Condition. $18,500
570-760-5833
FORD ‘05 EXPLORER
SPORT TRAC XLT
1/2 Ton, 4WD,
automatic, V6
$15,992
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
FORD ‘07 TAURUS SE
CD AND ALLOYS
$9,880
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
FORD ‘10
TAURUS SEL
AWD, V6 & Alloys
$21,920
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
HONDA `06 CIVIC EX
2 door, 5 speed, air,
power windows &
locks, sun roof, CD,
cruise & alloys.
Excellent condition,
very well main-
tained with service
records, remaining
Honda warranty.
65K, $10,500.
570-706-0921
HONDA `07 CIVIC
EX. 34k miles.
excellent condition,
sunroof, alloys, a/c,
cd, 1 owner, garage
kept. $13,000. Call
570-760-0612
HONDA `07 CIVIC
Sport SI. Red, with
black interior,
75,000 miles. 6
speed, spoiler and
body kit. Tinted win-
dows,
Reduced $11,900
(570) 714-0384
VITO’S
&
GINO’S
Wanted:
Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Highest
Prices
Paid!!
FREE PICKUP
288-8995
HYUNDAI `04
TIBURON GT
Blue, 5 speed
manual, CD, Air,
factory alarm,
power windows &
locks. 38K.
$7,500 negotiable.
Call 570-540-6236
HYUNDAI ‘11 SONATA
GLS, automatic.
Only 2,400 miles.
$20,750
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
412 Autos for Sale
JEEP `04 GRAND
CHEROKEE LIMITED
4WD, 6 cylinder
auto. Moonroof.
Fully powered. New
brakes & tires.
94,000 highway
miles. $11,500
(570) 822-6334
KIA `08 RONDO
Maroon with beige
interior. All options.
78,000 miles. Still
under warranty.
Received 60,000
mile servicing. New
tires. KBB Value
$8,500. Asking only
$7,900. A Must See!
(570) 457-0553
LEXUS `98 LS 400
Excellent condition,
garage kept, 1
owner. Must see.
Low mileage, 90K.
Leather interior. All
power. GPS naviga-
tion, moon roof, cd
changer. Loaded.
Asking $10,000. Call
570-706-6156
LINCOLN`06
TOWN CAR LIMITED
Fully loaded.
46,000 miles,
Triple coated
Pearlized White.
Showroom
condition.
$18,900.
570-814-4926 or
(570) 654-2596
WANTED!
ALL
JUNK
CARS!
CA$H
PAID
570-301-3602
WANTED!
ALL
JUNK
CARS!
CA$H
PAID
570-301-3602
MAZDA `04 3
Hatchback, 92,000
miles. Excellent
condition. auto,
sunroof, premium
sound and alloy
wheels. $8,300
(570) 864-2337
MAZDA `04 RX-8
Hunter Green,
80,000 miles.
New brakes &
rotors. New
alignment. Two
new rear tires.
No accidents.
PRICE REDUCED
$8,000 or best
offer. For more
information, call
(570) 332-4213
Rare, Exclusive
Opportunity To
Own...
‘26 FORD
MODEL T
Panel Delivery
100 point
Concours quality
restoration. Red
with black fend-
ers. Never Driven.
0 miles on
restoration.
RARE!
$40,000
$38,000
$36,500
2002 BMW 745i
The Flagship of
the Fleet
New - $87,000
Midnight Emerald
with beige leather
interior. 61K miles.
Mint condition.
Loaded. Garage
Kept. Navigation
Stunning,
Must Sell!
$20,000
$18,600
1993 CADILLAC
ALANTE
2 Door
Convertible
Exquisite Candy
Apple Red black
soft top. 13,000
original miles. All
available options,
including gold
alloy wheels.
Garage Kept. 1
owner. Final
Model Year.
Gorgeous
Automobile!
$31,000
$29,900
$27,900
From an Exotic,
Private Collection
Call 570-650-0278
MERCEDES-BENZ `01
C-240
Loaded, automatic,
AC, heated leather
seats, 4 door.
$4,700
Call 570-388-6535
MERCEDES-BENZ `06
C-CLASS
Silver with leather
interior. Good condi-
tion. 34,000 miles.
$15,000 Negotiable
(570) 885-5956
412 Autos for Sale
MERCEDES-BENZ `05
240C
4Matic, V6 - Gray,
77K highway miles,
Excellent condition,
dealer serviced. Sun
roof, heated seats.
$15,500. Call
570-288-3916
MERCEDES-BENZ `95
SL 500
Convertible, with
removable hard
top, dark Blue,
camel interior,
Summer Driving
Only, Garage Kept.
Very Good
Condition, No
Accidents. Classy
Car. Price
Reduced!
$13,995
or trade for
SUV or other.
570-388-6669
MERCEDES-BENZ
`97 SL320
Blue, convertible,
40th Anniversary
Model. 47,000
miles. Minor
repairs. $7,500
or best offer.
Call 973-271-1030
MERCURY `95
GRAND MARQUIS
4 door, V8, fully
loaded, moon roof,
new tires & brakes.
Interior & exterior in
excellent shape. 2
owners. Call
(570) 822-6334 or
(570) 970-9351
MINI COOPER S `06
GARAGED
Pure silver metallic.
Roof & mirror caps
in black. Tartan red
cloth / panther black
leather interior.
Black bonnet
stripes. Automatic.
Steptronic paddles.
Dual moon roofs,
Cockpit chrono
package, conven-
ience, cold weather
(heated seats) &
premium packages.
Dynamic stability
control. Xenon
headlights, front
and rear fog lights.
Parking distance
control. Harmon-
Kardon sound sys-
tem. Chrome line
interior. Mint condi-
tion. 17,000 miles.
Must Drive!
$21,500
570-341-7822
NISSAN `06 SENTRA
1.8 S, Special
Edition, Power
steering, brakes,
windows & locks.
6 CD changer.
Excellent condition,
43K. $12,500.
570-881-6897
NISSAN `08 ALTIMA
Low mileage,
18000 miles, auto-
matic, front wheel
drive, 4 door, anti-
lock brakes, air
conditioning, air
bags, power locks,
power windows,
power mirrors,
power seats, all
power, cruise con-
trol, GPS/naviga-
tion system,
AM/FM radio, CD
changer, Mp3 play-
er, keyless entry,
leather interior,
sun/moon roof,
rear defroster, new
floor mats, Winter
Frost pearl paint,
heated seats, side
mirror defroster,
backup camera,
auto rear view mir-
ror dimmer, Blue-
tooth, phone, nav.,
& radio controls
on steering wheel,
4.5 years remain-
ing on 7 year
100,000 miles Nis-
san bumper to
bumper Premium
Warranty included,
EXCELLENT CON-
DITION Altima
HYBRID 35city/33
highway mpg.
$18,900.
570-371-9001
Call after 5:00 p.m.
NISSAN ‘05 ALTIMA
Auto, one owner,
Local trade
$11,435
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
PLYMOUTH ‘99 VOY-
AGER VAN
6cyl., 7 pass, auto.
$1,750 DEALER
FORD ‘95 RANGER
4 cyl, 5-speed,
2WD, $1,350.
BUICK 94 LESABRE
4 dr. 6 cyl., auto
Runs exc., $1,650
Current Inspection
on all vehicles
570-825-8253
PONTIAC ‘69 FIREBIRD 400
CONVERTIBLE
Blue/white top &
white interior.
Recent document-
ed frame-off
restoration. Over
$31,000 invested.
will sell $21,500.
570-335-3127
SUBARU `05 LEGACY
SPORT AWD
Air, new tires &
brakes, 31,000
miles, great
condition. $11,995.
570-836-1673
412 Autos for Sale
PORSCHE `02 BOXSTER
S
Great convertible,
black top, 6 speed
manual transmis-
sion, carbon fiber
dash, leather interi-
or, front & rear
trunk, fast & agile.
$18,000 or best
offer. Call
570-262-2478
SCION ‘08 TC
Low mileage,
42,000 miles, 4
speed, front wheel
drive, 2 door, anti-
lock brakes, air con-
ditioning, air bags,
power locks, power
windows, power
mirrors, cruise con-
trol, AM/FM radio,
CD player, Mp3
player, keyless
entry, sun/moon
roof, rear defroster,
tinted windows.
$14,200.
(570) 443-7522 Call
before 9:30 p.m.
SUBARU `02
IMPREZA WRX
Low mileage,
57,000 miles, 5
speed, all-wheel
drive, 4 door, anti-
lock brakes, air
conditioning, air
bags, power locks,
power windows,
power mirrors,
cruise control,
AM/FM radio, CD
changer, rear
defroster, new Blitz
Stainless Exhaust,
AEM Cold Air
Intake, TURBOXS
Blowoff Valve &
Boost Control.
$10,500.
(201) 704-8640
Call before
7:30 pm
SUZUKI ‘10 SX4
5 door hatchback,
Only 8,600 miles
$15,892
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
TOYOTA `05 PRIUS
65,000 miles, good
condition, keyless
entry, cassette/
radio + snow tires.
$12,500
570-474-5268
TOYOTA `06
AVALON
New tires, new
brakes, Inspected
March 4, AC,
AVPS, Fully
loaded, 18,000
mile bumper to
bumper warranty.
90,000 miles.
$12,900.
(570) 881-3712
TOYOTA `10
Camry SE. 56,000
miles. Red, alloy
wheels, black cloth
interior. Will consid-
er trade. $14,200
(570) 793-9157
TOYOTA `93 MR2
T-top, 5 speed.
AM/FM/CD, AC,
power antenna.
New tires. No rust.
Great condition.
$5,000
(570) 708-0269
after 6:00PM
TOYOTA ‘09
SCION XD
Automatic,
traction control,
remote start.
$14,680
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
Volkswagen ‘03
GTI
moonroof, 5 speed,
loaded,$9750
excellent condition,
570-578-2149
VOLKSWAGEN `01 GTI
Great running
condition. Red with
cloth interior, power
door locks, power
windows, power
moon roof,
5 speed, just
serviced, 117k.
Asking $5,300
570-885-2162
VOLKSWAGEN `04
BEETLE
CONVERTIBLE
Blue. AM/FM cas-
sette. Air. Automat-
ic. Power roof, win-
dows, locks &
doors. Boot cover
for top. 22k. Excel-
lent condition.
Garage kept.
Reduced
$14,000
570-822-1976
Leave Message
VOLVO `95 TURBO
150,000 miles.
Excellent condition
inside and out.
Fully loaded.
$2,000.00
Very Negotiable
(570) 453-3358
412 Autos for Sale
VW `05 JETTA
Silver with black
interior. Auto. Sun-
roof. All options.
Excellent condition.
1 owner. 33K miles.
Asking $12,800. Call
570-693-2129
Leave Message
VW ‘07 BEETLE
Leather Interior,
Alloys, Moon Roof
$13,840
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
415 Autos-Antique
& Classic
CADILLAC `80
COUPE DEVILLE
Excellent condition,
$3,000 located in
Hazleton.
570-454-1945 or
561-573-4114
CHEVROLET `68 C10
New 350 motor and
new transmission.
REDUCED TO
$5,000 FIRM
(570) 906-1771
CHEVROLET `68 C10
New 350 motor and
new transmission.
REDUCED TO
$5,000 FIRM
(570) 906-1771
CHEVROLET `69 NOVA
SS clone. 350
engine, 290 Horse-
power. 10 bolt posi-
rear. PowerGlide
transmission. Power
disc brake kit. Over
$20,000 invested,
sacrifice at $8,500.
(Wilkes-Barre)
Call 732-397-8030
CHEVROLET `72
CHEVELLE
Two door hard top.
307 Motor. Needs
work. Comes with
additional 400 small
block & many parts.
$5,000. Serious
inquires only.
(570) 836-2574
CHEVROLET `79
CORVETTE L-48
All Corvette options,
all original, new
Good Year tires,
new mufflers, just
tuned. 46,000 miles.
$6,500 or best
offer 570-262-2845
or 570-239-6969
CHEVY `66 BEL AIR
2 door post car, in
good condition for
age. Serious
inquiries only, call
for details. $8,500
or best offer. Call
Steve at
570-407-0531
CHEVY `68 CAMARO
SS
396 automatic, 400
transmission, clean
interior, runs good,
71K, garage kept,
custom paint, Fire
Hawk tires, Krager
wheels, well
maintained.
$23,900
Negotiable
570-693-2742
CHEVY`75 CAMARO
350 V8. Original
owner. Automatic
transmission. Rare -
tuxedo silver / black
vinyl top with black
naugahyde interior.
Never damaged.
$6,000. Call
570-489-6937
CHRYSLER `49
WINDSOR
Silver / gray, 4 door
sedan. 6 cylinder
flathead, fluid drive.
45,000 original
miles. Just like new!
REDUCED $15,000
Call Jim:
570-654-2257
CORVETTES
WANTED
1953-1972
Any Condition!
Courteous, Fast
Professional Buyer.
Licensed & Bonded
corvettebuyer.com
1-800-850-3656
FORD `52
COUNTRY SEDAN
CUSTOM LINE
STATION WAGON
V8, automatic,
8 passenger,
3rd seat, good
condition, 2nd
owner. $9,500.
570-579-3517
FORD `65
GALAXIE 500 CONVERTIBLE
White with red
leather interior.
Black top.
289 Engine, rebuilt.
61,000 original
miles. Original
owners manual
EXCELLENT CONDITION!
$8,800.
(570) 881-2447
FORD `66
Mustang Coupe.
Pearl white, pony
interior. Pristine
condition. 26K
miles. $17,000 or
best offer.
(570) 817-6768
MAZDA `88 RX-7
CONVERTIBLE
1 owner, garage
kept, 65k original
miles, black with
grey leather interior,
all original & never
seen snow. $8,900.
Call 570-237-5119
415 Autos-Antique
& Classic
LINCOLN `66
CONTINENTAL
4 door,
Convertible, 460
cu. engine, 67,000
miles, 1 owner
since `69. Teal
green / white
leather, restorable,
$2,500 570-287-
5775 / 332-1048
LINCOLN `88
TOWN CAR
61,000 original
miles, garage kept,
triple black, leather
interior, carriage
roof, factory wire
wheels, loaded,
excellent condition.
$5,500. Call
Mike 570-237-7660
MERCEDES-BENZ `73
450SL
Convertible with
removable hard top,
power windows, AM
/FM radio with cas-
sette player, CD
player, automatic, 4
new tires. Cham-
pagne exterior; Ital-
ian red leather inte-
rior inside. Garage
kept, excellent con-
dition. $31,000. Call
825-6272
MERCEDES-BENZ `73
450SL
Convertible with
removable hard top,
power windows, AM
/FM radio with cas-
sette player, CD
player, automatic, 4
new tires. Cham-
pagne exterior; Ital-
ian red leather inte-
rior inside. Garage
kept, excellent con-
dition. $31,000. Call
825-6272
MERCEDES-BENZ `76
450SLC
80K miles, 1 owner,
mint condition, no
rust. Must Sell!
$9,900
570-829-0847
MERCEDES-BENZ `88
420 SEL
Silver with red
leather interior.
Every option.
Garage kept, show-
room condition.
$7,000.
(570) 417-9200
OLDSMOBILE `68
DELMONT
DRASTICALLY
REDUCED!!
This model only
produced in 1967
& 1968. All
original 45,000
miles, Color
Burgundy, cloth
& vinyl interior,
350 rocket
engine, 2nd
owner. Fender
skirts, always
garaged. Trophy
winner at shows.
Serious inquiries
only, $7,500.
570-690-0727
PONTIAC `68
CATALINA
400 engine. 2
barrel carburetor.
Yellow with black
roof and white wall
tires. Black interior.
$4,995. Call
(570) 696-3513
PONTIAC 1937
Fully restored near
original. New paint,
new interior, new
wiring, custom tint-
ed glass, new motor
& transmission.
Spare motor &
trans. 16” wide
white walls car in
excellent condition
in storage for 2
years. $14,000 or
best offer. Serious
inquiries ONLY.
Call 570-574-1923
STUDEBAKER ‘31
Rumble seat, coupe
Good condition.
Call for details
(570) 881-7545
TANK ‘07 VISION
2007 Tank Motor
Sports Vision Motor-
cycle. 250 cc,
Brand new. 0 miles.
$2,400. For more
information call Tom
at 570-825-2114
VOLKSWAGEN `71
SUPER BEETLE
Convertible. Runs
great. Excellent
condition. Original
engine. Can be
seen by appoint-
ment. Must Sell
$9,000
(570) 455-8400
VW CLASSIC `72
KARMANN GHIA
Restoration Vehicle
Family owned,
garage kept, good
shape. Needs some
interior work, new
seats, needs
carburetor work.
Only 58,000 miles.
Asking $8,000.
serious inquiries
only! 570-343-2296
WANTED: PONTIAC
`78 FIREBIRD
Formula 400
Berkshire Green,
Originally purchased
at Bradley-Lawless
in Scranton. Car
was last seen in
Abington-Scranton
area. Finder’s fee
paid if car is found
and purchased. Call
John with any info
(570) 760-3440
421 Boats &
Marinas
CUSTOM
CREST 15’
Fiberglass
boat with
trailer. Out-
board propul-
sion. Includes:
2 motors
Erinmade,
“Lark II series”
PRICE
REDUCED!
$2,400
NEGOTI ABLE
570-417-3940
SALT CREEK SKIF
14’ fiberglass fish-
ing boat, tri-hull
(very stable), 25 HP
Tahatsu outboard,
Full Galvanized
Trailer. Perfect Con-
dition. Built in fuel
tank. All new in ‘01.
$2,500
570-256-7311
STARCRAFT ‘80
16’ DEEP V
‘90 Evinrude out-
board 70hp with tilt
& trim— ‘92 EZ
loader trailer. With
‘00 Tracker Series
60lbs foot pedal, 2
downriggers, stor-
ages, gallon tanks,
2 fish finders and
more. MUST SEE.
Make Best Offer.
Call 866-320-6368
after 5pm.
427 Commercial
Trucks &
Equipment
CHEVY ‘08 3500
HD DUMP TRUCK
2WD, automatic.
Only 12,000 miles.
Vehicle in like
new condition.
$21,900.
570-288-4322
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY
C-3500 CHEVY
Food Truck with
new motor -
50,000. Excellent
condition. All stain-
less steel body.
Call Jack at
570-881-5825
or Rich at
570-357-8319
FORD ‘99 E350
BUCKET VAN
Triton V8. 2 speed
boom; 92,000miles;
$9999 or best price.
Great condition. Call
570-675-3384 or
570574-7002
439 Motorcycles
HARLEY ‘01
DAVIDSON
Electra Glide, Ultra
Classic, many
chrome acces-
sories, 13k miles,
Metallic Emerald
Green. Garage
kept, like new
condition. Includes
Harley cover.
$12,900
570-718-6769
570-709-4937
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘05
SCREAMING EAGLE
V-ROD
Orange & Black.
Used as a show
bike. Never abused.
480 miles. Excellent
condition. Asking
$20,000 or best
offer. Call
570-876-4034
HARLEY DAVIDSON
` 06 SOFTTAIL
NIGHTTRAIN
Dark gray metallic,
new rr tire &
brakes, many
extras. $10,900
(570) 592-4982
HARLEY DAVIDSON `01
Road King 19,000
miles, new tires, lots
of extra chrome.
Like New. $12,900.
Call 570-639-1989
or 570-760-1023
HARLEY DAVIDSON `03
100th Anniversary
Edition Deuce.
Garage kept. 1
owner. 1900 miles.
Tons of chrome.
$38,000 invested. A
must see. Asking
$20,000. Call
570-706-6156
HARLEY DAVIDSON
01’ SPORTSTER
883 cubic inch
motor, Paco rigid
frame, extended &
raked. Low miles.
$6,000 or best
offer.(973) 271-1030
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘04
SOFT TAIL DEUCE
LIMITED EDITION.
Radical paint, only
200 produced,
Rhinehardt pipes,
lots of chrome.
Beautiful bike!
Asking $9,500
or best offer.
570-474-0154
HONDA
2004 CRF 100.
Excellent condition.
$1500 or best offer.
570-498-7702
439 Motorcycles
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘10
SPORTSTER 1200
A MUST SEE!
Custom Paint.
Only driven under
10 miles!! Asking
$8,900 or best
offer. For more info,
call 570-864-2543
or 215-379-1375
HARLEY DAVIDSON
2006 NIGHTTRAIN
SPECIAL EDITION
#35 of 50 Made
$10,000 in acces-
sories including a
custom made seat.
Exotic paint set,
Alien Spider Candy
Blue. Excellent con-
dition. All Documen-
tation. 1,400 Asking
$25,000 or best
offer. Call
570-876-4034
HARLEY DAVIDSON
‘92 ULTRA CLASSIC
Many extras,
Garage kept,
2 tone blue.
17,600 miles.
$9,200.
Lehman area.
(570) 760-5937
KAWASAKI ‘05
NINJA 500R. 3300
miles. Orange.
Garage kept. His &
hers helmets. Must
sell. $2400
570-760-3599
570-825-3711
KAWASAKI ‘06
Vulcan Classic
1500
Black and chrome.
Fuel injected. 21”
windshield. Pas-
senger backrest.
Floor boards.
Remainder of war-
ranty. Expires
Feb., 2012. Kept in
heated garage!
Never damaged.
7,000 miles. Great
condition! $6,800
570-574-9217
KAWASAKI
`08 NINJA
250 cc, blue, like
new, under 1,000
miles. Great starter
bike. $2,800 Seri-
ous inquiries only.
Call 570-331-4777
KAWASAKI `10
CONCOURS 14
Sport/Touring with
ABS/traction
control, showroom
new, 400 miles,
metallic blue, 6 year
warranty included.
$12,000.
570-331-3674
KAWASAKI ‘ 99 ZX6R
600CC,
Muzzy Exhaust.
Great condition.
Asking $3,100
CALL FRANK
570-301-7221
theadvertisinguy
@gmail.com
SUZUKI `07 C50T
CRUISER
EXCELLENT
CONDITION
Windshield, Bags,
Floorboards,V&H
Pipes, White
walls,Garage Kept.
6K Miles $5,500
(570) 430-0357
SUZUKI `99 MARAUDER
800. 7,000 miles.
Must Sell. Like new.
$1,700. Please Call
570-394-9413
SUZUKI ‘04
GSXR 1000CC
Less than 1,000
miles. Team colors
with matching hel-
met & jacket. Fend-
er eliminator kit.
Scorpion exhaust.
$6,000.
Call Dave after 5
pm 570-825-0394
SUZUKI ‘77
GS 750
Needs work.
$1,500
or best offer
570-822-2508
SUZUKI 97 GSXR 600
Blue & White,
smoked wind
screen. Great bike,
runs great. Helmet
& kevlar racing
gloves included.
$2995. Call for info
(570) 881-5011
TRIUMPH ‘02 SPEED
TRIPLE 955 CC
7,000 miles. Very
fast. Needs nothing.
Blue, never
dropped. Excellent
condition. $4,200
Negotiable.
(570) 970-0564
YAMAHA `04 V-STAR
1100 Custom. 5800
miles, light bar,
cobra exhaust,
windshield, many
extras, must sell.
$5,995. Call
570-301-3433
YAMAHA `97 VIRAGO
750cc. 8,000 miles,
saddlebags, wind-
shield, back rest,
Black & Pearl,
Excellent Condition.
Must See. Asking
$2,499. Call after 4.
570-823-9376
YAMAHA ‘07 650 V-STAR
Matted black finish.
Mint condition. New
tires, inspected,
fully serviced &
ready to ride. Wind-
shield & sissy bar.
Low miles & garage
kept. $4800. or best
offer. 570-762-5158
PAGE 6D MONDAY, APRIL 25, 2011 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com MONDAY, APRIL 25, 2011 PAGE 7D
522 Education/
Training
522 Education/
Training
DALLAS SCHOOL DISTRICT - EOE
www.dallassd.com
To apply, submit the appropriate application
packet along with a letter of interest, resume,
letters of recommendation, copies of Act 34,
114 and 151 clearances to: Dr. Paul Reinert,
Assistant Superintendent, Dallas School Dis-
trict, PO Box 2000, Dallas, PA 18612
High School Technology Education
Teacher - DEADLINE: May 27, 2011
Full time technology education certified
teacher is sought to design and teach contem-
porary courses in Materials & Processes, Prod-
uct Design/Prototyping, Engineering, Robotics
& Automation, and a culminating Innovation
capstone course. Successful candidate will uti-
lize knowledge of contemporary curriculum,
best practices, and willingness to lead technol-
ogy related student organizations to develop a
state-of-the-art technology education program
to coincide with the opening of a new high
school in September 2011. Qualified candi-
dates will provide student work samples repre-
sentative of standards-based lesson design and
effective instruction.
Teaching application packet: PA standard
teaching application, copies of teaching certifi
cate, Praxis scores, and transcripts.
High School Building Secretary –
Deadline: April 26, 2011 4:30 PM
Position for the 2011-2012 school year is a 12
month, full time position with benefits. The
successful candidate will have a desire and
ability to work in a public high school setting.
Skills in the areas of written and oral commu-
nication, organization, multitasking and basic
computer programs are required.
Support Staff application packet:
district application (found on the employment
page of the district website).
527 Food Services/
Hospitality
527 Food Services/
Hospitality
527 Food Services/
Hospitality
FOOD SERVICES MANAGER
This position plans, directs, and supervises the camp’s food service.
It is responsible for the oversight of the kitchen staff, facility
maintenance, and food. Responsibilities including menu planning,
overseeing the cooking and serving of meals, supervising the kitchen
staff, and ordering of food and supplies.
Previous experience working in a camp or institutional food service
setting, experience as a cook, and cooking for large groups is required.
Excellent communication, management, and interpersonal skills are
also required. Candidates should have the ability to lift 50lbs.
and be able to stand for up to 8 hours.
This year, our resident camp will be held at Camp Archbald in
Kingsley, PA from July 17th until August 21st.
Kitchen staff members are not required to live onsite.
Interested candidates should submit a resume to careers@gshpa.org
or mail to Girl Scouts in the Heart of Pennsylvania
Attention: Human Resources, 350 Hale Ave., Harrisburg, PA 17104
439 Motorcycles
YAMAHA ‘1975 80
Antique. Very good
condition. Must see.
Low milage. Road
title. Asking $1,260
Call (570) 825-5810
Leave Message
YAMAHA` 08 R1
BEAUTIFUL BIKE
Perfect condition.
3700 miles, new
rear tire, undertail
kit, cover. Price
negotiable $7,800
570-852-9072
YAMAHA` 09 VSTAR
650 CLASSIC
Like New.
Less than 1000
miles. White and
chrome. Garage
kept. $6,300
(570) 817-8127
442 RVs & Campers
DUTCHMAN 96’
5TH WHEEL
with slideout & sun
room built on. Set
up on permanent
site in Wapwallopen.
Comes with many
extras. $7,000.
(570) 829-1419 or
(570) 991-2135
FLAGSTAFF `08
CLASSIC
Super Lite Fifth
Wheel. LCD/DVD
flat screen TV, fire-
place, heated mat-
tress, ceiling fan,
Hide-a-Bed sofa,
outside speakers &
grill, 2 sliders,
aluminum wheels,
water purifier,
awning, microwave
oven, tinted safety
glass windows,
raised panel fridge
& many acces-
sories & options.
Excellent condition,
$22,500.
570-868-6986
FLAGSTAFF `08
CLASSIC
Super Lite Fifth
Wheel. LCD/DVD
flat screen TV, fire-
place, heated mat-
tress, ceiling fan,
Hide-a-Bed sofa,
outside speakers &
grill, 2 sliders,
aluminum wheels,
water purifier,
awning, microwave
oven, tinted safety
glass windows,
raised panel fridge
& many acces-
sories & options.
Excellent condition,
$22,500.
570-868-6986
NEWMAR 36’
MOUNTAIN AIRE
5th wheel, 2 large
slides, new
condition, loaded
with accessories.
Ford Dually diesel
truck with hitch
also available.
570-455-6796
90’ SUNLINE CAMPER
35 ft. Well kept. On
campground on the
Susquehanna River
near great fishing.
Attached 12X22”
carpeted room.
Brick heater,
covered by metal
roof with large
breezeway. Shed &
many extras includ-
ed. Call for more
information.
(570) 237-7076
SUNLINE `06 SOLARIS
Travel Trailer. 29’,
mint condition, 1
slide out a/c-heat.
Stove, microwave,
fridge, shower
inside & out. Many
more extras.
Reduced. $15,500.
Call 570-842-6735
SUNLITE CAMPER
22 ft. 3 rear bunks,
center bathroom,
kitchen, sofa bed.
Air, Fully self con-
tained. Sleeps 6.
New tires, fridge
awning. $4500.
215-322-9845
TRAVEL TRAILER 33 ft
Rear queen master
bedroom, Walk
thru bathroom.
Center kitchen +
dinette bed. Front
extra large living
room + sofa bed.
Big View windows.
Air, awning, sleeps
6, very clean, will
deliver. Located in
Benton, Pa. $4,900.
215-694-7497
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
BUICK `05
RENDEZVOUS CX
AWD, Fully
loaded, 1 owner,
18,000 miles. 6
cylinder. New
inspection, tires
& brakes. Like
new, inside & out.
$16,900. Call
(570) 540-0975
CHEVR0LET`02
EXPRESS
CONVERSION
VAN
Loaded. Low
miles. Excellent
condition.
$18,900
570-674-3901
CHEVROLET `05
AVALANCHE
Dark red with tan
leather interior.
LT Z71 package.
Sunroof. 82,000
miles. Must See!
Asking $19,000
(570) 362-4143
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
CHEVROLET `05 SIL-
VERADO LT Z71
Extended cab,
automatic. Black
with grey leather
interior. Heated
seats. 59,000
miles. New Michelin
tires. $16,500
(570) 477-3297
CHEVROLET `05
TRAILBLAZER LT
Black/Grey. 18,000
miles. Well
equipped. Includes
On-Star, tow pack-
age, roof rack,
running boards,
remote starter,
extended warranty.
$16,000
(570) 825-7251
CHEVROLET `06
SILVERADO 1500
4X4 pickup, extend-
ed cab, 6 1/2 ft.
box, automatic.
Pewter. 48,000
miles. Excellent
condition. $17,000
Negotiable
(570) 954-7461
CHEVROLET `96
1500
6 cyl., 2WD, 6 ft.
bed, 5 speed. Only
85,000 miles. Just
inspected. Bedliner,
toolbox, cap &
4,000 lb. hitch all
included. New rear
drums, brakes &
calipers. Excellent
condition. Clean
inside & out. Only
$4,200 Firm
Joe (570) 868-5900
CHEVROLET `97
SILVERADO
with Western plow.
4WD, Automatic.
Loaded with
options. Bedliner.
55,000 miles.
$9,200. Call
(570) 868-6503
CHEVY ‘05 TRAIL
BLAZER 4 door, 4
new tires, regularly
serviced, great
condition. Silver.
AC, 4WD.
174,000 miles
$6,500 or best
offer. 570-242-7979
CHEVY `04 EXPRESS
2500
Series. 6.0 Litre V8.
Heavy Duty version.
Excellent cargo van.
85K miles. Excellent
condition. $8,700
570-829-4548 or
570-417-5991
CHEVY `05 EQUINOX
LT (premium pack-
age), 3.4L, 47,000
miles. All wheel
drive, power moon-
roof, windows, locks
& seats. Leather
interior, 6 cd chang-
er, rear folding
seats, keyless entry,
onstar, roof rack,
running boards,
garage kept.
$14,750.
570-362-1910
CHEVY `10 SILVERADO
4 Door Crew Cab
LTZ. 4 wheel drive.
Excellent condition,
low mileage.
$35,500. Call
570-655-2689
CHEVY `94 GLADIATOR
Custom Van. 67K
miles. Interior has
oak wood trim, car-
peting, storage
areas, TV, rear seat
convertible to dou-
ble bed, curtains.
Seats 7. Power win-
dows & seats. Cus-
tom lighting on ceil-
ing. New exhaust
system. New rear
tires. Recently
inspected. Excellent
condition. $4,800.
Call 570-655-0530
CHEVY `94 GLADIATOR
Custom Van. 67K
miles. Interior has
oak wood trim, car-
peting, storage
areas, TV, rear seat
convertible to dou-
ble bed, curtains.
Seats 7. Power win-
dows & seats. Cus-
tom lighting on ceil-
ing. New exhaust
system. New rear
tires. Recently
inspected. Excellent
condition. $4,800.
Call 570-655-0530
CHEVY ‘07
TRAILBLAZER LT
On-Star, Leather.
Satellite Radio.
$17,770
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
DODGE `00 RAM
1500 QUAD CAB
4X4, V8 automatic.
New tires & brakes.
Fully loaded. Lea-
ther interior. Many
extras. Must see.
Excellent condition.
(570) 970-9351
DODGE `01 RAM
1500 QUAD CAB
4x4, automatic,
New tires & wheels.
Remote starter.
Power locks & win-
dows. $900 cargo
rack. Toolbox. New
Optima battery.
118,000 miles,
New inspection.
Asking $5,400
(570) 823-1811
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
CHEVY`05 TRAILBLAZER
REDUCED!!!
ASKING $9,999
JUST REDUCED!
SAVE MONEY! GET
READY FOR THE
WINTER! Don’t pay
dealer prices! White
with grey interior.
Looks and runs like
it just came off the
lot. Four Door, 4
wheel drive, 84,900
miles, new tires,
tow package, anti
lock brakes, driver
and passenger
airbags, power
windows, power
mirrors, power
locks, rear window
defroster and
wiper, privacy tint,
air conditioner,
cruise control. CD,
keyless entry and
much more.
Call
570-332-4999
DODGE `04
RAM 1500
Too many extras to
list. Low Mileage.
$10,000
(570)709-2125
DODGE `10
GRAND CARAVAN
Only 17k miles.
Fully loaded.
Excellent condi-
tion. Factory &
extended war-
ranty. $17,995
(570) 690-2806
DODGE `94 DAKOTA
with cap. 1 owner,
garage kept, very
good condition.
Many extras includ-
ing lift & back seat.
29 MPG gas.
$4,000
or best offer
(570) 868-0944
DODGE RAM ‘06
1500 SLT
Low miles,
One owner
$19,845
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
FORD `01 LARIAT
250 Super Duty
with slide-in camper
new tires, 4 door, 8’
bed. Soft and hard-
top for bed covers.,
Good condition.
Sold together or
separately $10,900
(570) 639-5478
FORD `03 F150
LARIAT
Contractor ready
with ladder rack &
tool box, 4x4 diesel,
under 97K. Great
condition, $17,000
or best offer.
570-925-2845
FORD `05 WHEEL
CHAIR LIFT VAN
Seating capacity for
7 plus 2 wheel
chairs. 140,000
miles. Great condi-
tion. Asking $7,000.
For more details,
Call 570-589-9181
FORD `97 DIESEL
Cummins engine,
8-L. 49,049
miles. 33,000
gross wt. 6,649
light wt. $19,500
Must see!
(570) 829-5886
FORD `99 E250
Wheelchair Van
78,250 miles. Fully
serviced, new bat-
tery, tires & rods.
Seats 6 or 3 wheel-
chairs. Braun Millen-
nium lift with
remote. Walk up
door. Front & rear
A/C. Power locks &
windows. Excellent
condition. $9,500.
570-237-6375
FORD ‘68 BRONCO
302 V8 engine.
3-speed on the
floor transmission.
34X9.50 swamper
tires. Racing seats,
roll cage.
$9,500
For more pics or
information, call
(570) 301-7221
advertisinguy
@gmail.com
HONDA `02 CR-V
EX. Silver. Loaded. 1
owner, very clean,
meticulously main-
tained. Seasonal &
cargo mats. $8,400
or best offer. Call
570-646-3334 or
570-762-3294
HUMMER ‘05 H2
Yellow with black
leather interior.
Front & rear heated
seats. Many chrome
accessories. $28,500
or best offer. Call
(570) 788-9826 or
(570) 956-8547
Leave Message
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
HONDA `03
ODYSSEY
High mileage,
140000 miles,
automatic, front
wheel drive, 4
door, anti-lock
brakes, air condi-
tioning, air bags,
power locks,
power windows,
power mirrors,
AM/FM radio, CD
player, rear
defroster, rear
windshield wiper,
$5,990
(570) 606-4198
HONDA `10
ODYSSEY
Special Edition.
Maroon, Fully
loaded. Leather
seats. TV/DVD,
navigation, sun roof
plus many other
extras. 3rd seat .
Only 1,900 Miles.
Brand New.
Asking $37,000
(570) 328-0850
INTERNATIONAL ‘95
DUMP TRUCK
Refurbished, rebuilt
engine, transmis-
sion replaced.
Rear-end removed
and relubed. Brand
new 10’ dump. PA
state inspected.
$12,900/best offer.
570-594-1496
JEEP `00
WRANGLER
TJ, Black with grey
interior. 4 cylinder,
5-speed manual
transmission. CD
player, hardtop, full
doors, sound bar.
4” Skyjacker
Suspension lift with
steering stabilizer.
Like new BF
Goodrich 35’s with
Full size spare. Only
85,000 miles.
$6,999
(570) 301-7221
JEEP `02 LIBERTY
Blue/grey, new
rebuilt engine with
warranty, new
tires & brakes,
4,000 miles.
$5,900 or
best offer.
570-814-2125
JEEP `06
COMMANDER 4X4
Lockers, V-8. Heat-
ed leather. All
power. Navigation,
Satellite, Blue tooth,
3rd row, More.
69,000
highway miles.
$14,900. Call
(570) 855-3657
JEEP `07
WRANGLER X
4x4, stick shift, soft
top. Red exterior,
well maintained,
garage kept. 11,500
miles, one owner.
AC, CD player,
cruise control.
Tow package with
cargo carrier.
Excellent condition.
$18,700
Call 570-822-9680
JEEP `87 WRANGLER
YJ. Copper color
with black hard top.
4.0L 6 cylinder auto.
60K miles on 2nd
engine. Many new
parts. No rust.
$2,400. Call
570-706-1243
JEEP ‘02 WRANGLER
Low Miles
$14,850
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
JEEP ‘06
COMMANDER
4WD, Only 38K
$17,880
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
KIA `02 SEDONA
EX, Van, Sunroof.
61,000 miles.
Loaded. Good
condition.
$5000 or best offer.
570-606-7654
LEXUS `96 LX 450
Full time 4WD, Pearl
white with like new
leather ivory interi-
or. Silver trim.
Garage kept. Excel-
lent condition.
84,000 miles, Ask-
ing $10,750
570-654-3076 or
570-498-0005
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
LEXUS `06 GX 470
Cypress Pearl with
ivory leather interi-
or. Well maintained,
garage kept. All
service records.
Brand new tires.
All options including
premium audio
package, rear
climate control,
adjustable suspen-
sion, towing pack-
age, rear spoiler,
Lexus bug guard.
42,750 miles.
$28,950
(570) 237-1082
MERCEDES-BENZ
`99 ML 320
Sunroof, new tires,
115,930 miles
MUST SELL
$7,200 OBO
(570)760-0511
MITSUBISHI `95
MONTERO SR 4WD
177,102 miles, auto-
matic, four wheel
drive, 4 door, anti-
lock brakes, air con-
ditioning, air bags,
power locks, power
windows, power
mirrors, power
seats, cruise con-
trol, AM/FM radio,
cassette player, CD
changer, leather
interior, sun roof,
rear defroster, rear
windshield wiper,
new Passed inspec-
tion, new battery.
$2,500
(570) 868-1100
Call after 2:00 p.m.
MITSUBISHI `95
MONTERO SR 4WD
177,102 miles, auto-
matic, four wheel
drive, 4 door, anti-
lock brakes, air con-
ditioning, air bags,
power locks, power
windows, power
mirrors, power
seats, cruise con-
trol, AM/FM radio,
cassette player, CD
changer, leather
interior, sun roof,
rear defroster, rear
windshield wiper,
new Passed inspec-
tion, new battery.
$2,500
(570) 868-1100
Call after 2:00 p.m.
MITSUBISHI `97
15’ CUBE VAN
Cab over, 4 cylinder
diesel engine.
Rebuilt automatic
transmission. Very
good rubber. All
around good
condition inside
& out. Well
maintained.
Ready to work.
PRICE REDUCED!
$6,195 or
best offer
Call 570-650-3500
Ask for Carmen
NISSAN `08 ROGUE
SL. AWD, 1 owner,
no accidents. 4
door hatchback, 6
cylinder, roof rails,
dark gray, black
interior. Premium
wheels, new tires,
brakes extra set of
snows. Premium
sound/Bose/blue-
tooth, XM radio.
Intelligent key entry.
Newly inspected
36,900 miles
$19,500
(570) 371-7227
PONTIAC `04
MONTANA
95,000 miles, well
maintained. Excell-
ent overall condi-
tion. Keyless entry,
built in baby seat,
dual climate con-
trol. Rear air. Seats
7. Recent inspec-
tion & tires. KBB
over $6300. Asking
$5,000 firm. Call
(570) 417-9884
SUZUKI `07 XL-7
56,000 miles,
automatic,
all-wheel drive,
4 door, air condi-
tioning, all power,
CD player, leather
interior, tinted
windows, custom
wheels, $13,000
Call 570-829-8753
Before 5:00 p.m.
SUZUKI `09
GRAND VITARA
Luxury 4x4. 166
horsepower 4 cylin-
der, 4 mode full time
4 wheel drive. 1,269
miles. 4 wheel anti
lock disc brakes.
Leather, heated
seats. Power seats,
mirrors, locks &
sunroof. 6 cd
changer with 8
speakers. Cruise &
tilt. Smart pass key-
less entry start.
$19,000. Call
570-401-3714
TOYOTA ‘04
SIENNA XLE
DVD, leather
moonroof
$14968
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
TRACTOR
TRAILERS
FREIGHTLINER
’97 MIDROOF
475 CAT & 10
speed transmission.
$12,000
FREIGHTLINER
’99 CONDO
430 Detroit, Super
10 transmission.
Asking $15,000.
‘ 88 FRUEHAUF 45’
with sides. All
aluminum, spread
axle. $6,500.
2 storage trailers.
570-814-4790
VOLVO `08 XC90
Fully loaded, moon
roof, leather, heat-
ed seats, electric
locks, excellent
condition. New
tires, new brakes
and rotors. 52,000
miles highway
$26,500/ best offer.
570-779-4325
570-417-2010 till 5
TRUCKS FOR SALE
Ford, GMC,
International-Prices
starting at $2,295.
Box Truck, Cab &
Chassis available.
Call U-haul
570-822-5536
457 Wanted to Buy
Auto
ALL
JUNK
CAR &
TRUCKS
WANTED
Highest Prices
Paid In Cash!!!
FREE
REMOVAL
Call V&G
Anytime
288-8995
506 Administrative/
Clerical
ADMINISTRATIVE
ASSISTANT
Part Time general
office assistant
needed for unique
local project. Excel-
lent communication,
typing, Word &
Excel skills. Ability
to work under pres-
sure. Send cover
letter & resume to
abb@wplibrary.org
by May 4th.
NIGHT AUDITOR
Apply in person.
Knights Inn
310 Route 315
Pittston, PA 18640
570-654-6020
507 Banking/Real
Estate/Mortgage
Professionals
CLERK/TELLER
PART TIME
Credit union has
opening for a part
time Clerk/Teller.
Requires attention
to details, GL expe-
rience & excellent
customer service
skills. Please send
resume to: PG&W
Employees FCU
Attn: Carole Fischer
265 S. Main St.
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18701
Email: cfischer@
pgwefcu.org / EOE
509 Building/
Construction/
Skilled Trades
CARPENTERS
10+ years experi-
ence and roofing
experience a
must!
PAINTERS
10+ years experi-
ence. Must be able
to brush, roll &
spackle.
Steady work!
Good pay!
Benefits available.
Call 570-654-4348
CONCRETE LABORERS
Seasonal Help.
Must have driver’s
license and own
vehicle. 655-7689
In and apply
GENERAL LABORERS
Needed
immediately
Call us. 825-2105
1124 Highway 315
Wilkes-Barre
Save Time,
Apply Online!
www.onesource
staffing.com
PAVING & EXCAVATING
Black top laborers,
equipment experi-
ence a plus.
Must have drivers
license, CDL a plus.
Call 570-760-3486.
509 Building/
Construction/
Skilled Trades
LABORERS
Gas field Cleanup
Crew. Must be
physically fit and
willing to work in all
weather conditions.
Pre-employment
and Random Drug
Testing. Must be
available to work
Day/Night Shifts.
Starting wage
$15.00 per hour.
Benefits available
after 90 days. 570-
297-4720 or apply
in person @ 22020
Rt. 14 Troy, PA.
515 Creative/Design
LICENSED STYLISTS &
NAIL TECHNICIANS
Needed for new
salon. Experienced.
Spanish-speaking a
plus.
Call 570-606-1701
or 570-328-0948
518 Customer
Support/Client Care
TELEMARKETER
Looking for Part
Time/Full Time Tele-
marketer to start
immediately for
Insurance Company.
Would be making
outbound calls.
Please call Lisa @
570-208-5640.
527 Food Services/
Hospitality
LINE COOKS
SERVERS
Red Rooster
Restaurant
Rte. 118 & 29
Sweet Valley
533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
CABLE TV INSTALLERS
Openings for experi-
enced installers and
dedicated trainees
eager to learn in the
Scranton area.
Responsibilities
include installing
cable TV to the
customer’s home or
business, and
connection of all
customer premise
equipment. Educat-
ing the customers
on how to properly
operate the servic-
es and equipment
installed is a critical
part of this position.
QUALITY
WORKMANSHIP is a
MUST! We are a
DRUG FREE WORK-
PLACE, where
SAFETY is a CORE
VALUE. Contact us
at 570-235-1145
GRASS CUTTER
Mature reliable per-
son wanted to cut
grass on a 4 acre
residential property.
Knowledge of lawn
tractors essential.
We will supply
equipment and gas.
Call 570-675-2486.
MAINTENANCE
AND PRODUCTION
Night Shift
2 years experience
working in the coal
industry. Welding
experience neces-
sary. Plant & equip-
ment maintenance
experience. 8pm-
4am. To start imme-
diately. Apply in per-
son only - No calls.
Mountaintop
Anthracite Inc.
1550 Crestwood Dr.
Mountaintop, PA
MECHANIC
Responsible for
daily maintenance
of equipment.
Knowledge in
hydraulic and elec-
trical systems.
Welding a plus.
Competitive salary
and benefits.
Solomon Container
Service
495 Stanton St.
Wilkes-Barre
570-829-2206
WINDOW TREATMENT
INSTALLERS
Professional, Expe-
rienced, Opportuni-
ty, (Blinds, Shades,
Verticals, Horizon-
tals) for top Co.
Work in own area.
Email resume to
Edwin@distinctive
treatments.com or
call 516-358-9612.
539 Legal
LEGAL SECRETARY
Organizational skills
and experience
necessary. Knowl-
edge of office pro-
cedures and Word
a must. Salary
commensurate with
experience.
Send resume to:
c/o Times Leader
Box 2530
15 N. Main Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18711-0250
542 Logistics/
Transportation
DRIVERS
Independent con-
tractor opportuni-
ties for owners/
operators with 2002
or newer cargo
vans & some small-
er vehicles for distri-
bution and courier
services. Must have
cell phone and GPS.
484-768-1453
www.aexdrivers.net
542 Logistics/
Transportation
GET ON THE
ROAD TO
SUCCESS!
McLane, a
$28 billion supply
chain services
leader, is looking
for qualified
Class A Drivers to
become part of
our valued team.
McLane’s
uniformed drivers
are well recog-
nized and trusted
throughout
the U.S. for their
knowledge,
accuracy, and
professionalism.
Do you have
what it takes
to help drive
our team?
CLASS A
DRIVERS
• Earn more
money with more
at-home time
• “We’re here to
stay” –as a
McLane team-
mate, you’ll be
working in a
stable, secure
environment
• Multi-stop
deliveries prima-
rily located in
Pennsylvania and
New Jersey
• Great pay and
benefits -
$55,000 to
$60,000 in the
first year;
medical, dental,
vision, life and
401(k)
Requirements:
• HS diploma or
GED
• Two years driving
experience
• Clean driving
record and great
customer service
skills
Find out more or
apply to become a
valued Teammate
by contacting:
John Hart,
McLane People
Department by
phone:
(570) 330-8400,
or email: jfhart@
mclaneco.com.
EOE, M/F/D/V
HYDRO-VAC &
TRANSPORT DRIVERS
CDL A or B with
Tanker Endorse-
ment. 2 Years Expe-
rience required.
Clean MVR. Must be
able to work/day
night shift. Pay up to
$30.00/hour. Bene-
fits available after
90 days. Call 570-
297-4720 or apply
in person at 22020
Rt. 14 Troy, PA.
DRIVERS
Drive with the best
of the best!
Come join our great
family of Drivers
Kenan Advantage
Group
Tired of sorting
through all the ads
that promise home
weekly runs or
sorry no local runs
available? If what
you really want is to
be home daily, look
no further.
Driver Qualifications
Class A CDL ability
to obtain tank and
hazmat 2 years
recent verifiable
tractor-trailer expe-
rience. Safe driving
record.
Advantages
Home Daily. Com-
petitive pay pack-
age. Excellent ben-
efit packages. Train-
ing on safe driving
and product han-
dling. New and well
maintained equip-
ment, uniforms, and
more! Call Brian
972-740-8051 to
learn how to get
started. Apply online
@ www.thekag.com
To place your
ad Call Toll Free
1-800-427-8649
TRI-AXLE DRIVER
4-5 years experi-
ence. Start immedi-
ately. All local work.
No out of town.
Call Danny Jr. at
570-237-1734,
Danny Sr. at 570-
760-7896, or Home
# at 570-654-0525.
TRUCK DRIVER
Full time, able to
drive a 20’ truck,
7 year clean driving
record, able to do
physical work and
lift 60 lbs., PA driver
medical card, motor
vehicle report, flexi-
ble hours, $9/hour
plus incentive on
pounds collected.
Apply at:
U’SAgain Recycling
486 S. Empire St.
Wilkes-Barre
570-270-2670
542 Logistics/
Transportation
NES RENTALS
NES RENTALS, a
leader in a multi-bil-
lion dollar rental
industry for con-
struction is looking
to make immediate
hires for the follow-
ing positions in the
PITTSTON, PA
area:
DRIVER
You will operate
multi-dimensional
construction equip-
ment, delivery
trucks, including
tractor trailer com-
binations to pick up
and deliver equip-
ment to and from
customer work
sites, and is able to
train in safe usage
of the equipment.
H.S. diploma (or
equivalent), the abil-
ity to lift 70 lbs.,
have a valid CDL
license, satisfactory
driving record, and
knowledge of feder-
al motor carrier reg-
ulations is required.
Two years of com-
mercial driving
experience involving
the movement of
trucks and con-
struction equipment
including oversized
loads required.
Knowledge of safety
procedures for
securing and trans-
porting cargo is also
essential.
NES RENTALS
offers competitive
wages, medical/
dental, vision, tuition
reimbursement, and
401(k).
For considera-
tion, apply online
at our Careers
center at
www.nesrentals.
com/careers.
NES recognizes and
values diversity.
We are an
EOE/AA/M/F/D/V
employer.
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
545 Marketing/
Product
PART-TIME MARKETING
In search of a
dynamic person
with great commu-
nication skills and
ability to multi-task.
The successful can-
didate will be punc-
tual, organized, reli-
able, creative, con-
scientious, and per-
sonable. Must have
prior marketing
experience. Must
be a self-starter
with reliable trans-
portation. Computer
skills a must. Will-
ingness to work
Saturdays a must.
Positive attitude and
high energy a must.
Fax resume to
570-822-3446. No
phone calls please.
548 Medical/Health
Seeking energetic
and personable
candidate to work
with and motivate
residents to partici-
pate in activities.
Prior experience is
a plus.
Complete
Application
395 Middle Rd.,
Nanticoke
Located directly
across from LCCC
on LCTA Bus Route
GREAT PAY &
OPPORTUNITY
FOR GROWTH
ACTIVITY AIDE
PART TIME EVENINGS
LPN/RN
Part Time.
Flexible hours.
Private Clinic. Avail-
able immediately.
Send resumes to:
c/o Times Leader
Box 2505
15 N. Main Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18711-0250.
RESIDENTIAL
CARE AIDES
Part time positions
available. Looking
for caring & com-
passionate people
for Alzheimer’s
assisted living facil-
ity. Must be a high
school graduate.
Reliable applicants
need only apply. No
phone calls please.
Apply within.
Keystone
Garden
Estates
100 Narrows Rd
Route 11
Larksville
Riverstreet
Manor
has an opportunity
available for a
Full Time Day Shift
HOUSEKEEPING AIDE
We offer a competi-
tive salary and ben-
efits. Every other
weekend & holiday
rotation required.
Willing to train.
Opportunities for
RN’S AND C.N.A.’S
are also available.
All interested
parties please apply
in person at
Riverstreet Manor
440 North River St.
Wilkes Barre, PA
18707
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
Village at
Greenbriar
Assisted Living
PART TIME
POSITIONS AVAILABLE
•Personal Care
Aides - All Shifts
•Dietary Aide
•Cook
Apply within:
4252 Memorial Hwy
Dallas, PA 18612
PAGE 8D MONDAY, APRIL 25, 2011 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com MONDAY, APRIL 25, 2011 PAGE 9D
M ATT BURNE H O NDA
M ATT BURNE H O NDA M ATT BURNE H O NDA
1110 WYOMINGAVE. • SCRANTON • 1-800-NEXT-HONDA
www.MattBurneHonda.com
TON IGHT ON L Y!
6-8P M
1-800-NE XTH OND A
a tM a ttBu rne H onda
Refres h m ents
Being
Served
Givea wa ys To
Th e Firs t50
Fa m ilies
2012 Hon d a CIV IC
The b estsellin g com p actcarju stgotb etter.
O NLY A T M A TT B U R NE H O NDA
$
15,995
*
$
15,995
*
$
15,995
*
$
219/M O.
$
219/M O.
$
219/M O.
** ** **
L E A S E L E A S E L E A S E
39
M PG
BE TH E FIRST TO
SE E TH E NE W
2012 CIVIC
**L ease 36 m on ths, 36,000 m ilesthru AHF C. $780 cap red u ction p lu sfirst
p aym en tof$219. Totalin g $999 p lu stax & tagsd u e on d elivery. Resid u al
Valu e =$13,001. Total ofp aym en t$7,884 p lu stax. M od el Nu m b erF B2F 5CEW .
*2012 Hon d a Civic M od el Nu m b erF B2E2CEW .
PAGE 10D MONDAY, APRIL 25, 2011 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
548 Medical/Health 548 Medical/Health
554 Production/
Operations
554 Production/
Operations
554 Production/
Operations
NURSE
7a – 7p
Weekend Program
NURSES
All Shifts – Per Diem
CNAs
Evenings & Nights,
Per Diem All Shifts
Competitive Salary & Benefits Package
Golden Living Center Summit
50 N. Pennsylvania Avenue
Wilkes-Barre
Fax 570-825-9423 or
pamela.smith2@goldenliving.com
EOE M/F/D/V
There’s No Place
Like the Jewish Home…
The Jewish Home of Eastern PA, a leader in
long-term care, has an immediate need to fill the
following positions:
• RN Supervisor
o BSN
o Long Term Care Experience Preferred
• RNs and LPNs
Full Time and Part Time and Per Diem
Evening and Night Shift available.
Outstanding benefit package available including
fully paid family health insurance and generous
shift differential. Every other weekend and
rotating holidays required.
Apply in person - Monday through Friday
8:30am – 4:00pm
The Jewish Home of Eastern PA
1101 Vine Street
Scranton, PA 18510
Telephone: (570)344-6177 ext. 140
Fax: (570) 344-9610
Email: sstrunk@frontier.com
The Jewish Home of Eastern PA is an
Equal Opportunity Employer.
Sapa Extruder, Inc. an aluminum manufacturing facility located
in the Crestwood Industrial Park in Mountain Top, has an
opening for a 2nd shift CNC Technician for its fabrication
department. Qualified applicants must have experience with
Fanuc controllers and aluminum machining, Mastercam and
AutoCAD. The successful candidate should be able to read
blueprints and understand GD&T. Experience in set-up
reduction program, macro writing and Solidworks a plus but not
required. Applications can be submitted or resumes can be
mailed to:
Sapa Extruder, Inc.
330 Elmwood Avenue
Mountain Top, PA 18707
Attn: Human Resources
teresa.mandzak@sapagroup.com
E.O.E.
NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE!
CNC TECHNICIAN
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
CASH PAID 24/7
• Firearms • Gold • Silver
• Jewelry • Coins • Tools
• Military • Collectibles
Guaranteed Highest Cash Paid!
($10 Bonus per gun with ad)
570-735-1487 DAY
570-472-7572 EVES
WANTED
548 Medical/Health
Pennsylvania
MENTOR
has an exciting
opportunity for
DIRECT SUPPORT
PROFESSIONAL
in a new group
home opening in
Wilkes-Barre, PA.
Full-Time
Base Pay:
$9.50-11.00/hour
KEY RESPONSI-
BILITIES: Establish
a relationship with
the individual
receiving services
to ensure effective
guidance, support
and service delivery
•Coordinate, organ-
ize and/or assist
with household
activities such as
light housekeeping
and meal prepara-
tion
•Provide transporta-
tion for individuals
receiving services
to planned and/or
necessary activities
and appointments
•Maintains current
progress and con-
tact notes and any
other appropriate
documentation in
accordance with
MENTOR policy,
program standards
or other regulatory
policies
•May assist clients
with medication
administration
•Complete other
duties as needed
JOB
REQUIREMENTS:
•High school diplo-
ma or GED required;
Bachelor’s Degree
preferred
•One year service-
delivery experience
preferred
•Ability to apply
common sense
understanding to
carry out instruc-
tions furnished in
written or oral form
•Current driver’s
license, car regis-
tration and auto
insurance is neces-
sary
•Full time positions
are available –
morning, evening,
overnight shifts
Full Time benefits
include health, den-
tal, vision, Flexible
Spending Accounts,
Employee Assis-
tance Program.
CONTACT:
Randi Farr
570-654-4585
ext 4226
fax 570-654-3733
Randi.Farr@the
mentornetwork.com
Apply online
or in person:
312 Highway 315,
Pittston, PA 18640
www.
pa-mentor.com
EOE/M/F/D/V
Find Your Ideal
Employee! Place an
ad and end the
search!
570-829-7130
ask for an employ-
ment specialist
551 Other
EMTS
Part Time. Current
EMT and EVO certi-
fications required.
TRUCK DRIVER
Part Time. Valid &
Current CDL
Driver’s License.
To apply, call
570-675-3334
Kunkle Fire Co., Inc.
551 Other
VALET ATTENDANT
Full time position
available. Wilkes-
Barre location.
Immediate opening.
Apply in person to
Geisinger Wyoming
Valley Hospital/
Cancer Center.
See Bob Reese.
1000 East Mountain
Blvd. Wilkes-Barre,
PA or call 631-724-
6227. Must have
clean license and
neat appearance.
554 Production/
Operations
EQUIPMENT OPERATOR
Candidate must
have HS Diploma/
GED & a good work
history. Equipment
experience and
knowledge of
hydraulic machines
is a must. Benefits
include Health, Paid
Holidays/Vacation &
401K. Please call Al
at 570-822-6880.
MANUFACTURING POSI-
TIONS
A well-established
local manufacturer
is looking for full
time Machine Oper-
ator for 3rd shift at
our Plains location.
Will train right candi-
date. A comprehen-
sive benefit pack-
age, which includes
401K.
Applications can be
obtained at:
American Silk Mills
75 Stark Street
Plains, PA 18705
QUALITY CONTROL
TECHNICIAN –
Entry Level
Will assist QC
Supervisor, estab-
lish, examine and
maintain quality on
production floor.
Position will be “on
hands” in produc-
tion dept., on floor
testing and sam-
pling. $ 13/hour to
start. Hours: 7 a.m.
to 4 p.m Mon. – Fri.
Must have prior
experience in QC
and with Microsoft
Word & Excel. Will
operate forklift and
some heavy lifting
may be required.
Must be detailed
oriented and have
ability to multi-task.
Competitive benefit
package. Candi-
dates meeting qual-
ifications should for-
ward resume with
wage requirements
to:
AEP Industries,
Inc.,Attn: Human
Resources,
20 Elmwood Ave.,
Mountain Top, Pa.
18707, Fax (570)
474-9257, Email:
Grullony@
aepinc.com
We are a Drug Free
Workplace. EOE
566 Sales/Retail/
Business
Development
FLOOR HELP/CASHIER
Full & Part Time
Room to advance.
Apply in person.
Dallas Center
Hardware
42-44 Main Street
Dallas, PA
566 Sales/Retail/
Business
Development
SALESPERSON
Now hiring
Full time positions.
Commission
based. Experi-
ence in propane,
heating oil and
HVAC sales. Email
or fax resumes to
570-474-5256 or
eb2@buttonoil.com
600
FINANCIAL
610 Business
Opportunities
BEER DISTRIBUTOR
License available
with option to lease
building or sold
separately.
570-954-1284
FLORAL SHOP
The only shop
in the area!
1,300 sq/ft retail
& 1,300 sq/ft
storage
$63,000
Includes
established sales,
all equipment,
showcases,
inventory &
memberships to
FTD, Tele-Floral &
1-800-FLOWERS.
Willing to train
buyer. Owner
retiring after 25
years in business.
Room for
potential growth.
CALL 570-542-4520
Pictures available.
Liquor License
Luzerne County
Priced to sell
Cordora
Business Network
570-287-7013
630 Money To Loan
“We can erase
your bad credit -
100% GUARAN-
TEED.” Attorneys
for the Federal
Trade Commission
say they’ve never
seen a legitimate
credit repair opera-
tion. No one can
legally remove
accurate and timely
information from
your credit report.
It’s a process that
starts with you and
involves time and a
conscious effort to
pay your debts.
Learn about manag-
ing credit and debt
at ftc. gov/credit. A
message from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
700
MERCHANDISE
702 Air
Conditioners
AIR CONDITIONER
$40
570-740-1246
706 Arts/Crafts/
Hobbies
PATTERNS Simplici-
ty Daisy Kingdom
size 3456 on pat-
tern, all fabric &
details to match
pattern, size 3 - 30
patterns, includes
material to match,
Daisy Kingdom doll
pattern also on pat-
tern $200. One 18
gallon tall tote (plas-
tic) with lace, all
sizes, some eyelet
$50. Many plastic
dolls to crochet
dresses for, air
freshners included
$20. 570-674-3843
SEWING MACHINE -
Singer Spartan.
(free delivery) $10.
570-855-2568
708 Antiques &
Collectibles
$ ANTIQUES BUYING $
Old Toys, model kits,
Bikes, dolls, old gun
Mining Items, trains
&Musical Instruments,
Hess. 474-9544
BASEBALL UNI-
FORM 1950’s A.G.
Spaulding wool, Mil-
ton Team $200.
570-239-8377
708 Antiques &
Collectibles
FOREIGN world
coins total of 90,
mostly older types
all for $15.
570-735-6638
LIONEL TRAIN SET-
Spirit of 76 engine,
caboose, & 3 box
cars (Georgia, NC &
Delaware) slightly
used great condi-
tion. $175.
570-287-5045
STATE QUARTER
COIN SETS in fold-
ers. $20. 824-1180
YEARBOOKS:
Coughlin H.S. 1926,
1928, 1932, 1937,
1940, 1961, 1963,
1942, 1943, 1944,
1949. G.A.R. H.S.
1934, 1935, 1936,
1937, 1945, 1946,
1951, 1955, 1956,
1957, 1961, 1965,
1966, 1970, 1980,
1985, 2005, 2006.
Meyers H.S. 1935,
1936, 1937, 1938,
1942, 1943, 1944,
1945, 1946, 1960,
1974, 1975, 1976,
1977. Kingston H.S.
1938, 1939, 1940,
1944, 1948, 1949.
Plymouth H.S. 1930,
1931, 1932, 1933,
1938, 1943, 1944,
1959, 1960.
Hanover H.S. 1951,
1952, 1953, 1954,
1960. West Pittston
H.S. Annual 1925,
1926, 1927, 1928,
1931, 1932, 1959.
Luzerne H.S. 1951,
1952, 1956, 1957,
1959. Berwick H.S.
1952, 1953, 1956,
1957, 1958, 1960,
1967, 1968, 1969
,1970. Lehman H.S.
1973, 1974, 1976,
1978, 1980. Nanti-
coke Area H.S.
1976, 2008. Dallas
H.S. 1966, 1967,
1968. Bishop Hoban
H.S. 1972, 1973,
1974, 1975. West
Side Central
Catholic H.S. 1965 -
1974, 1980, 1981.
Westmoreland H.S.
1952, 1953 - 1954
G.A.R. H.S. 1972,
1973, 1974, 1975,
1976 Pittston H.S.
1936, 1951, 1954,
1963 Pittston Hospi-
tal School of Nurs-
ing, J.O.Y. of 1957,
1959 West Pittston
H.S. 1950, 1954,
1955, 1956, 1960
Hazleton H.S. 1938,
1939, 1940, 1941,
1942, 1943, 1945,
1948, 1949, 1950,
1953, 1954, 1955,
1956, 1957, 1959,
1960, 1961, 1962,
1964 Hazle Twp H.S.
1951, 1952
570-825-4721
710 Appliances
A P P L I A N C E
PA R T S E T C .
Used appliances.
Parts for all brands.
223 George Ave.
Wilkes-Barre
570-820-8162
REFRIGERATOR
Frigidaire, 18 cu. ft.
white, $100. or best
offer. 570-287-9946
REFRIGERATOR
Kenmore, almond,
21.6 cu. ft. with ice
maker & filtered
water $300.
570-868-6018
WASHER: Kenmore
front loader, new
door lock, but needs
new motor. $200.
570-954-2899
712 Baby Items
BASSINET with
canopy, mobile,
music, vibration.
Green/white pattern
for boy or girl. Can
also be used as
bedside sleeper.
Includes matt pad &
sheets. Excellent
condition. $50.
570-855-9221
HIGHCHAIR, white
vinyl highchair with
blue print padding $
large tray $30.
Walker red, blue &
yellow $15. Yellow
infant seat vibrates
with music, great for
feeding $40.
570-208-3888
INFANT CLOTHES
LARGE PLASTIC
BOX $10.
570-285-3119
UMBRELLA stroller,
red & blue plaid $7.
Backless booster
seat $5. Car seat,
gray with blue trim,
$30. Pack & Play,
Graco blue & yellow
with animal print
pad, asking $30.
Stroller, green &
cream plaid $40.
Booster high chair,
cream with bur-
gundy, $25. TV
video baby monitor,
brand new, $50.
Baby bath tub
shower $20. Wood-
en changing table
$60. Eddie Bauer
car seat, beige &
black suede $40.
570-239-5292
716 Building
Materials
DOOR. 36”x80”
solid wood, 6 panel.
Exterior or interior.
Natural oak finish,
right or left with
hardware. $200.
Call 570-735-8730
or 570-332-8094
DOUBLE UTILITY
SINK, with spraying
faucet. Barely used.
$75. 570-417-4188
leave message.
GLASS DOOR. 3
way glass door for
bath tub. $25
570-331-8183
LIGHT FIXTURE
Beautiful tiffany-
style light fixture
measuring 13”H x
32”W x 14”D,
stained glass piece
of art is done in
white & mother-of-
pearl tones & has a
polished brass fin-
ish. Asking price is
$350.. ALSO, a pair
of polished brass
and acrylic wall
sconces measuring
7”H x 9”W. These
classic looking fix-
tures are priced at
$48. for the pair.
Call 570-430-1366 if
interested. Photos
upon request.
ROOFING, 5 rubber
rolls, R.P.I. Royal
Edge 10’X50’ .060 G
Black EPDM. $200
per roll firm. Save!
(570) 822-9625
720 Cemetery
Plots/Lots
CEMETERY PLOTS
Plymouth National
Cemetery in
Wyoming. 6 Plots.
$450 each. Call
570-825-3666
CEMETERY PLOTS
(3) together.
Maple Lawn
Section of
Dennison
Cemetery.
Section ML.
$550 each.
610-939-0194
CEMETERY
PLOTS
(2) Available.
St. Mary’s
Cemetery. Near
front gate on N.
Main St. Call for
details at
(570) 328-7370
OAKLAWN CEMETERY
4 grave sites,
fabulous location.
Purchased 20 years
ago. $2,450
610-838-7727
726 Clothing
BOY’S CLOTHES
sizes M/L, all like
new 25 items for
$30. Boy’s sizes
L/XL polos, shorts,
shirts, sweatshirts,
25 items $30. Bare-
ly worn, some still
have tags 237-1583
JACKET: boys gen-
uine Italian stone
leather jacket, size
14. $25. 868-6018
PROM GOWNS,
excellent condition,
(3) available, sizes
4, 8, & 10. Colors
watermelon $75.,
black $50. & seam-
foam green $75.
Worn only once. Call
570-239-6011
730 Computer
Equipment &
Software
DESK. Computer
Desk $50. Call 735-
8730 or 332-8094
LAPTOP: Dell d610
refurbished:w7sp1,o
fc10,antivirus+more.
p4mc.6,60gb,dvdr
wifi, new battery &
bag. warranty $225.
Dell d600 laptop
refurb: w7sp1
,ofc10, antivirus +
more. p4mc 1.6,40
gb, cdrw+dvd, wifi,
new battery & bag,
warranty $200. HP
d530 small desk
top/monitor/key-
board/mouse=sys-
tem. refurb:w7 sp1,
ofc10,antivirus+mor
e.p4 2.6,80gb, cdrw
+ dvd, warranty/
complete system
$150.570-862-2236
TABLET: Coby tablet
PC with touch-
screen and android
OS. New! $99. Eric
609-433-5660 (in
Wilkes-Barre)
609-433-5660
732 Exercise
Equipment
WEIGHT BENCH,
curling bar, weights.
can deliver. $12.
570-855-2568
742 Furnaces &
Heaters
HEATER. Propane
gas, with 30’ cop-
per tubing. $100 or
best offer.
570-287-9946
742 Furnaces &
Heaters
HEATERS (4)
kerosene, all serv-
iced & working. $30
each, call Monday -
Thursday after 6 pm
570-288-6214
744 Furniture &
Accessories
BAR STOOLS for
counter/island, sad-
dle seat, walnut
wood, 24” like new
$40 set of three.
570-696-4494
BED twin complete
with rails $50.
570-675-2879
BEDROOM SET-
dresser with mirror,
highboy dresser,
nightstand & regular
size bed. $250.
570-287-0563
CEDAR CHEST
Antique with hand
painted flowers on
front, footed base &
beautiful carved
trim, leg needs
minor repair. $100.
Recliner $40. Bed-
room set, circa 1926
inlaid wood, bed,
dresser & armoire,
$125. Antique wash
stand, carved &
stenciled decora-
tions, $110. call
570-881-5143
CHINA CABINET
tan/white marble
finish, god Condi-
tion $60. Television
Stand 2 glass
shelves & bottom
shelf wood, excel-
lent condition $75.
Motion mirror with
sound Tropical
Scenery .$25.
570-855-5737
COFFEE TABLE -
Solid oak, 53 1/4” X
24” with 3 glass top
inserts. Excellent
condition, $50.
570-288-3723
COUCH, love seat,
& pillows, off white
with green & red
flowers, very good
condition. S shaped
coffee table (Mother
of Pearl) $200. for
all. 570-287-3716
CURIO CABINET
Solid oak, three
glass shelves & two
lights for display
$200. Bridal Pre-
cious Moment knick
knacks $5 to $35,
Hunter green couch
reclines on both
sides, drawer in
center bottom and
hidden pull out table
with cup holders
$150. Vera Bradley
retired pattern
purse $20. Vera
Bradley retired pat-
tern wallet $10,
Dooney and Burke
black purse $10.
call 570-704-8117
DESK, drop down
top 3 drawers,
pecan finish, 36x 44
x15” excellent con-
dition. $95.
570-287-2517
DRESSER: 3 drawer,
top drawer needs
repair $20. Larger
corner computer
desk, light oak &
gray $75.
570-868-6018
GAZEBO brand new
10’x12’ $400 new.
Sturdy steel con-
struction, net &
fence panels includ-
ed $225.
570-474-5643
GRANDFATHER
CLOCK, cherry,
carved top, beautiful
83”hx22’w, new,
never used $375.
570-457-7854
HUTCH, Oak, lights,
glass shelves, great
condition $250. Oak
Table, six chairs,
good condition
$150. Oak side-
board, great condi-
tion $250.
570-829-4025
LAMP - Parlor stand
up lamp. Very good
condition. Grey
metal color. $25.
570-740-1246
LIGHT BASKETBALL
SWAG rim net, glass
globe is red white
blue $45. Lamp
tiffany floor 69” tall
shade is 5” high 14”
across lamp shines
towards ceiling $60.
Empress fiber bed
cover queen size in
original package
$50. Syroco 2 piece
wall planter with silk
flowers $45. Canis-
ter set 4 pieces
stainless steel by
Revere Wear, excel-
lent condition $50.
570-288-5628
LIVING ROOM Sofa
and Loveseat.
Leather. Light beige,
great condition
$350. 823-9551
LOVESEAT &
OTTOMAN solid
sand colored cush-
ioned, excellent
shape $200.
SOFA: 100% Italian
black leather sofa &
loveseat, very good
condition $550.
570/824-7807 or
570-545-7006
AFFORDABLE
MATTRESS SALE
We Beat All
Competitors Prices!
Mattress Guy
Twin sets: $149
Full sets: $169
Queen sets: $189
All New
American Made
570-288-1898
OUTDOOR PATIO
SET green & white
in color. Great
shape, needs
umbrella. $200
(570) 824-1180
PATIO FURNITURE.
5 piece, umbrella
and cushions.
Round table, excel-
lent condition, $200.
TABLE plus 4 plastic
chairs and umbrella,
$50. Good condi-
tion. 570-474-5188
ROCKER - mauve
swivel/rocker.
Excellent condition.
$30. 570-287-1913
744 Furniture &
Accessories
PICTURE: giant
Southwest $75.
Wooden Teepee
shelf stand $75.
Area rug, olive
green with leaf
imprint, approxi-
mate 5x7 $40.
570-239-5292
SLEEPER SOFA 84”
sage green leather
in good condition,
bed is full size and
comes with foam
mattress pad. Ask-
ing $125 or best
offer. 570-388-4095
SOFA antique
provincial sofa with
matching Mr. & Mrs.
chairs, 2 oak end
tables, matching
coffee table, 2
brass lamps, great
condition $900. cell
570-436-7657 or
570-929-2645
eves, McAdoo
SOFA TABLE 48” all
wood sofa table,
medium shade,
$45. 570-868-5275
SOLID OAK DINING
TABLE 42X58 WITH
4-12 INCH LEAVES
AND 4 OAK CHAIRS.
BEAUTIFUL. A MUST
SEE. $500.00
(570)655-0286
STUFFED CHAIR
with matching
ottoman, excellent
condition $75.
570-954-3650
752 Landscaping &
Gardening
1st Choice
Landscaping
See our ad in the
Call an Expert sec-
tion under Category
1165 - Lawn Care
AZALEAS Mature 3,
3 Rhododendrons, 1
Holly, pavers, all for
$50. FREE DARK
FILL 3 tons, you
haul, Plains.
570-826-0079
BITTO
LANDSCAPING &
LAWN SERVICE
See Our Ad In The
Call An Expert
Section 1162
Brizzy’s
Arbor Care &
Landscaping
See our ad under
1162 Landscaping &
Gardening
Bruce’s
Lawn Service
See our ad under
Call An Expert
1165 Lawn Care
COUNTRY GENTLEMAN
TOTAL YARD CARE
See our ad under
Call An Expert
1162 Landscaping
& Gardening
DONE-RIGHT
Pressure Washing
see our ad under
Call An Expert
1234 Pressure
Washing
Keller’s Lawn Care
See our ad under
Call An Expert
1162 Landscape &
Garden
LAWN & SHRUB
MAINTENANCE.
See our ad under
1165 Lawn Care in
Call an Expert.
Lawn Maintenance
See our ad under
Call An Expert
1165 Lawn Care
LAWNMOWER
Craftsman /Honda
motor includes bag
not self propelled,
new blade runs
good $150. after
3pm 655-3197
NEED YOUR
LAWN CUT
OR TRIMMED?
See the ad for
Cole’s Lawn Care
Call An Expert
Section 1165
Patrick & Deb’s
Lawn Care
See our ad under
Call An Expert
1162 Landscape &
Garden
Peter’s Lawncare
See our ad under
Call an Expert
1165 Lawn Care
RAKE, PICK, and
SQUARE SHOVEL .
All 3 for $ 20.
Call 570-735-2081
Spike & Gorilla’s
Lawn Care & Out-
door Maintenance
See our ad under
Call An Expert
1162 Landscaping &
Gardening
TRIMMER/EDGER
Torro electric, 10”
cut, new in box
$20. 825-9744
YARDVARK wood
chipper 3hp Briggs
engine, no spark
otherwise good $75
firm after 3pm 570-
655-3197.
754 Machinery &
Equipment
HAULMARK ‘07 TRAIL-
ER 6’X14’
Like new with
electric brakes,
new tires and
reinforced tongue.
$2700.
570-239-5457
756 Medical
Equipment
WHEELCHAIR,
electric Nutron 350
watts.black, has 2
batteries, & charg-
er. $500. 654-1578
758 Miscellaneous
BARREL,
wooden.
53 gallon.
Excellent
condition $195.
570-876-3830
758 Miscellaneous
AB-DOER brand
new, in box never
opened $149.99
value will sacrifice
for $70. Lexmark
232 color ink jet
printer new in the
box $20. 1200 dpi
premium photo
quality also sharp
surround sound
speakers set for a
sharp boombox 5
speakers in all $20.
DVD/VCR combo
Sharp with hook ups
works great $40.
5000 air conditioner
energy saver works
great $40. in the
Ashley/Wilkes-Barre
Area Ask For Jamie
570-822-8957
BATHROOM SINK
SET: Gerber white
porcelain bathroom
sink with mirror and
medicine cabinet.
Matching set. $80.
570-331-8183
BEDLINER: 89
Chevy S10, standard
cab $30. 2000
Chevy Cavalier LS
rear trunk spoiler,
black $10. Four
barrel carb running
from Chevy motor
$50. 3 suitcases in
excellent shape
$40. 570-740-1246
BOOKS: (2) World
War II Veterans :
Tom Brokaw’s “The
Greatest Genera-
tion” stories of
World War II heroes
390 pages pub-
lished 1998. Both
books in good con-
dition. $10. each
Call Jim A WWII vet-
eran at 655-9474.
BUMPER rear 97-04
Ford full size pickup
with brackets $100
after 3pm 655-3197
CANES &WALKING
STICKS for hiking &
walking. $4 each.
Christmas manger,
handmade, wooden
includes 15 nativity
figurines, must see,
great deal 15.
Christmas Decora-
tions, over 200
items, old fashioned
Christmas figurines,
under the tree
items, Christmas
lights and window
displays, Christmas
vases & flowers.
$65. Toast Master
Snackster snack &
sandwich maker
and Toastmaster
reversible broiler
oven both for $ 15.
call 570-735-2081
CANISTER SET 4
piece, burgundy, $8.
Hamilton Beach can
opener, used less
than 1 year $8. Vac-
uum bags, Elec-
trolux upright, 4 ply,
style C (generic) 10
count $10. Elec-
trolux upright 4 ply
style U, 8 count $10
and style U (gener-
ic) 10 count $10.
570-868-6018
COKE COOLER for
sale. 36” H, 25” W,
18” D. Very good
condition. from
1940”s - 1950’s.
gas station model
with Westinghouse
compressor. Asking
$350. or best offer,
must sell. Jake
570-829-7859
DRAPES 2 pair sin-
gle width gold &
hooks $5. Maxi-
mum long pads, box
of 42. $10.50.
570-474-5653
ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER Sauder for
27” TV, glass door
with 3 shelves and 2
drawers on one side
and 2 doors under
section for TV.
Woodtone finish.
$40. Maple kitchen
table with drop
down leafs and 2
captain chairs $40.
CALL: 829-4776
HARLEY inspection
cover fits 85-96
$20. harley c to r
console door cover
pak fits 92 or later
$20. harley l to r
mirror, short stem,
left, fits all 65 and
later models, new
$25. 570-735-1589
SEWI NG FABRI CS
Lots of Them
WALLPAPER
1,000’s of patterns
WALLPAPER & BLIND
WAREHOUSE
30 Forrest St.,
Wilkes-Barre, PA
570-970-6683
SEWING MACHINE.
Singer is in a sewing
machine table with
stool. $200.
570-654-1578
SHAMPOOER: Big
Green canister
power brush deep
cleaner/hot water
extracted system
$50. 570-288-3723
TOASTER OVEN
Hamilton Beach,
excellent condition.
$10. 570-288-1063
TURKEY FRYER all-
in-one gas & char-
coal single burner
smoker grill & turkey
fryer, propane tank!
Like new over $300
invested. take all for
$165. Cash or pay-
pal. 570-735-2661
VACUUM CLEANER,
Fantom Fury, dual-
cyclonic cleaning
system, no bags
needed, attach-
ments inc. optional
hose extension,
HEPA filter, owner’s
manual, excellent
condition, $84. Call
(570) 709-3146 any-
time in Laflin
WHEELS & TIRES
from ‘98 Jeep
Cherokee 15” alu-
minum with silver
comes with tires
225/75r/15. 2
wheels with 1 new
tire & 1 needs to be
replaced. Wheels
are in excellent con-
dition. $100.
570-287-5045
760 Monuments &
Lots
GRAVE LOT
Near baby land at
Memorial Shine in
Carverton.
$400. Call
570-287-6327
762 Musical
Instruments
GUITAR a Fender
Stratocastor, apple
red color with case,
new, sacrifice price.
$200. 570-371-8581
HALF STACK!
Peavey valve king
100 watt tube
head/Laney 320
watt cabinet/rack
gear including Fur-
man power condi-
tioner, Alesis micro
verb 4 and 2 others.
Will sell individually.
$850. 362-2568
HARMONICA Hohn-
er with button. $50,
or best offer
570-287-9946
PIANO - Baldwin C
just tuned, excel-
lent, Delivered
$550. or best offer.
Call 570-474-6362
766 Office
Equipment
FAX MACHINE HP
640 LIKE NEW $40.
570-288-3401
OFFICE EQUIPMENT
Canon Image class
MF5500 combina-
tion copier & fax
machine with new
toner cartridge.
Good condition
$100. 570-735-0191
772 Pools & Spas
SAND FILTER for 24’
above ground pool
$50. 1.5HP pool
pump/motor $50.
Aqua Bug automatic
pool cleaner $25.
Safety pool ladder
for 4’ above ground
pool $25. Solar
cover for 24’ round
pool $25.675-0630
774 Restaurant
Equipment
BEVERAGE
COOLER, for restau-
rant use, with dou-
ble swing door, Ask-
ing $1,500 or best
offer. Call
(570) 459-6017
RESTAURANT
EQUIPMENT,
8x12 walk in
cooler $2300;
8x8x10 walk
in freezer $3800;
Pizza oven with
stones $2000;
Stainless steel
kitchen hood
$3000; Stainless
steel pizza oven
hood $4000;
bread pan rack
$100; 2 soup
warmers for $100;
2 door sandwich
prep table $500.
All equipment is
sold as is. For
more info, call
570-847-0873
RESTAURANT
EQUIPMENT,
Somerset Dough
Sheeter, Model
CAR-100. Only
1 available. $1,500
Call for more info
570-498-3616
RESTAURANT
EQUIPMENT,
SOMERSET TURN
OVER MACHINE -
model SPM45,
$500; ALSO, Bunn
Pour Over Coffee
Machine, Model #
STF15, $225
For more info, call
570-498-3616
RESTAURANT
EQUIPMENT,
AMERICAN EAGLE
MIXER, 20 quart
mixer, Model
AE-20, with timer
and guard, $1300.
ALSO, Bev Air 2
door refrigerator/
sandwich prep
table, Model
SP48-12, $1300.
Call 570-498-3616
for more details.
776 Sporting Goods
BASKETBALL
HOOP: Lifetime
Quick Court II
adjustable basket-
ball hoop, sand
filled, great condi-
tion. $100.
570-825-5353
CASH
CASH
FOR
ANTIQUE GUNS
Old Shot Guns
Rifles, Swords
& Daggers,
Military Items
Vintage Scopes
Old Toys &
Coins
PRIVATE COLLECTOR.
570-417-9200
776 Sporting Goods
GOLF CLUBS
Ladies only, great
condition, black
bag, like new. $75.
570-823-9551
PING PONG TABLE
asking $50. Yale
Gun Safe, fireproof,
14x17.5 $100.
570-825-5847
POOL TABLE
American Heritage
7’ oak & slate pock-
et table with blue
cloth, includes cwall
rack, 4 cues & brdi-
ge. Excellent codni-
tion, buyer must
move $999.
570-474-2206
TENT Pop-up cloth
paintball bunker/
tent, never used,
$20. Huffy Micro
bike, blue, $30. Dis-
ney proncess tricy-
cle with adult push
handle $25. WWE
championship toy
belts $10 each. Little
Tykes girls vanity
$25. Children’s
shopping cart $10.
Childrens Dirt devil
battery operated
vacuum $10. Small
lego set $5.
570-239-5292
778 Stereos/
Accessories
SPEAKERS one pair
of two way floor or
bookshelf speakers,
good condition in
original boxes. Can
be seen in down-
town Wilkes-Barre
$15. 607-565-1726
STEREO: Technics
with 2 3 1/2” speak-
ers $50. 239-5292
780 Televisions/
Accessories
TELEVISION: GE.
28” works good,
needs remote $90.
570-740-1246
TELEVISIONS: Con-
soles with remotes,
24” RCA color,
stereo sound,
works great $100.
Magnavox 24”
color, in original box
8 years, rarely used
$50. 570-826-0079
784 Tools
TOOL BOX new for a
full size pickup
truck, new diamond
plate 70” l x 20” w x
17” deep crossover
new in box, toolbox
with sliding tray.
location West
Pittston. $125.
570- 299-7073
786 Toys & Games
BICYCLE, Woman’s
Schwinn Collegiate
3, 26”, new tires.
$75. 570-654-2657
DVD’S Harry Potter
(1st four movies) all
$30. WWE wrestling
figurines & acces-
sories 20 for $35.
Tech Decks ramp &
skateboards (15) all
for $25.
570-237-1583
GAME TABLE 10 IN 1
approximate 3 X 5 -
$50. 868-6018
GAMES Are You
Smarter Than A Fifth
Grader new, sealed
$12. Little Tykes
snacks & snow
cones cart, working
cone maker, bever-
age dispenser,
snack/vending
tubes, play cash
register, scale, cut-
ting boards, used
2x $40. cash or
paypal. 735-2661.
794 Video Game
Systems/Games
GUITAR ONLY for
Guitar Hero III X-Box
360 & Playstation 2,
used almost new
$20. 570-868-6018
PS2 GAMES: Call Of
Duty 3 Special Edi-
tion $12. Call Of Duty
World At War Final
Fronts $15. Guitar
Hero $10. Hitman 2
$10. Dance Dance
Revolution Extreme
2 $12. Tekken Tag
Tournament (some
scratches works
fine) $5.
PLAYSTATION
GAMES: Spongebob
Squarepants Super-
sponge $10. Tony
Hawks Pro Skater
(some scratches
works fine) $5.
Crash Bandicoot 2
Cortex Strikes Back
(some scratches
works fine) $5.
PC GAMES: Hells
Kitchen (Windows
Vista, XP or MAC)
$15. Excellent Con-
dition unless noted.
Cash or PayPal.
Take $85 for all.
570-735-2661
XBOX 360 holiday
bundle. new! 250gb
slim system. $229
Eric 609-433-5660
(in Wilkes Barre)
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
Mr. Baseball, buying
all sports cards and
memorabilia.
203-557-0856
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com MONDAY, APRIL 25, 2011 PAGE 11D
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
412 Autos for Sale
412 Autos for Sale
EXIT 170B OFF I-81 TO EXIT 1. BEAR RIGHT ON BUSINESS ROUTE 309 TO SIXTH LIGHT. JUST BELOW WYOMING VALLEY MALL.
V is it U s 2 4 /7
w w w . va lleychevr o let. co m
SPRING TRAD E SPRING TRAD E
ASSISTANC E ASSISTANC E
HURRY!...
LIM ITED TIM E INCENTIVE
April20
th
-M ay 2
nd
Yourtrade can getyou an
additionalup to
$
1,500 OFF
yournew lease orpurchase!
Ifyourtrade is 2004 ornewerGM
vehicle...Chevy,GM C,Buick,
Pontiac,Hum m er,Saturn,Cadillac,
you can getan ADDITIONAL REBATE
towards yourpurchase orlease!
Spring Trade Assistance rebate – applies to in-stock inventory only. Must trade in a General Motors 2004 or newer vehicle to
be eligible for Valley Chevrolet incentive. Cars $1000 trade assistance; trucks, SUVs $1500 trade assistance. Certain
restrictions apply. Prior sales excluded. Must take delivery by May 2, 2011. †First year GM maintenance is included with
purchase/lease price of vehicle. Combined offer.
K E N W A L L A CE ’S
V A L L E Y CHE V ROL E T
601 K IDDE R S TRE E T, W IL K E S -BA RRE , P A
821-2772 •1-800-444-7172
Mon.-Thurs. 8:30-8:00pm; Fri. 8:30-7:00pm; Sat. 8:30-5:00pm
ATTENTIO N!
ATTENTIO N! ATTENTIO N!
All N ew Vehicle
Lea se orP urcha ses
Includes
F irstY ea r
G M
M a intena nce

SERVICE HOURS
Saturday
8 am -12 noon
M on.-Thurs.
8 am -6:30 pm
821-2778
2
8
4
1
2
3
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
The Vi deo
Game St or e
28 S. Main W.B.
Open Mon- Sat,
12pm – 6pm
570-822-9929 /
570-941-9908
$$ CASH PAID $$
VI DE O GAME S
& S YS TE MS
Highest $$ Paid
Guaranteed
Buying all video
games &
systems. PS1 & 2,
Xbox, Nintendo,
Atari, Coleco,
Sega, Mattel,
Gameboy,
Vectrex etc.
DVD’s, VHS & CDs
& Pre 90’s toys,
The Video
Game Store
1150 S. Main
Scranton
Mon - Sat,
12pm – 6pm
570-822-9929
VITO’S
&
GINO’S
Wanted:
Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Highest
Prices
Paid!!
FREE
PICKUP
288-8995
800
PETS & ANIMALS
810 Cats
CATS & KI TTENS
12 weeks & up.
Shots, neutered,
VALLEY CAT RESCUE
824-4172, 9-9 only.
810 Cats
CAT: Blue a 6 year
old cat, free to good
home. My allergies
have gotten worse
& I can no longer
give him the affec-
tion & attention he
needs. Blue is strict-
ly an indoor cat & is
declawed (front
paws only), &
neutered.
570-878-7327
815 Dogs
PAWS
TO CONSIDER....
ENHANCE
YOUR PET
CLASSIFIED
AD ONLINE
Call 829-7130
Place your pet ad
and provide us your
email address
This will create a
seller account
online and login
information will be
emailed to you from
gadzoo.com
“The World of Pets
Unleashed”
You can then use
your account to
enhance your online
ad. Post up to 6
captioned photos
of your pet
Expand your text to
include more
information, include
your contact
information such
as e-mail, address
phone number and
or website.
PAWS
TO CONSIDER....
ENHANCE
YOUR PET
CLASSIFIED
AD ONLINE
Call 829-7130
Place your pet ad
and provide us your
email address
This will create a
seller account
online and login
information will be
emailed to you from
gadzoo.com
“The World of Pets
Unleashed”
You can then use
your account to
enhance your online
ad. Post up to 6
captioned photos
of your pet
Expand your text to
include more
information, include
your contact
information such
as e-mail, address
phone number and
or website.
ALASKAN MALAMUTE
AKC Registered
Available May 24.
Rare breeding &
hand whelped.
4 males &
4 females: Seals,
Sables & Whites.
$600
570-510-6428
ALASKAN
MALAMUTE PUPPIES
AKC RARE Red &
white, 2 females,
shots & wormed,
$450 each. Call
570-477-3398
COCKER SPANIEL
PUPPY FOR SALE
3 months old, with
papers. All shots &
records. Crate
trained. Comes with
crate & all supplies.
$1,000 or best offer
(570) 212-2335
COCKER SPANIEL PUPS
2 male black & tan.
1 female chocolate.
$300 each. Parents
on premises
570-760-2036 or
570-371-6222
GERMAN SHEPHERD
PUPPIES, AKC
Shepherds By Fanti
25 Yrs. Experience
Family Raised
Black/Tan,
Black/Red. M/F
Hasenborn-Arminus
570-825-5597
570-239-5498
GOLDEN RETRIEVER
& LAB PUPPIES
Yellow $350. Black
$250. Wormed.
570-836-1090
PIT BULL PUPPIES
Ready now.
6 weeks old.
2 males, 3 females.
$300 & Up
570-817-4713
PAGE 12D MONDAY, APRIL 25, 2011 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
815 Dogs
ITALIAN CANE CORSO
Mastiff Puppies
ICCF Registered.
Parents on premis-
es. Blue & blue
fawn. Ready May 1.
Vet Checked
570-617-4880
POMERANIAN PUPPIES
Parents on premises
Shots Current. $500.
570-401-1838
POMERANIANS
Easter Special
AKC, 9-14 weeks,
All Shots &
wormed. Vet
checked. $275
to $400 each.
570-864-2643
PUPPIES
Chihuahuas, Poms,
Huskies, Poo Mixes,
Shih Tzus, Morkies,
Maltese, Toy Fox,
Puggles, Cocker,
Labs & more!
570-453-6900 or
570-764-2578
SHIH-POO PUPS
7 weeks old, $400.
Includes 1st set of
shot. Please
contact me at
(570) 332-6303
900
REAL ESTATE
FOR SALE
906 Homes for Sale
Having trouble
paying your mort-
gage? Falling
behind on your
payments? You
may get mail from
people who promise
to forestall your
foreclosure for a fee
in advance. Report
them to the Federal
Trade Commission,
the nation’s con-
sumer protection
agency. Call 1-877-
FTC-HELP or click
on ftc.gov. A mes-
sage from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
Having trouble
paying your mort-
gage? Falling
behind on your
payments? You
may get mail from
people who promise
to forestall your
foreclosure for a fee
in advance. Report
them to the Federal
Trade Commission,
the nation’s con-
sumer protection
agency. Call 1-877-
FTC-HELP or click
on ftc.gov. A mes-
sage from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
PLAINS
433 N. Main St,
REDUCED! Large
home in advanced
stage of remodel
ready for drywall
and your choice of
extras to be
installed. Studded
out for vaulted
master suite with 2
closets,separate
tub/shower and 2
more bedrooms,
even an upstairs
laundry planned!
Large foyer &
kitchen, formal Din-
ing Room. Ready
for new furnace/
water heater. Can
lights, outlets
already placed!
Large lot with room
for garage/deck/
pool. MLS# 10-4611
$99,900
Call Amy Lowthert
at (570)406-7815
COLDWELL BANKER
RUNDLE REAL ESTATE
WILKES-BARRE
89 Simpson St.,
This well kept 3
bedroom, 1.5 bath
home offers an
open living room/
dining room floor
plan. Master bed-
room with its own
office area. Plenty
of closets in addi-
tion to the walk-up
attic for storage!
Off-street parking,
large deck over-
looking the fenced
rear yard. Just
move right in!
$83,900
Jill Jones 696-6550
ASHLEY
16 Hazleton St
Conveniently
located to Rt. 309
and 81. Off street
parking in front and
rear. Two-story, 3
bedroom, modern
kitchen, Pergo
flooring in living
room and dining
room, modern bath,
low gas utility bills.
MLS#10-3703 .
Price reduced to
$68,500.
Call Maribeth Jones
at 696-6565
906 Homes for Sale
ASHLEY
29 Brown St.
Solid 2 story home
with 3 bedrooms,
1.5 baths, vinyl
sided, large carport
and fenced yard.
Convenient loca-
tion. Home needs
updating by
great potential.
$79,900
MLS 11-74
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
AVOCA
1206 Spring St.
Totally remodeled 2
bedroom home with
fabulous kitchen, 2
car garage,
inground heated
pool and 4 person
hot tub. Finished
basement could be
a 3rd bedroom.
Duryea Borough.
MLS #11-576
$145,900
Call Charlie
VM 101
570-829-6200
AVOCA
REDUCED!
314 Packer St.
Newly remodeled 3
bedroom home with
1st floor master, 1.5
baths, detached
garage, all new sid-
ing , windows, shin-
gles, water heater,
kitchen and bath-
rooms. A must
see house!
$109,900
MLS 11-73
Call Tom
570-262-7716
BEAR CREEK
2360 Laurel Run Rd.
Very well main-
tained Log home
and serene proper-
ty awaits you. This
home features 3
bedrooms, including
a very spacious
22x12 master bed-
room. Open floor
plan allows for
great entertaining.
Stone fireplace in
keeping with the
rustic theme. Full
walk-out basement
gives the potential
for more living
space. 17x15 deck
overlooks the
woods. $219,000
MLS #10-2433
Call Tracy Zarola
570-574-6465
570-696-0723
LEWITH & FREEMAN
BEAR CREEK
2992 Laurel Run Rd.
Absolutely stunning
jewel snuggled on 1
acre lot bordering
state game lands.
Rec room can be
re-converted to
garage. This stylish
4 bedroom modern
home can be heat-
ed for only $700 a
year! Entertain or
relax in our 600 sq
ft + family room fea-
turing a coal stove,
built in aquarium
and full wet bar!
State of the art
alarm system. Enjoy
serenity on the
patio or the 10x17
deck and only min-
utes from town
MLS #11-555
$189,900
Sandy Rovinski
Call 288-0770
Ext. 25
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
BENTON
Contemporary style
home in need of
some TLC. 3 bed-
rooms, 2 baths,
kitchen, dining
room, living room
with fireplace, foyer,
laundry room, full
basement & 2 car
attached garage on
9+ mostly cleared
& flat acres.
$180,000
MLS# 10-4750
Five Mountains
Realty
570-542-2141
906 Homes for Sale
BLAKESLEE
37 Chestnut Road
(Old Farm Estates)
Custom built solid
brick 4 bedroom,
3.5 baths Colonial
style home with an
open floor plan on
1+ acre lot in the
Poconos. A few of
the amenities
include central A/C.
2 Master bedrooms
each with bath
room and fireplace,
ultramodern
kitchen, hardwood
floors throughout,
cathedral ceiling
and 2 car garage.
MLS #11-653
$469,900
Call Kim
570-466-3338
DALLAS
(Newberry Estate)
3 bedroom, 2 bath
first floor condo
offers a spectacular
golf course view!
Central a/c. Fire-
place. Huge closets.
3 patios. Garage.
Pool, tennis, golf.
Many extras.
$149,900
Ask for Bob Kopec
Humford Realty
570-822-5126
DALLAS
NEW LISTING!
Desirable
upscale Dallas
neighborhood.
Attention to detail
at every turn in this
5000+SF home on
three floors.
Oversized cherry
kitchen with granite
island and upgrad-
ed appliances. Tray
ceiling, crown and
panel moldings,
family room with
vaulted ceiling and
gas fireplace. First
floor den/library, 5
bedrooms, 5 baths,
finished lower level,
1 year new 20x42
Oasis in-ground
pool, 3-car garage
on a 1+/- acre lot.
MLS#11-1067
$619,900.
Call Maribeth Jones
696-6565
DALLAS
119 Midland Drive
Custom Built Ranch
Home -The ranch
home is IN
DEMAND! This one
offers everything
you are looking for!
Plenty of space for
in-law quarters, 4
bedrooms, cherry
kitchen, sunroom,
recreation room
with 12 seat oak
bar. This home
includes an
attached 2 car
garage plus a
detached custom
garage that can fit
up to 12 cars or
boat storage, only 5
miles to beautiful
Harveys Lake - 1 yr
Home Warranty.
All this on 4 ACRES
of serenity in the
heart of Dallas
$419,000
MLS #11-155
Call Tracy Zarola
570-574-6465
570-696-0723
LEWITH & FREEMAN
Need to rent that
Vacation property?
Place an ad and
get started!
570-829-7130
DALLAS
152 Pine Drive
Bright & Open floor
plan - 4 year old
two story home set
on 2.26 private
ares - Fabulous
modern kitchen
with stainless steel
appliances. 4 bed-
rooms, 2.5 baths.
Detailed moldings &
hardwood floors.
Walk out basement
$345,000
MLS# 11-901
Call Geri
570-696-0888
570-696-3801
LEWITH & FREEMAN
DURYEA
Blueberry Hill.
3 bedroom ranch.
Large lot with pool.
Lease To Buy. For
more details, call
(570) 655-8118
906 Homes for Sale
DALLAS
17 Roosevelt Street
Wonderful country
cottage style
features elegant
decor. Living room
& dining room with
hardwoods, Modern
cook's kitchen with
pleasant breakfast
area, 2 story family
room with fireplace,
1st Floor office, 4
bedrooms, 2 full
and 2 half baths.
Master bedroom
with walk in closet,
whirlpool, double
vanities. Finished
lower level family
room. Gas heat,
central a/c.
$369,900
MLS# 11-164
Call Cathy
(570) 696-5422
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-696-1195
DALLAS
A MUST SEE!
Home features:
4 bedrooms, 2
baths, living room,
dining room with
cathedral ceilings,
kitchen with custom
hickory cabinets &
commercial range,
oversized 2 car
garage.
$389,900
Contact Judy Rice
570-714-9230
MLS# 11-1221
DALLAS AREA
Conveniently
located just off
Dallas Highway on
1.25 wooded acres.
Currently duplex or
convert to single,
good condition.
$117,500.
Negotiable
570-287-5775
or 570-332-1048
DALLAS
Estate like 6.35
acre setting in
Northwoods. 5,000
sq. ft. in all. Classic
brick home features
Summit Pointe
Builders attention
to detail at every
turn. 2 story family
room with accent
windows & fire
place, modern
maple kitchen with
cherry finish, den
with Oak built-ins,
impressive oak
entry. Elegant
master with
whirlpool overlook-
ing wooded lot.
Formal living room,
4 bedrooms, 5
baths. 4 car garage
& 2,500 sq. ft.
barn/shop for car
enthusiasts or
other use.
$650,000
Call Kevin
570-696-1195 or
570-696-5420
SMITH HOURIGAN GROUP
DALLAS
New construction
on 1 acre lot.
2500 sq. ft.
2 story, 4 or 5
bedrooms, 2.5
bath, Great room
with cathedral
ceiling, fire place,
dual zone gas heat
& central air,
2 car garage,
REDUCED Now!!
NOW $284,900.
Call 570-675-4805
DALLAS
Nice 2 bedroom
ranch in Great
Neighborhood!
Large Living Room,
sunny eat-in kitchen
& oversized bath.
Perfect place to
start out or down-
size to.
$62,900
MLS# 10-4624
Five Mountains
Realty
570-542-2141
FORTY FORT
65 West
Pettebone St.
Beautiful remod-
eled home in nice
neighborhood. 4
bed, 3 bath, new
carpeting new
kitchen, stainless
appliances.
A must see.
PRICE REDUCED
$169,500
Leave Message
570-881-8493
906 Homes for Sale
DALLAS SCHOOL
DISTRICT
4 bedroom bi-level
with open floor plan.
Large eat-it kitchen,
2 baths & fantastic
great room all on 2
private acres. Ideal
Mot her/ daught er
home.
$219,900
MLS# 10-2022
Call Jeannie
Four Star
McCabeRealty
570-674-9950
DUPONT
REDUCED
NEW LISTING
6 Ivy Lane
Lovely 3 bedroom
Rancher with 2 full
baths, granite
kitchen counters,
walk-in closet in
Master
bedroom.Separate
shower in Master
bath. Laundry room
on main level and
much more!
MLS #10-3285
$249,000
Jay A. Crossin
570-288-0770
Ext. 23
Crossin Real
Estate
570-288-0770
DUPONT
Single family home
for sale in quiet
neighborhood-
Beautiful 2400 Sq.
Ft. 6 bedroom, 2
full baths, 2 story
home, fully air con-
ditioned, oil & gas
heat, renovated
kitchen, full unfin-
ished basement, 2
enclosed porches,
15 x 20 deck with
power awning
cover – generous
size lot, off street
parking, first floor
washer/dryer. All
appliances includ-
ed. Offering price
$180,000
Call 570-421-0587
or Rodite@enter.net
use “Dupont Home”
in E-mail subject
line.
DURYEA
MOVE IN CONDITION
Classic home, two
story, single family,
3 bedrooms, 2 bath-
rooms, single car
detached garage,
eat-in kitchen, din-
ing room, family
room, living room,
oil heat, unfinished
basement, 110x115,
a landscaped yard
with a front covered
porch and large
patios in the rear
$126,900. Call
(570) 840-4654
before 9:00 p.m. for
a private showing
or email mulch810
@yahoo.com.
EDWARDSVILLE
122-124 Short St.
Very nice double-
block in
Edwardsville on a
quiet street and out
of the flood zone.
Good income prop-
erty for an investor
or live in one side
and rent the other
to help pay the
mortgage! Make
your appointment
today!
MLS #11-438
$69,900
Mary Ellen Belchick
570-696-6566
EDWARDSVILLE
66 East Grove St.,
Time to purchase
your first home!
Why keep paying
rent, this ½ double
is a great starter
home! Nice size
rooms, eat-in
kitchen, 1st floor
laundry, attic pull
down for storage,
some replacement
windows & a
fenced in yard.
Take a look &
make your offer!
$27,800
MLS#10-3582
Jill Jones
570-696-6550
WILKES-BARRE
387-389 North
Hampton St.
Three Unit. Great
Location. Great
Income. Tenants
pay all utilities.
Good condition.
$95,000
Call (616) 379-1165
906 Homes for Sale
FALLS
REDUCED!
RR1, Box 297
MAJESTIC VIEW!
3 bedroom brick
Ranch home nes-
tled on approxi-
mately an acre of
well groomed river-
front land with
breathtaking scenic
views, cascading
tree lines and the
legendary cliffs of
Falls. Beautiful bird
and wildlife to daz-
zle the eye and
excellent fishing
and hunting for your
enjoyment. Living
room w/fireplace,
family room, full
heated basement,
riverfront deck,
central A/C and
much more. A one
of a a kind find.
Must see!
MLS #10-3751
$182,000
Call Debbie
McGuire
570-332-4413
Crossin Real
Estate
570-288-0770
FORTY FORT
Great starter home
in nice neighbor-
hood. 2 story, 2
bedroom, 1 bath.
Dining room, living
room, kitchen.
Large fenced yard.
Car port & detached
2 car garage.
$79,900
Call (570) 954-4074
or (570) 906-7614
FORTY FORT
NEW PRICE
1509 Wyoming Ave.
Freshly painted and
insulated, immacu-
late and sitting on
almost half an acre
this 3 bedroom 1.5
bath home can be
yours. Features
include a modern
kitchen, central
A/C. laundry room,
office and free
standing fireplace.
All appliances
included. Just move
right in! For more
details and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-604
$181,900
Call Kim
570-466-3338
FORTY FORT
REDUCED
25 Center St.
Affordable single
family 3 bedroom, 1
and 3/4 bath home
located in a nice
area of Forty Fort.
Ample size and
freshly painted
rooms, walk up
attic for storage,
rear deck, 2 car
detached garage to
name a few!
MLS 11-947
$69,900
Jay A. Crossin
570-0770
Ext. 23
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
Reduced!
Bi-Level. 1,750 sq ft.
3 bedrooms, 2
baths, 1 car garage.
New carpeting,
paint, etc. Large lot.
Asking $114,500.
Deremer Realty
570-477-1149
HANOVER TWP.
275 Phillips Street
Well kept 2
bedroom ranch with
new kitchen, fenced
yard, one car
garage.
$79,900
MLS #11-638
Call Tracy Zarola
570-574-6465
570-696-0723
LEWITH & FREEMAN
MOCANAQUA
2 bedroom, 1 bath
home across street
from the river with
detached 2 car
garage.
$59,900
MLS# 11-283
Five Mountains
Realty
570-542-2141
906 Homes for Sale
HANOVER TWP.
476 Wyoming St.
Nice 3 bedroom
single home. Gas
heat. COnvenient
location. To settle
estate. Affordable
@ $39,500
Call Jim for details
Towne & Country
Real Estate Co.
570-735-8932 or
570-542-5708
HANOVER TWP.
8 Diamond Ave.
Loads of space in
this modernized tra-
ditional home. 3rd
floor is a large bed-
room with walk-in
closet. Modern
kitchen, family room
addition, deck over-
looking large corner
lot. Not just a
starter home but a
home to stay
in and grow!
MLS #11-622
$127,900
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
HANOVER TWP.
94 Ferry Road
Nice vinyl sided 2
story situated on a
great corner fenced
lot in Hanover Twp.
2 bedrooms, 2
modern baths,
additional finished
space in basement
for 2 more bed-
rooms or
office/playrooms.
Attached 2 car
garage connected
by a 9x20 breeze-
way which could be
a great entertaining
area! Above ground
pool, gas fireplace,
gas heat, newer
roof and “All Dri”
system installed in
basement.
MLS #11-626
$119,900
Mark R. Mason
570-331-0982
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
Price Reduction!
Nice raised ranch in
quiet neighborhood.
Attached 3 car
garage; plenty of
off-street parking,
utility room with 3/4
bath. Walk up stairs
to eat-in kitchen
with balcony, hard-
wood floors, living
room, bedrooms
and full bath. Bright
3rd floor attic ready
to finish. Seller anx-
ious to sell. All
appliances and
Coldwell Banker
Home Protection
Plan included.
MLS # 10-2673
$99,900
Call Amy Lowthert
at (570)406-7815
COLDWELL BANKER
RUNDLE REAL ESTATE
HANOVER TWP.
Buttonwood
581-583
Plymouth St.
Perfect for owner
occupied. Well
maintained, bright &
spacious two family.
Each identical unit
has Approx. (1300
sq ft.) with 3 bed-
rooms, bath, large
living & dining
rooms & eat in
kitchen. Clean neu-
tral décor with wall
to wall carpet
throughout. Newer
roof & tilt-in win-
dows. Each side
has a full attic &
basement with
washer & dryer
hook-ups. Gas
heat. 581 side has a
private fenced rear
yard & was rented
for $695 Month &
now vacant . 583
side rents for $600
Month with a long
time tenant.
Separate utilities.
$98,750
MLS# 11-1293
973-476-1499
It's that time again!
Rent out your
apartment
with the Classifieds
570-829-7130
PLAINS
594 N. Main Street
Beautifully redone 3
bedroom, 2 bath
ranch. New roof,
carpeting, paint &
stainless appli-
ances. Gas heat,
central air, garage,
screened in back
porch. Large fenced
in back yard & more
$139,900. Call
570-706-5496
906 Homes for Sale
HANOVER TWP.
Single family home
located on a well
manicured fenced
corner lot. This
home provides
paved off street
parking & a single
car detached
garage. Entering
the front door
you’re greeted by
hardwood floors,
updated windows
& a pleasant floor
plan. Seller will
pay 3% towards
closing costs.
Call for appointment
$89,900
MLS# 10-4598
Call Vieve Zaroda
(570) 474-6307
Ext. 2772
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-474-6307
HANOVER TWP.
Two homes, front &
rear, on 1 lot. One
car garage, patio.
Front home has 3
bedrooms, huge
kitchen, lots of
storage and a
workshop in the
basement; Rear
home features new
kitchen, 2 bed-
rooms and good
storage space.
Call for appointment
$89,900
MLS# 10-4597
Call Vieve Zaroda
(570) 474-6307
Ext. 2772
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-474-6307
HARDING
310 Lockville Rd.
SERENITY
Enjoy the serenity
of country living in
this beautiful 2
story home on 2.23
acres surrounded
by nature the prop-
erty has it’s own
private driveway.
Great entertaining
inside & out! 3 car
garage plus 2 car
detached. A MUST
SEE! MLS#11-831
$279,900
call Nancy
570-237-0752
HARDING
PRICE REDUCED
679 Appletree Rd.
4 bedrooms,
2.5 bath home
nestled among the
trees on a very
private 1 acre, this
country retreat
has high quality,
modern updates
complemented with
original woodwork
& builtins. Maple
eat in kitchen
with all appliances
overlooks huge
family room with
floor-to-ceiling brick
fire place. Formal
dining room with
Pella sliders look
out to stone patio &
inground pool.
French doors lead
to Master bedroom
suite with walk-in
closet. Central air &
Hi efficient heat,
water supplied
spring house.
$185,000
MLS #10-3089
Call Steve Shemo
570-793-9449
HUNLOCK CREEK
75 Hunlock
Harveyville Road
Absolutely immacu-
late 2 story on pris-
tine lot in Hunlock
Creek. This home
needs nothing! New
windows, furnaces,
electric and more.
Modern kitchen and
2 new baths. Bonus
sunroom and den
(possible 1st floor
bedroom_ Beautiful
landscaping with-
pond, deck, pool
and detached 2 car
garage. Brand new
coal furnace added
for additional more
efficient heat. ADT
Security and Fire
system. A truly
move into home!
MLS 11-1159
$149,500
Mark R. Mason
570-331-0982
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
906 Homes for Sale
HARVEYS LAKE
Entertaining is a
“must” in this
waterfront com-
pound! Spacious
room sizes accom-
modate family and
friends in this five
bedroom, 3500SF
beauty. Old world
charm includes
living room with
knotty pine walls,
beamed ceilings
and a gas stone
fireplace Dining
room includes two
built-in corner
cupboards and
sitting area with
stone fireplace
Game room with
mahogany flooring,
Five bedrooms,
including fabulous
views of the lake in
the spacious mas-
ter and fifth bed-
room (presently an
office). Lush gar-
dens with perenni-
als and annuals. 84’
of lakefront with
two-story boat-
house! “Low taxes”.
MLS#11-1083
$850,000.
Call Maribeth Jones
570-696-6565
HUNLOCK CREEK
Main Road
Country Living
At It’s Best.
Well Maintained
farmhouse on 6+
acres. Garage,
stream. Easy
access to Route 11.
Affordable at
REDUCED TO
$159,500
Bonus To
Selling Office
Call Jim
Towne & Country
Real Estate Co.
570-735-8932 or
570-542-5708
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
HUNLOCK CREEK
New construction,
3 bedroom, 2 bath
tan brick ranch on
1 acre. Features
include pella
windows, oak hard-
wood floors, car-
peted bedrooms,
tiled kitchen &
baths, maple
kitchen cabinets,
hanstone counter-
tops, propane fire-
place, walk up attic,
tray ceiling in living
room & attached
2 car garage.
$279,900
MLS# 10-4527
Five Mountains
Realty
570-542-2141
JENKINS TWP
REDUCED!
1717 River Road
Compact 2 story
home with 3 bed-
rooms, 1st floor
bath with laundry,
large kitchen. Park-
ing in rear with
alley access.
$39,900
MLS 11-99
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
JENKINS TWP.
2 W Sunrise Dr.
Well maintained
bi-level continually
cared for by the
original owners.
Upgraded kitchen
with granite counter
tops and breakfast
bar. Four bedrooms
and two baths.
Large veranda over
the garage. Lower
level recreation
room with fireplace
and wet bar. 27’ x
10’ 3-season
room…. A great
place to entertain.
Motivated sellers!
Come and tour this
lovely home
in a great
neighborhood!
MLS#11-1031
$239,500
Mary Ellen Belchick
696-6566
PLAINS
Nicely maintained
home. 3 bed-
rooms, full bath
with shower, pri-
vate driveway with
1 car garage,
Appliances
included
$76,000
Call 570-655-9722
906 Homes for Sale
JENKINS TWP.
23 Mead St.
Newly remodeled 2
story on a corner
lot with fenced in
yard and 2 car
garage. 4 bed-
rooms, 1 bath,
1,660 sq. ft.
$89,900
MLS 10-3684
Call Bill
570-362-4158
JENKINS TWP.
250 Susquehan-
nock Drive
Immaculate Cape
Cod home features
1st floor master
suite with office and
3/4 bath. 2nd floor
has 2 large bed-
rooms with walk in
closets and adjoin-
ing bath. 1st floor
laundry and 1/2
bath, modern
kitchen with bam-
boo floors, living
room with stone
fireplace. 2 tier
deck overlooks
above ground pool,
ready for summer
fun! For more infor-
mation and photos,
please visit
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS #11-657
$299,000
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
JENKINS TWP./
INKERMAN
45 Main St.
Own this home for
less than $400 a
month! Large 3
bedroom home with
formal dining room,
off street parking
and large yard. For
more information
and photos, log
onto www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS#09-2449
$64,900
Call Charles
KINGSTON
163 Poplar St.
Nice 2 1/2 story
home with original
woodwork. Corner
lot in quiet neigh-
borhood. Roof 9
years old. Hard-
wood floors in good
condition. Ductless
AC and new 100
amp wiring
MLS #11-625
$89,000
Donald Crossin
570-288-0770
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
KINGSTON
290 Reynolds St.
Very roomy 2 story
on lovely street in
Kingston. 4 bed-
rooms, 3 baths,
wood burning fire-
place in living room.
Large eat-in kitchen
as well as formal
dining room. Freshly
painted, carpets
cleaned and numer-
ous updates makes
this move-in ready!
Call for your
private showing.
MLS #11-364
$159,900
Mary Ellen Belchick
570-696-6566
LARKSVILLE MOUNTAIN
NEW LISTING!
Stunning view of
the Wyoming Valley
architecturally built
on pristine 1 acre
lot…grape vines,
fruit trees, fish
pond, raised gar-
dens, contemporary
home with Great
room fireplace,
beamed ceilings,
hardwood flooring
and much more!
MLS#11-1079
$325,000.
Call Maribeth Jones
696-6565
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com MONDAY, APRIL 25, 2011 PAGE 13D
551 Other 551 Other 551 Other
906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale
2
8
1
0
0
6
Earn Extra Cash
For Just A Few
Hours A Day.
Deliver
To find a route near you and start
earning extra cash, call Rosemary at
570-829-7107
Laflin/Hudston
$920 Monthly Profit + Tips
225 daily papers / 240 Sunday papers
Chamberlain Street, Driftwood Drive, Hilldale Drive,
Jason Drive, Lombardo Drive
Duryea
$560 Monthly Profit + Tips
149 daily papers / 141 Sunday papers
Adams Street, Blackberry Lane, Cherry Street,
Columbia Street, Cranberry Terr., Evans Street
West Pittston
$760 Monthly Profit + Tips
183 daily papers / 186 Sunday papers
Exeter Ave., Ann Street, Clear Spring Ct.,
Ledgeview Drive, Susquehanna Ave., York Ave.
Dallas
$400 Monthly Profit + Tips
92 daily papers / 144 Sunday papers
Baldwin Avenue, E. Center Hill Road, Claude Street,
Midland Drive, Saginaw Street
Parsons
$965 Monthly Profit + Tips
194 daily papers / 222 Sunday papers
Wyoming Street, Auburn Street, West Chestnut Street,
East Elm Street, John Street
Available routes:
( No Col l ect i ons) ( N ( Noo Co Col l l l ec ect i t i on ons) s)
OFFICENTERS - Pierce St., Kingston
Professional Office Rentals
Full Service Leases • Custom Design • Renovations • Various Size Suites Available
Medical, Legal, Commercial • Utilities • Parking • Janitorial
Full Time Maintenance Staff Available
For Rental Information Call: 1-570-287-1161
548 Medical/Health 548 Medical/Health
EXPERIENCED
CAREGIVERS NEEDED
Visiting Angels is looking for skilled,compas-
sionate and reliable caregivers to
work in the homes of the elderly.
We offer competitive wages, training,
friendly and supportive staff.
Come Join Our Growing Team!
Must have a minimum of 2 years experience,
valid driver’s license. Certification a plus.
Immediate Openings in the
Dallas, Pittston area.
Why a career with Visiting Angels?
Because we care about our caregivers!
Call 570-270-6700 today!
Equal Opportunity Employer
548 Medical/Health 548 Medical/Health
Part Time 7-3 & 11-7
Accepting applications for
Per Diem RNs all shifts
Full Time 11-7 Part Time 3-11
Accepting applications for
Per Diem LPNs all shifts
Full Time 3-11 & 11-7
Part Time 7-3, 3-11 & 11-7
Per Diem All shifts Available
How To Apply?
Call 877-339-6999 x1
Fax: 866-854-8688
Email: Jobs@horizonhrs.com
Complete Application in Person
395 Middle Road, Nanticoke
Located directly across from
LCCC on LCTA Bus Route
AMAZING SHIFT
DIFFERENTIALS & PAY RATES
2nd shift $1.75
3rd Shift $1.00
Weekend Days - $1.00
RN’s
LPN’s
CNA’s
906 Homes for Sale
KINGSTON
DRASTIC
REDUCTION!!!!!
543
Westmoreland
Ave.
Stately 5 bedroom
home in prestigious
neighborhood.
Yearning to be
restored to its origi-
nal splendor. Porch,
rec room, sun room
and inground pool.
Huge Reduction
$145,000
Call Jay Crossin
Ext. 23
Crossin Real
Estate
570-288-0770
MOCANAQUA
Very nice side by
side (2 unit) with off
street parking for 5,
public water &
sewer. At present
time both sides are
vacant. Live in one
side and rent out
the other.
$75,000
MLS# 10-3183
Five Mountains
Realty
570-542-2141
906 Homes for Sale
KINGSTON
New Listing
Located within 1
block of elementary
school & neighbor-
hood park this spa-
cious 4 bedrooms
offers 1450 sq. ft of
living space with
1.75 baths, walk up
attic, and partially
finished basement.
Extras include gas
fireplace, an in-
ground pool with
fenced yard, new
gas furnace, hard-
wood floors &
more. Call Ann
Marie to schedule a
showing.
$114,900
Ann Marie Chopick
570-760-6769
BELL REAL ESTATE
(570) 288-6654
MOUNTAIN TOP
Affordable New
Construction with
Pond - 2 Available
1/2 acre pond view.
1 acre with pond.
Central sewer.
Roomy 2 story with
hardwood, tile,
maple kitchen,
2 car garage and
all the goodies.
Complete move in
package from the
low $200’s. 90 day
build time.
Financing available.
Oak Ridge Homes
Incorporated
(570) 788-7100
906 Homes for Sale
KINGSTON TWP.
8 Circle Drive
Only one lucky fami-
ly will be able to
make this home
their own! Beautiful-
ly kept Ranch with
2 car garage, new
bath, partially fin-
ished basement, 3
season room,
almost 1 acre in
Dallas School Dis-
trict. Home Warran-
cy included. For
more information
and photos visit our
website at
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS #11-370
$179,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
VM 101
LAFLIN
7 Hickorywood Dr.
Wonderful 4 bed-
room Ranch with
sweeping views of
the valley. Master
bedroom with walk-
in closet and bath,
ultra modern eat-in
kitchen with granite
counters and cherry
cabinets with large
island and stainless
steel appliances. 2
car garage, full
unfinished base-
ment with
walk-out to yard.
MLS #10-4060
$269,900
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
NANTICOKE
Hanover St. Bi
Level, single family,
3 bedrooms, 2 bath-
rooms, single car
attached garage,
kitchen, dining
room, office/study,
family room, living
room, bonus room,
utility room, electric
heat, finished base-
ment, lot size
approximately 90 X
150, deck. newly
renovated kitchen,
living room, and
bathrooms.
$154,900 Call
(570) 735-9199
after 5:30 p.m. for
private showing
906 Homes for Sale
Lake Ariel
HOME AUCTION
NO MINIMUM BID
1382 Woodview
Terrace, Lake Ariel,
PA classic home,
two story, single
family, 2 bed-
rooms, 1 bath-
room, kitchen, din-
ing room, family
room, living room,
fireplace, electric
heat, .85 acres,
deck. Located in a
Goldstar communi-
ty, lake rights,
community ameni-
ties include pool,
beaches, club-
house, golf, ski
slopes, boating
and other water
activities.
BIDS DUE BY
MAY 9.
LPSAuctions.com
(866) 763-9094
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
LARKSVILLE
111 Falcon Drive
Brand new since
2004, 3 bedrooms,
2 baths, central air,
2 car garage, shed,
6 car driveway.
Roof, kitchen, fur-
nace, a/c unit and
master bath all
replaced. Modern
kitchen with granite
island, tile floors,
maple cabinets.
Fireplace in family
room, large closets,
modern baths.
Stamped concrete
patio. For more
information and
photos visit
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS #11-1166
$279,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
LARKSVILLE
Beautiful Bi-Level
with Oak Hardwood
Floors in Living
room, Dining room,
Hallways &
Staircase.
Upgrades Galore,
central air, gas
heat, 16x32
in-ground pool
surrounded with
Perennial Gardens
& Fenced yard with
Hot Tub, shed,
deck, oversized
driveway, 1 car
garage. 1 year
warranty. $189,900
MLS# 10-3677
Call Nancy Palumbo
570-714-9240
LUZERNE
REDUCED
271 Charles St.
Very nice 3 bed-
room 1.5 bath home
with detached 1 car
garage. Home has
replacement win-
dows, new carpet,
fresh paint and
remodeled bath-
rooms. This is a
must see in a nice
neighborhood,.
MLS 11-442
$99,000
Call John Polifka
570-704-6846
Antonik &
Associates, Inc.
570-735-7494
906 Homes for Sale
MESHOPPEN
Novak Road
Lovely nearly com-
pleted renovated
Victorian farmhouse
sits high on 7.81
acres featuring
panoramic pastoral
views, high ceilings,
original woodwork,
gutted, rewired,
insulated and sheet-
rocked, newer roof,
vinyl siding, kitchen
and baths. Lots of
potential with TLC.
Elk Lake School Dis-
trict. $199,000
MLS# 11-525 Call
570-696-2468
WILKES-BARRE
MINERS MILLS
NEW LISTING!
Charming two-story
home with hard-
wood and pine
floors, modern
kitchen and baths,
formal living room
and dining room, 3
bedrooms, gas
heat, separate
330SF of office
space. Detached
garage and carport,
updated windows,
roof and furnace.
Zoned business
commercial.
MLS#11-1010
$129,000
Call Maribeth Jones
570-696-6565
NANTICOKE
Gorgeous Original
Woodwork & Hard-
wood floors. 4 bed-
rooms, 2 baths, 1st
floor laundry area,
built-in drawers/
cabinets in 2nd floor
hallway. Dou-
blestairs leading
from upstairs into
foyer & kitchen.
Walk-up finished
attic with 2 more
rooms. New furnace
(‘07), Deck, Drive-
way, Much restora-
tion & remodeling
done. $99,900.
Call Nancy Palumbo
570-714-9240
NANTICOKE
HOME FOR SALE
Single home, 3
bedrooms, eat-in
kitchen, electric
heat, unfinished
basement, deck.
Extremely well-
maintained two-
story, 7 rooms, 3
bedrooms, 2.5
baths, eat in
kitchen, very large
dining/living room
combination, den,
front porch , deck,
and nice size yard;
electric heat; safe
neighborhood;
move-in condition
for the right buyer;
no realtors or bro-
kers; $132,999. call
570-878-2424
after 10:00 a.m.
THORNHURST
2 or 3 bedroom
home in Country
Club Estates. 1.5
bath with lots of
storage space.
For info & pics,
1061fairway.
weebly.com
Call 570-472-3032
906 Homes for Sale
NANTICOKE
REDUCED
25 West
Washington St.
Move right into this
very nice 3 bed-
room 1 bath home.
Lots of natural
woodwork and a
beautiful stained
glass window.
Kitchen appliances
and wall to wall car-
peting approxi-
mately 1 year old.
Home also has a
one car detached
garage.
$83,900
MLS 11-347
Call John
570-704-6846
Antonik & Associ-
ates, Inc.
570-735-7494
Let the Community
Know!
Place your Classified
Ad TODAY!
570-829-7130
NUANGOLA
Summer is just
around the corner,
now is the time to
make the invest-
ment! 50' of lake-
front on a motor-
boat lake! With a
newer roof, remod-
eled kitchen and
bath, not much left
for you to do but
relax and enjoy the
Lake views from
the sunroom, dining
room, bedrooms or
patio. This home
makes a perfect
summer getaway or
year round home.
MLS #10-3124
$269,900
Call Jill Jones
570-696-6550
PARDEESVILLE
738 PARDEESVILLE RD
CORNER LOT
Single family built
in 2005. 2.5 baths,
two story with
attached garage.
Oil furnace with
central air. 90 x
140 corner lot.
Kitchen with cen-
ter cooking island,
dining room,
raised ceiling with
glass door entry &
hardwood floor.
Carpeting thru out
home. Tiled
kitchen and bath.
Kitchen appli-
ances included.
NICELY PRICED
$219,900
(570) 233-1993
PITTSTON
107 Johnson St.
4 bedroom Ranch
home with hard-
wood floors, large
room sizes, gas
heat and central air,
garage and carport.
Nice home, corner
lot, large unfinished
basement. For
more information
and photos visit
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-1209
$129,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
PITTSTON
3 bedroom, 1 bath,
semi modern
kitchen with stove
and fridge. Nice
yard, one car
garage.
Priced to sell.
MLS 11-1298
$59,900
Call Lu-Ann
570-602-9280
PITTSTON
49-51 Curtis St.
Fully occupied dou-
ble with separate
utilities. 2 bed-
rooms each side,
off street parking
and fenced in yard.
MLS #10-2584
$75,900
Call Lu-Ann
570-602-9280
906 Homes for Sale
PITTSTON
52 W. Columbus
Ave. Large 2 story
home with balcony
off master bedroom
showing views of
the valley. A great
place to see the
fireworks! Full bath
plus 3/4 bath, eat in
kitchen, enclosed
porch, first floor
laundry. Corner low
maintenance lot.
MLS 11-930
$115,000
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
PITTSTON TWP.
120 Parnell St.
Classic Ranch in
great location. 3
bedroom, 3 baths,
high quality
throughout. 3 sea-
son porch over
looking private rear
yard. Owners says
sell and lowers
price to
$219,900. For
more information
and photos please
visit our website at
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS #10-2817
Call Charlie for
your private
showing.
VM 101
PITTSTON TWP.
40 Gain St.
Be the first occu-
pants of this newly
constructed Ranch
home on a low traf-
fic street. All you
could ask for is
already here, 3
bedrooms, 2 baths,
hardwood and tile
floors with granite
and stainless steel
kitchen, gas fire-
place, central air, 2
car garage and
rear patio and full
basement. For
more information
and photos, log
onto www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS #10-3676
$229,900
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
PLAINS
1610 Westminster Rd
PRICE REDUCED!
Gorgeous estate
like property with
log home plus 2
story garage on 1
acres with many
outdoor features.
Garage.
MLS# 11-319
$325,000
Call Charles
PLAINS TWP
For Sale By Owner
Plains Township
Mill Creek Acres
4 Lan Creek Rd
Close to Mohegan
Sun & Geisinger, 4
Bedrooms, 3 Baths,
Fireplace, 2 Car
Garage. Excellent
Condition. All Appli-
ances Included.
Large yard.
Go To
www.plainsre.com
for details.
Asking $219,900
Call 570-817-1228
for showing
906 Homes for Sale
PLAINS
20 Nittany Lane
Convenience! Loca-
tion! Easy Living!
This home has it all.
3 floors of living
space w/hardwood
floors and gas fire-
place in living room.
Open floor plan,
lower level family
room w/laundry and
3/4 bath. 3 bed-
rooms w/2 full
baths on upper
level. Deck and
patio for outdoor
living! 2 zone heat,
central a/c, inter-
com and stereo
plus central vac
system, 2 car
garage. What more
could you want?
MLS #11-782
$199,900
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
PLAINS
Absolute Must
See River Ridge
Townhouse!
264 Burke Street
No maintenance
fees. Many
upgrades. Move in
condition. 2,000 sq.
ft. Berber, ceramic
tile & hardwood.
2 bedroom, 2.5
baths. All appli-
ances, washer
& dryer & window
treatments includ-
ed. Walk in closet.
No units in front of
or behind. 1 car
garage. Very
private. Near all
interstates.
REDUCED TO
$179,900
Call 570-829-3162
PLYMOUTH
44 Church St
46 Church St. Rear
Package Deal, sold
together for
$115,000. 2 units.
MLS 10-3634
MLS 10-3635
Maria Huggler
CLASSIC
PROPERTIES
570-587-7000
PRINGLE
NEW LISTING
Charming 2 story,
Spacious livin-
groom, eat in
kitchen, 1st floor
laundry / powder
room, 2 bedrooms,
1.5 baths on a deep
lot with patio and
waterfall. Priced to
sell $54,900. Call
Call Ann Marie
570-760-6769
570-288-6654
Bell Real Estate
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
SCRANTON
103 Arnold Avenue
AFFORDABLE PRICE
Cape Cod with 1st
floor master bed-
room, 3 season
porch, attached
garage. MLS#
10-1069 $84,900
call Nancy
570-237-0752
906 Homes for Sale
SHAVERTOWN
13 Lehigh St., N.
Lovingly cared for 2
bedroom, 1 bath
bungalow with
many improve-
ments done includ-
ing new (2 yrs. old)
central air and fur-
nace. 1 car garage
with attached cus-
tom built carport.
This property is a
“must see”!
MLS #10-3624
$139,000
Donald Crossin
570-288-0770
Crossin Real
Estate
570-288-0770
SHAVERTOWN
138 Wakefield Road
Inviting contempo-
rary with breathtak-
ing sunsets fea-
tures an open floor
plan, ultra kitchen,
hardwoods
throughout, two-
sided gas FP, spa-
like master bath,
very generous
room sizes, 5 bed-
rooms, 4 baths, fin-
ished walk-out
lower level.
$583,000
MLS #11-952
Call Tracy Zarola
570-574-6465
570-696-0723
LEWITH & FREEMAN
SHAVERTOWN
375 Greenpond Rd.
Well kept Ranch in
Midway Manor with
7 rooms, 3 bed-
rooms, 2 baths, 2
car garage, newer
furnace.
MLS #10-4474
$162,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
SHAVERTOWN
SUNDAY MAY 1st
12:00PM-2:00PM
1071 Meadowcrest
Drive
Every corner of this
ranch home has
been beautifully
upgraded. Wood
floors, new kitchen
with granite and
stainless. Gas fire-
place, tiled baths,
neutral decor,
completely finished
lower level (800
additional square
feet!), just move
right in! Lake
Lehman schools
$219,000
MLS #11-306
Call Tracy Zarola
570-574-6465
570-696-0723
LEWITH & FREEMAN
SHICKSHINNY
Completely
remodeled 3 bed-
room, 1.75 bath
brick & aluminum
ranch on over 4
acres with Pond.
New stainless steel
appliances, 2 car
attached and 1 car
built-in garage,
paved driveway,
open front porch,
3 season room,
rear patio, brick
fireplace & property
goes to a stream
in the back.
$199,900
MLS# 10-4716
Five Mountains
Realty
570-542-2141
906 Homes for Sale
SWOYERSVILLE
236 Poland St.
Cute 2 bedroom
starter home in
need of some cos-
metic updating.
Great for first time
homebuyers. Huge
lot, patio, newer
windows, shed,
nice location.
MLS #11-772
$65,000
Call Karen Ryan
570-283-9100
SWOYERSVILLE
9 Jay Street
Totally renovated
Ranch home.
Modern kitchen,
modern bath, 3
bedrooms, AC,
off street parking.
Affordable at
$149,500
Towne & Country
Real Estate Co.
570-735-8932 or
570-542-5708
SWOYERSVILLE
Investors Wanted!
Stone front 2 bed-
room, 2 story on
nice lot. Open 1st
floor with nice eat-in
kitchen. 2nd floor
needs tlc. Gas heat.
Space Heaters.
$35,900. Call Pat
570-885-4165
Coldwell Banker
Gerald L. Busch
Real Estate, Inc.
SWOYERSVILLE
REDUCED!
184 Owen St.
Roomy 2 story, 4
bedroom, 1.75 bath
single family home
on a large lot with
large modern eat in
kitchen. Large living
and dining rooms.
1st floor laundry
room, ductless air
conditioning on 1st
floor, vinyl siding,
carport, off street
parking and much
more.
MLS 11-432
$149,900
Jay A. Crossin
Ext. 23
Crossin Real
Estate
570-288-0770
WANAMIE
950 Center St.
Unique Property.
Well maintained 2
story. 10 years old.
Privacy galore.
3.5 acres. Pole
Barn 30 x 56 for
storage of equip-
ment, cars or
boats. A must
see property.
$289,000
MLS# 10-3799
Call Geri
570-696-0888
570-696-3801
LEWITH & FREEMAN
570-288-9371
WEST PITTSTON
322 SALEM ST.
Great 1/2 double
located in nice
West Pittston loca-
tion. 3 bedrooms,
new carpet. Vertical
blinds with all appli-
ances. Screened in
porch and yard
MLS#10-1535
$59,000
Charlie VM 101
PAGE 14D MONDAY, APRIL 25, 2011 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
906 Homes for Sale
WEST PITTSTON
Well cared for and
nicely kept. A place
to call home! Com-
plete with 2 car
oversized garage,
central air, first floor
laundry, eat in
kitchen. Convenient
to shopping, West
Pittston pool and
ball fields. $152,500
MLS 11-583
Call Judy Rice
570-714-9230
WEST WYOMING
438 Tripp St
SUNDAY
1:00PM-3:00PM
Completely remod-
eled home with
everything new.
New kitchen, baths,
bedrooms, tile
floors, hardwoods,
granite countertops,
all new stainless
steel appliances,
refrigerator, stove,
microwave, dish-
washer, free stand-
ing shower, tub for
two, huge deck,
large yard, excellent
neighborhood
$154,900 (835.00 /
30years/ 5%)
570-654-1490
Need to rent that
Vacation property?
Place an ad and
get started!
570-829-7130
WEST WYOMING
REDUCED!!
536 W. Eighth St.
Nice starter home
with 7 rooms, 3
bedrooms, 1.25
baths. 1 car garage
and carport. Home
has plenty of park-
ing in rear with
shed and great
yard.
MLS #11-559
$92,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
WILKES-BARRE
108 Simpson St.
Cute and well cared
for home. Enclosed
patio on back, off
street parking for 4
cars. Nice big yard,
privacy in rear.
MLS 09-3505
$49,900
Call Jay Crossin
Ext. 23
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
WILKES-BARRE
INVESTMENT!
123 S. Main St.,
Great downtown
Wilkes-Barre
opportunity for
investor! Ideal for
student housing!
First floor tenant is
a successful
restaurant with a
lease. Plus 4 large,
2 bedroom apart-
ments on the sec-
ond and third floors.
Off-street parking
for 3 cars.
MLS#11-829
$154,900
Ted Poggi 283-9100
ext. 25
WILKES-BARRE
191 Andover St.
Lovely single family
3 bedroom home
with lots of space.
Finished 3rd floor,
balcony porch off of
2nd floor bedroom,
gas hot air heat,
central air and
much more.
Must see!
MLS 11-59
$69,900
Jay A. Crossin
570-288-0770
Ext. 23
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
906 Homes for Sale
WILKES-BARRE
195 Mclean St.
Off street parking
with carport, nice
rear yard, first floor
laundry, updated
electrical, some
replacement win-
dows, why not take
a look at this
home!!!! 3 Bed-
rooms, large eat in
kitchen, lower level
has a 1/2 bath and
a built in bar area,
would make a nice
game room! Call for
your appointment
today!
MLS #11-453
$67,500
Call Jill Jones
570-696-6550
Looking to buy a
home?
Place an ad here
and let the
sellers know!
570-829-7130
WILKES-BARRE
313 N. River Street
Nice 2 bedroom
single home, A/C,
well maintained.
Near courthouse
& colleges.
Affordably Priced
@ $44,900.
Call Jim
Towne & Country
Real Estate Co.
570-735-8932 or
570-542-5708
WILKES-BARRE
35 Hillard St.
Great
neighborhood
surrounds this
updated 2 story
with original
woodwork. 3
bedroom, 1 bath,
1,500 sq.ft. oak
eat-in kitchen,
wood floors,
stained glass
windows, large
room sizes, fenced
yard, deck. $89,000
MLS #10-3023
Call Tracy Zarola
570-574-6465
570-696-0723
LEWITH & FREEMAN
WILKES-BARRE
363 North
Washington St.
Large home with
5 bedrooms,
within walking
distance of Kings
College. Possible
in-law suite on 3rd
floor. Great origi-
nal woodwork.
First floor fluted
columns in living
room, original
stained glass
window, pocket
french doors,
beautiful hard
wood floors &
large kitchen. 2
car garage, Off
street parking.
$40,000
MLS# 11-824
Call Michael Pinko
(570) 899-3865
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-474-6307
S
O
L
D
I’D
BE
G
LAD
TO
H
ELP
Y
O
U
FIN
D
A
N
O
T
H
E
R
!!!
WILKES-BARRE
39 W. Chestnut St.
Lots of room in this
single with 3 floors
of living space. 3
bedrooms, 1 bath
with hardwood
floors throughout,
natural woodwork,
all windows have
been replaced,
laundry/pantry off of
kitchen. 4x10 entry
foyer, space for 2
additional bed-
rooms on the 3rd
floor. Roof is new.
MLS 11-325
Jay A. Crossin
570-288-0770
Ext. 23
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
WILKES-BARRE
455 S. Main St.
Charming traditional
home. Four bed-
room, very large liv-
ing room, finished
attic, beautiful
woodwork, French
doors & fenced in
back yard.
MLS # 11-1117
$75,000
George Sailus
(570) 407-4300
TRADEMARK
REALTORS
906 Homes for Sale
WILKES-BARRE
73 Richard Street
3 Bedroom, 1 Bath
Traditional in Very
Good Condition.
Open Layout. Off
Street Parking,
Yard & Shed.
Many Updates.
Asking $47,900
Call 570-762-1537
for showing
WILKES-BARRE
84 Madison Street
Nice duplex.
Renovated 2nd
floor. Great invest-
ment or convert
back to single.
3 bedroom, 1 bath
on 1st Floor.
2 bedroom, 1 bath
2nd floor. Detached
garage.
$79,000
MLS# 11-1095
Call Jeff Cook
Realty World
Bank Capital
570-235-1183
WILKES-BARRE
912 S. Franklin St.
Move-in condition
2-story with 3
bedrooms, 1.5
baths with open
floor plan; finished
lower level, walk-up
attic and fenced-in
yard with newer
pool. $82,900
MLS #10-3914
DJ Wojciechowski
570-283-9100 x22
WILKES-BARRE
MINERS MILLS
29 W. Beatty St.
Lovely 2 story re-
modeled home in
very good condi-
tion. Laminate and
tile flooring through-
out. 16x20 great
room addition with
cathedral ceilings
and recessed light-
ing. Quiet neighbor-
hood. Appliances
included in sale.
$62,000
570-885-3664
WILKES-BARRE
NEW LISTING!
54 CORLEAR ST.
Well maintained
home on a double
lot, on a lovely resi-
dential street. Walk
to the River Com-
mon Park. Close to
schools. 1st floor
bedroom and ½
bath. 2nd floor 2 or
3 bedrooms and a
full bath. Although
not currently fin-
ished, the base-
ment is heated and
can be finished for
additional living
space. Call for your
private showing.
MLS#11-1142
$115,000
MaryEllen Belchick
696-6566 or Walter
Belchick 696-2600
ext. 301
WILKES-BARRE
INVESTMENT!
133-135 Old River Rd
Designed and con-
structed as a 4-unit
apartment building.
Solid brick and
masonry exterior.
Each apartment
contains 1300+/-SF
of living space with
6 rooms, 2 bed-
rooms and one
bath. Full concrete
basement and off-
street parking for 6
cars. MLS#11-1232
$124,900
Ted Poggi
283-9100 ext.25
WYOMING
530 Dennison Ave.
REDUCED
Great 3 bedroom
Cape Cod with
charm & character,
1 3/4 baths, nice
yard. MLS#
10-342 $139,900
call Nancy
570-237-0752
906 Homes for Sale
WILKES-BARRE
REDUCED
116 Amber Lane
Very nice Bi-level
home with 2-3 bed-
rooms, open floor
plan, built in
garage, driveway,
on corner lot.
Lower level family
room with pellet
stove. Move in
condition home
$95,000
MLS 10-4538
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
WILKES-BARRE
SALE BY OWNER
GREA GREAT T VIEW VIEW
54 Penn Street
Renovated two
story in East End. 2-
3 bedrooms, large
ceramic tile bath
with walk-in linen
closet; first floor
laundry with 1/2
bath; large dining
room with oak floor-
ing; eat-in kitchen
with oak cabinets
and built in table;
stained glass win-
dows, wrap porch,
fenced yard; ceiling
fans; shed; gas
heat; walk up attic
with wood flooring;
close to mall.
$85,900. By
appointment only
Call (570) 970-8065
or email
aleta59@msn.com.
WYOMING
NEW LISTING!
104 5TH ST.
Great location to
invest in with this
duplex, you can
have a tenant help
with your mortgage
or just collect the
rents. 2 bedrooms
in each unit. Semi-
modern kitchens
and baths. Both
units have access
to the basement for
storage. First floor
has gas fireplace,
ductless A/C units
and laundry area.
Large garage with
workshop area.
Take a look and
bring your offers!
MLS#11-1038
$109,900
Jill Jones
696-6550
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
YATESVILLE
20 Osborne Drive
Buy a newer 2
story in the growing
Willow View Devel-
opment. This home
has 3 bedrooms,
2.5 baths, formal
dining and sitting
room, family room
with wood burning
fireplace, finished
room in lower level,
electric heat and
central air. 2 car
garage, level lot.
NEW REDUCED
PRICE.
MLS 10-2379
$246,000
Call Lu-Ann
570-602-9280
YATESVILLE
PRICE REDUCED
12 Reid st.
Spacious Bi-level
home in semi-pri-
vate location with
private back yard. 3
season room. Gas
fireplace in lower
level family room. 4
bedrooms, garage.
MLS 10-4740
$159,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
VM 101
906 Homes for Sale
YATESVILLE
REDUCED!
61 Pittston Ave.
Stately brick Ranch
in private location.
Large room sizes,
fireplace, central
A/C. Includes
extra lot.
MLS #10-3512
PRICE REDUCED
$198,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
VM 101
909 Income &
Commercial
Properties
AVOCA
25 St. Mary’s St.
3,443 sq. ft.
masonry commer-
cial building with
warehouse/office
and 2 apartments
with separate elec-
tric and heat. Per-
fect for contractors
or anyone with stor-
age needs. For
more information
and photos log onto
www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
Reduced to
$89,000
MLS #10-3872
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
VM 101
DALLAS
Commercial space
for lease. $10/sq. ft.
Physician's office
ready to occupy
approx 7500 sq. ft.
Various suites up to
20,000 sq. ft. also
available. State of
the art amenities.
Ample parking.
Contact Judy Rice
714-9230
MLS# 10-4102
DURYEA
622 Donnelly St.
Double Block in
good condition.
Great investment
property. Come
take a look.
$96,000
MLS# 10-2668
Call Karen
Coldwell Banker
Rundle Real Estate
570-474-2340
EDWARDSVILLE
62-67 ½Thomas St
This would make an
awesome family
compound. No
shortage of parking
on this unique prop-
erty. One single
home, one duplex
and an extra lot all
included. Homes
are right on the
Edwardsville/Larksvi
lle border.
$129,900
11-252
Call Betty
(570) 510-1736
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-287-1196
It's that time again!
Rent out your
apartment
with the Classifieds
570-829-7130
EDWARDSVILLE
Former Vic Mar
building. Reduced!
Turnkey business
opportunity.
Complete commer-
cial kitchen, large
dining area, 90 x
130 parking lot.
Live-in quarters.
Well known
location.
$89,000
MLS# 11-445
Call Pat Guzzy
570-407-2480
570-586-1111
909 Income &
Commercial
Properties
EDWARDSVILLE
Lawrence St.
Nice 3 unit
property. Lots of
off street parking
and bonus 2 car
garage. All units are
rented. Great
income with low
maintenance
$159,900
MLS# 10-2675
Call Karen
Coldwell Banker
Rundle Real Estate
570-474-2340
FORTY FORT
138-148 Welles St.
DRASTIC PRICE
REDUCTION!
Be part of the
Welles Street
Revitalization! 2
buildings with
offices & ware-
house/garage
areas. Zoned M-1.
Office space for
lease. Call agent for
more details. 138-
142 Approx 9784
sq. ft. & 144-146
approx 5,800 sq ft.
$335,000
Contact Judy Rice
714-9230
MLS# 11-4293
FREELAND
Large duplex with 4
bedrooms on each
side. Nice neighbor-
hood, Fenced yard,
One side is owner
occupied with duct-
less AC/heat unit.
recessed lighting,
jacuzzi bath excel-
lent condition,
seperate utilities.
Great opportunity to
live on one side and
pay your mortgage
with the rental.
$99,952
MLS# 11-1229
Call Stanley
(570) 817-0111
Coldwell Banker
Rundle Real Estate
570-474-2340
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
22 W. Germania St
This 6,600 sq. ft.
concrete block
building has multi-
ple uses. 5 offices
& kitchenette.
Over 5,800 sq. ft..
warehouse space
(high ceilings). 2
overhead doors.
$96,500
MLS 10-1326
Bob Kopec
HUMFORD
REALTY
570-822-5126
JENKINS TOWNSHIP
May Street
Former Parrish
Center Hall with
kitchen & parking
MLS#08-2954
$179,900
Call Charlie
KINGSTON
47 N. Thomas St.
Well maintained
duplex in a nice
area of Kingston.
2nd floor unit is
occupied. New
roof, new heating
system, brand new
in ground pool
recently installed.
Laundry hook-up for
both units in base-
ment. Newer roof
and exterior
recently painted.
MLS 11-1199
$144,500
Jay A. Crossin
570-288-0770
Ext. 23
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
PITTSTON
2 Unit through
8 Unit apartments
for sale in the
Greter Pittston
area. Call
570-655-1606
WILKES-BARRE
Commercial
Property 1 block
from Courthouse,
College & Hospital.
Needs Renovation.
N. River Road
$18,500.
Call 570-991-7571
909 Income &
Commercial
Properties
KINGSTON
Highly visible office
building w/ample off
street parking.
Executive office on
1st level. Potential
for 2 tenants in
lower level.
$449,000
MLS #11-995
Call Tracy Zarola
570-574-6465
570-696-0723
LEWITH & FREEMAN
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
MOUNTAINTOP
S. Mountain Blvd.
Best location in
Mountaintop. 7,700
sq. ft. building with
250’ frontage.
Currently an
automotive
center. Building is
adaptable
to many uses.
$595,000
Call Dave
570-474-6307
SMITH HOURIGAN GROUP
NANTICOKE
FOR SALE
MULTI-UNIT
PROPERTY
Available immedi-
ately. Commercial
property has 2
apartments and
large office area,
lots of storage, multi
“bay” heated
garage, large yard,
ample off street
parking; all units
rented; Close to Rt
81 and Cross Valley
expressway; off-
street parking. Seri-
ous inquiries only.
No brokers/real
estate agents!
$189,999 Call
(570) 878-2424
after 10:00 a.m.
PITTSTON
1011-1015 Oak St
Available 2 buildings
on site. #1011 is a 2
story office building
with approximately
3800 square feet.
#1015 is a single
story building with
approximately 3000
square feet.
$489,000
MLS# 11-445
Call Pat Guzzy
570-407-2480
570-586-1111
PITTSTON
144 S. Main St.
Busy downtown
location, perfect for
your business. Be a
part of the Down-
town Revitalization.
Located across
from the Tomato
Festival lot, current-
ly has a 3 story
building on the
property. When
removed, would
leave a 30x120
building lot that
backs on Wharf
Street.REDUCED
MLS 10-2742
$14,900
Call Lu-Ann
570-602-9280
PITTSTON
328 Kennedy Blvd.
Modern medical
space, labor &
industry approved,
ADA throughout, 2
doctor offices plus
4 exam rooms, xray
and reception and
breakrooms. Could
be used for any
business purpose.
Will remodel to suit.
Also available
for lease.
MLS #11-751
$595,000
Call Charlie
VM 101
909 Income &
Commercial
Properties
PITTSTON
Township Blvd.
MAKE AN OFFER!
Ideal location
between Wilkes-
Barre & Scranton.
Ample parking with
room for additional
spaces. Perfect for
medical or profes-
sional offices. Con-
tact agent to show.
Contact Judy Rice
570-714-9230
MLS# 10-1110
PLAINS
107-109 E. Carey St.
High traffic, high
potential location
with enough space
for 2 second floor
apartments. Large
front windows for
showroom display.
Basement & sub-
basement for
additional storage
or workspace.
$125,900
MLS# 10-1919
Call Stanley
(570) 817-0111
Coldwell Banker
Rundle Real Estate
570-474-2340
PLAINS TWP.
LAND!
HIGHWAY 315
2 acres of commer-
cial land. 165 front
feet. Driveway
access permit and
lot drainage in
place. WIll build to
suit tenant or avail-
able for land lease.
MLS 11-17
Price Negotiable
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
VM 101
PLYMOUTH
155 E Walnut St.
Good investment
property knocking
on your door. Don't
miss out, come and
see for yourself.
Also included in the
sale of the property
is the lot behind the
home. Lot size is
25X75, known as
147 Cherry St.
$82,000
MLS# 10-2666
Call Karen
Coldwell Banker
Rundle Real Estate
570-474-2340
WILKES-BARRE
819 North
Washington St.
2020 Sq. Ft,
Commercial build-
ing on corner lot
with parking. Prime
location. Lower
level street
entrance. Close to
major highways.
$149,900
MLS# 10-3225
Call Jeff Cook
Realty World
Bank Capital
570-235-1183
Job Seekers are
looking here!
Where's your ad?
570-829-7130 and
ask for an employ-
ment specialist
WYOMING
14 West Sixth St.
Former upholestry
shop. 1st floor in
need of a lot of
TLC. 2nd floor
apartment in good
condition & rented
with no lease. Stor-
age area. Off street
parking available.
$79,500
Contact Judy Rice
714-9230
MLS# 11-572
WYOMING
Affordable Building
waiting for your
business to occupy
it! It also offers
income from 2 bed-
room apartment
above. Off street
parking. Offers con-
sidered! MLS 11-572
$79,500
Call Judy Ross
570-714-9230
909 Income &
Commercial
Properties
WYOMING
PRICE REDUCED!
285 Wyoming Ave.
First floor currently
used as a shop,
could be offices,
etc. Prime location,
corner lot, full base-
ment. 2nd floor is 3
bedroom apartment
plus 3 car garage
and parking for
6 cars.
MLS #10-4339
$174,900
Call Charlie
VM 101
912 Lots & Acreage
DURYEA
44.59 ACRES
Industrial Site. Rail
served with all
utilities. KOZ
approved.
$2,395,000
MLS#10-669
Call Charlie
PRICES REDUCED
EARTH
CONSERVANCY
LAND FOR SALE
46+/- Acres
Hanover Twp.,
$89,000
10+/- Acres
Hanover Twp.,
$69,000
28+/- Acres
Fairview Twp.,
$85,000
61+/- Acres
Nuangola
$125,000
40+/- Acres
Newport Twp.
$180,000
32 +/- Acres
Wilkes-Barre Twp.
See additional Land
for Sale at
www. earth
conservancy.org
570-823-3445
WILKES-BARRE
1 Kidder & Walnut
Buildable 1.5 acre
lot in Wilkes-Barre
Township. Utilities
available. Lot is
located in a
residential area.
$39,500
MLS 11-583
Call Judy Rice
570-714-9230
915 Manufactured
Homes
ASHLEY PARK
Laurel Run & San
Souci Parks, Like
new, several to
choose from,
Financing&Warranty,
facebook.com/
MobileOne.Sales
Call (570)250-2890
930 Wanted to Buy
Real Estate
WE BUY HOMES
Any Situation
570-956-2385
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
ASHLEY
Modern 2 bedroom,
laundry, parking,bus
stop. No pets.
Water included.
$535 + utilities, first
/last & security
570-954-1992
AVOCA
1 & 2 bedroom
apartments, just
remodeled, no pets.
$500 to $575 +
utilities & security.
Call 570-328-3773
AVOCA
3 rooms, wall to wall
carpeting, appli-
ances, coin-op laun-
dry, off street park-
ing, security. No
pets. $410/month
(570) 655-1606
BACK MOUNTAIN
3 large 1 bedroom
apts, 3 kitchens
with appliances, 3
baths. Apts. have
access to one
another. No lease.
$795 for all 3 apts
($265 per apt.)
Convenient to all
colleges and gas
drilling areas.
Call for more info
570-696-1866
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
DALLAS
1 bedroom, 1 bath,
off street parking,
laundry room, deck.
1 year lease. Credit
check & references
required. $525/
month + utilities.
(570) 675-4597
DALLAS TWP
CONDO FOR LEASE:
$1,800. 2 bedroom/
2 Bath. Call Us to
discuss our great
Amenity & Mainte-
nance program!
Call 570-674-5278
Dallas, Pa.
MEADOWS
APARTMENTS
220 Lake St.
Housing for the
elderly & mobility
impaired; all utilities
included. Federally
subsidized program.
Extremely low
income persons
encouraged to
apply. Income less
than $11,900.
570-675-6936,
8 am-4 pm, Mon-Fri.
EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY
HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE
DUPONT
Totally renovated
6 room apartment.
Partially furnished,
brand new fridge/
electric range, elec-
tric washer & dryer.
Brand new custom
draperies, Roman
shades, carpeting /
flooring & energy
efficient furnace &
windows. 2 bed-
room + large attic
loft bedroom with
spacious walk-in
closet, full tiled bath
on 1st floor, Easy
access to I-81,
airport & casino, off
street parking. No
smoking, No pets.
$750 + utilities &
security.
570-762-8265
DURYEA
1 bedroom, 1 bath
room, refrigerator
and stove provid-
ed, washer/dryer
hookup, off-street
parking, no pets,
garbage included,
second floor, no
smokers, 450/per
month, plus utili-
ties, $450 plus
first months rent/
security deposit.
570-457-3335
DURYEA
Modern 2 bedroom,
2nd floor. Quiet
location. Appliances
& garbage included.
Off street parking.
No pets. $485 +
security. Call
570-479-1203
EXETER
1st floor, 2 bedroom,
eat in kitchen,
enclosed heated
porch. Large refin-
ished basement. 1
car carport. Gas
heat. Central air.
$700 + utilities &
security. Will consid-
er reduced rent for
maintenance work.
Call 570-760-6277
FORTY FORT
2nd floor, 2 bed-
room with sunroom.
$495/month.
Gas heat. Washer &
dryer included.
Garage Optional.
Lease & security
required.
Call after 6 p.m.
570-220-6533
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
1st floor, 2 bedroom,
stove, refrigerator,
private deck, wash-
er/dryer hookup.
Heat, garbage &
sewer included.
$625/month
570-842-1264
HANOVER TWP
214 Taft Street
2nd floor. Modern 2
bedroom. Newer
kitchen, bath, stove
& fridge. Washer &
dryer in basement.
$500 + utilities &
security. No pets.
No smoking. Call
(570) 825-6259
KINGSTON 1 BEDROOM
2nd floor, washer/
dryer hookup, yard,
parking, No Pets,
No Smoking, Quiet
/Secluded/
Convenient
$425. + utilities.
Discount available,
lease, references.
574-9827
KINGSTON
3 bedrooms,
remodeled with
appliances, washer
& dryer, gas heat,
$575 + utilities.
Call 570-814-0843
or 570-696-3090
KINGSTON
E. WALNUT ST.
Light, bright, 1st
floor, 2 bedrooms,
elevator, carpet-
ed, Security
system. Garage.
Extra storage &
cable TV included.
Laundry facilities.
Heat & hot water
furnished. Fine
neighborhood.
Convenient to bus
& stores. No
pets. References.
Security. Lease.
No smokers
please. $840.
570-287-0900
KINGSTON
Large 2 bedroom,
newly remodeled,
1st floor duplex
apartment. Appli-
ances include dish-
washer & gas
dryer. Off street
parking. Water &
sewer included.
$650 + utilities. Call
(570) 283-3887
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com MONDAY, APRIL 25, 2011 PAGE 15D
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
2
8
1
1
0
3
EAST
MOUNTAIN
APARTMENTS
The good life...
close at hand
• 1 & 2 Bedroom Apts.
• Total Air-Conditioning
• Washer & Dryer
• Community Building
• Spa & Pools
• Hi-Tech Fitness Center
• Tennis & Basketball Courts
• Private Entrances
Monday - Friday 9-5
Saturday 9-1
680 Wildflower Drive
Plains, PA 18702
www.EastMountainApt.com
email:EMA@The ManorGroup.com
• 1,2 & 3 Bedroom Apts.
• Total Air-Conditioning
• Gas Heat & HW Included
• Swim Club, Heated Pools
• Hi-Tech Fitness Center
• Shopping Shuttle
• Full -Size Washer & Dryer
• Private Entrances
Regions Best
Address
200 Gateway Drive
Edwardsville, PA 18704
288-6300 822-4444
www.GatewayManorApt.com
email:GA@The ManorGroup.com
Monday - Friday 9-5
Saturday 9-1
Monday - Friday 9-5
Saturday 9-1
Monday - Friday 9-5
Saturday 9-1
IN THE HEART OF WILKES-BARRE
Immediate Occupancy!!
MARTIN D. POPKY APARTMENTS
61 E. Northampton St.
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18701
• Affordable Senior Apartments
• Income Eligibility Required
• Utilities Included! • Low cable rates;
• New appliances; laundry on site;
• Activities!
• Curb side Public Transportation
Please call 570-825-8594
TDD/TTY 800-654-5984
CEDAR
VILLAGE
Apartment
Homes
Ask About Our
Holiday Specials!
$250 Off 1st Months Rent,
& $250 Off Security
Deposit With Good Credit.
1 bedroom starting @ $690
F e a t u r i n g :
‹ Washer & Dryer
‹ Central Air
‹ Fitness Center
‹ Swimming Pool
‹ Easy Access to
I-81
Mon – Fri. 9 –5
44 Eagle Court
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18706 (Off Route 309)
570-823-8400
cedarvillage@
affiliatedmgmt.com
M ond a y - Frid a y 9 -5
Sa tu rd a y 1 0-2
W IL KE SW OOD
822-27 1 1
w w w .liv ea tw ilk esw ood .com
1 Bedroom Sta rting
a t$675.00
• Includes gas heat,
w ater,sew er & trash
• C onvenient to allm ajor
highw ays & public
transportation
• Fitness center & pool
• P atio/B alconies
• P et friendly*
• O nline rentalpaym ents
• Flexible lease term s
APARTM E NTS
*RestrictionsAp p ly
CALL
AN EXPERT
Professional Services Directory
CALL
AN EXPERT
1015 Appliance
Service
LEN HOSEY
Appliance Service
Washer/Dryer
Range/Dishwasher.
Whirlpool, Maytag,
Kitchenaid & Roper
287-7973
1024 Building &
Remodeling
ALL OLDERHOMES
SPECIALIST
825-4268.
Remodel / Repair
Kitchen
& Baths
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
Look for the
BIA symbol
of quality
For information
on BIA
membership
call 287-3331
or go to
www.bianepa.com
Building or
Remodeling?
DAVE JOHNSON
Expert Bathroom
Remodeling, Whole
House Renovations,
Interior & Exterior
Carpentry. Kitchens
and Basements
Licensed &Insured
570-819-0681
DA DAVID A JONES VID A JONES
BUILDING &
REMODELING
Additions, garages,
sheds, kitchens,
bathrooms, tile
floor, finished
basements, decks,
siding, roofing,
windows, doors,
custom built oak
stairs & trim.
Licensed & insured.
No job too small.
570-256-7567 or
570-332-0933
PA #0001719
NICHOLS CONSTRUCTION
All Types Of Work
New or Remodeling
Licensed & Insured
Free Estimates
570-406-6044
Northeast
Contracting Group
Decks, Roofs, Sid-
ing, Masonry,
Driveways, Patios,
Additions, Garages,
Kitchens, Baths, etc
(570) 338-2269
ROOFING, SIDING,
DECKS, WINDOWS
For All of Your
Remodeling Needs.
Will Beat Any Price
25 Yrs. Experience
References. Insured
Free Estimates
570-332-7023
Shedlarski Construction
Home improvement
specialist, Licensed,
insured, PA
registered.Kitchens,
baths, vinyl
siding & railings,
replacement
windows & doors,
additions, garages,
all phases of home
renovations.
570-287-4067
WWW.CHESHIRE
CONSTRUCTIONSERVICES.COM
Kitchens, Baths,
Finish Basements,
Decks, Porches
Handyman Jobs.
570-357-8631
1039 Chimney
Service
A-1 ABLE CHIMNEY
Rebuild & Repair
Chimneys. All
types of Masonry.
Liners Installed,
Brick & Block,
Roofs & Gutters.
Licensed &
Insured
570-735-2257
COZY HEARTH
CHIMNEY
Chimney Cleaning,
Rebuilding, Repair,
Stainless Steel Lin-
ing, Parging, Stuc-
co, Caps, Etc.
Free Estimates
Licensed & Insured
1-888-680-7990
1042 Cleaning &
Maintainence
HOME/OFFICE
CLEANING
Experienced,
References &
Background check.
Call Shirley Call Shirley
570-288-2653 570-288-2653
Leave Message
1054 Concrete &
Masonry
D. Pugh
Concrete
All phases of
masonry &
concrete. Small
jobs welcome.
Senior discount,
Free estimates
Licensed & Insured
288-1701/655-3505
DEMPSKI MASONRY
& CONCRETE
All Phases
Licensed & Insured
No job too small.
Free Estimates.
570-824-0130
dempskimasonry.com
WYOMING
VALLEY
MASONRY
Concrete, stucco,
foundations,
pavers, retaining
wall systems,
dryvit, flagstone,
brick work. Senior
Citizen Discount.
570-287-4144
570-760-0551
1057Construction &
Building
GARAGE DOOR
Sales, service,
installation &
repair.
FULLY INSURED
HIC# 065008
CALL JOE
(570)606-7489
(570)735-8551
1078 Dry Wall
MIKE SCIBEK DRYWALL
Hanging & finishing,
design ceilings.
Free estimates.
Licensed & Insured.
570-331-2355
MIRRA DRYWALL
Hanging & Finishing
Drywall Repair
Textured Ceilings
Licensed & Insured
Free Estimates
(570) 675-3378
1084 Electrical
DNF ELECTRIC
Affordable &
Reasonable Rates
No Job Too Small.
Licensed & insured.
Free estimates.
570-574-6213
570-574-7195
GRULA ELECTRIC LLC
Licensed, Insured,
No job too small.
570-829-4077
SLEBODA ELECTRIC
Master electrician
Licensed & Insured
Bucket truck to 40’
8 6 8 - 4 4 6 9
1093 Excavating
All Types Of
Excavating,
Demolition &
Concrete Work
Large & Small Jobs
FREE ESTIMATES
(570) 760-1497
1105 Floor Covering
Installation
CARPET REPAIR &
INSTALLATION
Vinyl & wood.
Certified, Insured.
570-283-1341
HARDWOOD FLOOR
REFINISHING &
INSTALLATION
Recoat your hard-
wood floors starting
at $1. A SQ. FT.
For free estimate
call 570-793-4994
1129 Gutter
Repair & Cleaning
GUTTERS CLEANED & REPAIRED
Window Cleaning.
Regulars, storms,
etc. Pressure
washing, decks,
docks, houses,Free
estimates. Insured.
(570) 288-6794
1132 Handyman
Services
ALL
MAINTENANCE
We Fix It
Electrical,
Plumbing,
Handymen,
Painting
Carpet Repair
& Installation
All Types
Of Repairs
570-814-9365
DO IT ALL HANDYMAN
Painting, drywall,
plumbing & all types
of home repairs,
also office cleaning
available.
570-829-5318
1135 Hauling &
Trucking
A A C L E A N I N G
A1 Always hauling,
cleaning attics, cellar,
garage, one piece or
whole Estate, also
available 10 &20 yard
dumpsters.655-0695
592-1813or287-8302
AAA CLEANING
A1 GENERAL HAULING
Cleaning attics,
cellars, garages.
Demolitions, Roofing
&Tree Removal.
FreeEst. 779-0918or
542-5821; 814-8299
A.S.A.P Hauling
Estate Cleanouts,
Attics, Cellars,
Garages, Fire &
Flood Damage.
Free Estimates,
Same Day
Service!
570-822-4582
ACTION HAULING
You Call Today,
Job Gets Done
The Same Day!!
Cleaning Houses,
Garages, Yards, etc
Call Mike,
570-826-1883 570-826-1883
ALL KINDS OF
HAULING & JUNK
REMOVAL
Estate Cleanouts
TREE/SHRUB TREE/SHRUB
REMOV REMOVAL AL
Free Estimates
24 HOUR
SERVICE
570-823-1811
570-239-0484
CASTAWAY
HAULING JUNK
REMOVAL
823-3788 / 817-0395
Charlie’ Charlie’s s Hauling Hauling
Residential &
Commercial,
Licensed & Insured.
Free estimates.
Whole estates, yard
waste, construction
Spring cleanup.
570-266-0360 or
570-829-0140
P.C. HAULING & CLEANING
Call Us First!
That’s all you need!
Free Estimates
570-592-5401
WILL HAUL ANYTHING
Clean cellars,
attics, yards &
metal removal.
Call John
570-735-3330
1162 Landscaping/
Garden
BASIL FRANTZ LAWN
& GARDEN SERVICE
Residential &
Commercial
Shrub Trimming &
Mulching. Junk
Removal. Free Est.
(570) 855-2409 or
(570) 675-3517
BITTO
LANDSCAPING &
LAWN SERVICE
Over 25 years
experience,
landscape designs,
retaining walls,
pavers, patios,
decks, walkways,
ponds, lighting,
seeding, mulch, etc
Free Estimates.
570-288-5177
Brizzy’s
Arbor Care &
Landscaping
Tree trimming,
pruning & removal.
Stump Grinding,
Cabling.
Free Estimates
Fully Insured
570-542-7265
Power rake your
yard, dethatching
aeration, shrubbery
trimming & spring
clean ups.
570-639-2711
Free estimates.
COUNTRY GENTLEMAN
TOTAL YARD CARE
Lawns-Shrubs -
Tilling-Mulch.
Senior Discount.
Free Estimates
Family Owned
570-287-3852
KELLER’S LAWN CARE
Mowing, mulching,
Spring cleanup,
gravel & trimming.
Commercial
& Residential.
570-332-7016
1162 Landscaping/
Garden
MOWING, TRIMMING
EDGING, SHRUBS
& HEDGES.
LAWN CARE.
FULLY INSURED
Residential & Com-
mercial
FREE ESTIMATES
570-814-0327
NEED YOUR LAWN CUT?
LEAVES RAKED?
GENERAL YARD
WORK?
Two responsible
High School
students available.
Mountain Top
only. 570-868-6134
Patrick & Deb’ Patrick & Deb’s s
Landscaping Landscaping
Landscaping, basic
handy man, house
cleaning & help
moving. We even
do inside painting.
Any salvageable
items can be picked
up for free.
Free estimates.
Call 570-793-4232
Or 570-793-4773
QUALITY LAWN
& LANDSCAPE
Spring Clean Ups,
Mulching, Grass
Cutting,Fertilization,
Tree & Shrub
Maintenance &
Installation
Experienced,
Affordable, Reliable
Free Estimates
(570) 592-4847
(570) 885-1488
Rainbow
Landscaping
& Lawn Service
Spring & Fall
Cleanups. Trimming,
mulching, complete
landscape installa-
tion. Lic. & Insured.
Call 570-674-2418
Spike & Gorilla’s
Lawn Care & Out-
door Maintenance
We do it all!
Lawn Care - Summer
packages available,
concrete patios,
tree trimming &
removal. Gutter
cleaning. Custom
dog Kennels &
wooden playsets.
570-702-2497
1165 Lawn Care
1ST Choice
Landscaping Com-
plete Lawn Mainte-
nance, Landscaping,
Junk Removal.
Free Estimates.
570-288-0552
A1 PAUL’S LAWN CARE
Free Estimates. Fair
Rates. Over 20
years experience.
References. Call
570-542-4693
BRUCE’S LAWNSERVICE
Established 1988.
Fully insured.
Free estimates.
(570) 746-2087 or
(570) 721-2746
COLE LAWN CARE
Will Mow &
Trim Your Lawn
For What You
Can Afford
FREE ESTIMATES
(570) 991-8474
JOHN’S
LAWN SERVICE
Insured.
Reasonable
rates.
Free Estimates.
570-991-7150
Lawn & Shrub
Maintenance
Residential &
Commercial
Best rate guaran-
teed - Call Today!
570-283-5984
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
PETER’S LA PETER’S LAWNCARE WNCARE
Reliable service &
reasonable rates!
570-829-5444
570-332-4199
PORTANOVA’S LAWN
CARE Weekly & Bi-
Weekly Lawn Cut-
ting, Landscaping.
Reasonable rates.
Now accepting new
customers. Call
570-650-3985
RAINERI’S LAWN
CARE & SHRUBS
Lawns Trimmed &
Edged, Hedges Cut,
Mulch & More
Free Estimates
570-825-2779
570-954-2302
1189 Miscellaneous
Service
VITO’S
&
GINO’S
Wanted:
Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Highest
Prices
Paid!!
FREE PICKUP
288-8995
1195 Movers
BestDarnMovers
Moving Helpers
Call for Free Quote.
We make moving easy.
BDMhel pers. com
570-852-9243
1204 Painting &
Wallpaper
A & N PAINTING
Airplane Quality at
Submarine Prices!
Interior/Exterior,
pressure washing,
decks & siding.
Commercial/Resi-
dential. Over 17
years experience!
Free estimates.
Licensed & Insured
570-820-7832
A + CLASSICAL
Int./Ext. Experts!
Aluminum, Wood
& Deck Staining
Free Estimates
Licensed-Insured
30 Years
Experience
Book Now &
Receive 10% Off
570-283-5714
A.B.C. Professional
Painting
36 Yrs Experience
We Specialize In
New Construction
Residential
Repaints
Comm./Industrial
All Insurance
Claims
Apartments
Interior/Exterior
Spray,Brush, Rolls
WallpaperRemoval
Cabinet Refinish-
ing
Drywall/Finishing
Power Washing
Deck Specialist
Handy Man
FREE ESTIMATES
Larry Neer
570-606-9638
Chris Emmett’s
Int./Ext. Painting
Plaster, Drywall
Repairs
25 Yrs. Experience
570-899-5781
10% Senior Discount
Free Estimates
DAVID WAYNE
PAINTING
Call About
Interior/Exterior
Specials, Drywall
& Wallpaper
570-762-6889
FREE ESTIMATES
Prompt Starts
& Completions.
No Hidden Extras.
Repairs
38 Yrs. Experience
THE PAINT DUDE
570-650-3008
M. PARALI S PAI NTI NG
Int/ Ext. painting,
Power washing.
Professional work
at affordable rates.
Free estimates.
570-288-0733
PRECISION PAINTING &
POWER WASHING
Interior & Exterior
Painting, Masonry
& Decks.
Residential
& Commercial
570-338-2269
Serra Painting
Book Now For
Spring & Save. All
Work Guaranteed
Satisfaction.
30 Yrs. Experience
Powerwash & Paint
Vinyl, Wood, Stucco
Aluminum.
Free Estimates
You Can’t Lose!
570-822-3943
1213 Paving &
Excavating
Mountain Top
PAVING & SEAL
COATING
Patching, Sealing,
Residential/Comm.
Licensed Bonded
Insured
570-868-8375
1213 Paving &
Excavating
EDWARD’S ALL COUNTY
PAVING & SEAL COATING
3 Generations of
experience.
Celebrating 76
years of Pride &
Tradition!
CALL NOW & Get
The 1st Seal Coat-
ing FREE with
signed contract.
Licensed and
Insured.
Free estimates.
570-474-6329
Lic.# PA021520
1234 Pressure
Washing
DONE-RIGHT
Pressure
Washing
Patios, decks, sid-
ing, concrete. Serv-
ing Lackawanna &
Luzerne Counties.
570-655-4004
1249 Remodeling &
Repairs
D & D
REMODELING
From decks and
kitchens to roofs,
and baths, etc.
WE DO
IT ALL!!!!!!!
CALL US FOR CALL US FOR
ALL OF YOUR ALL OF YOUR
INTERIOR AND INTERIOR AND
EXTERIOR EXTERIOR
REMODELING REMODELING
NEEDS NEEDS
570-406-9387
Licensed/Insured
YOU’VE TRIED
THE REST NOW
CALL THE
BEST!!!
Russ Keener
Construction
All types Int./Ext.
Remodeling.
Porches & Decks
Windows & Doors
Free Estimates.
PA Lic #: 079549
570-336-6958
1252 Roofing &
Siding
J&F ROOFING
SPECIALISTS
All types of roofing.
Repairs & Installation
25 Years Experience
Licensed / Insured
Free Estimates
Reliable Service
Lifetime Shingles
on all roofs for same
price as 30 year.
570-855-4259
J.R.V. ROOFING
570-824-6381
Roof Repairs & New
Roofs. Shingle, Slate,
Hot Built Up, Rubber,
Gutters & Chimney
Repairs. Year Round.
Licensed/Insured
ŠFREE EstimatesŠ
Jim Harden
570-288-6709
New Roofs &
Repairs, Shingles,
Rubber, Slate,
Gutters, Chimney
Repairs. Credit
Cards accepted.
FREE ESTIMATES!
Licensed-Insured
EMERGENCIES
Mister “V” Mister “V”
Constr Construction uction
Year Round
Roof Specialist
Specializing In
All Types of
Roofs, Siding,
Chimneys
& Roof Repairs
Low Prices
Free Estimates
Licensed
& Insured
28 Years
Experience
570-829-5133
WINTER
ROOFING
Special $1.29 s/f
Licensed, insured,
fast service
570-735-0846
1297 Tree Care
GASHI AND SONS
TREE SERVICE
AND STUMP
REMOVAL.
Fully Insured.
570-693-1875
1336 Window
Cleaning
Professional
Window Cleaning
& More.
Gutters, carpet,
pressure washing.
Residential/com-
mercial. Ins./bond-
ed. Free est.
570-283-9840
Call 829-7130 to Advertise!
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
KINGST KINGSTON ON
A A GREA GREAT T PLACE!!! PLACE!!!
LIKE NEW!! LIKE NEW!!
2 bedroom
apartment in
great neighbor-
hood. 2nd floor.
Includes new
kitchen (with new
stove, dishwash-
er & microwave)
& bath w/washer
dryer hookup.
Hardwood
throughout with
ceramic tile in
kitchen and bath.
$695/mo + utili-
ties and security.
No Pets, refer-
ences required.
Call Scott
(570) 823-2431
Ext. 137
KINGSTON
Large 2 bedroom.
Newly painted.
Stove & fridge
included.
Washer/ dryer
hookup. $650; heat
included. Call
570-814-0843 or
570-696-3090
KINGSTON
SDK GREEN
ACRES HOMES
11 Holiday Drive
Kingston
“A Place To
Call Home”
Spacious 1, 2 & 3
Bedroom Apts
3 Bedroom
Townhomes
Gas heat included
FREE
24hr on-site Gym
Community Room
Swimming Pool
Maintenance FREE
Controlled Access
Patio/Balcony
and much more...
Call Today
or stop by
for a tour!
Now Offering
Move In Specials
570-288-9019
LARKSVILLE
Very clean, 1st floor
3 Bedroom with
modern bath and
kitchen. New floor-
ing, large closets.
Off Street Parking,
fenced yard. Water
& garbage included.
Tenant pays electric
& gas service.
$575/month. No
pets. One year
lease.
570-760-5573
LUZERNE
1 bedroom, wall to
wall, off-street
parking, coin
laundry, water,
sewer & garbage
included. $495/
month + security
& lease. HUD
accepted. Call
570-687-6216 or
570-954-0727
LUZERNE
41 Mill Street
1st floor, 2 bed-
room, large bath
with shower, stove,
refrigerator and
dishwasher, wash-
er/dryer hookup,
1 car attached
garage. Fieldstone
working fireplace.
Non Smoking.
Too many extras to
mention, call for
more details.
$700 + utilities.
570-288-3438
MOUNTAIN TOP
1 Bedroom apart-
ments for elderly,
disabled. Rents
based on 30% of
ADJ gross income.
Handicap Accessi-
ble. Equal Housing
Opportunity. TTY711
or 570-474-5010
This institution is an
equal opportunity
provider &
employer.
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
MOUNTAIN TOP
WOODBRYN
1 & 2 Bedroom,
available
immediately, No
pets. Rents based
on income start
at $395 & $430.
Handicap Accessi-
ble. Equal Housing
Opportunity.
Call 570-474-5010
TTY711
This institution is an
equal opportunity
provider and
employer.
NANTICOKE
1 bedroom, 2nd floor,
refrigerator, stove,
washer/dryer
hook-up &porch.
$425/month plus
utilities, security
&references.
Water, sewage,
garbage included.
No smoking.
No pets.
570-239-2070
NANTICOKE
1st floor, 1 bedroom.
Heat, water,
garbage & sewage
included. Off street
parking. All appli-
ances included.
$530 + security.
Call 570-406-5221
NANTICOKE
2 bedroom, wall to
wall carpet, off-
street parking, $495
per month+ utilities,
security, lease.
HUD accepted. Call
570-687-6216
or 570-954-0727
NANTICOKE
Modern 3 room,
wall to wall carpet,
washer/dryer
hookup, fridge &
range. Water
sewer, garbage&
off street parking
included. $430/mo.
No pets. Call
570-735-3479
NANTICOKE
Spacious 2 bed-
room apartment.
Wall to wall carpet,
coin operated laun-
dry on premises,
Garbage & sewer
included. $600/mo.
+ security. Credit
check & references
required. Call
Monica Lessard
570-287-1196
Ext. 3182
NANTICOKE
Spacious 2 bed-
room, enclosed
porch, No pets.
$475 + electric.
Call 570-262-5399
PARSONS
Newly renovated 1st
floor, 1 bedroom.
Nice neighborhood.
Appliances includ-
ed. Washer/dryer
hookup. No pets.
Security & lease.
$435/month + all
utilities. Call
570-690-3086
PITTSTON
3 bedroom. Off
street parking, on
site laundry.
Enclosed porch.
Tenant pays electric
& trash. $695 +
utilities. Security
required. Call
(570) 881-1747
PITTSTON TWP.
Newly remodeled 2
bedroom apart-
ment. Living room,
kitchen, laundry &
bath 1st floor. 2 bed-
rooms 2nd floor.
Includes water &
garbage. No pets,
no smoking. $550 +
security. Call
(570) 655-4533
WILKES-BARRE
2 bedroom. Heat &
hot water included,
$600 month +
Security required
570-237-5397
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
PLAINS TOWNSHIP
Walking Distance to
the Casino!! 2 bed-
room, 1 bath, living
room, kitchen, off
street parking.
$600/month +
utilities, security &
references. Call
Classic Properties
Nikki Callahan
718-4959 Ext. 1306
PLYMOUTH
1st floor, 1 bedroom
apartment. Stove,
fridge, water &
sewage included.
Front & Back porch.
$400 + security. Call
570-262-0540
PLYMOUTH
Nice, recently reno-
vated 1st floor 1
bedroom. Stove &
Fridge included.
$500 + electric &
garbage. Lease,
security, references
Call for appointment
and application.
570-417-0088
SHEATOWN
Beautiful 1st floor, 2
1/2 bedroom. Stove
and fridge. Large
kitchen, on-site
laundry room. Off
street parking. $600
+ Cooking Gas &
Electric, security,
lease & background
check. Call
570-417-0088
for appointment
SUGAR NOTCH
675 Main St
3 bedroom, 1 bath,
2nd floor, electric
heat, refrigerator
and stove included.
No pets.
$550/month +
utilities & security
Call 570-371-2030
West Pittston, Pa.
GARDEN VILLAGE
APARTMENTS
221 Fremont St.
Housing for the
elderly & mobility
impaired; all utilities
included. Federally
subsidized
program. Extremely
low income persons
encouraged to
apply. Income less
than $11,900.
570-655-6555,
8 am-4 pm,
Monday-Friday.
EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY
HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE
WHITE HAVEN
1 bedroom. Heat
included. Pay
electricity and
cable.
$460/monthly
516-457-4002
WILKES-BARRE
1ST FLOOR
260 CAREY AVE.
Small 1 bedroom,
recently remodeled,
heat & water includ-
ed. $520/month.
Call 570-288-3375
WILKES-BARRE
2 bedroom, newly
remodeled. Gas
heat. Washer/dryer
hookup. $475/mo. +
security & utilities.
No pets. Call
(570) 823-5984
WILKES-BARRE
264 Academy St
2 bedrooms, newly
renovated building.
Washer & dryer.
$600/per month
includes heat, hot
water and parking.
646-712-1286
570-328-9896
570-855-4744
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
WILKES-BARRE
Mayflower
Crossing
Apartments
570.822.3968
- Light & bright
open floor plans
- All major
appliances included
- Pets welcome*
- Close to everything
- 24 hour emergency
maintenance
- Short term
leases available
Call TODAY For
AVAILABILITY!!
www.mayflower
crossing.com
Certain Restrictions
Apply*
WILKES-BARRE
2 bedrooms apt.
2nd floor, stove,
fridge, fenced in
yard, $500 + gas,
electric & water.
570-417-0088 for
appointment &
application.
WILKES-BARRE
447 S. Franklin St.
MUST MUST SEE! SEE!
1 bedroom, study,
off street parking,
laundry. Includes
heat and hot water,
Hardwood floors
and appliances.
Trash removal.
$575/per month,
Call (570) 821-5599
Wilkes-Barre
Apartments
Available
SAI NT JOHN
APARTMENTS
419 N. Main St
Wilkes Barre
Spacious
1 bedroom.
Secured Senior
Building.
Applicants must
be over age 62 &
be income
qualified.
Rent start at $501
per month.
Includes ALL
utilities.
570-970-6694
Opportunity
Equal
Housing
WILKES-BARRE
APARTMENTS
FOR RENT!
425 South Franklin
Street. For lease.
Available immedi-
ately, washer/dryer
on premises, no
pets. We have stu-
dio, 1, 2 bedroom
apts. On site park-
ing. Fridge, stove
provided. We have a
24/7 security cam-
era presence and all
doors are electroni-
cally locked. $450-
650/per month,
water & sewer paid,
One month/security
deposit. Call (570)
793-6377 after
10:00 a.m. to set an
appointment or
email shlomo_voola
@yahoo.com.
wilkesliving.com
WILKES-BARRE
LAFAYETTE GARDENS
SAVE MONEY THIS YEAR!
113 Edison St.
Quiet neighborhood.
2 bedroom apart-
ments available for
immediate occu-
pancy. Heat & hot
water included. $625
Call Aileen at
570-822-7944
Formerly The
Travel Lodge
497 Kidder St.,
Wilkes-Barre
Rooms Starting
at:
Daily $44.99 +
tax
Weekly $189.99
+ tax
Microwave,
Refrigerator,
WiFi, HBO
570-823-8881
www.Wilkes
BarreLodge.com
WILKES-BARRE WILKES-BARRE
LODGE LODGE
WILKES-BARRE NORTH
1 East Chestnut St.
Near Cross Valley &
General Hospital.
2nd floor, 2
bedrooms, wall to
wall carpet, eat-in
kitchen with range,
shared yard, water
included. Tenant
pays gas heat &
electric. $425 +
security, No pets.
570-814-1356
WILKES-BARRE NORTH
807 N. Washington
2 bedrooms, 2nd
floor. Wall to wall
carpeting. Eat in
kitchen with appli-
ances. Off street
parking - 2 cars.
Coin op laundry. All
utilities included.
$645 / month +
security. No pets.
570-814-1356
WILKES-BARRE SOUTH
SECURE BUILDINGS
1 & 2 bedroom
apartments.
Laundry facility. Off
street parking avail-
able. Starting at
$440. 570-332-5723
PAGE 16D MONDAY, APRIL 25, 2011 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
962 Rooms
971 Vacation &
Resort Properties
962 Rooms
971 Vacation &
Resort Properties
Rooms starting at
Daily $39.99 + tax
Weekly $169.99 + tax
Microwave
Refrigerator
WiFi
HBO
(570) 823-8027
www.casinocountrysideinn.com
info@casinocountrysideinn.com
Bear Creek Township
C
o
u
n
t
r
y
s
i
d
e
I
n
n
C
a
s
i
n
o
BLACK LAKE, NY
NEED A VACATION?
Come relax and enjoy
great fishing & tranquility
at it’s finest.
Housekeeping cottages
on the water with all the
amenities of home.
(315) 375-8962
www.blacklake4fish.com
daveroll@blacklakemarine.com
944 Commercial
Properties
944 Commercial
Properties
PROVINCIAL TOWER - S. MAIN
Great Commercial Store Front,
& Inside Suites Available
Steps from New Intermodal Hub
& Public Parking
FREE RENT - Call For Details Today!
570-829-1573
Starting at $650
utilities included
WILKES-BARRE
CALL AN
EXPERT.
Looking to improve your home...
Check out The Times Leader’s “Call An
Expert” directory in the classifieds. We have
the largest professional services directory in
your hometown.
TO ADVERTISE YOUR “EXPERT” SERVICES,
CALL US AT 570-829-7130
NUMBER
ONE
AUDITED
NEWSPAPER
IN LUZERNE COUNTY
N
NNNNNEEEEEWWWWWWWWWWSSSSSSSS
IIIINNNN LLLLUUUZZZZZZZEEEEEEEEERRRRRRRRRRRNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNN
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
WILKES-BARRE
NORTH END
Large 1 bedroom
apartment. Includes
heat, hot & cold
running water,
fridge, stove, coin-
op laundry, off
street parking, back
yard. $535 + securi-
ty. For appointment
call 570-814-3138
WILKES-BARRE
OPEN HOUSE
April 16th
10:00AM-4:00PM
Š1 & 2 bedrooms
ŠLaundry facility
ŠStove, fridge
ŠSecure building
ŠCommunity
Rooms.
ŠElevator
Š2 fully handicap
accessible apts.
also available
Recently
renovated.
Call Christy
570-417-0088
FRANKLIN GARDENS
SENIOR LIVING
WILKES-BARRE
Scott Street
2nd floor, 5 rooms,
heat & hot water
furnished. Stove,
fridge, off-street
parking, no pets.
$400/month + secu-
rity & references.
Call 570-696-3381
WILKES-BARRE SOUTH
1st floor, 2 bed-
room. Wall to wall
carpet. Off street
parking. Washer/
dryer included. 1
month security &
references & credit
check. No pets. Call
for more info.
(570) 574-2249
Wilkes-Barre SOUTH
Charming 2 bed-
room, 2nd floor,
duplex, 1 1/2 baths,
laundry room, wall
to wall, stove &
refrigerator. Heat &
Water included.
$575
Call 570-824-4904
WILKES-BARRE TWP
2.5 bedroom,
basement apartment,
washer/dryer hookup
and yard.
Clean &ready.
No smoking or pets.
$505 + utilities
&security
Call 570-823-3983
LEAVE A MESSAGE
Wilkes-Barre
Wilkes University
Campus
Studio up to 4 bed-
room. From $400.
All utilities included.
570-826-1934
Wilkes-Barre
Š2 bedroom
single,
exceptional
Kingston
ŠLarge 3
bedroom
Hanover
Š3 bedroom,
large, affordable
Nanticoke
Š2 bedroom,
large, water
included
Pittston
ŠLarge 1
bedroom water
included
Wyoming
Š3 bedroom
exceptional
Old Forge
Š2 bedroom
exceptional
water included
McDermott &
McDermott
Real Estate
Inc. Property
Management
570-821-1650
(direct line)
Mon-Fri. 8-7pm
Sat. 8-noon
WYOMING
2nd floor. Bright &
cheery. Freshly
painted. Single
Occupancy. One
bedroom. Quiet
building & neighbor-
hood. Includes
stove, refrigerator,
heat, water, sewer
& trash. No
smoking. No pets.
Security, references
& credit check.
$585./month
Call (570) 609-5133
WYOMING
BLANDINA
APARTMENTS
Deluxe 1 & 2 bed-
room. Wall to Wall
carpet. Some utili-
ties by tenant. No
pets. Non-smoking.
Elderly community.
Quiet, safe. Off
street parking. Call
570-693-2850
944 Commercial
Properties
ASHLEY
Hazleton St.
Modern office for
lease only. Visible
from Rt309 & I-81
with easy access to
both. Adaptable to
many uses. Tenant
pays utilities.
$5,000/month
Contact Judy Rice
714-9230
MLS# 11-851
COMMERCIAL BUILDING
12,000 + square
foot. Forty Fort
60 Dilley Street
Rent with Option
To Buy or For Sale.
Zoned commercial
& Industrial. Ware-
house, offices, 4
bath rooms, huge
storage area.
Available June 1st.
570-881-4993
COMMERCIAL COMMERCIAL
RET RETAIL AIL SP SPACE ACE
800 to 2400 sq. ft.
available starting at
$750/month
Established
Wilkes-Barre
Shopping
Center
973-265-4234
DOLPHIN PLAZA
Rte. 315
2,000 SF
Office / Retail
Next to Gymboree
4,500 SF Office
Showroom,
Warehouse
Loading Dock
4 Acres touching
I81 will build to suit.
Call 570-829-1206
DURYEA
Up to 7,500 SF
Warehouse.
Includes offices and
baths. 20’ ceilings.
3 overhead doors
with loading dock.
Much paved off
street parking.
Reduced to
$800-$2,100/mo.
Call 570-885-5919
FORTY FORT
Free standing build-
ing. Would be great
for any commercial
use. 1900 sq. ft. on
the ground floor
with an additional
800 sq. ft in finished
lower level. Excel-
lent location, only 1
block from North
Cross Valley
Expressway and
one block from
Wyoming Ave (route
11) Take advan-
tage of this prime
location for just
$1050 per month!
570-262-1131
KINGSTON
239 Schuyler Ave
2,050 sf office
space. 2nd floor.
Modern, four sepa-
rate offices, large
reception area,
break room, confer-
ence room & pri-
vate bathroom.
$795 month
+ utilities
Call 706-5628
COMMERCIAL SPACE
KINGSTON FOR RENT
620 Market St.
Newly Renovated
Prime Space.
1,250 sq. ft.,
Near Kingston
Corners. Great
location for retail or
business office.
Easy Access and
parking. Call Cliff
570-760-3427
LUZERNE
125 Main Street
Office or Retail
Space available
with over 2,000 sq.
ft. + attached
garage in high
traffic area. $650/
month + utilities.
Call 570-331-3600
OFFICE SPACE
18 Pierce St
Kingston, PA
Available Immedi-
ately, Off street
parking. Security
required. 3 room
Suite $300/month,
includes utilities.
570-690-0564
570-823-7564
944 Commercial
Properties
OFFICE SPACE
KINGSTON
166 W. Union St.
Avail. March 1.
600 sq. ft of newly
renovated office
space. Rent
includes heat and
electric. Off street
parking available.
$800 per month.
Call 570-287-5090
OFFICE SPACE
West Pittston
Wyoming Ave.
High traffic location.
Office space with
Character. 885 sq.
ft. Great for busi-
ness, retail or spa.
Rent includes heat
& water. Call for
more details at
570-655-9325
PAD WITH DRIVE THRU
Available on
busy corner.
2500 sq. ft.
Wilkes-Barre
973-879-4730
PLAINS TWP
7 PETHICK DRIVE
OFF RTE. 315
1200 & 700 SF
Office Available.
Reasonable.
570-760-1513
315 PLAZA
1750 & 3200 SF
Retail / Office
Space Available
570-829-1206
944 Commercial
Properties
SWEET VALLEY
REDUCED PRICE!
Start your own
business in the
heart of Sweet Val-
ley! Showroom, fire-
place, pole building,
storage building,
paved parking,
fenced rear, well &
septic. Prime loca-
tion, high traffic
area. Lot next door
is going with the
property.
NOW LISTED AT
$115,000
MLS# 08-3297
Five Mountains
Realty
570-542-2141
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
944 Commercial
Properties
WAREHOUSE/LIGHT
MANUFACTURING
OFFICE SPACE
PITTSTON
Main St.
12,000 sq. ft. build-
ing in downtown
location. Ware-
house with light
manufacturing.
Building with some
office space. Entire
building for lease or
will sub-divide.
MLS #10-1074
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
VM 101
WILKES-BARRE
TIRED OF HIGH
RENTS?
Are you paying too
much for your cur-
rent office? Call us!
We have modern
office space avail-
able in Luzerne
Bank Building on
Public Square.
Rents include heat,
central air, utilities,
trash removal, and
nightly cleaning - all
without a sneaky
CAM charge.
Access parking at
the new intermodal
garage via our cov-
ered bridge. 300SF
to 5000SF available.
We can remodel to
suit. Brokers Pro-
tected. Call Jeff
Pyros at 822-8577
944 Commercial
Properties
WILKES-BARRE
Lease this free-
standing building for
an AFFORDABLE
monthly rent. Totally
renovated & ready
to occupy. Offices,
conference room,
work stations, kit
and more. Ample
parking and handi-
cap access. $1,750/
month. MLS 11-419
Call Judy Rice
5701-714-9230
947 Garages
KINGSTON
2,500 sf Garage
Zoned Commercial-
ly. Two over head
garage & entrance
doors. Private bath.
Located on private
road. Gas Heat.
$875/month +
utilities, security &
references.
570-706-5628
950 Half Doubles
SUGAR NOTCH
3 bedrooms, quiet
street, yard. Fresh
paint. $525/month
+ utilities, lease,
security. No pets.
Call 570-332-1216
or 570-592-1328
950 Half Doubles
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
Lyndwood Avenue
Very spacious 3
bedroom half dou-
ble with neutral
decor. Off street
parking. Private
yard in rear. Ample
Storage. Conve-
nient to schools.
$560 / month + utili-
ties. 1 year lease,
security. No pets.
Call 570-793-6294
KINGSTON
Large 1/2 double
with 3 bedrooms,
living room, dining
room (with red car-
pet throughout)
eat-in kitchen with
additional pantry
area. 1 bath. Large
fenced yard.
Gas/hot water
baseboard heat. All
utilities by tenant.
$650 + security.
Call Steven
(570) 561-5245
950 Half Doubles
LARKSVILLE
3 bedroom, 1 bath
half double, Freshly
cleaned & painted.
Tenant pays all utili-
ties including sewer.
$550 plus security.
Call (570) 332-5723
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
NANTICOKE
55 Loomis St
3 bedroom, wall
to wall carpet,
full basement &
attic, stove,
fridge & water
included. No
pets. $630
plus security
570-814-1356
950 Half Doubles
PITTSTON 1/2 DOUBLE
2 bedrooms, sun-
room, new bath,
washer/dryer
hookup. No pets.
$580 + utilities &
security, sewer &
garbage included.
Call (570) 655-5156
WILKES-BARRE
178 Charles St
Available Now!
2 bedroom, 1.5
bath, Townhouse
style. No Section 8.
$550/month + utili-
ties. References &
security required.
Call 570-301-2785
953Houses for Rent
BACK MOUNTAIN
2 bedroom, 2 bath
home in beautiful
rural setting next to
Friedman Farms.
$1,100 monthly. Call
570-822-2992
BEAR CREEK VILLAGE
Beautiful 2 story
4 bedroom home
for rent situated on
4 wooded acres.
Garage, shed,
$1,200. All utilities
by tenant. Security
& references
required. Small pets
ok. (570) 690-3094
DUPONT
Large completely
remodeled 2 bed-
room styled town-
house. Stove &
fridge included.
Private interior
attic & basement
access. Washer/
dryer hookup. Heat
included. Nice yard.
$750. No pets.
570-479-6722
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
3 bedroom single
family. 1 1/2 baths.
Driveway, yard, nice
area. $800 + utilities
Call 570-332-5723
HARVEY’S LAKE
2 bedroom home.
All appliances,
water, sewer & trash.
NO PETS. Security
and lease.
570-762-6792
KINGSTON
54 Krych St.
Single: 3 bed-
room, 1.5 bath,
gas heat, wall to
wall, kitchen with
stove & refrigera-
tor. Quiet street.
No pets. Not Sec-
tion 8 approved.
$675/mo.
570-288-6009
KINGST KINGSTON ON
For lease, avail-
able immediately.
3 bedrooms, 2
bathrooms, Stove,
Refrigerator, Dish
Washer Provided,
washer/dryer hook
up, NO Pets,
Freshly Painted,
$750/per month,
plus utilities, $750
+First Month/secu-
rity deposit. Call
(570)885-0843
after 9:00 a.m. for
a private showing
or email
ccamark49
@verizon.net.
LUZERNE
2nd floor, 2 bed-
rooms, living room,
eat-in kitchen, wall
to wall, washer &
dryer. $485 heat
included. Security &
references required
Call 570-288-8012
MOUNTAINTOP
2 Bedroom
Cottage in quiet
setting. $875 +
utilities, security,
application & lease.
570-592-1241
NANTICOKE
Desirable
Lexington Village
Nanticoke, PA
Many ranch style
homes. 2 bedrooms
2 Free Months With
A 2 Year Lease
$795 + electric
SQUARE FOOT RE
MANAGEMENT
866-873-0478
PITTSTON
James Street
Single family home,
freshly painted,
brand new gas fur-
nace, 3 bedrooms,
1 1/2 baths, off
street parking. No
pets, no smoking.
$675 / month + utili-
ties. Call Betty at
Century 21
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-287-1196
ext 3559
or 570-714-6127
953Houses for Rent
SWEET VALLEY
Available May 1st
3 bedroom, 2 bath
home in quiet,coun-
try setting. Large
eat in kitchen, full
basement. No pets.
$800/month + secu-
rity & utilities. Call
(570) 477-3346 or
(570) 762-2774
WEST PITTSTON
SINGLE FAMILY
HOME
622 Foundry Street,
Available immedi-
ately, 3 bedrooms, 1
bathroom, refrigera-
tor and stove pro-
vided, washer/dryer
hookup, pets ok,
Fenced in yard.
Great neighbor-
hood. $725.00/per
month, plus utilities,
$$725.00/security
deposit. Call
(570) 239-4102
WILKES-BARRE
MONARCH RENTALS
STUDENT HOUSING
3 bedrooms,
all appliances
provided.
Call 570-822-7039
WILKES-BARRE
Parsons
143 Stucker Ave.
3 Bedroom 1-1/2
Bath. 1,900 square
foot Modern Home
in Great Neighbor-
hood. Includes all
Appliances. Large
fenced in yard with
deck & shed. Off
Street Parking. No
smokers / pets.
$875 / month + utili-
ties. Security, Cred-
it Check & Refer-
ences Required.
570-332-6003
WILKES-BARRE
Riverside Dr.
Stately brick, 4
bedroom, 2 bath &
2 half bath home.
Hardwood floors,
spacious rooms,
beautiful patio,
all appliances
included. $1,600/
month + utilities.
MLS#10-2290
570-696-3801
Call Margy
570-696-0891
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
962 Rooms
KINGSTON HOUSE
Nice, clean
furnished room,
starting at $315.
Efficiency at $435
month furnished
with all utilities
included. Off
street parking.
570-718-0331
965 Roommate
Wanted
SCRANTON/SOUTH
Quiet Block
4 private bedrooms
plus shared kitchen
& baths, ample
closets.
$420/month
570-575-6280
971 Vacation &
Resort Properties
FLORIDA
Boca Raton
Beautiful 5 room
home with Pool.
Fully furnished. On
canal lot. $600
weekly. If interest-
ed, write to:
120 Wagner St.
Moosic, PA 18507
WILDWOOD CREST
Ocean front, on the
Beach. 1 bedroom
Condo, pool.
5/6-6/23 $1,250/
week. 06/24 - 9/9
$1,550/week
Call 570-693-3525

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