The Pittston Dispatch 04-24-2011 | Pittston | Easter

WILKES-BARRE, PA $1.

00 Sunday, April 24, 2011
Catholic radio
station broadcasts
from the Oblates.
>> PAGE 3
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Word of God
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Ashby Game
is Monday
HAPPY EASTER
PHOTO BY BILL TARUTIS
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Today’s Jesus, the Easter
Jesus, is the one I want to be-
lieve in. He’s the Jesus of tri-
umph, the Jesus of everlasting
life.
But it’s the Garden at Geth-
semane Jesus that I most identi-
fy with. He’s the Jesus of fear,
the Jesus of doubt.
My faith, I must confess, is
rife with doubt. The Garden at
Gethsemane Jesus understands
this.
It’s my faith, let me empha-
size, that’s weak, not my love of
Christ. That’s stronger than
ever.
Jesus is the best friend I’ve
ever had and I’ll take up a cross
for him any day. I’m just not
completely positive it leads to
resurrection.
I discuss this with Jesus all
the time, and I do talk to Him
all the time, first thing in the
morning, for certain, and al-
ways last thing at night.
And most definitely if I
should awake from my sleep
during the night. That’s when I
have my best conversations
with Him, even though they
often begin with, “Jesus, I’m
not so sure you exist, but …”
Then I become the Biblical
father of the sick child who
tells Jesus, “Yes I believe; help
my unbelief.”
That’s me – one big contra-
diction.
If I were Jesus I think I might
be mad at me by now. Eddie, I
might say, how many times do I
have to reassure you? But I’m
not Jesus. Good. Jesus, one
would think, has the patience of
a saint.
And a sense of humor, I
hope.
My head is filled with teach-
ings of Jesus: want to be first,
be willing to be last; want to
find yourself, lose yourself;
love your God with your whole
heart and mind and your neigh-
bor as yourself; be careful
where you store up your riches,
for that is where your heart will
be. Those I adhere to without
much trouble. But the one that
trips me up is: “Do not put the
Lord, thy God, to the test.”
I truly don’t want to do that,
but I can’t help myself.
My tests aren’t that difficult,
mind you, no need to keep
parting the Red Sea. And I’d
never even hint at anything as
obvious as a winning lottery
ticket, too much self in that.
No, just a little sign is all I
request of my God, an occa-
sional something to make me
take notice. I let the details up
to Him. And I’ve discovered
He’s quite creative.
At the risk of sounding silly,
I’m going to share a story of
such a sign.
One of my duties at the Dis-
patch is to edit the column
“Peeking into the Past” and
then place it into a template on
page 17. I do that every single
week. You don’t have to be a
graphic designer to appreciate
that having it fit exactly into the
template is quite impossible.
Judy Minsavage, who writes
the column, produces in the
vicinity of 1400 words every
time. But because words vary
in size, usually the column is as
much as an inch short or an
inch long, sometimes more. It’s
my job to make it fit, which
could mean cutting out words,
even whole paragraphs, one
week, or adding a few sentenc-
es the next. It’s not hard, but it
must be taken care of.
Well, a year or so ago, I was
in the midst of a more devas-
tating than usual collapse in
faith. When that happens, I just
continue to do my daily chores
until the gloom passes. I really
don’t have much of a choice.
Heavy-hearted, I sat alone one
night at the Dispatch going
about my business. I was in the
middle of heaving yet another
sigh as I let go of the mouse
and watched Judy’s “Peeking”
column flow onto the computer
screen … and fit absolutely
perfectly. Right to the pica, as
old school printers might say.
Trust me, this borders on the
miraculous. It certainly had
never happened before.
I looked Heavenward and felt
chills creep up my arms. “This
is You, isn’t it?” I said, and I
knew it was.
That shut me up for a good
while.
Spin the calendar ahead to
about a month ago, however,
and yet again there I was wide
awake in the middle of the
night talking to a Jesus I’m sure
wasn’t listening and yet again
begging for help with my un-
belief. “Remember that night
with Judy’s column?” I asked.
“Well, I’m sorry but I need
those little reminders every now
and then. They keep me going.”
The very next evening I was
alone at the Dispatch editing
Peeking into the Past. Need I
say more?
Right to the pica.
I gasped and this time I could
even feel the chills in the few
hairs I have left on my head.
My eyes filled up and I must
admit my joy was tempered by
a genuine sense of fear. At the
same time I felt incredibly
small yet somehow eternal.
I considered falling to my
knees and, looking back, I wish
I had. I owe you one, Jesus.
Ed Ackerman, optimist
eackerman@psdispatch.com
Help for my unbelief
God through the Air.........................................3
Sunday Sitdown ...............................................4
The Great Awning Caper ................................5
Local Chatter ....................................................8
Matters of Faith ...............................................10
Editorial /Letters.............................................14
Jack Smiles ......................................................15
Nutrition............................................................15
Peeking into the Past......................................17
Maria Heck .......................................................18
Town News ......................................................39
Sports ..............................................................46
Obituaries .......................................................60
Weddings.................................................Social 1
Birthdays................................................Social 3
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VOL. 65, NO. 11
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Call Karen Fiscus at 970-7291
Advertising deadline is Thursday at 3 P.M.
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Father Leo McKernan is well-
known as the pastor of St. Mon-
ica’s Church of the Wyomings,
the new parish created by the
merger of St. Joseph’s and Our
Lady of Sorrows parishes.
But he’s got another giga lot of
folks may not know about – he’s
the host of his own radio show.
Father McKernan hosts his
show “Reflections with Father
Leo” four times a week on JMJ
Catholic Radio on WQOR 750
AM.
And here’s another thing not
widelyknown–JMJ has beenlo-
cated in Pittston at the St. Joseph
Oblates Seminary on Rt. 315 for
three years.
Ed Niewinski and his wife
Carol manage the 1600-watt sta-
tion, a 501c3 non-profit organi-
zation that depends on listener
donations andunderwriters Bon-
ner Chevrolet and Saporito Law
Offices for operating capital.
For Holy Week this week on
Wednesday, Thursday and Fri-
day the station will conduct an
on-air fund raiser in conjunction
with National Catholic Radio’s
Radiothon. During local breaks
JMJ Radio will accept donation
pledges on air.
Ed explained howthe station’s
studio wound up in Oblates
building. He and his wife were
volunteers and on the advisory
board for the owner of several
Catholic radio stations, one of
which was in Scranton. Four
years ago that owner called Ed
and said donations were down to
the point where he couldn’t keep
the Scranton station going and
he wanted to sell it.
Ed understood the owner’s po-
sition. “I said ‘that’s fine, I hope
you sell it to someone who will
keep it Catholic.’ He couldn’t
guarantee that. So my wife and I
went to Landmark Bank and se-
cured a loan with our personal
guarantee and bought the sta-
tion.” The sale included the FCC
license, the studio equipment, a
satellite dish and the transmitter
on Olyphant Mountain from
where the station’s signal can re-
ach Luzerne, Lackawanna and
Monroe Counties and the South-
ern Tier of New York.
At the time the station was
renting studio space in Scranton.
Three years ago in March of
2008 the station moved the stu-
dio to a free space at the Oblates
Seminary offered by Fr. Paul
McDonnell, O.S.J. the Oblates
Seminary Rector. How did that
happen? “I went to him on my
hands and knees and asked,” Ed
said with a laugh.
Volunteers moved the studio
into the Oblates and set up the
satellite dish outside to receive
National Catholic Radio feeds
which provide 60 percent of the
programming for the station
which broadcasts fromsunrise to
sunset seven days a week.
The other 40 percent is pro-
duced locally, including Father
McKernan’s show and shows
hosted by Jerry Gilmartin, Ann
Marie Yeager, Carol Margetts
and Arlene McCabe.
Go to www.jmj750.com for a
programing schedule.
Ed said based on calls to the
station housewives and over-the-
road truckers and salesmen com-
prise a lot of the station’s audi-
ence, though Catholics of all
stripes do tune in.
Ed and Carol emphasize that
the stationhas nopaidstaff andis
operated entirely by volunteers
and is dependent on donations to
survive.
Tune in, again that’s 750 AM
on Wednesday, Thursday, and
Friday to learn more about Ca-
tholic radio and howto donate to
keep the station going.
Filling the airwaves with the Word of God
Local Catholic radio station on-air fund raiser this week
By Jack Smiles
Associate Editor
JMJ radio station volunteers and staff, front row, fromleft, Ann Marie Yeager, Carol Margetts, Arlene McCabe, Jackie Galvin, Ed Niewinski, Carol Ann Niewinski, Phillip
Galasso. Second row, Father Leo McKernan, Carol Skalski, Mary Ann Magda, Father Michael Salvagna C.P., James Galvin, Mark Gill, Dr. Richrad Loomis, Karen Comisky,
Father Alvardo Deo Live OSJ, Father Daniel Schwebbs OSJ, Father Paul McDonnell, OSJ, Jerome Gilmartin.
PHTOS BY TONY CALLAIO
JMJ Radio manager Ed Niewinski tests the studio equipment
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827 Exeter Avenue, West Pittston, PA • 655-5579
Happy Easter!
from
Open Today
4 to 10pm!
Serving Generations of Greater Pittston
Residents For Over 60 Years
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Maxwell Marcus, 64, has lived
most of life in Exeter, where he
graduated from Exeter High
School in 1964. He graduated
from King’s in ’68 with degrees
in Political Science and History
then was drafted and served in
the Army for three years, includ-
ing a year in Vietnam.
After the Army he got a mas-
ter’s degree from Villanova in
Public Administration and then
worked for the IRS for 20 years
in out of the area before coming
back to Exeter.
What was it like growing up
in Exeter?
It was a typical small town,
where every neighborhood had
its own teams and you had your
own buddies. Every street was
different. I was on Lincoln and
we were friends with kids from
Penn Avenue and maybe as far
down as Orchard Street. Then
from Orchard down to Schooley
that was another group and then
Sullivan Park. First Ward was
another group. It was fine grow-
ing up here.
They had the Liberty Theater
in Exeter. I think it closed in ‘64,
after that we would walk to
Wyoming to go to the movies or
walk or get a ride to Pittston. My
father had an insurance business
in Pittston. To us Pittston was
like New York City.
People talk about Pittston,
but Exeter had its own down-
town?
Oh yeah. They had the theater,
they had supermarkets, they had
drygoods stores. There was a ba-
by store. Alot of themwere Jew-
ish merchants. Abe Kaufman
had a feed store. SamStern had a
furniture store. Mark’s had a su-
permarket. My grandfather had
Montrose Beef. They got people
from all over. Then there were
others who weren’t Jewish.
Charlie’s ice cream store. Tony
Workomski had an Army Navy
store next to Zavada’s pool room.
There were a lot of pool rooms.
And, of course, a bar on every
corner.
Were there a lot of Jewish
people in the area?
We went to the Exeter Syn-
agogue. It was where Sickler’s
has a parking lot now. My father
was the secretary. My uncles
were the presidents. They still
have a cemetery in West Pittston
and I’m the vice-president. Exe-
ter even had a Jewish burgess,
Max Gross in the 1890s.
There was a synagogue in Pitt-
ston. We’d go over there some-
times.
The Exeter synagogue lasted
from probably 1906 to 1975.
What happened to the local
Jewish population?
The same thing that happened
with any ethnic group. There
were a lot of Jewish merchants,
Jewish family businesses. World
War II was a big dividing point.
After the war some people held
on to the businesses and the chil-
dren went into it, but a lot of
them didn’t. The second and
thirdgenerations became profes-
sional people. They went to col-
lege. They had to leave for op-
portunities. They didn’t want to
come home to run a fruit store or
market. The same happened to
the Irish, Italians, Protestants.
Look what’s happening to St.
Cecilia’s, St. John’s, the Polish
church on Schooley Street.
They’re all hurting for number,
money. I’msick about St. Mary’s
Assumption school closing.
Okay, money rules everything,
give it its due, but I think we lose
something every time something
like that happens.
In Greater Wyoming Valley
there were say, four or 5,000 10
years ago Jews before the flood
even more. That was another di-
viding point. Now there are
probably about 1800, so it’s hard
to keep the synagogues going.
Given that, why did you
come back?
My mother was elderly and
living alone and I wanted to
come back. I was in collection
with the IRS, which was no fun.
(Laughs). It’s hard to be hard-
nosed. You’re torn between what
you think is right and what they
[the IRS] want. They want some-
thing and they have to have it.
Vietnam?
I was drafted. I was in the Ar-
my three years. For one year I
was stationedat Qui Nhon, a port
where deep draft ships came in.
It was a support command. I
wasn’t in infantry, but we pulled
guard duty. It was a long year.
You helped start the Exeter
Historical Society. Why?
I was one of the founders with
Kate Gibbons. We founded it be-
cause every time the Battle of
Wyoming came up people would
say it was in Wyoming. I did an
informal survey and ask where
the Battle of Wyoming was and
people would say right where the
Monument is.
Very, very few people knew it
was in Exeter. I got to be friendly
with Steve Killian of the Histor-
ical Society. He led a walking
tour that started on Fourth Street
at the Avenue in Wyoming and
went up to Valley Street in Exe-
ter. At Fourth Street he said look
downthe street andsee if youcan
see Susquehanna Ave. and you
can’t. Exeter is a lot narrower
that Wyoming from Susquehan-
na to the Avenue. It’s something
you know, but never really think
about.
The British funneled the colo-
nists into that narrowarea. It was
a sucker move. Fort Wintermute
was on the corner of Valley and
Susquehanna. So the colonists
saw smoke and flames coming
from there and the colonists
thought, oh, they’re fleeing now,
but they weren’t. The British did
this to lure themand they walked
right into the trap.
Valley Street was where the
main line of battle was. It was all
farmland or woods then.
S U N D AY S I T D O W N
Maxwell Marcus founded the Exeter Historical Society
With Jack Smiles
Maxwell Marcus
See MAXWELL, Page 23
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When the city’s redevelop-
ment authority acquired the for-
mer Wayne’s World building at
30 South Main Street an awning
was part of the deal.
As the authority’s plan for re-
constructing the façade of the
building does not include the
awning, the city offered it to
Mark Williamson and Ryan
Ksiezopolski, proprietors of
Yore Antiques two doors north at
25 South Main on the corner of
Charles Street.
The business partners happily
accepted the offer and asked the
authority to store the awning in a
space which is part of their prop-
erty behind Yore Antiques until
they could renovate it and mount
it out front.
Afewdays later when they ar-
rived at their business to start
their work day, the 23-foot long,
150-pound, reinforced alumi-
num frame awning was gone.
Williamson and Ksiezopolski
estimated, based on replacement
value, the awning was worth
$8,000 to $10,000.
After spending the morning
calling metal recyclers from Ha-
nover to Carbondale in an effort
to determine if someone had sto-
len it to sell as scrap they filed a
police report.
An investigation quickly de-
termined the awning had been
removed by city public works
workers by order of Councilman
Danny Argo.
A few days after the awning
went missing, Williamson and
Ksiezopolski addressed Argo at
the CityCouncil. TheysaidArgo
initially denied involvement, but
eventually admitted ordering the
DPW workers to remove the
awning as a favor to the proprie-
tor of Jackett’s Central Lunch
who said the awning was limit-
ing her use of the back of the res-
taurant making deliveries diffi-
cult.
Williamson and Ksiezopolski
accused Argo of acting unilater-
ally and irresponsibly and de-
manded an apology.
Officials apologized on behalf
of the city, but Argo would not.
“It was a misunderstanding,”
Argo said. “I went into the Cen-
tral one morning and they were
tellingme somebodyput anawn-
ing out back that blocked her
kitchen. They were complaining
about deliveries. I had no idea it
was their property (Williamson
and Ksiezopolski) so I had them
(DPW) get it out of there. It was
innocent. Nothing happened. It
wasn’t damaged and it was put
back. It was a misunderstanding
andanyrational personcouldsee
that. They are making a big deal
out of it for political reasons.”
As to his refusal to apologize,
Argo said, “We they got up to
speak at the meeting they said
they had been watching me pick
my nose. Somebody like that
doesn’t deserve acknowledg-
ment.”
Antique businessmen still waiting for Argo apology
By Jack Smiles
Associate Editor
PHOTO BY JACK SMILES
Ryan Ksiezopolski points out the awning that went missing last month.
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West Wyoming Borough re-
ceived a Governor’s Award for
Local Government Excellence
in the category of “responding to
adversity” for taking initiatives
to reverse a deteriorating finan-
cial situation.
Through Pennsylvania’s Early
Intervention program, and with
assistance from the Pennsylva-
nia Economy League, West
Wyoming Borough officials re-
viewed every facet of their gov-
ernment and made difficult deci-
sions to strengthen financial
management and administrative
practices.
By implementing best man-
agement practices, the borough
was able to stabilize its finances
in less than a year and finished
last year in the black for the first
time in five years.
One and a half years ago, West
Wyoming Borough was on the
brink of bankruptcy and contem-
plating filing for an Act 47 dis-
tressed municipality status. The
borough was more than
$900,000 in debt with mounting
unpaid bills and vendors threat-
ening to terminate services.
On the advice of State Repre-
sentative Phyllis Mundy, the bor-
ough entered the State’s Early In-
tervention Program looking to
achieve four basic objectives:
expenditure reduction; revenue
enhancement; adoption of best
management practices to
achieve operating efficiencies;
and pursuit of intergovernmental
cost sharing strategies.
Guided through the program
by the Pennsylvania Economy
League, council members re-
viewed every facet of their gov-
ernment andmade changes toes-
tablish best management prac-
tices for the borough. The chang-
es instituted by borough council
led to a dramatic recovery.
Gerald Cross and Joe Boyle of
the Pennsylvania Economy
League worked closely with
West Wyoming Council mem-
bers through the Early Interven-
tion Program. “With the conclu-
sion of the Early Intervention re-
port and the Borough’s giant
steps toward fiscal responsibili-
ty, fiscal integrity, and sustaina-
bility, I can honestly say that the
leadership of West Wyoming
Council saved the Borough gov-
ernment and allowed it to main-
tain local services without de-
stroying the faith of local citi-
zens and elected leaders,” Cross
said.
Council members re-bid con-
tracts to achieve a significant
savings, cut wasteful spending
and required employees to con-
tribute to their pension and
health care costs. These mea-
sures resulted in a substantial
savings to taxpayers. In addition
the council took aggressive mea-
sures to collect the nearly
$200,000 in delinquent sewer
bills. The council also took steps
to fund its pensions in order to
remove them from the distress
status list.
In order to establish best man-
agement practices the council in-
stituted more oversight by add-
ing an independent treasurer and
pay roll manager and adding a
new financial software package
to increase transparency as well
as regulation. Additionally, to
further increase transparency,
the council established a website
and posts all financial reports as
well as minutes, newsletters and
ordinances. “Establishing best
management practices andtrans-
parency have been two main
goals of this council,” saidCoun-
cil Chairperson Eileen Cipriani.
In October, 2009, the borough
West Wyoming gets Governor’s Award
Through state’s Early Intervention program, borough avoided bankruptcy
Rep. Phyllis Mundy congratulates West Wyoming Borough for receiving the Governor's Award for Local Government Excellence for
taking initiatives to pull itself out of near financial ruin. Pictured are Council Member Geno Leoni; Council member Gil Atherholt; Coun-
cil Chairperson Eileen Cipriani; Rep. Mundy; Council Vice Chairman Gary Stavish; Council Member Daniel Grescavage; and Council
Member Daniel Gadomski. Absent are Council Member Len Tarreto and Mayor Joseph Herbert.
West Wyoming officials receive the Governor's Award in Harrisburg. Fromleft, Fred Reddig Executive Director Governor's Center of
Local Government Services DCED; Rich Hudic, Executive Deputy Secretary DCED; Ray Gustave Secretary West Wyoming Borough;
The Honorable James Cawley Lt Governor Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; Eileen Cipriani Chairperson West Wyoming Borough;
Mayor Joe Herbert; Council Members Dan Gadomski and Gil Atherholt.
See AWARD, Page 9
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A new bill passed recently by Congress
adds guns to the list of household goods
protected from creditors during bank-
ruptcy. The new law allows consumers in
bankruptcy to keep up to $3,000 worth
of frearms in their homes as protected
household goods.
***
A new NewYork state law will allow
homeowners who win foreclosure
proceedings to have the lender pay their
lawyers’ fee.
***
The Washington State Supreme Court
has unanimously upheld the Legislature
made to state water law in 2003 despite
environmentalists’ fear that it will
encourage sprawl and water speculation.
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Best Wishes For A Happy Easter!
Personal bereavement services from a family
owned funeral home. We are not affiliated with
any other funeral home or corporate business.
802 Susquehanna Avenue
West Pittston, PA
PETER J. ADONIZIO
FUNERAL HOME
654-8683
City Council on Wednesday
night unanimously approved the
hiring of Diamond and Associ-
ates of Philadelphia, a real estate
development adviser in afforda-
ble housing and revitalization, to
assist the city in developing a tar-
geted housing plan for a fee not
to exceed $2,500.
Mayor Jason Klush said that
while much has been done
downtown, it was one of his
goals to also work to improve the
individual neighborhoods.
It is hoped the development of
a housing plan help obtain fund-
ing just as past downtown plans
have assisted in getting funding
for the downtown.
In line with the actions of the
Luzerne County district attorney
in seeking a permanent injunc-
tion to stop the sale of “bath
salts” in the county, the council
passed a resolution supporting
the temporary injunction and the
DA’s efforts to obtain a perma-
nent injunction.
Also, council passed a resolu-
tion hiring Richard Goldberg
from Hourigan, Kluger and
Quinn to represent the city in up-
coming labor negotiations with
the police union.
Council also appointed John
McGuire as a trainee for the fire
department and named Dion
Fernandes to a six-month proba-
tionary period as the part-time
property maintenance inspector.
City Administrator Joseph
Moskovitz said the position will
involve the criminal enforce-
ment of existing city ordinances
and regulations as they relate to
building codes. The appoint-
ment was not without controver-
sy.
Councilman Danny Argo said
he was concerned because, even
though the position was adver-
tised, there apparently was no
previous vote to authorize the
advertising for the position.
He also had concerns because
he had no opportunity to be in-
volved in interviews or other hir-
ing activity and because Fer-
nandes was also hired as a part-
time police officer.
The final vote was 4-1, with
Argo opposed.
Council approved an adden-
dum to the professional agree-
ment for the city’s engineering
firm, Reilly Associates, for an
additional payment of $96,900.
Moskovitz said the additional
payment would come from con-
tingency funds in the current
sewer project to cover delays in
the project that necessitated
changes and additional inspec-
tion work.
Council was told paving of
some of the affected roads might
start in a few weeks.
The city passed the final read-
ing of the storm water ordinance
that all municipalities in the
county must adopt to comply
with a newstate law, and an ordi-
nance to restrict truck traffic on
New Street.
City hires firm to help develop housing plan
Mayor says he wants to work to improve city’s neighborhoods
William Bell
Times Leader Correspondent
Charles A. Adonizio III, presi-
dent of the Greater Pittston
Chamber of Commerce, an-
nounced that Michael T. Vough,
Esq. will act as the General
Chairperson of the 91st Anniver-
sary Dinner Meeting. The affair
will be held on Wednesday, May
11, at St. Anthony Parish Center,
Exeter with cocktail hour and
open bar at 5:30 p.m. and cabaret
style event at 6:15 p.m.
Atty. Vough was awarded his
Juris Doctorate Degree from the
University Of Dayton School Of
Law, Dayton, Ohio. He also at-
tended a Summer Honors Pro-
gramin Lawat Oxford Universi-
ty, Oxford, England and earned a
Bachelor of Science degree in
accounting from the University
of Scranton.
Since 1992, Vough worked as
an Assistant District Attorney
for Luzerne County. He has pre-
pared, evaluated and prosecuted
all criminal cases from commis-
sion of the crime through sen-
tencing. He has represented the
Commonwealth in all areas of
Vough chairs Chamber’s anniversary dinner
Atty. Michael T. Vough
See CHAMBER, Page 31
LOCALCHATTER
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What are you chattin’ about? Call 602-0177 or email sd@psdispatch.com and let us know.
Michael O’Donovan of Pitt-
ston was one of 33 students from
Susquehanna University who re-
cently presented research at the
25th annual National Confer-
enceonUndergraduateResearch
at Ithaca College
O’Donovan’s research was ti-
tled, “Variation in Female Sexual
Advertisements with Age and
Social Experience in the Wolf
Spider Pardosa Milvina.” He
worked with Susquehanna facul-
ty member Matt Persons, profes-
sor of biology.
Established in 1987, the con-
ference is dedicated to promot-
ing undergraduate research and
scholarship done in partnership
with faculty or other mentors.
Students experience firsthand
the processes of scholarly explo-
ration and discovery that charac-
terize academic life.
Besides sponsoring the annual
conference, which attracts more
than 2,000 participants, the
NCUR maintains a national net-
work of faculty, students and ad-
ministrators and assists in the
planning and evaluation of un-
dergraduate research programs.
O’Donovan, a senior majoring
in biology, is a 2007 graduate of
Pittston High School and the
daughter of Michael and Karen
O’Donovan.
Happy Birthday-
Happy birthday wishes go to
Mike English Sr. of Pittston
Township who will celebrate on
April 25.
Phil Campenni of West Pitt-
ston will celebrate on April 27.
Amy Lynn Soska of Hughes-
town will celebrate on April 28.
BrookeGoreyof Hughestown
will celebrate on April 28.
Bob Ryzner Sr., of Duryea
will celebratehisdayonApril 28.
Sal Infantino of Suscon will
celebrate on April 30.
Anniversary Wishes-
Happy40thanniversarytoGe-
orgeandAnnTeresaEngleman
of Pittston April 24
Wayne and Maryanne Quick
of Hughestown will celebrate on
April 28.
Wayne and Linda Azaravich
of Pittstonwill celebrateonApril
30.
Recent Grad-
StevenWaskoof Jenkins Twp.
will be graduating cum laude
fromEast Stroudsburg Universi-
ty on May 7. He will be receiving
his Bachelor of Sciencedegreein
ElementaryEducation. Stevehas
done his student teaching at
Pleasant Valley School District
and is presently student teaching
at Pocono Mountain School Dis-
trict. Steve is the sonof Gene and
Chris Wasko.
Free Concert-
Cantores Christi Regis, the
choral group of King’s College,
will performa programof classi-
cal, contemporary, sacred and
secular choral music during their
annual Spring Concert at 7:30
p.m. Friday, April 29 and Satur-
day, April 30, in the J. Carroll
McCormick Campus Ministry
Center, located on Jackson
Street.
For more information, visit
“Experiencing the Arts Calen-
dar” at www.kings.edu or con-
tact RobYenkowski at (570) 208-
6044.
The Easter Egg Chick and
The Easter Bunny
Did you ever notice howdeco-
rative an egg
looks after it is dyed?
Did you ever discover an East-
er chick so beautifully
yellowand wide?
Howabout onanEaster Dayso
sunny,
discovering a floppy-eared
Easter bunny?
Materialized symbols these all
are, of a Blessed
holiday season which is en-
joyed fromafar!
We hunt for the Easter eggs as
children, We
take home a delicious or a pas-
tel-colored prize,
Yes, howunique it would be to
see a beautiful
fluffy chickadee hatch right
before our very
eyes.
The Easter bunny delivers to
children the
beautiful Easter eggs.
Now we as adults realize, that
when we
were all children, we did noth-
ing but fantasize
Wehavebeenblessed, fromthe
start of Lent
until now, with the ultimate
imagination our
minds do allow.
Because, just as the bear will
beg for the
lick of some honey.
So lives on our child-like
friendship with
the "Easter egg, the chick and
the Easter bunny!"
Michael J. English
Our Easter Wish For You
I remember times of Easter
past,
Followingpast seasons of Lent
Which are times of fast!
I remember the family seated
around the table,
Keeping our prayers and
Our alms givings stable!
My mother would dress us so
nicely,
We would dress in our Sunday
best,
Then, we would go to church,
And Jesus would take care of
the rest.
Yes, I remember since I was a
little boy
HowEaster brought the family
Times of togetherness and joy!
My parents would hide our
Easter baskets,
They would fill themwith pre-
sents and candy,
Yes our Easter morning was
definitely dandy!
The day before Easter my sis-
ter and I
Would color our Easter eggs
Until the day passed us by.
My grandma would help us.
She would do her best,
And with the other eggs, well,
again,
Jesus took care of the rest.
My mother’s Easter pizza of
ham and cheese is
Also another of my mom’s
ways to please!
Yes, praying, going in your
Sunday best,
Coloring eggs, hiding Easter
baskets,
Family joy true and true,
Is my family’s Easter wish of
the English’s,
"Our Easter Wish for You"
Michael J. English
O’Donovan presents research at national conference
Strengthening the relationship and livestock trade with America, Dr. Inayat H. Kathio met with
top Pakistan Diplomat and U.S. Senator on Foreign Relations.
Fromleft are U.S. Senator Robert Casey, Dr. I.H. Kathio and Pakistan’s Ambassador, His Excel-
lency Husain Haqqani.
Dr. Kathio meets with
Pakistan Diplomat
Steven Wasko
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The city’s plan for sprucing up
the look of the South Main busi-
ness corridor includes new sig-
nage. The city has money for
small façade grants and is part-
nering with businesses to create
a more uniform signage look.
Inthe past whennewbusiness-
es opened in the city, the proprie-
tors often just changed the pan-
els on existing signs which cre-
ates a hodgepodge look. In many
cases the hardware mounting the
signs, much of it decades old, is
rusted and unsightly.
A section in the city’s new fa-
çade ordinance is designed to
eventually eliminate the old
signs by requiring business leav-
ing Main Street to take down the
old signs.
This week the first example of
the vintage, village-style, en-
graved wood signage the city
wants to encourage went up at
Yore Antiques at 25 South Main
Street.
Yore Antiques is just down the
street from Palazzo’s Restaurant
which installed a vintage-look
Radio City-style lighted sign a
couple of weeks ago.
Attorney Rose Randazzo who
acts as the city’s pro bono down-
town manager said the sign at
Yore Antiques is just the begin-
ning. “Several more are in the
works,” she said.
MarkWilliamson, the proprie-
tor of Yore Antiques with busi-
ness partner Ryan Ksiezopolski,
said the city is doing a good job
encouraging activity on Main
Street.
Through the façade grant the
city provided a portion of the
cost of the new sign. “It’s a good
partnership,” Williamson said.
Signs are looking up on Main St.
A worker from Fiesler Signs of
Pittston puts the finishing tou-
ches on the first of the new vil-
lage-style signs that are planned
for Pittston businesses.
First of new style signs installed
By Jack Smiles
PHOTO BY JACK SMILES
had $168,000 in unpaid bills and
$32 in its general fund checking
account, but that has all changed.
“Through strict financial poli-
cies and requiring all depart-
ments to stay within their bud-
get, our financial situation has
improved dramatically,” Council
Vice Chairman Gary Stavish
said.
In less than one year, through
the efforts of the borough coun-
cil and with the guidance of the
Pennsylvania Economy League
and borough solicitor Linell Lu-
kesh, the borough is now finan-
cially stable.
The borough has been on bud-
get and finished 2010 in the
black, which was the first time in
five years that happened. The
2011 budget is balanced and tax-
es and fees have remained un-
changed.
Even though the financial pic-
ture looks better, Cipriani is
quick to point out there are still
issues facing the borough. “West
Wyoming has a stagnate tax
base, so like many other munici-
palities across the state, it strug-
gles to maintain the services that
residents require, without bur-
dening them with higher taxes,
but with the policies we have es-
tablished, the council is in a bet-
ter position to keep costs down,”
she said.
This recognition was part of
the 15th annual Governor’s
Awards for Local Government
Excellence.
In total eight local government
leaders and 10 communities
across the state received awards
presented by Lt. Governor James
Cawley on Friday April 15 in
Harrisburg.
“There are 2562 local govern-
ments in Pennsylvania, so we are
excited and honored to be recog-
nized by the Governor for this
achievement,” concluded Ci-
priani.
Mundy said congratulations
are in order for West Wyoming
Borough. “West Wyoming is a
perfect example of how hard
work and innovation can pay
off,” Mundy said. “I would like
to congratulate the Council
members, the Mayor, and staff
for their unwavering dedication
in bringing the borough back
from the brink of bankruptcy.”
Award
Continued from Page 6
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In the best tradition
of the families of
Wyoming Area, and our
friends in Pittston Area,
My Family and I
wish you all a
Joyous Easter and a
Blessed Passover.
-Deanna Farrell
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MATTERS OF FAITH
email items for this page to sd@psdispatch.com; fax to 602-0183
Plans are being completed for
St. Peter’s Lutheran Church An-
nual Sunday School Penny Auc-
tion, to be held at the church on
Rock Street, Hughestown, at 2
p.m. May 1. Sunday school
teachers organize the auction.
Several theme baskets will be
featured along with other items.
The auction is open to the public.
Refreshments will be served.
Admission is $2.
MEMORIAL DINNER
Amemorial dinner in honor of
the late Rev. Daniel D. Hitchko
will be held at St. Cecilia’s
Church, 1700 Wyoming Avenue,
Exeter, inthe churchhall onSun-
day, May 22 at 1p.m. The day in-
cludes a Musical Concert with
Spiritual Interludes by special
guest Reverend Ed Bucheit, Pas-
sionist Priest from St. Ann’s
Monastery, Scranton, and Ca-
tholic TV. Ticket cost is $20.
For reservations and tickets
please call 654-2049, 693-1091
or 654-2133 and please leave a
message. The event is sponsored
by St Cecilia’s Altar and Rosary
Women’s Society. All are wel-
come.
EASTER BREAKFAST
The members of the Lang-
cilffe Presbyterian Church will
hold an Easter Sunday Breakfast
beginning at 9:30 a.m. until
10:30 a.m. in the Church social
hall prior to worship on Easter
Sunday morning. All are wel-
come to join in fellowship.
BOOK SALE
A Spring Flea Market and
Book Sale will be held Saturday,
May 14, 8:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.
and Sunday, May 15, 9:00 a.m.-
noon at St. Maria Goretti Ban-
quet Hall, Laflin Road, Laflin.
Free admission, plenty of
parking directly in front of the
handicapped accessible hall.
Books are 25-50 cents each.
Sunday everything will be half
price.
GOLF CLASSIC
The Holy Redeemer School
System “Golf Classic” will be
held Monday, May 16, at Blue
Ridge Golf Course, Mountain-
top. Proceeds benefit Diocesan
Catholic Schools of Luzerne
County. Captain and Crew for-
mat, with lunch at 11 a.m. and
shot-gun start at 12 noon, fol-
lowed by reception and awards
dinner. Golfer fee is $100.
For complete golfer and spon-
sorship information, call the
Diocese Development Office at
570-207-2250or visit www.Dio-
ceseofScranton.org , “Catholic
schools.”
DIVINE MERCY SUNDAY
All invited to the Oblates of St.
Joseph Seminary Highway 315
on May 1 at 2 p.m. to celebrate
Divine Mercy Sunday and the
beatification of the Mercy Pope,
John Paul II. The principal cele-
brant will be Reverend Paul
McDonnell, OSJ, Seminary
Rector.
Itinerary includes Sacrament
of Reconciliation from 1 to 1:45
p.m. followed by Celebration of
the Eucharist. Exposition of the
Blessed Sacrament will followat
3 p.m. The Chaplet of Divine
Mercy in song, Marian Devo-
tions, Rosary, special homage to
Blessed John Paul II, Benedic-
tion and concluding with the in-
dividual veneration of the 1st
Class Relic of St. Faustina.
Prior to the services, Cathy
Mack, Coordinator and Cenacle
Leader for the Eucharistic Apos-
tles of Divine Mercy will speak
on John Paul II’s Encyclical let-
ter The Mercy of God and ex-
cerpts from St. Faustina’s Diary
of Divine Mercy in my Soul.
LADIES OF CHARITY
The Ladies of Charity, Dio-
cese of Scranton, have scheduled
their annual Day of Enrollment
for Saturday, April 30, at the
King’s College Chapel. The
doors will open at 10 a.m. and
Mass with Msgr. Joseph Kelly
will begin at 10:45 a.m. Thereaf-
ter, a luncheon will be served in
the Walsh Roomon the 3rd floor
of the Sheehy-Farmer Campus
Center at King’s College. An ele-
vator is available.
The cost for the luncheon is
$17. Reservations are required.
The deadline is April 25. Make
your check payable to “Ladies of
Charity” and send it to President,
Christine Palmiter, at 440 Ice
Harvest Drive, Mountaintop, Pa
18707. Please call her at 868-
3952 with any questions. New
members are always welcome.
BUS TRIP
Fall Doo Wop Cavalcade Bus
Trip to American Music Theater
in Lancaster, is planned for Sat-
urday, September 24, at 2 p.m.
The trip includes a Smorgasbord
Dinner at Shady Maple follow-
ing show. Bus leaves Pittston
Plaza promptly at 10:30 a.m.
Cost is $94whichincludes bus
seat, show ticket, dinner, bus
driver tip, all taxes and tips. A
$50 deposit is required when
making reservation and balance
is due by August 1.
For additional information or
to make a reservation call 603-
1915 leave a message if no an-
swer. Trip is being sponsored by
the United Methodist Church
Pittston.
BUS TRIP
The Women’s Unit of the First
United Methodist church of
West Pittston is sponsoring a bus
trip on Wednesday, May18 to the
Sight and Sound Millennium
Theatre in Lancaster to see “Jo-
seph.” Total cost of the trip
which includes seat on the bus,
ticket to theatre and dinner at
Shady Maple for their smorgas-
bord is $100. For further infor-
mation, please contact Doris
Dushok at 654-2689
BENNETT PRESBYTERIAN
501 Bennett Street, Luzerne
Easter morning - April 24 -
7:30 a.m. Sunrise service (re-
freshments following), 11 a.m.
Morning worship
Everyone is welcome. The
church is handicap accessible.
Further information may be
obtained by calling the church
288-7361
BETHEL UNITED
METHODIST
Main St., Avoca
11:15 a.m. Worship
BRICK UNITED
METHODIST
905 Foote Ave., Duryea
Pastor Michael Shambora
Service: Sunday 9:45 a.m.
Fellowship coffee hour after-
ward downstairs.
CORPUS CHRISTI PARISH
Holy Redeemer, Harding
Immaculate Conception, West
Pittston
As our parish bazaar is only
about six week away, the bazaar
meeting this week is an impor-
tant one. Everyone is invited on
Wednesday, May 27, at 7:00
p.m., at Holy Redeemer Church.
Security, grounds set up, equip-
ment, tents, foods, games, enter-
tainment, raffle, donations, so on
and so on will be discussed.
The Corpus Christi Youth
Choir will be singing the nation-
al anthemat SWBYankee Stadi-
um in Moosic on Sunday, July
24, for the1:05 p.m. game, SWB
Yankees vs. Syracuse Chiefs. It
is also “Kids Run Day.” Follow-
ing the game all children 12 and
under are invited to run the
bases.
To reserve your seat, please
take a form (found in the vesti-
bules of the churches) fill it out
and return it to the rectory. All
children are welcome to join the
Youth Choir, just fill out a regis-
tration form (found in the vesti-
bules of the churches).
The dates for First Eucharist
practice have been changed.
Penny auction next Sunday at St. Peter’s
The First United Presbyterian Church of West
Pittston invites the public to a concert by Bill
Carter and the Presbybop Quartet to debut their
latest CD release, “Interior Window.” The con-
cert will be Sunday evening, May1, at 7 p.m. in
the church sanctuary at 115 Exeter Ave., West
Pittston. A “Meet the Artists” reception will be
held following the concert.
Admission is free. A freewill offering will be
received to benefit the food pantries of the First
United Methodist Church and the Salvation Ar-
my Citadel, both of West Pittston, and the Care
and Concern Free Health Clinic, Pittston.
The Presbybop Quartet is one of the cultural
treasures of Northeastern Pennsylvania. Com-
prised of international stars and regional favor-
ites, this group has delighted audiences across
America with new outlooks on traditional jazz
and religious themes. Presbybop’s latest CD,
“Interior Window” will be released on May 1.
All eight of their CDs will be available for pur-
chase following the performance.
For more information, contact the First Unit-
ed Presbyterian Church at 654-8121 or
www.presbywp.org or Presbybop at www.pres-
bybop.com.
Dave Brubeck said, “Bill Carter is a great pi-
ano player. I think his music is wonderful, and I
highly recommend his recordings.”
“Can any of you jazz fans out there imagine
what it wouldbe like if Dave Brubeckwas living
a double life, one as a Presbyterian minister and
the other as a piano-playing leader of a jazz
quartet? The Rev. Bill Carter and his jazz band,
named after both of his vocations, answer that
musical question. Not only does the Presbybop
Quartet sound like Brubeck’s classic 1950s
group, the famous jazz pianist is a fan of this
current aggregation,” said Charlie Ricci at
www.rambles.net
Unique jazz concert next Sunday
See FAITH, Page 11
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$7.99 LB.
PEELED BUTT
TENDERLOIN
$
9.99lb.
$
2.99lb.
BONELESS & SKINLESS
CHICKEN BREAST
BONELESS & SKINLESS
CHICKEN TENDERS
$
2.29lb.
MARINATED
SPLIT FRYERS
MARINATED
CHICKEN CUTLETS
PORK LOIN
PORKETTA
PORK BUTT
PORKETTA
$
1.99lb.
$
2.99
$
9.99
lb.
lb.
$
3.29lb.
$
3.69lb.
$
7.99
$
5.99
$
9.99
lb.
lb.
PORTER HOUSE OR
T-BONE STEAK
CHICKEN BREAST
WHOLE OR SPLIT
$
1.39lb.
SMALL CUT
TO ORDER
CHICKETTA
ROAST
$
2.49lb.
$
3.99lb.
lb.
CENTER CUT
PORK CHOPS OR ROAST
BONELESS
PORK CHOPS OR ROAST
$
2.29
THE ORIGINAL
SINCE 1978
HOT OR
SWEET
BABY BACK
RIBS
$
4.99lb.
BONELESS NEW YORK
STRIP STEAK
$
7.99lb.
SIRLOIN STEAK
BONELESS
VEAL T-BONE
STEAK
ITALIAN
SAUSAGE
$
3.49lb.
LOIN
LAMB CHOPS
$
3.69 lb.
TENDER CUT
BEEF ROAST
RUMP ROAST OR
BONELESS CHUCK ROAST
$
3.99lb.
lb.
Happy Easter
from Roxy and all of us at the
LEO J. SPERRAZZA AGENCY
21 Broad Street, Pittston, 603-0664
leosperazza@allstate.com
Practice will be held on Monday,
May 2 from 6-8 p.m. and Friday,
May 6 from 6-7 p.m. in IC
Church. The Sacrament of First
Eucharist will be celebrated on
Saturday, May 7, at 10:00 a.m. in
IC Church.
Altar & Rosary Mother/
Daughter Breakfast will be held
on Sunday, May 15, following
the 7:30 a.m. Mass in ICC hall.
Donation is $10.00 adults and
$5.00 children 12 and under.
Parish website is www.cor-
puschristinepa.com
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Pittston
Rev. James H. Breese, pastor,
First Baptist Church, Water
Street, Pittston
Sunday 9:30 a.m. Worship and
praise service/Children’s Sunday
school, adult/teenSundayschool
immediately following service.
For more information, please
contact the church at 654-0283.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL
UCC
500 Luzerne Avenue
West Pittston
Pastor: the Rev. Wayne
Shontz, Jr.
Sanctuary is handicapped ac-
cessible.
Easter Sunday, 11:00 a.m.
Worship Service.
A Spring Roast Beef Dinner
will be held on Saturday, May14.
For tickets call Jean Williams at
654-0588.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
14 Broad Street Pittston
Sunday Worship 9:15 a.m.
with Rev. William N. Lukesh.
All are welcomed
FIRST UNITED
PRESBYTERIAN
West Pittston
The Sessionof the First United
Presbyterian Church of West
Pittston announces the following
schedule:
Sunday, April 24 - 7 a.m. East-
er Sunrise Service on the River
Common between Delaware &
North Streets; 9:30 a.m. Sunday
School; 10:30 a.m. Wor-
ship,11:40 a.m. Choir rehearsal
Monday, April 25 - 8 p.m. Al-
coholics Anonymous Big Book
meets in kitchen
Wednesday, April 27 - Noon, 7
p.m. Alcoholics Anonymous
Saturday, April 23 - 10:30 a.m.
Overeaters Anonymous.
The First United Presbyterian
Church is located at the corner of
Exeter Avenue and Warren
Street.
GLENDALE GOSPEL
CHURCH
105 Church Drive
Glendale/Pittston Township
Sunday Service 10:45 a.m.
HARDING CHURCH OF
CHRIST
RR 1 Box 187A, Falls
Sunday services: 10:00 a.m.
Sunday School and 11:00 a.m.
Church Service.
Call 388-6534 www.harding-
churchofchrist.org
HOLY MOTHER OF
SORROWS PNCC
212 Wyoming Avenue, Dupont
Sunday Masses Easter Sunday
7:00 a.m. Resurrection Mass
and Procession
10:30 a.m. High Mass
Daily Masses
9:00 a.m. Monday thru Satur-
day
April 28, Thursday 4:30, Con-
firmation Class
IMMANUEL BAPTIST
CHURCH
25 Zerby Avenue, Edwards-
ville
Easter morning - April 24 - 7
a.m. Youth Sunrise Service,
breakfast following; 9 a.m.
Morning worship. Everyone is
welcome. Further information
call 288-9215
INKERMAN
PRESBYTERIAN
Main St., Inkerman
Services: Sundays, 9 a.m.
LANGCLIFFE
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Main Street Avoca
Sunday Worship at 11:15
The Langcliffe Presbyterian
Church of Avoca is pleased to
welcome new interim pastor
Rev. Barbara Shaw Jenkins.
Faith
Continued from Page 10
See FAITH, Page 12
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SD
SD
OAK ST • PITTSTON TWP.
654-1112
Tues. 8-11
COMEDY NIGHT
Hosted by Kevin Neary, Comedian
Fri. 9-1
KARTUNE
Sat. 9-1
LIP STYK
Thurs. 8-11
12 LETTERS
The Langcliffe Church is
handicap accessible and Sunday
School/Nursery is provided for
young children during worship.
The Langcliffe Church is
pleased to continue with our care
packages for soldiers. To date
over 40 packages have been sent
to our soldiers serving our coun-
try overseas.
MOOSIC ALLIANCE
CHURCH
608 Rocky Glen Road, Moosic
Pastor: DougJensen457-6020
maccma2@verizon.net
Saturday Evening Bible Study
at 6:00 p.m. Saturday Evening
Worship at 7:00 p.m. Sunday
Morning Sunday School for all
ages at 9:30 a.m. Sunday Morn-
ing Worship at 10:45 a.m.
Prayer Meeting, Wednesdays
at 7:00 p.m.
Celebrate Recovery Ministry,
Thursdays at 7:30 p.m.
OBLATES OF ST. JOSEPH
Highway 315, Pittston
Masses are held daily in the
seminary chapel at 7:00 a.m.
(Monday – Friday) and on Sat-
urday mornings at 8:00 a.m.
There are no weekend Masses.
Confessions are heard daily
from 9:00 a.m. – noon and from
3:00 – 6:00 p.m.
Office hours are Monday –
Friday: 9:30 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.,
evenings and weekends by ap-
pointment. Office phone num-
ber is 654-7542.
Every Wednesday evening
Faith
Continued from Page 11
The Second Presbyterian
Church, Parsonage Street,
Pittston, spaghetti dinner is
Thursday, April 28. Take-
outs 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.
(please call ahead to specify
pick up time) and serving in
the dining room 5:00 p.m. to
7:00 p.m. Donation $8.00 for
adults, $4.00 for children
under 12. Tickets at the
door. First row: Adriana
Grillo, Janet Demech, Sarah
Lamar, Julie Lucarella, Billy
Burke, Antoinette DeVergi-
lio, John Devlin, Jean Dev-
lin, Isabel Lucarella and
Rene Lucarella. Second
row: Michele Brague, Joe
Grillo, Christine Grillo,
Michael Delconte, Minnie
Bartell, Vince Tedeschi,
Catherine Havrilla and Tom
Devlin. Third row: Rose
Molino, Judy Chimento,
Maria Doyle and Marie
Lucarella. Fourth row; Gene
Molino, Ray Lucarella, Jean
Evans and Janet Mead. Fifth
row: Toni Ardiere and 6th
row: Steve Kresge, Pastor
David Brague, Norman and
Jean Evans. For additional
information, call 654-1411.
See FAITH, Page 13
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Mass is celebratedat 7:00p.m. in
conjunction with the Novena to
St. Joseph &St. Joseph Marello.
Novena prayers and the blessing
of the first-class relic of St. Jo-
seph Marello, Founder of the
Oblates of Saint Joseph Congre-
gation, immediately follow the
Mass. All are welcome to partic-
ipate!
Tune into Catholic Radio 750
AM. The radio studio is located
in the seminary building and is
broadcast daily from dawn to
dusk. For more information
about this station, contact Ed
Niewinski at 287-4670.
The Oblates of St. Joseph
priests offer all their friends &
benefactors a Happy & Blessed
Easter. May the love our Risen
Lord showed for the world at
Easter bring joy to your hearts,
peace to your souls and His holy
light into your lives. Thank you
for all your prayers, kindness and
support that you show to us
throughout the year.
Mass and devotions for the
Feast of Divine Mercy will be
held next Sunday, May 1, in the
seminary chapel starting with
confessions at 1:00 p.m., fol-
lowed by a solemn Mass at 1:45
p.m. and then Exposition of the
Blessed Sacrament, praying the
Divine Mercy Chaplet and Holy
Rosary, concluding with Bene-
diction. There will also be a spe-
cial tribute to Blessed Pope John
Paul II on the day of his Beatif-
ication in Rome. Rev. Paul A.
McDonnell, OSJ, seminary rec-
tor, will serve as principal cele-
brant of the Mass and afternoon
devotions. All are welcome to
participate. If you have any ques-
tions, contact Cathy Mack, Di-
vine Mercy coordinator, at 654-
6063.
Organizers of FUN FEST ’11
will have a meeting this Wednes-
day evening, April 27, following
the 7:00 pm Mass & Novena.
Fun Fest ’11 will be held on Sat-
urday, Aug. 13, on the seminary
grounds which will include
games, foods, children’s attrac-
tions, outdoor chicken bar-b-q
dinner and evening entertain-
ment with live music from the
band“Sweet Peppers &the Long
Hots”, formerly “Them Again”.
The public is asked to mark their
calendars andplantojoinus for a
day&night of funandfriendship
to benefit the Oblates Seminary.
Monthly meeting for the Jose-
phite-Marellian Laity members
will be held on Wednesday, May
4, following the 7:00 p.m. Mass/
Novena to St. Joseph. Plans will
be made for the upcoming Tridu-
um&Feast of St. JosephMarello
(May 27-30), Founder of the
Congregation of the Oblates of
St. Joseph. Newmembers are al-
ways welcome.
Monthly Vocation Holy Hour,
Thursday, May 5, at 7:00 p.m. in
the seminary chapel. The faith-
ful are encouraged to attend this
important monthly devotion for
an increase of priestly and reli-
gious vocations in the Church.
Blue Army First Friday Prayer
Vigil, May 6, beginning at 8:00
p.m. with confessions, followed
by Mass to the Sacred Heart and
devotions to the Immaculate
Heart of Mary.
Check out more information
about the seminary and the Ob-
lates of St. Joseph locally and
worldwide by turning to their
website: www.oblates-stjo-
seph.com
OUR LADY OF
MT. CARMEL
ST. ROCCOS
Blessed water is available in
the sanctuary. The water was
blessed at the Easter Vigil and is
available for private use.
Holy Communion Class par-
ent meeting will be held Sunday,
May1, at noon in the parish con-
Faith
Continued from Page 12
See FAITH, Page 19
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It’s Easter Sunday a day when hundreds
of millions of Christians around the world
celebrate the Resurrection of their Lord
and Savior, Jesus Christ.
Let’s not be afraid to acknowledge that
and to wish the Christians among us a
Happy Easter.
Supposedly a Seattle school had a,
ahem, Easter Egg Hunt. But it wasn’t
called an Easter Egg hunt. It was called a
“spring sphere” hunt.
Whether it’s a true story or one of those
crazy internet stories we’re not sure. If it’s
not true it probably soon will be, but even
if it’s not true it’s illustrative of the increas-
ing secularization of our society.
Locally Christians built our towns, so-
ciety and culture.
Granted they divided themselves by de-
nomination and ethnicity into enclaves of
Polish, IrishandItalian, etc. Catholics and
English-Welsh Protestants, in what might
be said to be an unchristian-like way to
live.
But at the same time by conducting
their lives with Christian values like self-
reliance, family devotion, hard work, edu-
cation and patriotism they laid the
groundwork for better lives for the gener-
ations to come.
After all, it is on the shoulders of those
Christian soldiers that we stand today.
Worldwide and here in the United
States the history of Christianity is rife
with incidents of intolerance and vio-
lence.
Yes, it was Christians who began who
sold and owned slaves in this country, but
it also was they who wrote the laws and
fought the war to end slavery.
Some 600,000 died in that war, the vast
majority of them Christians.
Yes it was Christians who were the ag-
gressors in the Medieval Crusades, but it
was also Christians who stopped the holo-
caust of Jews and end the reign of the
atheistic Nazis in Europe.
Yes it was Christians who participated
in the conquest of indigenous peoples
around the world, but it was also Chris-
tians who established missions in such
places to spread not only the word of their
God, but to spread food, medicine, and
education.
Christians aren’t perfect, as they will
acknowledge, but the best of them strive
to be.
Christianity maybe on the wane in
America, but, given the impact of its his-
tory on our lives and culture, come on,
let’s not be afraid to speak its name.
Dare we wish
Happy Easter
As a taxpayer and voter, I have adopted the policy of wait and
see when it comes to Wyoming Area School Board Politics. I
wait and eventually see the polluted politics that exist. I don’t
think all politicians are grand standers and I don’t believe that
citizens run for the School Board with the intent of deception,
but just like spring follows winter, it just seems to happen.
Four years ago, Dr. Estelle Campenni ran on a platformof her
credentials and as a breath of fresh air for the taxpayers. She still
has her credentials but the air has become politically polluted
and now we, the taxpayers, are forced to breathe it.
Dr. Campenni promised to end politics as usual in the School
Board’s hiring procedures, however, when the opportunity pre-
sented itself, she chose to hire not one, but two of her cousins. If
experience was the reason, I might understand it but no, it wasn’t
experience, it was plain old nepotism. Right out of college and
into the classroomas full time teachers, that’s not fresh air, that’s
pollution called nepotism. One of her cousins replaced a long
termsubstitute, so fairness went up the nepotismpollution stack.
Dr. Campenni enjoyed her power so much, she voted to re-
place a part-time job with a full-time position, which includes
benefits. At the very least, a taxpayer would have expected Dr.
Campenni to use her vote to be fiscally prudent and recommend
to out-source the athletic trainer job to a professional group like
Geisinger or other qualified company; again polluted politically
motivated decisions.
And please don’t forget Dr. Estelle Campenni voted to fire
long time maintenance employee William Simmons. Now the
taxpayers face another potential wrongful termination law suit
thanks in no part to Dr. Campenni’s vote.
When will it end? And why has she been absent over fromthe
last few meetings? If she is so concerned about the needs of the
taxpayers and the fiscal health of Wyoming Area, her absence
does not demonstrate it and seems a political convenience.
Her utopian platform sounded great at the time and she can
blame whoever she wants for Wyoming Area’s current financial
woes but her votes and selective actions over the past four years
show otherwise. Dr. Campenni wanted to clear the air however,
four years later she has joined the club and brought nothing but
more polluted politics.
Vincent Holland
WA Taxpayer
Ed Note: Some of the accusations in this letter were forward
Letter writer questions director Campenni; she responds
See CAMPENNI, Page 28
OUROPINION
YOUROPINION
Stephanie Griffin submitted this photo of the sun setting over Lake Jean at Rickett’s Glen State Park.
To submit items for Your Space, drop off or mail to the Sunday Dispatch, 109 New St., Pittston, PA, 18640, or email to sd@psdis-
patch.com
YO U R S PA C E
Sunset at Lake Jean, Rickett’s Glen
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Today hundreds of millions of Christians
around the world celebrate the resurrection of
their Lord and Savior Jesus Christ. And today
Christians will be persecuted, attacked, arrested
for being Christian and maybe even killed. Today
the Bible, the Holy Book of Christianity, will be
burned.
These things will happen in Muslim countries
like Saudi Arabia and Egypt.
But you’ll have to dig deep into the news to
hear anything about persecution of and attacks on
Christians.
That’s because attacks by Muslims on Chris-
tians don’t fit into the media’s template that it is
Christians who are intolerant and violent against
Muslims.
Yes Bibles are burned everyday and Christians
simply turn the other cheek. But let one kook, a
so-called minister in backwater, Florida, burn the
Koran and look out. Random violence in the
Middle East kills 15 people and who will our
media blame?
Not the perpetrators of the random violence,
no, they are excused. The blame falls squarely on
the kook Koran-burner and by extension Amer-
ican Christians.
Happy Easter.
Oops, I goofed
Two weeks ago I named the wrong judge in
writing about the letters sent to the court request-
ing sentence leniency in the Judge Toole case.
The Judge in the Toole case is U.S. Middle Dis-
trict Judge Richard P. Conaboy.
Sorry about the error and thanks to Joe Castel-
lino for calling me on it.
Reader E-mail
In that column two weeks ago I wrote about
how many little American flags are made in
foreign countries. I got the following email from
Carl Yorina this week.
“ABC national news is doing an ongoing series
on American made products. Tonight, they did a
report on Annin Flag Company. These U.S. made
flags are of excellent quality. The one I have has
lasted over a year. I checked out their on line
catalog and guess what? They make miniature
flags. I honestly didn’t know this. Just wanted to
let you know.”
Thanks for the heads up, Carl.
The key words in the email are “excellent qual-
ity.”
What the Frack?
At a Wyoming Valley Sanitary Authority meet-
ing Tuesday, John Minora of PA Northeast Aqua
Resources explained how a proposed plant in
Hanover would treat fracking water. He said 80
percent of the water treated at the plant would be
returned to drillers for reuse in drilling, and the
remaining 20 percent would be treated a second
time using a reverse osmosis process that re-
moves salt and dissolved solids from the water.
He was quoted directly in the Times Leader
saying, “It’s much cleaner than the treated ef-
fluent that we currently discharge, and it’s cleaner
than the water that’s already in the Susquehanna,”
adding that many of the chemicals that would be
removed from the water are found in much high-
er concentrations in gasoline and diesel fuel than
they are in frack water.
He also said building the plant would generate
income for the authority that would provide fund-
ing to build EPA upgrades at the current WVSA
facility and alleviate the need for future rate
increases.
Further he added the plant would also directly
add as many as 20 jobs in the community as well
as indirectly create jobs for truck drivers, inject
money into the local economy and improve road
conditions in the township.
For daring to buck the anti-frack crowd by
saying these things he was booed and heckled.
Impact Assessment
Is Gov. Corbett backing down from his vow not
to impose an extraction tax on the natural gas
drillers? There are hints that he may be open to a
“local impact assessment.”
Is that just a code term for a tax?
Well, maybe, but there is a difference between
a local impact assessment and a state tax. In the
former, the state doesn’t get any of the money, it
all goes to the affected local communities.
While in either case the ultimate cost is going
to be passed on to the consumers as a price add-
on, at least in the case of the local assessment,
the money is kept out of the hands of the spend-
thrift legislature in Harrisburg.
Mickey D’s is Hiring
Tuesday was a nationwide hiring day at McDo-
nald’s Restaurants across the country. The com-
pany planned to hire 50,000 new workers in one
day.
The TV news reports of the event just had to
point how entry-level full-time McDonald’s
workers earn less than the poverty line.
I would love to see a follow up story two years
from now which would track some of the work-
ers hired on Tuesday.
They won’t follow up on it because here’s what
such a story would likely show: most of the
workers hired in April of 2011 moved on the
bigger and better things, some within McDo-
nald’s and others elsewhere.
There will be no such story because it won’t fit
in with the media bias against McDonald’s which
says McDonald’s must be demonized as Big
Hamburg, an evil exploitive business which
keeps people in poverty while at the same time
making them obese.
SMILES ANDFROWNS
by JACK SMILES - jsmiles@psdispatch.com
Random notes on the news
Eggs have gotten a bad rap over the past years. Many folks avoid
them because of their high cholesterol content. Then, even when
folks find out that the cholesterol was only in the yolk, then came the
salmonella scare.
As with any food, there are food safety tips to keep in mind while
preparing and storing the foods. Here are a few:
Hunting Eggs: Hard-cooked eggs for an egg hunt must be prepared
with care to prevent cracking the shells. If the shells crack, bacteria
could contaminate the inside. Do not hide cracked eggs. Eggs should
be hidden in places that are protected fromdirt, pets, and other sourc-
es of bacteria. The total time for hiding and hunting eggs should not
exceed 2 hours. The "found" eggs must be re-refrigerated and eaten
within 7 days of cooking, or discarded.
Storing hard cooked eggs: Avoid freezing hard-cooked eggs, or
hard-cooked white as freezing causes them to be tough and watery.
Hard-cooked eggs in the shell last up to one week when properly
refrigerated.
Eggs are reasonably priced, nutritious, and are an excellent source
of protein. One large egg contains 6 grams of protein. Most of the
protein is found in the egg white (3.6) and a considerable amount,
(2.7) is in the yolk.
To find out how much protein is in the foods we eat, read the food
label. The label tells us both the total number of grams of protein in
the serving size plus the percent of Daily Value (DV) An interesting
point to make is that a gram of protein varies by quality. Just like the
quality of a cotton shirt can vary, so can’t a gram of protein.
Protein’s quality is determined by the number and amount of the
eight essential amino acids. These are the protein building blocks
found in food that our bodies cannot not reconfigure or change to
what our bodies are requiring at that period in time. These eight must
come from the food that we eat.
Egg whites receive the maximumscore of 1.0, which is the highest
for protein digestibility corrected amino acid (PDCAAS). This is
based on the amino acid profile of the egg white. In comparison,
chickpeas receive a .66. It is not that one is best and the other not a
goodchoice, it is important tonote that a varietyof foods is important
when planning meals and snacks.
In summary, Easter eggs can boost any one’s protein level. Handle
and store eggs safely. Don’t cloud their nutritious value by serving
with bacon and or sausage. Instead, serve with lean ham and or non
starchy vegetables like spinach in an omelet.
Salad Nicoise
( 4 servings )
Boston or Romaine lettuce
1 package (9 oz.) frozen Italian green beans, cooked and drained
4 medium red potatoes, cooked and thinly sliced
4 medium tomatoes sliced or sliced red peppers
8 hard-cooked eggs, sliced (You may substitute cooked chicken,
seedless grapes)
1/4 cup sliced pitted drained ripe olives
Reduced-fat or non-fat Italian dressing
Arrange lettuce leaves on each of 4 salad plates. Mound about 1/2
cupof the beans inthe center of each. Arrange potato, tomatoandegg
slices in petal fashion around beans. Sprinkle each salad with about 1
tablespoon of the olive slices. Pass the dressing.
NUTRITION
CORNER
Mary Ehret, MS, RD, LDN
Easter eggs for protein
Mary R. Ehret, M.S., R.D., L.D.N., is with Penn State Cooperative
Extension, Luzerne County, 16 Luzerne Ave., West Pittston, Pa., 18643.
(570) 825-1701/602-0600. Fax (570) 825-1709. mre2@psu.edu.
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Young members of St. Anthony of Padua parish, Exeter, presented
The Living Stations at the church on Friday, April 22. These photos
were taken earlier in the week during rehearsal. The role of Jesus was
portrayed by David Dorbad and that of Mary by Angela Coco. Pastor
of St. Anthony’s is Rev. Joseph Sibilano, OSJ.
Living Stations
at St. Anthony’s
Angela Coco and David Dorbad
Jeremy Zezza, David Dorbad and Evan Musto
Christopher Wall, Carmen Ciampi, David Dorbad and Michael DeAngelo
Carmen Ciampi, David Dorbad, Michael DeAngelo, Christopher Wall
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Question#1
School students in
1947 were happy to
hear that they would
be given an unsched-
uled day off from
their classes to allow
teachers to travel to
Harrisburg. What was the purpose of
their trip?
1947 – 64 Years Ago
The excellent financial condition of
the Pittston City school district allowed
city council to lower the per capita tax
from $5 to $3. A reduction in millage
was also being considered but most
council members felt that would strain
the budget in the coming year as reno-
vations of the high school and added
costs created by a “spread out” school
district were rising.
In April of 1947, Dispatch headlines
read “National Government out of the
Red.” President Truman hailed “Good
Times” because for the first time in 17
years, the government ended the fiscal
year with a surplus of $1,250,000,000.
The Chief Executive opposed tax cuts
saying, to do so would lead to inflation.
Frank Yuscavage of West Pittston
advertised lots along the Sullivan Trail
priced at $300 and up stating that “The
sun shines every day at Harding. Ideal
locations to build your dream home, city
conveniences, with healthful advantages
of the country.”
Duryea fishermen considered them-
selves experts at catching big fish. Sev-
eral of the local anglers planned a
school to be conducted by Joseph Rus-
savage and Jack Gillespie. Both were
willing to give out instructions on how a
hook should be baited and what bait to
use to become successful fishermen.
1957 – 54 Years Ago
The Borough of West Pittston was
planning its centennial celebration. Part
of the plans included the publication of a
booklet entitled “Centennial Chronicles.
Victor B. Luchsinger, newspaperman
and borough historian, began assem-
bling facts with the help of heads of
borough organizations and West Pittston
high school students.
The booklet detailed borough histor-
ical data, as well as facts about how
West Pittston was named, the meaning
of the Susquehanna River; floods that
occurred such as the famous “Pumpkin
Flood”; names of all burgesses, post-
masters and elected officials in Luzerne
County and the state legislature.
Also included in the booklet was a
listing of the borough’s mine disasters,
the greatest of which claimed 17 lives,
as well as the Wyoming and Fort Jenkins
Massacres.
The West Pittston Historical Society
was formed in 2001. To read the in-
teresting history and view early photos
of the borough go to www.westpitt-
stonhistory.org.
Floyd Swantkowski’s Pharmacy, Be-
laski’s Service Station Carmen’s Tee
Vee, Luggs Supermarket, Kunigiels
Wallpaper and Paint Store and Walter
Naylor’s Garage, all Duryea businesses,
informed local residents that ballots
could be obtained at their establish-
ments. Borough girls were competing
for the title Miss Duryea in a contest
sponsored by the Lion’s Club.
Bernadine and Judy Aruscavage,
Marian Chicoski, Jean Chipko, Janice
Panick, Peggy Zabrowski, Bernadine
Sobeski, Pat Szumski, Regina Yasul-
itis and Maryanne Rava were just a few
of the girls vying for the title.
450 youngsters showed up at the Jen-
kins Township American Legion Post
938 to search for Easter eggs. James
Burke, Commander of the post, along
with Andrew Lapusnak and Patrick
Duffy, co-chairman of the event, were
pleased with the overwhelming attend-
ance. The post was located on River
Road in Port Blanchard.
With the start of the 1957 baseball
season the Sunday Dispatch Inquiring
Photographer asked area sports fans,
“Who do you think will win the big
league pennants and who will capture
the batting titles?”
Jimmy Suriano of Pittston answered,
“I think the Yanks and Brooklyn will
repeat and Mickey Mantle to take the
American League batting title and either
Hank Aaron or Willie Mays the Nation-
al.”
Joe Falzone, Pittston barber, added,
“The Yankees and the Braves with Stan
Musial to win the National League bat-
ting race.”
Leo Monteforte of Pittston said, “I
pick the Yankees and the Reds. In bat-
ting, it looks like Mantle and Aaron.”
The Yankees and Braves battled in the
’57 Series. The Braves won their first
championship since the "Miracle
Braves" of 1914. Ted Williams of the
Boston Red Sox took the American and
Stan Musial of the St. Louis Cardinals
took the National League batting titles.
Question #2
In 1957 The West Pittston “Brothers
of the Brush” society was formed, what
were these gentlemen planning to do?
1967 – 44 Years Ago
Joseph Montagna of Pittston was
honored by the Pittston Elks Lodge 382
the Man of the Year. Club members
lauded Mr. Montagna for “personifying
the principles of Elkdom such as broth-
erly love, justice, charity and fidelity.”
Some of those attending the event were
Mr. and Mrs. Peter Tabone, Mr. and
Mrs. John Tramontana, Attorney An-
thony J. Lupas, Mr. and Mrs. Philip
Medico.
According to paelks.com on August 2,
1897, The Pittston Lodge was instituted.
This was the same year the nation’s first
automobile insurance policy was issued,
John J. McDermott, won the first run-
ning of the Boston Marathon, the first
such race to be held in America, and
Jell-O was invented.
Several members of the ILGWU re-
ceived certificates for completing a
six-week course in How to Enforce the
Union Agreement conducted by William
Matthews Educational Director for the
union. Sam Bianco, headquarters man-
ager, presented the certificates at a
meeting attended by Mildred Walsh,
Helen Wozniak, Lena Gregori, Betty
LaNunziata, Adelaide Ochreiter, Ann
Gillis, Minnie Caputo, Theresa Car-
dascia, Helen DePhillip, Pearl Saka-
louskas, Rose Usavage. Ann Perry,
Helen Burke, Stella Grabowski, Sally
Pakuta, Louise Mullen, Sophie Klink,
Elizabeth Fereck, Mary Hrab, Cathe-
rine McGuire, Amelia Spigarelli,
Gretta Ash, Rachel Chismar. Lillian
Gusinsky, Ann Sardy, Belle Scott,
Leon Saslow, John Ventura, William
Gable, Marian Gregalis, Viola Nar-
done, Shirley DiBiasi and Clem Lyons.
According to the web site rmc.library-
.cornell.edu, David Dubinsky, an im-
migrant from Belarus who came to
America in 1911 became president of
ILGWU in 1932. During his presidency
which lasted to 1966, the union experi-
enced unprecedented growth by forming
of the Committee for Industrial Orga-
nization, and enabling the union to be-
come a political force in the national
Democratic Party and Liberal Party.
Beautification of the Mosier Ceme-
tery in Duryea was the special project or
Mayor John B. Salek, James Steer,
Joseph Kreseski, Ray Krafjack, Al
Throne, John Moss and Paul Szewc-
zyk. Mosier Cemetery contains markers
dating back to the 1700s. The committee
hoped to gain support to remove debris,
groom areas and plant grass to beautify
the historical site. Healey Memorial
Playground Association was the first
organization to contribute. Information
donated by Suzanne LaFrance on the
graves located at the cemetery can be
found online at Luzerne County’s page-
genweb.org site managed by Luzerne
County Coordinator, Mary Ann Lubin-
sky.
1977 – 34 Years Ago
Local “barbershoppers” Anthony
D’Angelo and Raymond Ramage of
West Pittston and Ben Tielle and Roy
Thomas of Pittston rehearsed for Har-
mony Month which was being observed
along with the 39th anniversary of the
national organization of Barbershop
singers. According to barbershop.org,
the Barbershop Harmony Society began
with Owen Clifton Cash on April 11,
1938. Cash and acquaintance Rupert
Hall were interested in getting a few
guys together to sing. Cash drafted an
invitation and mailed it to the 14 singers
he knew might show up and encouraged
them to bring guests, 26 showed. By the
following week, the amount of singers
tripled.
After Dupont celebrated its bicenten-
nial in 1976 the planning committee
decided to stay active and continue its
beautification efforts in the borough. In
doing so, the committee hoped to keep
alive the spirit of the bicentennial year.
Tony Smithonic, Bob Jones, John
Boyer, Stanley “Poncho” Piechota,
Tom Titton, Mayor Michael Kamin-
ski, Frank Kutza, Henry Gimzek and
Bernie Krappa used a beautiful April
day to plant the cherry trees at Memorial
Playground. Future projects were being
planned.
1987 – 24 Years Ago
Anthony Botyrius of Wyoming re-
ceived the Circle of Excellence Award
from Northern Telecom Limited, the
first supplier of digital telecommunica-
tion systems and information manage-
ment systems. Tony ranked in the top 25
percent in sales earning him a trip to
Madrid, Spain. According to their web
site, Northern Telecom formerly known
as Northern Electric and today as Nor-
tel, introduced the world’s first X.25
data switch in 1976, the first standard-
based commercial application of packet
City able to lower per capita tax in 1947
Peeking
into the past
With Judy Minsavage
See PEEKING INTO THE PAST, Page 18
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Recently, I was considering
how lucky my children are that
they’re in everyday contact with
both sets of grandparents.
They have their traditions al-
ready established and these
come into play most clearly
around the holidays.
And sometimes it’s like re-liv-
ing my own childhood over and
over again.
Every. Single. Day.
Each year, my father joins us
for Easter Mass. We picked him
up last Easter Sunday and I ar-
rived too early. He’d called the
prior evening with dark predic-
tions about limited parking and
cramped seating. As always, he
scared me into a reaction, so I
beeped for him a full 30 minutes
before the start of Mass. Even
though it was his prompting that
made me so damn early, he felt
rushed and frazzled. He quickly
recovered however, in time to re-
gurgitate the annual Easter Joke.
My eye roll was palpable.
“Hey! Have I told you the one
about the anesthetized bunny?!”
(InmyheadI’mdoingcalcula-
tions. If I’m48 years old, yes, I’d
say I heard this joke about 48
times.)
“He was the “Ether Bunny”
get it…ETHER?!!!”
I’m sure he expected gales of
laughter but sadly, my children
have no idea what “anesthe-
tized” means, nor “ether”, thank
God.
Me, on cue: “Heh, heh. Good
one, Pops.”
It was going to be a
lonnnngggg morning.
We arrived at the church and it
was virtually empty. As my hus-
band stated repeatedly, “We
could’ve parked on the steeple
for God’s sake, there were so
many choice parking spaces”.
As we seated ourselves, sepa-
rating the boys from their sister
and me from my father, Dad
stated, loudly,” HOLY CRAP!
Why don’t we sit up on the altar
while we’re at it!”
I’d forgotten that he doesn’t
enjoy being so close to the
“stage”. I reminded him to
please adjust his hearing aid, be-
cause I was sure they could hear
him clearly behind the sound-
proof glass of the crying room.
I realized, too late, that I
should’ve also separated my
boys from my father. I had mis-
calculated the tom-foolery quo-
tient of all “boys”. As I rose to
the opening prayer, I noticed my
kids were all giggling, manically.
I shot them all my: “Knock it off
or no donuts after church look”
until it became apparent it was
my father who was the culprit,
making shadow figures on the
seat in front of us with his hands.
I believe it was either a bunny
or RichardNixon, but either way,
he was grounded.
In the midst of the sermon, he
nudged my son. “Hey, Nick.
Wanna borrow Grampa’s comb?
You could use it!”
My son sighed heavily, as this
is one tradition that never gets
stale for my father. “Grampa, I
like my hair this way. It’s sup-
posed to look messy.”
Grampa: “Well, how‘bout that
collar? Is that supposed to look
messy too? Put it down. Put it
down!”
My son assured him with
strained patience: “Grampa, I
told you, all the kids pop their
collars!”
My father snorted and yelled,
“Well, in my day, we went to
church in a tie and sports coat!
Boys looked like gentlemen!
And”... he looked at me pointed-
ly, apparently misinterpreting
myfoldedhands andbowedhead
as his signal to continue his dis-
sertation of retro church apparel
“…women wore their finest
clothing on holidays! With East-
er BONNETS! It used to be a la-
dy had to cover her head at
church! That’s how it should be!
It was a question of respect!”
“Dad!” I hissed. “If I get a
comb through my hair and
change out of my slippers before
church, then by God, I’m ahead
of the game! Make me slap a
freaking bonnet on my head and
you’re just asking for trouble!”
As we exited church, he was
warming-up for his next favorite
church topic: people who take up
two spaces with one car. Or,
more tragically, people who stay
and chat after Mass when they’re
clearly blocking a car parked be-
hind them! In his mind, this
should classify as the eighth
deadly sin.
“Did I ever tell you about the
time…?”
Me: “Yes. Every week.”
… “I waited in my car for
twenty minutes …”
Me: “Heard it.”
Him: “…before that rude
churchgoer lady decided to
come and move her car! AND, I
had to go to the bathroom!”
Me: “Dad, we’ve discussed
this twentytimes. I toldyouI was
sorry! I never did it again, did I?
He harrumphed. “Disrespect-
ful, that’s all.”
Here’s hoping your own Easter
is joyous…
… and your bunny ether-free!
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Internet.
Answer #1
Teachers rallied in Harrisburg
to support the passage of House
Bill 417. The bill provided for
an increase in pay for the teach-
ers. Also at issue was the re-
quired retirement age for teach-
ers. Most did not want the limit
reduced from age 70. Accord-
ing to PSEA.org, a bill on ad-
dressing teacher’s salaries was
not passed until 1949.
Answer #2
West Pittston Council Chair-
man William Hastie an-
nounced that the West Pittston
Brothers of the Brush society
would start growing beards in
celebration of the Borough’s
centennial. No doubt, wives
had something to say about it
though because most of the
men decided to wait until after
the Easter parade to begin their
growths.
The Internet has been the
most fundamental change dur-
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dreds of years.
- Rupert Murdoch
Peeking into the past
Continued from Page 17
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9:15
ference. All second grade stu-
dents are asked to attend. Com-
munion will be held on May 7 at
10 a.m.
Hoy Name will meet on Mon-
day, May 2, in the parish center
Red Cross blood drive will be
held Thursday, April 28, from
noon to 4:30 at Mt. Carmel par-
ish center.
Altar and Rosary Society an-
nounce the annual Mother’s
Communion Breakfast/program
to be held on Sunday May 15 in
the parish banquet hall immedi-
ately following the 8 a.m. Mass.
This year’s speaker is Sister. Jo-
sephine Palmieri M.P.F. Barbara
Sico is toastmaster. Tickets are
$11adults and$4for childrenun-
der 12. and available by calling
the rectory offices.
Father Dan Schwebs O.S.J.
will be celebrating his 25th anni-
versary of priesthood on Sunday,
May 22, with a Mass of Thanks-
giving at St. Rocco’s Church at 2
p.m. Reception immediately fol-
lowing at St. Anthony of Padua
parish center, Exeter. Open to the
public, no tickets required. Call
the parish office at 654-6902 or
654-2914.
Life Line screening will be on
Monday, May 23, at Mt Carmel
parish center sponsored by Geis-
inger Health Care System. Pre-
registration required call 800-
324-1851.
Anyone wishing to rent the
Mt. Carmel Hall call Christine
Silinskie at 704-8861 for infor-
mationor email christine@olmt-
carmel.com.
Holy Week Schedule:
St. Rocco’s: Easter Sunday -
9:30 a.m. Mass
Our Lady of Mt Carmel: East-
er Sunday - Masses 8 a.m. 9:30
a.m. and 11:15 a.m.
Mt. Carmel’s11thannual raffle
with Grand Prize your choice
$20,000 or 2011Chevrolet Mali-
bu. Winner will be drawn on
Sunday July 17. Purchase your
tickets or request ticket to sell.
Seller of winning ticket wins
$500. Fill out order and return to
parish office or call 654-6902 or
Frank Sciabacucchi655-6125.
OUR LADY OF THE
EUCHARIST PARISH
535 N Main Street , Pittston,
PA 18640
Mass Schedule
Saturday Vigil: 4:00 p.m.
Sunday: 8:30 a.m. and 10:30
a.m.
Daily Mass: 8:00 a.m.
Sacrament of Reconciliation
(Confessions)
Saturday from 3:30 p.m. to
3:45 p.m. and by appointment
Our parish community wel-
comes Russell Day, Ellen Riddle
and Charles Schillinger to full
communion in the Catholic
Church and we pray God’s spe-
cial blessings on Russell, his
wife, Linda and son, Thomas, on
Ellen, her husband, James, and
her children and grandchildren,
and on Charles and his wife,
Courtney.
Easter Sunday
Masses will be celebrated on
Sunday, April 24, at 8:30 a.m.
and 10:30 a.m.
Thank You
One cannot celebrate Lent and
the Easter Triduum as a Parish
Community without the help of
many people. Here at Our Lady
of the Eucharist, we are lucky to
have a generous group of parish-
ioners. We are most grateful to
our Liturgical Ministers: lectors,
cantors, Eucharistic Ministers,
altar servers and ushers, Maurita
Bartnitkowski, our Director of
Music, Paula Schnelly, Michael
Sowa and all the members of our
parish choir, all those who
helped in the cleaning and deco-
rating of our church, those who
collated and stapled our worship
aids.
As we reflect on the power of
God in our lives, we remember
Faith
Continued from Page 13
See FAITH, Page 20
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the strength of our Parish Com-
munity as reflected in the kind-
ness and generosity of those we
call brother and sister in the Ris-
en Christ.
First Holy Communion will be
celebrated next Sunday, May 1,
2011 at the 10:30 a.m. parish
Mass.
Committee Meetings
Monday, May 2nd at 7:00 p.m.
– Liturgy Committee
Monday, May 9th at 7:00 p.m.
– Finance Council
Confirmation pictures are in
and can be picked up in the sac-
risty after weekend Masses or in
the parish office during the
week.
Choir rehearsals are held on
Tuesday evenings at 7:00 p.m. in
the Church. All parishioners are
invited to participate in this im-
portant ministry.
Father Maloney will lead a
Scripture Study beginning on
Tuesday May 3. There will be
two programs, one on Tuesday
mornings from 8:30 a.m. until
10:00 a.m. and one on Tuesday
evenings from 7:00 p.m. to 8:30
p.m. Both programs will be held
in the Religious Education Cen-
ter at Our Lady of the Eucharist,
Main Street, Pittston. The title of
this study will be The Gospel
According to John and the Jo-
hannine Letters. There will be 8
sessions. Inorder tobe able toor-
der the necessary materials, we
ask that you call the parish office
(654-0263) or e-mail olepitt-
ston@gmail.comto register. The
program is open to all from the
greater Pittston area.
The Parish Mass Intention
Bookis openthroughAugust 30,
2011. Please call or come into the
office with your Mass Intention
Requests.
The Pittston Catholic Youth
Group meets on Sunday eve-
nings from 6:00 to 7:00 p.m. at
the Oblates of St. Joseph Semi-
nary. Please check out their web-
site at http://www.pittstoncath-
olicyouthgroup.blogspot.com/
The Ministry Schedule for
April, May and June has been
mailed to all ministers. It has al-
so been posted on the parish
webpage.
The address for the parish
webpage is: www.eucharist-pitt-
ston.org. You will find links to
the Schedule for Liturgical Min-
isters, our weekly bulletins,
monthly calendars, upcoming
events and additional informa-
tion. We hope that you will find
the information useful and easily
accessible.
On the first Friday of each
month Communion is brought to
those who are unable to partici-
pate in Sunday Mass because of
age or health. The Sacrament of
the Anointing of the Sick is cele-
brated with anyone seriously ill,
anticipating a serious operation,
or quite elderly. Please notify the
parish office of anyone desiring
these Sacraments, as well as any-
one in the hospital or a nursing
home.
PRINCE OF PEACE PARISH
Old Forge
St. Mary’s Church, Lawrence
Street, Saturday Vigil 4 p.m.
Sunday, Mass 8 and 10 a.m.
St. Lawrence’s Church, Main
Street, Saturday Vigil 5:30 p.m.
Sunday Mass 11:15 a.m.
SACRED HEART OF JESUS
Lackawanna Ave., Dupont
Masses Easter Sunday at 7:30
a.m. 9:30 a.m. and 11:00 a.m.
The Rectory Office will re-
main closed on Easter Monday.
ST. ANTHONY’S
Memorial Avenue, Exeter
No Religious Education class-
es this Monday.
A novena to the Divine Mercy
started on Good Friday and it
will continue after Easter with a
special Mass every day at 11a.m.
with the Divine Mercy Chaplet.
The Feast of Divine Mercy is on
Sunday, May 1.
A special meeting for St. An-
thony and St. John the Baptist
churches in Exeter, will be held
Faith
Continued fromPage 19
See FAITH, Page 26
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
Atlas
Realty, Inc.
1550 Highway 315, Suite 100
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702-7194
OFFICE (570) 829-6200
FAX (570) 829-6878
CELL (570) 817-5792
FREDMECVERIZON.NET
Fred Mecadon
REALTOR ASSOCIATE, SRES
Call Me If You Are Buying Or Selling... Or Just Call Me.
I Can Answer Your Real Estate Questions.
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Ha ppy Ea s ter to a ll a nd on M a y
17
th
, vote for Nick D eA ngelo, Jer r y
S tofk o a nd Toni Va lenti.
P aid forb ythe W yom in g Area Con cern ed Can d id ate Com m ittee
TheW y om in g Area Con cern ed Ca n dida tesru n n in g fortheS chool Boa rd
a reha vin g a ra lly fortheirelection on S u n da y ,M a y 1stfrom 7 to 9 p.m .
a tV a len ti’sResta u ra n ton W y om in g Aven u ein Exeter.Don a tion is
$25.00.Ticketswill bea va ila blea tthedoor.Food a n d bevera geswill be
served.Com eou ta n d seey ou rfrien dsa n d su pporty ou rca n dida tes
W yo m ing A rea Vo ters , w e hea rd yo u , w e pledge to redu ce dis trict
expenditu res , to trim a ll w a s te fro m the bu dget, w o rk w ith em plo yees
to ga in co nces s io ns a nd m a inta in the qu a lity o fedu ca tio n.
Nick D eA ng elo Jerry S tofko Toni Va lenti
Formerly Allied Medical & Technical Institute
FORTIS INSTITUTE
Business Administration / Accounting • Electrical Trades
ECG / Phlebotomy / Lab Assistant • Medical Assistant Technician
Criminal Justice • Health Information Technician
Heating, Ventilation, Air Conditioning & Refrigeration
Massage Therapist • Medical Assistant
Medical Transcriptionist / Insurance
Billing Specialist • Pharmacy Technician
Paralegal
166 SlocumSt. • Forty Fort, PA18704
866-708-6626
www.fortisinstitute.edu
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The Greater Pittston YMCA
2011 Annual Campaign is about
to begin. This year’s campaign
entitled “Help Change a Life”
will kick-off on Monday, May 2,
withaneveningof elegant dining
at Brutico’s Restaurant, Old
Forge. The goal of the campaign
is to raise $50,000.
“We believe in the Greater
Pittston community and we ap-
preciate the support they have
given us in previous years,” said
Debby Mendicino, executive di-
rector. “I truly believe this year
will be no different.”
Money raised from the annual
campaign is used by the YMCA
to help fund the organization’s
childcare program and sports
and aquatics programs.
“The money is for the chil-
dren,” said Mendicino. “This is
about improving and enriching
their lives.”
The focus of the Greater Pitt-
ston YMCA is healthy living,
youth development, and social
responsibility. Funds raised also
support the Y’s scholarship pro-
gram, which helps families and
youths with fitness and childcare
costs.
The May 2 dinner is a first in a
series of fundraising events
planned by the YMCA board
and Fund Development commit-
tee. Future events include a com-
munity picnic and the organiza-
tion’s annual dinner. The May 2
event offers a five course dinner
and wine tasting throughout the
evening.
“This is an opportunity for the
community to meet and interact
with the YMCA board and em-
ployees,” said Tina Fisher, board
president. “It gives us the oppor-
tunity to share with community
how the YMCA is changing and
growing.”
The Pittston organization re-
cently completed an extensive
M E E T I N G S & B R I E F S
YMCA campaign kicks off with May 2 dinner
Wyoming Area Class of 1978 plans informal reunion May 21
The Care and Concern Free Health Clinic celebrated National Doctor's Day and honored its volunteer practitioners. The Clinic serves
the underinsured and uninsured and uses donations to pay for diagnostic testing and lab work for its patients. Fromleft, Diane Barush,
NP; Dr. Lewis Druffner, MD; Dr. Robert Czwinilla, DO; Dr. John Callahan, DO and Commonwealth Medical College students Jen Sidari
and Meg Mattheson. Absent at the time of the photo were Dr. Mary Sewatsky, MD; Dr Joseph Costello, Dr. Ned Carey, Dr Ernie Paglarini,
DMD; Dr. Valerie Weber, MD; Mary Wilkinson Kearns, NP; Tara Scarantino, NP and Dr. Keneric Maynor, MD.
See BRIEFS, Page 31
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Tis Week’s Dining Guide Feature:
MARCH
DINING GUIDE
WINNER
BILL KULL
of Exeter
To Advertise In Te Dining Guide Call:
Karen Fiscus
829-7291
Steve Morris
829-7290
ENTER TOWIN
THIS MONTH’S
GIFT CERTIFICATE:
Fill out and deliver
or mail entry to:
Te Sunday Dispatch
Dining Guide
109 New Street
Pittston, PA 18640
Name:____________________
Address:___________________
__________________________
City:______________________
State:______________________
Zip:_______________________
Phone:____________________
• BOBBY O’s
• CENTER CITY CAFE
• COOPER’S WATERFRONT
• CUZ’S SUSQUEHANNA BAR
& GRILLE
• DENTE’S CATERING
• ERNIE G’S
• FIRE & ICE
• HARRY JACKETT’S LUNCH
• IPANEMA GRILLE
• JUNIOR’S MEDITERRANEAN
GRILL & BAR
• NARDONE’S RESTAURANT
• PARENTE’S RIVER VIEW
PIZZERIA
• RIVERSTREET ALE HOUSE
• SAVO’S PIZZA &
RESTAURANT
Look On Te Following Pages For
Tese Advertiser’s Weekly Ads
Come enjoy Scranton’s best all you can eat steak house.
At Ipanema Grille we specialize in Brazilian cuisine offering a variety of entree items as
well as the all you can eat meat option known as the Rodizio
A meat lover’s dream!
Rodizio is a style of serving favorful cuts of fre roasted meats tableside. Our trained waiters
will bring you the meats, one at a time, on large sword-like skewers. The amount he/she carves
depends on you. Remember that we offer fourteen meats including beef, lamb, pork, chicken
and turkey. Therefore pacing yourself, if you intend to try all meats, is recommended.
Our Specials
Come celebrate your birthday with us and
enjoy one of our homemade desserts for free.*
Ten Stamps Deal!
After you pay your bill you will be
given an Ipanema Stamp Card. For every
Rodizio your table had you will receive
one stamp. Accumulate ten stamps and
receive One Rodizio Free*
Our Meats:
1. Bacon Wrapped Turkey
2. Chicken Legs
3. Pork Sausage
4. Pork Ribs
5. Boneless Pork Ribs
6. Pork Tender Loin
7. Lamb with Rosemary
8. Top Round Steak
9. Peppered Roasted Beef
10. Rib Eye Steak
11. Sirloin Steak
12. Sirloin with Garlic
13. Flank Steak with
Parmesan Cheese
14. Beef Shish Ka Bob
15. Chicken Hearts
...and a Grilled Pineapple
with Cinnamon included as
dessert.
-To complement the Rodizio we offer a cold salad bar with a variety of fresh
vegetables, as well as our hot buffet including both traditional Brazilian and American
side-dishes and more.
Other menu items, aside from our house specialty
Rodizio, include mouth-watering appetizers, a wide
variety of entrees and lastly home made desserts.
• Seafood Paella • Seafood Shish Ka Bob
• Broiled Salmon • Stuffed Flounder
• Ipanema Shrimp • Grilled Cod Fish
• Fettuccini Rose • Penne a la Vodka
• Linguini Jumbo Shrimp Scampi • Penne Ipanema
• Steak Ipanema (NewYork Strip)
• Ipanema Grilled Chicken Breast
• Churrasco Mixto (Mixed Grill)
• Feijoada (Brazil’s National Dish)
Best
Sangria in
Scranton
*Not valid in combination with any other offer. Not valid
during holidays. Offer only valid if used Tuesday, Wednes-
day, Thursday or Sunday.
Ipanema Grille
1911 N. Main Ave
Scranton PA, 18508
Phone: 570-558-0742
Fax: 570-558-0743
Also on the Web:
www.ipanemagrille.com
&
Join us on Facebook
Ipanema Grille @ Scranton PA
Hours:
Tuesday 5:00pm to 9:00pm
Wednesday 5:00pm to 9:00pm
Thursday 5:00pm to 9:00pm
Friday 5:00pm to 10:00pm
Saturday 5:00pm to 10:00pm
Sunday 5:00pm to 9:00pm
Reservations Recommended...
Ipanema
Grille
MakeYour
Mother’s Day
Reservations
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THE MUSIC BOX DINNER PLAYHOUSE
196 Hughes St, Swoyersville, PA 18704
CALL: 283-2195 OR 800-698-PLAY
FOR INFORMATION AND RESERVATIONS
May 6 to 8, 12 to 15, 19 to 22
Dinner and Show and Show-Only Tickets Now On Sale
www.musicbox.org
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UNIVERSITY OF SCRANTON
BOYS’ BASKETBALL DAY CAMPS
$185 Includes Camp T-shirt,
Basketball & Lunch Daily
Visit www.scranton.edu, click on athletics, then icon for Summer Camps for more information
or to register on line or contact Carl Danzig at 941-7252
Session I: Monday, June 20 - Friday, June 24
Session II: Monday, Aug. 15-Fri., Aug. 19
8:30 am - 3:00 pm
Ages 8-15 • Long Center
Paid For By The Candidate
Anthony
Tuttle
Candidate for Pittston
Area School Board
Invites you to:
MEET THE CANDIDATE
Diane’s Deli May 7th 6pm to 8pm
Food and Refreshments served
FREE admission
The battle only lasted 45 min-
utes. It wasn’t much of a battle. It
was a massacre. There were ex-
perienced soldiers who were
home on leave and they knew it
was a trap, but the hotheads
among the colonists said no
we’re going in and they got
themselves killed.
Why is important to know
the battle was in Exeter?
Because I’m from Exeter
(Laughs.) Because we don’t
want revisionist history.
What else is the societyinter-
ested in?
We’ve had programs on the
mine tragedies in Exeter. The
Schooley shaft was in 1947.
Where Murawski’s Electrical is
now.
It was early in the morning
when they were going down the
shaft. There was an explosion, 10
or 12 men were killed. The
Knight Mine Disaster, 19 or 20
killed. It was in the Black Desert.
Bill Hastie saidhe’s goingtotake
me there someday. That was
1871. Avondale was in 1869
down in Plymouth.
After Avondale they passed a
lawthat there hadtobe a separate
entrance and separate exit, but
the Knight was the same scena-
rio, one way in one way out, so
the law was ignored.
Sturmerville was an early
name for Exeter. What was it?
Sturmer, I think he was from
West Pittston, wanted to develop
homes in Exeter. There was no
Exeter then, it was all Exeter
Township. It was all farmland.
Sturmerville wasn’t all of Exeter
as it is today, it was that area from
Penn Ave. down to Schooley. I
think the first home was built
was around 1858-1860 around
Valley Street.
The McNeil family, the police
chief’s family, had the first
home. The house where I live
and the corner of Lincoln and
Adams Court was built, the orig-
inal house was, by a Mr. Adams
in 1858. Originally it was just a
kitchen, a pantry and a couple
bedrooms.
Why did Exeter break away
from Exeter Township?
What we call Harding was
more populous than Exeter and
the civic meetings and the
schools and stuff were up on Rt.
92.
In 1884 they wanted to form
their own town, so people
wouldn’t have to travel up 92.
Talk about the Exeter Echo.
It was published every Satur-
day. I still have some copies at
home. Benny Anzelmi was the
owner, publisher and editor. He
had a printery where the ambu-
lance is now. Benny graduated
Exeter in say ’32 or so. He was
the burgess in the late ‘40s.
He had a lot of oomph. He
started it right before World War
II and it went into the ‘70s. He
used to mail it to all the service-
men fromExeter who were over-
seas. He was a good guy.
Exeter had 31 killed in World
War II. Benny had a picture of
every one of them.
Favorite music.
Military marches, Broadway
music, Beatles, Barbara Strei-
sand.
Last book read.
Right now I’m reading the
Philadelphia Brigade about the
Civil War.
Sports fan?
Yeah. Yankees. I like the Phil-
lies in the National, but the Yan-
kees are my number one love.
Football, Penn State.
All-time favorite movie.
The Sting
TV show.
I watch MSNBC a lot. House,
Grey’s Anatomy.
Dinner guests.
Abraham Lincoln, President
Kennedy, Teddy Roosevelt. Give
me two more, Robert E. Lee and
Ulysses Grant.
Maxwell
Continued fromPage 4
A summer golf league is now
forming at the Pittston Senior ci-
tizens Center. Golfing will be at
Four Seasons Golf Course in
Exeter for 15 weeks followed by
a golf banquet at the end of the
season. Golfing will begin on
Thursday, May 5.
Clarence Briggs, former club
champion at Four Seasons, will
be overseeing and organizing
this group. To register or for fur-
ther information, contact Connie
Andrews at 655-5561. This is a
mixed league.
On Thursday, April28, at 11:15
a.m. Mercy Wound Care will
present a program on Recogniz-
ingSkinCancer. The public is in-
vited.
Reservations are open for a 5-
day, 4-night trip to Wildwood,
New Jersey on September 11 to
15. Price is $395 includes trans-
portation, three night oceanfront
accommodations in Wildwood
one night at the Tropicana Casi-
no Resort with revue show if
available, 8 meals, visits to Cape
May, Smithville, an afternoon
pizza party, an ice cream social
and three nights of entertain-
ment. A $150 deposit is required
to reserve your seat.
Tickets are nowon sale for our
annual Dinner Dance at Genet-
ti’s in Wilkes-Barre on Wednes-
day, May 11, from 2 to 6 p.m.
Cost is $21 if you are over 60.
Dinner choices are prime rib,
sole w/stuffed crab imperial or
chicken Francias. Music will be
providedbyFancyDancer. Abus
will be available from the center
for an additional charge of $3.
Reservations must be made by
May 5.
Senior Citizens Centers, spon-
sored by the Area Agency on
Aging for Luzerne and Wyom-
ing counties, offer hot noon
meals, Monday through Friday
to people 60 years of age or ol-
der. Donations from participants
are gratefully accepted and
needed in order to expand this
program.
Monday - Italian chicken
(thigh) sweet potatoes, steamed
garlic spinach w/white beans,
multi-grain dinner roll, crackers,
banana, chocolate pudding, mar-
garine, milk and coffee
Tuesday - Stuffed cabbage
rolls, chicken noodle soup,
mashed potatoes, whole wheat
bread, crackers, grapes and apri-
cots, margarine, milk, coffee.
Wednesday - BBQ riblet,
steamed carrots, macaroni &
cheese, three bean salad, whole
wheat dinner roll, cookie, mar-
garine, milk and coffee.
Thursday - Beef stir fry, mixed
Asian vegetables, steamed rice,
whole wheat bread, pineapple
juice, pineapple & Mandarin or-
anges, margarine, milk, coffee.
Friday -Liver and onions,
creamed corn, mashed potatoes,
dinner roll, crackers, apple pie,
margarine, milk, coffee.
Golf league forming at Pittston Senior Citizens Center
Geisinger will host a free oste-
oporosis seminar at 5:30 p.m.
Monday, May 2, at Geisinger
Specialty Services, Entrance C,
675 Baltimore Drive, Wilkes-
Barre. As you age, the risk for
osteoporosis increases and it of-
ten strikes silently and without
warning, making early detection
vital. Ademonstration of a DXA
bone densityscan- the goldstan-
dard in detecting osteoporosis -
will be provided.
Registration is required.
Please call 1-800-275-6401 and
say “CareLink,” or register on-
line at www.geisinger.org/
events.
Osteoporosis seminar slated
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SUNDAY
DISPATCH
189 Susquehanna Ave,
Exeter, PA 18643
299-7591
SUN., MON., TUES.
7 A.M.-3 P.M.
WED., THUR., FRI., SAT.
7 A.M.-8 P.M.
509 Exeter Ave., West Pittston
CALL FOR SPECIALS • 654-2536
“The Best Breakfast Around”
• Overstuffed Omelets • Huge Frittatas
• Fluffy Buttermilk Pancakes • Hand Dipped FrenchToast
Available All Day
Sundays
Voted “Best Value”...”Most Affordable”... and Favorite Restaurant” by our loyal customers
Thursday Special - 2 Pork BBQ for $3.99
Wednesday Special - 2 Hot Dogs for $1.99
Saturday Special - All You Can Eat Pasta $7.99
Friday Lent Special - Fish & Chips $7.75
Ipanema Grille
Brazilian Churrascaria
Tues, Wed, Thurs,
& Sun 5-9pm
Fri & Sat 5-10pm
1911 N. Main Ave.
Scranton, PA 18508
Phone: 570-558-0742
Fax: 570-558-0743
Offers not valid on holidays
www.ipanemagrille.com
Special Deal!!!
FREE Dessert on
Your Birthday!
Taking Mother’s Day
Reservations
Open at Noon
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Steve Morris 970-7290
Karen Fiscus 970-7291
To Advertise In The
Please Contact
1022 Main St. • Avoca, PA 18641 • 570-457-1600
Lunch Specials from 11am to 2pm
Free Lunch Delivery is available with a $20.00 minimum purchase F L h D li i il bl ith $20 00 i i h
Monday
3 slices of Plain Pizza - $3.00
Tuesday
8 inch Meatball Hoagie/Chips - $5.00
Wednesday
Porketta Sandwich/Chips/Soda - $5.00
Thursday
8 inch Sausage, Onion and Pepper Hoagie - $5.00
Friday
7 cut Tray of Cheese Steak Pizza - $1.00 discount
Week of 4-25
W
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CUZ’S
SUSQUEHANNA BAR & GRILL
It’s The Place To Be
And Meet Friends!
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OPEN FOR LUNCH
Waterfront - 654-6883
304 Kennedy Blvd. Pittston
Scranton - 346-6883
701 N. Washington Ave.
Dinner On
Your Birthday
Call For Details
in the Pittston Commons, Pittston By-Pass, Pittston
& Family Restaurant
Since
1964
655-0001
OPEN WEEKDAYS 11 TO 9;
FRI. & SAT. 11 TO 10;
SUN. 12-9
MONEY SAVING SPECIALS
7 DAYS A WEEK!
CLOSED TODAY! HAPPY EASTER!
When you buy 12 cuts at the regular price. Price
does not include sales tax. Cannot be used with
other specials. Good for our Red Pizza only.
EXPIRES 5/31/10
12 CUTS OF PIZZA
ONLY
$
4.45
DELIVERY, PICK-UP OR EAT-IN COUPON
COUPON SPECIAL
When you buy 12 cuts at the regular price. Price
does not include sales tax. Cannot be used with
other specials. Good for our Red Pizza only.
EXPIRES 5/31/10
12 CUTS OF PIZZA
ONLY
$
4.45
DELIVERY, PICK-UP OR EAT-IN COUPON
These pizza specials do not include White Pizza, Broccoli Pizza or Fresh Tomato & Garlic Pizza.
Upcoming Entertainment
Saturday - May 7th - 9pm - Lee Strumski & John Shemo - formerly of Strawberry Jam
Saturday - May 21st - 9pm - Phyllis Hopkins Band
Check Weekly for upcoming Entertainment Events!
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SUNDAY
DISPATCH
1575 River Road • Pittston • 602-6374
PIZZA - PASTA
and ALE HOUSE
Biagio A. Dente, CEC,AAC, HOF
Blaise Alan Dente, CCC
DENTE’S
Catering & Tent Rental C
655-0801
www.dentescatering.com
Voted Best Caterer &
Best Chef 2010
TABLE TALK
FREE DELIVERY IN THE PITTSTON AREA
22 S. Main St., Pittston • 654-9161
Mon - Fri 6 to 3; Sat 6 to 2; Closed Sundays
FREE DELIVERY IN THE PITTSTON AREA
Kitchen Open
Nightly Till Midnight
TAKE - OUT AVAILABLE
HAPPY HOUR MON. 9PM - 11PM
TUES. - FRI. 5PM - 7PM
ENJOY GREAT DRINKS & FOOD SPECIALS!
• Fresh Dough N.Y. Style and Fried Sicilian Pizza • Cheesesteaks
• Wings • Boneless Bites • Subs • Stromboli • Calzone • Tripe
Mon. MEXICAN MADNESS
Tues. BONLESS BITE NITE
Wed. WING NIGHT
Thurs. STEAK & POTATO NITE
Fri. PIZZA NITE
Sat. $5.50 WING BITES OR STEAMERS
YonKondy Enterprises L.L.C. West Pittston, Penna.
SPECIALTY
CATERING
Now Accepting
Graduation Parties
2 Public Square • Wilkes-Barre
Phone: 970-2233 • Fax: 970-9701
Different Specials Features Daily
BREAKFAST SPECIAL served 6 to 11 a.m.
YOUR CHOICE: $1.99, $2.99 OR $3.99
DAILY LUNCH SPECIALS
starting at ..........................................
$
4.25
Texas
Hamburgers
$
1.25
Texas
Hot Dogs99
¢
E V E R Y W E D N E S D AY E V E R Y T H U R S D AY
2 EGGS
& TOAST99
¢
AFFORDABLE FAMILY RESTAURANT
300 MAIN ST., DUPONT (Formerly Kalmanowicz Corner Store)
Dine In • Take Out • Delivery 654-2200 Fax: 654-2265
Mon-Thurs. 11 to 9 - Fri. & Sat. 11 to 10 • Closed Sun.
View Our Full Menu At: menusnepa.com/bobbyos1.html
FEATURING OVER 30 DINNERS UNDER $10.00!
HANDICAPPED ACCESSIBLE
2009 & 2010
READERS CHOICE
BEST
CHEESESTEAKS!
2010
READERS CHOICE
BEST
LUNCH!
2010
GREATER PITTSTON
BEST
CHEESESTEAK!
2009 & 2010 2010 2010
JUNIOR’S
Mediterranean Grill and Bar
formerly Cafe Olivia
Serving Monday thru Saturday, 4:30pm ‘til Close
• Pizza • Homemade Pastas
• Fresh Seafood
• Veal • Steaks • Chops
• Appetizers • Salads and More!
204 Broad Street, Pittston
299-7814
Check out Junior’s Bar on Facebook
Biagio, Emma Jean,
Alan & Staff at
Dente’s Catering & Rental Co.
Happy
Easter
BOBBY O’S
NOW DOES
FRIED
CHICKEN
Cannot be combined with other offers. Expires May 31, 2011
FOR A LIMITED TIME
8 PC. CHICKEN DINNER
2 BREASTS, 2 THIGHS,
2 WINGS, 2 LEGS
FRENCH FRIES & COLE SLAW
$
10.99
Now Accepting Mother’s Day Reservations
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Pittston
Animal
Hospital
4 - O’Connell St. (Off Broad St.)
Pittston, PA
655-2412
Hours: 8 A.M. - 8 P.M. Mon.-Fri.
Weekends and Holidays
(Subject to Doctor Availability)
on Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. in the
Parish Center. Plans will be pre-
sented.
Summer Parish Bazaar will be
July 22, 23, 24. Friday, Saturday
and Sunday. A meeting will be
held on Wednesday at 7:30 p.m.
in the Parish Center.
The Golden Age Club will
meet on Thursday, April 28, at
1:30 p.m. at the Parish Center.
Hostesses are: Jennie Chiampi,
Netta Deeb and Josephine Del-
priore.
First Holy Communion will be
celebrated next Sunday with a
special Mass at 12:30 p.m. be-
fore the Mass the First Holy
Communion Children will
crown the Blessed Mother. Prac-
tice for all children in the First
Holy Communion class, Cathol-
ic and Public Schools will be
held on Monday, April 25, from
5:30 to 6:30 p.m.; on Tuesday,
April 26, from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m.
andonSaturday, April 30, from9
to 10:30 a.m. with Confessions
and Enrollment in the Brown
Scapular.
Weekend Masses: on Saturday
at 4:30 p.m., on Sunday at 7:30
and 10:30 a.m. and at 7 p.m. (the
last Mass in the valley). Confes-
sions are heard on Saturday at
3:30 pm and before Masses.
The Eucharistic Adoration is
held every day from11:30 a.m. to
6:30 p.m. followed by the Bene-
diction with the Blessed Sacra-
ment.
The Holy Rosary is recited 20
minutes before the weekend
Masses.
ST. JOHN THE
EVANGELIST PARISH
COMMUNITY
Pittston
The parish office will reopen
on Monday, April 25. If you have
an emergency call the rectory.
Mass intentions are currently
being accepted for May, June
and July.
Altar and Rosary Society
Meeting will be held on Wednes-
day, May 4, in the church hall.
Rosary at 1:30 p.m. meeting at 2
p.m. Refreshments will be pro-
vided
Holy Name Society meeting
will be held on Sunday, May 15,
at 11a.m. inthe parishcenter din-
ing room.
All parents anticipating Bap-
tism of their first child are re-
quired to attend baptismal in-
struction. The next session will
be held Tuesday, June 7, in the
parish center 7:30 to 8:30.
If you are looking for help
coping with the recent loss of a
loved one consider joining St.
John the Evangelist’s Bereave-
ment Support Group. The group
will begin meeting on May 10
and continue meeting on Tues-
day evenings from7 to 8:30 p.m.
in the parish center dining room.
For more information call the
parish office.
The Greater Pittston Food
Pantry is sponsored by the Care
and Concern Committee of St.
John the Evangelist Parish. If
you are in need of food please
call 654-9923. Distribution of
food is by appointment only.
The Free Health Clinic is open
every Wednesday from 5:30 to
6:30 p.m. in the former Seton
Catholic High School, and on
first come first serve basis.
Pediatric Health Clinic is open
on the first and third Wednesday
of the month. Registration is
held in the Seton building from
4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Bring your
child’s immunizations records.
Greater Pittston Kids Closet is
open Wednesday from 9 to 11
a.m. and 5 to 7 p.m. and on
Thursdays from11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
The Closet accepts donations
new and gently used. For infor-
mation call the parish office.
The Pittston Catholic Youth
Group will meet on Sunday eve-
nings at the Oblates of St. Joseph
Seminary, Laflin at 6:30 p.m.
The group is under the direction
of Father Phil, Father Paul and
Jeff McCabe. For more informa-
tion call Father Paul 654-7542 or
email osjseminary@com-
cast.net
ST JOHN’S LUTHERAN
9 Wood St., Pittston
Serving in the House of the
Lord this morning.
Pastor - John Castellani
Organist - Marcia Colleran
Lay Reader - Tracy Drum-
mond
Acolyte - Justin Peterson
Church Service begins at 7:30
a.m. Sun Rise Service; 9:30 a.m.
Regular Service
Acolyte Schedule for May is:
May1ShelbyRinaldi; 8, Marissa
Faccipointi; 15, John Peterson;
22, Katie Colleran; 29, Brooke
Cherney.
Altar Guildfor May- Michelle
Cherney Jennifer Peterson and
Cathy Capobianco.
If you have any questions
comments or would like to join
our Church family please call
655-2505. Our e-mail is stjohn-
spittston@verizon.com
ST. JOHN’S P.M. CHURCH
316 Main St., Avoca
Sunday Service 10:00 a.m.
Tuesday Bible Study 6:00-
7:30 p.m.
ST. MARIA GORETTI
Laflin Road, Laflin
There will be no CCDclass on
April 24.
May 1 CCD classes will be
canceled due to the First Com-
munion celebration.
The last CCD class will be on
May 8.
Our next Flea Market Drop-
Off will be Saturday, April 30,
from10:00 a.m. to1:00 p.m. Our
next Flea Market Sale will be in
May. Please watch the bulletin
for complete details.
SAINT MONICA’S CHURCH
363 West 8th Street, West
Wyoming, PA18644
Office Hours - 9:00 a.m. to
4:30 p.m., Mon. – Fri.
Phone: 570-693-1991
Email: olos363@verizon.net
Web site: www.stmonicanepa-
.com
Father Leo J. McKernan, Pas-
tor
April 24 Easter Sunday Mass-
es: 8:30a.m. (St. Joseph–site) &
11:00 a.m. (OLOS site)
There will be no Bible Study
on April 21 & 28.
OnMay1we will celebrate Di-
vine Mercy Sunday at 3 p.m.
Girls 3 through 12 grades in-
terested in joining the Blessed
Mother Sodality call Sandy Nar-
dell at 693-0416 or email srnar-
dell@6mail.com.
SAINT PETER’S
EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN
CHURCH
100 Rock Street, Hughestown
Stpeters_elc@yahoo.com
Sunday 9:00 Sunday School,
Confirmation Class; 10:00 Wor-
ship Service
Easter Sunday Worship Ser-
vice 9:00 a.m.
April 26, 7:00 p.m. Social
Committee meeting
May 1, 2:00 p.m. Penny Auc-
tion
May14, triptoLancaster tosee
“Joseph.” There are seats avail-
able call Linda @ 655-8995
ST. MARY’S PARISH
200 Stephenson Street, Du-
ryea
Rev. Richard Wosiak - Pastor
Phone: (570)-457-2291
Easter Sunday - April 24 - 6
a.m. Mass of Resurrection 10
a.m. East Sunday Mass
Monday April 25, Monday of
Bright Week 7 p.m. Holy Mass
SAINT MARY’S/SS PETER
AND PAUL’S CHURCHES
715 Hawthorne St./1000 Main
St., Avoca
stmarysavoca@verizon.net
www.stmaryavoca.4lpi.com
The Rev. Phillip J. Sladicka
and the parishioners of St. Ma-
ry’s Church, 715 Hawthorne St.,
and SS. Peter and Paul’s Church,
1000 Main St., will celebrate the
Mass of the Resurrection at 8
and 11:30 a.m. at St. Mary’s
Church and at 10 a.m. at SS. Pe-
ter and Paul’s Church.
Congratulations to this week’s
winners of St. Mary’s Church’s
Pot of Gold raffle: Joyce Kushn-
er, KevinBoone, Emma Shimko,
and Sue Dente.
Congratulations to the follow-
ing children who will receive the
Sacrament of First Communion
Saturday, April 30 at 10 a.m. at
St. Mary’s Church: William Al-
drich, Lily Andricks, Tyler Bro-
dy, Nicholas Cortes, Madison
Evans, James Guariglia, Eliza-
beth Guzik, Joshua Iovacchini,
Hannah Kozlowski, Joseph
Long, Frank Lyons, Katelyn
Lyons, Mary McAdarra, Syra
Reza, Nicholas Sherinsky, Mat-
thew Soy, Matthew Steinkirchn-
er, Ann Marie Sudol, Jonathan
Volch, Mariah Volch, and Aba-
gail Winburn.
The members of St. Mary’s/
SS. Peter and Paul’s Churches
First Communion class will have
practice for their First Commu-
nion April 27-29 at 5 p.m. in St.
Mary’s Church, 715 Hawthorne
St. Please note onApril 28, inad-
dition to practice, there will also
be a scapular service and confes-
sion.
St. Mary’s/SS. Peter and Paul’s
Churches will have its May
Crowning Sunday, May 8 during
the11:30 a.m. Mass at St. Mary’s
Church. All children in the reli-
gious education program should
participate.
St. Mary’s Church will have its
annual St. Mary’s Classic golf
tournament Sunday, May 15 at
Pine Hills Country Club, Taylor.
This year’s tournament will be
played in memory of Judge Tho-
mas Gibbons. Registration in-
formation can be obtained by
calling the parish office at 457-
3412. For sponsorship informa-
tion, please e-mail Jimbo
McMahon at jimmcma-
hon1@verizon.net.
Become a fan today! St. Ma-
ry’s/SS. Peter and Paul’s Church-
es now has a page on Facebook.
You can join it by typing in “St.
Mary’s/SS. Peter and Paul’s
Churches, Avoca” in the search
bar at www.facebook.com. And
then clicking on the “like” but-
ton once you arrive at the page.
Anyone who is interested in
renting St. Mary’s School for
child care, parties, or other use-
ful activities is invited to call the
rectory at 457-3412 to learn
more about this opportunity.
Daily Masses: During March,
April, and May at SS. Peter and
Paul’s Church, 1000 Main St., at
8 a.m.
Eucharistic Adoration: Tues-
days from8:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m.
at SS. Peter and Paul’s Church.
Miraculous Medal Novena:
Faith
Continued fromPage 20
See FAITH, Page 27
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490 N.M a in St.,Su ite 202,Pitts ton • 654-4643
Ha ppy E a ste rfrom the A ttorne ys & S ta ff
Seated,leftto righ t: W illiam J. W att,III,Esqu ire,Sam u el A . Falcone,Jr.,Esqu ire,Joseph F. Saporito,Jr.,Esqu ireand Carlo J. Saporito.
Standing,leftto righ t: Eileen Casper,TracyCiarim b oli,LeeA nn Sh ovlin,
PatriciaSu rvillaand NicoleRinaldi.
Depicted in th eportraitisth elateJoseph F. Saporito,Sr.,fou nderof th efirm .
Saporito,Saporito
& Falcone
2
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Unique Cake Creations
Tired of the same old cake?
Let us create a Truly Incredible Cake
That will excite all your senses!
Let the
CAKE FAIRY
work her magic
for you!
Plus...
Candy Platters,
Baskets and a
wide variety of
Gourmet Apples
also available
Call Samantha at 655-3238
Wednesday following the 8 a.m.
Mass
Weekends Masses: Saturday
at 4 p.m. at SS. Peter and Paul’s
Church and at 5:30 p.m. at St.
Mary’s Church; Sunday at 8 and
11:30 a.m. at St. Mary’s Church
and at 10 a.m. at SS. Peter and
Paul’s Church
Confession: Saturdays 3-3:45
p.m. at SS. Peter and Paul’s
Church; anytime upon request
by calling 457-3412.
Prayer Chain: 457-5867
SECOND PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
143 Parsonage Street, Pittston
The Session of the Second
Presbyterian Church, 143 Par-
sonage Street, Pittston announc-
es the following schedule:
Sunday, April 24 - 7 a.m. East-
er Sunrise Service; 11 a.m. Wor-
ship
Monday, April 25 - 6:30 p.m.
Fellowship meeting
Tuesday, April 26 - 6 p.m.
Meatball making; 7 p.m. AA
Meeting
Wednesday, April 20 - 6:30
p.m. Choir Rehearsal
Thursday, April 28 - Spaghetti
dinner 3-4 p.m. take outs 5-7
p.m. dining room
TRINITY EPISCOPAL
CHURCH
Spring Street and Montgom-
ery Avenue, West Pittston
Parish Mission: “To live and
build holy community.”
All welcome: Worldwide An-
glican Communion: ‘We believe
in one holy, Catholic apostolic
church.”
Web of information and links
at www.trinityepiscopalchurch-
westpittston.org and www.dio-
beth.org.
Sunday Holy Eucharist: 11
a.m. every Sunday. Holy Days as
announced.
Easter Day (April 24): 11 a.m.
Easter Sunday Holy Eucharist
Mondays are a day of prayer,
and special intentions are wel-
come.
Prayernetwork. Open To Pub-
lic. Daily prayer for those with
needs requesting prayerful sup-
port. Start Prayernetwork at par-
ish office 654-3261.
Youth Program: 10:45 a.m. ev-
ery Sunday. Weekday special
events andservice projects as an-
nounced.
Faith Forum for Adults: En-
richment for adults seeking spir-
itual renewal and opportunities
for ministry and volunteerism.
Parish Life Events Team: Bi-
monthly first Sundays.
Parish Council: Every second
Sunday.
Women of Trinity: Every third
Sunday.
Party and Banquet Space.
Newly renovated banquet room
and kitchen. All Day Rental
$100. Reservations at 654-3261.
Music Together Classes: Fun
and music for infants and chil-
dren through age five accompa-
nied by a parent or caregiver.
Visit www.musictogether.com
for details. Call 654-3261.
Adopt a garden: Various areas
of Trinity Grounds are still
awaiting adoption and care. A
map of the various areas up for
adoption is available and volun-
teers are needed to help provide
appreciation and care for our
gardens by adopting a section for
Spring through Fall 2011.
Trinity’s Giant Neighborhood
Yard Sales: Every First Saturday
beginning Saturday, May 7! Re-
serve space in advance by tele-
phoning the parish office at 654-
3261. All day vendor space only
$10. Lunch items such as chili-
dogs, wimpies and baked goods
available throughout the day. Av-
erage of 30+ vendors every First
Saturday and hundreds of cus-
tomers visiting! We do the ad-
vertising. You make the sales!
Annual Pasta and homemade
meatball dinner: Tickets now
available! The dinner is sched-
uled for Saturday, May14 from3
p.m. –7p.m. withbothseatingor
take-outs available. Includes
bread, butter, salad, beverages
and dessert. Adults: $7.00 / Chil-
dren Age 10 and Under: $4.
UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
Corner of Broad & Church
Sts., Pittston
Rev. Dr. Michael Turner
Sunday Worship Service 9:30
a.m.
Children’s Sunday School:
9:30 a.m.
Holy Communion: 1st Sunday
each month
Choir Rehearsal: Thursday’s
at 7 p.m. unless told otherwise
United Methodist Women:
secondMonday
Website www.umcpittston.org
Phone 655-4340 leave mess-
age
Sun., April 24, 9:30 a.m. -
Easter Sunday
Tues., May 3 - Hoagie Sale -
Choices are ham, salami and
cheese or turkey and cheese with
or without onion. Price of hoagie
is $3.50.
To order call 654-3936 or 693-
1572- Orders must be placed by
Sunday, May 1st.
Sat., May 14 - Family Style
Roast Chicken Dinner and Bake
Sale. Takeouts start at 4:30p.m. -
seating 5 to 7 p.m. - Adults $8.50
- Children $4.25.
Advanced tickets recom-
mended.
For tickets call 603-1915 or
332-9156 on or before Friday,
May 6 - please leave a message if
no answer.
Saturday, September 24 - Bus
trip to Lancaster to see a Doo
Wop Cavalcade Showand Smor-
gasbord dinner at Shady Maple.
For additional information call
603-1915.
Faith
Continued fromPage 26
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(2)
(with the writer’s name omitted)
to Dr. Campenni for a clarifica-
tion or response. Following is
that response:
Evidently, Mr/Ms Doe is back-
ing another horse in the upcom-
ing WA School Board election
andfeels the needtodiscredit me
because he perceives me as a
threat. Well, allow me to set the
record straight.
The relatives referred to in Mr/
Ms Doe’s letter are Mr. Aritz’s
daughters. Yes, we are distantly
related (3rd cousins) but who
isn’t around here? I have never
shared a meal or conversation
with them and I really never
knew anything about them prior
to reviewing the materials pre-
sented at the personnel meeting.
If Mr/Ms Doe is truly concerned
about jobs being awarded to rela-
tives, then s/he needs to address
the number of wives, brothers,
daughters, nephews and best
friends that this Board has hired
and the effect these hires have
had on our budget and the qual-
ity of our School District. I have
neither hired nor attempted to
hire anyfriendor relative intothe
school district. I have heard and
read that I hired relatives, but the
detractors never state that the
“relatives” are Mr. Aritz’s
daughters. Rather, that fact is
conveniently ignore.
Regarding the out-sourcing of
the athletic trainer, there was
some discussion about this topic
over a year ago and I asked the
Activities Chair, Dave Alberigi,
to provide documentation of the
terms of agreement and costs to
the District that these agencies
could offer us. Of course, no in-
formation was ever provided to
me and the Activities Chair nev-
er presented a viable, document-
ed alternative to the position of
athletic trainer. Given that I have
been effectively shunned by the
Board majority, I do not see how
Mr/Ms Doe conjectures this is
somehow my fault.
Concerning the wrongful ter-
mination lawsuit filed by Mr.
Simmons, yes I did vote with the
Board to terminate him. Howev-
er, the first I heard of this issue
was at my first Board meeting. I
am not at liberty to discuss the
details of this matter because all
of my information was gleaned
during a series of personnel
meetings, which are not open to
the public or discussion. With
that said, the matter is in litiga-
tion and, through council, I have
provided the facts which demon-
strate what was done by adminis-
tration and the other board mem-
bers noting that I relied 100% on
the advice of our solicitor, Ray
Hassey, for direction on what
should be done. Suffice it to say
that based on the content of the
lawsuit filed by Mr. Simmons, I
can agree with one line in Mr/Ms
Doe’s letter that reads “Now the
taxpayers face another potential
wrongful termination law suit
thanks in no part to Dr. Campen-
ni’s vote.”
Estelle Campenni
West Pittston
YO U R O P I N I O N
Campenni
Continued fromPage 14
We the committee of the1st Lt.
Jeffrey DePrimo Memorial
Fund, Luzerne Foundation, wish
to say “thank you, thank you,
thank you” to all our wonderful
sponsors, supporters, donors,
family and friends, for the suc-
cessful Night at the Races event
we hosted last month.
A fun time was had by all, but
more importantly, we will be
able to continue to keep Jeff’s
spirit alive with a scholarship ev-
eryyear toa Greater Pittstonarea
student, donations to three area
schools music department, sup-
port for our local veterans,
young and old, and community
ministries, etc.
As always, we emphasize pa-
tronage to all our local sponsors,
who are the backbone of many
Lt. DePrimo
Memorial Fund
expresses gratitude
See DEPRIMO, Page 30
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cmccare.org
l
570 969 8888
Neuroscience Institute.
l
Expect more.
Hope.
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Shripathi Holla, M.D.
BOARD CERTIFIED NEUROSURGEON
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charitable events, not just ours.
We can’t say enough about our
supporters who have come to our
event for the last three years, and
those who have just joined our
family.
You truly prove that this is the
Valley with a Heart.
Thank you again, and may the
Good Lord bless you all with
music in your heart, and love for
our country and all who serve.
Committee of the
1st Lt. Jeffrey DePrimo
Memorial Fund
DePrimo
Continued fromPage 28
YO U R O P I N I O N
My granddaughter has been a
patient at Care and Concern pe-
diatric clinic in Pittston since
birth. Anna is 10 months old
now.
She sits up by herself and
crawls.
I am sure she will be walking
soon. Her shots are up to date.
Her height and weight are on tar-
get for her age and she is reac-
hing all of her developmental
milestones on time.
Anna’s mom, my daughter, is a
single parent.
She is a college student who
will graduate from LCCC in
May and is applying to Miser-
icordia University to continue
her studies in Special Education.
I am committed to help my
daughter to raise and provide for
Anna.
When we began to look for pe-
diatric care for babywe were pre-
pared to deal with judgmental
people who treated us poorly in
less than optimal surroundings
due to lack of insurance and in-
ability to pay.
What we found instead was
Care and Concern. We found
toys that were clean and not bro-
ken, exam rooms that were
bright and cheerful, and most of
all, people that really care.
We truly feel that everyone at
Care and Concern has become a
part of Anna’s extended family.
They do not only provide med-
ical care.
The “care and concern” they
have for our little one and her
mommy are apparent in every-
thingtheydo. Mydaughter looks
forward to her appointments so
that she can share with everyone
how well baby is doing.
She receives so much encour-
agement there as a young mom.
Her parenting worries are vali-
dated and addressed.
Anna is an absolutely thriving,
happy, healthy little baby. She is
truly a blessing.
In preparation for Easter, I
have been reading the Gospel of
Markandthinkingabout harden-
ed hearts.
There is so much hardness,
coldness in our world today. We
barely notice each other. We fol-
low our routines and traditions
but don’t really think about what
we are doing because life is so
busy and noisy.
There is so much pain and
heartache in the world; it’s easier
just to tune it out than feel it.
Sometimes we do the right
things but not for the right rea-
sons.
Sometimes we ignore the right
things and don’t do anything at
all. We stand clearly in the pres-
ence of the grace of God but
don’t pay attention.
I want you to know that find-
ing Care and Concern has
breathed new spiritual life into
me and given me strength to
keep working so hard to take
care of my family.
Thank you, Msgr. Bendik,
your parishes, and all of the fi-
nancial sponsors of Care and
Concern.
We are so very grateful for ev-
erything that your support does
for all the children and their fam-
ilies.
Words are not nearly enough
to say how thankful we are.
I am not able to financially
support Care and Concern but I
promise that I will continue to
keep this program, its patients,
and their families, staff, and sup-
porters in my prayers.
I respectfully ask for your
prayers and blessing upon my
family – that God may walk with
us on a path to less difficult
struggles and more peace in our
lives.
Baby Anna’s Grandmother
Grandmother appreciates Care and Concern clinic
Dear Area Business and
Civic Leaders,
On behalf of the communi-
ties of West Pittston Borough
and the City of Pittston, we
would like to enlist your as-
sistance in providing a Fire-
works Display for the people
of Greater Pittston during the
week of the celebration of the
birthday of our nation’s inde-
pendence.
Our major concern is the
need of for financial help in
procuring a professional ser-
vice to display the fireworks in
a safe environment.
This is why we are seeking
your generosity in this endeav-
or.
We hope that you will be
able to make a donation, large
or small. We appreciate any
support you offer and we will
ensure that your sponsorship is
publicly advertised.
Finally, we truly feel this
Fireworks Display will help to
continue the harmonious rela-
tionship between the people,
businesses and government of-
ficials of both communities.
More importantly, it will
provide a fun event for all the
people of the Greater Pittston
area, and it will help foster
pride in the great events sur-
rounding the founding of our
great nation, especially for the
youth of our area.
If you decide to assist us
from either side of the river,
please send your donation to
“Pittston-West Pittston Com-
munity Fund” c/o Pittston City
Clerk’s Office, Pittston City
Hall, 35 Broad Street, Pittston,
Pa 18640 as soon as possible.
The fireworks display is ten-
tatively scheduled for Saturday,
July 3.
Jason Klush,
Mayor
City of Pittston
William Goldsworthy,
Mayor
West Pittston Borough
Mayors request financial
support for fireworks display
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Exceptional healthcare for your child,
convenience and peace of mind for you.
Stella Marie Cruz, MD, board-certified pediatrician is now seeing patients in Dallas.
From well visits and colds to earaches and asthma. And much more. Geisinger–Dallas
offers one-stop pediatric healthcare, including: Appointments available within 24 hours
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Stella Marie Cruz, MD
Pediatrician
criminal prosecution including,
but not limited: Homicide, DUI
homicide, DUI homicide, Drug
Trafficking and Possession, As-
sault, Battery, Domestic Vio-
lence, Robbery, ChildAbuse and
Elder Abuse.
In addition, he has worked
with the Federal Bureau of In-
vestigation, US Marshall Ser-
vice, PA State Police and Local
Law Enforcement assisting in
search and seizure procedures as
well as testimony issues. He has
prepared over 1000 witnesses;
reviewed over 1000 criminal re-
ports; and reviewed/approved
Search Warrant Applications for
Local Law Enforcement.
In 1991, Vough founded the
LawOffices of Vough &Associ-
ates. Since its inceptionVough&
Associates has grown to serve
over 3000 clients through the
Commonwealth of Pennsylvania
and now employs a staff of ten.
He represents clients in various
civil matters and in all types of
civil litigation.
He serves his community in
various capacities: Counsel to
the Greater Pittston Chamber of
Commerce; Member of the
Knights of Columbus; Lector,
Our Lady of the Eucharist Par-
ish; Member of the Fox Hill
Country Club: Previously served
as a Solicitor and later Chairman
of the Board for the Wilkes-
Barre Chapter of Make-A-Wish
Foundation and Athletic Direc-
tor and Basketball Coach of St.
Mary’s Assumption School, Pitt-
ston.
Vough resides in West Pittston
with his wife, the former Cindy
Forlenza, and they are the proud
parents of four children, Mi-
chael, Matthew, Nicholas and
Jessica.
Invitations are in the mail to all
members and friends of the
Chamber. For further informa-
tion, please contact the Chamber
office at 655-1424.
Chamber
Continued fromPage 7
renovation project on its indoor
pool. Renovations included a
new HVAC system and retiling
of the pool floor.
“Improvements can be seen
throughout the facility,” said
Mendicino. “We have a newly
remodeled multipurpose room
and babysitting room. You can
also see pictures of our youths
and members hanging through-
out the facility. This is a commu-
nity organization and we want
our members to feel comfortable
and at home.”
Reverend Paul McDonnell is
chairman of this year’s annual
campaign.
WA Class of ‘78
Frank Tierney and friends are
planning an informal reunion for
Wyoming Area’s Class of 1978
on May 21, at Rodano’s in
Wilkes-Barre.
To RSVPor for more informa-
tion please contact Frank Tier-
ney atfptierney@hotmail.com;
Paula Smith Opel atpop-
el@epix.netor 570-675-4722; or
Patricia Bilder Forry atrjfor-
ry@comcast.netor 717-695-
3236.
Pittston Library
The Hangout Club, Pittston
Area Memorial Library’s Young
Adult book club for high school
students, will meet on Monday,
April 25 at 6 p.m. Copies of this
month’s selection. "The Angel of
Death" by Alane Ferguson, are
available for checkout at the cir-
culation desk. new members are
always welcome. Refreshments
will be served.
Celebrate Children’s Book
Week at Pittston Area Memorial
Library, from Monday May 2
through Saturday, May 7, chil-
dren up to age 12 can select a
book from a special cart located
near the circulation desk (one
book per child) Children will al-
so receive a a treat.
Pittston Area Memorial Li-
brary is located at 47 Broad
Street, Pittston. Hours are Mon-
days and Thursdays, 12 to 8 p.m;
Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Fri-
days, 9a.m. to 5 p.m; Saturdays,
9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Phone number is
654-9565 or visit on the web at
www.pittstonlibrary.com
Blogfest Friday
Area bloggers from Lacka-
wanna andLuzerne counties will
participate in another blogfest
meet and greet Friday, April 29,
at Rooney’s Irish Pub on Main
Street in Pittston starting at 6:00
p.m..
PittstonPolitics.com blogger
and organizer Joe Valenti said,
“Last time around blogger
Gort42 helped organize the shin-
dig. Gort, however, has experi-
enced a long case of writer’s
block and has hung up his key-
board. Dave Yonki, of the LuLac
Political Newsletter has offered
to step up to the plate and lend a
helping hand.”
Admission is free, no speech-
es, cash bar.
Twirlerettes Signups
Lynnette’s Twirlerettes will
hold registration and class for it’s
Briefs
Continued fromPage 21
See BRIEFS, Page 35
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Duryea Police Chief Nick
Lohman and Avoca Fire Depart-
ment Sgt. Chris Collins an-
nounced the 5th annual Guns ‘n’
Hoses charity basketball game to
benefit St. Jude Children’s Re-
search Hospital was the most
successful one in the history of
the event. The event raised
$3,000.
In addition, the game itself
was a thriller withthe Police offi-
cers edging out the Firefighters
106-104 in overtime at the Pitt-
ston Area High School gym.
The participating police offi-
cers and firefighters thank ev-
eryone who made this event a
success especially the West Side
Stars cheerleaders; My Sister’s
Kitchen Restaurant, Duryea; the
University of Scranton Dance
team; Rocky from Mornings
with Rocky and Sue on 98.5
KRZ; Magisterial District Judge
Fred Pierantoni III; all of the lo-
cal businesses who donated door
prizes; and everyone who made
donations including a $12 dona-
tion froma little girl named San-
tina from Duryea to $100 dona-
tions from people all over Lu-
zerne County; the players, refer-
ees, and crew helping with the
event; and everyone else who
helped.
Anyone eeking participants
for charity basketball games
should contact Chief Lohman at
457-1721 ext. 2 or send him a
message via the Duryea Police
Facebook page.
Duryea Police, Avoca Firefighters raise $
PHOTOS BY BILL TARUTIS
Judge Fred Pierantoni poses with Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Penguins mascot Tux, players, officials, and the We
Children's Research Hospital.
BILL TARUTIS
The University of Scranton Dance Teamcheers on the players before their halftime show.
Rocks from98.5 KRZ FMannounces the starting lineup.
Germania Hose Company Chief
Joe Bender holds his six-week-old
son Brayden while proud grandpa
Ted Bender looks on fromthe
stands.
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$3000 in annual charity basketball game
est Side All Stars before the Guns 'n' Hoses event to benefit St. Jude
Eleven-month-old Courtney Korea, left, is held by her momAlana,
both of Duryea.
West Side All Stars cheerleaders Kendyl Margallis, left, Paige Stanley, Keilan Verdekal, Alyx Miko-
laichik, and Madison Wageman-Russo work on face painting.
Jason Schwartztrauber of the Police, right, shoots as Mike Noreika of the Firefighters defends.
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The Wyoming Area Con-
cerned Candidates ticket an-
nounced their candidacy for the
Wyoming Area School Board.
They are Nick DeAngelo, Jerry
Stofko and Toni Valenti.
Nick DeAngelo
Nick DeAngelo currently
serves on the Wyoming Area
School Board and announced his
candidacy for another four year
term. He will be seeking both the
Democratic and Republican
nominations. Nick and his wife,
the former Lisa Tocheny, are
life-long residents and graduates
of Wyoming Area. They are the
proud parents’ of three children
all of whom attend or have at-
tended Wyoming Area: Daniel-
la, Elena and Julianna.
Nick was born and raised in
Exeter and lived there for 36
years and for the last 15 years the
family’s home has been in
Wyoming. “I am proud to call
both of these towns my home,”
Nick says.
Nick is a member of St. An-
thony’s Church in Exeter and al-
so a member of the Holy Name
Society. He is a lifetime member
of the Exeter Fire and Rescue
Hose Company #1. He is a past
coach for the Exeter Panthers C
team and assisted in coaching in
the Wyoming – West Wyoming
Little League. He is also a mem-
ber of the Exeter Lion’s Club.
While a member of the
Wyoming Area School Board,
Nick served as Board President,
Vice- President and Treasurer.
He also served a one year term
on the West Side Vocational
Technical Joint Committee
School Board. Nick has been
employed for 34 years in retail
sale, 19 of which have been in
managerial positions.
If re-elected, Nick pledges to
continue to focus on the children
and taxpayers of the District.
Jerry Stofko
Jerry Stofko is announcing his
candidacy over the Wyoming
Area School board. Jerryis seek-
ing a 4 year term on the School
Board. Jerry was born and raised
in Harding by his parents George
and Anna. Jerry is the youngest
of five siblings. He is a member
of the 1966 West Pittston grad-
uating class.
He went on to serve two years
in the Army Air Calvary with a
one year deployment in Vietnam
where he rose to the rank of Ser-
geant E-5. During his deploy-
ment he was awarded 3 purple
hearts, 2 Bronze Stars with V
Device for heroism and The Air
Medal for participating in over
25 Aerial Missions over hostile
territory. He is a Life Member of
Purple Heart.
After Honorable Discharge
from the Army he worked at Ce-
lotex in Harding where he was a
member of the OCAWLocal 8-1.
He alsoworkedas a heavyequip-
ment operator joining the Oper-
ating Engineers until he was em-
ployed by the Postal Service
where he retired after 32 years as
a Letter Carrier in Scranton
where he was a member of the
National Association of Letter
Carriers.
Jerry has long been an active
member in the community. He is
a Life Member of VFWPost 396
where he has served as Jr. and Sr.
Vice President as well as three
years as Commander. He is also
a Life Member of the American
Legion. He served as Parade
Chairman of the Wyoming/West
Wyoming Memorial Day Parade
for five years and Chairman of
the Confederate Soldier Memo-
rial. He is a past member of St.
John the Baptist Holy Name in
Pittston and is currently a mem-
ber of Corpus Christi Parish.
As a candidate for School
Board, Jerry is sensitive to the
poor economic climate that ev-
eryone is experiencing, high un-
employment, escalating gas,
food and heating costs; there-
fore, the District must live within
its means and not continue to
overburden the taxpayers. Jerry
pledges to investigate every
available option to reduce Dis-
trict expenditures. “The time has
come that everyone must work
together as a team…the School
Board, Employees and Tax-
payers to achieve the goal of re-
duced spending without com-
promising the quality of educa-
tion at Wyoming Area,” he says.
Jerry resides in Exeter with his
wife Katie and is the Sstepfather
of Jerry Wall and Susanne Wes-
brook, both graduates of Wyom-
ing Area. He is the grandfather
of Jerry Wall, Jr. a student at
Montgomery Ave. Elementary.
Toni Valenti
Toni Valenti of West Pittston is
a candidate for School Director
in the Wyoming Area School
District. She will seek both the
Democratic and Republican
Nomination.
Valenti is a graduate of Saint
John the Evangelist High School
and is currently employed as Of-
fice Manager for Cenera Auto
Parts, Inc. West Pittston.
Toni is currently serving her
20th year on the Wyoming Area
School Board, where she served
as the first female President,
Secretary and Treasurer. She
represents Wyoming Area on the
Luzerne Intermediate Unit
board where she is presently
serving as the first female Presi-
dent on that board. She was on
the Strategic Planning Commit-
tee at Wyoming Area and repre-
sented the Board at the Parents
Awareness Group meetings.
Valenti is a member of the
Corpus Christi Parish (formerly
Immaculate Conception
Church) and its Altar and Rosary
Society, where she served as
President and is the current Trea-
surer. She has been involved in
Scouting for the past 30 years,
serving as Den Mother for 8
years and Chairperson of Cub
Scout Pack 302 for the past 22
years. Toni is a member of the
Exeter Lion’s Club where she
served as the first female Presi-
dent and was the first female
member. She helped organize
the first West Pittston/Pittston
July 4th celebration. She is cur-
rently serving on the Luzerne
County Transportation Board
where she is the Secretary.
Toni served as President of the
Wyoming Area Basketball Par-
ents Organization. She was in-
volved with the West Pittston
Little League for 14 years, serv-
ing as President of the Little
League Ladies Auxiliary and
Secretary of the Little League
Board of Directors.
Toni is the daughter of the late
Albino and Antoinette Forlenza
Ciampi. She is married to Faust
Valenti and they are the parents
of a son Michael, married to the
former Mara Pagnotti, who are
the proud parents of Toni’s
granddaughter, Nina Antoinette.
Michael and Mara are graduates
of Wyoming Area and owners of
Michael Valenti’s Restaurant,
Exeter.
P R I M A R Y E L E C T I O N 2 01 1
Wyoming Area Concerned Candidates announce slate
Nick DeAngelo Jerry Stofko Toni Valenti
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new Pittston Division on Mon-
day, April 25, from 6:00- 6:45
p.m. in the Pittston YMCA.
Classes will be held weekly.
Lynnette’s Twirlerettes has a
28 year history with other divi-
sions in Carbondale-Lackawan-
na County, Forest City-Susque-
hanna County, Lake Ariel-
Wayne County and now in Pitt-
ston-Luzerne County. They have
traveled and performed exten-
sively across the United States,
Canada, Bermuda, and the Ca-
ribbean.
For more information logo on
to www.lynnettestwirlerettes-
.com or register by calling 281-
9797.
Lions Scholarships
The Hughestown Lions Club
will sponsor three scholarships
again this year. All participants
must be from Hughestown and
seniors at Pittston Area. Partici-
pants can get application forms
from the guidance counselor at
Pittston Area High School.
This year the club is proud to
announce that a $500 scholar-
ship has been added as well as
two $250.00 scholarships.
This is just one of many func-
tions that the Lions Club pro-
vides in the borough. Anyone
wishing to join the club may call
President Steve Golya at 655-
4552 or contact any member.
IAA Membership Drive
The Italian American Associ-
ation of Luzerne County is con-
ducting its 2011 Membership
Drive. If you are of Italian De-
cent or married to someone of
Italian Descent, come and cele-
brate your heritage by participa-
ting in cultural events, commu-
nity service, scholarship pro-
grams and social events.
This membership is open to
Luzerne and surrounding county
residents. For informationplease
call Judy Deice at 654-7600 or
Louise Castellani at 654-6454.
Jacquelines Meeting
The Jacquelines, ladies auxu-
liary to the JFK Council 372
Kights of Columbus, will have
their April Meeting on Tuesday,
april 26, at the Council Home 55
South main Street. Luzerne
County District Justice Fred Pie-
rantoni will be Principal Speak-
er. He a graduate of Temple Law
School and has been District
Judge for 19 yrs.
Nominations for 2011/12 offi-
cers will be presentedbyBarbara
Lanunziata and Sally Scott.
Elections take place at the May
meeting
Lithuanian Women
The Lithuanian Womens Club
of Wyoming Valley will hold its
April Meeting at Boscov’s on
Tuesday, April 26. Meeting will
be at one with lunch beforehand
at noon. Pres. Martha Warnagiris
will preside and invites all mem-
bers and guests to attend. Plans
will be discussed for the annual
Spring Enrollment Banquet.
Jenkins Taxes
The rebate period for payment
of the 2011county and municipal
taxes will expire on Saturday,
April 30. Office hours are on
Monday and Tuesday from1to 3
p.m. at the Jenkins Township
municipal building, 46 1/2 Main
Street, Inkerman during the re-
bate period only.
Also office hours will be every
Tuesday from 4 to 5:30 p.m. at 3
Laflin Road, Inkerman or you
may call the tax collector at 654-
9710 if these hours are not con-
venient.
Payments can be sent in the
mail and postmark date will be
accepted. If you have not re-
ceived your tax bill or if you have
received a bill in error, please
contact the tax collector. Also if
your bill is paid by an escrowac-
count, send your bill to the mort-
gage company as soon asp pos-
sible to ensure prompt payment.
Chicken BBQ
The Falls Lions Club will hold
a Chicken Barbecue Dinner (eat
in or take out) on Sunday, May1,
from11 a.m. until sold out. Din-
ner includes half chicken, baked
potato, baked beans, coleslaw,
roll, dessert & refreshments.
Event will be held at the Volun-
teer Hall, Route 92, Falls.
Holocaust Mass
The Polish American Con-
gress of Northeastern Pennsyl-
vania will conduct its 34th an-
nual Holocaust Memorial Mass
at 8:30 a.m. Sunday, May1, in St.
Stanislaus Church, North Main
Street, Wilkes-Barre.
Immediately prior to the Mass
PAC members will present spe-
cial gifts: chain and crown of
thorns to symbolize the millions
of Holocaust victims, sheaves of
wheat symbolizing the rebirth of
Poland, bread and grapes sym-
bolizing new life, doves, and lily
symbolizing peace. Members
will then light votive candles in
memory of those who perished
in the 27 known concentration
camps in Europe.
Six of the camps were Ausch-
witz, Dachau, Treblinka, Ber-
gen-Belsen, Buchenwald, and
Theresiendstadt. A seventh can-
dle is lit in memory of over
15,000 Polish Army officers and
intelligentsia massacred in the
Katyn Forest. The final candle is
lit to memorialize our great Pol-
ish pope, John Paul II.
All members are askedtomeet
at the church prior to service
time.
Osteoporosis Seminar
Geisinger will host a free oste-
oporosis seminar at 5:30 p.m.
Monday, May 2, at Geisinger
Specialty Services, Entrance C,
675 Baltimore Drive, Wilkes-
Barre.
As you age, the risk for osteo-
porosis increases and it often
strikes silently and without
warning, making early detection
vital. Geisinger rheumatology
experts will be onhandfor todis-
cuss prevention, risk factors, di-
agnosis and treatment of osteo-
porosis in women and men. A
demonstration of a DXA bone
density scan - the gold standard
in detecting osteoporosis - will
be provided.
Registration is required.
Please call 1-800-275-6401 and
say “CareLink,” or register on-
line at www.geisinger.org/
events.
Rummage Sale
The Washington Square Resi-
dents’ Club, Washington Square
Apartments, 163 South Wash-
ington Street, Wilkes-Barre, is
sponsoring their annual Rum-
Briefs
Continued from Page 31
See BRIEFS, Page 36
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H OURS: M on.-Th u rs. 9 a.m .-9 p.m .,Fri. 9 a.m .-6 p.m .
Sat. 9 a.m .-5 p.m .,Su n. 9:30 a.m .-1 p.m . H OLIDA Y H OURS Ph arm aciston Call
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• 24 H O UR
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mage Sale, May 4 and 5 from10
a.m. to 3 p.m. and May 6 from10
a.m. to 12 noon (Bag Day).
There will also be a bake sale.
Lots of clothing, electrical items,
knick-knacks, books, jewelry,
and lots more.
Senior Dinner Dance
“Hollywood Glamour” is this
year’s theme for the 44th annual
senior dinner dance sponsored
bythe Area AgencyonAgingfor
Luzerne-Wyoming Counties.
This gala event will be held at
Genetti’s Best Western, Wilkes-
Barre on May11from2 p.m. to 6
p.m. Swing and sway or just lis-
ten to the wonderful tunes of this
year’s entertainment, the “Fancy
Dancer “band.
There will be over 65 door
prizes and a grand prize donated
by Central Penn Gas for the
lucky persons chosen to be the
King and Queen of the dance.
Open to all adults, tickets are
$21 for age 60 plus and $22 for
under age 60. Acash bar is avail-
able.
Tickets can be purchased at
any senior center listed on
www.aginglw.org or by calling
Rhonda Adams at #822-1159
Ext. 3337 or for more informa-
tion call Brenda Lispi at # 822-
1159 Ext. 3333.
PA Class of 1981
Pittston Area class of 1981will
holda reunionmeeting- cookout
on Saturday, May 28 at 3:30 p.m.
at the home of Sandy Russo-
Schwartz, 12 Friend Street, Pitt-
ston. Classmates that plan on at-
tending are asked to please email
paclassof1981@gmail.com or
Sandy directly via Facebook.
RSVPfor the class reunion are
due by June 1 with payment of
$35 per person due no later than
July 1. Please forward payments
to Patty Capitano-Kachinsky,
508 McCullen Street, Duryea Pa
18642. Our 30th class reunion
will be held on Saturday, Sep-
tember 10, 2011from6 to11p.m.
at the Firelite Banquet Hall Du-
pont.
Salvation Army Camp
The Salvation Army is now
taking applications for their
weeklong, summer camp pro-
gram at Camp Ladore. Summer
camp dates are June 22-27, July
8-16, and August 3-8.
“It’s an experience not to be
missed,” observes Wilkes-Barre
Salvation Army Captain Patty
Richwine. “Time spent at camp
can be a life-changing experi-
ence for kids. We are so grateful
to our friends who sponsored
these children.”
Last summer, 34 children
fromthe Wilkes-Barre area went
to a weeklong camp where they
played sports, swam, explored
the outdoors and made crafts.
Children ages 7-17 can have the
opportunity to attend The Salva-
tion Army camp at Camp Ladore
in Waymart. The camp is owned
and operated by The Salvation
Army and consists of 1,200 acres
of land surrounding a 265 acre
lake.
Programs contribute to the
spiritual, educational, social, and
recreational needs of every
camp. Transportation is provid-
ed to and from camp. Scholar-
ships are based on need, with
proper paperwork completed
two weeks before camp.
“School will be ending soon,”
Richwine points out. “For some
kids, going to Camp Ladore is
the highlight of the whole sum-
mer.”
Parents interested in sending
their children to summer camp
should register at The Salvation
Army, 17 S. Pennsylvania Ave-
nue, Wilkes-Barre. For more in-
formation, contact The Salva-
tion Army at 570-824-8741.
Theatre Workshops
The Music Box is pleased to
announce the following Theatre
Workshops:
Children’s Summer Theatre
Workshop for ages 8-12. Classes
begin July 25 and run Mondays,
Wednesdays and Thursdays
from 9 a.m. - noon through Au-
gust 19. The students will per-
form Disney’s Aladdin Kids on
August 19 & 20. Tuition is $200
per child.
Music Box Theatre Academy
for ages13-18. Classes beginAu-
gust 30 and will be held twice
weekly in the evening through
October 13. The students will
perform Grease on October 14,
15 &16. Tuition is $275 per stu-
dent.
Both programs are enrolling
nowand will fill up very quickly.
Call 283-2195 for enrollment
forms or additional information.
All classes will be held at The
Music Box Dinner Playhouse,
196 Hughes Street in Swoyers-
ville.
PA Class of 1986
Pittston Area Class of 1986
will hold a 25th reunion week-
end. The following events are
set: Friday September 24, tail-
gate party at PAHS 7-9 p.m. and
Saturday, September 25, net-
working at Good Fellos in Pitt-
ston from 7-11 p.m.
All interested alumni are
asked to contact either Janine
Kubasko-Starinsky
(Starz364@verizon.net)or Ro-
maine Gillow Astolfi (rtes-
sie@aol.com) on face book or
email with current mailing ad-
dresses or to join the committee.
Briefs
Continued from Page 35
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F
C
C
arey
rank
onstruction, Inc.
Where High Quality
Is Te Standard
New Residential
Construction
Custom
Remodeling
Kitchen and
Baths
Land
Development
www. f r a n k c a r e y c o n s t r u c t i o n . c o m
Office:
570-655-2374
Direct:
570-237-1444
Paid for by Committee to Elect Joe Saporito Judge
Joseph and Giovanna Saporito
and Family
would like to wish your family a
The Old Forge Athletic Asso-
ciation will hold registration for
Jr. Blue Devils football and
cheerleading on April 28 from
6-8 p.m. and April 30 from 11
a.m.-1 p.m. in the Old Forge
High School lobby.
Residents of Old Forge ages 5-
13 are eligible to participate.
Registration fees are $45 for a
single child, $65 for families
with two children; and $75 for
families with three or more chil-
dren.
For more information contact
OFAA president Shawn Nee at
650-2021.
Pasta Dinner
The Old Forge Boys’ Round-
ball Club will hold its annual
Pasta Dinner on May1from12-4
p.m. at Arcaro and Genell’s Ban-
quet Room. The Dinner is eat-in
or take-out and includes pasta, a
salad, desert and a beverage.
Tickets are $9 for adults and
$4 for children under 12, and can
be purchased from any member
of the Old Forge Boys’ Basket-
ball Program or at the door.
Retirees to Meet
The Old Forge Retired Citi-
zens will meet May4, at 2p.m. at
Arcaro and Genell’s.
Reservations and payments
for the May 15 Mother and Fa-
ther’s ay dinner will be taken at
the meeting.
Tee Time for Kiel
The Friends of Kiel Eigen are
sponsoring the Third Annual Tee
Time for Kiel Golf Tournament
on June 4 at Sand Springs Golf
Club. The Tournament is Cap-
tain and Crewwith a1p.m. shot-
gun start.
Cost is $100 per player and in-
cludes golf fees, lunch, dinner
and a snack and drink at the turn.
Registration begins at 11:30 a.m.
withlunchandrange time sched-
uled for 12 p.m. Prizes will be
awarded for first and second
place in each flight.
Teams will be accepted on a
first-come basis. All fees must
accompany registration. Hole
Sponsors are also welcome at
$100 per hole.
For more info or to register
contact Adam Barsigian at 561-
5822, J Argonish at 862-3566,
Corey Palma at 861-4743 or Ian
Nemetz at 267-6802.
All proceeds go to the Kiel Ei-
gen Fund.
Jr. Devils football, cheerleader signups scheduled
OLD FORGE
Hughestown residents will not
have newspapers picked upon
Monday, April 25, due to the ho-
liday. Place at curbside for Tues-
day pick up.
No pick up of grass or lawn
material as yet. Borough has
been working with Dupont,
hopefully to make an agreement
for this.
Hughestown Girls League sig-
nups still going on this Thursday
from6 to 7 in the borough build-
ing. Tenative opening day is May
7. Final plans for the new stand
are being completed. Donations
are being accepted. Drop them
off at borough building. The re-
frigerator has been donated in
memory of Joann Davenport.
She served the Girls League for
many years.
Hughestown news notes
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Attention
Lo.iouorro c Lu:.rr. Court· Ho¬. Our.rs
FHA Title I is now available through approved lenders
to oualitied applicants tor home repairs up to
$
25,000
No Monev Down* No Eouitv Reouired*
Attro:.c otti:.ot:ors u:ii oo:. uori .o¬ti.t.c
o· o ouoi:t· .r.u tro::c.c o·:
Homeowner Resource Center
R.tio..¬.rt V:rcous · H.ot:r. S·st.¬
V:r·i S:c:r. · Roo/:r. · Irsuiot:or · Arc Mor..
*All applications will be numbered and processed on a frst come frst serve basis.
Sorry, No Exceptions
www.hrchelp.com
For More Information Call: 1-866-465-4620
contractor #: PA001581
For More Information Call: 1-800-793-1848
Kim Marie Alfano would like
to formally announce her candi-
dacy for Pittston City Council.
A Pittston resident for over 23
years, she is married to JimAlfa-
no and has two sons, James and
Nicholas.
Formerly from Moosic, she is
the daughter of Joseph and An-
drea Craig of Moosic.
A graduate of Riverside Jr./Sr.
High School and Marywood,
with a Bachelor’s degree in En-
glish and a certified paralegal,
plus real estate credits fromPenn
State.
Employed by the Riverside
School District for 25 years,
Mrs. Alfano worked in the Busi-
ness Office and now works with
transportation and state report-
ingfor the District. For over eight
years, she represented the RES-
PA as union president.
Mrs. Alfano has also been ac-
tively involved in the Pittston
Little League for over 13 years,
serving as player agent and pub-
lic relations.
Her other activities included
being a former member of the
Pittston Area PTO and past trea-
surer of the Pittston Area Base-
ball Booster Club.
P R I M A R Y E L E C T I O N 2 01 1
Kim Marie Alfano a candidate for Pittston City Council
Kim Marie Alfano
The Lower Lackawanna Val-
ley Sewer Authority rules and
regulations require bills to be
mailed to the owner of the prop-
erty and not the tenant. Any
agreement between owner and
tenant is in no way a concern of
the LLVSA. The homeowner is
solely responsible for the pay-
ment for services at LLVSA.
Any customer bill not paid by
the due date will be subject to a
five percent late charge that will
be computed on any unpaid
charges. Any owner who is over
two quarters delinquent on their
LLVSAbill will be placed on our
water shut off program and/or a
lien may be placed against the
property.
The American Water Compa-
ny has informed the LLVSAthat
they will charge a $30 fee for the
water service to be shut off and a
$30 fee for turning the water ser-
vice backon. Your LLVSAsewer
account will be charged the $60
fee charged to LLVSAby Amer-
ican Water Company.
Senior citizens are reminded
that proof of age (photo ID or
driver’s license) is required with
every bill they submit either
through the mail or at our office
on Coxton Road in Duryea. Any
customer 62 years of age and ol-
der and owning and residing in
the home, qualify for a ten per-
cent discount on their sewer bill.
Businesses and tenant occupied
units do not qualify for the senior
citizens discount.
The LLVSA payment can also
be made at the Medicine Shoppe
in Old Forge, Llewellyn’s Phar-
macy in Avoca or The Hub in
Dupont. However, senior Cciti-
zendiscount cannot be appliedat
these locations.
The LLVSA is now accepting
“over the telephone payments”
with MasterCard and Visa credit
card/debit cards only.
Call the LLVSA business of-
fice at 655-1665 to make a pay-
ment. Any customer using their
“on-line” banking system must
verify that the correct LLVSA
account number is on the check
and that one check per payment
is issued for every individual ac-
count. Some banks only provide
one account number for verifica-
tion. This will prevent the wrong
LLVSA account from being in-
correctly applied.
The business office hours are
Monday through Friday from 8
a.m. to 4 p.m. The business of-
fice is closed on Saturdays and
Sundays.
Any questions concerning
these programs, please contact
LLVSA at 655-1665.
LLVSA bills due
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In the towns
Happy Easter everybody!
Many religious services are tak-
ing place throughout town today.
The Rev. Michael Shambora
and the congregation of the Be-
thel United Methodist Church,
532 Main St., will have their
Easter service today at 11:15 a.m.
The Rev. Barbara Shaw Jen-
kins and the congregation of the
Langcliffe Presbyterian
Church, 1001Main St., will cele-
brate the Resurrection of Jesus at
their service today at 11:15 a.m.
The Rev. Rich Rock and the
congregation of St. John’s
Primitive Methodist Church,
314 Main St., will have Easter
services today at 7 and 10 a.m.
The Rev. Phillip J. Sladicka
and the parishioners of St. Ma-
ry’s Church, 715 Hawthorne
St., and SS. Peter and Paul’s
Church, 1000 Main St., will cel-
ebrate the Mass of the Resurrec-
tion at 8 and11:30 a.m. at St. Ma-
ry’s Church and at 10 a.m. at SS.
Peter and Paul’s Church.
Happy Birthday
Happy birthday to Bob Ryzner
Sr. who will celebrate his special
day Thursday, April 28.
Raffle Winners
Congratulations to this week’s
winners of St. Mary’s Church’s
Pot of Gold raffle: Joyce Kushn-
er, KevinBoone, Emma Shimko,
and Sue Dente.
First Communion
The followingchildrenwill re-
ceive the Sacrament of First
Communion Saturday, April 30
at 10 a.m. at St. Mary’s Church:
William Aldrich, Lily Andricks,
Tyler Brody, Nicholas Cortes,
Madison Evans, James Guari-
glia, Elizabeth Guzik, Joshua Io-
vacchini, Hannah Kozlowski,
Joseph Long, Frank Lyons,
KatelynLyons, MaryMcAdarra,
Syra Reza, Nicholas Sherinsky,
Matthew Soy, Matthew Stein-
kirchner, Ann Marie Sudol, Jo-
nathan Volch, Mariah Volch, and
Abagail Winburn.
The members of St. Mary’s/
SS. Peter and Paul’s Churches
First Communion class will have
practice for their First Commu-
nion April 27-29 at 5 p.m. in St.
Mary’s Church, 715 Hawthorne
St. Please note onApril 28, inad-
dition to practice, there will also
be a scapular service and confes-
sion.
Sewer Bills
Berkheimer Associates re-
cently mailed sewer bills to all
Avoca borough residents. Please
note the property owners are re-
sponsible for paying the bills. If
the bills are not paid in full by
December 31, 2011, they will be
turned over to Creditech. All ac-
counts that are delinquent $70 or
more for more than one year will
be placed on a water shutoff list.
Property owners will also be re-
sponsible for water shutoff and
restoration fees.
Wildcats Sign-ups
The Duryea Wildcats will
have early sign-up sessions April
27 and May 11 from 5:30-7:30
p.m. at the Duryea Sports Com-
plex, corner of Kramer and Shaft
Streets, Duryea. All participants
must submit their birth certifi-
cate, two proofs of residency, a
photo, and medical clearance
from a doctor to play. The regis-
tration fee is $60 and 20 tickets
for a single family and $60 and
25 tickets for a family of two or
more. Returning players who
have not returned their uniforms
are asked to do so at this time.
For more information, please e-
mail Wildcatsmommy05@veri-
zon.net.
Crime Watch
The Duryea Police, the Du-
ryea Neighborhood Crime
Watch, and the United States
Drug Enforcement Administra-
tion invite the community to par-
ticipate in the National Take
Back Initiative Saturday, April
30 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the
Duryea Municipal Building, 315
Main St., Duryea. The National
Take Back Initiative provides the
community with a safe place to
depose of any unwanted, unused,
or outdated prescriptions. Please
note this program is not just for
Duryea residents. Anyone can
utilize it. For more information,
please visit the Duryea Police
Facebook page or www.DEA-
.gov and click on the “Got
Drugs” banner on the top of the
screen.
Spaghetti Dinner
Avoca V.F.W. Post 8335 will
have its annual spaghetti dinner
Saturday, April 30 from1-5 p.m.
at the post home, 915 Main St.
Takeouts will be available too.
Tickets are $6 and can be pur-
chased from any member or at
the post home.
Concert Sunday
The congregation of the Lang-
cliffe Presbyterian Church, 1001
Main St., will host a concert by
the Northeast Choral Society
Youth Division Sunday, May1at
3 p.m. in the church sanctuary.
Refreshments will be served
following the concert. A free
will offering will be accepted as
well as non-perishable food do-
nations for a local food pantry.
Waleski Camps
The Stan Waleski Basketball
Camp will take place July 11-29
at the St. Joseph’s Oblates Semi-
nary gymnasium, 1880 Highway
315, Pittston, for boys andgirls in
Kindergarten through eighth
grade. The camp stresses funda-
mentals, skills, team play, and
fun. All attendees will receive a
campT-shirt andcertificate. Dis-
counts are available for players
who register by May1. There are
also discounts for multiple fam-
ily members attending the camp.
For more information, please
contact Coach Waleski at 457-
1206 or stanwaleski@ya-
hoo.com or Coach LoBrutto at
654-8030. Camp information is
also available at www.stanwales-
ki.com.
VFW Auxiliary
V.F.W. Post 8335 Ladies Aux-
iliary will have a brief meeting
Monday, May 2 at 6 p.m. at the
post home, 915 Main St. Presi-
dent June Fitzgerald will preside
over the meeting. Mary Ann
Ruane will be installing the offi-
cers elected for the 2011-2012
term at this time: June Fitzger-
ald, president; Mary Ann Tigue,
senior vice president; Joan Em-
law, junior vice president; Patri-
cia Rinkus, treasurer; Patricia
Bartnicki, chaplain; Sylvia
Smith, conductress; Betty Le-
wis, guard; Mary Starinsky, pa-
triotic instructor; Mary Orluk,
secretary; and trustees Mary Ha-
dley, Marilyn O’Boyle, and
Elaine Frietas. Following the in-
stallation ceremony, dinner will
be served. All members should
attend this important meeting.
Yard Waste
Avoca Borough will have yard
waste collections Tuesday, May
3 and 17 weather permitting. In
addition to collecting grass clip-
pings and leaves, the borough
workers will also collect other
yard waste including shrubs,
hedge clippings, and tree limbs.
Please note that grass clippings,
leaves, and brush must be placed
in separate containers. The tree
limbs should not exceed three
feet in length and one-half inch
in diameter.
Please note that rocks, stones,
dirt, and animal waste are not ac-
ceptable forms of yard waste and
will not be collected. A maxi-
mum of three open containers,
not exceeding 30 pounds, will be
allowed per collection. Please do
not put your collection items in
plastic bags. They will not be
collected. Collection items
should be placed curbside by 8
a.m. on the collection date.
Please note due to the large vol-
ume of yard waste and grass, the
collection may take two or three
days to complete. Please leave
your items curbside. They will
be collected.
May Crowning
St. Mary’s/SS. Peter and Paul’s
Churches will have its May
Crowning Sunday, May 8 during
the11:30 a.m. Mass at St. Mary’s
Church, 715 Hawthorne St. All
children in the religious educa-
tion program should participate.
Night at the Races
The Avoca A.O.H. will have
sponsor a Night at the Races Sat-
urday, May 14 at the West Side
Social Club, 711 McAlpine St.
The doors will open at 6:30 p.m.,
and the races will begin at 7:30
p.m. Race sponsorships are $50.
And horse sponsorships are $10
which includes admission, food,
and beverages at the event. All
proceeds will benefit the A.O.H.
scholarship program.
Golf Tournament
St. Mary’s Church will have its
annual St. Mary’s Classic golf
tournament Sunday, May 15 at
Pine Hills Country Club, Taylor.
This year’s tournament will be
played in memory of Judge Tho-
mas Gibbons. Registration in-
formation can be obtained by
calling the parish office at 457-
3412. For sponsorship informa-
tion, please e-mail Jimbo
McMahon at jimmcma-
hon1@verizon.net.
Permit Reminder
Residents are reminded that
Avoca Borough and Luzerne
County permits are required pri-
or to starting work on any of the
following projects: new residen-
tial or commercial construction,
additions, renovations, demoli-
tions, garages, swimming pools,
decks, sheds and electrical work.
In addition, Avoca Borough
permits are required before con-
necting driveways to public
roads, improving existing drive-
Easter services in borough begin as early as 7 a.m.
AVOCA
JACKIE BORTHWICK-GALVIN
457-3351
avocahappenings@verizon.net
See AVOCA, Page 41
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The 5th Annual Dupont Soft-
ball Tournament has been
scheduled for July 15-17 at the
Dupont Little League Field.
All proceeds from this tour-
nament will benefit the Dupont
Little League, the Dupont Lions
Club and other local charities.
The games are set to begin on
Friday, July 15, at 7 p.m. and
continue through all day Satur-
day, July 16, before concluding
on Sunday, July 17.
This event will be a double-
elimination tournament which
guarantees each participating
team at least two games played.
Entry fee for each team will
be $150.00 with prizes being
awarded to the winner and run-
ner-up of the event.
For further information or to
enter a team please contact Rob
Lopata at 883-0185 as entrants
are limited.
Collecting DVDs
Sarah Snyder, a student at
Holy Redeemer High School, is
working on her Girl Scout Sil-
ver Award.
She is collecting adult and
children DVDs to send to the
head trauma unit at John Heinz
Rehab Hospital and also the pe-
diatric unit at Mercy Hospital.
There will be a box in the
back of the Sacred Heart of Je-
sus Church and also at the Du-
pont Municipal Building to
drop the DVDs in.
Food Giveaway
The monthly food distribu-
tion sponsored by the Dupont
Lions will be held on Thursday,
April 28, from 4 to 5 p.m. at the
Holy Mother of Sorrows Parish
Hall on Wyoming Ave.
All qualifying residents of
Dupont and Suscon are eligible.
Happy Birthday
Happy Birthday Justin Baran,
who will be celebrating his
birthday on Monday, April 25,
from your family and friends.
Justin is a student at Blooms-
burg and is the son of Jeanene
and Jeffrey Baran.
Night at the Races
The Avoca AOH will hold a
Night at the Races on May 14.
Race sponsorships are only
$50.00 and horse sponsorships
are $10.00 which includes your
admission, food and beverages.
Doors will open at 6:30 p.m.
and racing will begin at 7:30
p.m. at the West Side Social
Club in West Avoca.
All proceeds will benefit the
AOH scholarship program.
PACC Meeting
The Polish American Citizens
Club of Elm Street Dupont will
hold their regular monthly
meeting at 2 p.m. on Sunday,
May 15, at the Club home.
PACC active members are en-
couraged to attend; refresh-
ments will be served after the
meeting.
Barletta Office
A representative from Con-
gressman Lou Barletta’s office
will be available at the West
Pittston Municipal Building on
Exeter Avenue, the first and
third Wednesdays of every
month from 10:00 a.m. to noon.
The representative will be
there to answer questions from
residents regarding Medicare,
Social Security, Veterans bene-
fits, etc.
No appointments are neces-
sary, any resident with ques-
tions or concerns are welcome
to stop by during these hours.
Eco-tip
Here is Joey Jones Eco-tip of
the week: This past Friday,
April 22, was Earth Day!
Help the earth by recycling
your cereal boxes. This saves
trees!
Medication Disposal
Residents can turn in their
unused or expired medication
for safe disposal at the Dupont
Municipal Building on Saturday
April 30. Dupont Borough will
have a box for the drug disposal
in the manager’s office, or you
can visit www.dea.gov or call
800-882-9539 for a collection
site near you.
Yard Waste
Dupont Borough reminds res-
idents that yard waste pickup is
for small projects only.
Anyone doing a major tree
cutting or bush removal project
must make arrangements to
have the borough truck parked
and someone to load the truck.
The cost per load is $15.00
per load for fuel and labor. Call
the borough office for available
rates and times.
Reservations are being ac-
cepted for spring cleaning bulk
pickups which will take place
on Thursdays and Fridays dur-
ing the month of May. Contact
the municipal office for avail-
able dates and times.
Information regarding yard
maintenance, dog ordinance,
pavilion rental and park cleanup
can be found on the Dupont
borough website at www.du-
pontpa.info.
300 Club Winners
Holy Name 300 Club Win-
ners Final Week: $500.00 - Joe
Cronick, $100.00 -Rich Antal $
50.00 - Irene Kivak, $25.00 -E
& J Eustice $ 25.00 Alice Jones
Candidates Rally
Members of Team Patriot,
candidates for Pittston Area
School Board, will hold a rally
on Thursday, April 28, at the
Jenkins Twp. Hose Company
2nd Street Port Griffith, from7
p.m. to 9 p.m.
The public is invited to attend
and refreshments will be se-
vered.
Tickets are $10.00 and can be
purchased from any member of
the team or at the door. Team
members are John Boone,
Casey Donahue, Tony Guari-
glia, Joe Kelly, and Charles
Sciandra.
Service Schedule
Dupont service schedule for
the week of April 25:
Monday, April 25 - Purple re-
fuses bags
Tuesday, April 26 - Ashes,
yard waste
Wednesday, April 27 - Recy-
cling mix papers
Got News?
If you have an article which
you would like to submit you
can send the information to du-
pont.news@comcast.net or by
calling 654-0897.Send your
news items by Wednesday eve-
ning. Please include a contact
phone number.
Bowling Results
Magic Circle
High Scratch Series Scores:
Edward Collins, 699; John Co-
larusso, 650; Bill Pupa, 600;
Kyle Wagner, 599; Francis Pu-
pa, 584; Drew Nicholson, 578;
Rich Sr. Aston, 567; Paul
Chmiel, 553; John Pupa, 550;
Russ Stevens, 539.
Friday Junior/Senior
High Scratch Series Scores:
Men’s Division: Kyle Berlin-
ski, 568; Michael Szumski, 513;
Kevin Boone, 461; Sam Carlen,
440; Tyler Baran, 437.
Women’s Division: Chantel
Cebula, 325.
American
High Scratch Series Scores:
Dave Kern, 708; Jerry Coggins,
693; Neal Elko, 690; John Gro-
howski, 687; Mark Kulick, 654;
Tom Spurlin, 651; Rob Miller,
645; Pete Latona, 614; Gary Jr.
Magdon, 608; Bruce Rydzy,
585.
Dupont Bowlerettes
High Scratch Series Scores:
Gracelynn Williamson, 526;
Helen Zapotoski, 493; Rose
McDade, 491; Connie Berlin-
ski, 478; Irene Jemiola, 464;
Donna Kasa, 457; MaryLou Fe-
reck, 431; Debbie Stevens, 419;
Kim Kishel, 413.
Warehouse Mixed
Men’s Division: Scott
Schramm, 711; John Doran,
582; Matt Charney, 559; Ron
Shaw, 553; Ed Warunek, 528.
Women’s Division: Noel Hor-
wath, 465; Melony Yurek, 437;
Sandra Sands, 403; Ann Ko-
peck, 342; Nikki Sands, 318.
National
High Scratch Series Scores:
Edward Collins, 706; Allyn Jr.
Ferretti, 698; Rich Gorzkowski,
684; John Pisano, 650; Steve
Seeley, 650; Jerry Coggins,
633; Allyn Sr. Ferretti, 629;
Bruce Rydzy, 610; Robert Lus-
si, 601; Neal Elko, 586.
Universal
High Scratch Series Scores:
Jerry Coggins, 721; Mike
Gotcha, 656; David Titton, 621;
Dan Polerecki, 616; Edward
Collins, 608; Jim Lavelle,III,
605; Richard Arditi, 603; Wil-
liam Elko, 593; Lowell Stoss,
586; Leonard Trolio, 580.
Sunday Night Mix
High Scratch Series Scores:
Men’s Division: Paul Chmiel,
626; Vito Buzzetta, 563; Joe
Argenio, 561; Francis Pupa,
532; Russ Stevens, 504.
Women’s Division: trisha
Chmiel, 483; Gravelynn Wil-
liamson, 469; Marianne Arge-
nio, 420; MaryLou Fereck, 401;
Debbie Stevens, 336.
Dupont Prep Boys
High Scratch Series Scores:
Joey Jones, 392; Charles Kul-
ick, 356; Evan Elko, 350; Mi-
chael Walsh, 343; Zachary Gar-
barino, 330; Jesse Carlen, 316;
David Noble, 277; Bryan
Shupp, 262; Nick Arcarese,
242; Caden Sutcliffe, 230.
Bantam/Prep Boys
High Scratch Series Scores:
Anthony DePascale, 220; Joe
Wruble, 188; Tyler Cegelka,
183; Zachary Elko, 169; Jeremy
Lavelle, 161; Tyler Granahan,
147; Marc Piechota, 143; Bra-
dley Augenstein, 134; Chaz
Sciandra, 131; Tommy Dessoye,
129.
Bantam/Prep Girls
High Scratch Series Scores:
Samantha Piechota, 230; Mor-
gan Mesaris, 211; Kayla Hind-
marsh, 193; Piper Kane, 183;
Gabrielle Rose, 179; Nikki
Price, 169; Evelyn Pourmonir,
159; Hannah Maruhnich, 156;
Emily Dessoye, 122; Makenzie
Kaminski, 74.
Dupont Mixed Boys
High Scratch Series Scores:
Zachary McKitish, 584; Spen-
cer Saxon, 559; Peter Kulick,
541; David Zydko, 515; Andrew
Adkins, 491; Stephen Yuhas,
469; Michael Minich, 448; Joey
Musto, 446; Dave Pacovsky,
431; Jason Roche, 424.
Pittston Twp VFW
High Scratch Series Scores:
Jack Casper, 654; Joe Sr. Walsh,
594; Phil Jr. Gianfarcaro, 590;
Bert Myers, 589; Joe Dalessan-
dro, 566; Joe Jr. Walsh, 555; Jo-
dy Marranca, 547; Gene Was-
ko, 531; Rich Russian, 531; An-
thony Grieco, 527.
Annual Dupont Softball Tournament slated July 15-17
DUPONT
ANN MARIE PADDOCK
654-0897
dupont.news@comcast.net
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201 Foote Avenue, Duryea
FREE DELIVERY! CALL 457-8881
OPEN DAILY: 6 a.m.-7 p.m. • Saturday & Sunday ‘til 5 p.m.
REHOSKI’S MARKET
Boneless Chuck Roast .......................$3.99 lb
Eye Round Roast ............................... $3.99 lb.
Boneless Pork Chops......................... $2.99 lb.
Fresh Cut Minute Steaks.................... $3.99 lb.
Butt Steaks ....................................... $2.59 lb.
Smoked Bacon.................................. $4.99 lb.
Turkey Breast ....................................$5.99 lb.
Slicing Pepperoni..............................$4.99 lb.
Cooper Cheese .................................$4.99 lb.
FRESH & SMOKED KIELBASI
Happy Easter everybody!
Many religious services are tak-
ing place throughout town today.
The Rev. Michael Shambora
and the congregation of the
Brick United Methodist
Church, 935 Foote Ave., will
have their service today at 9:45
a.m.
The Rev. Dr. Al Cremard and
the congregation of the Inde-
pendent Bible Church, 328
Main St., will have a sunrise ser-
vice at 6 a.m., Sunday school at
9:15 a.m., a morning worship
service at 10:30 a.m., and a Sun-
day evening service at 6 p.m.
The Rev. Charles Rokosz, the
Rev. Joseph G. Elston, and the
parishioners of Nativity of Our
LordParishwill have Masses to-
dayat 8, 9:30, and11a.m. at Holy
Rosary Church, 127 Stephenson
St.; and at 10:30 a.m. at Sacred
Heart of Jesus Church, 529 Ste-
phenson St.
The Rev. Richard Wosiak and
the parishioners of St. Mary’s
Polish National Catholic
Church, 200 Stephenson St.,
will have an outdoor Resurrec-
tion procession (weather permit-
ting) followed by the Mass of the
Resurrection and blessing of
Easter food at 6 a.m. today. They
will also have a High Mass at 10
a.m. which will also include the
blessing of the Easter food and
benediction.
Father Wosiak, Parish Chair-
man Byron Wescott, and the par-
ishioners of St. Mary’s PNCC
wish everyone a Happy Easter!
Wesologo Alleluhia!
Happy Birthday
Happy birthday to Pauline Di-
Biasi who will celebrate her spe-
cial day Monday, April 25.
Happy birthday to Bob Ryzner
Sr. who will celebrate his special
day Thursday, April 28.
Charity Basketball
Duryea Police Chief Nick
Lohman and Avoca Fire Depart-
ment Sgt. Chris Collins are
pleased to announce the 5th an-
nual Guns ‘N’ Hoses Charity
Basketball game to benefit St.
Jude Children’s Research Hospi-
tal was the most successful one
in the history of the event. With
the help of the community, they
raised $3,000! And for you
sports enthusiast, the game was a
thriller with the police officers
edging out the firefighters 106-
104 in overtime.
The participating police offi-
cers and firefighters would like
to thank everyone who made this
event a success especially the
West Side Stars cheerleaders;
My Sister’s Kitchen Restaurant,
Duryea; the University of Scran-
ton Dance team; Rocky from
Mornings with Rocky and Sue
on 98.5 KRZ; Magisterial Dis-
trict Judge Fred Pierantoni III;
all of the local businesses who
donated door prizes; and every-
one who made donations includ-
ing a $12 donation from a little
girl named Santina from Duryea
to $100 donations from people
all over Luzerne County; the
players, referees, and crew help-
ing with the event; and everyone
else who helped make the chil-
dren of St. Jude’s the real win-
ners of this special event.
Anyone who seeking partici-
pants for charity basketball
games should contact Chief
Lohman at 457-1721 ext. 2 or by
sending him a message via the
Duryea Police Facebook page.
Offices Closed
The Duryea Street Depart-
ment and borough offices will be
closed Easter Monday. Garbage
and recycling collections will be
one day late this week. Yard
waste will not be collected this
Friday.
Wildcats Sign-ups
The Duryea Wildcats will
have early sign-up sessions April
27 and May 11 from 5:30-7:30
p.m. at the Duryea Sports Com-
plex, corner of Kramer and Shaft
Streets. All participants must
submit their birthcertificate, two
proofs of residency, a photo, and
medical clearance from a doctor
to play. The registration fee is
$60 and 20 tickets for a single
family and $60 and 25 tickets for
a family of two or more. Return-
ing players who have not return-
ed their uniforms are asked to do
so at this time. For more infor-
mation, please e-mail Wildcat-
smommy05@verizon.net.
Crime Watch
The Duryea Police, the Du-
ryea Neighborhood Crime
Watch, and the United States
Drug Enforcement Administra-
tion invite the community to par-
ticipate in the National Take
Back Initiative Saturday, April
30 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the
Duryea Municipal Building, 315
Main St. The National Take
Back Initiative provides the
community with a safe place to
depose of any unwanted, unused,
or outdated prescriptions. Please
note this program is not just for
Duryea residents. Anyone can
utilize it. For more information,
please visit the Duryea Police
Facebook page or www.DEA-
.gov and click on the “Got
Drugs” banner on the top of the
screen.
Ziti Dinner
The members of the Duryea
American Legion Brennan Re-
gan Post 585 will have their an-
nual ziti dinner Saturday, April
30 from 5-8 p.m. at the post
home 329MainSt. Takeouts will
be available from 3-5 p.m. Tick-
ets, which can be purchased at
the post home, are $7.50 for
adults and $3.50 for children.
They will also have raffle tickets
for several prizes for $1 each.
Waleski Camps
The Stan Waleski Basketball
Camp will take place July 11-29
at the St. Joseph’s Oblates Semi-
nary gymnasium, 1880 Highway
315, Pittston, for boys andgirls in
Kindergarten through eighth
grade. The camp stresses funda-
mentals, skills, team play, and
fun. All attendees will receive a
campT-shirt andcertificate. Dis-
counts are available for players
who register by May1. There are
also discounts for multiple fam-
ily members attending the camp.
For more information, please
contact Coach Waleski at 457-
1206 or stanwaleski@ya-
hoo.com or Coach LoBrutto at
654-8030. Camp information is
also available at www.stanwales-
ki.com.
Excelsior Meeting
The members of the Excelsior
Hose Co. No. 2 will have their
regular monthly meeting Thurs-
day, May 5 at 7 p.m. at the hose
company, 798 Foote Ave. All
members are urged to attend.
Night at the Races
The Avoca A.O.H. will have
sponsor a Night at the Races Sat-
urday, May 14 at the West Side
Social Club, 711 McAlpine St.,
Avoca. The doors will open at
6:30 p.m., and the races will be-
gin at 7:30 p.m. Race sponsor-
ships are $50. And horse spon-
sorships are $10 which includes
admission, food, and beverages
at the event. All proceeds will
benefit the A.O.H. scholarship
program.
Sons of Legion
The Sons of the American Le-
gion (S.A.L.S.), Squadron 585,
will meet Sunday, May 15 at 3
p.m. at the post home, 329 Main
St. The nomination of officers
will take place at this meeting.
The offices available for nomi-
nation are commander, senior
vice-commander, junior vice-
commander, historian, and ser-
geant at arms. Any S.A.L.S
member in good standing may
run for these offices. Please note
the meeting was moved fromthe
second Sunday of the month due
to Mother’s Day.
Until Next Time
That’s about it for this week! If
you would like something to ap-
pear in next Sunday’s edition, of
the Duryea News please e-mail
or call me with your information
by Thursday at noon. You can e-
mail me at duryeahappen-
ings@verizon.net or call me at
457-3351. Please be sure to in-
clude your name and phone
number with any correspond-
ence in case I need to reach you.
Have a great week!
St. Mary’s PNCC outdoor procession today at 6 a.m.
DURYEA
JACKIE BORTHWICK-GALVIN
457-3351
duryeahappenings@verizon.net
ways, and connecting new or re-
pairing existing sewer lines. Fail-
ure to secure any of the above
permits can result in citations
and penalties.
For more information about
obtaining a permit, please call
the Avoca Borough secretary at
457-4947 Monday through Fri-
day between 10 a.m. and 3 p.m.
Dog Ordinance
Residents are reminded ordi-
nance no. 3-1987 prohibits dogs
fromrunning at large, disturbing
the peace, injuring humans, or
causing a nuisance in the bor-
ough. Residents are to curb dogs.
The police department can cite
violators.
Until Next Time
If you would like something to
appear in next Sunday’s edition
of the Avoca News, e-mail or call
with your information by Thurs-
day at noon. You can e-mail me
at avocahappenings@veri-
zon.net or call me at 457-3351.
Avoca
Continued from Page 39
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The Cosmopolitan Seniors
will meet on Tuesday, May 3, at
11 a.m. at St. Anthony of Padua
Church to celebrate their 36th
anniversary, beginning with a
Mass at 11 a.m. followed by a
dinner at the center at noon.
Cosmopolitan Seniors travel
coordinator Johanna is accepting
reservations for a trip to Mount
Airy Casino on Wednesday, May
11. The trip is open to the public.
Details can be obtained from Jo-
hanna at 655-2720
Exeter Website
The newExeter Borough web-
site is up and running, you can
visit it atwww.exeterborough-
.com
Barletta’s Office
A representative from Con-
gressman Lou Barletta’s office
will be available at the West Pitt-
ston Municipal Building on Exe-
ter Avenue, the first and third
Wednesdays of every month
from10 a.m. to noon. The repre-
sentative will be there to answer
questions from residents regard-
ing Medicare, Social Security,
Veterans benefits, etc.
No appointments are neces-
sary, any resident with questions
or concerns are welcome to stop
by during these hours.
PSEA-Retired
Shirley Judge, Luzerne Coun-
ty Chapter President of PSEA-
Retired, announced plans for the
Spring Luncheon have been
completed. This year’s luncheon
will be held on May 5, the meet-
ing will be held at the East
Mountain Inn. Guest speaker
will by PSEA Staff member and
former state representative Steve
Nickol, who will speak on the
current status of the PSERS sys-
tem and current legislative hap-
penings in Harrisburg.
Reservations should be sent to
Shirley Judge, 3 Bond Avenue,
Swoyersville, PA18643 by April
30. Meal choices are Fish or
Chicken at a cost of $18. Checks
can be made payable to: North-
eastern Region PSEA-Retired.
Or you can call Shirley at 693-
3864.
Coyne Memorial
The 3rdAnnual Joseph F.
Coyne III Memorial Softball
tournament is May15, beginning
at 8:30 a.m. at the Exeter Little
League Fields.(Behind St. Ceci-
lia’s Church). Over the past two
years the event raised over
$11,000 for two families in need.
The recipient this year is 3-year-
old Anthony Lydon. Anthony is
the son of the former Tanya
Nawrocki of Duryea.
The softball game’s proceeds
will benefit Anthony and his
family. To in donate or enter a
team, please call Mayor Cole-
man at 654-3001 ext. 5
Trash Stickers
The refuse stickers for Exeter
Borough are now in the penalty
phase. The sticker price is now
$250 for everyone. Anyone who
does not have a valid 2011sticker
byApril 30will be inviolationof
the refuse ordinance.
The police department will
start issuing citations starting on
May 1. You will then have to pay
court costs, plus the price of the
sticker. Any questions, call 654-
3001 extension 2. Hours are
Monday through Friday from 9
a.m. until 3 p.m.
St. Anthony’s
No Religious Education class-
es this Monday.
A novena to the Divine Mercy
started on Good Friday and it
will continue after Easter with a
special Mass every day at 11a.m.
with the Divine Mercy Chaplet.
The Feast of Divine Mercy is on
Sunday, May 1.
A special meeting for St. An-
thony and St. John the Baptist
churches in Exeter, will be held
on Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. in the
Parish Center. Plans will be pre-
sented.
Summer Parish Bazaar will be
July 22, 23, 24. Friday, Saturday
and Sunday. A meeting will be
held on Wednesday at 7:30 p.m.
in the Parish Center.
The Golden Age Club will
meet on Thursday, April 28, at
1:30 p.m. at the Parish Center.
Hostesses are: Jennie Chiampi,
Netta Deeb and Josephine Del-
priore.
First Holy Communion will be
celebrated next Sunday with a
special Mass at 12:30 p.m. be-
fore the Mass the First Holy
Communion Children will
crown the Blessed Mother. Prac-
tice for all children in the First
Holy Communion class, Cathol-
ic and Public Schools will be
held on Monday, April 25, from
5:30 to 6:30 p.m.; on Tuesday,
April 26, from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m.
andonSaturday, April 30, from9
to 10:30 a.m. with Confessions
and Enrollment in the Brown
Scapular.
Weekend Masses: on Saturday
at 4:30 p.m., on Sunday at 7:30
and 10:30 a.m. and at 7 p.m. (the
last Mass in the valley). Confes-
sions are heard on Saturday at
3:30 pm and before Masses.
The Eucharistic Adoration is
held every day from11:30 a.m. to
6:30 p.m. followed by the Bene-
diction with the Blessed Sacra-
ment.
The Holy Rosary is recited 20
minutes before the weekend
Masses.
Reminder
If you have any events or news
you would like listed in the Exe-
ter Town column, you can reach
me at 287-3349 orecipria-
ni@comcast.net.
Cosmopolitan Senior citizens to note 36th anniversary
EXETER
EILEEN CIPRIANI
287-3349
ecipriani@comcast.net
West Wyoming Hose Compa-
ny #2 with the assistance of Girl
Scout Troop 3941 will sponsor a
community yard sale on Satur-
day May 28 the at the fire com-
pany grounds on Stites Street.
The community is invited to take
part by selling your unwanted
items at the sale. A10 foot by 10
foot space will only cost $10.00.
Larger spaces will be available
by request.
Half of all profits from this
fund raiser will be donated to
Girl Scout Troop 3941.
To reserve a spot, call 570-
287-1182andleave a message, or
you can also fax to the same
number. Someone from the fire
department will get back to you.
Rain date will be Sunday May
29th.
Best Wishes
Joe Piccillo, of Oaklyn, NJ, a
resident of West Wyoming from
1928 to 1956 and graduate from
WWHS class of 45, would like
to send best wishes to some
friends from his early years, in
particular, Tommy "Cowboy"
Territo, Edward Heck, Walter
Heck, Daniel Bozinko.
Recycling
The West WyomingRecycling
containers are now located be-
hind Hose Company #1. Recy-
cling can be dropped off any day
of the week. The borough ac-
cepts newspaper, magazines, of-
fice paper, books, cardboard and
commingled items. The borough
is encouraging residents to recy-
cle; this will not only help the en-
vironment, but lower the bor-
ough’s garbage tonnage totals
thereby controlling costs.
Community yard sale planned at hose company
West Wyoming Hose Company #2 with the assistance of Girl Scout Troop 3941 will sponsor a com-
munity yard sale at the fire department grounds on Saturday May 28. First row, Rebecca Colwell,
Victoria Reno, and Alorah Colwell. Second row, Fire Chief Mike Kuharchik, with Ice, Chief Engineer
Frank Hawk, Firefighter Frank Hawk, President Mark Mizzer, Firefighter Drew Austin, Fire Police
Captain Carl Worthington.
WESTWYOMING
See WEST WYOMING, Page 43
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A representative from Con-
gressman Lou Barletta’s office
will be available at the West Pitt-
ston Municipal Building on Exe-
ter Avenue, the first and third
Wednesdays of every month
from10:00 a.m. to noon.
The representative will be
there to answer questions from
residents regarding Medicare,
Social Security, Veterans bene-
fits, etc.
Rams Signups
The West PittstonRams Junior
CheerleadingandFootball Asso-
ciation Announces 2011 season
registration dates at the Moose
Lodge, 425 Exeter Avenue on
April 28, May 12 and May 24,
June 9, 23 and 30, and July 7
from6:00 p.m. to 8 p.m. for resi-
dents of West Pittston, Harding,
Falls & Exeter Township from
ages 5 to 14 years. Children will
be placed in age-designated
teams fees due at registration
Fees are: $60.00 registration
fee, $10.00. The cost for a foot-
ball jersey is $30.00, if needed.
There is a $25 refundable activ-
ityfee for concessionstandstaff-
ing.
A birth certificate is required,
a photo of the child to be regis-
tered, 2 documents to prove resi-
dency (ex: utility bills, driver’s li-
cense), and a Medical clearance
to participate in football or
cheerleading.
No appointments are neces-
sary, any resident with questions
or concerns are welcome to stop
by during these hours.
Cherry Blossom
The West Pittston Cherry
Blossom Committee is still ac-
cepting vendors for its 40th an-
nual festival on May 14 and 15.
Any vendors interested in partic-
ipating in this year’s festival are
asked to contact Arts & Crafts
chairperson Jessica Werbin for
details at jessicaw@epix.net.
This year’s West Pittston
Cherry Blossom Parade will be
held on Saturday, May 14 at
noon. The parade route is ap-
proximately two-miles long.
Line-up for the parade is at Cen-
era’s Auto Parts, Exeter Avenue
(Rt. 92) West Pittston. Any
groups/individuals interested in
attending is asked to contact pa-
rade co-chairman Ralph Saler-
no@sal602@hotmail.com or
call 570-602-4127. If you were a
past GrandMarshal, youare wel-
come to march in the parade.
Cherry Blossom organizers
are looking for all 39 girls who
were crowned Little Miss Cher-
ry Blossom from as far back as
1971. If you are or if you know a
former princess, please call Gina
Malsky at 570-332-7817 or
email her at lmalsky@aol.com.
On Sunday, May15, West Pitt-
ston Idol will be held. The show
opens at noon. Local singing tal-
ent will have the chance to win a
cash prize. There will be two cat-
egories: 12 and under and 15 and
up.
Yard Waste
Yard waste pick up will began
on Monday, April 11. Montgom-
ery Avenue to Erie Street will be
picked up on Mondays while
Montgomery Avenue to Susque-
hanna Avenue will be picked up
on Tuesdays.
Branches are to be tied in
small bundles no larger than one
inch round by 4 feet in length.
Grass and leaves are to be in con-
tainers weighing no more than
25 to 30 pounds.
Street Sweeping began on
Monday, April 11. Residents are
requested to obey No Parking
Signs on designated days.
Recycling materials are
picked up curbside on the first
and third Thursdays of each
month andinclude newspapers
(in covered containers only) and
commingled glass and alumi-
num cans.
Drop off recycling is every
Saturday from 8:00 a.m. to noon
at the Public Works Facility, 505
Delaware Avenue. Residents can
drop off commingled, newspa-
per and corrugated cardboard.
Tax Reminder
Tax rebate period ended April
8 and the face amount will be
good until June 8.
His office hours are: Tuesday
and Wednesday, 6:00 – 8:00
p.m.; Saturday: 9:00 a.m. to
noon or by appointment by
called 655-3801.
If you are requesting a receipt,
please send a self-addressed,
stamped envelope.
Library Display
The West Pittston Library has
a display of World War II mem-
orabilia which highlights the
crucial Battle of Britain. Various
aircraft, pictures and books tell
about this dark period when En-
gland stood alone in August and
September of 1940.
Also on display are some arti-
facts about the US Army Air
Corp during that period. Ron
Skamanich, a retired Commer-
cial Pilot and Flight Instructor
has provided the items for dis-
play.
The West Pittston Library has
a wide assortment of books dur-
ing that period of history. They
can be reached at 654-9847 or
www.wplibrary.org.
Library Programs
Adult Programs
Beginner Yoga: Tuesdays &
Thursdays, thru 5/31, 8:30-9:30
a.m. - $7.00 drop-in; discounted
punch passes available. Classes
are held in the former American
Legion Building at 316 Linden
St. next to the Montgomery Ave.
Elementary School.
West Pittston Library Book
Club: First Tuesday of each
month, 6:45 p.m.
Basic Computer Classes: Ses-
sion 2: Thursdays, thru 5/26,
6:30-7:30 p.m. - $35.00.
Beginner Knitting Class: Ses-
sion 2: Mondays, 5/9-5/23, 6:00-
8:00 p.m.
New York City’s Sullivan
Street Bakery Bread Making
Class: The Assembly Room in
the First United Methodist
Church, 408 Wyoming Ave. Ses-
sion 2: 5/12, 6:00-7:00 p.m. &5/
13, 6:00-9:00 p.m. - $20.00.
Friends of the Library Meet-
ing & Fundraisers: The Friends
of the Librarymeet once a month
at the Library. Call the Library
for information about their up-
coming meetings.
Getting Started with Genealo-
gy: 5/7, 9:00-11:30 a.m.
Financial Courses: Estate
Planning 101: 5/17, 6:00-7:00
p.m.
Resume Workshop for Educa-
tion Applicants: 4/27, 6:30-7:30
p.m. Cover Letter Workshop:
5/4, 6:30-7:30 p.m. One-on-One
Resume &Cover Letter Review:
5/18 & 5/25, 5:30-8:00 p.m.
Intro to Ebooks and the Li-
brary: 5/24, 6:00-7:00 p.m.
Photography Workshop:
Learning to See: Discovering the
Possibilities for Creative Vision:
5/21, 9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. -
$40.00.
Children’s Programs
Weekly Story Time: Every
Friday, 1:00 p.m.
American Girl Tea: 5/15, 1:00
p.m.
One Book Every Young Child:
5/18, 6:30 p.m.
Events with an asterisk require
registration. Stop by the circula-
tion desk or call the library at
654-9847 to sign up. If a cost is
associated with the program, the
fee will be required at the time of
sign-up to reserve your spot. For
detailed program information,
please visit www.wplibrary.org,
join our mailing list, or give the
Library a call!
Birthday Notes
Happy birthday this week to:
Lisa Lewis, 4/24; Megan Yurek,
4/24; Maura Williams, 4/25;
Greg Hall, 4/25; Lorraine Ku-
dey, 4/25; Cathy Connors, 4/26;
Ali Hritzak, 4/27; Gloria Blandi-
na, 4/27; Palmer Denisco, 4/28;
Alex Romano, 4/29; Luba Dela-
ney, 4/29; Dylan Maloney, 4/30.
Thought for the Week
In every walk with nature one
receives far more than he seeks.
Quote of the Week
“Courage is not the absence of
despair; it is, rather, the capacity
to move ahead in spite of de-
spair.”
Bumper Sticker
Art is man’s nature; nature is
God’s art.
Cong. Barletta’s office schedules West Pittston hours
WESTPITTSTON
Tony Callaio
654-5358
tonyc150@verizon.net
Yard Waste
West Wyoming Borough has
begun yard waste pick-ups in
April.
Pick-ups will be on Thursday.
Every other week one-half the
town will be collected until the
beginning of November.
The schedule will be as fol-
lows, April 28, 8th Street to the
Exeter Line. May 5, Atherton
Section up to 8th Street but not
including 8th Street.
This schedule of alternating
weeks will continue until No-
vember. Residents can call the
Borough building to arrange to
drop off waste or request the
truck be left at their residence for
large volume.
Open House
West Wyoming Borough was
awarded $241,114 in funding
through the PA Conservation
Works Grant program last year.
The program, made available
through the American Recovery
and Reinvestment Act of 2009
Energy Efficiency and Conser-
vation Block Grant Program, is
to assists local governments and
nonprofits in funding renewable
energy efficiency projects that
result in a minimum of 25 per-
cent savings of all energy used.
The borough is planning an
open house at the town hall 464
West Eighth St. on Thursday,
May12, at 6p.m. toshowcase the
energy improvements.
The event will include local
officials, DEP representatives,
project engineers and architects
and the local media will be invit-
ed.
There will also be light re-
freshments served.
Website
Visit the West Wyoming Web-
site at www.westwyoming.org.
If any residents are interested
in receiving a monthly e-news-
letter from the borough, please
visit the website for more details.
West Wyoming
Continued from Page 42
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The Wyoming Free Library is
conducting a “Little Miss Li-
brary” contest. Applicants must
be Wyoming or West Wyoming
residents between the ages of 5
and 8.
Applicants are asked to send
or drop off a photograph with
name, address and telephone
number and a paragraph entitled
“Why I Love the Library” to the
Wyoming Free Library, 358
Wyoming Avenue, Wyoming,
PA18644.
Entries must be submitted by
Friday, May 20. The winner will
be notifiedbyphone andmust be
available on Monday, May 30 in
the morning.
Library Book Sale
The Wyoming Free Library
will hold a book sale on May 21,
from 12 to 4 pm. The library is
accepting donated items for the
sale. No school books or ency-
clopedias will be accepted.
Raffle tickets will be available
throughout the month of May for
a Basket Give Away which will
be held at the close of the sale.
Please call the library at 693-
1364 for more details.
Seneca Wine Trip
The Wyoming Free Library
will host the Seneca Lake Wine
Trip on Sunday, May 22. The trip
will depart from the Park-N-
Ride Route 315 in Pittston at 8
a.m. and return at 5:30 p.m. The
cost is $55 per person a $30 de-
posit will hold your seat. Pay-
ment due in full by May 6.
Checks can be made out to the
Wyoming Free Library.
To reserve a seat, please call
the Wyoming Free Library at
693-1364 or Carol Salvaggio at
899-0024.
Rec Board News
The Wyoming Recreation
Board sponsored an Easter Egg
Hunt onSunday, April 17, at But-
ler Street Park. Winners of the
bicycles donated by UFCW
Credit Union in Wyoming were
Emma Kuharchik and Andrew
Lutz.
WRB members and volun-
teers that participatedwere Lind-
say Rysz, Mary Sinabaldi,
Jeanne Wisnewski, John Bolin,
Mayor Bob Boyer, Katie Hig-
gins, Ann Marie Thomas and
Kyler Higgins.The WRB thanks
Price Chopper for donating two
gift baskets for the drawing.
The WRB meeting has been
changed from April 28 to Mon-
day, April 25, at 8 p.m. It will be
held at the temporary borough
building in the Midway Shop-
ping Center. All new members
are welcome and greatly needed
in order to continue providing
community events.
The WRB will sponsor their
4th Annual Cinco De Mayo Fun-
draiser on Thursday, May 5 from
6:00-10 p.m. at Bo Brothers,
Wyoming Ave., Wyoming. $20
Donation includes unlimited
Mexican buffet, three refresh-
ments, and live entertainment
beginning at 7 p.m. by CNR(Ri-
chie & JBird from Flaxy Mor-
gan) with Jeanne Zano.
To donate a gift certificate or
basket for the Chinese Auction,
please contact Jeanne Wisnew-
ski at 905-1946. All proceeds
will go to WRBto fund commu-
nity events.
Pig Roast Picnic
Wyoming United Methodist
Church at 376 Wyoming Ave-
nue, Wyoming, will hold its an-
nual Pig Roast Picnic on Satur-
day, May 14. Dine in picnic style
or pick up take outs at a drive
thru pick up.
Adult tickets are $9 and chil-
dren’s are $5. Serving is from 4
to 7 p.m. Also included with the
dinner is a variety of homemade
desserts. For information/tickets
call 693-2821 or 693-1303.
St. Monica’s Parish
St. Paul Center for Biblical
Theology is sponsoring a Pil-
grimage to Italy November 10-
19. Mike Aquilina (best selling
author and EWTN host), Dr.
Matthew Bunson (editor of the
Catholic Answer and the Cathol-
ic Almanac and best selling au-
thor), Steve and Janet Ray (pro-
ducers of the Footprints of God
documentaries, Holy Land
guides and international author
and speaker), and Father Leo
McKernan (pastor of St. Moni-
ca’s Parish, West Wyoming, re-
treat master and spiritual writer)
will lead this pilgrimage.
For more information or regis-
tration contact: Corporate Travel
Services, Inc. 23420 Ford Rd.,
Dearborn Heights, MI. 48127 or
phone 313-565-8888 ext. 121 or
Fax 313-565-3621 orwww.ct-
scentral.net.
The Vacations Sweepstakes
Tickets are available for pur-
chase at the Parish Office (363
W. 8thSt. W.W. Pa or by phone at
570-693-1991) from 9 a.m. to
4:30 p.m. Monday through Fri-
day or by calling Howard Kelley
at 570-693-1521.
The cost of the ticket is
$20.00. Returns must be made
by Tuesday, April 26. The
Sweepstakes is based on the PA
Big Four number and will run for
the Monthof May. Prizes include
a trip to Cancun for two, a trip for
two to NY City and cash of
$1000 for exact matching num-
ber. Many other prizes are
awarded for numerous combina-
tions.
The choirs have been invited
to sing the Star Spangled Banner
at the Lackawanna Yankee Stadi-
um on Saturday, July 9, at 7 p.m.
www.stmonicanepa.com is
growing. Check out Father’s
Corner, upcoming events, minis-
tries, sacraments and highlights.
There is something new every
day.
There will be no Bible study
onApril 28. Studywill resume in
May.
Your generosity for the Food
Bank collection is not unnoticed.
The needs in the Wyoming Val-
ley for food for those in desper-
ate situations have been grow-
ing. Please think of buying one
extra, non-perishable food and
dropping it in the baskets at
Church. The children look for-
ward to carrying the baskets to
the Altar at Mass. The food col-
lected goes to the Food Pantry
located at St. John the Evangelist
Church in Pittston. On a regular
basis they provide food for 725
families in the Greater Pittston
Area. They have packed over
14,500 bags of food to date.
Kids are called for ‘Little Miss Library’ contest
WYOMINGNEWS
EILEEN CIPRIANI
287-3349
ecipriani@comcast.net
The Wyoming Recreation Board sponsored an Easter Egg Hunt on Sunday, April 17, at Butler Street Park. Pictured are winners of the
bicycles donated by UFCWCredit Union in Wyoming. Fromleft to right seated: Emma Kuharchik, Easter Bunny (John Bolin), and An-
drew Lutz. Standing are WRB members and volunteers Lindsay Rysz, Mary Sinabaldi, Jeanne Wisnewski, Mayor Bob Boyer, Katie
Higgins, Ann Marie Thomas and Kyler Higgi.
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Development
PHASE IVB
JENKINS TWP.
HUMFORD REALTY INC.
HUMFORD.COM
(570)822-5126 ext.3
HUMFORD REALTY INC.
WillowViewDevelopment
NEWPhase IV-B in Pittston Area (Jenkins Twp.)
Build immediately in the developments only cul-de-sac.
All utilities available.
10 lots available from$66,000!
Build
Immediately!
Close to
Everything!
Next to Pittston High School
Centerpoint Industrial Park: 4 minutes
Route 81 and Turnpike: 4 minutes
Mohegan Casino: 6 minutes
Avoca Airport: 10 minutes
Center City Wilkes-Barre: 16 minutes
Center City Scranton: 19 minutes
Travel time calculated by Mapquest
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Rob Finlay, Broker
(570)822-5126 ext. 3
humford.com
A family-style roast chicken
supper and bake sale is sched-
uled on Saturday, May 14, at
United Methodist Church, cor-
ner of Broad and Church streets,
Pittston.
Takeouts will be available be-
ginning at 4:30 p.m.
Sit-down dinners will be of-
fered from 5 to 7 p.m.
Cost is $8.50 for adults and
$4.25 for children.
Advance purchase of tickets is
recommended. Call 332-9156 or
603-1915 by Monday, May 1. A
limited number of tickets will be
available at the door.
All bake sale items are home-
made.
Family style roast chicken supper at United Methodist
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Sports
Pittston Area continued to
dominate on the track with an
83-67 victory over Coughlin in
a Wyoming Valley Conference
Division I meet at Charley
Trippi Stadium on Tuesday in
Yatesville.
The Patriots won its fourth
straight meet to open the season
as Cody Rydzy won three
events to lead Pittston Area
(4-0) to the victory. Dave
McLean also had a solid show-
ing with two victories.
PA Head Coach Jason Mills
has talked all season about how
hard McLean has worked in the
offseason, and really believes
that hard work is paying off. It
would be hard to argue consid-
ering McLean was victorious in
the 1600m run with a time of
4:56. The second place finisher
was 10 seconds behind
McLean.
“Well, I was motivated by
great runners like Nate Zondlo
and Eric Fay who had great suc-
cess at Pittston Area in track,”
McLean said. “So I pushed my-
self by going the extra mile and
working hard during the offsea-
son.”
McLean also won the 3200m
run with a time of 10:49. He
beat his opponent by 36 sec-
onds. McLean was also part of
the first place 3200m relay
team. McLean ran the anchor
leg with Brian Gima, Brandon
Hampton and Shawn Simmons
to capture the victory with a
time of 8:48.
“Dave is so good because of
all the hard work he put in over
the offseason and in the pre-
season,” Mills said. “The hard
work is paying off and he is
much better this year.”
Rydzy won the 110m Hurdles
with a time of 15.5 with Ron
D’Eliseo finishing second with
McLean, Rydzy lead Patriots to win
PA girls pick up first victory; WA sweeps Nanticoke
By Josh Horton
Dispatch Correspondent
PHOTO S BY BILL TARUTIS
Top left, Pittston Area's Dave McLean takes first place in the 1600m run
against Coughlin. Above, Cody Rydzy is midair during his winning leap
in the long jump. McLean and Rydzy led PA to its fourth win of the sea-
son by combining for five victories. At left, Wyoming Area's Jenna Skri-
nak delivers the shot put in the Lady Warriors win over Nanticoke.
See BOUIE, Page 54
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Wyoming Area was com-
petitive in four of its f ive
matches but could not get
over the hump in a 5-0 loss to
Coughlin on Monday at Kir-
by Park.
All threes singles players –
Davide Fanelli, Trevor Alder
and Jon Scrobola – lost by
the same scores. Fanelli and
Scrobola last 7-5, 6-3, and
Alder lost 6-3, 7-5.
The No. 1 Doubles team of
Tyler Manganiello and Nick
Szewczyk lost 6-4, 6-4.
WA 2, Valley West 3
Wyoming Area swept both
Doubles matches but could
not come up with a singles’
point in a 3-2 loss to Wyom-
ing Valley West on Wednes-
day afternoon in Plymouth.
The team of Nick Szewc-
zyk and Tyler Manganiello
defeated James Yozwiak and
Andrew Crossin, 4-6, 6-1,
7-6 (7-5) in a back-and-forth
match at No. 1 Doubles.
Connor Mangan and Tom
Rose had somewhat of an
easier time, winning 6-2, 7-6
(8-6) over Chris loom and
Steve Wheaton at No. 2 Dou-
bles.
PA 0, Dallas 5
Pittston Area was swept by
Dallas, under the lights on
Monday night, 5-0, at Dallas
High School.
The Patriots got a solid ef-
fort from No. 2 Doubles
Team Austin Welch and Ter-
ry Briggs who lost 6-3, 6-2.
But the rest of the squad
struggled, winning just nine
games in three singles and
another doubles match.
This week’s schedule
Monday
WA at Hazleton
Tuesday
PA at Seminary
WA at Tunkhannock
Thursday
PA at Berwick
WA at Redeemer
VA R S I T Y T E N N I S
Wyoming Area loses two tough matches
Pittston Area falls to Dallas in Monday Night Tennis
By Rick Notari
Dispatch Staff
PHOTOS BY TONY CALLAIO
Above, Connor Mangan returns a shot during Wyoming Area's loss to Coughlin on Monday. Mangan
and doubles teammate TomRose won against Valley West later in the week. Below left, WA's Jon
Scorbola delivers a forehand winner against Coughlin. Below middle, Tyler Woodruff backhands a
shot for PIttston Area. Below right, WA's Trevor Alder returns a shot.
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Josh Savokinas thrives on
pressure situations.
Among the league leaders in
homers in the Wyoming Valley
Conference, the senior ripped a
three-run, walk-off homer to
propel Pittston Area to a 7-5
come-from-behind win over
Wyoming Valley West at the
Bucky Harris Athletic Complex
in Hughestown on Monday af-
ternoon.
“Coach(John) Richards called
it. Guy on first and second with
me at the plate and the game will
be over. So I said, ‘We’ll see you
at the bottom of the pile,’” Savo-
kinas elaborated. “I love coming
up clutch in the game.”
Despite the victory, it wasn’t
the greatest performance PA
Coach Paul Zaffuto could have
hoped for.
In first inning, starter JimCas-
tellino ran into some early inning
woes. With two runners on,
Chris Clocker ripped a three-run
homer over the left field fence to
give Valley West an early 3-0 ad-
vantage.
But the lead didn’t last long as
the Patriot bats tacked on three
runs in the bottom half of the in-
ning.
Table setter Jordan Bone led
off with a line-drive single to left
and was moved over to second
after a sacrifice bunt. Savokinas
then drilled a 400-foot shot off
the center field wall chasing
Bone in fromsecond. One batter
later, senior Ron Musto high-
lighted the inning with a two-run
home run over the left-center-
field fence.
While both teams were held
scoreless through the second in-
ning, Valley West mustered an-
other run off Castellino in the top
of the third for a 4-3 lead.
The Patriots bats were held in
check through most of the mid-
dle innings, accounting for just
three base runners as Spartans
pitcher Matt Zielen began to
cruise.
But RJ Emmett broke up the
drought with a solo home run in
the bottom of the sixth to tie the
game at 4-4.
Pittston Area reliever Kyle
Callahan entered the seventh
with confidence and momentum
on his side. However, he surren-
dered a lead-off walk and a sacri-
fice bunt which advanced the
runner to second. After another
walk, Joe Dosiak connected
again on a short RBI single to
right scoring Zielen for a 5-4
lead.
With their backs against the
wall, Zaffuto made a daring, last-
minute coaching move.
Freshman Josh Razvilla was
summoned off the bench for a
rare pinch-hit appearance. The
moved paid off dearly for the Pa-
triots as Razvilla came through
with a lead-off double to start the
inning. After a walk to Anthony
Schwab, the Patriots were in
business with two runners on,
and nobody out.
After Valley West Reliever
Matt Pechulis retired the next
two batters, Savokinas connect-
ed on a lowfastball for the game-
winning round tripper.
“This is Savokinas’ fourth
home run in three games. He’s
swinging a hot bat and today we
VA R S I T Y B A S E B A L L
Savokinas delivers for Pittston Area
Senior blasts three-run GW home run against Valley West
By Matt Petrini
Dispatch Correspondent
PHOTO BY CHARLOTTE BARTIZEK
Pittston Area's Anthony Schwab (3) is airborn in celebration before scoring on Josh Savokinas'
game-winning home run against Valley West earlier this week.
See PATRIOTS, Page 51
The 14th Annual Andy Ashby Game,
featuring the Pittston Area and Wyoming
Area varsity baseball teams, will be
played Monday at 4:15 p.m., at PNCField
in Moosic, home of the Scranton/Wilkes-
Barre Yankees.
Ashby will be on hand to present the
MVP Trophy to the outstanding player of
the game.
The Warriors lead the series, 7-6, after
winning last season’s game, 11-0. WA
pitcher Anthony Bellino was named the
Ashby MVP.
The series began in 1998. The game is
named for former Major League pitcher
and Pittston resident, Andy Ashby, who
sponsors an MVP trophy.
Former Wyoming Area baseball coach
Ron Musto said the idea to attach an MVP
trophy to the PA-WAbaseball game came
to himin the fall of 1997 as he watched the
Falcone Trophy MVP be presented at the
PA-WA football game.
When the idea for a baseball game
MVP trophy was floated, Ashby, then a
pitcher with the San Diego Padres, came
forward to sponsor it.
Ashby pitched in16 Major League Sea-
sons for four different teams. His best sea-
son was 1998, the year he started the Ash-
by Trophy, when he was 17-9 with a 3.33
ERA with the Padres. He walked 58 and
struck out 157 in 226 innings. He started
two games in the National League Cham-
pionship Series and pitched well, allow-
ing just three runs in 13 innings, through
he didnot get decisions ineither game. He
was the starter and loser in one game
against the New York Yankees in the
World Series that season.
For his career Ashby was 98-110 with a
4.12 ERA.
Previous Ashby Trophy winners
Year ................................Name, School
1998 .........................Shane Beatty, WA
1999 ....................George LoPresto, PA
2000.........................Mike Gerney, WA
2001.........................Blake Barbini, PA
2002......................Rich Overman, WA
2003............................Rob Licata, WA
2004.....................Ryan Overman, WA
2005................................Joe Hines, PA
2006 ...................Kyle Shymanski, WA
2007......................George Dructor, PA
2008............................Kevin Daley, PA
2009 .............................Joe Dorbad, PA
2010 ...................Anthony Bellino, WA
Ashby Game to be played at PNC Field
Pittston Area hosts Wyoming Area tomorrow at 4:15 p.m.
By Jack Smiles
Associate Editor
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The Wyoming Area girls’ soccer team
took the field Thursday with hopes of a
big win to get the team rolling as they
battle to get to the top spot in the divi-
sion. The Lady Warriors took advantage
of the opportunity given as Katie Scalzo
recorded a hat trick in a 6-0 win over
MMI Prep at the Tenth Street Elemen-
tary Soccer Field in Wyoming.
"A win is a win in our division," said
coach Mike Pryor. "We’re at a point in
our season where we can go forward or
stay the same, and finishing off six
goals is finishing six goals and we are
pleased with it."
Kourtny Schwerdtman opened the
scoring 12 minutes into the game when
she was able to beat the defense to the
through-ball played by Jenn Bone.
Schwerdtman then used her speed to
sprint away from the defenders and fin-
ish the ball into the back of the net past
the diving keeper.
The Lady Warriors never looked
back.
Less than five minutes after
Schwerdtman’s goal, Scalzo put her
name in the book as she notched her
first of three goals. She gained posses-
sion of the ball and used her speed to run
away from the defense. One-on-one
with the keeper, the WA senior blasted a
shot into the left corner of the net to give
Wyoming Area (2-2-1) a 2-0 lead.
Then, at the 16:32 mark Scalzo re-
corded her second goal on a play that
was a near spitting image of her first.
She took a loose ball, sprinted away
from the attempts of the defenders and
hit a shot into the left side of the net.
With less than a minute left in the first
half, the ball was bouncing around in
front of the MMI goal and numerous
Lady Warriors made an attempt to put
the ball into the goal. However, the ball
then found its way to the foot of Saman-
tha Acacio who poked it through the
scrum and into the goal, giving WA a
4-0 lead at the half.
After a dominant first half in which
Wyoming Area out-shot MMI, 19-2, the
second half started like the first ended.
Scalzo finished off her hat trick less
than three minutes into the half when
she scored on a play similar to her first
two goals. She found herself with the
ball and was able to run past and then
away from the defense. This time, how-
VA R S I T Y S O C C E R
Scalzo hat trick leads WA past MMI
Pittston Area wins two versus Hanover, MMI
WA PHOTOS BY CHARLOTTE BARTIZEK
PA PHOTOS BY BILL TARUTIS
Above, Wyoming Area team members, from left to right, Katie Scalzo, Gabrielle Bohan and Courtney Schwerdtman congrat-
ulate each other after the Lady Warriors first goal against MMI Prep. Below left, Sara Ruby (13) pushes the ball ahead in the
Lady Patriots win over MMI. Below right, Jenny Meck (19) fights for position against MMI last Monday. Both PA and WA beat
the Lady Preppers in WVC action this week.
By Matt Page
Dispatch Correspondent
See RUBY, Page 53
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Taylor Baloga set the tone last
Friday when the Pittston Area
pitcher struck out the first batter
of the Lady Patriots junior high
softball game with Wyoming
Valley West.
Baloga would allow just five
earned runs on the afternoon as
Pittston Area won its first game
in over two years, 12-10, over the
Lady Spartans. The Lady Patri-
ots did not play a complete, 7-in-
ning game a season ago.
AccordingtoCoachStephanie
Griffin, the victory was long
overdue.
“We came out ready to play to-
day. They were aggressive, and
they wanted to win it,” said Grif-
fin.
The Lady Patriots scored two
quick runs on a Megan Karuzie
home run, and added another on
an RBI double from Lauren
Dragon. PAthen broke the game
open with RBIs from Allie Bar-
ber, Baloga and Karuzie.
Valley West rallied to take the
lead, 10-9, in the fourth inning,
but the Lady Patriots would not
be denied.
PittstonArea scoredthree runs
in the sixth as Julie Lieback,
Theresa Domarasky, Mindina
Lieback, Dragon and Baloga all
game up with RBI hits. Doma-
rasky’s two-run single put the
Lady Patriots ahead for good.
Adison Hazlet and Amanda
Radginski also added two hits
each to the PA attack.
“The girls played well,” said
Coach Amy Hazlet. “When they
got down, they rallied back to
win. Their effort was outstand-
ing.”
Patriots faced off against Ber-
wick on Monday, but lost 8-3.
Baloga picked up five more
strikeouts, and Allie Barber,
Amanda Radginski, and Mindi-
na Lieback scored the Patriots
three runs on RBIs by Megan
Karuzie and Theresa Domaras-
ky.
To round off the week the La-
dy Patriots picked up their sec-
ond win of the season besting
Crestwood in a 3-inning shutout.
Lauren Dragon went 3-for- 3
with a double, and Taylor Baloga
added a triple to the PA’s 13 hits
on the day.
To submit your junior high
sports news, scores and stats,
email rnotari@psdispatch.com
J U N I O R H I G H S O F T B A L L
Lady Patriots win
first in two years
Greater Pittston Little League
JT Phillies 7, PT Red Sox 2
Johnny Jones picked up the win as the Jenkins
Twp. Phillies beat the Pittston Twp. Dr. Jeff Walker
Red Sox, 7-2.
Nick Allardyce had two triples, and Steven
Shamnoski andJones alsohadtwohits for the Phil-
lies.
Other hitters for the Phillies were Ryan Zelonis,
Jonathon Bone, Vito Quaglia, and Santo Insalaco.
Phil Cocco had two hits for the Red Sox.
JT Phillies 12, A/D VFW 7
ZachMlodzienski andNickAllardyce ledthe of-
fence for the Jenkins Township Milazzo Phillies in
a 12-7 win over Avoca/Dupont VFW.
Mlodzienski hit a home run and two singles, and
Allardyce homered, doubled, and singled.
Johnny Jones doubled and Vito Quaglia singled
twice for the Phillies, and Steve Shamnoski, Ryan
Zelonis, and Jonathon Bone all singled. Mlodzien-
ski and Shamnoski contributed to the winning ef-
fort on the mound.
Hitting for Avoca Dupont were Zuba, McAn-
drew, and Smithonic.
JT Giants 8, PT Red Sox 5
The Jenkins Twp. Mondlak Giants beat the PT
Red Sox, 8-5, behind the two-run home of Ivan Ba-
lavage.
Jonathon Winters added two hits and earned the
save in the sixth by recording the final out with the
bases loaded.
Trevor Tigue had two hits for the Red Sox.
Dupont VFW 5, Duryea VFW 2
Dupont VFW beat Duryea VFW, 5-2, in the
opening game at the Dupont LL.
Aidan Jopling picked up the win on the mound.
He struck out 14 batters and gave up only one hit in
five innings of work.
Anthony Zimmerman led Dupont VFW with
three hits, two RBI, and one run scored. Eric Fritz
added two hits and two runs, and Kevin Krawczyk
chipped in with an double and two RBI.
For Duryea VFW, Tony Demark had a single and
two runs scored, and Josh Mies knocked in a run
with a double.
Dupont VFW 8, JT Giants 7
Dupont VFWdefeated the Jenkins Giants 8-7 on
Friday night in Jenkins Township.
Kevin Krawczyk picked up the win on the
mound, striking out five batters in three innings of
relief work.
Leading Dupont hitters were Brandon Baldrica
with three hits and an RBI. Justin Smicherko had a
key hit in the 6th inning and scored a run. Chris
Merithew had a hit and two runs batted in.
For the Giants, Jonathan Winters has two hits
and a run scored. Matt Havrilla added a hit, a run
and a run batted in.
All area Little League Baseball and Softball
coaches are askedtosubmit results andstatistics to
the Sunday Dispatch by Friday evening via email
at rnotari@psdispatch.com or by fax at 602-0183.
Please include notes on both teams with full names
of players.
L I T T L E L E A G U E
JT Phillies opens season with
wins over Red Sox, VFW
The Royal Cougar Chal-
lengers began its junior high
cross country season this
past week at Flack Field with
a meet against Msgr.
McHugh/Notre Dame and
Marian Catholic. The RCC
team is made up of students
from Holy Rosary, Duryea;
Wyoming Area Catholic; and
St. Mary Assumption.
Varsity Boys
MC 15 RCC 50
RCC 20 MMH/ND 35
6. Kevin Kizis, 12:16
9. Jordan Nagle, 12:33
10. Eric Sklanka, 12:36
15. Thomas Day, 13:22
17. Peter Kulick, 13:49
18. Joey Rutledge, 13:50
19. Gaetano Buonsante,
13:50
21. Lucas Mark, 14:29
24. Michael Gorsky, 14:47
27. Tyler Egan, 15:41
Varsity Girls
MC 16 RCC 39
MMH/ND 16 RCC 39
9. Megan Moran, 15:01
12. Lauren Aldrich, 15:33
16. Ana Rogers, 15:50
19. Sarah Scavo, 16:21
22. Michaelene Mecadon,
16:44
23. Vicky Sidari, 17:01
24. Isabella Romani, 17:08
26. Nicole Telford, 17:49
30. Claudia Shandra, 20:03
31. Katelyn Sharp, 21:14
JV Boys
MC 18 RCC 37
MMH/ND 16 RCC 39
5. James Cunningham,
7:47
10. Kyle McAndrew, 8:44
12. Conor Nealon, 8:58
13. Ryan Hartigan, 9:09
17. Matt McGlynn, 10:39
JV Girls
RCC 26 MC 29
RCC 27 MMH/ND 28
2. Samantha Rajza, 8:05
4. Rosalie Bennie, 8:23
6. Courtney June, 8:27
11. Ashton Ashby, 9:02
20. Jocelyn Kosik, 9:42
25. Genny Frederick, 10:31
J U N I O R H I G H C O R S S C O U N T R Y
RCC begins XC season
Pittston Twp. V.F.W. Bowling
League
League Camps 2010-2011
Season were the Cougars with
Jody Marranca leading his team
to victory with a 209 – 552 series
and John Blattner’s 204 – 521.
They outlasted the Warriors,
whowere ledbyJoe Dalessandro
203 – 202 – 566 and Joe Scaran-
tino 175 – 498.
Lady Birds Bowling Results
Second Half Standings
Parakeets 48–16, Blue Jays 39
½ - 24 ½, Seagulls 34 – 30, Tweety
Birds 32 – 32, Blue Birds 30 ½ -
33 ½, Robins 30 – 34, Flamingos
30 – 34.
Leaders (this week)
Judy Krifka 605, Mary Kay
Stetina 585, Tricia Suwilla 556,
Lee Lawrence 544, Sandie Toole
517, Deanna Yonki 503, Mary
Pisano490, Barbara Slusser 486,
Sylvia Appel 473, Debbie Anza-
lone 452
Leaders (last week)
Deanna Yonki 556, Tricia Su-
willa 520, Judy Krifka 492, Ma-
ry Pisano 490, Evelyn Marsh
483, Lee Lawrence 480, Barbara
Slusser 478, Maria Yonki 473,
Mary Kay Stetina 467, Barbara
Granahan 463.
L O C A L B O W L I N G
Cougars win VFW
Bolwing League
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relied on the long ball for the
win,” Zaffuto said.
“It was a down and in fastball.
I love coming up clutch for my
team,” Savokinas said.
Callahan got the win in relief,
allowing one hit in two innings
of work.
Castellino allowed four runs
while recording two strikeouts
and a walk in five innings while
scattering five hits.
Five of the Patriots six hits
went for extra-bases.
PA 5, Coughlin 4
Three pitchers combined to al-
low just four hits and shortstop
Josh Savokinas continued his
torrid hitting as Pittston Area
won its fourth straight game with
a 5-4 decision over Coughlin on
Thursday afternoon at Hilldale
Ballpark in Plains.
Savokinas hit in his fifth
straight game, raising his aver-
age to .666 with three hits in four
at-bats. The senior is 12-for-18
on the season with13 RBI and12
runs scored, and has also
knocked in a run and scored in
all five games. He has eight ex-
tra-base hits on the season, in-
cluding four home runs.
Chuck Bressler picked up the
win for the Patriots in his first
appearance of the season. The
junior scattered two hits and
three walks while striking out
five in five innings. Brandon
Pernot followed Bressler and
walked two without recording an
out before Kyle Callahanpitched
two innings for the save. Only
one of the Crusaders runs were
earned.
Ron Musto added a two-run
single for Pittston Area (4-1),
and RJ Emmett chipped in with
an RBI-single.
Jordan Bone, Josh Razvilla,
AJ Mancini, Evan Hahn, and
Matt Antal alsoaddedsingles for
the Patriots.
PA10, Berwick 0
PittstonArea continuedtoroll,
winning its third straight game
with a 10-0, six-inning victory
over Berwick on Wednesday af-
ternoon in Columbia County.
Jordan Bone dominated on the
hill, allowing just two hits and
two walks in six innings of work.
Bone also did some damage at
the plate with three hits and two
RBI while scoring two runs.
The Patriots exploded for sev-
en run in the first two innings as
Bone and Ron Musto stroked
two-RBI hits.
Brian Delaney also drove in
two runs for PA with a single,
and Josh Savokinas and RJ Em-
mett both had RBI hits for the
Patriots. Savokinas also scored
three times for Pittston Area
(3-1).
WA 7, Crestwood 2
Wyoming Area picked up its
first win of the season in a 7-2
victory over Crestwood in a
WyomingValleyConference Di-
vision I crossover on Monday af-
ternoon in Mountain Top.
Dylan Maloney went the dis-
tance for the Warriors, scattering
three singles and four walks
while striking out eight. The ju-
nior lefty did not allowan earned
run in the complete-game victo-
ry. He also helped himself at the
plate with an RBI double.
Randy McDermott and Nick
O’Brien did most of the damage
at the plate for Wyoming Area
(1-4) as the Warriors scored a run
in every inning but the first and
seventh to support Maloney.
McDermott singled and dou-
bled and drove in two runs while
scoring one, and O’Brien also
singled and doubled and drove in
a run for WA. The sophomore
centerfielder also scored two
runs.
Kyle Colarusso added two sin-
gles for the Warriors, and Chris
Murphy doubled in his first
game back from elbow surgery.
OF 3, Valley View 6
Old Forge suffered its first loss
of the Lackawanna League Divi-
sion II season in a 6-3 loss to de-
fending champ Valley View on
Monday afternoon in Archbald.
The Blue Devils led 1-0 in the
top of the first when Connor
Fultz singled home Michael
Long who had doubled with one
out one batter before.
Valley View answered with a
run in the second and three in the
third to take a 4-1lead. But Gary
Puckett got Old Forge (4-1) back
inthe game witha two-runsingle
in the top of the fourth, scoring
Dom Avvisato and Dave Argust
who had both singled, to get the
Blue Devils within 4-3.
The Cougars scored two insur-
ance runs in the sixth and set
down Old Forge in the seventh to
Patriots on winning streak heading into Ashby Game
Continued fromPage 48
PHOTOS BY CHARLOTT BARTIZEK
Above, Pittston Area's Jordan Bone eyes up a pitch during the Patriots win over Valley West. Below,
PA second baseball RJ Emmett (1) throws to first base to complete a double play against the Spar-
tans.
See OLD FORGE, Page 56
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Old Forge snapped a three-
game losing streak with a 4-2
win over Mid Valley on Wednes-
day afternoon at the Old Forge
Miles Street Community Park.
Andi Alsalahat continued to
tear the cover off the softball for
the Blue Devils as the senior
turned in a 3-for-3 day with two
doubles and two RBI.
Lindsay Regan added an RBI
double for Old Forge (3-3), and
Nicole Marianelli chipped in
with an RBI single.
Kim Regan pitched the victo-
ries for the Blue Devils, allowing
two unearned runs over seven in-
nings. The sophomore scattered
four singles and three walks
while striking out four.
OF 5, Valley View 6
OldForge went toe-to-toe with
Lackawanna League Division II
leader Valley View but the Cou-
gars scored an unearned run in
the bottom of the seventh to take
a heartbreaking 6-5 win fromthe
Blue Devils on Monday after-
noon in Archbald.
The Blue Devils took the lead
in the top of the fifth against the
undefeated Cougars as Chelsea
Cadwalder’s two-run single
capped a four-run inning.
But Valley View came right
back in the bottomhalf of the in-
ning with four runs of its own to
tie the game at 4-4.
The Cougars took the lead in
the bottomof the sixth on a Katie
Iyoob two-out home run that
traveled almost 250-feet at the
Valley View Complex.
Andi Alsalahat answered for
Old Forge in the top of the sev-
enth with a solo home run off of
the scoreboard in centerfield to
tie the game at 5-5.
The Cougars however would
win the game in their half of the
seventh, scoring on a passed ball
and two one-out singles.
Alsalahat finished with three
hits and two RBI, and Nicole
Marianellli added two hits, in-
cluding a double.
WA 2, Crestwood 6
Wyoming Area lost its third
straight game, falling to Crest-
wood, 6-2, on Monday afternoon
in Mountain Top.
The Lady Warriors pounded
out 11 hits but could not take ad-
vantage of its best hitting day of
the season.
Kaitlyn Kross went 3-for-3
with a double and a run scored to
lead Wyoming Area (1-3) at the
plate.
Kayla Kross added two hits,
including a double, and Nicole
Turner added two hits and two
RBI for the Lady Warriors.
Riley Thomas also chipped in
with two hits for WA.
Alex Holtz allowed just three
hits in six innings of work, but
walked six while being charged
with the loss.
Standings
WVC Division I East
Nanticoke ..........................5-0
Hazleton.............................3-1
Crestwood .........................4-2
Coughlin............................2-4
Holy Redeemer..................1-5
Pittston Area .....................0-4
WVC Division I West
Dallas.................................4-1
Tunkhannock.....................4-2
Berwick.............................3-2
Wyoming Area ..................1-3
Valley West ........................1-4
LL Division II
Valley View.......................6-0
Carbondale........................3-2
Old Forge ..........................3-3
Riverside ...........................3-3
Lakeland............................3-3
Mid Valley.........................2-4
Dunmore ...........................2-4
Holy Cross.........................1-4
This week’s schedule
Tuesday
PA v. Wyoming Area
OF v. Riverside
Wednesday
PA at Tunkhannock
WA v. Hazleton
Thursday
OF v. Dunmore
Friday
WA at Nanticoke
VA R S I T Y S O F T B A L L
Old Forge snaps three-game losing streak
Blue Devils double-up Mid Valley, 4-2
By Rick Notari
Dispatch Staff
PHOTOS BY RICK NOTARI
Above, Old Forge's Lindsay Regan looks to the umpire for the safe call after sliding into home
against Valley View. Below left, Sarah Fish connects for a single. Below right, Andi Alsalahat fires a
throw to first base for an out, and KimRegan is in her windup against Valley View
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ever, Scalzo showed her versa-
tility by rifling a shot with her
left foot that beat the keeper.
Wyoming Area pushed the
lead to 6-0 less than 10 minutes
into the second half on a beau-
tiful showing by Acacio. She
displayed her great skill set by
dribbling around most of the
MMI players before coming
one-on-one with the keeper.
Acacio decided to share the
glory by laying the ball off to
Bone, who stood in front of the
goal with no one near her, and
she tapped the ball into the
wide-open goal.
Around the 25 minute mark,
Pryor subbed out his entire
starting lineup.
While the subs were unable
to find the back of the net they
played aggressive, and were
able to control most of the pos-
session, develop scoring
chances and keep the opposi-
tion from getting on the board.
Of course a shutout usually
requires one or two good saves
from the keeper.
So with approximately eight
minutes left, the ball was roll-
ing around inside WA’s six-
yard box. With a lot of commo-
tion in front of her, Caitlin Vi-
tale was able to see an MMI
player poke the ball through
the defenders. Vitale dove left
to make the save and preserve
the shutout.
"I think today we improved
upon certain things we wanted
to improve upon," said Pryor.
"Every time we come out we
try to be a better team than last
time and I think we did a good
job of that."
WA held the advantage in
shots 29-7, while 15 of those 29
shots were on goal.
Vitale made six saves in the
shutout victory.
PA 3, Hanover 2
Pittston Area and Sara Ruby
continued their hot streak as
the Lady Patriots pulled out a
3-2 win over Hanover on
Wednesday afternoon at the
Bucky Harris Athletic Com-
plex in Hughestown. Ruby
scored a hat-trick, and Pittston
Area won its third match in
four tries in the Wyoming Val-
ley Conference Division 2-A
Soccer race.
Ruby got the Lady Patriots
off to a fast start, scoring off of
a Tianna Stull assists just 4:09
into the game. She then scored
six minutes later on a feed from
Jenny Meck to give PA a 2-0
lead just 10:02 into the match.
Hanover answered with two
goals before halftime to knot
the score at 2-2, but Ruby and
the Lady Patriots would not be
denied.
Danielle Fereck set Ruby up
with less than 10 minutes re-
maining in regulation, and the
freshman blasted the ball into
the net for the game-winning
goal.
Jordan Cumbo stopped eight
shots in goal for Pittston Area
(3-2-1) as the Lady Patriots
outshot Hanover, 20-10.
PA 10, MMI Prep 1
Liz Mikitish scored three
goals an assisted on another as
Pittston Area flooded the net
with 10 goals in a 10-1 victory
over MMI Prep in a Wyoming
Valley Conference Division 2
Crossover on Tuesday after-
noon at the rain-soaked Bucky
Harris Athletic Complex in
Hughestown.
Freshman Sara Ruby got
things off to a fast start for the
Lady Patriots, scoring just 17
seconds into the match on an
assist from Kaylene Sutkowski
to give PA a 1-0 lead.
Sutkowski then scored the
first of her two unassisted
goals on the afternoon just over
two minutes later before Mikit-
ish scored her first at the 2:47
mark to begin the onslaught.
Freshman Jenny Meck fol-
lowed with her first varsity
goal at the 18:40 mark of the
first half to put the Lady Patri-
ots ahead, 4-0, and Mikitish
and Gabby Vaxmonsky each
scored within a minute to give
Pittston Area (2-2-1) a 6-0 half-
time advantage.
Vaxmonsky added her sec-
ond goal on an assist from Ru-
by to open the second half, and
Sutkowski scored five minutes
later for the 8-0 lead.
Daniele Fereck added a goal
on an assist from Mikitish at
the 61:15 mark of the second
half, and Mikitish scored for
the hat trick at the 74:28 mark.
The Lady Patriots outshot
the Lady Preppers, 34-5, on the
afternoon. Jordan Cumbo and
Nicolette Bradshaw each stop-
ped two shots in goal for Pitt-
ston Area.
Sunday Dispatch Staff Writ-
er Rick Notari also contributed
to this report.
Statistics
Goals
1t. Ruby, PA.......................7
2t. Scalzo, WA...................6
3t. Mikitish, PA .................4
3t. Sutkowski, PA ..............4
5t. Bone, WA.....................3
6t. Acacio, WA..................2
6t. Schwerdtman, WA........2
6t. Vaxmonsky, PA.............2
Assists
1t. Sutkowski, PA...............3
2t. Mikitish, PA .................2
2t. Fereck, PA....................2
2t. Scalzo, WA...................2
2t. Schwerdtman, WA........2
6t. Six tied at .....................1
Saves
1. Cumbo, PA...................54
2. Vitale, WA...................30
3. Yurek, WA...................20
Standings
WVC-2A
Honesdale.......................4-0
Pittston Area................3-3-1
Hanover .......................2-2-1
North Pocono ...............1-1-1
Wyoming Seminary........2-3
WVC-2B
Meyers.........................3-0-1
Tunkhannock................2-1-1
Wyoming Area ............2-2-1
GAR...............................2-3
MMI Prep.......................0-5
This week’s schedule
Tuesday
PA v. MMI Prep
WA at Honesdale
Wednesday
PA v. Hanover
Thursday
WA v. MMI Prep
Ruby, Scalzo score hat tricks as soccer teams victorious
Continued from Page 49
PA PHOTO BY BILL TARUTIS/WA PHOTO BY CHARLOTTE BARTIZEK
Above left, Pittston Area's Daniele Fereck (3) passes the ball on a rain-soaked day at the Bucky Harris Athletic Complex in Hughestown on Monday. Above right, Wyoming
Area's Katie Scalzo (10) is about to boot a corner kick on a sun-kissed day at the Tenth Street Elementary Soccer Field in Wyoming on Thursday.
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a 15.8 for the Patriots Rydzy al-
so won the Triple Jump with a
distance of 41’6 and the Long
Jump with a distance of 18’10.
Joe Coyne finished second in
the long jump with a distance of
17’11. D’Eliseo also won the
300m Hurdles for the Patriots
in a time of 44.7
Hampton added a victory in
the 400m with a time of 56.5,
and finished third in the 800m
It was also a successful day
for the Patriots throwers.
John Poli finished first in the
Shot Put with a distance of
44’3, and placed third in discus
with a distance of 97’3.
Charles Gallo earned first
place in the discus with a throw
of 114’4. Chris Musto finished
second with 98’7 in the Du-
ryea, and won the Javelin throw
at 115’1.
WA 107, Nanticoke 43
Chris Hromek and Ahmad
Bouie each won three events to
lead Wyoming Area to a 107-43
victory over Nanticoke on
Wednesday afternoon in a
WVC Division II meet.
Hromek won the 800m in
2:17.8 and the 1600m in 5:09.1,
after winning the Triple Jump
in 38’2. Bouie won both sprints
with winning times of 11.6 in
the100m, and 23.9 in the 200m,
and also captured the 400m in a
time of 58.6.
Sophomore Jacob Smith won
the Javelin with the throw of
130’10, and the Discus with a
throw of 123’8 for WA. He also
teamed with Larry Popovich,
Justin Langdon and Cody
Schmitz to win the 400mRelay.
Eric Eramo won the High
Jump and Pole Vault for the
Warriors and finished second
in the 110m Hurdles.
Mark Basta added a win in
the Long Jump with a leap of
18’8 and finished second in
both the High Jump and Triple
Jump.
Julian Campenni won the
Shot Put for WAwith a throwof
39’5. He also finished second
in the Discus.
Eric Filipiak won the 3200m
distance run with a time of
12:04.
GIRLS
PA 84, Coughlin 66
The girls’ squad also picked
up a win over the Lady Crusad-
ers, 84-66, for its first victory
of the season. Catherine Lom-
bardi led the Lady Patriots with
three wins in the meet.
Lombardo led Pittston Area
to a sweep in the 1600m with a
time of 5:49. Bianca Bolton
and Emily Seaman finished
second and third. The sopho-
more then won the 800m in
2:32 as Kaitlynn Kutcha and
Bolton placed second and third;
and finished her day with a win
in the 3200m in a time of 14:32
with Seaman and Ashley Men-
ichini placing second and third.
Kutcha added a second indi-
vidual win in the 400m with a
time of 1:07, and Fereck placed
second. The sophomore also
teamed with Fereck, Menichini
and Emily Zera to win the
3200m Relay in a time of 13:18.
Taylor Powers won the 100m
dash with a time of 13.4 with
Amy Mozeleski finishing sec-
ond with a 13.6 and Madeline
Dworak posting a time of13.7
for third place.
Mozeleski added a win in the
200m with a time of 27.7, and
Dworak finished second.
Shelby Shimkoski won the
shot put for the Lady Patriots
with a throw of 27’5.
WA 116, Nanticoke 21
Samantha Shiner won three
events to lead Wyoming Area to
a 116-21victory over Nanticoke
on Wednesday in a WVC Divi-
sion II Track and Field meet.
Shiner won both the Triple
and Long jumps, with distances
of 31’4 and 15’7 respectively.
The junior also won the 100m
Dash with a time of 14.2. Shiner
also finished third in the 800m.
Sara Radzwilka, Melissa
Cruz and Jenna Skrinak also
won three events each for WA.
Radzwilka won the 400mand
800m middle distance races in
times of 1:03.8 and 2:28.4, re-
spectively, and also teamed
with Cruz, Skrinak and Kayla
Bardzell to win the 1600m Re-
lay. Bardzell added a win in the
High Jump for WA.
Cruz added a win in the 200m
dash in a time of 27.4 for the
Lady Warriors; and a win in the
1600m in a time of 5:41.
Skrinak added wins in the
400m Relay with Christie Ar-
genio, Ashley Melendez and
Liz Foglietta; and in the 3200m
Relay with Foglietta, Alex Am-
ico, and Rachel Taylor. Argenio
added a victory in the Pole
Vault for the Lady Warriors.
Michelle Gitkos and Emily
Shemanski all won two events
each for the Lady Warriors.
Gitkos won the Shot Put and
Javelin events, and Shemanski
took home the 100m Hurdles
and 300m Hurdles.
Dispatch Staff Writer Rick
Notari contributed to this re-
port.
Girls’ Standings
WVC-1
Hazleton..........................3-0
Dallas..............................3-0
Crestwood.......................2-0
Valley West .....................2-1
Tunkhannock...................2-1
Pittston Area ...................1-3
Berwick ..........................0-4
Coughlin .........................0-4
WVC-2
Meyers.............................2-1
Holy Redeemer ...............3-0
Northwest .......................2-0
Wyoming Area ................2-1
Lehman ...........................2-1
Hanover ...........................0-1
Nanticoke........................0-3
GAR................................0-4
Boys Standings
WVC-1
Pittston Area...................4-0
Hazleton..........................3-0
Tunkhannock ..................3-0
Dallas ..............................1-2
Berwick ..........................2-2
Crestwood.......................0-2
Valley West .....................0-3
Coughlin .........................0-4
WVC-2
Meyers ............................3-0
Holy Redeemer ...............3-0
Wyoming Area ................2-1
Northwest ........................1-1
Lehman ...........................1-2
GAR................................1-3
Hanover ...........................0-1
Nanticoke........................0-3
This week’s schedule
Wednesday
WA v. Meyers
Thursday
PA at Berwick
Friday
WA v. Northwest
Bouie, Hromek, Shiner lead WA
Continued from Page 46
PHOTOS BY BILL TARUTIS
At top, Wyoming Area's Cody Schmitz is in the middle of his Pole
Vault against Nanticoke. Above, Pittston Area's Paris Powers
takes first in the 100-meter dash against Coughlin.
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The Wyoming-West Wyoming-Exeter Panthers Foot-
ball/Cheerleading Association will hold registration for
the 2011 season on the following dates and times: April
30, 12-3 p.m.; May 15, 1-4 p.m.; June 12, 12-3 p.m.; and
June 26, 12-3 p.m.
Registrations will be at the Panther Fieldhouse on Ce-
dar Street in Exeter. Cost is $60 for an individual and
$75 for a family.
Legion baseball sign ups May 1
Greater Pittston Senior Legion sign ups are Sunday,
May 1 at 3 p.m. at the Atlas in West Pittston. Players
must provide a copy of birth certificate.
JTLL Opening Day is Saturday
Opening Day is Saturday, April 30 (Rain Date Sunday,
May 1). All players should be dressed in uniform and
gather atMayPark(behind Baloga Funeral Home) at 11
a.m. for the parade to the field at 11:30 a.m. After the
parade to the field, the players will be introduced and
exhibition baseball will be played featuring our T-Ball,
Coach Pitch, and Girls Minors Softball. Then at 4 p.m.
Pittston will take on our Golden Tech Minor League
Boys baseball team.During the day, the other fields will
be open for all boys and girls to showtheir skillsat some
Pitch, Hit and Run games.
Dupont Softball/Teeball to open May 7
The Dupont Softball/Teeball League will hold open-
ing day ceremonies on May 7 beginning at 2 p.m. Due to
the expected large crowd, car pooling is suggested to cut
down on traffic and parking congestion.
Seating is limited so bringing your own lawn chair is
suggested. There will be gues speakers and all teams
will play a one-inning exhibition game – weather per-
mitting. Player photos will also be taken.
PA Softball boosters to meet
The Pittston Area Softball Booster Club will meet on
Tuesday at 7 p.m. at the River Street Ale House in Pitt-
ston. All parents with children in grades 7-12 are invited
and encouraged to attend. Plans for future fundraisers
and banquet details will be discussed.
PA Track Parents meeting scheduled
The Pittston Area Track Parents will hold an impor-
tant meeting on Tuesday, May 3 at 7 p.m. in the high
school cafeteria. All parents with team members from
grades 7-12 are urged to attend. Plans for the end of the
season party along with other topics are on the agenda.
WA football parents meeting
The Wyoming Area Football Parents Association is
meeting on Thursday, April 28, at 7 p.m. in high school
room #129. All parents/guardians of players in grades
7-12 for the upcoming football season are encouraged to
attend. Questions? Call WAFPA Pres., Dan Resciniti at
814-5803.
GP Jr. Legion tryout set
Greater Pittston Junior Legion Manager Robert Sepe-
lyak has announced that the tryout for the squad will be
held on April 30 at 5 p.m. at the Atlas Complex. All
players must bring a copy of their birth certificate.
Waleski hoop camp offering discount
Registrations are being accepted for the Stan Waleski
Basketball Camp in the St. Joseph’s Oblates gym from
July 11-29 for boys and girls entering grades K through
8.
The camp stress skills, fundamentals, teamplay, com-
petition and fun with all players receiving a camp t-shirt
and certificate.
The camp features an early registration discount for
players registering prior to May1and discounts for mul-
tiple family members attending the camp. For registra-
tion information call Coach Waleski at 457-1206 or
Coach LoBrutto at 654-8030 or at stanwaleski.com or
by e-mailing stanwaleski@yahoo.com.
West Pittston Run set
The 34th Annual West Pittston Anthracite Run for the
Coal four-mile run/fun walk has been set for June 4.
Registration will begin that day at 7:30 a.m. at the West
Pittston Borough Building. The Fun Walk Course is two
miles with the Run Course a four-mile loop around the
perimeter of West Pittston. Streets will be traffic con-
trolled and miles will be marked. The start and finish
will be at the borough building. The course is relatively
flat with some hills. Cost of the event is $15 if you pre-
register by May 30, and $18 after May 30.
Trophies and prizes will be given to the Top 3 Male
and Female runners in the overall and each age group.
There are 11 age groups for males and 10 age groups for
females.
For more information, call the West Pittston Borough
Office at 570-655-7782.
Stoners Soccer sets signups
The Greater Pittston Stoners Youth Soccer League
will hold signups for Fall Soccer on the following dates:
April 28 from 6:30-8:30 p.m.; May 7 from 1:30-4:30
p.m.; and May 10 from 6:30-8:30 p.m. at the Exeter
Scout Home, located in the rear of the Exeter Borough
Building on the corner of Lincoln Street and Wyoming
Avenue in Exeter.
Cost of registration is $63 for players win new uni-
form, and $48 per player with no uniform. New players
must show birth certificate. For more info visit
www.stonesoccer.org.
Tickets on sale for OFBRC Pasta Dinner
The Old Forge Boys’ Roundball Club will hold its an-
nual Pasta Dinner on May1from12-4 p.m. at Arcaro and
Genell’s Banquet Room. The Dinner is eat-in or take-out
and includes pasta, a salad, desert and a beverage.
Tickets are $9 for adults and $4 for children under 12,
and can be purchased fromany member of the Old Forge
Boys’ Basketball Program or at the door.
PA-Seton Alumni games
Alumni from Pittston Area and Seton Catholic will
square off in a basketball fundraiser set for April 29 at
the Thomas R. Kelly Gymnasium at Pittston Area High
School.
The women’s game will begin at 6 p.m., followed by
the men’s game. All former players interested in playing,
contact Coach Kathy Healey at 654-5424.
PA Wrestling Boosters slate party, meeting
The Pittston Area Wrestling Booster Club will hold a
meeting on May 2 at6:30 p.m. in the cafeteria. Nomi-
nations of officers will take place. Final plans for the
banquet will be discussed.
PA Hoop Boosters golf tourney set
On June 4, the Pittston Area Basketball Booster Club
will host a captain-and-crew golf tournament at Four
Seasons Golf Club with an 8 a.m. shot gun start.
Fee for the tournament will be $65 a person which will
include cart, green fee and old fashioned cook out at
Four Seasons after golf. To sponsor a hole for $50 or to
register a team for the tournament call Carl at 883-7220
or 954-3067. Deadline to register is June 1.
Parents Night at Old Forge
The Old Forge Diamond Devils Club will host Senior
Parents Night on Thursday at the Old Forge Miles Street
Community Park approximately 7 p.m. before the start
of the Blue Devils game against Dunmore.
Youth soccer tourney scheduled
The Greater Pittston Stoners Soccer Club, in conjunc-
tion with the Hanover Youth Soccer Organization, has
organized a soccer tournament/family fun day to benefit
Mackenzie Marx who is being treated for Acute Mye-
loid Leukemia.
The tournament is June 25 at the Hanover Youth Soc-
cer Complexwitha raindate of June 26. The tournament
is U6-U13 with an entry fee of $50. Games begin at 9
a.m. and WVYSA rules will be followed. Teams do not
have to be affiliated with any organizations. Other activ-
ities scheduled include face painting, Bounce House,
money wheel, bake sale, a DJ, and much more. All pro-
ceeds will be directed to the Marx Family.
For more information, contact Stoners vice president
Jamie Szafran-Williams at newtown22@yahoo.com.
Tee Time for Kiel
The Friends of Kiel Eigen are sponsoring the Third
Annual Tee Time for Kiel Golf Tournament on June 4 at
Sand Springs Golf Club. The Tournament is Captain and
Crew with a 1 p.m. shotgun start.
Cost is $100 per player and includes golf fees, lunch,
dinner and a snack and drink at the turn. Registration
begins at 11:30 a.m. with lunch and range time sched-
uled for 12 p.m. Prizes will be awarded for first and sec-
ond place in each flight.
Teams will be accepted on a first-come basis. All fees
must accompany registration. Hole Sponsors are also
welcome at $100 per hole.
For more info or to register contact AdamBarsigian at
561-5822, J Argonish at 862-3566, Corey Palma at 861-
4743 or Ian Nemetz at 267-6802.
All proceeds go to the Kiel Eigen Fund.
OFAA holding Jr. Devils registration
The Old Forge Athletic Association will hold regis-
tration for Jr. Blue Devils football and cheerleading on
April 28 from6-8 p.m. and April 30 from11a.m.-1p.m.
in the Old Forge High School lobby.
Residents of Old Forge ages 5-13 are eligible to partic-
ipate. Registration fees are $45 for a single child, $65 for
families with two children; and $75 for families with
three or more children.
For more information contact OFAApresident Shawn
Nee at 650-2021.
S P O R T S B R I E F S
WWWE football, cheer registration dates set
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hold on for the win.
Mario Martinelli and Chris
Talipski added doubles for the
Blue Devils.
Tony Goodall was charged
with the loss, allowing nine hits
and four walks in six innings of
work.
OF 3, Mid Valley 8
Old Forge lost its second con-
secutive game in an 8-3 loss to
Mid Valley on Wednesday after-
noon at Pagnotti Park.
The Blue Devils struggled de-
fensively as two pitchers com-
bined for six walks and the de-
fense committed an uncharacter-
istic four errors which led to five
unearned runs for the Spartans.
Trailing 6-1 in the bottom of
the fifth, Dom Avvisato ripped a
two-run double to the right cen-
terfield gap to get Old Forge
(4-2) within three runs. But Mid
Valley came right back with two
in the sixth to put the game away.
Michael Long led the Blue
Devils at the plate with two sin-
gles, a walk and a stolen base
while scoring a run. Dave Argust
added an RBI single for Old
Forge.
Dave Chromey was charged
with the loss in allowing five
runs on five hits and four walks
in 2.2 innings of work. Sopho-
more Derek Drasba saw his first
varsity action out of the bullpen,
allowing five hits and two walks
in 4.1 innings of work.
Sunday Dispatch Staff Writer
Rick Notari also contributed to
this report.
Standings
WVC Division I East
Hazleton.............................4-1
Pittston Area......................4-1
Holy Redeemer .................4-2
Coughlin............................3-4
Crestwood..........................1-4
Nanticoke...........................1-5
WVC Division I West
Tunkhannock .....................5-1
Valley West........................3-3
Dallas ................................2-2
Berwick.............................2-3
Wyoming Area ..................1-4
LL Division II
Riverside............................5-1
Valley View.......................5-1
Mid Valley.........................4-2
Old Forge ..........................4-2
Dunmore ...........................3-3
Holy Cross.........................1-3
Lakeland............................0-5
Carbondale........................0-6
This week’s schedule
Monday
Pittston Area
v. Wyoming Area
at PNC Field, Moosic
Tuesday
OF v. Riverside
Wednesday
PA at Tunkhannock
WA v. Hazleton
Thursday
OF v. Dunmore
Friday
WA at Nanticoke
OLD FORGE
Continued from Page 51
PHOTOS BY RICK NOTARI
Above fromtop left, Old Forge's Mario Martinelli connects for a single against Mid Valley on Wednes-
day afternoon; Derek Drasba delivers a pitch for the Blue Devils; MIchael Long steals second base
for Old Forge.
Wyoming Area won a thrilling four-set match over
Wyoming Valley West for its second win of the season, a
3-1victoryover the Spartans ina WyomingValleyConfer-
ence Volleyball matchup on Monday afternoon in Exeter.
The Warriors won the first game, 25-21, before Valley
West came backtotake the secondgame, 26-24. Wyoming
Area then won the third game, 28-26, before clinching the
matchwitha25-17victoryinthefourthanddecidinggame.
Tony Richards led the Warriors with a season-high 27
assists, seven kills and two blocks.
CodyGates added13kills, twoassists andoneblock, and
Chris Evans scored five kills and had two assists.
Zak Lanunziata chipped in with eight kills and two aces
for WA.
Statistics
Aces
Tony Richards.................................................................9
Chris Evans.....................................................................6
Assists
Tony Richards .............................................................137
Kills
Cody Gates ...................................................................67
Tony Richards...............................................................35
Chris Evans ...................................................................19
Blocks
Tony Richards ...............................................................15
Cody Gates .....................................................................6
VA R S I T Y V O L L E Y B A L L
WA takes thrilling victory from WVW
Gates, Richards lead Warriors to victory
By Rick Notari
Dispatch Staff
See VOLLEY, Page 58
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Alumni fromPittston Ar-
ea and Seton Catholic will
square off in a basketball
fundraiser set for April 29
at the Thomas R. Kelly
Gymnasium at Pittston Ar-
ea High School.
The women’s game will
begin at 6 p.m., followed by
the men’s game. All former
players interested in play-
ing can contact Coach
Kathy Healey at 654-5424.
Pictured in the photos are
some of the participants in
boththe men’s andwomen’s
games.
The Men, from left to
right, Jon Munski, Greg
Ratchford, Pat Ratchford,
JohnWalsh, CarmenScian-
dra and Alan Keisinger.
The Women, from left to
right, Joyce Mitchell, Mary
Elizabeth Gregor, Kathy
Healey, Marcia Tomaszew-
ski, Jessica Linskey, Franc-
es Hergan, Nicole DePhil-
lips, Lauren Smicherko,
Mary Ellen Zaffuto and
Caroline Rabender.
VA R S I T Y B A S K E T B A L L
Former Patriots, Eagles squaring off
The Rock Solid AAU girls’ 8th grade team recently qualified for
the 8th grade National Championships to be held in Orlando, FL.
The girls recently won the AAU Super Regional held in Bethle-
hem. The team finished the tournament with a perfect 4-0 record.
Theywere downinthe last couple of minutes inboththe semi-final
game and the championship game. In the semi-final game the girls
rallied back to tie the game and won in overtime. In the final game,
the ladies took their first lead with 17 seconds left and they handled
the ball extremely well to hang on to win the championship game,
51-50.
Picture fromleft to right, first row, Talia Szatkowski (Dallas Area),
Gabbie Volpetti (Dallas Area), Lydia Lawson (Good Shepherd), and
Ali Barber (Pittston Area); second row, Coach Amy Buzinski, Erin
Schmidt (Pittston Area), Alexis Lewis (Wyoming Valley West), Ala-
na Wilson(St. Jude’s), Kayla Hons (St. Jude’s) andCoachKathyHea-
ley.
J U N I O R H I G H B A S K E T B A L L
Rock Solid girls win AAU Super Regional
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Happy Easter everyone!
Isn’t it is hard to believe that
Easter is here already? It
seems like we were just wish-
ing each other happy New
Years. The months of 2011
are certainly flying by. For
example, we are in our sec-
ond month of spring already
and May is just one week
away. The key is not to be
caught flipping the pages of
the calendar without living
each day of the month to its
fullest. While April showers
are certainly bringing the
May flowers, it is also bring-
ing many outdoor opportuni-
ties. Trout fishing and turkey
hunting are two good exam-
ples.
The trout season opened
last weekend and many an-
glers were chased off the
lakes and streams because of
the heavy rains and winds.
That means there is plenty of
fish still swimming around
for local anglers. In addition
to the trout stocked before
the season, the Pennsylvania
Fish and Boat Commission
are already restocking lakes
and streams in what they call
their “In-Season Stocking
Program.” The Lake at Franc-
es Slocum State Park was res-
tocked this past Monday and
what an event it was. Hun-
dreds of people lined the
shore awaiting the arrival of
the stocking truck. Perhaps
the most inspiring thing was
the number of children with
parents and grandparents.
These afternoons spent to-
gether will be forever looked
back at as good wholesome
family memories.
The trout were a little fin-
icky are first but within an
hour they settled down and
started to bite. I did a quick
survey of the anglers landing
trout. They claim that bright
power bait fished on the bot-
tom is the most successful
way to land the trout stocked
at Frances Slocum. I did meet
up with a few fishermen us-
ing minnows quite success-
fully as well. The key to
catching fish is to get out and
fish. The rest of it should
happen naturally. The Fish
Commission stocked more
than three thousand trout on
Monday and they are sched-
uled to restock it again in
May. For the most up to date
schedule of in-season stock-
ing, visit the Pennsylvania
Fish and Boat Commission
home page at http://
www.fish.state.pa.us.
Young turkey hunters had
their chance yesterday to
shoot a Pennsylvania Gob-
bler. The one day hunt for
kids is designed to get our
youth interested in hunting
and in this case, turkey hunt-
ing. The official opening of
the turkey season starts next
Saturday, April 30, one half
hour before sunrise. Youths
under the age of 12 years may
participate in this spring gob-
bler season through the Game
Commission’s Mentored
Youth Hunting Program.
They can hunt with a mentor
during the general spring
gobbler season. Mentored
youths need to obtain a per-
mit for $2.70, and must be
accompanied by an adult
mentor who is a properly li-
censed and at least 21 years
of age. A field harvest tag is
provided with the mentored
youth hunting program per-
mit. Mentored youths also
are required to report their
harvest to the Game Com-
mission either online or by
using one of the report card
inserts that are part of the Di-
gest.
The outlook for the turkey
season is excellent. I have
seen quite a few turkeys on
my travels and my scouting
trips at daybreak have been
very productive. The key is to
get out this week and make
sure the birds are where you
think they are. Scouting is al-
ways the key to a successful
hunt. More important than a
successful hunt is a safe and
enjoyable one. Here are a few
tips to follow to help make
your outing a safe adventure.
Positively identify your tar-
get. Be absolutely certain
that the turkey you are about
to shoot is a legal (bearded)
turkey before you pull the
trigger. The bird should be
fully and clearly visible. Be
sure to look beyond the path
of your shot to make sure it is
safe to pull the trigger.
Never stalk a turkey or tur-
key sounds. Take up a calling
location and let the bird come
to you. Movement or sounds
you think are a turkey may be
another hunter. Sneaking in
on another hunter is not only
unsafe, it’s illegal. Spring
turkey hunting is by calling
only.
Assume every noise and
movement is another hunter,
not a turkey.
Protect your back! Select a
large tree, rock, or other sub-
stantial natural barrier while
calling. Sit with your back
against this object. Hunt in
open woods so you can easily
see approaching hunters.
Shout “STOP!” to alert ap-
proaching hunters. Never
move, wave, or make turkey
sounds to alert hunters of
your position.
Eliminate red, white, blue,
and black colors from your
clothing. These colors are
found on the head, neck, and
body of mature gobblers.
Pre-select a zone of fire.
Shoot at a turkey only in that
predetermined zone and only
when you’re certain it is safe
to do so. Agree upon these
zones with your hunting
companions before the hunt.
Choose safe and responsib-
le hunting companions.
Know where they are at all
times.
Wear hunter orange when
entering or leaving your tur-
key hunting area. Fluorescent
orange is not requited in the
spring but it is a smart thing
to wear while moving about.
Remember to practice
these safety tips, be courte-
ous and patient. No turkey is
worth risking a human life
for. Good luck if you are
heading in search of a gob-
bling turkey.
Still Time for Two
It is not too late to get a
second turkey tag. Pennsyl-
vania hunters who would like
the opportunity to harvest a
second spring gobbler can
purchase a second spring
gobbler tag until Saturday,
April 30. Thanks to the new
Pennsylvania Automated Li-
cense System (PALS), hun-
ters can purchase a second
spring gobbler tag at any is-
suing agent and walk out of
the store with it. A second tag
could be purchased online
but it could take up to ten
days to get in the mail. The
cost of the second turkey tag
is $21.70 for residents and
$41.70 for nonresidents.
Be sure to watch Pennsyl-
vania Outdoor Life tonight at
6:30 on WNEP-TV. We have
dedicated most of the pro-
gram to turkey hunting and
turkey call making.
Turkeys, trout and the State Park
OUTDOORS WITH JAKE
by Don Jacobs
Digs
Chris Evans....................................................1
Standings
North Pocono ............................................. 7-0
Holy Redeemer........................................... 7-0
Coughlin..................................................... 6-1
Lake-Lehman.............................................. 6-2
Crestwood................................................... 6-2
Abington Heights ....................................... 5-2
Tunkhannock .............................................. 4-3
Nanticoke ................................................... 4-3
Dallas ......................................................... 3-3
Meyers........................................................ 2-4
Wyoming Area............................................ 2-5
Valley West ................................................ 2-5
Delaware Valley.......................................... 3-5
Hazleton..................................................... 2-6
Hanover ...................................................... 0-5
West Side Tech........................................... 0-6
Berwick...................................................... 0-7
This week’s schedule
Tuesday
WA v. Meyers
Thursday
WA at Delaware Valley
VOLLEY
Continued from Page 56
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T H E S U N D AY D I S PAT C H AT H L E T E S O F T H E W E E K
It didn’t take long for Pittston Area’s Sara Ruby
to make her mark on the Lady Patriots cross-river
rivalry with Wyoming Area.
The freshman scored two goals to lead PA to a
3-2 win over the Lady Warriors as the Lady Patri-
ots picked up their f irst win of the season.
For her efforts, Sara has been named The Sun-
day Dispatch Pittston Area Athlete of the Week
for the week April 10-16.
Ruby broke a scoreless tie with less than eight
minutes left in the f irst half for her f irst goal and
a 1-0 PA lead, and then chipped in the eventual
game-winning just nine minutes into the second
half for a 3-1 advantage.
Posters of Sara can be found at Tony’s Pizza in
Pittston, and Smart Designs and Graphics in
Wyoming, sponsors of the Pittston Area Athlete
of the Week.
Sara Ruby
PA Soccer
The rain-drenched baseball season has affected
the hitting on the West Side, but it has not damp-
ened the performance of Wyoming Area’s Dylan
Maloney.
Maloney hit .555 with four RBI and has
pitched 15 strong innings for the Warriors de-
spite his team’s 0-3 start.
For his efforts, Dylan has been named The
Sunday Dispatch Wyoming Area Athlete of the
Week for the week April 10-16.
Maloney doubled, tripled and homered in
Wyoming Area’s f irst three games, and also
struck out 13 from the mound in three appear-
ances.
Posters of Dylan can be found at Januzzi’s Piz-
za in Wyoming, and Smart Designs and Graphics
in Wyoming, sponsors of the Sunday Dispatch
Athlete of the Week.
Dylan Maloney
WA Baseball
Old Forge centerf ielder Michael Long has picked
up where he left off last season.
The senior smashed six hits and drove in seven as
the Blue Devils pushed their record to 4-0 after the
f irst two weeks of the season.
For his effort, Michael has been named The Sun-
day Dispatch Old Forge Athlete of the Week for the
week April 10-16.
Long singled twice, homered and drove in f ive
runs in a win over Dunmore, and smacked three
singles in a win over Carbondale. He scored two
runs in each game, including the game-winning run
against Dunmore.
Posters of Michael can be seen at Revello’s Pizza
in Old Forge, and Smart Designs and Graphics in
Wyoming, sponsors of the Old Forge Athlete of the
Week.
Michael Long
OF Baseball
Stevens Financial and O’Connor Plumbing remain un-
defeated after two weeks of cold, damp Industrial League
golf at Emanon.
Stevens swept Hoffman Electric led by 39s shot by Pip
McDermott and Joe Gentile. Sean Fortney led Hoffmn’s
with a 40.
Bob Lampman shot 37 and Tom Kerrigan 39 to lead
O’Connor Plumbing to a 3 point sweep of PJ Adonizio’s
Funeral Home. Jim Devers shot 39 for Adonizio’s.
Ashley Machine took3 points from Red Mill to keep
pace with the league leaders. Len Coleman and John
Mulhern paced the winners with 37s while Mike Lazev-
nick paced the Mill with a 38.
In the night’s final action, Selenski Insurance defeated
AS Powers and Sons by a 2-1score. JimBreck led Selen-
ski’s with a 38 and Brian Rinker shot 42 for Powers.
Action continues next week as all teams will tee off at
5:10 p.m..
L O C A L G O L F
Stevens, O’Connor remain undefeated
Email your Rec League stats, standings, news and photos
to Rick Notari at rnotari@psdispatch.com
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OBITUARIES
Emil F. Pe-
chal Sr., 76, of
Swoyersville,
died April 13,
2011, at home.
Born No-
vember 16,
1934, in Wilkes-Barre, he was a
son of the late Francis and Anna
Mercincavage Pechal. He was a
member of Holy Trinity Church,
Swoyersville. He was a veteran
of the U.S. Marine Corps, serv-
ing in Korea. He was a lifetime
member of the Disabled Amer-
ican Veterans Association, Post
102 of Kingston. He worked 14½
years in the local mines and re-
tired after 27½ years of employ-
ment from Techneglas in Pitt-
ston.
He was also preceded in death
by his son Emil F. Jr.; brother,
Frank; and sisters, Mary Ann
Frushon, Louise Loftus, and
Evelyn Pechal.
Surviving are his wife of 54
years, the former Irene Smaka;
children; son Henry and his
wife, Barbara, of Old Forge, son
David of Swoyersville, daughter
Debra Ann Stachyra and her
husband, Andrew, of Exeter, and
son Edward and his wife, Jean,
of Land O’ Lakes, FL; two
granddaughters, April Pechal
and Nicole Catherine Stachyra;
brother, John Pechal, Plains
Township; sister, Agnes Makara,
Bricktown, NJ; numerous nieces
and nephews.
Funeral was held April 19
from the Bednarski Funeral
Home, Wyoming, witha Mass of
Christian Burial in Holy Trinity
Church, Swoyersville. Interment
St. Mary’s Cemetery, Swoyers-
ville.
Emil F. Pechal, Sr.
April 13, 2011
Josephine
Lapsansky, of
Wilkes-Barre,
died April 15,
2011, at the
Timber Ridge
Nursing and
Rehabilitation Center, Plains
Township.
She was born in Inkerman, on
November 17, 1923, a daughter
of the late Frank and Helen
Biestek Niemiec. She was a
graduate of Jenkins Township
High School, class of 1941, and
moved to Newark, NJ, to work
in a defense plant during World
War II. She was one of the first
"42 Crew of Rosie the Riveters
Brigade" that built the B-17
bombers. Her future husband,
Jacob, flew B-17 missions dur-
ing the Normandy invasion and
brought his invasion parachute
home after the war. This silk
material was used to make Jo-
sephine’s wedding dress in
1947. They celebrated 50 years
of marriage in 1997. She was a
member of Ss. Peter & Paul
Church, Plains Township, and
was past secretary and treasurer
of the Altar and Rosary Society
and Choir of Ss. Peter & Paul
and St. Cecelia’s Parishes. She
was employed for many years
as a nurses aide at the Little
Flower Manor and Wilkes-
Barre General Hospital.
Also preceding her in death
were her husband, Jacob, in
1997; brother, John Niemiec;
and sisters Sophie Ruskey, Nel-
lie Paczkowski, Agnes and
Theresa Niemiec.
Surviving are her sons, Jacob
and wife Cathy, of Plains Town-
ship; Michael and wife Geor-
gia, of Plains Township; and
Philip and wife Mary, of Nuan-
gola; grandchildren, Kimberly
Ann, Jacob, Brian and Michael;
great-granddaughter Lia Isa-
bel; as well as sisters Hedy Gill
of Wilkes-Barre, Helen Sartin
of Kingston, and Mary Kosuth
of New Jersey.
Funeral services were held
April 19 from the Mikelski Fu-
neral Home, Plains Township,
with a Mass of Christian Burial
at Ss. Peter & Paul Church,
Plains Township. Interment St.
Rocco’s Cemetery, Pittston.
Memorial donations may be
made to Pennsylvanians for
Human Life, 31 Hanover St.,
Wilkes-Barre, 18702.
Josephine Lapsansky
April 15, 2011
Romayne B.
Norton, 87,
formerly a res-
ident of
Wilkes-Barre,
and most re-
cently a guest
at the Wesley Village Campus,
Jenkins Township, died April
15, 2011, at the Partridge-Tip-
pett Nursing Facility of the Wes-
ley Village Campus, Jenkins
Township. Her husband of 65
years was the late George H.
Norton, who passed away on
September 29, 2009.
Born on May 13, 1923, in
Clarks Summit, she was a
daughter of the late George and
Emma (Koerner) Bowen. She
was raised in Wilkes-Barre and
was a graduate of Elmer L.
Meyers High School, class of
1941. A homemaker most of her
life, she also worked as a teach-
er’s aide for Dan Flood Elemen-
tary School, Wilkes-Barre, and
later as a secretary in the Circu-
lation Department at The Times
Leader, Wilkes-Barre.
She was also preceded in
death by her brother, Robert
Bowen; and her sister, Mary
Louise Bowen.
She is survived by her daugh-
ter, Cathy Norton, of Lattimer
Mines; her son, Scott Norton
and his wife, Jackie, of Newton,
NJ; her grandson, Corey Nor-
ton; and several nieces and ne-
phews.
Funeral was private. Inter-
ment Oak Lawn Cemetery, Ha-
nover Township. To send an on-
line condolence, visit
www.wroblewskifuneralhome-
.com. Memorial contributions
may be made to the Hazleton Li-
brary, Southside Branch, 15 Ke-
layres Road., McAdoo, 18237.
Romayne B. Norton
April 15, 2011
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Sa l M orrea le,Jr.
A pril 20,2010
M issyou rsm ile,lau gh ter
and su pport
M issyou rlove,m issyou rh eart
Cancer-you took
awayh isvoice,h ish ope,
Bu tyou nevertook h issou l.
You h avestolen h im ,h isb ody
Bu tyou can’th aveh is
m em oriesorh issm ile.
You can’th aveh islove
orh ism em ory
Itisou rsto k eep.
You m ayh avewon th eb attle,
b u tnotth ewar.
You will b eforeverin ou rh earts.
L ove,M a ryjo,S a m m y III,
A m y,M icha el
a nd M icha el III.
2
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In Loving M em ory
Peg g y a nd Fra nk D u shko of D u ryea
wh o passed away
Loved and Sadlym issed b ySons,Dau gh ters,
Grandch ildren,Fam ilyand Friends.
Fra nk
10 yearsago
11/7/32-3/19/01
Peggy
30 yearsago
6/2/37-4/21/81
OBITUARIES
Louis R.
Lanzone, 86, of
West Pittston,
died April 18,
2011, in King-
ston Com-
mons.
Born in Pittston on April 15,
1925, he was a son of the late
Rocco, and Evelyn Rossi Lan-
zone. He was a graduate of Pitt-
ston High School, class of 1942.
He enjoyed picking coal as a
youth, and during high school,
he played football along side
Charley Trippi. He served in the
U.S. Navy during World War II
on the USS Mainstay, a mine-
sweeper in the Pacific Theater.
He worked at the Hitchner Bis-
cuit Company, West Pittston; the
VA Hospital, Lyons, NJ, as well
as the VA Hospital, Wilkes-
Barre, where he retired. He was a
member of the DAV Nino Mon-
tante Post 46, a member of the
Dupont VFWPost 4909, a mem-
ber of the National Society of
Retired Federal Employees, a
member of the Pittston Red Dev-
ils, and a member of Immaculate
Conception Parish, West Pitt-
ston.
Surviving are his wife of 61
years, Agnes Jukas Lanzone;
daughters, Linda Suponcic and
husband James, Luzerne; Mary
Agnes Petrewski and husband
John, Taylor; LuAnn Hancock
and husband William Jr., West
Pittston; brother, Anthony Lan-
zone, Florida; sisters, Nancy
Vaccaro, Florida, and Corrina
Kozloski, Colorado; numerous
nieces and nephews.
Funeral service was held April
21fromthe Peter J. Adonizio Fu-
neral Home, West Pittston, with
a Blessing Service in Corpus
Christi Church at Immaculate
Conception Parish, West Pitt-
ston. Interment Mt. Olivet Cem-
etery.
Memorial donations may be
made to Immaculate Conception
Parish, 605 Luzerne Ave., West
Pittston, 18643. Online condo-
lences may be made at www.pe-
terjadoniziofuneralhome.com.
Louis R. Lanzone
April 18, 2011
Shirley A.
Tible, of Du-
pont, formerly
of Clifton and
Lake Hopat-
cong, NJ, died
April 15, 2011,
in Hospice Care of the VNA,
Heritage House, Wilkes-Barre.
She was the widow of Joseph P.
Tible, who died August 26,
2006.
Born in Dupont, she was a
daughter of the late Stella Sera-
fin. She was a graduate of Du-
pont High School, class of 1952.
She was a member of Sacred
Heart of Jesus Church, Dupont.
Surviving are her son, Joseph
P. III, and his wife, Liz, Wayne,
NJ; and daughter Robin Davey
and her husband, David, Land-
ing, N.J.; brother, John Lena and
his wife, Margaret, Oak Ridge,
NJ; sister, Pat Neubert and her
husband, Dick, Hiawassee, GA;
sixgrandchildren, AmyandJoey
Tible, Jennifer, Lisa, Bryan and
Sean Davey; great-grandson
Brent; several nieces, nephews
and cousins.
Amemorial Mass will be cele-
brated in Sacred Heart of Jesus
Church, Dupont, at a later date.
Interment Sacred Heart of Jesus
Cemetery, Dupont. To send an
online condolence, visit
www.balogafuneralhome.com.
Shirley A. Tible
April 15, 2011
Kenneth E.
Hoover, 85, of
Harveys Lake,
died April 18,
2011, at Hos-
pice Communi-
ty Care Inpa-
tient Unit of Geisinger South
Wilkes-Barre, after several
weeks of illness at the hospital
and at home.
He was born in Avoca, a son of
the late Ira E. and Catherine Po-
well Hoover. He was a member of
Fellowship Evangelical Free
Church, Dallas. He retired in
1984 from Acme Warehouse,
Forty Fort. He also worked as
Claims Manager for DeanPhipps
Stores Inc. Warehouse, Avoca,
and served as Deputy Game Pro-
tector, Forest Fire Warden, and
Pittston Township Police Officer.
He was also preceded in death
by sisters, Mrs. Marion Delli-
quanti, Deleware; Mrs. Ruth Pe-
terson, Exeter; Mrs. Ann Barlow,
Hughestown; and brother, Lewis
Hoover, New Jersey.
He is survivedbyhis wife of 64
years, Betty Richens Hoover;
sons, Lon and his wife, Sandy,
Beaufont, SC; Kim and his wife,
Marian, Royersford; daughter,
Jan, and her husband Patrick
McAuley, Rochester, NY; Elea-
nor Jones Hoover, Overland
Park, KS; six grandchildren, two
great-grandchildren, and nieces
and nephews.
Funeral was held April 21from
The Fellowship Evangelical Free
Church, Dallas. Interment Me-
morial Shrine Burial Park. Fu-
neral arrangements by the Dis-
que Funeral Home, Dallas.
Memorial donations may be
made to Fellowship Evangelical
Free Church, c/o 45 Hildebrandt
Road, Dallas.
Kenneth E. Hoover
April 18, 2011
Benjamin
Jenkins Jr.
(Duke), 71,
died April 16,
2011.
He was a son
of the late Ben-
jamin and Elizabeth Powell Jen-
kins. Born December 9, 1939, he
graduated from Plymouth High
School, class of 1957. After
overcoming polio, he went on to
graduate from Wilkes College
and Bucknell University. He was
a dedicated teacher for 38 years,
starting at Lake-Lehman High
School, then Kingston School
District, and eventually Wyom-
ing Valley West High School,
where he taught History, Civics,
Economics, and Sociology. He
played soccer for Wilkes Col-
lege, coached Little League
baseball, was a Hunter Safety In-
structor for the PA Game Com-
mission, and a rifle instructor for
the Wyoming Valley West Rifle
Team. While at Wyoming Valley
West he was actively involved in
History Day. He was a deacon
and Superintendent at the Ebe-
nezer Baptist Church, Plymouth.
He most recentlyattendedthe In-
dependent Bible Church, Du-
ryea.
He was also preceded in death
by a brother, Alan, at age 6.
He is survived by his wife of
46 years on April 10, Valeria L.
Mundy Jenkins; sons, Dale T.
and Daniel B. Jenkins, Harris-
burg, Pa.; brother, Thomas E.
Jenkins, and his wife, Georgia,
Shavertown; sisters-in-law, El-
len Miller, and her husband,
Fred, Edwardsville, and Karen
Grady, Nottingham, Md.; broth-
ers-in-law, Michael Mundy, Ply-
mouth; Bill Mundy and his wife,
Joyce, Taylors, SC, and James
Mundy; five nieces, four neph-
ews, eight great-nieces, and four
great-nephews.
Funeral services were held
April 20 at the WilliamA. Reese
Funeral Chapel, Plymouth, with
Pastor Eugene Setzer and Pastor
Al Cremard officiating.
Memorial donations may be
made to Wyoming Valley Chil-
dren’s Association, 1133 Wyom-
ing Ave., Forty Fort, 18704.
Benjamin Jenkins, Jr.
April 16, 2011
Subscribe to
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Call 829-5000
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H elen
Yu s ca va ge
A pril 21,2008
M om ,
God took you h om e3 yearsago.
Th esh adow of you rsm ilestill
stayswith m e.
Im issyou and loveyou so m u ch .
You werealwaysth ereto com fort
m eand teach m erigh tfrom wrong.
Itreasu reall of th em em ories
and k eep th em closeto m yh eart.
L ove,Da ughterAn n Ma rie
a n dFa m ily.
2
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In Loving M em oryOf
W illia m A.
Girm a n
wh o passed away2 yearsago
4/28/09
Th eywh om weloveand lose
areno longerwh ere
th eywereb efore...
Th eyarenow wh ereverweare!
S a dly m issed by W ife,
D a u g hters,
Fa m ily a nd Friends.
OBITUARIES
Kenneth G. Holtz, 74, of West
Pittston, died April 15, 2011, in
Kindred Hospital of Wyoming
Valley.
Born in Pittston, on January
12, 1937, he was a son of the late
George, and Hazel Webster
Holtz. He attended Pittston High
School, and served in the U.S.
Navy. In his earlier years, he
worked for Acme Bakery and
Culp Brothers. He along with his
wife, Janice Mugford Holtz,
owned and operated Old Mill
Pine Products Inc., in West Pitt-
ston for over 30 years. He was a
member of the First United
Methodist Church of Pittston.
He was also preceded in death
by a son-in-law, Lee Schobert.
Surviving, in addition to his
wife of 52 years, Janice Mugford
Holtz; are daughter, Hazel Lynn
Schobert, Harding; sons, Ken-
neth Holtz and his wife, Elaine,
West Pittston; Todd Holtz, West
Pittston; and Jeffrey Holtz and
his wife, Christine, West Pitt-
ston; grandchildren, Kenneth,
Todd, Trevor, Samantha, and
Alexandra; as well as nieces, ne-
phews, a great-niece and great-
nephews.
Funeral services were held at
the convenience of the family
with interment at the West Pitt-
ston Cemetery. Funeral services
were entrusted to the Peter J.
Adonizio Funeral Home, 802
Susquehanna Ave., West Pitt-
ston.
Memorial donations may be
made to the United Methodist
Church of Pittston, Church and
Broad streets, Pittston, 18640.
Online condolences may be
made at www.peterjadonizio-
funeralhome.com.
Kenneth G. Holtz
April 15, 2011
Shirley O’Malley, 75, of
Bound Brook, NJ, formerly from
Avoca, died April 16, 2011 at her
home.
She was born on November 5,
1935, and was the loving wife of
the late JohnD. "Jack" O’Malley.
She moved to Bound Brook with
her husband some 50 years ago,
and was the proud homemaker
and caretaker of her family. She
was an avid supporter of the As-
sociation of Retarded Citizens of
Somerset County. She was also a
member of St. John’s Primitive
Methodist Church, Avoca.
She was alsoprecededindeath
by her sister, Caroline ’Jane’
Reap, and Jane’s husband, John.
She is survived by her chil-
dren, Shannon O’Malley, Bound
Brook, NJ; Brian O’Malley,
Manville NJ; and Keith O’Mal-
ley and his wife, Jill, Washing-
ton, NJ; grandchildren, Cassan-
dra and Casey O’Malley of
Washington, NJ; sister, Nelda
Cavalari, and husband, John,
Avoca.
Funeral services were held
April 19 at St. John’s Primitive
Methodist Church, Avoca. Me-
morial donations may be made
be made to The A.R.C. of Som-
erset County, or St. John’s Prim-
itive Methodist Church.
Shirley O’Malley
April 16, 2011
Frances Bencho, 81, of Ply-
mouth, died April 17, 2011, at the
Hospice Community Care Inpa-
tient Unit of Geisinger South
Wilkes-Barre.
Born June 1, 1929, she was a
daughter of the late Ignatz and
Catherine Stanavage Laukaitus.
She resided in Plymouth most of
her life, and she was a graduate
of Plymouth High School. She
was employed at Gent J. Manu-
facturing, Plymouth. She was a
member of Ss. Peter & Paul Uk-
rainian Catholic Church, Ply-
mouth.
She was preceded in death by
her husband, Dimitri, who
passed away in 2001; brothers
Andrew Laukaitus, Anthony
Malesky, Joseph Malesky, Ge-
orge Malesky, and Charles Lau-
kaitus; sisters, Aldona Laukai-
tus, Della Callahan, Anna Jano-
vitch, Eleanor Wanyo, and Mar-
garet Lukas.
Survivingare her children, Re-
becca Molecavage and her hus-
band, Thomas, Luzerne; James
Bencho, Wyoming; John Ben-
cho, Nanticoke; David Bencho,
Plymouth; SusanStahleyandher
husband, John, Hunlock Creek;
Lisa Allan, Berwick; and Kim-
berly DeMuzzio and her hus-
band, Charles, Larksville; grand-
children, Thomas Molecavage
Jr. and his wife, Juli, Kingston;
John Bencho Jr., Nanticoke; Aa-
ron Bencho, Exeter; Nicole Ben-
cho, Wyoming; Christina and
John Stahley, Hunlock Creek;
and Evan DeMuzzio, Larksville;
great-grandchildren, Isabella
Molecavage and Ryder Bencho;
brother Albert Laukaitus, Spain;
numerous nieces and nephews.
Funeral was held April 20
from the Grontkowski Funeral
Home, Plymouth, followed by
service inSs. Peter &Paul Ukrai-
nianCatholic Church, Plymouth.
Interment parish cemetery, Ply-
mouth Township.
Frances Bencho
April 17, 2011
Patrick A.
"Curley" Cola-
russo, 95, of
Pittston, died
April 16, 2011,
in Geisinger
Wyoming Val-
ley Medical Center, Plains
Township, surrounded by his
family.
Born in Pittston, on March 2,
1916, he was a son of the late
George, and Elizabeth (Zelin-
da) Casterline Colarusso. He
attended Pittston High School,
and served in the U.S. Army.
Curley was a member of Our
Lady of Mount Carmel Church,
Pittston. He was employed as a
machinist and had worked for
Duryea Anthracite Coal Com-
pany, Adonizio Brothers and
Addy Asphalt Company.
He was also preceded in
death by his first wife, Helen
Makar Colarusso; his second
wife, Helen Karlow Colarusso;
son, George Colarusso; grand-
son, Anthony Manganiello; and
his sister, Mary Martin.
Surviving are his daughter,
Patricia Manganiello, and her
husband, Tony, West Pittston;
sons, Charles ’Chic’ Colarus-
so, and his wife, Donna, Jen-
kins Township; John Colarus-
so, Moosic; step-daughter,
Donna Matthews, and her hus-
band, Ted, Dupont; brothers,
Carmen Colarusso, and his
wife, Ruth, West Pittston, and
Joe Colarusso, and his wife,
Ann Marie, Old Forge; sister,
Doris Vidzar, Rome, NY; eight
grandchildren; six great-grand-
children; and numerous nieces
and nephews.
Funeral services, with full
military honors, were held
April 20 from the Peter J. Ado-
nizio Funeral Home, West Pitt-
ston with a Mass of Christian
Burial in Our Lady of Mount
Carmel Church, Pittston. Inter-
ment Denison Cemetery,
Swoyersville. Online condo-
lences may be made at
www.peterjadoniziofuneral-
home.com.
Patrick A. Colarusso
April 16, 2011
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OBITUARIES
TheSundayDispatchpublishesobituariesoflocalindividualswhoreside,formerlyresidedorhavefamily
living
Obituaries
Emailispreferredforsubmission,butfaxorhandwrittenentrieswillbeacceptablewithacontactnameand
phone
Email obituaries tosd@psdispatch.com; Faxobituaries to570.602.0183; or mail themto109NewSt.,
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570.602.0168.
Obituary Policy
Antoinette
Denisco, 87, of
West Pittston,
died April 16,
2011, at Wesley
Village Nursing
Care Center,
Jenkins Township.
Born in Pittston, on May 7,
1923, shewasadaughter of thelate
Raphael, and Rose Cioffi Ros-
tock. Shewasamember of Corpus
Christi Parish, Immaculate Con-
ceptionChurch, West Pittston. She
was formerly employed in local
dress factories, andwas a member
of ILGWU. She was also employ-
ed at the former Espresso Restau-
rant.
She was also preceded in death
by her husband of 49 years, John
Denisco, in1995; her brothers Sa-
muel, Dominick, James, Raphael
and Anthony; and sisters, Cathe-
rine Rostock, Mary Muzzi, and
Catherine Campenni.
Survivingareher sons, Johnand
wifePaula, West Wyoming; James
andwifeMarie, West Pittston; and
Joseph and wife Mary Joan, Har-
leysville; brothers Anthony, West
Pittston, and Nicholas, Pittston;
six grandchildren, Stephanie,
John, John Jr., Catherine, Emily
and Palmer; and two great-grand-
children, Dante and Dominic.
Funeral was held April 20 from
theRecuperoFuneral Home, West
Pittston, with a Mass of Christian
Burial in Immaculate Conception
Church. Interment Denison Cem-
etery, Swoyersville. Family re-
quests donations may be made to
Wesley Village Nursing Center,
Pittston, 18640.
Antoinette Denisco
April 16, 2011
Rose Marie
Gerrity, 80, of
Swoyersville,
died April 15,
2011, at Geisin-
ger Wyoming
Valley Medical
Center, Plains Twp. She was the
wife of the late James J. Gerrity,
who died September 14, 1984.
Born on June 12, 1930, in
Wilkes-Barre, Rose was a daugh-
ter of the late August and Anna
(Hetro) Peeler. She was raised in
Swoyersvilleandwasagraduateof
Swoyersville High School, Class
of1948. Priortoherretirement, she
was employedfor over 25years by
the former Topps Chewing Gum,
Duryea. Shewas amember of Ho-
ly Trinity Church of Swoyersville.
She was also preceded in death
by her brother, Robert Peeler.
She is survived by her daugh-
ters, RoseannBarreraandher hus-
band, James, of Mesa, AZ, Cindy
Gerrity of Swoyersville, and Deb-
bie Layaou of Swoyersville; her
grandchildren, Kara Chase, Lisa
Barrera, Janine Barrera, Bill Lay-
aou and James Layaou; her great-
grandchildren, AshleyandWalker
Chase; nieces and nephews.
Funeral serviceswereheldApril
18 from the Wroblewski Funeral
Home, Forty Fort, followed by a
Mass of Christian Burial in Holy
Trinity Church, Swoyersville. In-
terment Denison Cemetery,
Swoyersville. To send an online
condolence, visit www.wroblew-
skifuneralhome.com.
Rose Marie Gerrity
April 15, 2011
Mary U. Far-
rell, of Duryea,
died April 19,
2011, at theMer-
cy Hospice
Unit. She was
the widow of
WilliamFarrell.
Born November 15, 1913, she
was a daughter of the late Paul and
MaryFitzpatrickUrban. Shewasa
graduateofEast StroudsburgState
College and was an elementary
teacher for over 40 years in Du-
ryea, Northeast, and Pittston Area
school districts. She was an active
member of Sacred Heart Church
in Duryea for many years taking
care of the altar, teaching CCD,
singing in the choir and participa-
ting in first communion training,
May Crowning, and the church
picnic. She was also active in
bowlingandlocal musical groups.
She was preceded in death by a
son, Michael; a sister, Cecelia
Mullaly; and brothers, Aloysius,
Paul, and Joseph Urban.
Surviving are many nieces and
nephews.
The funeral will be held Mon-
day at 10 a.m. with Mass of Chris-
tian Burial at Sacred Heart
Church, Stephenson Street, Du-
ryea. Interment St. Mary’s Ceme-
tery, Avoca.
Memorials may be made to the
Mercy Hospice, 746 Jefferson
Ave., Scranton, 18501.
Mary U. Farrell
April 19, 2011
John Peter
Farrell, 46, of
Lakeside Drive
in Harveys
Lake, diedApril
15, 2011.
Born July 2,
1964, in Wilkes-Barre, he was a
son of the late John Patrick and
MaryMcCallickFarrell. He was a
graduate of E.L. Meyers High
School, class of 1982, and Lu-
zerne County Community Col-
lege. Employed by the Wilkes-
Barre Area School District for 25
years, hewasheadcustodianat the
district administration building.
He served as vice-president of the
Lake-Lehman School Board and
as a member of the Joint Operat-
ing Committee of the West Side
Career and Technology Center.
He was first vice-president of the
Harveys Lake Lions Club, Chap-
lain of the Sons of the American
Legion Squadron 967, PSEA
Union Shop Steward and a com-
municant at Our Lady of Victory
Church.
He is surviving by his wife, the
former Lorraine Schriver; son
Christopher; sister, Mary Bridget
Farrell Michael and her husband,
CaptainFrankMichael, USN, and
their children, John, Mary and El-
izabeth of San Diego, Calif.; and
mother-in-lawMaryLouSchriver
of Pittston.
A Celebration of Life was held
April 20fromMcLaughlin’s Fam-
ilyFuneral Service, Wilkes-Barre,
withfuneral MassintheChurchof
St. Aloysius. Interment St. Mary’s
Cemetery in Hanover Township.
Online condolences can be left at
www.celebratehislife.com.
John P. Farrell
April 15, 2011
Millie B. Cumbo, 93, of West
Pittston died April 23, 2011 at the
home of her daughter inHarding.
Born in Pittston on October 8,
1917, she was the daughter of the
late Salvatore and Josephine Bur-
gio.
She was a graduate of Pittston
High School and was employed in
the local garment industry. She
was a member of Immaculate
ConceptionChurch, WestPittston;
its Altar and Rosary Society and
the Morning Prayer Group. She
wasalsoamember of theILGWU.
She was also preceded in death
by her husband, Michael Cumbo;
son-in-law, Joseph Vavrek; broth-
ers, David, Angelo, Joseph, Mi-
chael and Leonard; sisters, Rose,
Mary, Lena, Connie andNina.
Surviving are her daughter,
Phyllis Vavrek, Harding; son, Pat
Cumbo and his wife, Joyce, Vir-
ginia; grandchildren, Pat Cumbo;
Gina Windham; SamCumbo; Jo-
seph Vavrek; Michele Ondish and
Michael Vavrek; great-grandchil-
dren, Devan, Rachel, James, Jo-
seph, Matthew, Diane, Andrew,
Nicholas, Jacob, HaleyandAlexa;
numerous nieces andnephews.
FuneralserviceswillbeTuesday
at 9:30 a.m. fromthe Peter J. Ado-
nizio Funeral Home, 802 Susque-
hanna Ave., West Pittston with a
Mass of ChristianBurial at10a.m.
inCorpus Christi Parish, Immacu-
late Conception Church, Luzerne
Avenue, West Pittston.
Interment, Mt.Olivet Cemetery,
Carverton. Friends may call Tues-
day morning from 8-9:30 a.m. at
the funeral home. On-line condo-
lences maybe made atwww.peter-
jadoniziofuneralhome.com.
Millie B. Cumbo
April 23, 2011
Michael E. Keating, Pittston,
died April 21, 2011in the Golden
Living Center, Plains Twp.
Born in Bayonne, NJ, he was
the son of Michael and Rose Fal-
ternan Keating. He served in the
US Army during World War II
andworkedas a truckdriver until
his retirement.
He was preceded in death by
his sisters, Rose Marie Keating
and Patricia DeWitt.
Surviving are brothers, Jack,
Brick, NJ and Eddie, Las Vegas,
NV; nieces and nephews.
Funeral arrangements by the
Ruane and Regan Funeral
Home, Pittston.
Michael E. Keating
April 21, 2011
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our
Comfortable payment within your budget
Control your financing to reduce stress
Certainty about what your payment will be
Concentrate on shopping for your new vehicle, not on financing
Carefee shopping since you will be prepared
Crush dealer rate with our “Meet or Beat Program”
Competition for the dealer to offer the best rate
Clarity of mind by focusing on the our-the-door price and buying like
you have cash-in-mind
C M Y K
SUNDAY DISPATCH SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2011 PAGE 1B
Social Section
Inside
Brides .................................1
Birthdays............................3
Schools...........................4-8
Classified......................9-16
S E C T I O N B
➛ S O C I A L
P
aul and Catherine Matreselva of Swoyersville celebrated
their 30th wedding anniversary on April 25.
Catherine is the daughter of Amy George and the late
Michael A. George of Wilkes-Barre. Paul is the son of Angelina
Matreselva and the late Joseph Matreselva of Wyoming.
They were married on April 25, 1981 at Saint George’s Maro-
nite Church, Wilkes-Barre, Pa. Paul is employed as the manager
of Burger King in Pittston. Catherine is recently retired from the
Department of Veteran’s Affairs Medical Center, Wilkes-Barre.
The Matreselva’s were blessed with their son Paul. Atrip to the
Bahamas is planned.
Catherine and Paul Matreselva
30th Anniversary
H
oly Name St. Mary’s Church, Swoyersville was the set-
ting, November 6, 2010 for the wedding of Sara Chis-
dock, Moosic and Ryan Hogan, Forty Fort.
The bride is the daughter of John and Mary Theresa Chisdock,
Moosic. The bridegroom is the son of John and Georgia Hogan,
Forty Fort.
The Rev. Louis Grippe officiated at the 2 p.m. ceremony. Cris-
tin Hogan, Dupont, sister of the bride was matron of honor. Bri-
desmaids were Stephanie Bojnowski, Maryland; Kara Corbett,
Exeter; Mary Kate Hodowarac, Philadelphia; Tara Hummel,
Drexel Hill; Tara Crofton, Plains; ElizabethTracyJones, Pittston;
Ann Marie Morreale, Dupont and Stephanie Ramsky, Duryea. all
friends of the bride.
William Smith, Forty Fort, friend of the bridegroom was best
man. Ushers were John Hogan, Dupont; Michael Hogan, Plains;
Kevin Hogan, Forty Fort, brother of the groom; Matthew Chis-
dock, Camp Hill, brother of the bride; John Smutko, West Ches-
ter, cousin of the groom; Erik Davidson, South Abington; James
Gurnari, Maryland and Joshua Hook, Swoyersville, all friends of
the groom. A cocktail hour and reception was held at the Via
Appia, Taylor.
The bride is a graduate of Seton Catholic High School. She
earned a Bachelor’s degree in Business Management from East
Stroudsburg University and a Master’s degree in Business Ad-
ministration from Wilkes University. Sara is employed as the
Customer Service Manager at Lord and Taylor.
The bridegroomis a graduate of Bishop O’Reilly High School.
He earned a Bachelor’s degree in Criminal Justice from King’s
College. Ryan is employed at Wyoming Valley Drug and Alco-
hol. The bride was honored at a shower at the Green Ridge Club,
Scranton by her attendants. The parents of the groom hosted the
rehearsal party at The Cafe on 315.
The couple honeymooned in the Dominican Republic.
Mr. and Mrs. Ryan Hogan
United in Marriage
F
red and Jean Marie Hoover are celebrating their 40th wed-
ding anniversary today, Easter Sunday. The couple was
married April 24, 1971 in Sacred heart of Jesus Church,
Duryea, bythe late Rev. Dr. Francis Mikus. There attendants were
Kathy (Kotula) Kimmel, Francis Hoover, Mary Lou (Hoover)
Radnovich (deceased), Ray Haduck, Cheryl (Judge) Goul and
Carl Swiderski (deceased). Cathy (Jezorwski) Breymeier was the
flower girl and PJ Connolly served as the ring bearer.
Fred is the son of the late Fred, Sr and Ann Hoover of Shaver-
town. He is retired from RCA, Dunmore and PennDot, Wilkes-
Barre. Jean Marie is the daughter of the late John and Marie Chi-
lekof Duryea. She is employedas a Sr. Buyer byIntegratedPower
Designs, Hanover Industrial Park, Wilkes-Barre.
The couple’s marriage has been blessed with three children,
Jeff and his girlfriend, Tara Vols; Mark and Melissa. The grand-
children are Jeffrey Bennett (J.B.) Hoover and Elizabeth (Libby)
Williams, all of Duryea.
AMass of Thanksgiving will be celebrated today at Nativity of
Our Parish (Sacred Heart of Jesus) Duryea. A family dinner will
mark the occasion.
Fred and Jean Marie Hoover
40th Anniversary
K
rystle Cardamone and Adam Kowalczyk were united in
marriage by Father John O’Bell on November 13, 2010 at
the Church of Holy Redeemer in Falls.
The bride is the daughter of GaryandPatricia Cardamone, Bear
Creek. She is the granddaughter of the late James and Jessie Car-
damone, Wilkes-Barre and the late Walter and Anna Zelenick,
Plains. The groomis the son of Ann Marie Kowalczyk, Exeter, Pa
and the late Stanley Serino and Anna Serino-Davis of Pittston Pa.
The bride was given in marriage by her father and chose her
sister Patricia Rutkowski, as matron of honor, and her sister Co-
lette Yaronski, as maid of honor. Bridesmaids were Caroline Kre-
seski, cousin of the groom, Chelsea Rutkowski, niece of the bride
and Stacy White, friend of the bride and groom. The junior bri-
desmaid was Kira Meager, cousin of the groom.
The groom chose his cousin Donald Kreseski as his best man.
Groomsmen were Robert Rutkowski, brother-in-lawof the bride,
GaryCardamone, brother of thebride, KevinCardamone, brother
of the bride and Fred White, friend of the bride and groom. The
junior groomsman was Jacob Rutkowski, nephew of the bride.
An evening cocktail hour and reception was held at the Irem
CountryClub, Dallas. Arehearsal dinner was givenbythe mother
of the groom the previous evening at Marianacci’s Restaurant,
Wyoming. The bride was honored with a bridal shower given by
her mother at the Ramada Inn, Wilkes-Barre.
The bride is a 2001graduate of Coughlin High School, Wilkes-
Barre and a 2005 graduate of King’s College, Wilkes-Barre
where she earned a Bachelor’s degree in Criminal Justice and
Psychology. She is employed as an Adult Probation and Parole
Officer.
The groomis a 1999 graduate of Wyoming Area High School,
Exeter and a 2004 graduate of Wilkes University, Wilkes-Barre,
where he earned a Bachelor’s degree in Political Science. He is
employed as a Pennsylvania State Police Trooper.
Mr. and Mrs. AdamKowalczyk
United in Marriage
M
ichael Edward Baldwin and Stacy Lorraine Hartung, to-
gether with their families announce their engagement
and approaching marriage.
Thebride-to-beisthedaughter of LorrainePark, Bradenton, Flor-
ida. Stacy is a 1998 graduate of Tamaqua Area High School and
earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in Psychology fromBloomsburg
University in 2002 and a Master of Science in Secondary School
Counseling at Marywood University in 2006. She is employed by
Community Care Behavioral Health, Moosic, as a Quality Clini-
cian. She is also a National Certified Counselor.
The prospective groomis the son of Joan Baldwin, Avoca. He is
the grandson of the late Mary Bennett, Avoca. Michael is a g1996
graduateof PittstonAreaHighSchool. HeisemployedbyGeisinger
Medical Center, Glenmaura as a Quality Assurance Supervisor.
The couple will exchange vows September 10, 2011 aboard the
Carnival Liberty in Miami, Florida.
Stacy Hartung and Michael Baldwin
Engaged to Wed
Four generations recently
gathered for the celebration of
great grandmother, Ann Cod-
ick’s 84th birthday.
Shownare SeanAnthonyDe-
Santo, father of Madeline Ann
DeSanto now 10 months old;
Ann Codick and Christine De-
Santo.
Four
Generations
Holy Redeemer High School’s
Royal Players will present two
plays, Lawand Order: Fairy Tale
Unit and The Seussification of
Romeo and Juliet on Friday and
Saturday, May 6 and 7 at 7 p.m.
Both plays are comedies that
combine TV’s LawandOrder se-
ries, William Shakespeare, and
Dr. Seuss. Law and order: Fairy
Tale Unit presents the stories of
the fairy tale characters who rep-
resent the police who investigate
fairy tale crimes, as well as the
district attorneys who prosecute
the fairy tale offenders. A crime
of epic proportions has been
committed in a land far, far away,
and characters like Pinocchio
and the Seven Dwarfs are among
the suspects.
The Seussification of Romeo
and Juliet answers the question
of what would result if William
Shakespeare and Theodor Seuss
Geisel (Dr. Seuss) collaborated
ona play. This reinventionof Ro-
meoandJuliet combines rhymed
couplets, creative wordplay, and
fantastical machines to present a
whimsical take on the classic
play. The plays are under the di-
rection of Mr. Michael Stofko.
Admission donation is $5 for
adults and$3for students andse-
nior citizens. Tickets may be ob-
tained at the door.
Holy Redeemer H.S. to
perform plays in May
C M Y K
PAGE 2B SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2011 SUNDAY DISPATCH
➛ S O C I A L
Fr. Phil Massetti is pleased
to announce that the 17th An-
nual Mt.Carmel/St.Rocco’s
Golf Tournament will be held
on Sunday June 12 at the
Wilkes-Barre Municipal golf
course in Bear Creek. This
year’s outing Tournament
sponsor is Charles Sciandra,
President of CAS Strategic
Consulting. The Peter J. Ado-
nizio Funeral Home and Al-
bert B. Melone Co., CPA firm,
and the Saporito, Sapotiro and
Falcone Law firm will once
again provide Corporate Spon-
sorship for the tournament.
Registration forms will be
available at the Rectory and in
the back of, both, Mt. Carmel
and St. Rocco’s churches. An-
other feature of the tourna-
ment will be new car lease
from Coccia Ford.
Pictured above are Jason
Eike, John Bingham, Fr. Phil
Massetti, OSJ, Charles Scian-
dra, and Frank Sciabacucchi.
Golf committee members mis-
sing from the photo are Ken
Augustine, Larry Piazza, Jack
Casper, and Emory Guffrov-
ich.
Mt. Carmel/St/ Rocco’s Golf
Tournament set for June 12
The Back Mountain Police
Association held a coat drive for
their Warm Coats for Kids Pro-
gram and donated a portion of
the coats received to the Greater
Pittston Kids Closet. The Kids
Closet is part of the Care and
Concern Ministry of St. John the
Evangelist parish community
and is open to the public on
Wednesdays 9 – 11:30 and 5 – 7
p.m.
The closet is located in the for-
mer Seton Catholic High School
on William Street, Pittston. Do-
nations of new or gently used
clothing are accepted during
closet hours or can be dropped
off at the parish office.
Pictured is Mary Ann Speece,
closet volunteer and Bob Sabol,
Back Mountain Police Associ-
ation.
Back Mountain Police Assoc.
donates to Kids Closet
Alumni, staff and students
of Luzerne County Commu-
nity College met recently on
the College’s basketball
court in the 24th annual
alumni vs. students/staff bas-
ketball game. The alumni
team came away with a 54-
53 victory over the student/
staff team.
Pictured in top photo are
members of the alumni team.
In first row, from left are
Melissa Taney ‘03, Nanti-
coke, president, LCCC
Alumni Association; Mary
Sullivan, Swoyersville, di-
rector, student life and ath-
letics, LCCC; Joseph Mal-
strom ‘09, Hunlock Creek;
Ben Pozniak ‘08, Tunkhan-
nock; Dan Blaser ‘07, Hazle-
ton; Francis Curry ‘71, Forty
Fort; Henry Hunsinger ‘98,
Hunlock Creek; Bonnie
Brennan Lauer ‘87, Shaver-
town, director, alumni rela-
tions, LCCC; and Teddi Ja-
nosov, Sheatown, secretary,
student life and athletics,
LCCC.
Second row: Ed Hennigan
‘95, Wyoming, assistant di-
rector, admissions, LCCC;
Jim Domzalski, Mountain
Top; John Belak ‘88, Hazle-
ton; Phil Woods ‘96, Wilkes-
Barre Township; Dan Yacu-
lak ‘09, Drums; Dave Wasi-
lewski, Hunlock Creek; Bob
Shoemaker ‘98, Hanover
Township; and Russell Keel-
er ‘91, Kingston, immediate
past president, LCCC Alum-
ni Association.
In bottom photo are mem-
bers of the student/staff
team. In first row are Teddi
Janosov, Sheatown, secreta-
ry, student life and athletics,
LCCC; J.C. Hyncinthe,
Kingston; Dirk Saar, Wilkes-
Barre; Antoni Lakkis,
Plains; Eoin Ellis, Harveys
Lake; Brandon Owens, King-
ston; Darian Twyman,
Wilkes-Barre; Eli Amick,
Bloomsburg; and Mary Sul-
livan, Swoyersville, director,
student life and athletics,
LCCC.
Second row -- Matt Luca-
rino, Harveys Lake; Bruce
Mosier, Lake Silkworth;
Mike Meyhoff, Dupont; Eric
Warner, Hunlock Creek;
Bernie Moska; Pittston; Sa-
meal Hill, Wilkes-Barre;
Scott Knox, Wilkes-Barre;
and Ross M. Wayman,
Wilkes-Barre.
LCCC holds annual
basketball game
On March 26, the youth group
of St. Monica’s of the Wyomings
participated in the Bowl for Big
Brothers/Big Sisters event held
at Stanton Lanes in Wilkes-
Barre. The youth group raised
over $200 for the charity.
Pictured in the first row are
Michelle Stark, Hallie Stark, and
Amber Rodda. Back row: Jared
Saporito, Greg Cajka, Rachael
Stark, and Chuck Stark.
St. Monica’s Youth Group
participates in bowling event
Duryea Cub Scout Pack
375 held their Derby Day at
the Sacred Heart Hall and
winners of the Raingutter
Regatta and Pinewood Derby
are shown in the first row.
First place: Michael Renna -
Raingutter Regatta; Second
place Raingutter Regatta and
Best Looking Boat A.J. Han-
do, IV; Third place - Lars
Thomas; Raingutter Regatta
Alternate and First Place
Pinewood Derby - Jacob
Giardina.
Second row: Anthony Ra-
nieli, Kyle Skutack, Tristian
Kwaitkowski, Third place
Pinewood Derby - James
Wilk, Alternate-Brandon
Mickaviz and Joseph Ranie-
li. Best looking car went to
Jacob Semon. Absent from
the photo was Frank Lyons
and Billy Bonczek.
Boy Scout Troop 285 pro-
vided refreshments, lane as-
sistants and judges for the
derby. Jerry Wozniak was the
chief mechanic for the
scouts. Each scout received a
participation ribbon, pocket
card and certificate. Winners
received medals and certif-
icates and the trophies will
be presented at the Blue and
Gold Banquet on April 17 at
the Duryea V.F.W.
Duryea Cub Scout Pack
375 holds Derby Day
C M Y K
SUNDAY DISPATCH SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2011 PAGE 3B
➛ B I R T H D A Y S
Stop by or mail your birthday photo to:
The Sunday Dispatch
109 New Street
Pittston, PA18640
Pictures can run in black and white for $2 or color for $10.
Deadline is Wednesday at 5 p.m., but space is limited, so pictures
will be published on a first-come, first-served basis. Any ques-
tions, please call 602-0168.
Happy Birthday!
Checks can be made payable to The Sunday Dispatch.
Emily Ruth Griglock,
daughter of Joseph and
Holly Griglock of Laflin,
will be celebrating her
third birthday on April
28. She is also a big sister
to her brother, Ethan (six
months old.)
She is the granddaught-
er of Donald Rau and the
late Ruth Rau, Wilkes-
Barre, and Anthony and
Eleanor Griglock of Jen-
kins Township.
Emily Griglock
Nora James Krenit-
sky, daughter of Susan
and Jamie Krenitsky of
Old Forge, celebrated
her fourth birthday on
April 19. Her sister
Emma celebrated her
fifth birthday on Feb-
ruary.
Nora is the grand-
daughter of Cindy and
Carl Stromwall and
Madeline and Philip
Krenitsky and great
granddaughter of Nata-
lie and Harold Maik-
ranz.
Nora Krenitsky
Tanner Stephen Cappel-
lini, sonof BrianandNata-
lie Cappellini of Gilbert,
Arizona, is celebrating his
tenth birthday on Monday,
April 25.
Tanneristhegrandsonof
Edolo and Norma Cappel-
lini of West Wyoming, and
Jerry and Margene Mich-
nal of Tempe, Arizona.
Tanner is infourthgrade
andhisfavoritesubjectsare
math and science. He en-
joys playing flag football,
ridinghis bike, andplaying
Wii withhisfriends. Tocel-
ebrate his birthday, he is
having a Mario themed
party
Tanner Cappellini
Lily Madelyn Kasa,
daughter of Chris and
Jacki Kasa, Wyoming is
celebrating her fourth
birthday today.
Lilyisthegranddaught-
er of Rick and Cindy Hi-
zynski, WyomingandCa-
ry and Donna Kasa, Sus-
con. She is the great
granddaughter of Mary
Hizynski, Exeter andGlo-
ria Costello, Dupont.
Lily has an awesome
big sister, Maya Lauren,
eight years old and is in
nursery school at Cookie
Corner. She will be cele-
brating her birthday with
a Drive-in Movie Party.
Lily Kasa
Joshua R. Kollar, sonof
Sandra S. and Randall C.
Kollar of Mountain Top,
is celebrating his seventh
birthday on April 30.
Joshua is the grandson
of Beverly and Jack Se-
vernak of West Wyoming
and the late Andrew C.
and Teresa L. Kollar of
Mountain Top.
Joshua is a first grade
student at Fairview Ele-
mentary and a Tiger
Scout in Pack106, Moun-
tain Top. He will cele-
brate his birthday at the
movies with his family
and friends.
Joshua Kollar
Grace Jeffery, daughter
of Paul and Nancy Jeffery
of Wyoming, celebrated
her 10th birthday on April
30.
Grace is the grand-
daughter of Allan and
Shirley Larnerd of Du-
pont and Ron and Ruth
Ann Jeffery of Forty Fort.
Grace is a fourth grade
student at Wyoming Ar-
ea’s 10th Street Elemen-
tary.
Grace Jeffery
AdamAndrewChase and AndrewBrady Chase, sons of Adam
and Sharon Chase, Old Forge, are celebrating their birthdays this
month. Adamwill be12 years old on April 27 and Andrewturned
four years old on April 23.
They are the grandchildren of Bill and Mary Kay Brady, Du-
ryea and Ralph and Ethel Chase, Old Forge.
Parties will be held in their honor.
Adam and Andrew Chase
Campbell Benjamin
Schumann will celebrate
his first birthday on April
30. Campbell is the son of
Peggy (Agolino) Schu-
mann and Christian
Schumann, Melrose,
Massachusetts.
He is the grandson of
Ann and Santo Agolino,
Wyoming and Walter and
Paula Schumann, King of
Prussia.
Campbell has a brother,
Christian, who is two and
a half years old.
Campbell
Schumann
Jeffrey S. Ross Jr. cele-
brated his fifth birthday
on April 21. Jeffrey is the
son of Jeff and Alyson
Ross, Pittston.
His grandparents are
Mike and Liz Ross, Pitt-
ston; Joyce Pisano, Du-
ryea and John Pisano,
Dupont.
Jeffrey Ross
Kasey Joyce Morreale,
daughter of Michelle Gavi-
gan and Dominick Mor-
reale, Pittston, celebrated
her first birthday on April
7.
Kasey is the grand-
daughter of Patricia and
Gerard Gavigan, Pittston
and Dominick and the late
Joyce Morreale, Pittston.
She is the great grand-
daughter of Connie Battis-
ta, Pittston, Mary Gavigan,
Pittston and Dominick
Morreale, Exeter.
Kasey has an older
brother, Justin.
Kasey Morreale
Callisandra Elizabeth
Ardoline, daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Robert and Lau-
rie Ardoline of Chester
Springs, celebrated her
fifth birthday on April 1.
Maternal grandparents
are Mr. and Mrs. Vincent
and Barbara O’Hop of
Hughestown. Paternal
grandparents are Mrs.
Louis Ardoline of West
Pittston and the late Mi-
chael Ardoline.
Callie takes ballet les-
sons through the Brandy-
wine Center for the Per-
forming Arts and will at-
tend St. Elizabeth’s in the
fall. She has a brother Mi-
chael whowill turnone inJune.
Callisandra Ardoline
Emilee Shaw, daughter of
Ron and Patti Shaw of Duryea,
is celebrating her eighth
birthday today, April 24.
Emilee is the grand-
daughter of Patrick and Jo-
sephine Dowd, Duryea;
Cheryl Misstishin, Potts-
ville and Ron Shaw Sr.,
Claymont, DE. She is the
great granddaughter of Ida
Giamber, Duryea and the
late Joseph Giamber; the
late Anna Dowd, Pittston
and the late Patrick Dowd,
Tarrytown, NY; Faith Kay-
lan, St. Clair and the late
Joseph Kaylan.
Emilee is a second grade
student at Pittston Area.
She is also a competitive
dance student at the Pitt-
ston David Blight School of
Dance where she studies tap,
jazz, hip hop and lyrical dance.
A party was held in her honor.
Emilee Shaw
Gianna Armitage,
daughter of Amber and
Joseph Armitage of
Dupont, celebrated her
third birthday on April
16.
Gianna is the grand-
daughter of Diane Al-
ba and Thomas
O’Brien, Hughestown
and Michael Alba of
Benton. Parental
grandparents are Jo-
seph Armitage of Pitt-
ston and Sharon Ar-
mitage also of Pittston.
Gianna has a brother
Joe, five years old. Her
mom the former Am-
ber Alba will celebrate
her 30th birthday on
April 25.
Gianna Armitage
Selena Ann Forlenza cele-
brated her ninth birthday on
April 7. She is the daughter of
Albert and Gina Forlenza of
West Pittston.
Selena attends third grade
at Montgomery Avenue in
Wyoming Area School Dis-
trict. She is the grand-
daughter of John and Do-
reen Lamela of Sweet Valley
and Albert and Kathy For-
lenza of West Pittston. Sele-
na is the great granddaught-
er of Julia Boyer of Missou-
ri, Manuela Lamela of New
Jersey and Jule Bianco of
West Pittston.
Selena has a younger
brother, Anthony. Selena
plays softball for the West Pitt-
ston Little League, attends
gymnastic classes at the YM-
CA, and is a girl scout for
Troop 30217.
Selena Forlenza
Bianca Lauren Mazza-
rella, daughter of Joseph
and Tiziana Mazzarella,
Pittston, will celebrate her
tenth birthday on Thursday,
April 28.
Bianca is the grand-
daughter of Mary Alice
Mazzarella, Exeter and Gi-
useppe and Elvira Rinaldis,
Selinsgrove.
Bianca is a fourth grade
student at Wyoming Area
Catholic School, Exeter.
She has a sister, Alexia,
who is thirteen years old.
Bianca
Mazzarella
J.C. Salvo, son of
Chuck and Kristen
Salvo, Washington,
DC, celebrated his
first birthday on Sat-
urday, April 23.
JC is the grandson
of Jim and Debbie
Stripling, Newnan,
Georgia and Pearl Sal-
vo, Hughestown and
Charles Salvo, Dun-
more. JC has a sister
Frace who will be
three years old on
May 28.
A party will be held
at his home in Wash-
ington DC.
J.C. Salvo
C M Y K
PAGE 4B SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2011 SUNDAY DISPATCH
➛ S C H O O L S
Real Estate Briefs
–– Prepared by The Times Leader Advertising Department
Jonathan Nelson, REALTOR
®
Joins
Lewith & Freeman Real Estate
Virginia Rose, President of Lewith & Freeman Real Estate is pleased to
announce Jonathan Nelson recently joined the Lewith & Freeman Sales Team
in the Kingston Office. Jonathan is an accomplished real estate professional
whose achievements have earned him recognition as an award winning Top
Producer, with over $30,000,000 in career sales. Virginia Rose stated, “Jona-
than’s extensive sales experience combined with his focus on customer ser-
vice are the keys to his success in assisting Buyers and Sellers in the Market
Place.”
A veteran of the US Navy spending time in 9 countries promoting peace
and participating in the Somalia Conflict earned him 5 medals. Professionally
Jonathan is a member of the Greater Wilkes Barre Board of Realtors, the National Association of Realtors
and the Pennsylvania Association of Realtors.
Jonathan is a lifetime resident of Greater Pittston, currently residing in West Wyoming with his wife
Melissa, and his children Matthew, Patrick, and Emily.
Jonathan wants everyone to know that he is a versatile, results oriented, real estate professional who
demonstrates excellent customer service, business acumen and strategic planning ability to get the job
done in the buying and selling process. He is armed with solid communication and interpersonal skills
which have enabled him to establish and maintain rapport with hundreds of clients for over a decade.
Since 1921, Lewith & Freeman Real Estate has worked to establish a tradition of excellence in real estate in
Northeastern Pennsylvania. Today, they are the largest independent real estate company in Luzerne County
representing both buyers and sellers in nearly $200 million of real estate transactions each year. More than 100
Lewith & Freeman Real Estate professionals serve the area from offices in Kingston, Shavertown, Mountain
Top, Drums, Wilkes-Barre and Clarks Summit. They are the only local real estate company to have the distinc-
tion of representing Christie’s Great Estates, a subsidiary of Christie’s Auction House that represents important
properties throughout the world.
(Visit Jonathan’s page on the Lewith & Freeman website at www.lewith-freeman.com)
S C H O O L M E N U S
School menus for the weekof
April 24
Pittston Area
Kindergarten, Primary and
Intermediate Centers
Monday –No School
Tuesday –Chicken nuggets, or
grilled cheese sandwich, green
beans, peach crisp, low fat milk.
Breakfast: Ham, egg and cheese
on bagel 100%fruit juice, lowfat
milk
Wednesday –Hot turkey sand-
wich or bacon cheeseburger,
mashed potatoes & gravy, pears,
low fat milk. Breakfast: Pan-
cakes with syrup 100% fruit
juice, low fat milk.
Thursday –Italian dunkers
with marinara sauce or chicken
patty on bun, peas, mixed fruit,
low fat milk, Breakfast: Scram-
bled eggs & toast 100% fruit
juice, low fat milk
Friday -Macaroni & cheese or
hot dogonbun, corn, apple slices
with cinnamon, low fat milk
Weekly choices -chicken
wrap, Chef salad, ham and
cheese sandwich ,Italian hoagie.
plain pizza available daily.
Breakfast available daily - As-
sorted whole grain cereals w/
toast, breakfast pizza, buttered
toast.
Middle and High Schools
Monday –No School
Tuesday–Popcorn chicken
bowl, bread slice, mashed pota-
toes &gravy, corn, pears, lowfat
milk.
Wednesday –Roasted turkey
and gravy, stuffing, bread slice,
carrots, apple crisp, low fat milk
Thursday –Cheese dunkers
with marinara sauce, peas,
mixed fruit, oatmeal cookie, low
fat milk
Friday –Italian baked chicken,
dinner roll, green beans, manda-
rin oranges, low fat milk
Daily at High School - Favor-
ites - Plain Pizza. -
Grill Specials - Cheeseburg-
ers, Buffalo chicken patties, Pa-
nini Sandwiches, grilled chicken
patties and chicken fajita
Deli Specials: Salad assorted
"made to order" hoagies and
wraps.
Daily at Middle School - Fa-
vorites - Plain Pizza;
Grill Specials - Cheeseburg-
ers, hot dogs, Buffalo chicken
patties, grilled chicken patties
and chicken fajita.
Deli Specials - salads, assorted
hoagies and wraps.
This weeks specials: High and
Middle Schools-
Pizza
Monday -Hot chicken wing
Tuesday and Thursday -Pep-
peroni
Wednesday -Fresh tomato
white pizza
Friday -Hot chicken wing
Weekly specials: High School
- Panini
Monday -steak and cheese
Tuesday -Hot chicken &
cheese
Wednesday -Ham and cheese
Thursday -Hot chicken &
cheese
Friday - Turkey and cheddar
Monday -Egg &cheese on ba-
gel or French toast sticks with
syrup
Tuesday-Sausage &cheese on
English muffin or scrambled
eggs with toast
Wednesday - Pancakes with
syrup or egg, bacon and cheese
on bagel.
Thursday – Breakfast pizza or
egg and cheese on bagel
Friday –Waffles with syrup or
ham and cheese on bagel
Wyoming Area
Elementary
Monday-No School - Easter
Vacation .
Tuesday-New mini corn dogs,
or cheeseburger on bun, baked
beans, golden sweet corn, sliced
peaches. Alternate Cheese sand-
wich or PBJ or 4 oz yogurt and
Animal Crackers all w/choice of
string cheese or sunflower seeds
Breakfast-Scrambledeggs w/ba-
con, toast, fruit juice, milk
Wednesday -Popcorn chicken,
bread, mashed potatoes/gravy,
garden peas Ycarrots, chocolate
pudding. Alternate entrée
Cheese sandwich or PBJ or 4 oz
yogurt and Animal Crackers all
w/choice of string cheese or sun-
flower seeds. Breakfast: Warm
pizza slice, cereal, juice, milk
Thursday -Taco w/beef,
cheese, lettuce & tomato or
cheeseburger on bun, green
beans, seasoned rice, mixed
fruit. Alternate entrée Cheese
sandwich or PBJ or 4 oz yogurt
and Animal Crackers all w/
choice of string cheese or sun-
flower seeds. Breakfast: Bagel
w/jelly, juice, milk
Friday -BBQ rib-a-que, or
grilled cheese sandwich, French
fries, tomato soup, saltine crack-
ers, applesauce, oatmeal cookie.
Alternate entrée Cheese sand-
wich or PBJ or 4 oz yogurt and
Animal Crackers all w/choice of
string cheese or sunflower seeds.
Breakfast: French toast w/syrup,
bagel w/jelly, cereal, juice, milk.
Secondary Center
Monday- No School - Easter
Vacation
Tuesday- A. White French
bread pizza. B. Chipotle burger
w/ lettuce. C. Chicken fajita w/
lettuce, tomato, salsa, sour
cream. D. Rib-a-que, cheese-
burger or chicken patty on bun.
Sides: Tossed salad w/dressing,
tortilla chips/salsa, juice peach-
es.
Wednesday -A. Baked pop-
corn chicken, bread. B. Chicken
Caesar wrap. C. Hot pork sand-
wich. D. Rib-a-que, cheeseburg-
er or chickenpattyonbun. Sides:
Peas and carrots, mashed pota-
toes/gravy, chocolate pudding.
Thursday - A. Meatball hoagie
w/mozzarella cheese. B. Taco
bowl w/beef, rice, corn tortilla
chips, cheese, topping. C. Tur-
key bacon, cheese & lettuce
wrap. D. Rib-a-que, cheeseburg-
er or chickenpattyonbun. Sides:
A,C, D, green beans, baked pota-
to wedges, mixed fruit.
Friday -A. Buffalo chicken or
cheese pizza. B. Bosco sticks w/
marinara sauce. C. Pierogies,
bread. .D. Rib-a-que, cheese-
burger or chicken patty on bun.
Sides: Tossed salad/dressing,
crispy baked colossal fries, ap-
plesauce.
Christopher Thomas,
OFHS Principal, has an-
nounced the third quarter
honor roll for the students at
Old Forge High School for
the 2010-2011 school year.
Twelfth Grade
Deion Aldubayan, Andrea
Alsalahat, Taylor Bennett,
Alexis Benson, Dana Bilski,
Sabrina Brunozzi, Jessica
Casey , Ashley Cesare, An-
gelo Conforti, Kiel Eigen,
Alexander Enciso, Dominic
Eremo, Joshua Evarts, Sarah
Fish, Connor Fultz, Rebecca
Godusky, Anthony Goodall,
Allison Grevera, Alexandra
Herron, Christopher Herron,
Melissa Hiller, Tianna Lette-
ri, Michael Long, Nicole
Marianelli, Mario Martinelli,
Joseph Mascaro, Alivia Mat-
tioli, Timothy McGrath, De-
siree Mead, Kara Nunes,
Brian Palma, Kenneth Paul-
ish, Ariane Pepsin, Lindsay
Regan, Giovanni Ripa, Ni-
cole Rutledge, Ryan Scime-
ca, Jason Sniegowski, Bran-
don Souryavong, Maria Ta-
larico, Bradley Vender, and
Emani Wallace.
Eleventh Grade
Kerri Alexander, John Ar-
gonish, David Argust, Britta-
ny Baron, Adam Barsigian,
Jameel Bowen, Corinne
Breymeier, Nichole Burk-
hart, Colin Carey, Briah Car-
ling, Emily Celli, Joseph Ci-
uccio, Haley Colarusso, An-
thony Conforti, Elissa Datti-
lo, Sara Dukauskas,, Louis
Febbo, Joseph Fortini, An-
thony Fumanti, Michelle
Giacometti, Brandon Glea-
son, Victoria Graham, Ni-
cholas Grevera, Nina Grippo,
Dylan Harrison, Kelly Kem-
pa, Shana Kwiatkowski, John
Licciardone, Morgan Malia,
Sara Manso, Alexa Marcin-
ko, Natalie Mischello, Ian
Nemetz, Corey Palma, Mark
Panusky, Gabriella Papi, Ma-
ria Perrone, Michael Phan,
Marisa Pherreigo, Stephanie
Piccoletti, Ashley Salerno,
Mia Sallavanti, Philip Scavo,
James Sheedy, Jessica Ship-
toski, Brendan Stinson,
Christopher Talipski, Joshua
Tisdel, Anthony Trotta, Ceci-
ly Vega, Nicholas Vieira,
Kelci Wolfe, and Samantha
Ziemba.
Tenth Grade
Bryonna Aldubayan, Aria-
naArgust, Mia Baresse,
Briannan Budzak, Chelsea
Cadwalder, Kayla Chludzin-
ski, David Chromey, Antho-
ny DeSando, Derek Drasba,
Brian Finnerty, Elizabeth
Godusky, Nicholas Killino,
Mariah Kresefski, Daphne
Maeso, Nicole Mancuso,
Shauna Nunes, Anthony Pic-
colini, Kristen Pietryka,
Kimberly Regan, Nicole Ro-
berts, Brittany Souryavong,
Samantha Talarico, Vincent
Talarico, Warren Welsh, and
Melanie Wylam.
Ninth Grade
James Aversa, Rhyan Bar-
nic, Carla Bellenzeni, Jamie
Bennett, Troy Benson, Nata-
lie Bieryla, Gena Cadwalder,
Cassidy Califano, Lauren
Carey, Matthew Cesare,
Anne Cherundolo, Sarah
Cherundolo, Devin Chickey,
Austin Conforti, Rachel Co-
val, Courtney Enderline,
Kayla Florovito, Alexa Fur-
con, Kayleen Hutchinson,
Isiah Leepier, Jacob Manetti,
Stephen Mascaro, Stewart
Mitchell, Christian Mozeles-
ki, Christopher Muha, Taylor
Nemetz, Paul Papi, Jamie
Sacchetti, Gabriel Saucedo,
Jorden Sekol, Erica Stolan,
Teri Vieira, Brandon Yescav-
age and Marisa Zambetti.
Eighth Grade
Aisha Aldubayan, Reilly
Boyd, Alexandra Brown, An-
thony Cantarella, Cameron
Carpenter, Mary Cosentini,
Tiffany Dukauskas, Benja-
min Flowers, Matthew Gal-
lagher, Kayla Grasso, Eric
Grochowski, Justin Honick,
Janelle Jones, Jenna Loeffler,
Paul McCool, Nina Pascoli-
ni, Vienna Piazza, David Pie-
tryka, Robert Rinaldi, Corey
Souryavong, Nicole Tagia-
ferri, Sabrina Talarico, Vic-
toria Tansley, Brandon Va-
hey, Mark Voyack, Ryan
Voyack, and Kelci Yesnow-
ski.
Seventh Grade
Brendan Bordick-Lesav-
age, Kathryn Bound, Michael
Cantarella, Alexis Coval, An-
drea DeSando, Alexis DiGre-
gorio, Thomas Domozych,
Steven Farber, Matthew Foss,
Sara Fumanti, Meredith Gi-
glio, Kelcey Hill, Gerald
Hobbs, Taylor Hoover, Jaret
Horn, Amanda Jones, Mattia
Krappa, John Lee, Erika,
Licciardone, Taylor Marsico,
Noah Matsko, Christian
Mitchell, Marcus Pacheco,
Bobby Panek, Nicholas Pelo-
si, Melaina Pepsin, Trisha
Renna, John Roberts, Ar-
mando Sallavanti, Debra Se-
kol, Kailin Snyder, Amanda
Taylor, Daicia Tompkins, Ga-
brielle Verespey, Kara White,
Daniel Zaykowski, and Kim-
berly Ziemba.
Old Forge High School announces third quarter honor roll
Easter Vacation
Easter vacation is Monday,
April 25.
Science Fair
The annual Science Fair will
be held in the Intermediate Gym
on April 27 and 28. Parents are
invited from 6-7:30 p.m. on
April 28.
Band
The Intermediate Center Band
will be attending the Northeast-
ern, PA Philharmonic Young
People’s Concert on Wednesday
May 4 at 10 a.m. at the Scranton
Cultural Center.
Young Author’s Club
The Young Author’s Club will
hold a spelling bee for all inter-
ested Intermediate Center stu-
dents. The first round of the
spelling bee will consist of a 50
item multiple-choice test, and
the second round will consist of
spelling words aloud. Parents are
invited to the second round of
spelling words aloud on Thurs-
day, May12 at 3:30 in the Middle
School cafeteria.
Band Concert
The annual Intermediate Cen-
ter Spring band Concert will be
held on Thursday evening, May
12 at 7 at the Senior High School
auditorium. Reporting time is
6:15 p.m. for flutes, saxophones,
trumpets, trombones and bari-
tones and 6:30 p.m. for clarinets
and drums. Band members are to
meet in the high school cafeteria.
Junior Achievement Biz Town
The annual fifth grade JA Biz
Town visits are on Tuesday, May
24 and Thursday, May 26. Class-
es that will visit on Tuesday, May
24 - Mr. Struckus, Mr. Wrubel,
Mrs. Zbysheski, Mrs. Pupa, Ms.
Rickus and on Thursday, May 26
- Mr. Lombardo, Ms. Beseda,
Mr. Twardowski, Mrs. Ralston,
Ms. Roman.
PTOField Trips
The annual PTO class trips to
Knoebel’s will be on May 31,
June 1 and 2. Third grade will
visit on May 31, Fourth grade
will be on June 1 and fifth grade
will visit on June 2.
Spring Games
The annual Intermediate Cen-
ter Spring Games will be held on
June 1, 2, and 3. The spring
games feature a morning bazaar
andanafternoonof games. Third
grade will be held on June 1,
fourth grade will be on June 2
and fifth grade will be hold on
June 3.
PAC Breakfast
The annual fifth grade PAC
Reading appreciation breakfast
will be held on Thursday, June 9
at 9:30inthe middle school cafe-
teria.
Fifth Grade Dance
The annual fifth grade dance
will be held on Friday, June 10
from6to9p.m. inthe Intermedi-
ate Center gym.
Box Tops
Box tops for education are col-
lected daily in the office.
In a special Box tops for Edu-
cation promotion Hanes is offer-
ing schools one box top for every
Hanes printed T-shirt, polo shirt
or sweat shirt purchased. Parents
canjust sendtheir Hanes storere-
ceipt to the Intermediate Center.
Redner’s Sav ATape
Redner’s Sav A Tapes are col-
lected daily in the office.
PA Intermediate Center to hold annual science fair this week
Luzerne County Community
College will hold an art exhibit
featuring the work of students
in the Commercial Art pro-
gram at the College’s Schul-
man Gallery. The exhibit will
open with a reception on Fri-
day, May 6, from 6 to 8 p.m.
The reception is free and
open to the public. More than
200 pieces of student artwork
will be on display. The show
will include drawings, paint-
ings, graphic designs, illustra-
tions, photographs, sculptures,
advertising portfolios, and
computer graphics.
The exhibit is free and open
to the public and will be on
display through Friday, July 1.
Gallery hours are Monday
through Friday, from 9 a.m. to
5 p.m. For more information,
call the LCCC Commercial Art
Department at 740-0727 or
(800) 377-LCCC, extension
7727.
LCCC’s student art exhibit
opening on May 6
Easter Vacation
The Easter Vacation will be-
gin on Thursday, April 21, 2011
and end on Monday, April 25,
2011. School will resume on
Tuesday, April 26, 2011. The
faculty and staff from Mont-
gomery Avenue Elementary
would like to wish everyone a
Happy Easter.
Chamber
The Pittston Chamber of
Commerce will be sending
some local men and women in
our business community to
read to some of our elementary
students on Wednesday, April
27th.
Food Drive
The Holiday Food Drive is
now over for Easter time. We
would like to thank all the par-
ents and students for contrib-
uting to this food collection.
The First United Methodist
Church of West Pittston does
appreciate all your efforts in
stocking up their food pantry at
their church. Thanks again for
all you do!
PTO Officers
The Montgomery Avenue
PTO officers for the 2011-12
school year will be as follows:
Holly Alfano and Heather
Lewis – co-presidents; Amber
Flynn – Vice President; Jennif-
er Bonita – Secretary; and Kel-
ly Steransky – Treasurer. We
would like to wish them good
luck in the next school year.
The PTO will have their regu-
lar meeting on Monday, May 2
at 7:00 p.m. in the school cafe-
teria. All parents are welcome
to attend.
Montgomery Avenue announces PTO officers for 2011-2012
C M Y K
SUNDAY DISPATCH SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2011 PAGE 5B
➛ S C H O O L S
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A Mother’s Day Giveaway
The Times Leader
!!
!
rr
r
HH
H
ee e
DD
D
a
a
a
z
z
z
L
L
L
e
e
e
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Do you know a mom who deserves to be dazzled?
Enter her for a chance to win big this Mother’s Day!
The Times Leader DAZZLE HER Giveaway
Your name: __________________________________________ Phone number: ________________________
Mailing address: __________________________________________________________________________
Mother’s name: _________________________________ Mother’s phone number: ________________________
Mother’s mailing address: ___________________________________________________________________
Your e-mail: _______________________________ Mother’s e-mail: __________________________________
To enter, go to timesleader.com and click on “Dazzle Her: A Mother’s Day Giveaway” or return this form to The Times
Leader, Dazzle Her Contest, 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711. All entries must be received by Friday, April 29,
2011 to qualify. Winners will be announced in The Times Leader on May 4, 2011.
No purchase is necessary to participate and there is no charge or fee for contest entry. Prizes cannot be exchanged
for cash and are nontransferable. Prizes cannot be refunded. Prize receipt is the sole responsibility of the winner
and the advertiser. Winners are solely responsible for any taxes that may be due as a result of the contest. All prizes
must be redeemed within six months of the day the winners are announced. Entries may be examined at our office
at 15 N. Main Street, Wilkes-Barre. The winners will be determined from all submissions received by Friday, April 29,
2011. Winners names and associated prizes will be drawn at random. Odds of winning are dependent upon the
number of entries received. Winner must be at least 18 years of age and a legal resident of the Commonwealth of
Pennsylvania. Must present proper photo identification in order to redeem prizes. The Wilkes Barre Publishing
Company, Inc., and/or The Times Leader and/or any of their affiliates, subsidiaries, corporate officers or employees
are not responsible for supplying any of the prizes or guaranteeing any prize or service offered by any business and/
or individual as part of the Dazzle Her contest. By participating in the Dazzle Her contest, each person authorizes the
Wilkes Barre Publishing Company, Inc., The Times Leader and/or any of their affiliates, subsidiaries and/or
subsequent owners and/or operators and/or assigns of any of them to use photographs, video, film and/or other
graphic representations of each contest entrant for any promotional purpose. Sponsors’ employees and their
immediate family members are not eligible to enter.
Mother must be 18 or older to win.
NUMBER
ONE
AUDITED
NEWSPAPER
IN LUZERNE COUNTY
– AUDIT BUREAU OF CIRCULATIONS (ABC)
ed
zes
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29,
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AUD
NEWS
IN LUZERN
– AUDIT
One lucky grand prize mom will win a $500 jewelry shopping spree from:
Carpenter Dental
Dunay Jewelers
HEROLDS
FARM
MARKET
blu
l
a
t
i
n
u
m
P
Simon & Co.
J E W E L E R
D I A M O N D S D I A M O N D S
tring Thing
hop
Dukey’s
Cafe
Butler Eyecare
HAPPY PIZZA Inc.
apphire Salon
26 additional moms will receive a $100 gift certificate from one of these sponsors:
The Wyoming Area National Honor Society donated over 80 East-
er Baskets to homeless and underprivileged children in our area.
Each member donated baskets, candy and toys to fill the baskets.
Jeff Zimmerman, HCI Region 7 Coordinator for the Luzerne
County Intermediate Unit 18’s Homeless Children’s Initiative accept-
ed the baskets from members of the National Honor Society. On be-
half of the Wyoming Area National Honor Society, Conway distrib-
uted the baskets to the Domestic Violence Service Center, Salvation
Family Kirby House, Gabrielle’s House, Nanticoke Community Res-
idential Rehabilitation, Catherine McAuley House, and Bennet
Home.
Senior Sentiments
“There’s no place like home,” the saying goes. This thought is as
cliché as clichés come, but there is deep truth to it. Unfortunately,
many teenagers seem to disregard this expression nowadays. Yearn-
ing to break free of parental control and the familiarity of their own
neighborhoods, the majorityof highschool seniors seemtoinsist that
they are bound for a future in a faraway place. They dream of an
escape fromthe sameness they are used to, a life of newfriends, new
experiences, andnewopportunity. But home can’t be that intolerable,
can it?
I recently spent a weekend in Washington, D.C., to compete in a
history bowl with some beloved classmates of mine. Our time in the
city was nothing less than spectacular. It was as if we had entered an
entirely new atmosphere; surrounded by businesspeople, bellhops,
and buildings that spanned entire blocks. My teamand I had a taste of
luxury at a posh restaurant, and enjoyed all the accoutrements of a
four star hotel. It was lovely, and certainly very different from what
we were accustomed to. But the
trip evoked a feeling of home-
sickness in me that I won’t soon
forget. That weekend, I learned
the accuracy behind the saying.
Upon returning home, I found
a newsort of joy in my own dusty
bedroom, my not-so-manicured
backyard, and my dilapidated lit-
tle green house. My neighbor-
hood was inviting and brilliant,
thoughrainandgale-force winds
were pummeling it at the time. I
immediately wondered why
most of my peers were so ada-
mant about leaving this area.
Don’t get me wrong. There are
many things to see and do be-
yond good ol’ Wyoming Valley.
If you get the chance, you should
explore the rest of this fine-look-
ing world to determine what ex-
actly it has to offer you, and vice
versa. But at the same time,
wherever you end up, remember
your roots. Cherish where you
have been, and where you are
now. Know that it does not al-
ways take a fancy meal or a
crowded city to find content-
ment. Often, it exists right in
front of you.
Training Meeting
A special education training
meeting for parents will be held
in the library on April 28 from 6
to 8 p.m.
Tournament
The Tournament Indoor Asso-
ciation All-Chapter Champion-
ship for percussion players will
be held fromApril 28 to May1in
Wildwood, New Jersey. Best of
luck to all Wyoming Area partic-
ipants.
Drama Club
The Drama Club will hold its
annual trip to New York City on
April 30. Enjoy the Big Apple,
thespians and crew members.
Quote of the Week
The first step to getting the
things you want out of life is this:
Decide what you want. –Ben
Stein
Warrior News
By Debbie Gross
National Honor Society pictured above fromleft to right. Front row: Ashlee Blannett, Maria Mar-
ianacci, Brianna Romiski, Cassandra Lescavage, Leslie Shumlas, Valerie Bott, Megan Bonomo,
and Andrew Coco. Second row: Caitlin Vitale, Megan Yurek, Alyssa Zekoski, Lauren Wysocki, Ni-
cholas Perugini, Brianna Mikolaichik, Victoria Brown, Gabrielle Alberigi, Michael Kohut, Ashley
Lombardo, and Jordan Johnston. Back Row: Louis Vullo, Nick Mazzone, Ronald Klepadlo, James
Rose, Matthew Kolbeck, Andrew Morrison, John Bankus, and Stormy Ruiz. The National Honor
Society advisor is Mr. James C. Belles.
The Pittston Area High School will present
Talent Show 2011 “It’s My Life” on Saturday,
April 30 at 7:00 p.m. in the high school audi-
torium. The Talent Showis directed by Mrs. Ta-
ra Craig and Mr. Sal Latona.
This year the show will feature several vocal-
ists, dancers, rock performers, and an original
poetry reading. The show will highlight several
seniors who have participated in the Talent
Show for their entire high school career as well
as some first time performers. The theme song
by Bon Jovi will be performed.
As an added bonus to this year’s show will be
an exhibit by the Pittston Area Art Club. The Art
Club is under the direction of Mrs. Judy Green-
wald.
Tickets for Saturday’s show are currently on
sale at the High School. The price is $4.00 in
advance and $5.00 at the door. All proceeds
from this year’s show will benefit the Class of
2011 Yearbook. Don’t miss it.
Pictured are members of Talent Show 2011.
Pittston Area High School to hold Talent Show this Saturday
Mr. R. Scott Jeffery, Superin-
tendent of the Old Forge School
District presented an engraved
iPod on behalf of the Riverside
School District to Kiel Eigen for
the recognition of tremendous
courage, drive, and determina-
tion to live life regardless of ad-
versity.
Pictured is Kiel Eigen and Mr.
Jeffery
Old Forge recognizes Kiel Eigen
LCCC Health, Physical Edu-
cation, and Exercise Science De-
partment will hold a 5K Run or
Fun Walk for Cancer Awareness
on Saturday, April 30, at 10 a.m.,
at the College’s campus in Nanti-
coke. Pre-registration fee is $10
per person. Registration fee on
the day of the event is $15 per
person with registration begin-
ningat 9a.m. Awards will be giv-
en to the first overall male and
female inthe 5KRun. Awards al-
so will be given to the top three
finishers in the following age
groups for both males and fe-
males in the 5K Run: 19 and un-
der, 20-29, 30-39, 40-49, 50-59,
60-69, and 70 and over. A free t-
shirt will be given to the first 150
registered participants.
For more information, or to
register in advance, contact Mi-
randa Costa, race director at
LCCC, at 740-0237 or mcos-
ta@luzerne.edu.
Cancer walk at LCCC on April 30
C M Y K
PAGE 6B SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2011 SUNDAY DISPATCH
➛ S C H O O L S
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DOORS
TO
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OPEN
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6 P.M.
ALL PROCEEDS BENEFIT BIG
BROTHERS BIG
SISTERS
ANTI-BULLYING
PROGRAM
GGOO-GGOO GGADJJET K88 PAANNACEA FFAARRMMER SS DAUGHTEER
FACEBOOK.COM/CONCERTFORACAUSE
Four sixth grade girls in Mrs.
Kosco’s class, at the 10th Street
elementary school, recently
came up with an idea to help the
people affected by the earth-
quakes in Japan. With the ap-
proval of the district’s superin-
tendent, they held a fundraiser.
The girls created and sold duct
tape bracelets that read “Hope
for Japan.”
The bracelets were sold in
school to students in fourth
through sixth grades for $1.00
each. They raised $284.00 over a
one-week period. Elementary
Principal, Mr. Jon Pollard, will
send the money to Japan via the
Red Cross. Pictured in the photo
are the girls from left to right:
Alexandria Peck, Eve Urban, El-
izabeth Weaver, and Vanessa
Casterline. Also pictured are stu-
dents purchasing the bracelets.
Talent show will be May 19 at
the high school. There will be a
practice April 27 at Tenth Street
and a mandatory dress rehearsal
May 13.
Field Trip Dates
May 10: Third grade going to
Crayola Factory
May 11: First grade going to
Bloomsburg Museum
May 18: Kindergarten goes to
The Lands at Hillside
May 24: Fourth grade goes to
WB/Scranton Yankees game
May 25: Fifth grade goes to
Camp Orchard Hill
May 26: Fifth grade goes to
Knoebels
Second grade information will
be available soon.
Field Day
Field Day will be Friday June
3. Kindergarten thru fifth will be
in the morning and sixth grade
will be in the afternoon. Lots of
help is needed for this event.
Yearbook Ads
Yearbook ads will be coming
home when the students return
from the holiday. The money
raised is used to offset the cost of
the yearbook.
Tenth Street students hold bracelet fundraiser to aid Japan
JFKheld the annual “Amateur
Night” Talent Show on March
31. The show was a great suc-
cess. Participants pictured in
front rowwere Chase Whittaker,
Kayle Switzer, Megan Tomsak,
Mia Jones, and Saige Stempien.
Second row: Erica Brockway,
Tinsley Sarnak, Brianna Pizza-
no, Ellie Glatz, Zipporah Film-
ore, Emma Granahan, Tristan
Chronowski, Melanie Lombar-
do, and Dreama Stufflelbeam.
PTO Meeting
The next JFK PTO meeting
will take place on Wednesday,
May 4 at 6:30 p.m.
Sabatini’s Night
The next Sabatini’s Night will
take place on Thursday, May 5.
JFKPTOwill receive10%of the
profit when you mention JFK.
Thank you to Sabatini’s Pizza for
their continued support.
Art Show
The JFK Art Show will take
place on Thursday, May 5 from
6-7 p.m.
Spring Musical
The JFK Spring Musical will
take place in the high school au-
ditorium on May 9 at 6:30 p.m.
Third Grade Social
The JFK annual third grade
social will take place onTuesday,
May 10 from 6-8 p.m. Any one
interested in helping with the
event, please speak to any PTO
officer.
Tools for Schools
Please register your cards for
the Tools for Schools program.
Once you sign up, everything
you purchase at Price Chopper
with your AdvantEdgeCard
earns points to help our school.
Every dollar you spend earns a
point for our school, which helps
us earn free equipment. You can
alsoregister your SureSave cards
to earn rewards for our school.
Please remember to save your
Box Tops for Education. Each
one is worth 10 cents when our
school redeems them. Please
keep saving your Box Tops and
thank you for your support.
Tyson Chicken A+ Program:
Clipandsave labels frompartici-
pating Tyson products earns us
24 cents for each label. We will
announce a date for collecting
the labels in the future.
Smencils
Smencils are available in the
school office. Anyone interested
please see Ms. Rachelle.
Pennies for the Playground
The playground committee is
collecting spare change to help
upgrade our playground. You
can help out by sending in any
spare change you may have into
school with your child. Thank
you for your support.
Website
Please visit the WyomingArea
website at www.wyominga-
rea.org and click on JFK for
more PTOinformation. Click on
Mr. Pollard’s name to view PTO
information.
Annual ‘Amateur Night’ talent
show held at JFK Elementary
Email school news
and
photos to
sd@psdispatch.com
C M Y K
SUNDAY DISPATCH SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2011 PAGE 7B
➛ S C H O O L S
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2011
Brightest
&
The times leader
Best
Each year The
Times Leader
Best & Brightest
program honors
local high school
students for
their scholastic
achievements and
community service.
Listed here are this
year’s fnalists.
The fnal winners
for each category
will be announced
at The Times
Leader’s 2011
Best & Brightest
Awards Ceremony
to be held at
The Woodlands
Inn & Resort on
Wednesday,
May 11, 2011.
ART:
Neil Mattern
Loren Schott
Rachel Spect
Delilah Van Gorden
BUSINESS
SKILLS:
Brandon Harding
Alexandra Petsuck
Sara Lynn
Kathryn Tressa
COMPUTERS
& TECHNOLOGY:
Jacob Daniels
Sergey Ivanov
Karisa Nicole Calvitti
FOREIGN
LANGUAGES:
Brianna Winter
Jackeline Torres
Amanda Lara
Samantha Martin
Cicely Hazell
PERFORMING
ARTISTS:
Jillian A. Puhalla
Meghan Hourigan
Courtney Prozeralik
Katie Joyce
Amanda Urbanski
ENGLISH &
LITERATURE:
Rebecca Ann Richards
Caitlin Vitale
Joseph Hornak
SCIENCE
& ENVIRONMENT:
Letitia Warunek
Carly Sokach
Alexandra Elizabeth Chapin
Sara Brozena
Pierce Donovan
SERVICE TO THE
COMMUNITY:
Linnae Homza
Courtney Sult
Morgan Elise McGrane
Erin Ryan
Ronald Klepadlo
MUSIC:
Megan Gallagher
Kelcie Lushefski
Molly Allan
Eric Petterson II
Julia Kundratic
ATHLETICS:
Selena Adamshick
Michael Papi
Shelley Black
Lauren Skudalski
JOURNALISM:
Brianna Wise
Matthew Morgis
Rebecca Farrell
MATHEMATICS:
Timothy Yurish
Noah James Long
Danielle Phillips
Katelyn Arcelay
Ami Patel
CIVICS:
Thomas Hogan
Omeed Firouzi
Samantha Snyder
Gabrielle Richards
Robert Kost
NUMBER
ONE
AUDITED
NEWSPAPER
IN LUZERNE COUNTY
– AUDIT BUREAU OF CIRCULATIONS (ABC)
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AUD
NEWS
IN LUZERN
– AUDIT
by Kathleen Prest
On Monday, March 28 the
Pittston Area Stand Tall Club
held their annual blood drive. It
lasted the entire day, and had a
great turnout. One student, Ma-
rissa Gerrity, donated for her ve-
ry first time. She said she decid-
ed to come out and donate be-
cause her grandfather has been
through many surgeries, and she
never knows when he is going to
need blood. A returning donor,
MatthewErfman, says he likes to
donate because its nice knowing
you are helping someone in
need.
It seemed unanimous that the
Red Cross staff members were
happy to see so many high
school students coming out to
help. Overall 100 pints of blood
were donated. The club moder-
ator as well as the Pittston Area
High School nurse, Mrs. Betty
Turco said “I believe the blood
drive was very successful in light
of the circumstances, as far as
the rescheduling of the event and
also it being held on a Monday.”
At top left are Stand Tall mem-
bers, from left to right, Rachael
Branas, Amanda King, Lauren
Antal, Brandon Hampton, Ma-
riah Curtis, Anthony Passarella,
Maria Carone, Bill Ardoline,
Matt Erfman, Emily Zielinski,
and Carly Bellas.
At top right are members of
the Stand Tall Club at the blood
drive registering donors. Seated
are Maria Carone, Mariah Cur-
tis, and Anthony Passarella.
Standing are Brandon Hampton
and Bill Ardoline.
In bottomphoto is Dave Drag-
on donateing double red blood
cells. Standing is recent donor
John Biarea.
PA Students work exhibited in
the State Capitol
By: Matt Gromala
Recentlythe Pennsylvania De-
partment of Education conduct-
ed their annual student art exhi-
bition in Harrisburg, which oc-
curs during Youth Art Month ev-
eryyear. Three artists fromevery
school district in the state can
submit their work.
The artists representing Pitt-
ston Area were Ashleigh Cris-
pell, Lyndsie Johndrow, and An-
drea Krevey (also WVIA’s Artist
of the Week.
The students enteredtheir self-
portraits done in pencil from
2010. They received a lot of at-
tention at the exhibit, and a cer-
tificate fromthe PDEfor partici-
pating. The students and their
family members, as well as Mrs.
Judy Greenwald, their art teach-
er, then went on a tour of the
State Capitol building, which
had been arranged by State Sen-
ator John Yudichak, D-Nanti-
coke, for them.
Cheer Parents
The PACheer Parentswill hold
an important meeting on
Wednesday, May 4 at 7:00 at Sa-
vo’s. Final plans for the Apple-
bee’s Flapjack fundraiser will be
discussed. All parents are en-
couraged to attend.
Senior Interviews
Maria Carone, the daughter
of Frank and Josephine Carone
of Pittston, was born December
7, 1992. If Maria isn’t watching
her favorite movie, Help, she can
be found hanging out with Whit-
ney Cooper and Sarah Morreale.
Maria’s extracurricular activities
not only include National Honor
Society, yearbook, the ICE and
Stand Tall clubs, but also dace at
the Ballet Theater of Scranton.
After graduation, Maria is plan-
ning on attending college and is
looking forward to getting mar-
ried and starting a family in the
future.
Maria Christine Sagliocco
was born on September 10, 1992
and is the daughter of Josephand
Dorothy Sagliocco of Port Grif-
fith. Some of Maria’s favorite
teachers are Mr. Devlin, Mr. Ca-
prari, Mrs. Saunders and Mr. Ri-
chards. When Maria isn’t work-
ing, eating pasta, or watching
movies with Rupert Grint, you
can find her hanging out with
Jenny Chaump, Megan Mooney,
Natalie Carr, Emily Zurek, and
many more.After high school,
Maria plans on going to college
to become a speech pathologist.
With Maria’s mom as her per-
sonal idol, she is looking for-
ward to maturing and making a
life of her own in the future.
Bryanna Darbenzio, the
daughter of Leah and Dave Dar-
benzio, was born on March 19,
1993. If Bryanna isn’t hanging
out withBrittanyHogan, Stepha-
nie Bartz, and Jeffery Timlin,
she is seen participating in her
favorite activities such as track,
Stand Tall club, Key club, and
ICE club. Bryanna states that
“the AP classes” were the most
challenging part of high school.
Bryanna is hoping to attend Cor-
nell after graduation, with
thanks to her favorite teachers
Mr. Zyblicki and Mr. Richards.
Kindra Lee, the daughter of
Williamand Lynn Lee, was born
on March 3, 1993. If Kindra isn’t
watching her favorite movie,
Crybaby, or participating in
track and field, she can be found
hanging out with Chelsey Karp,
Emily O’Brien, and Barbara La-
Sota. After graduation, Kindra is
looking forward to attending
Lackawanna for general transfer
studies. Kindra states that she is
looking forward to the "free-
doms" when becoming an adult
and isn’t going to miss "waking
up in the morning" for high
school.
Pittston Area H.S.’s Stand Tall Club holds annual blood drive
Easter Vacation
Mr. Bilbow and Mr. Booth
would like to wish all faculty,
staff, and students as well as their
families a very happy and healthy
Easter Holiday. The Pittston Area
school district will be closed to-
morrow due to the observance of
the Easter holiday. Schools will
reopen on Tuesday, April 26th ac-
cording to the regular schedule.
Drama Club Practice
The Middle School Drama
Club will practice every Wednes-
day from 3:00 until 4:15 p.m. at
the middle school. Students are
responsible for their own trans-
portationhome, andall rides must
be at the middle school no later
than 4:10 p.m.
Dress rehearsal will be held on
Wednesday, June1, from3:00 un-
til 4:30 p.m. The big showwill be
heldonFriday, June3, at 7:00p.m.
May Act 80Day
Friday, May27isanAct 80Day.
Middle School students will be
dismissed at 1:00 p.m.
Memorial Day
The Pittston Area School Dis-
trict will be closed on Monday,
May 30 in observance of Memo-
rial Day. Schools will reopen on
Tuesday, May 31.
Communications Club
MID-TV’s schedule for 4/26
through 04/29: Members of the
RedTeamshouldreport totheTV
Studio first thing in the morning.
All members are reminded to
check in with their homeroom
teachers prior to reporting to the
studio.
Sports Weekly Schedule
Visit highschoolsports.net for
complete and up to date spring
sports’ schedules.
Middle School Boys’ Baseball:
Wednesday, April 27 at Holy Re-
deemer; Wednesday, April 27 vs.
Wyoming Area
Junior High Girls’ Softball:
Monday, April 25 vs. Wyoming
Area; Thursday, April 21at Nanti-
coke Area
Junior High Coed Track and Field: Monday, April 25 at Ber- wick Area
Pittston Area Middle School announces May Act 80 Day
Easter Happenings
There will be no school on
Monday April 25 for Easter
break. School will resume on
Tuesday, April 26.
Report Card Distribution
Report cads for the thirdmark-
ing period were distributed on
Wednesday, April 20. Please
sign the report card envelope and
return to your child’s teacher on
Tuesday, April 26.
PTO Monthly Meeting
The April PTO Meeting will
be held on Wednesday, April 27
at 7 p.m. in the middle school
cafeteria.
Kindergarten Registration
Pittston Area Kindergarten
registration for the2011-12
school year will take place on
May 23 through May 26 at the
Kindergarten Center in Dupont.
Registration hours are 9 a.m. to
11 a.m. or 1 to 3 p.m. The child
must be 5 years old by August 31
to be eligible. Registration pack-
ets are available for pickup at the
Primary and Intermediate Cen-
ters daily between 8 a.m. and 4
p.m. If you have any questions
call 654-0503.
Box Tops
The Kindergarten Center is
going to be collecting General
Mills Box Tops for Education lo-
gos for the 2010-2011 school
year. We are asked parents to
please begin collecting these box
tops over the summer. Please cut
the box tops and put in bundles
of 50 before you send them to
your child’s teacher.
Kindergarten Center to hold
registration May 23 -26
C M Y K
PAGE 8B SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2011 SUNDAY DISPATCH
➛ S C H O O L S
Congratulations tothe WyomingArea JETSTeamAfor taking1st
place at this year’s northeast regional TEAMS competition on
March 8, 2011.
TEAMS stands for Test of Engineering Aptitude, Mathematics,
and Science. The perpetual trophy will reside at WA until next year
at this time, when the trophy must be defended. Team members re-
ceived plaques for their accomplishment. In addition, the team just
found out recently that they tied for first place in the state within
their division! The workthat the students completedwill nowbe sent
to the national level for additional scoring and placement. JETS
stands for Junior Engineering Technical Society.
Pictured in first row are Eric Werbin, Samantha Scott, Andrew
Ambruso, Alyssa Cajka, and Xuan Kang
Second row: John Barnes, JETS coordinator for Penn State
Wilkes Barre, David Pizano, WA JETS TEAMS coach, Tony Ri-
chards, Josh Carey, David Dorbad, and Bill McFarland, P.E., Presi-
dent, Pennsylvania Society of Professional Engineers Luzerne
County Chapter.
Wyoming Area JETS team takes first at competition
Three Wyoming Area Cathol-
ic students, Sarah Cragle, Bren-
na Satkowski and Sarah Satkow-
ski, recently participated in the
2011 Regional Middle School
and High School Computer Fair
held at the Wilkes-Barrre Career
and Technical Center. The event
was sponsored by the Luzerne
Intermediate Unit. Local Stu-
dents from grades six to twelve
are invited to enter in any 14 dif-
ferent categories. Middle and
high school students not only
showcase their knowledge in
various media literacy, but also
their application and creativity
when presenting the final prod-
uct.
Sarah Cragle competed in the
Desktop Publishing with an
original story she wrote and il-
lustrated. Brenna Satkowski and
Sarah Satkowski competed as a
teamin Desktop Publishing with
a menu which they designed for
fictitious restaurant.
Pictured are Sarah Satkowski,
Brenna Satkowski, Sarah Cragle
and Mrs. Elaine Snyder moder-
ator and computer instuctor at
Wyoming Area Catholic.
Dates to Remember
April 21 -25: Easter Holiday
April 26: Classes Resume
Congratulations
The fourth grade boys won the
championship in the GSA/St.
Nick’s third and fourth grade
basketball league.
In the Wyoming Area Cathol-
ic Madness Tournament:
Eighth grade boys: Cham-
pions
Fourth grade boys: Second
place
Seventh grade boys: Second
place
Fifth grade girls: Second place
Seventh grade girls: Second
place.
Congratulations to the coach-
es, parents, Booster Club, stu-
dents and the Wyoming Area
Catholic School Community for
a wonderful season of March
Madness.
Gym Classes
For the week of April 25 the
gym schedule is as follows:
Thursday, April 28: Gym for
grades Pre-K through fifth
grade
Friday, April 29: Gym Classes
for sixth, seventh and eighth
grades
Chess Club
Schedule is as follows:
April 26: 6:30 to 8:00 p.m., SS
Peter and Paul, Plains
Cross Country
Schedule is as follows:
April 27: Cross Country Meet
at Home
May 5: Cross Country Meet at
McDade Park
May 11: Cross Country Meet
at Condella
May 21: Cross Country Con-
ference Meet at Baptist Bible
College
Cougar Cash
Cougar Cash Orders will re-
sume on Tuesday, April 26.
Labels
Please keep sending in Camp-
bell Soup Labels and Box Tops
for Education. The containers
for the labels are in the main
hallway.
Students at Wyoming Area Catholic participate in computer fair
Misericordia University rec-
ognized the seventh graduating
class from the Diagnostic Med-
ical Sonography Certificate Pro-
gram during the annual certifi-
cate presentation ceremony in
Sandy and Marlene Insalaco
Hall on campus.
Ten students completed the
challenging 18-month program,
which includes classroom and
clinical instruction. The sonog-
raphy program, more commonly
referred to as ultrasound, is de-
signed for adult or non-tradition-
al learners who posses the neces-
sary pre-requisites. The program
offers a convenient and predict-
able schedule with alternating
weekend classes and a weekday
clinical component. Classes be-
gin every September.
The Misericordia University
Sonography Program is accred-
ited by the Commission on Ac-
creditationof AlliedHealthEdu-
cation Programs. Sonographers
perform a diagnostic medical
procedure that uses ultrasoundto
produce dynamic visual images
of human organs, tissues or
blood flow inside the body. It is
increasingly being used to detect
and treat fetal anomalies as well
as non-surgical interventions of
abdominal and gynecological
pathologies.
For more information about
the diagnostic medical sonogra-
phy certificate program, please
contact Sheryl Goss, program
director, at (570) 674-6790 or
sgoss@misericordia.edu. For an
application and additional infor-
mation, please contact Larree
Brown in the Center for Adult
andContinuingEducationat Mi-
sericordia University at (570)
674-6451 or lbrown@misericor-
dia.edu.
The following students com-
pleted the certificate program
Sarah Blumbergs, Mount Joy,
PA; Jamie Crop, Kingston; Be-
thany Daron, Shavertown; Chel-
sea Jiorle-Lutte, Walnutport,
PA.; Mary DeGeorge, Scranton;
Stephanie McGaw, William-
sport; Debra Owens, Exeter;
Bailey Reedy, Clifford Town-
ship, PA; Taylor Washburn, Em-
maus, PA; and Janelle Westlake,
Millerton, PA.
For more information about
Misericordia University, please
log on to www.misericordia.edu
or call (570) 674-6400. Founded
and Sponsored by the Sisters of
Mercy in 1924, Misericordia
University is Luzerne County’s
first four-year college and offers
32 bachelor’s, master’s and doc-
toral degree programs in three
colleges in full- and part-time
formats.
Participating in the ceremony,
first rowfromleft, are JeanDyer,
Ph.D., dean of the College of
Health Sciences at Misericordia
University; Janelle Westlake,
Bethany Daron, Taylor Wash-
burn, Stephanie McGaw and
Mary DeGeorge.
Second row: Karen Klimas,
clinical coordinator, Misericor-
dia University; Sheryl Goss,
chair of Sonography, Misericor-
dia University; Jamie Crop, De-
bra Owens, Chelsea Jiorle-Lutte,
Bailey Reedy, Sarah Blumbergs
and Michael A. MacDowell,
president, Misericordia Univer-
sity.
Misericordia recognizes students who completed certificate program
Pictured are some students
from Montgomery Avenue Ele-
mentary at their third and fourth
grade dance. Montgomery Ave-
nue PTO sponsored the dance.
Sue Feeney and Nicole Klaproth
chaired the event.
Thanks to everyone that
helped make this event special
for the students. Music was pro-
vided by Nick Hufford of Lesser
Evil DJ.
Montgomery Avenue holds third and fourth grade dance
SUNDAY DISPATCH SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2011 PAGE 9
100 Announcements
200 Auctions
300 Personal Services
400 Automotive
500 Employment
600 Financial
700 Merchandise
800 Pets & Animals
900 Real Estate
1000 Service Directory
MARKETPLACE
To place a Classified ad: Call 570-829-7130 or 1-800-273-7130 Email: classifieds@thepittstondispatch.com
thepittstondispatch.com
135 Legals/
Public Notices
135 Legals/
Public Notices
PUBLIC NOTICE
Pursuant to the “Surface Mining
Conservation and Reclamation Act” and
the “Clean Streams Law” notice is hereby
given that Mineral Reclamation, LLC, 30
Market Street, Pittston, PA 18640 has
made application to the Pennsylvania
Department of Environmental Protection
(DEP) for a permit to conduct refuse recla-
mation activities in Dupont and Avoca
Boroughs, Luzerne County. The proposed
permit area is 25 acres and is situated on
the north side at the end of the Pittston
By-Pass near Main Street in Avoca. The
receiving stream for this proposed permit
area is Mill Creek, a cold watery fishery.
The Pittston, PA, U.S. Geographical Survey
7.5 minute topographical map contains the
area described. A copy of the application
is available for public inspection at the
Luzerne County Conservation District, 325
Smiths Pond Road, Shavertown, PA 18708.
Written comments, objections, or a
request for public hearing or informal con-
ference may be submitted to the DEP,
Pottsville District Mining Office, 5 West
Laurel Blvd., Pottsville, PA 176901 by June
15, 2011 and must include the person’s
name, address, telephone number, and
brief statement as to the nature of the
objection.
LEGAL NOTICE
Sealed bids will be received by the
Board Secretary of The Pittston Area
School District for:
REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL
ANNUAL AUDIT SERVICES
AND
REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL
BANKING & FINANCIAL SERVICES
Specifications may be secured from the
Secretary’s Office in The Pittston Area
Senior High School, 5 Stout St., Yatesville,
Pittston, PA.
Bids will be opened on Friday, May 13,
2011 at 3:00 P.M. in the Board Room of
The Senior High School.
The Board of Directors reserves the right
to reject any or all bids or to accept or
reject any item or items thereof.
BY ORDER OF THE BOARD
DEBORAH A. RACHILLA
SECRETARY
Are You Looking for a Career with a Growing and Stable Company?
Do You Want the Opportunity to be Part of a Winning Team?
Are You Driven to Work in a Fast Paced Environment?
DISTRIBUTION CENTER
If this sounds like you, we may be your ideal company. As one of the most successful retail
companies worldwide, we are eager to share our success with you. Whatever your
individual talents or interests, it’s more than likely that we have exactly what you are
looking for. With an extensive range of career options, The TJX Companies, Inc. stand out
as one of the most successful retail companies worldwide and we are eager to share this
success with you. Located in Pittston, just minutes from the PA Turnpike and I-81, we are a
company committed to variety and diversity. Currently, positions are available in the
following areas:
Human Resources
Distribution Supervisor
Industrial Maintenance
Expense/Finance
Shipping/Receiving Associates
T.J. Maxx offers advancement opportunities, medical, dental and life
insurance, 401(k), paid vacation and paid sick time, in-store discounts,
$400 potential referral bonus and a clean, safe working environment.
Interested applicants may obtain position information
and apply on-line at: www.careers-tjx.com
Applicants will be subject to a pre-employment drug screen and background check.
T.J. Maxx is an equal opportunity employer committed to workplace diversity.
All programs/bonuses are subject to change at any time due to business necessity.
Shipping/Receiving applicants may apply in person at:
400 Oldfield Blvd.
Pittston, Pa 18640
For directions, please call 570-603-5890
100
ANNOUNCEMENTS
110 Lost
LOST: White
German Shepherd.
Female. Last seen
in West Wyoming
4/7. Named Secret
or may come to
Puppy. Very shy.
570-864-0739
Find Something?
Lose Something?
Get it back where it
belongs
with a Lost/Found ad!
570-829-7130
135 Legals/
Public Notices
ESTATE NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby
given that Letters
Testamentary have
been granted in the
Estate of ROSE M.
GARUBA, late of
the City of Pittston,
who died
April 3, 2011.
All persons indebt-
ed to said Estate
are requested to
make payment and
those having claims
to present the
same, without
delay, to the
Executrix,
ROSE MARY
COLARUSSO and
her Attorneys.
SAPORITO,
SAPORITO &
FALCONE
490 NORTH
MAIN STREET
PITTSTON, PA
18640
LEGAL NOTICE
CERTIFICATE OF
ORGANIZATION
NOTICE IS HERE-
BY GIVEN that a
Certificate of Orga-
nization for RW
Development,
LLC, a Pennsylva-
nia limited liability
company, has been
filed and approved-
by the Department
of State, Common-
wealth of Pennsyl-
vania, April 5,
2011, in accor-
dance with the pro-
visions of the Com-
monwealth of Penn-
sylvania Limited Lia-
bility company law,
of 1994, 15 Pa.
C.S.A. Section 8901,
as amended. The
principal place of
business is 135
Park Avenue, Apt.
#2, Wilkes-Barre,
Pennsylvania, 18702
ESTATE NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby
given that Letters
Testamentary have
been granted in the
Estate of STANLEY
E. SOKOLOWSKY,
late of the Township
of Exeter, who died
March 16, 2011. All
persons indebted to
said Estate are
requested to make
payment and those
having claims to
present the same,
without delay, to
the Executrix,
ANN MARIE
ROWLANDS and
the Attorneys.
SAPORITO,
SAPORITO
& FALCONE
490 NORTH
MAIN STREET
PITTSTON, PA
18640
150 Special Notices
ADOPT: Adoring
Mom, Dad, Big
Brother would like
to share a lifetime
of hugs & kisses
in our loving home
with a newborn.
Please Call
Lynda & Dennis
888-688-1422
Expenses Paid
ADOPTING A NEWBORN
is our greatest wish.
Abundance of love,
secure life of family
awaits.
Annie & Mike
1-800-606-5589.
Expenses Paid.
ADOPTION
A loving married
teacher couple
with so much to
offer would love
to adopt your
newborn. We
can provide a
lifetime of happi-
ness, security
& educational
opportunities.
Expenses paid.
Nancy/Kevin
1-866-254-3529
www.nancykevin
2adopt.com
P PA AYING $500 YING $500
MINIMUM
DRIVEN IN
Full size 4 wheel
drive trucks
ALSO PAYING TOP $$$
for heavy equip-
ment, backhoes,
dump trucks,
bull dozers
HAPPY TRAILS
TRUCK SALES
570-760-2035
542-2277
6am to 8pm
310 Attorney
Services
Bankruptcy $595
Guaranteed LowFees
www.BkyLaw.net
Atty Kurlancheek
825-5252 W-B
Free Bankruptcy
Consultation
Payment plans.
Carol Baltimore
570-822-1959
380 Travel
SPRING GETAWAYS
Longwood/QVC 4/30
Seneca Lake W/E
4/30 to 5/1
Baltimore
Aquarium 5/14
Sight & Sound -
Joseph 5/14
NYC/World Yacht
5/22
Boston Pop W/E
5/28 to 5/30
1-800-432-8069
Yankees
Home Games
5/1 Blue Jays
5/15 Boston
5/22 Mets
6/26 Rockies
(Old Timers Day)
1-800-432-8069
380 Travel
Upcoming Trips
Hollywood Casi-
no, 5/9
$25 free slot
play & $5 off
buffet. 1 Lucky
Rider Wins $100
Free Slot Play
Price: $23
Hunterdon Hills
Playhouse 6/24
Branson Style
Dinner Show.
Choice of 5
entrees.Price:$85
570-654-2967
YANKEES TRIP
TO CINCINNATI
June 20, 21 and 22
(Monday, Tuesday,
Wednesday)
Catch the Yankees
take on the Reds at
The Great American
Ballpark in Cincin-
nati, Ohio
Trip Includes:
*Round trip bus
transportation
*Beer, soda & food
on the bus
*Great box level
seats to two games
(Mon & Tues night)
*Hotel accommoda-
tions at the Millenni-
um Hotel. Just three
blocks from stadium
and walking dis-
tance from Cincin-
nati Zoo and other
downtown attrac-
tions
Price: $350
Call 570-287-9701
for more info.
406 ATVs/Dune
Buggies
QUARTER MIDGET
RACE CAR
76 inch Bull Rider,
Honda 120 motor,
Kirkey seat,
new brake system,
A-Main feature wins
Asphalt/Dirt,
Many Extras,
Value $6,000,
Sell for $2,999
Call (570) 954-2749
SUZUKI ’00
QUAD MASTER
4x4, auto, 520
miles, winch, heat-
ed grips. $4,650.
570-239-2877
409 Autos under
$5000
CADILLAC `94
DEVILLE SEDAN
94,000 miles,
automatic, front
wheel drive, 4
door, air condi-
tioning, air bags,
all power, cruise
control, leather
interior, $3,300.
570-394-9004
CHRYSLER `97
SEBRING
Convertible. Gold
with newly installed
navy top/rear win-
dow. 124,000 city
miles. As is. Asking
$2,100. Negotiable.
570-822-2776 or
570 709-9404
Leave Message
412 Autos for Sale
ACURA `08 RDX
Good Condition.
53,000 miles.
AWD, Full Power,
AM/FM, CD
Changer, Blue
Tooth, XM Radio,
Leather Interior
& Sunroof
$20,500
(570) 814-8398
Call after 9:30 a.m.
BMW `07 328xi
Black with black
interior. Heated
seats. Back up &
navigation sys-
tems. New tires &
brakes. Sunroof.
Garage kept. Many
extras! 46,000
Miles.
Asking $19,500.
570-825-8888 or
626-297-0155
Call Anytime!
BMW `93 325 IC
Convertible,
Metallic Green
Exterior & Tan
Interior, 5 Speed
Transmission,
Heated Seats. 2nd
Owner, 66k Miles.
Excellent Condition,
Garage Kept,
Excellent Gas
Mileage. Carfax
available. Price
reduced $7,995
or trade for SUV or
other. Beautiful /
Fun Car.
570-388-6669
412 Autos for Sale
BMW `93 325 IC
Convertible,
Metallic Green
Exterior & Tan
Interior, 5 Speed
Transmission,
Heated Seats. 2nd
Owner, 66k Miles.
Excellent Condition,
Garage Kept,
Excellent Gas
Mileage. Carfax
available. Price
reduced $7,995
or trade for SUV or
other. Beautiful /
Fun Car.
570-388-6669
CADILLAC ‘06 STS
AWD, 6 cylinder, Sil-
ver, 52,600 miles,
sunroof, heated
seats, Bose sound
system, 6 CD
changer, satellite
radio, Onstar, park-
ing assist, remote
keyless entry, elec-
tronic keyless igni-
tion, & more!
$17,600
570-881-2775
To place your
ad Call Toll Free
1-800-427-8649
CHEVROLET ‘06
CORVETTE
CONVERTIBLE
Silver beauty, 1
Owner, Museum
quality. 4,900
miles, 6 speed. All
possible options
including Naviga-
tion, Power top.
New, paid $62,000
Must sell $45,900
570-299-9370
CHEVROLET `84
CAPRICE CLASSIC
Excellent Condition.
Very Clean. New
Tires. Burgundy red
with vinyl top.
MUST SEE! $2,000
or best offer
(570) 269-0042
Leave Message
CHEVROLET
2010 CAMARO
V-6 Victory Red,
black interior,
all bells and
whistles.
$25,000
570-706-6489
412 Autos for Sale
CHRYSLER ‘06
300C HEMI
Light green, 18,000
miles, loaded,
leather, wood trim,
$24,000.
570-222-4960
leave message
CHRYSLER `02
PT CRUISER
Inferno Red, flame
design. Chrome
wheels. 47,000
miles, one owner.
Looks and runs
great. New inspec-
tion. $5,800
Call (570) 472-1854
FORD `04 MUSTANG
Mach I, 40th
ANNIVERSARY EDITION
V8, Auto, 1,200
miles, all options,
show room condi-
tion. Call for info.
Asking $24,995
Serious inquiries
only. 570-636-3151
FORD `07 MUSTANG
63,000 highway
miles, silver, runs
great, $11,500.
negotiable.
570-479-2482
FORD `07
MUSTANG GT
Premium package,
silver, black leather
interior, 5 speed
manual. 20,000
miles. $18,900
(570) 868-3832
FORD `10 FUSION SE
Silver/grey, grey
interior. Automatic,
AWD, Moonroof/
spoiler package.
15,000 miles.
Remainer of
extended warranty.
Sirius radio, 6 CD
changer. Garage
kept. Asking
$17,000 or best
offer. Call
(570) 823-8403
FORD `92 MUSTANG
Convertible,
55,000 original
miles 5.0 auto,
some engine
upgrades. Garaged
showcar. $8200
(570) 283-8235
412 Autos for Sale
FORD ‘02 MUSTANG
GT CONVERTIBLE
Red with black top.
6,500 miles. One
Owner. Excellent
Condition. $18,500
570-760-5833
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
HYUNDAI `04
TIBURON GT
Blue, 5 speed
manual, CD, Air,
factory alarm,
power windows &
locks. 38K.
$7,500 negotiable.
Call 570-540-6236
WANTED!
ALL
JUNK
CARS!
CA$H
PAID
570-301-3602
WANTED!
ALL
JUNK
CARS!
CA$H
PAID
570-301-3602
MAZDA `04 3
Hatchback, 92,000
miles. Excellent
condition. auto,
sunroof, premium
sound and alloy
wheels. $8,300
(570) 864-2337
412 Autos for Sale
MAZDA `04 RX-8
Hunter Green,
80,000 miles.
New brakes &
rotors. New
alignment. Two
new rear tires.
No accidents.
PRICE REDUCED
$8,000 or best
offer. For more
information, call
(570) 332-4213
MERCEDES-BENZ `01
C-240
Loaded, automatic,
AC, heated leather
seats, 4 door.
$4,700
Call 570-388-6535
MERCEDES-BENZ `05
240C
4Matic, V6 - Gray,
77K highway miles,
Excellent condition,
dealer serviced. Sun
roof, heated seats.
$15,500. Call
570-288-3916
MERCEDES-BENZ `95
SL 500
Convertible, with
removable hard
top, dark Blue,
camel interior,
Summer Driving
Only, Garage Kept.
Very Good
Condition, No
Accidents. Classy
Car. Price
Reduced!
$13,995
or trade for
SUV or other.
570-388-6669
NISSAN `06 SENTRA
1.8 S, Special
Edition, Power
steering, brakes,
windows & locks.
6 CD changer.
Excellent condition,
43K. $12,500.
570-881-6897
PONTIAC ‘69 FIREBIRD 400
CONVERTIBLE
Blue/white top &
white interior.
Recent document-
ed frame-off
restoration. Over
$31,000 invested.
will sell $21,500.
570-335-3127
412 Autos for Sale
Rare, Exclusive
Opportunity To
Own...
‘26 FORD
MODEL T
Panel Delivery
100 point
Concours quality
restoration. Red
with black fend-
ers. Never Driven.
0 miles on
restoration.
RARE!
$40,000
$38,000
$36,500
2002 BMW 745i
The Flagship of
the Fleet
New - $87,000
Midnight Emerald
with beige leather
interior. 61K miles.
Mint condition.
Loaded. Garage
Kept. Navigation
Stunning,
Must Sell!
$20,000
$18,600
1993 CADILLAC
ALANTE
2 Door
Convertible
Exquisite Candy
Apple Red black
soft top. 13,000
original miles. All
available options,
including gold
alloy wheels.
Garage Kept. 1
owner. Final
Model Year.
Gorgeous
Automobile!
$31,000
$29,900
$27,900
From an Exotic,
Private Collection
Call 570-650-0278
TOYOTA `93 MR2
T-top, 5 speed.
AM/FM/CD, AC,
power antenna.
New tires. No rust.
Great condition.
$5,000
(570) 708-0269
after 6:00PM
412 Autos for Sale
NISSAN `08 ALTIMA
Low mileage,
18000 miles, auto-
matic, front wheel
drive, 4 door, anti-
lock brakes, air
conditioning, air
bags, power locks,
power windows,
power mirrors,
power seats, all
power, cruise con-
trol, GPS/naviga-
tion system,
AM/FM radio, CD
changer, Mp3 play-
er, keyless entry,
leather interior,
sun/moon roof,
rear defroster, new
floor mats, Winter
Frost pearl paint,
heated seats, side
mirror defroster,
backup camera,
auto rear view mir-
ror dimmer, Blue-
tooth, phone, nav.,
& radio controls
on steering wheel,
4.5 years remain-
ing on 7 year
100,000 miles Nis-
san bumper to
bumper Premium
Warranty included,
EXCELLENT CON-
DITION Altima
HYBRID 35city/33
highway mpg.
$18,900.
570-371-9001
Call after 5:00 p.m.
PORSCHE `02 BOXSTER
S
Great convertible,
black top, 6 speed
manual transmis-
sion, carbon fiber
dash, leather interi-
or, front & rear
trunk, fast & agile.
$18,000 or best
offer. Call
570-262-2478
SCION ‘08 TC
Low mileage,
42,000 miles, 4
speed, front wheel
drive, 2 door, anti-
lock brakes, air con-
ditioning, air bags,
power locks, power
windows, power
mirrors, cruise con-
trol, AM/FM radio,
CD player, Mp3
player, keyless
entry, sun/moon
roof, rear defroster,
tinted windows.
$14,200.
(570) 443-7522 Call
before 9:30 p.m.
412 Autos for Sale
SUBARU `02
IMPREZA WRX
Low mileage,
57,000 miles, 5
speed, all-wheel
drive, 4 door, anti-
lock brakes, air
conditioning, air
bags, power locks,
power windows,
power mirrors,
cruise control,
AM/FM radio, CD
changer, rear
defroster, new Blitz
Stainless Exhaust,
AEM Cold Air
Intake, TURBOXS
Blowoff Valve &
Boost Control.
$10,500.
(201) 704-8640
Call before
7:30 pm
TOYOTA `06
AVALON
New tires, new
brakes, Inspected
March 4, AC,
AVPS, Fully
loaded, 18,000
mile bumper to
bumper warranty.
90,000 miles.
$12,900.
(570) 881-3712
Volkswagen ‘03
GTI
moonroof, 5 speed,
loaded,$9750
excellent condition,
570-578-2149
415 Autos-Antique
& Classic
CADILLAC `80
COUPE DEVILLE
Excellent condition,
$3,000 located in
Hazleton.
570-454-1945 or
561-573-4114
CHEVY `66 BEL AIR
2 door post car, in
good condition for
age. Serious
inquiries only, call
for details. $8,500
or best offer. Call
Steve at
570-407-0531
PAGE 10 SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2011 SUNDAY DISPATCH
*ALL PRICES PLUS TAX, TAG, & TITLE. FINANCING AVAILABLE WITH APPROVED CREDIT. PRIOR SALES EXCLUDED. DEALER NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS. WARRANTY ON SELECT MAKES AND MODELS. SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS. UNITS MAY BE SOLD PRIOR TO PRINTING.
OFFERS EXPIRE 04/30/11.
Call 1.866.356.9383
MotorWorld Drive, Just Off Interstate 81, Wilkes-Barre
Cc|| ¡e|| Free 1·8óó·35ó·º383 º MeIerWer|d Drìve 1usI O|| |nIersIcIe 81, Wì|kes·8crre
SHOP 24/7 @ MOTORWORLDGROUP.COM SALES HOURS MON – FRI: 9AM-7PM SAT: 9AM-5PM SUN: OPEN FOR OUTDOOR BROWSING NOON-5PM
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P14809B
H26171A
K11889A
L11157A
H26361A
K11898A
M7824A
T27727A
J4536B
H25981A
K11738A
T26956A
T27469A
B9072A
H26274A
BS0319B
H26310A
H26338A
H26362A
DP15146
T27877A
H26304A
T26966A
K11638A
L11133A
B9027B
T27768A
H26069A
K11457A
CP15174
T27022A
CP15171
H25899A
H25638A
JP15133A
A10617A
T27451A
H26221A
H26245A
K11852A
HP15231
H26049B
A10678A
DP14985A
M7758A
H26179A
H26118A
JP15156
T27677A
H25659A
D0194A
JP15140
A10649A
K11381A
H25755A
JP15132
DP15169
H26053A
H26223A
J4502A
KP15216
T27602B
JP15134
H25760A
KP15149
H26122A
HP15148
L10734C
H26370A
T27415A
H25450B
H26167A
TP15235
L11063A
H25977A
H26104A
T27498A
T27622A
KP15150
TP15207
H26177A
P15214
P15213
T27788A
T26970A
J4567A
H26246A
D0211A
T27346A
H25961A
T27075A
K11706A
J4539A
KP15215
K11865A
H26340A
BP15177A
T27791A
H26233A
BS0322A
J4513A
H26073A
A10655A
K11736A
CP15135
H26186A
H25918A
H26328A
H25563A
H26389A
T27805A
A10710B
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Mercury...
Mercury...
Hyundai....
Chevrolet.
Honda.......
Hyundai....
Ford...........
Ford...........
Jeep..........
Honda.......
Hyundai....
Toyota.......
Toyota.......
Nissan.......
Honda.......
Dodge.......
Jeep..........
Toyota.......
Honda.......
Dodge.......
Honda.......
Honda.......
Toyota.......
Hyundai....
Lexus........
Jeep..........
Toyota.......
Honda.......
Hyundai....
Chrysler....
Toyota.......
Chrysler....
Nissan.......
Toyota.......
Jeep..........
Acura........
Toyota.......
Honda.......
Honda.......
Suzuki.......
Honda.......
Dodge.......
Honda.......
Hyundai....
Mitsubishi
Honda.......
Honda.......
Jeep..........
Toyota.......
Honda.......
Mitsubishi
Jeep..........
Toyota.......
Honda.......
Honda.......
Jeep..........
Dodge.......
Honda.......
Honda.......
Jeep..........
Hyundai....
Ford...........
Jeep..........
Honda.......
Hyundai....
Honda.......
Honda.......
Honda.......
Toyota.......
Dodge.......
Dodge.......
Honda.......
Toyota.......
Lexus........
Honda.......
Honda.......
Toyota.......
Toyota.......
Hyundai....
Toyota.......
Mercury...
Nissan.......
Nissan.......
Toyota.......
Ford...........
Jeep..........
Honda.......
Toyota.......
Toyota.......
Honda.......
VW.............
Ford...........
Jeep..........
Hyundai....
Mazda.......
Lexus........
Honda.......
Toyota.......
Ford...........
Lexus........
Jeep..........
Honda.......
Honda.......
Honda.......
Chrysler....
Honda.......
Honda.......
Honda.......
Honda.......
Honda.......
GMC..........
Toyota.......
4dr Sdn 2.3........................................
4dr Sdn GS ........................................
4dr Sdn GT Auto................................
2dr Cpe LS.........................................
LX Auto..............................................
4dr GLS 4WD Auto 2.7L V6...............
2dr Cpe S...........................................
4dr Sdn SE.........................................
4dr Sport 4WD..................................
5dr HB Man.......................................
4dr Sdn SE.........................................
4dr Sdn LE Auto.................................
5dr LE FWD 7-Passenger...................
4dr Sdn SE Auto................................
EX AT.................................................
4dr HB SE FWD.................................
4dr Laredo 4WD................................
4dr Sdn Auto XLE ..............................
4dr Man LX........................................
4dr Sdn SXT.......................................
4dr Auto LX........................................
4dr Auto LX........................................
4dr Sdn Auto LE.................................
4dr Sdn I4 Auto Limited ....................
4dr Sdn..............................................
4WD 4dr Sport ..................................
4dr Sdn V6 Auto LE ...........................
4dr Auto LX........................................
4dr Sdn Limited.................................
4dr Sdn Limited.................................
4dr Base 4-cyl 4WD..........................
4dr Sdn Limited.................................
4WD 4dr Auto S................................
4dr Sdn I4 Auto LE.............................
4WD 4dr Sport ..................................
4dr Sdn AT.........................................
4dr Sdn XL.........................................
4dr Auto EX .......................................
4WD EX AT........................................
4WD 4dr Auto XSport w/Snrf ...........
4dr Auto LX........................................
4dr Sdn R/T RWD..............................
RTS AT...............................................
2dr 2.0T Auto.....................................
4WD 4dr XLS.....................................
2dr Auto EX-L ....................................
4dr I4 Auto EX ...................................
4WD 4dr Sport *Ltd Avail*...............
4WD 4dr 4-cyl Limited ......................
4WD 5dr EX.......................................
AWD 4dr LS.......................................
4WD 4dr Sport *Ltd Avail*...............
4dr Sdn I4 Auto LE.............................
4WD 5dr Auto EX..............................
4WD 5dr EX.......................................
4WD 4dr Sport ..................................
4dr Wgn SXT.....................................
4WD 4dr AT EX..................................
4dr I4 Auto LX....................................
4WD 4dr Limited...............................
...........................................................
Supercab 133” XLT 4WD...................
4WD 4dr Sport ..................................
4dr I4 Auto EX ...................................
...........................................................
4dr I4 Auto EX-L PZEV.......................
...........................................................
4dr I4 Auto EX-L ................................
5dr HB................................................
AWD 4dr SXT....................................
4dr Wgn SE .......................................
4dr I4 Auto EX ...................................
4dr Sdn I4 Auto LE.............................
4dr Sdn..............................................
4WD 5dr EX-L....................................
4WD 5dr EX-L....................................
4dr Sdn I4 Auto LE.............................
4dr Sdn I4 Auto LE.............................
...........................................................
4dr Sdn I4 Auto LE.............................
4WD 4dr V6.......................................
...........................................................
...........................................................
4dr Sdn I4 Auto LE.............................
4dr Sdn V6 SE AWD..........................
4WD 4dr Laredo................................
4WD 5dr LX.......................................
4WD 4dr 4-cyl Sport..........................
4dr Sdn I4 Auto LE.............................
4WD 5dr EX-L....................................
4dr Wgn SE .......................................
2dr Cpe Premium...............................
4WD 4dr Sport ..................................
4dr Sdn 2.4L Auto GLS......................
AWD 4dr Grand Touring
4dr Sdn..............................................
4WD 5dr EX-L....................................
4WD 4dr 4-cyl Sport..........................
2dr Conv Deluxe................................
4dr Sdn..............................................
4WD 4dr Sport ..................................
4dr V6 Auto EX-L...............................
4dr V6 Auto EX-L...............................
4WD 5dr EX-L....................................
4dr Sdn 300C RWD...........................
4WD 4dr EX.......................................
4WD 4dr VP.......................................
4WD 5dr EX.......................................
4WD 5dr EX.......................................
4WD 4dr VP.......................................
4WD 4dr SLE1...................................
4dr SR5 V8 Auto 4WD.......................
Milan...........
GrandMarquis
Elantra.........
Monte Carlo
Accord.........
Santa Fe......
Focus...........
FiveHundred
Liberty.........
Fit ................
Azera...........
Camry .........
Sienna.........
Maxima.......
Civic ............
Caliber.........
GrandChero
Corolla ........
Civic ............
Avenger ......
Civic ............
Civic ............
Corolla ........
Sonata.........
GS 300 ........
Compass.....
Camry .........
Civic ............
Azera...........
Sebring .......
RAV4 ...........
Sebring .......
Xterra..........
Camry .........
Patriot .........
TL ................
Avalon.........
Civic ............
CR-V............
GrandVitara
Civic ............
Charger.......
Ridgeline.....
Genesis.......
Outlander....
Civic ............
Accord.........
Patriot .........
RAV4 ...........
CR-V............
Endeavor ....
Patriot .........
Camry .........
Element.......
CR-V............
Liberty.........
GrandCaravan
Element.......
Accord.........
Liberty.........
Sonata.........
F-150............
Commander
Accord.........
Sonata.........
Accord.........
Accord.........
Accord.........
Prius............
Journey.......
GrandCaravan
Accord.........
Camry .........
ES 330.........
CR-V............
CR-V............
Camry .........
Camry .........
Sonata.........
Camry .........
Mariner .......
Altima .........
Altima .........
Camry .........
Fusion .........
GrandChero
CR-V............
RAV4 ...........
Camry .........
CR-V............
Routan ........
Mustang......
Liberty.........
Sonata.........
CX-9 ............
ES 330.........
CR-V............
RAV4 ...........
Mustang......
ES 330.........
Liberty.........
Accord.........
Accord.........
CR-V............
300-Series...
Pilot .............
Pilot .............
CR-V............
CR-V............
Pilot .............
Envoy..........
4Runner ......
68,535
35,466
69,902
52,020
87,743
85,559
45,694
44,698
75,082
22,789
50,765
67,434
86,299
60,313
57,315
34,535
70,722
43,748
46,117
23,132
26,385
30,041
33,842
46,644
57,067
59,730
29,762
20,870
43,959
24,973
32,738
21,071
65,037
44,326
33,977
59,149
42,738
20,903
68,930
43,498
2,192
50,087
57,118
4,579
40,232
4,726
20,651
18,510
56,948
52,311
41,089
17,064
21,592
33,037
32,978
29,605
28,049
56,262
26,153
46,140
26,861
69,184
34,040
21,693
15,890
24,073
32,207
24,089
34,820
53,116
36,313
27,827
32,059
54,703
47,834
35,158
12,394
24,925
11,509
23,755
23,676
37,675
35,986
23,987
30,116
47,196
28,571
37,156
34,098
46,857
21,595
23,104
28,610
14,767
56,733
50,341
44,842
47,276
33,358
58,840
27,749
32,704
24,509
53,900
39,230
39,473
32,721
19,479
27,940
35,088
44,468
50,988
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$9,989
$10,489
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$11,489
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$12,489
$13,489
$13,979
$13,989
$13,989
$13,989
$14,479
$14,489
$14,489
$14,489
$14,989
$14,989
$15,295
$15,479
$15,479
$15,479
$15,479
$15,489
$15,489
$15,495
$15,979
$15,995
$16,395
$16,395
$16,450
$16,489
$16,499
$16,499
$16,595
$16,895
$16,979
$17,489
$17,499
$17,499
$17,595
$17,895
$17,995
$17,995
$17,995
$18,295
$18,295
$18,295
$18,499
$18,499
$18,795
$18,995
$18,995
$18,995
$18,995
$18,995
$18,999
$18,999
$18,999
$18,999
$18,999
$19,050
$19,095
$19,150
$19,195
$19,195
$19,375
$19,479
$19,499
$19,499
$19,499
$19,499
$19,695
$19,795
$19,895
$19,979
$19,979
$19,999
$19,999
$19,999
$19,999
$19,999
$19,999
$19,999
$19,999
$20,479
$20,479
$20,479
$20,499
$20,499
$20,499
$20,499
$20,499
$20,499
$20,499
$20,499
$20,499
$20,499
$20,499
$20,499
$20,595
$20,650
$20,795
$20,995
$20,995
$21,479
$21,479
$21,479
$21,479
$21,499
$21,499
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H26183B
H26263A
H26353A
B8804C
H26023A
P15164
CP15175
A10687A
J4420A
AP15217
T27749A
K11830A
J4543A
T27576A
T27820A
T27642A
T27509A
H26184A
AP15205
H25980A
H25661A
TP15160
T27695A
TP15236
D0183A
L11124A
B9064A
H25653A
H26123A
B9020A
T27123A
H25556A
H26326A
H26324A
H26365A
T27706A
T27703A
H26295A
DP15178
A10664A
H26352A
B9055A
T27376A
T27738A
H26099A
T27976A
L11148B
DP15200
L11172A
P15179
L11033B
T27392A
L11170A
K11896A
B8953A
H25996A
L11034A
A10695A
B8782B
L11127A
T27626A
L11108A
B8893A
L11140A
L11156A
T27694A
A10548A
T27895A
T27909A
H26381A
L11175A
T27948A
H26120A
B8809A
L11142A
T27776A
L11173A
T27531A
B9062A
LS0308A
M7813A
T27569A
T27713A
A10750A
A10768A
A10663A
L11126A
BP15117
LP15225
L11178A
BP15119
L11017A
TP15218
L11149A
T27961A
BP15121
L11186A
B8967A
BP15102
BP15153
BP15152
P15127
T27847A
L11183A
L11079A
A10688A
T27671A
L10953B
H26002A
B8776A
LP15237
B9034A
2010
2007
2008
2008
2008
2007
2010
2007
2008
2008
2008
2006
2007
2005
2007
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2008
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2009
2010
Honda.......
Honda.......
Toyota.......
Honda.......
Honda.......
Cadillac.....
Chrysler....
Acura........
Honda.......
Acura........
Honda.......
Toyota.......
Jeep..........
Toyota.......
Toyota.......
Honda.......
Toyota.......
Honda.......
Acura........
Honda.......
Honda.......
Toyota.......
Honda.......
Toyota.......
Dodge.......
Lexus........
BMW.........
Honda.......
Honda.......
Audi ..........
Toyota.......
Honda.......
Honda.......
Honda.......
Honda.......
Toyota.......
Honda.......
Honda.......
Dodge.......
Lexus........
Honda.......
Toyota.......
Toyota.......
Toyota.......
Honda.......
Nissan.......
Lexus........
Dodge.......
Lexus........
Chevrolet.
Cadillac.....
Toyota.......
Lexus........
Honda.......
Infiniti .......
Toyota.......
Lexus........
Lincoln......
Chevrolet.
Lexus........
Dodge.......
Lexus........
MB.............
Lexus........
Lexus........
Toyota.......
Chevrolet.
Lincoln......
Chevrolet.
Ford...........
Lexus........
Honda.......
Nissan.......
Honda.......
Lexus........
Toyota.......
Lexus........
Toyota.......
Honda.......
Infiniti .......
Chevrolet.
Chevrolet.
Acura........
Acura........
GMC..........
Lexus........
Lexus........
MB.............
Lexus........
Lexus........
MB.............
Lexus........
Audi ..........
Lexus........
Toyota.......
MB.............
Lexus........
BMW.........
MB.............
MB.............
MB.............
Cadillac.....
Toyota.......
Lexus........
Lexus........
Lexus........
Toyota.......
MB.............
BMW.........
MB.............
Lexus........
MB.............
4WD 5dr Auto LX ..............................
4WD 5dr EX-L....................................
4WD 4dr 4-cyl 4-Spd AT....................
4WD Crew Cab RT ............................
4WD 4dr EX.......................................
4dr Sdn Luxury I.................................
4dr Wgn Touring................................
AWD 4dr............................................
4WD 5dr EX-L w/Navi.......................
4dr Sdn Auto .....................................
4WD 4dr VP.......................................
4dr Sdn Limited.................................
4WD 4dr Limited...............................
4dr SR5 V6 Auto 4WD.......................
4WD 4dr V6 Limited..........................
4WD 4dr EX.......................................
4WD 4dr V6 5-Spd AT.......................
4WD 5dr EX.......................................
4dr Sdn Auto .....................................
4WD 5dr EX.......................................
4dr V6 Auto EX-L...............................
5dr 7-Pass Van LE FWD.....................
4dr V6 Auto EX-L...............................
4dr Sdn..............................................
4WD Mega Cab 160.5” SLT..............
4dr SUV AWD....................................
4dr Sdn 328xi AWD...........................
4WD 4dr SE.......................................
4WD 4dr SE.......................................
4dr Sdn Auto 2.0T quattro.................
4WD 4dr 4-cyl 4-Spd AT Ltd..............
4WD 4dr SE.......................................
4WD 4dr EXL.....................................
5dr EX................................................
2WD 4dr EX-L w/Navi.......................
Dbl 4.7L V8 5-Spd AT SR5.................
4WD 4dr SE.......................................
4WD 4dr EX.......................................
4WD Crew Cab Bighorn/Lonestar.....
4dr Sdn..............................................
5dr EX-L.............................................
4WD 4dr Auto ...................................
Dbl 5.7L V8 6-Spd AT SR5.................
Dbl 5.7L V8 6-Spd AT Grade..............
4WD Crew Cab RTL w/Lthr...............
4WD Crew Cab SWB Auto SE ..........
4dr Sport Sdn Auto............................
4WD Crew Cab Bighorn/Lonestar.....
4dr Sdn..............................................
4WD Ext Cab 143.5” LT.....................
AWD 4dr V6 ......................................
4WD 4dr 4-cyl 4-Spd AT Ltd..............
4dr Sdn..............................................
4WD 4dr EX.......................................
4dr x AWD.........................................
4WD 4dr V6 5-Spd AT Ltd.................
4dr Sdn..............................................
AWD 4dr............................................
4WD Ext Cab 143.5” LS ....................
4dr Sdn..............................................
4WD Quad Cab 140.5” SLT...............
4dr Sdn..............................................
4MATIC 4dr 3.5L................................
4dr Sdn..............................................
4dr Sdn..............................................
Dbl 5.7L V8 6-Spd AT Grade..............
4WD Ext Cab 143.5” LTZ...................
AWD 4dr............................................
4WD Ext Cab 143.5” LT w/1LT..........
4WD SuperCab 145” STX .................
4dr Sdn..............................................
4WD Crew Cab RTL...........................
4WD 4dr V6 LE..................................
4WD 5dr EX-L....................................
4dr Hybrid SUV AWD........................
5dr 7-Pass Van XLE Ltd AWD............
4dr Hybrid SUV AWD........................
4WD 4dr V6 Base..............................
4WD 5dr EX-L w/Navi.......................
AWD 4dr............................................
4WD Ext Cab 143.5” LT.....................
4WD Ext Cab 143.5” LT.....................
4WD 4dr ............................................
4WD 4dr Sport Pkg............................
AWD 4dr SLT1...................................
4dr Sdn AWD ....................................
AWD 4dr............................................
4dr Sdn Luxury 3.5L 4MATIC.............
4dr Sdn..............................................
AWD 4dr............................................
4dr 3.5L 4MATIC................................
AWD 4dr............................................
2dr Cpe Man quattro 2.0L Premium Plus..
4dr Sport Sdn Auto AWD..................
4WD 4dr V6 SE..................................
4dr 3.5L 4MATIC................................
AWD 4dr............................................
4dr Sdn 750Li ....................................
4MATIC 4dr 4.7L................................
4MATIC 4dr 3.5L................................
4MATIC 4dr 3.5L................................
AWD 4dr............................................
4WD 4dr V6 Limited..........................
4dr Sdn..............................................
AWD 4dr............................................
4WD 4dr ............................................
4WD 4dr LV8 6-Spd AT Ltd................
4MATIC 4dr 3.5L................................
AWD 4dr 30i......................................
4MATIC 4dr 3.0L BlueTec..................
4dr Sdn AWD ....................................
4MATIC 4dr 5.5L................................
Element.......
CR-V............
RAV4 ...........
Ridgeline.....
Pilot .............
DTS .............
Town&Cntry
RDX.............
CR-V............
TL ................
Pilot .............
Avalon.........
GrandChero
4Runner ......
RAV4 ...........
Pilot .............
RAV4 ...........
CR-V............
TL ................
CR-V............
Accord.........
Sienna.........
Accord.........
CamryHybrid
Ram 1500....
RX 330.........
3-Series.......
Pilot .............
Pilot .............
A4................
RAV4 ...........
Pilot .............
Pilot .............
Odyssey......
Pilot .............
Tundra 4WD
Pilot .............
Pilot .............
Dakota.........
ES 350.........
Odyssey......
FJ Cruiser....
Tundra 4WD
Tundra 4WD
Ridgeline.....
Frontier .......
IS 350 ..........
Dakota.........
LS 430 .........
Silverado1500
SRX.............
RAV4 ...........
ES 350.........
Pilot .............
G37..............
RAV4 ...........
ES 350.........
MKX............
Silverado1500
ES 350.........
Ram 1500....
ES 350.........
R-Class........
ES 350.........
ES 350.........
Tundra 4WD...
Silverado1500
MKX............
Silverado2500HD
F-150............
ES 350.........
Ridgeline.....
Pathfinder ...
AccordCrosstour
RX 400h ......
Sienna.........
RX 400h ......
Highlander..
AccordCrosstour
FX35............
Silverado1500
Silverado1500
MDX............
MDX............
Acadia.........
GS 350 ........
RX 350.........
E-Class ........
ES 350.........
RX 350.........
R-Class........
RX 350.........
A5................
IS 250 ..........
Highlander..
R-Class........
RX 350.........
7-Series .......
GL-Class ......
M-Class.......
M-Class.......
Escalade......
4Runner ......
LS 460 .........
RX 350.........
GX 470 ........
Sequoia.......
R-Class........
X5................
M-Class.......
LS 460 .........
GL-Class ......
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
$21,979
$21,979
$21,979
$21,989
$21,995
$21,995
$21,995
$21,999
$21,999
$21,999
$22,479
$22,479
$22,499
$22,499
$22,499
$22,895
$22,979
$22,979
$22,999
$22,999
$22,999
$23,395
$23,479
$23,479
$23,499
$23,499
$23,499
$23,895
$23,895
$23,895
$23,979
$23,995
$23,999
$24,479
$24,479
$24,499
$24,499
$24,499
$24,695
$24,999
$25,479
$25,479
$25,499
$25,595
$25,995
$25,999
$26,479
$26,499
$26,499
$26,595
$27,479
$27,479
$27,479
$27,479
$27,895
$27,990
$28,479
$28,499
$28,499
$28,979
$28,995
$28,995
$28,999
$29,479
$29,479
$29,479
$29,499
$29,499
$29,499
$29,499
$29,499
$29,979
$29,995
$30,479
$31,479
$31,479
$31,479
$31,479
$31,479
$31,499
$31,499
$31,995
$31,999
$32,479
$32,499
$32,895
$33,479
$33,995
$34,479
$34,979
$34,995
$35,479
$35,499
$35,979
$35,979
$36,479
$36,489
$36,499
$36,995
$36,995
$37,995
$39,995
$40,479
$40,479
$41,195
$41,479
$43,479
$46,995
$47,499
$48,479
$49,479
$77,479
21,335
31,772
19,810
44,348
42,737
31,363
17,933
46,680
48,864
33,549
15,038
56,998
52,557
53,877
47,581
35,013
14,591
30,341
29,753
32,684
28,967
13,317
18,002
18,432
55,974
67,910
53,045
31,247
38,604
18,062
26,864
34,157
51,202
14,799
37,861
71,440
45,038
32,049
12,321
42,416
32,888
42,948
62,285
41,984
20,439
19,584
46,809
13,123
25,556
21,185
35,319
9,438
36,592
27,029
19,058
13,017
31,761
31,903
6,691
26,268
37,344
15,058
29,491
18,905
29,967
35,569
34,286
29,326
19,269
6,858
33,950
21,548
9,592
7,366
32,325
38,265
17,915
15,950
12,568
29,638
13,714
1,932
16,143
41,865
29,830
22,978
30,174
32,749
22,761
34,410
25,459
30,245
31,760
12,010
18,492
31,982
30,806
48,901
29,502
25,172
24,282
32,519
15,603
26,273
17,449
19,582
15,288
14,493
21,554
23,493
25,768
14,023
Pre-Owned Superstore 14 Brands p Pre-Owned Sup 14 Brands
J
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100
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DELS
TO CHOOSE FROM!
SUNDAY DISPATCH SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2011 PAGE 11
PAGE 12 SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2011 SUNDAY DISPATCH
The Bes tP rices In The V a lley!
821- 2772 •1- 800- 444- 7172
601 KIDDER STREET, W ILKES-BA RRE, PA
M O N .-THUR S. 8 :3 0 -8 :0 0 pm ; FR I. 8 :3 0 -7:0 0 pm ; SAT. 8 :3 0 -5 :0 0 pm
V AL L EY CH EV R OL ET
www.v alleyc hev ro let.c o m K EN W AL L ACE’S
EX IT 170 B O FF I-8 1TO EX IT 1. B EAR R IG HT O N B USIN ESS R O UTE 3 0 9 TO SIX TH LIG HT. JUST B ELOW W YO M IN G V ALLEY M ALL.
THE B EST COV ER AG E IN AM ER ICA.
100,000-M IL E
5 Y EA R PO W ERTRA IN LIM ITED W A RRA NTY
100,000-M IL E S
5 Y EA RS O F C O URTESY TRA NSPO RTA TIO N
100,000-M IL E S
5 Y EA RS O F RO A DSIDE A SSISTA NC E
W hichever com es first.See dealer for lim ited w arranty details.
the
W E W A N T
YOUR
TRA DE !
$TOP DOL L A R$
V IS IT US 24/7 W W W .V A L L E YCHE V ROL E T.COM
*Tax & Tags additional. LowAPR to qualified customers. See dealer for details. Select vehicles may not be GM Certified. Photos may not represent actual vehicle. Prior use daily rental on select vehicles. Not responsible for typographical errors.
06 CHE V Y E XP RE S S COM M CUTA W A Y
#Z2314,54K M iles........................................
$
16,499
*
sa les ev en t
1
.9%
A s L ow A s Pre -Ow n e d
w w w .va lleych evro let.co m
N EW
2011 S IL V E RAD O HD
D URAM AX D IE S E L S
IN S TO C K !!
2011 C HE V Y S IL V E RAD O
1500 4W D RE G UL AR C AB
Stk. #11412,4.3L V 6,A utom atic T ransm ission,
A ir C ond itioning,Sid e Im p actA ir B ags,17”
SteelW heels,40/20/40 Seating
M S R P
$25,3 85
2011 C HE V Y IM P AL A
L S S E D AN
M S R P
$25,490
Stk. #11173,3.5L V 6 A utom atic,D ual Z one A ir
C ond itioning,Stabilitrak,Six-W ay Pow er D river Seat,
PW ,PD L ,T ilt,O nStar,X M Satellite R ad io
2011 C HE V Y S IL V E RAD O
1500 E X T C AB 4W D
Stk. #11230,4.8L V 8 4 Sp eed A utom atic,Stabilitrak,
D eep T inted G lass,A ir C ond itioning,F old ing R ear
Seat,17” SteelW heels,40/20/40 Seating
M S R P
$3 0,620
L S • LT • LT Z
AL L N E W
2011
C HE V Y C RUZE
2011 C HE V Y M AL IBU
1L S S E D AN
M S R P
$22,7 3 5
Stk. #11417,2.4L D O H C M F I A utom atic,
A ir,R em ote K eyless E ntry,A M /F M /C D /
M P3,PW ,PD L ,O nStar,X M Satellite
O nSta r O nSta r O nSta r
Tu rn-B y-Tu rn Tu rn-B y-Tu rn Tu rn-B y-Tu rn
N a viga tio n N a viga tio n N a viga tio n
75 75 75
AV A ILA B LE AV A ILA B LE AV A ILA B LE
IN -STO C K & IN -STO C K & IN -STO C K &
IN -B O U N D IN -B O U N D IN -B O U N D
O
R
O
R
M S R P
$1 7 ,1 7 5
2011 C HE V Y S IL V E RAD O
1500 4W D C RE W C AB
Stk. #11099,4.8L V 8 A uto.,A ir C ond itioning,Stabilitrak,
PW ,PD L ,K eyless E ntry,O nStar,X M Satellite R ad io,
C hrom e W heels,Pow er H eated M irrors,A M /F M /C D
M S R P
$3 4,505
2011 C HE V Y TRAV E RS E
FW D & AW D
Stk. #11517 M S R P
$3 0,43 9
L S • LT • LT Z
M S R P
$42,7 95
2011 C HE V Y TAHO E
L S 4W D
Stk. #11370,5.3L V 8 A utom atic,C lim ate
C ontrol,Stabilitrak w / T raction C ontrol,PW ,
PD L ,B luetooth,A uto L ocking D ifferential,
8 Passenger Seating,T hird R ow Seat,O nStar,
X M Satellite
F o r7 2 M o s F o r7 2 M o s F o r7 2 M o s
0
%
0
%
0
%
A P R A P R A P R
F o r60 M o s F o r60 M o s F o r60 M o s
0
%
0
%
0
%
A P R A P R A P R
F o r60 M o s F o r60 M o s F o r60 M o s
0
%
0
%
0
%
A P R A P R A P R
F o r60 M o s F o r60 M o s F o r60 M o s
0
%
0
%
0
%
A P R A P R A P R
F o r60 M o s F o r60 M o s F o r60 M o s
0
%
0
%
0
%
A P R A P R A P R
F o r60 M o s F o r60 M o s F o r60 M o s
0
%
0
%
0
%
A P R A P R A P R
*Tax & tags additional. ** Price includes all rebates and Ally down Payment Assistance (must finance through Ally) to qualified buyers. LowAPR in lieu of rebates. CRUZE: lease for 39 mos at $159 per
month plus tax and tags, 12K miles per year, Security deposit is waived, $2519 due at signing to qualified buyers; MALIBU: lease for 39 mos at $179 per month plus tax & tags, 12K miles per year, $1949,
first payment, security deposit and tags due at lease due at signing to qualified buyers. EQUINOX: lease for 39 mos at $269 per month plus tax & tags, 12K miles per year, $2459 due at signing (includes
security deposit) to qualified buyers. Spring Trade Assistance rebate – applies to in-stock inventory only. Must trade in a General Motors 2004 or newer vehicle to be eligible for Valley Chevrolet incentive.
Cars $1000 trade assistance; trucks, SUVs $1500 trade assistance. Certain restrictions apply. Prior sales excluded. Artwork for illustration purposes only. Must take delivery by May 2, 2011.
In clu d es AAR P R eb a te
B een allover tow n looking for the bestdeal? P ullinto our
lotfor unm atched new and pre-ow ned autom otive values.
O ur prices,selection and service m ake us w orth the drive!
C hevy Runs Deep
$
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P er
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9
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**
2011 C HE V Y C AM ARO
C O UP E
1LT • 2LT • 1SS • 2SS
O R D ER Y O UR O R D ER Y O UR O R D ER Y O UR
C A M A R O C A M A R O C A M A R O
C O N V ER TIBL E C O N V ER TIBL E C O N V ER TIBL E
TO D AY ! TO D AY ! TO D AY !
$
2
2
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9
9
**
S TAR TIN G AT
Stk. #10531,4.8L V 8,A ir,C argo Sid e
D oor,C ustom C loth Seats,A M /F M
Stereo,F ull F loor C overing,16” W heels
2010 C HE V Y E X P RE S S
2500 C ARG O V AN
M S R P
$27 ,63 5
F o r60 M o s F o r60 M o s F o r60 M o s
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0
%
0
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A P R A P R A P R
$
2
2
,9
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** S TAR TIN G AT
$
2
4
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**
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$
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**
$
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$
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S TAR TIN G AT
2011 C HE V Y E Q UIN O X
AW D a n d FW D
L S • LT • LT Z • 4 C yl. • 6 C yl.
ST K #11458
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$23 ,490
$
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P er
M o . L EAS E
F OR
$
2
6
9
10 CHE V Y IM P A L A L T
#Z2387,13K M iles .......................................
$
19,388
*
06 P ON TIA C TORRE N T S UV
#Z2323,49K M iles........................................
$
16,999
*
08 CHE V Y A V E O H/B
#Z2063,22K M iles............................................
$
9,999
*
06 CHE V Y M ON TE CA RL O L T
#Z2342,36K M iles........................................
$
14,995
*
10 BUICK E N CL A V E CXL A W D
#Z2316,17K M iles.......................................
$
34,900
*
08 CHE V Y S IL V E RA DO E XT CA B
#11452A ,27K M iles......................................
$
25,878
*
08 CHE V Y M A L IBU L T
#11458A ,24K M iles......................................
$
15,995
*
08 CHE V Y IM P A L A L S
#Z2370,O nly 17K M iles..................................
$
14,995
*
06 HUM M E R H3
#10549C ,62K M iles......................................
$
19,999
*
06-07 CA DIL L A C S RX A W D
#Z2213,10 To C hoose From ...............S ta rtin g A t
$
21,972
* 05 CHE V Y S IL V E RA DO DUM P TRUCK
#Z2372,30K M iles........................................
$
23,999
*
2008 P ON TIA C G6 GT
CON V E RTIBL E
#Z2380
B L OW OU T
P R ICE !
$
21,495
* $
21,495
*
ON L Y
24K M IL E S
3.9L
Sport
P a c ka ge
2006 P ON TIA C S OL S TICE
CON V E RTIBL E
#Z2379
B L OW OU T
P R ICE !
$
16,888
* $
16,888
*
P ow er
P a c ka ge
45K M iles
Su n roof 07•08•10 CHE V Y IM P A L A S
L S •L T•S S
B L OW OU T
P R ICE !
$
12,995
* $
12,995
*
L OW
M IL E S
18
Im pa la s
To Ch oose
F rom
S ta rtin g A t
2007 BUICK L A CROS S E
CX S E DA N
B L OW OU T
P R ICE !
$
13,999
* $
13,999
*
#Z2281A
3 8K
M iles
2008 CHE V Y CA N YON
4W D E XT. CA B
ON L Y
25K M iles
B L OW OU T
P R ICE !
$
20,850
* $
20,850
*
ON L Y
25K M IL E S
2010 CHE V Y E XP RE S S 3500L T
P A S S E N GE R V A N
#Z2312
B L OW OU T
P R ICE !
$
24,950
* $
24,950
*
ON L Y 9,264
M IL E S
12
P A SSE N G E R
V A N
2009 CHE V Y COBA L TS
CP E S •S DN S
#Z2359
B L OW OU T
P R ICE !
$
11,967
* $
11,967
*
L OW
M IL E S
16
Coba lts To
Ch oose
F rom
S ta rtin g A t
2007 S A TURN OUTL OOK
XE A W D
#Z2328
B L OW OU T
P R ICE !
$
25,999
* $
25,999
* 3 1K
M iles
10 CHE V Y COBA L T L T 4DR
#Z2336,25K M iles.......................................
$
13,699
*
07 CHE V Y S IL V E RA DO 2500HD
#10630B,Diesel,65K M iles............................
$
27,500
* 07 CHE V Y COL ORA DO W /T
#Z2320,O nly 32K M iles..................................
$
18,999
*
08 CHE V Y S IL V E RA DO 1500 2W D
#Z2400,O nly 9K M iles...................................
$
16,450
*
06 P ON TIA C G6 GT
#11537A ,39K M iles......................................
$
14,999
*
06 CHE V Y COBA L T S S
#Z2381,O nly 4K M iles...................................
$
20,875
*
05 GM C S A V A N A CA RGO V A N
#Z2415,38K M iles........................................
$
16,999
*
06 GM C S IE RRA DUM P TRUCK
#Z2373,29K M iles........................................
$
23,999
*
08 CA DIL L A C CTS A W D
#Z2356,20K M iles........................................
$
31,500
*
In clu d es
AAR P R eb a te
#Z2414
E n d s
M a y 2n d
Up To 60 M o s Up To 60 M o s Up To 60 M o s
O n S electV eh icles O n S electV eh icles O n S electV eh icles
0
%
0
%
0
%
A P R A P R A P R
N E W S E RV ICE HOURS
O PEN SATUR D AY
8 AM -12 N O O N
M O N . -FR I. 8 AM -6 :3 0 PM
2 2 1 Co nyngha m Ave., W ilk es -B a rre
5 70 .8 2 1.2 778
SPRING TRAD E SPRING TRAD E
ASSISTANC E ASSISTANC E
LIMITED TIME – Now til May 2
nd
LIMITED TIME – Now til May 2
nd
Yourtrade can getyou an
additionalup to
$
1,500 OFF
yournew lease orpurchase!
Trade a GM 2004 -2011 and get
up to $1500 towards new vehicle.
05 S UZUK I XL 7 4x4
#Z2270A ,70K M iles......................................
$
10,995
* 07 DODGE CA L IBE R R/T
#11554A ,O nly 27K M iles................................
$
15,999
* 05 N IS S A N XTE RRA 4W D
#11679A A ,71K M iles....................................
$
14,995
*
SUNDAY DISPATCH SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2011 PAGE 13
457 Wanted to Buy
Auto
457 Wanted to Buy
Auto
542 Logistics/
Transportation
542 Logistics/
Transportation
539 Legal
468 Auto Parts
548 Medical/Health
542 Logistics/
Transportation
539 Legal
468 Auto Parts
548 Medical/Health
542 Logistics/
Transportation
548 Medical/Health
542 Logistics/
Transportation
548 Medical/Health
542 Logistics/
Transportation
$$$ HIGHEST PRICE PAID $$$
FOR JUNK
VEHICLES
PICKED UP
570-876-1010
570-346-7673
BUYING JUNK VEHICLES
$300 and Up
$125 extra if driven,
pulled or pushed in.
NOBODY Pays More
570-760-2035
Monday thru Saturday 6 am-9 pm
Sunday 8 am - 68 pm
2
8
3
5
8
6
Casual Bus Operator
The County of Lackawanna Transit System (COLTS) is hiring Casual Bus
Operators for coverage as needed. This position is safety sensitive and
requires pre-employment and random drug and alcohol screening.
Preferred candidates should be comfortable in all driving situations while
providing customer service. The position consists of varied hours
Monday through Saturday, with little advance notice and starts with a pay
of $15.00+ per hour. To be considered for an interview, you:
• Need a high school diploma or GED equivalent;
• Must show that you are a U.S. Citizen or present your proof of
Employment Eligibility;
• Must have a Commercial Driver’s License (CDL);
• Passenger Endorsement with no Air Brake Restriction is preferred but not
required to be hired. However, the prospective employee will be
expected to acquire this endorsement within two weeks of being hired;
• Must have acceptable driving record ;
• Must be physically capable to perform the essential job functions;
• Must have no conviction of a felony, or any drug-related convictions;
• Must comply with all other applicable qualifications for employment
established by the organization;
COLTS is an Equal Opportunity Employer.
Applications are available via www.coltsbus.com
or by request at 570-346-2061 and should be sent to:
Casual Bus Operator
ATTN: Dorothy A. Sterling Hill
COLTS
800 North South Road; Scranton, PA 18504
Or to
jobs@coltsbus.com
2
7
8
2
7
8
Thursday,
April 17
th
,
April 21
st
, and
April 28
th
10:00 am - 4:00 pm
Tunkhannock
Library
XLC Services, LLC (Logistics) is
seeking experienced forklift
operators & Inexperienced candidates
with great employment history to
work at their Mehoopany, PA
location. The following skills are
necessary for these positions:
• High School Diploma/GED
• Computer Skills
• Valid Driver’s License
• Criminal Background Check
• Pass Pre-employment Drug Screen
& Physical
• Part-time position for experienced
driver only.
All full-time positions come with the
following benefts:
medical, 8 paid holidays, 401k after
1 year, and paid vacation. Pay increase
based on skill development.
Interested Applicants can Apply Online!
www.XLCServices.com or Call 888-382-4078
NURSE
7a – 7p
Weekend Program
NURSES
All Shifts – Per Diem
CNAs
Evenings & Nights,
Per Diem All Shifts
Competitive Salary & Benefits Package
Golden Living Center Summit
50 N. Pennsylvania Avenue
Wilkes-Barre
Fax 570-825-9423 or
pamela.smith2@goldenliving.com
EOE M/F/D/V
There’s No Place
Like the Jewish Home…
The Jewish Home of Eastern PA, a leader in
long-term care, has an immediate need to fill the
following positions:
• RN Supervisor
o BSN
o Long Term Care Experience Preferred
• RNs and LPNs
Full Time and Part Time and Per Diem
Evening and Night Shift available.
Outstanding benefit package available including
fully paid family health insurance and generous
shift differential. Every other weekend and
rotating holidays required.
Apply in person - Monday through Friday
8:30am – 4:00pm
The Jewish Home of Eastern PA
1101 Vine Street
Scranton, PA 18510
Telephone: (570)344-6177 ext. 140
Fax: (570) 344-9610
Email: sstrunk@frontier.com
The Jewish Home of Eastern PA is an
Equal Opportunity Employer.
Friendship House
Therapeutic Staff Support
BA/BS in Human Service field required,
Autism Spectrum Disorder experience strongly
preferred. Part time day positions available.
Please reply to:
BMcCartney@friendshiphousePA.Org
Or mail resume to: Friendship House
c/o Beth McCartney
1509 Maple Street, Scranton, Pa 18505
visit us On-Line at www.friendshiphousepa.org
548 Medical/Health
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
548 Medical/Health
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
944 Commercial
Properties
944 Commercial
Properties
IN THE HEART OF WILKES-BARRE
Immediate Occupancy!!
MARTIN D. POPKY APARTMENTS
61 E. Northampton St.
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18701
• Affordable Senior Apartments
• Income Eligibility Required
• Utilities Included! • Low cable rates;
• New appliances; laundry on site;
• Activities!
• Curb side Public Transportation
Please call 570-825-8594
TDD/TTY 800-654-5984
PROVINCIAL TOWER - S. MAIN
Great Commercial Store Front,
& Inside Suites Available
Steps from New Intermodal Hub
& Public Parking
FREE RENT - Call For Details Today!
570-829-1573
Starting at $650
utilities included
WILKES-BARRE
EXPERIENCED
CAREGIVERS NEEDED
Visiting Angels is looking for skilled,compas-
sionate and reliable caregivers to
work in the homes of the elderly.
We offer competitive wages, training,
friendly and supportive staff.
Come Join Our Growing Team!
Must have a minimum of 2 years experience,
valid driver’s license. Certification a plus.
Immediate Openings in the
Dallas, Pittston area.
Why a career with Visiting Angels?
Because we care about our caregivers!
Call 570-270-6700 today!
Equal Opportunity Employer
415 Autos-Antique
& Classic
CHEVROLET `68 C10
New 350 motor and
new transmission.
REDUCED TO
$5,000 FIRM
(570) 906-1771
CHEVROLET `72
CHEVELLE
Two door hard top.
307 Motor. Needs
work. Comes with
additional 400 small
block & many parts.
$5,000. Serious
inquires only.
(570) 836-2574
CORVETTES
WANTED
1953-1972
Any Condition!
Courteous, Fast
Professional Buyer.
Licensed & Bonded
corvettebuyer.com
1-800-850-3656
FORD `52
COUNTRY SEDAN
CUSTOM LINE
STATION WAGON
V8, automatic,
8 passenger,
3rd seat, good
condition, 2nd
owner. $9,500.
570-579-3517
FORD `65
GALAXIE 500 CONVERTIBLE
White with red
leather interior.
Black top.
289 Engine, rebuilt.
61,000 original
miles. Original
owners manual
EXCELLENT CONDITION!
$8,800.
(570) 881-2447
FORD `66
Mustang Coupe.
Pearl white, pony
interior. Pristine
condition. 26K
miles. $17,000 or
best offer.
(570) 817-6768
LINCOLN `88
TOWN CAR
61,000 original
miles, garage kept,
triple black, leather
interior, carriage
roof, factory wire
wheels, loaded,
excellent condition.
$5,500. Call
Mike 570-237-7660
MAZDA `88 RX-7
CONVERTIBLE
1 owner, garage
kept, 65k original
miles, black with
grey leather interior,
all original & never
seen snow. $8,900.
Call 570-237-5119
To place your
ad call...829-7130
MERCEDES-BENZ `73
450SL
Convertible with
removable hard top,
power windows, AM
/FM radio with cas-
sette player, CD
player, automatic, 4
new tires. Cham-
pagne exterior; Ital-
ian red leather inte-
rior inside. Garage
kept, excellent con-
dition. $31,000. Call
825-6272
OLDSMOBILE `68
DELMONT
DRASTICALLY
REDUCED!!
This model only
produced in 1967
& 1968. All
original 45,000
miles, Color
Burgundy, cloth
& vinyl interior,
350 rocket
engine, 2nd
owner. Fender
skirts, always
garaged. Trophy
winner at shows.
Serious inquiries
only, $7,500.
570-690-0727
STUDEBAKER ‘31
Rumble seat, coupe
Good condition.
Call for details
(570) 881-7545
TANK ‘07 VISION
2007 Tank Motor
Sports Vision Motor-
cycle. 250 cc,
Brand new. 0 miles.
$2,400. For more
information call Tom
at 570-825-2114
421 Boats &
Marinas
CUSTOM
CREST 15’
Fiberglass
boat with
trailer. Out-
board propul-
sion. Includes:
2 motors
Erinmade,
“Lark II series”
PRICE
REDUCED!
$2,400
NEGOTI ABLE
570-417-3940
SALT CREEK SKIF
14’ fiberglass fish-
ing boat, tri-hull
(very stable), 25 HP
Tahatsu outboard,
Full Galvanized
Trailer. Perfect Con-
dition. Built in fuel
tank. All new in ‘01.
$2,500
570-256-7311
427 Commercial
Trucks &
Equipment
CHEVY ‘08 3500
HD DUMP TRUCK
2WD, automatic.
Only 12,000 miles.
Vehicle in like
new condition.
$21,900.
570-288-4322
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY
C-3500 CHEVY
Food Truck with
new motor -
50,000. Excellent
condition. All stain-
less steel body.
Call Jack at
570-881-5825
or Rich at
570-357-8319
FORD ‘99 E350
BUCKET VAN
Triton V8. 2 speed
boom; 92,000miles;
$9999 or best price.
Great condition. Call
570-675-3384 or
570574-7002
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
439 Motorcycles
HARLEY DAVIDSON
` 06 SOFTTAIL
NIGHTTRAIN
Dark gray metallic,
new rr tire &
brakes, many
extras. $10,900
(570) 592-4982
HARLEY DAVIDSON `01
Road King 19,000
miles, new tires, lots
of extra chrome.
Like New. $12,900.
Call 570-639-1989
or 570-760-1023
HONDA
2004 CRF 100.
Excellent condition.
$1500 or best offer.
570-498-7702
KAWASAKI ‘06
Vulcan Classic
1500
Black and chrome.
Fuel injected. 21”
windshield. Pas-
senger backrest.
Floor boards.
Remainder of war-
ranty. Expires
Feb., 2012. Kept in
heated garage!
Never damaged.
7,000 miles. Great
condition! $6,800
570-574-9217
SUZUKI `07 C50T
CRUISER
EXCELLENT
CONDITION
Windshield, Bags,
Floorboards,V&H
Pipes, White
walls,Garage Kept.
6K Miles $5,500
(570) 430-0357
SUZUKI ‘04
GSXR 1000CC
Less than 1,000
miles. Team colors
with matching hel-
met & jacket. Fend-
er eliminator kit.
Scorpion exhaust.
$6,000.
Call Dave after 5
pm 570-825-0394
YAMAHA `04 V-STAR
1100 Custom. 5800
miles, light bar,
cobra exhaust,
windshield, many
extras, must sell.
$5,995. Call
570-301-3433
YAMAHA `97 VIRAGO
750cc. 8,000 miles,
saddlebags, wind-
shield, back rest,
Black & Pearl,
Excellent Condition.
Must See. Asking
$2,499. Call after 4.
570-823-9376
YAMAHA ‘07 650 V-STAR
Matted black finish.
Mint condition. New
tires, inspected,
fully serviced &
ready to ride. Wind-
shield & sissy bar.
Low miles & garage
kept. $4800. or best
offer. 570-762-5158
YAMAHA` 08 R1
BEAUTIFUL BIKE
Perfect condition.
3700 miles, new
rear tire, undertail
kit, cover. Price
negotiable $7,800
570-852-9072
YAMAHA` 09 VSTAR
650 CLASSIC
Like New.
Less than 1000
miles. White and
chrome. Garage
kept. $6,300
(570) 817-8127
442 RVs & Campers
FLAGSTAFF `08
CLASSIC
Super Lite Fifth
Wheel. LCD/DVD
flat screen TV, fire-
place, heated mat-
tress, ceiling fan,
Hide-a-Bed sofa,
outside speakers &
grill, 2 sliders,
aluminum wheels,
water purifier,
awning, microwave
oven, tinted safety
glass windows,
raised panel fridge
& many acces-
sories & options.
Excellent condition,
$22,500.
570-868-6986
442 RVs & Campers
SUNLINE `06 SOLARIS
Travel Trailer. 29’,
mint condition, 1
slide out a/c-heat.
Stove, microwave,
fridge, shower
inside & out. Many
more extras.
Reduced. $15,500.
Call 570-842-6735
SUNLITE CAMPER
22 ft. 3 rear bunks,
center bathroom,
kitchen, sofa bed.
Air, Fully self con-
tained. Sleeps 6.
New tires, fridge
awning. $4500.
215-322-9845
TRAVEL TRAILER 33 ft
Rear queen master
bedroom, Walk
thru bathroom.
Center kitchen +
dinette bed. Front
extra large living
room + sofa bed.
Big View windows.
Air, awning, sleeps
6, very clean, will
deliver. Located in
Benton, Pa. $4,900.
215-694-7497
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
BUICK `05
RENDEZVOUS CX
AWD, Fully
loaded, 1 owner,
18,000 miles. 6
cylinder. New
inspection, tires
& brakes. Like
new, inside & out.
$16,900. Call
(570) 540-0975
CHEVR0LET`02
EXPRESS
CONVERSION
VAN
Loaded. Low
miles. Excellent
condition.
$18,900
570-674-3901
CHEVROLET `05
TRAILBLAZER LT
Black/Grey. 18,000
miles. Well
equipped. Includes
On-Star, tow pack-
age, roof rack,
running boards,
remote starter,
extended warranty.
$16,000
(570) 825-7251
CHEVROLET `06
SILVERADO 1500
4X4 pickup, extend-
ed cab, 6 1/2 ft.
box, automatic.
Pewter. 48,000
miles. Excellent
condition. $17,000
Negotiable
(570) 954-7461
CHEVROLET `07
TRAILBLAZER LS
Perfect condition,
17,000 miles.
Asking $20,000
570-332-3681
CHEVY `05 EQUINOX
LT (premium pack-
age), 3.4L, 47,000
miles. All wheel
drive, power moon-
roof, windows, locks
& seats. Leather
interior, 6 cd chang-
er, rear folding
seats, keyless entry,
onstar, roof rack,
running boards,
garage kept.
$14,750.
570-362-1910
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
CHEVROLET `09
EQUINOX LS
Low mileage, 15000
miles, automatic,
all-wheel drive, 4
door, anti-lock
brakes, air condi-
tioning, air bags,
power locks, power
windows, power
mirrors, cruise con-
trol, AM/FM radio,
cassette player, CD
player, keyless
entry, rear de-
froster, rear wind-
shield wiper, tinted
windows. $17,500.
(570) 954-9333
Call after 9:00 a.m.
CHEVY `94 GLADIATOR
Custom Van. 67K
miles. Interior has
oak wood trim, car-
peting, storage
areas, TV, rear seat
convertible to dou-
ble bed, curtains.
Seats 7. Power win-
dows & seats. Cus-
tom lighting on ceil-
ing. New exhaust
system. New rear
tires. Recently
inspected. Excellent
condition. $4,800.
Call 570-655-0530
CHEVY `94 GLADIATOR
Custom Van. 67K
miles. Interior has
oak wood trim, car-
peting, storage
areas, TV, rear seat
convertible to dou-
ble bed, curtains.
Seats 7. Power win-
dows & seats. Cus-
tom lighting on ceil-
ing. New exhaust
system. New rear
tires. Recently
inspected. Excellent
condition. $4,800.
Call 570-655-0530
DODGE `10
GRAND CARAVAN
Only 17k miles.
Fully loaded.
Excellent condi-
tion. Factory &
extended war-
ranty. $17,995
(570) 690-2806
DODGE `94 DAKOTA
with cap. 1 owner,
garage kept, very
good condition.
Many extras includ-
ing lift & back seat.
29 MPG gas.
$4,000
or best offer
(570) 868-0944
FORD `01 LARIAT
250 Super Duty
with slide-in camper
new tires, 4 door, 8’
bed. Soft and hard-
top for bed covers.,
Good condition.
Sold together or
separately $10,900
(570) 639-5478
FORD `03 F150
LARIAT
Contractor ready
with ladder rack &
tool box, 4x4 diesel,
under 97K. Great
condition, $17,000
or best offer.
570-925-2845
FORD `99 E250
Wheelchair Van
78,250 miles. Fully
serviced, new bat-
tery, tires & rods.
Seats 6 or 3 wheel-
chairs. Braun Millen-
nium lift with
remote. Walk up
door. Front & rear
A/C. Power locks &
windows. Excellent
condition. $9,500.
570-237-6375
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
HONDA `03
ODYSSEY
High mileage,
140000 miles,
automatic, front
wheel drive, 4
door, anti-lock
brakes, air condi-
tioning, air bags,
power locks,
power windows,
power mirrors,
AM/FM radio, CD
player, rear
defroster, rear
windshield wiper,
$5,990
(570) 606-4198
HONDA `10
ODYSSEY
Special Edition.
Maroon, Fully
loaded. Leather
seats. TV/DVD,
navigation, sun roof
plus many other
extras. 3rd seat .
Only 1,900 Miles.
Brand New.
Asking $37,000
(570) 328-0850
HUMMER ‘05 H2
Yellow with black
leather interior.
Front & rear heated
seats. Many chrome
accessories. $28,500
or best offer. Call
(570) 788-9826 or
(570) 956-8547
Leave Message
Selling your
Camper?
Place an ad and
find a new owner.
570-829-7130
INTERNATIONAL ‘95
DUMP TRUCK
Refurbished, rebuilt
engine, transmis-
sion replaced.
Rear-end removed
and relubed. Brand
new 10’ dump. PA
state inspected.
$12,900/best offer.
570-594-1496
JEEP `00
WRANGLER
TJ, Black with grey
interior. 4 cylinder,
5-speed manual
transmission. CD
player, hardtop, full
doors, sound bar.
4” Skyjacker
Suspension lift with
steering stabilizer.
Like new BF
Goodrich 35’s with
Full size spare. Only
85,000 miles.
$6,999
(570) 301-7221
JEEP `07
WRANGLER X
4x4, stick shift, soft
top. Red exterior,
well maintained,
garage kept. 11,500
miles, one owner.
AC, CD player,
cruise control.
Tow package with
cargo carrier.
Excellent condition.
$18,700
Call 570-822-9680
KIA `02 SEDONA
EX, Van, Sunroof.
61,000 miles.
Loaded. Good
condition.
$5000 or best offer.
570-606-7654
LEXUS `04 GX 470
Black with dark
gray leather interior.
DVD player. Fully
loaded. 92,000
miles. Excellent
condition. $19,000
(570) 675-4424
NISSAN `08 ROGUE
SL. AWD, 1 owner,
no accidents. 4
door hatchback, 6
cylinder, roof rails,
dark gray, black
interior. Premium
wheels, new tires,
brakes extra set of
snows. Premium
sound/Bose/blue-
tooth, XM radio.
Intelligent key entry.
Newly inspected
36,900 miles
$19,500
(570) 371-7227
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
SUZUKI `07 XL-7
56,000 miles,
automatic,
all-wheel drive,
4 door, air condi-
tioning, all power,
CD player, leather
interior, tinted
windows, custom
wheels, $13,000
Call 570-829-8753
Before 5:00 p.m.
TRACTOR
TRAILERS
FREIGHTLINER
’97 MIDROOF
475 CAT & 10
speed transmission.
$12,000
FREIGHTLINER
’99 CONDO
430 Detroit, Super
10 transmission.
Asking $15,000.
‘ 88 FRUEHAUF 45’
with sides. All
aluminum, spread
axle. $6,500.
2 storage trailers.
570-814-4790
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
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A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
TRUCKS FOR SALE
Ford, GMC,
International-Prices
starting at $2,295.
Box Truck, Cab &
Chassis available.
Call U-haul
570-822-5536
460
AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
468 Auto Parts
BEST PRICES
IN THE AREA
CA$H ON THE $POT,
Free Anytime
Pickup
570-301-3602
570-301-3602
CALL US!
TO JUNK
YOUR CAR
506 Administrative/
Clerical
ADMINISTRATIVE
ASSISTANT
Part Time general
office assistant
needed for unique
local project. Excel-
lent communication,
typing, Word &
Excel skills. Ability
to work under pres-
sure. Send cover
letter & resume to
abb@wplibrary.org
by May 4th.
GET THE WORD OUT
with a Classified Ad.
570-829-7130
NIGHT AUDITOR
Apply in person.
Knights Inn
310 Route 315
Pittston, PA 18640
570-654-6020
507 Banking/Real
Estate/Mortgage
Professionals
CLERK/TELLER
PART TIME
Credit union has
opening for a part
time Clerk/Teller.
Requires attention
to details, GL expe-
rience & excellent
customer service
skills. Please send
resume to: PG&W
Employees FCU
Attn: Carole Fischer
265 S. Main St.
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18701
Email: cfischer@
pgwefcu.org / EOE
509 Building/
Construction/
Skilled Trades
CARPENTERS
10+ years experi-
ence and roofing
experience a
must!
PAINTERS
10+ years experi-
ence. Must be able
to brush, roll &
spackle.
Steady work!
Good pay!
Benefits available.
Call 570-654-4348
HEATING &
COOLING TECHS
Local contractor is
now accepting
applications for
experienced com-
mercial techs only.
Some travel
required. Company
van, cell phone &
fuel card provided.
Hourly rate is based
on experience &
work history.
For more info call
Rich 570-899-3308
LABORERS
Gas field Cleanup
Crew. Must be
physically fit and
willing to work in all
weather conditions.
Pre-employment
and Random Drug
Testing. Must be
available to work
Day/Night Shifts.
Starting wage
$15.00 per hour.
Benefits available
after 90 days. 570-
297-4720 or apply
in person @ 22020
Rt. 14 Troy, PA.
PAVING & EXCAVATING
Black top laborers,
equipment experi-
ence a plus.
Must have drivers
license, CDL a plus.
Call 570-760-3486.
518 Customer
Support/Client Care
TELEMARKETER
Looking for Part
Time/Full Time Tele-
marketer to start
immediately for
Insurance Company.
Would be making
outbound calls.
Please call Lisa @
570-208-5640.
533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
AUTOMOTIVE
MANAGERS/MECHANICS
/TIRE INSTALLERS
Mavis Discount Tire
is actively hiring
Managers, Assis-
tant Managers,
Mechanics and Tire
Installers. Qualified
applicants should
be proficient in tire
sales, undercar
repairs & exhaust.
PA emissions license
a plus. Experienced
candidates please
call 914-804-4444
or e-mail resume to
cdillon@
mavistire.com
MAINTENANCE
AND PRODUCTION
Night Shift
2 years experience
working in the coal
industry. Welding
experience neces-
sary. Plant & equip-
ment maintenance
experience. 8pm-
4am. To start imme-
diately. Apply in per-
son only - No calls.
Mountaintop
Anthracite Inc.
1550 Crestwood Dr.
Mountaintop, PA
533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
CABLE TV INSTALLERS
Openings for experi-
enced installers and
dedicated trainees
eager to learn in the
Scranton area.
Responsibilities
include installing
cable TV to the
customer’s home or
business, and
connection of all
customer premise
equipment. Educat-
ing the customers
on how to properly
operate the servic-
es and equipment
installed is a critical
part of this position.
QUALITY
WORKMANSHIP is a
MUST! We are a
DRUG FREE WORK-
PLACE, where
SAFETY is a CORE
VALUE. Contact us
at 570-235-1145
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
MECHANIC
Responsible for
daily maintenance
of equipment.
Knowledge in
hydraulic and elec-
trical systems.
Welding a plus.
Competitive salary
and benefits.
Solomon Container
Service
495 Stanton St.
Wilkes-Barre
570-829-2206
533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
MOTORCYCLE
MECHANIC
Experience neces-
sary. PA motorcycle
inspection license
required.
No phone calls,
apply in person at:
Team Effort Cycle
1280 Sans Souci
Parkway
Hanover Township,
PA 18706
Let the Community
Know!
Place your Classified
Ad TODAY!
570-829-7130
WINDOW TREATMENT
INSTALLERS
Professional, Expe-
rienced, Opportuni-
ty, (Blinds, Shades,
Verticals, Horizon-
tals) for top Co.
Work in own area.
Email resume to
Edwin@distinctive
treatments.com or
call 516-358-9612.
542 Logistics/
Transportation
DRIVERS NEEDED
Potential average
earnings of
$800-$1200 plus
tips Bi-weekly.
Call 570-606-7838,
Monday-Friday
8am-4:30pm
PAGE 14 SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2011 SUNDAY DISPATCH
ALL NEW FORDFOCUS SE
CALL NOW 823-8888 CALL NOW 823-8888
1-800-817-FORD 1-800-817-FORD
Overlooking Mohegan Sun Overlooking Mohegan Sun
577 East Main St., Plains 577 East Main St., Plains
Just Minutes from Scranton or W-B Just Minutes from Scranton or W-B
*Tax and tags extra. Security Deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months
payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. See salesperson for details. All payments subject to credit approval by the primary lending source, Tier 0 rate.
Special APR financing cannot be combined with Ford cash rebate. “BUY FOR” prices are based on 72 month at $18.30 per month per $1000 financed with $2,500 down (cash or trade). Photos of
vehicles are for illustration purposes only. Coccia Ford is not responsible for any typographical errors. No Security Deposit Necessary. See dealer for details. Sale ends APRIL 30, 2011.
WWW.COCCIACARS.COM
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease
21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 4/30/11.
72
Mos.
24
Mos.
NEW2011 FORDEDGE SEL AWD
All Wheel Drive, SEL, Auto., ABS, V6, Remote Keyless Entry
with Keypad, Rear Spoiler, Anti-Theft Sys., CD, Personal
Safety Sys., Safety Canopy, Side Impact Air Bags,
Sirius Satellite Radio, Cruise, Dual Electronic
Climate Control, Convenience Group, PW, Auto.
Headlamps, Pwr. Seat, Reverse Sensing, PDL,
18” Alum. Wheels, MyKey, MyFord LCD Display
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease
21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 4/30/11.
72
Mos.
24
Mos.
NEW2011 FORDTAURUS SEL
Automatic, 3.5L V6, SYNC, Reverse Sensing
System, AM/FM with CD, Keyless Entry
with Keypad, Pwr. Windows, Pwr.
Door Locks, 18” Aluminum Wheels,
Anti-Theft Perimeter Alarm,
Sirius Satellite Radio
NEW2011 FORDESCAPE XLS 4X4
72
Mos.
All Wheel Drive, Pwr. Door Locks,
Automatic, 16” Steel Wheels, Pwr.
Windows, Air, Keyless Entry with
Remote, Safety Canopy,
Side Air Bags
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease
21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 4/30/11.
72
Mos.
24
Mos.
NEW2011 FORDF-150 SUPERCAB STX 4X4
STX, Auto., Air, ABS, 18” Cast Alum.
Wheels, Cloth Seat, 40/20/40 Split
Seat, Sliding Rear Window, Decor
Pkg., Chrome Step Bar, STX Plus Pkg.,
Cruise, Fog Lamps, Floor Carpet,
Pwr. Equipment Group, Limited Slip
Mos.
APR
NEW2011 FORDF-150 4X4
72
Mos.
3.7L V6, Automatic, Air, AM/FM/CD,
Cloth Seat, Cruise Control, 40/20/40
Split Seat, XL Plus Pkg.,
XL Decor Group, ABS
FOOT BOX
Mos.
APR
NEW2011 FORDFUSION SE
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease
21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 4/30/11.
72
Mos.
24
Mos.
Auto., AM/FM/CD, Tilt Wheel, PW, PDL, Pwr.
Seat, Safety Pkg., Side Impact Air Bags,
1st & 2nd Air Curtains, Anti-Theft Sys.,
Sirius Satellite Radio, Keyless Entry,
Message Center, Pwr. Moonroof, SYNC
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease
21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 4/30/11.
24
Mos.
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease
21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 4/30/11.
72
Mos.
All Wheel Drive, XLT, Safety Canopy,
CD, Side Impact Air Bags, Pwr.
Driver’s Seat, Auto., PW, PDL, Air,
Fog Lamps, Privacy Glass, Roof Rack,
Keyless Entry, 16” Alum. Wheels, Rear
Cargo Convenience Pkg., Sirius Satellite
Radio, SYNC, Pwr. Moonroof
Auto., CD, Anti-Theft Sys., Side Curtain Air Bags,
16” Steel Wheels, Tilt Wheel AC, Instrument
Cluster, Message Center, PW, PL, Keyless Entry,
Pwr. Side Mirrors, Convenience Pkg., Cruise
Control, Map Light, Fog Lamps, Perimeter Alarm,
MyFord, SYNC, Sirius Satellite Radio, MyKey
24
Mos.
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease
21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 4/30/11.
72
Mos.
24
Mos.
NEW2011 FORDFIESTA SE
Auto., Air Conditioning, Pwr. Mirrors, Advance Trac
with Electronic Stability Control, Side Curtains,
AM/FM/CD, Pwr. Door Locks, Tilt Wheel,
SYNC, Sport Appearance Pkg., Rear Spoiler,
Cruise Control, 15” Alum. Wheels, Winter
Pkg., Heated Seats, Keyless Entry w/Keypad
SUNDAY DISPATCH SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2011 PAGE15
554 Production/
Operations
554 Production/
Operations
554 Production/
Operations
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale
Sapa Extruder, Inc. an aluminum manufacturing facility located
in the Crestwood Industrial Park in Mountain Top, has an
opening for a 2nd shift CNC Technician for its fabrication
department. Qualified applicants must have experience with
Fanuc controllers and aluminum machining, Mastercam and
AutoCAD. The successful candidate should be able to read
blueprints and understand GD&T. Experience in set-up
reduction program, macro writing and Solidworks a plus but not
required. Applications can be submitted or resumes can be
mailed to:
Sapa Extruder, Inc.
330 Elmwood Avenue
Mountain Top, PA 18707
Attn: Human Resources
teresa.mandzak@sapagroup.com
E.O.E.
NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE!
CNC TECHNICIAN
CASH PAID 24/7
• Firearms • Gold • Silver
• Jewelry • Coins • Tools
• Military • Collectibles
Guaranteed Highest Cash Paid!
($10 Bonus per gun with ad)
570-735-1487 DAY
570-472-7572 EVES
WANTED
NOTICE!
If you bid on any of the properties listed below
at the Judicial Tax Sale held on August 26,
2009, please call our law office immediately
at (570) 829-3606.
1. 30-32 Timpson St., Ashley
2. Coxton Rd., Duryea
3. 17 Gail Drive, Foster Twp.
4. 404-406 E. Elm St., Hazleton
5. 608 Seybert St., Hazleton
6. 687 Seybert St., Hazleton
7. 149 Muir Ave. Hazleton
8. 151 S. Wyoming St., Hazleton
9. 130 W. Ridge St., Nanticoke
10. 107 S. Main St., Pittston
11. 154 Center St., Pittston
12. 1230 E. Fifth St., Salem Twp
13. 5 Washington Ave.,
West Hazleton Boro
14. 503 Luzerne Ave., West Pittston Boro
15. 21 Meyers Ct., Wilkes-Barre
16. 230 Nuangola Rd., Wright Twp
542 Logistics/
Transportation
HYDRO-VAC &
TRANSPORT DRIVERS
CDL A or B with
Tanker Endorse-
ment. 2 Years Expe-
rience required.
Clean MVR. Must be
able to work/day
night shift. Pay up to
$30.00/hour. Bene-
fits available after
90 days. Call 570-
297-4720 or apply
in person at 22020
Rt. 14 Troy, PA.
TRI-AXLE DRIVER
4-5 years experi-
ence. Start immedi-
ately. All local work.
No out of town.
Call Danny Jr. at
570-237-1734,
Danny Sr. at 570-
760-7896, or Home
# at 570-654-0525.
TRUCK DRIVER
Full time, able to
drive a 20’ truck,
7 year clean driving
record, able to do
physical work and
lift 60 lbs., PA driver
medical card, motor
vehicle report, flexi-
ble hours, $9/hour
plus incentive on
pounds collected.
Apply at:
U’SAgain Recycling
486 S. Empire St.
Wilkes-Barre
570-270-2670
545 Marketing/
Product
PART-TIME MARKETING
In search of a
dynamic person
with great commu-
nication skills and
ability to multi-task.
The successful can-
didate will be punc-
tual, organized, reli-
able, creative, con-
scientious, and per-
sonable. Must have
prior marketing
experience. Must
be a self-starter
with reliable trans-
portation. Computer
skills a must. Will-
ingness to work
Saturdays a must.
Positive attitude and
high energy a must.
Fax resume to
570-822-3446. No
phone calls please.
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
548 Medical/Health
LPN/RN
Part Time.
Flexible hours.
Private Clinic. Avail-
able immediately.
Send resumes to:
c/o Times Leader
Box 2505
15 N. Main Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18711-0250.
Come work for a
company that
works with you!
Work 100 hours,
earn an
additional $100
NOW HIRING
RN’s, LPN’s,
CNA’s
Hospital,
Long Term Care,
Private Duty
As an employee
we offer…
Competitive
Rates, Flexible
Scheduling,
Weekly Pay and
much more!
570-587-4000
nicolec@caregivers
america.com
RESIDENTIAL
CARE AIDES
Part time positions
available. Looking
for caring & com-
passionate people
for Alzheimer’s
assisted living facil-
ity. Must be a high
school graduate.
Reliable applicants
need only apply. No
phone calls please.
Apply within.
Keystone
Garden
Estates
100 Narrows Rd
Route 11
Larksville
Riverstreet
Manor
has an opportunity
available for a
Full Time Day Shift
HOUSEKEEPING AIDE
We offer a competi-
tive salary and ben-
efits. Every other
weekend & holiday
rotation required.
Willing to train.
Opportunities for
RN’S AND C.N.A.’S
are also available.
All interested
parties please apply
in person at
Riverstreet Manor
440 North River St.
Wilkes Barre, PA
18707
551 Other
EMTS
Part Time. Current
EMT and EVO certi-
fications required.
TRUCK DRIVER
Part Time. Valid &
Current CDL
Driver’s License.
To apply, call
570-675-3334
Kunkle Fire Co., Inc.
FLAGGERS WANTED
Hiring 50. Vehicle
required, $8-$30
per hour. Will train.
570-714-FLAG.
EOE
VALET ATTENDANT
Full time position
available. Wilkes-
Barre location.
Immediate opening.
Apply in person to
Geisinger Wyoming
Valley Hospital/
Cancer Center.
See Bob Reese.
1000 East Mountain
Blvd. Wilkes-Barre,
PA or call 631-724-
6227. Must have
clean license and
neat appearance.
554 Production/
Operations
EQUIPMENT OPERATOR
Candidate must
have HS Diploma/
GED & a good work
history. Equipment
experience and
knowledge of
hydraulic machines
is a must. Benefits
include Health, Paid
Holidays/Vacation &
401K. Please call Al
at 570-822-6880.
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INCLASSIFIED!
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A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
PRODUCTION
MANAGER
Supports Director of
Manufacturing by
ensuring efficient
execution of the
production sched-
ule, product quality,
planning and exe-
cuting maintenance
programs, and
communicating with
customers and key
leadership team
members. Lead
production and
maintenance teams
to ensure safe and
efficient manufac-
turing operations.
Detailed, timely
communication with
logistics team, qual-
ity assurance, cus-
tomer service and
customers on pro-
duction status.
Responsible for
maintaining Data-
base system infor-
mation for current
production status.
Work with the logis-
tics team in planning
material needs for
upcoming produc-
tion. Assists with
production schedul-
ing to ensure pro-
duction schedule
meets customer
requirements and
enables efficient
operations. Knowl-
edge of GMPs and
quality assurance
requirements.
E-mail resume with
cover letter to info@
LionBrewery.com
Include job title in
subject line.
QUALITY CONTROL
TECHNICIAN –
Entry Level
Will assist QC
Supervisor, estab-
lish, examine and
maintain quality on
production floor.
Position will be “on
hands” in produc-
tion dept., on floor
testing and sam-
pling. $ 13/hour to
start. Hours: 7 a.m.
to 4 p.m Mon. – Fri.
Must have prior
experience in QC
and with Microsoft
Word & Excel. Will
operate forklift and
some heavy lifting
may be required.
Must be detailed
oriented and have
ability to multi-task.
Competitive benefit
package. Candi-
dates meeting qual-
ifications should for-
ward resume with
wage requirements
to:
AEP Industries,
Inc.,Attn: Human
Resources,
20 Elmwood Ave.,
Mountain Top, Pa.
18707, Fax (570)
474-9257, Email:
Grullony@
aepinc.com
We are a Drug Free
Workplace. EOE
600
FINANCIAL
610 Business
Opportunities
FLORAL SHOP
The only shop
in the area!
1,300 sq/ft retail
& 1,300 sq/ft
storage
$63,000
Includes
established sales,
all equipment,
showcases,
inventory &
memberships to
FTD, Tele-Floral &
1-800-FLOWERS.
Willing to train
buyer. Owner
retiring after 25
years in business.
Room for
potential growth.
CALL 570-542-4520
Pictures available.
774 Restaurant
Equipment
RESTAURANT
EQUIPMENT,
AMERICAN EAGLE
MIXER, 20 quart
mixer, Model
AE-20, with timer
and guard, $1300.
ALSO, Bev Air 2
door refrigerator/
sandwich prep
table, Model
SP48-12, $1300.
Call 570-498-3616
for more details.
RESTAURANT
EQUIPMENT,
SOMERSET TURN
OVER MACHINE -
model SPM45,
$500; ALSO, Bunn
Pour Over Coffee
Machine, Model #
STF15, $225
For more info, call
570-498-3616
776 Sporting Goods
CASH
CASH
FOR
ANTIQUE GUNS
Old Shot Guns
Rifles, Swords
& Daggers,
Military Items
Vintage Scopes
Old Toys &
Coins
PRIVATE COLLECTOR.
570-417-9200
800
PETS & ANIMALS
805 Birds
PARROTLETS
Hand raised, baby
blues, $80 each
570-735-2243
810 Cats
CAT: Blue a 6 year
old cat, free to good
home. My allergies
have gotten worse
& I can no longer
give him the affec-
tion & attention he
needs. Blue is strict-
ly an indoor cat & is
declawed (front
paws only), &
neutered.
570-878-7327
815 Dogs
POMERANIAN PUPPIES
Parents on premises
Shots Current. $500.
570-401-1838
POMERANIANS
Easter Special
AKC, 9-14 weeks,
All Shots &
wormed. Vet
checked. $275
to $400 each.
570-864-2643
SHIH-POO PUPS
7 weeks old, $400.
Includes 1st set of
shot. Please
contact me at
(570) 332-6303
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
900
REAL ESTATE
FOR SALE
906 Homes for Sale
DURYEA
Blueberry Hill.
3 bedroom ranch.
Large lot with pool.
Lease To Buy. For
more details, call
(570) 655-8118
906 Homes for Sale
Having trouble
paying your mort-
gage? Falling
behind on your
payments? You
may get mail from
people who promise
to forestall your
foreclosure for a fee
in advance. Report
them to the Federal
Trade Commission,
the nation’s con-
sumer protection
agency. Call 1-877-
FTC-HELP or click
on ftc.gov. A mes-
sage from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
Having trouble
paying your mort-
gage? Falling
behind on your
payments? You
may get mail from
people who promise
to forestall your
foreclosure for a fee
in advance. Report
them to the Federal
Trade Commission,
the nation’s con-
sumer protection
agency. Call 1-877-
FTC-HELP or click
on ftc.gov. A mes-
sage from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
DUPONT
Single family home
for sale in quiet
neighborhood-
Beautiful 2400 Sq.
Ft. 6 bedroom, 2
full baths, 2 story
home, fully air con-
ditioned, oil & gas
heat, renovated
kitchen, full unfin-
ished basement, 2
enclosed porches,
15 x 20 deck with
power awning
cover – generous
size lot, off street
parking, first floor
washer/dryer. All
appliances includ-
ed. Offering price
$180,000
Call 570-421-0587
or Rodite@enter.net
use “Dupont Home”
in E-mail subject
line.
EXETER TOWNSHIP
CUSTOM RANCH
HOME FOR SALE
BY OWNER
Marcy Rd. Beauti-
ful family residen-
tial area, 6 years
old, ranch, single
family, 3 bed-
rooms, 3 bath-
rooms, double car
attached garage,
eat-in kitchen, din-
ing room, office/
study, family room,
living room, utility
room, 2 sided see
thru floor to ceiling
stone gas fire-
place, forced air
furnace, central air,
unfinished base-
ment, 3 beautiful
groomed acres,
deck. Large Cus-
tom ranch home. 9
rooms plus 2 1/2
baths. Approxi-
mate 2600 sq ft.
Open floor plan
with eat-in kitchen
and island, granite
tops & custom tile
backsplash. Brand
NEW Stainless
Steel Appliances.
Lots of crown
moulding, chair
rails. Hardwood
floors throughout
with high vaulted
ceilings. Master
Bedroom with multi
-tierd tray ceiling
and walk-in closet.
Master bath with
large Whirlpool tub
with inline heater &
sperate shower.
Dining room with
French Doors.
Oversized 2 Car
DETACHED garage
in addition to 2
cars attached on
home! 4 Cars
Total! Plus 10 x 20
ft. custom shed.
Paved Driveway.
Central Alarm.
$379,900 Call
(570) 388-6344
Any time week-
ends or after
4 p.m. weekdays.
FORTY FORT
65 West
Pettebone St.
Beautiful remod-
eled home in nice
neighborhood. 4
bed, 3 bath, new
carpeting new
kitchen, stainless
appliances.
A must see.
PRICE REDUCED
$169,500
Leave Message
570-881-8493
NANTICOKE
Hanover St. Bi
Level, single family,
3 bedrooms, 2 bath-
rooms, single car
attached garage,
kitchen, dining
room, office/study,
family room, living
room, bonus room,
utility room, electric
heat, finished base-
ment, lot size
approximately 90 X
150, deck. newly
renovated kitchen,
living room, and
bathrooms.
$154,900 Call
(570) 735-9199
after 5:30 p.m. for
private showing
906 Homes for Sale
HARDING
310 Lockville Rd.
SERENITY
Enjoy the serenity
of country living in
this beautiful 2
story home on 2.23
acres surrounded
by nature the prop-
erty has it’s own
private driveway.
Great entertaining
inside & out! 3 car
garage plus 2 car
detached. A MUST
SEE! MLS#11-831
$279,900
call Nancy
570-237-0752
JENKINS TWP./
INKERMAN
45 Main St.
Own this home for
less than $400 a
month! Large 3
bedroom home with
formal dining room,
off street parking
and large yard. For
more information
and photos, log
onto www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS#09-2449
$64,900
Call Charles
PARDEESVILLE
738 PARDEESVILLE RD
CORNER LOT
Single family built
in 2005. 2.5 baths,
two story with
attached garage.
Oil furnace with
central air. 90 x
140 corner lot.
Kitchen with cen-
ter cooking island,
dining room,
raised ceiling with
glass door entry &
hardwood floor.
Carpeting thru out
home. Tiled
kitchen and bath.
Kitchen appli-
ances included.
NICELY PRICED
$219,900
(570) 233-1993
PITTSTON
3 bedroom, 1 bath,
semi modern
kitchen with stove
and fridge. Nice
yard, one car
garage.
Priced to sell.
MLS 11-1298
$59,900
Call Lu-Ann
570-602-9280
SCRANTON
103 Arnold Avenue
AFFORDABLE PRICE
Cape Cod with 1st
floor master bed-
room, 3 season
porch, attached
garage. MLS#
10-1069 $84,900
call Nancy
570-237-0752
WEST WYOMING
438 Tripp St
SUNDAY
1:00PM-3:00PM
Completely remod-
eled home with
everything new.
New kitchen, baths,
bedrooms, tile
floors, hardwoods,
granite countertops,
all new stainless
steel appliances,
refrigerator, stove,
microwave, dish-
washer, free stand-
ing shower, tub for
two, huge deck,
large yard, excellent
neighborhood
$154,900 (835.00 /
30years/ 5%)
570-654-1490
906 Homes for Sale
WYOMING
530 Dennison Ave.
REDUCED
Great 3 bedroom
Cape Cod with
charm & character,
1 3/4 baths, nice
yard. MLS#
10-342 $139,900
call Nancy
570-237-0752
909 Income &
Commercial
Properties
JENKINS TOWNSHIP
May Street
Former Parrish
Center Hall with
kitchen & parking
MLS#08-2954
$179,900
Call Charlie
Looking to buy a
home?
Place an ad here
and let the
sellers know!
570-829-7130
NANTICOKE
FOR SALE
MULTI-UNIT
PROPERTY
Available immedi-
ately. Commercial
property has 2
apartments and
large office area,
lots of storage, multi
“bay” heated
garage, large yard,
ample off street
parking; all units
rented; Close to Rt
81 and Cross Valley
expressway; off-
street parking. Seri-
ous inquiries only.
No brokers/real
estate agents!
$189,999 Call
(570) 878-2424
after 10:00 a.m.
PITTSTON
2 Unit through
8 Unit apartments
for sale in the
Greter Pittston
area. Call
570-655-1606
915 Manufactured
Homes
ASHLEY PARK
Laurel Run & San
Souci Parks, Like
new, several to
choose from,
Financing&Warranty,
facebook.com/
MobileOne.Sales
Call (570)250-2890
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
AVOCA
3 rooms, wall to wall
carpeting, appli-
ances, coin-op laun-
dry, off street park-
ing, security. No
pets. $410/month
(570) 655-1606
DUPONT
Totally renovated
6 room apartment.
Partially furnished,
brand new fridge/
electric range, elec-
tric washer & dryer.
Brand new custom
draperies, Roman
shades, carpeting /
flooring & energy
efficient furnace &
windows. 2 bed-
room + large attic
loft bedroom with
spacious walk-in
closet, full tiled bath
on 1st floor, Easy
access to I-81,
airport & casino, off
street parking. No
smoking, No pets.
$750 + utilities &
security.
570-762-8265
DURYEA
1 bedroom, 1 bath
room, refrigerator
and stove provid-
ed, washer/dryer
hookup, off-street
parking, no pets,
garbage included,
second floor, no
smokers, 450/per
month, plus utili-
ties, $450 plus
first months rent/
security deposit.
570-457-3335
EXETER
1st floor, 2 bedroom,
eat in kitchen,
enclosed heated
porch. Large refin-
ished basement. 1
car carport. Gas
heat. Central air.
$700 + utilities &
security. Will consid-
er reduced rent for
maintenance work.
Call 570-760-6277
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
KINGSTON
E. WALNUT ST.
Light, bright, 1st
floor, 2 bedrooms,
elevator, carpet-
ed, Security
system. Garage.
Extra storage &
cable TV included.
Laundry facilities.
Heat & hot water
furnished. Fine
neighborhood.
Convenient to bus
& stores. No
pets. References.
Security. Lease.
No smokers
please. $840.
570-287-0900
KINGST KINGSTON ON
Like New Like New 2 bed-
room apartment in
great neighbor-
hood. 2nd floor.
Includes new
kitchen (with new
stove, dishwasher
& microwave) and
bath w/washer
dryer hookup. Hard-
wood throughout
with ceramic tile in
kitchen and bath.
$695/mo + utilities
and security. No
Pets, references
required. Call Scott
(570)823-2431
Ext. 137
PITTSTON
3 bedroom. Off
street parking, on
site laundry.
Enclosed porch.
Tenant pays electric
& trash. $695 +
utilities. Security
required. Call
(570) 881-1747
PITTSTON TWP.
Newly remodeled 2
bedroom apart-
ment. Living room,
kitchen, laundry &
bath 1st floor. 2 bed-
rooms 2nd floor.
Includes water &
garbage. No pets,
no smoking. $550 +
security. Call
(570) 655-4533
PLAINS TOWNSHIP
Walking Distance to
the Casino!! 2 bed-
room, 1 bath, living
room, kitchen, off
street parking.
$600/month +
utilities, security &
references. Call
Classic Properties
Nikki Callahan
718-4959 Ext. 1306
PLYMOUTH
1st floor, 1 bedroom
apartment. Stove,
fridge, water &
sewage included.
Front & Back porch.
$400 + security. Call
570-262-0540
WILKES-BARRE
Mayflower
Crossing
Apartments
570.822.3968
- Light & bright
open floor plans
- All major
appliances included
- Pets welcome*
- Close to everything
- 24 hour emergency
maintenance
- Short term
leases available
Call TODAY For
AVAILABILITY!!
www.mayflower
crossing.com
Certain Restrictions
Apply*
WILKES-BARRE
1ST FLOOR
260 CAREY AVE.
Small 1 bedroom,
recently remodeled,
heat & water includ-
ed. $520/month.
Call 570-288-3375
WILKES-BARRE
2 bedroom, newly
remodeled. Gas
heat. Washer/dryer
hookup. $475/mo. +
security & utilities.
No pets. Call
(570) 823-5984
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
WILKES-BARRE
264 Academy St
2 bedrooms, newly
renovated building.
Washer & dryer.
$600/per month
includes heat, hot
water and parking.
646-712-1286
570-328-9896
570-855-4744
WILKES-BARRE NORTH
1 East Chestnut St.
Near Cross Valley &
General Hospital.
2nd floor, 2
bedrooms, wall to
wall carpet, eat-in
kitchen with range,
shared yard, water
included. Tenant
pays gas heat &
electric. $425 +
security, No pets.
570-814-1356
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
Wilkes-Barre
Apartments
Available
SAI NT JOHN
APARTMENTS
419 N. Main St
Wilkes Barre
Spacious
1 bedroom.
Secured Senior
Building.
Applicants must
be over age 62 &
be income
qualified.
Rent start at $501
per month.
Includes ALL
utilities.
570-970-6694
Opportunity
Equal
Housing
Sell your own home!
Place an ad HERE
570-829-7130
WILKES-BARRE NORTH
807 N. Washington
2 bedrooms, 2nd
floor. Wall to wall
carpeting. Eat in
kitchen with appli-
ances. Off street
parking - 2 cars.
Coin op laundry. All
utilities included.
$645 / month +
security. No pets.
570-814-1356
WILKES-BARRE
NORTH END
Large 1 bedroom
apartment. Includes
heat, hot & cold
running water,
fridge, stove, coin-
op laundry, off
street parking, back
yard. $535 + securi-
ty. For appointment
call 570-814-3138
944 Commercial
Properties
COMMERCIAL BUILDING
12,000 + square
foot. Forty Fort
60 Dilley Street
Rent with Option
To Buy or For Sale.
Zoned commercial
& Industrial. Ware-
house, offices, 4
bath rooms, huge
storage area.
Available June 1st.
570-881-4993
COMMERCIAL SPACE
KINGSTON FOR RENT
620 Market St.
Newly Renovated
Prime Space.
1,250 sq. ft.,
Near Kingston
Corners. Great
location for retail or
business office.
Easy Access and
parking. Call Cliff
570-760-3427
PLAINS TWP
7 PETHICK DRIVE
OFF RTE. 315
1200 & 700 SF
Office Available.
Reasonable.
570-760-1513
315 PLAZA
1750 & 3200 SF
Retail / Office
Space Available
570-829-1206
944 Commercial
Properties
WILKES-BARRE
COMMERCIAL RETAIL SPACE
AVAILABLE IN ESTABLISHED
SHOPPING CENTER
800 to 2400 sq. ft.
Starting at
$750/month
973-265-4234
WILKES-BARRE
OFFICE/COMMERCIAL
2,500 SF First Floor
$500/month +
utilities.
Will divide.
First month free.
570-829-0897
WILKES-BARRE
PAD WITH DRIVE THRU
Available on busy
corner. 2500 sq ft
973-879-4730
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
WILKES-BARRE
TIRED OF HIGH
RENTS?
Are you paying too
much for your cur-
rent office? Call us!
We have modern
office space avail-
able in Luzerne
Bank Building on
Public Square.
Rents include heat,
central air, utilities,
trash removal, and
nightly cleaning - all
without a sneaky
CAM charge.
Access parking at
the new intermodal
garage via our cov-
ered bridge. 300SF
to 5000SF available.
We can remodel to
suit. Brokers Pro-
tected. Call Jeff
Pyros at 822-8577
950 Half Doubles
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
Lyndwood Avenue
Very spacious 3
bedroom half dou-
ble with neutral
decor. Off street
parking. Private
yard in rear. Ample
Storage. Conve-
nient to schools.
$560 / month + utili-
ties. 1 year lease,
security. No pets.
Call 570-793-6294
LARKSVILLE
3 bedroom, 1 bath
half double, Freshly
cleaned & painted.
Tenant pays all utili-
ties including sewer.
$550 plus security.
Call (570) 332-5723
NANTICOKE
55 Loomis St
3 bedroom, wall
to wall carpet,
full basement &
attic, stove,
fridge & water
included. No
pets. $630
plus security
570-814-1356
NANTICOKE
HALF DOUBLE
3 bedroom with
washer/dryer hook
up. Front & back
porch. Fenced in
back yard.
No Pets.
$550/month +
security & utilities.
(570) 822-7657
PITTSTON 1/2 DOUBLE
2 bedrooms, sun-
room, new bath,
washer/dryer
hookup. No pets.
$580 + utilities &
security, sewer &
garbage included.
Call (570) 655-5156
950 Half Doubles
WILKES-BARRE
178 Charles St
Available Now!
2 bedroom, 1.5
bath, Townhouse
style. No Section 8.
$550/month + utili-
ties. References &
security required.
Call 570-301-2785
953Houses for Rent
BACK MOUNTAIN
2 bedroom, 2 bath
home in beautiful
rural setting next to
Friedman Farms.
$1,100 monthly. Call
570-822-2992
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
3 bedroom single
family. 1 1/2 baths.
Driveway, yard, nice
area. $800 + utilities
Call 570-332-5723
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
KINGSTON
46 Zerby Ave
Sunday 1pm-3pm
Lease with option
to buy, completely
remodeled, mint,
turn key condition,
3 bedrooms, 1.5
baths, large
closets, with
hardwoods, carpet
& tile floors, new
kitchen and baths,
gas heat, shed,
large yard.
$134,000, seller
will pay closing
costs, $5000 down
and monthly
payments are
$995/month.
WALSH
REAL ESTATE
570-654-1490
LUZERNE
2nd floor, 2 bed-
rooms, living room,
eat-in kitchen, wall
to wall, washer &
dryer. $485 heat
included. Security &
references required
Call 570-288-8012
NANTICOKE
Desirable
Lexington Village
Nanticoke, PA
Many ranch style
homes. 2 bedrooms
2 Free Months With
A 2 Year Lease
$795 + electric
SQUARE FOOT RE
MANAGEMENT
866-873-0478
SWEET VALLEY
Available May 1st
3 bedroom, 2 bath
home in quiet,coun-
try setting. Large
eat in kitchen, full
basement. No pets.
$800/month + secu-
rity & utilities. Call
(570) 477-3346 or
(570) 762-2774
PAGE 16 SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2011 SUNDAY DISPATCH
906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale
2
7
8
2
9
0
Charming 2 story w/natural woodwork, 5BR, 2 bath,
enclosed porch, finished walk-up attic, 1 car garage. 10-1614
GERI 696-0888
Rt.11 Wyoming Ave - R on 3rd Ave - Property on L.
Well cared for & nicely kept. A place to call
home! Complete w/2 car oversized garage, C/A, 1st fl laundry,
eat-in kitchen. Convenient to shopping, West Pittston pool &
ball fields. 11-583
JUDY 714-9230
Rt 11N (Wyoming Ave) bear L on Tunkannock Avenue near
CVS. House on R.
Exquisite 3stry home in prestigious area. 3BR
& 2 3/4 bath w/3rd flr 1BR apt. 2 car detached garage, deep
lot. Beautiful foyer & wood thru-out. Lowered to flood zone "B".
$300/year. 11-896
ANDY 714-9225
North on Wyoming Avenue, R on Montgomery, home on L
near the end of the street.
Brand new 2300SF 2story w/4BRs, 2.5 baths, DR w/
HW, lg FR w/FP, tile in kitchen, bath & laundry. Corian in
kitchen. Level lot. 10-4664
JIM 715-9323
Main St., Avoca to turn onto McAlpine, straight across
Foote Ave. to L into Blueberry to 1st L onto Cranberry.
3BR, 2 3/4 baths, 4yr old Bi-Level. Large fenced yard.
Open 1st floor w/Master Suite with C/A. Finished LL rec room,
office & bath w/coal burner, 2 car garage on corner lot. 11-11
ANDY 714-9225
Take N. Main St through Pittston, R on Parsonage, bear L
on Foote Ave, L on Grove St, home in front of you at corner of
Grove & Meyers St.
Why rent when you can own this 2-3BR, 1 bath Ranch?
New roof, nicely maintained. Convenient location. All appliances
included. 11-770
LAURA 696-0842
81N to Dupont exit - Follow 315 down to L onto Main - L
on McCalpine - L on Gedding - House on R.
UNDER NEW OWNERSHIP. No upgrades
needed. Includes HW, tile baths, granite & stainless in kitchen.
All units have open floor plans. VIRTUAL TOUR! 10-4765
MARCIE 714-9267 OR MARIE 881-0103
Rte. 315 to Oak St. Oak St. to Pittston by-pass. L on by-
pass to end. L on Main. Insignia Courtyards is on the R.
Great location! Many upgrades to this 4 BR, 3 bath
Tudor. New roof, hw floors, Corian, tile. Move right in! 10-4093
SHIRLEY 714-9281
Rt 315N from W-B, L at Oblates of St Joseph (Pittston
Ave), L on Old Mill, house on L.
Unique 2stry w/exceptional mother-in-law apt. 4-5BRs,
HW & 9ft ceilings 1st flr. 2FRs w/2 gas FPs, 4zone heat/A/C,
plenty of granite & tile. 2 car gar in desireable Blueberry Hills
Estates. 10-4120
DEB R. 714-5802
North on Main St, R on Phoenix, L on Blueberry Drive, L on
Huckleberry Drive, property on L.
Great starter home in convenient location. Many
updates including electric, newer roof & windows. Nice size
backyard. A must see! 11-707
CHRISTINA 714-9235
Take Rt315 which turns into Chestnut St, Dupont, house
on R, just past traffic light.
Beautiful new Townhome w/ 1st flr
Master, HW flrs in FR & DR, kitchen, heated sunroom &
deck off the MBR. A must see!
PEG 714-9247
10-2359
Move into luxury! Bright open floor plan
w/2story foyer, great room & stone FP. Balcony loft!
Energy efficient & more!
TOM 715-9329
11-705
3BR move-in condition Ranch. Sunken LR w/
HW floor, DR w/hardwood, eat-in oak kitchen w/Corian
countertops, 2 baths, 2 car garage.
MATT 714-9229
11-969
Appreciate the comforts in this 3BR split
level home. Great location! Only minutes from I-81.
DIANE 696-0889
10-3728
Beautiful open staircase w/original woodwork
greets you in this formal foyer. Features LR, DR, Kit, 4BR,
1 bath & private drive.
KATHLEEN 696-0870
10-3837
Lovely spacious home w/2BRs, 2 baths. Why rent
when you can buy?
SHARON 970-1106
11-976
3-4BR 2 story home w/large LR/DR, eat-in
oak kitchen, 2 full baths, 1st floor FR, finished lower level,
2 car garage & fenced yard.
MATT 714-9229
11-988
Well maintained Cape Cod featuring large
rooms, oak kitchen, HW floors, FP & covered deck.
VIRTUAL TOUR!
MARION 585-0602
10-5680
Beautiful new 2story w/all the extras in
a wonderful community! Large lot & many great features.
Come & see!
LISA 715-9335
10-2209
Supreme living! Set a new standard of
living in this wonderful brick/vinyl sided 2sty nestled in a
great neighborhood! Large sunken LR w/gas FP, tastefully
decorated mod kitchen, 3BRs & much more!
ROSEMARIE 714-9231
10-3101
Move right into this 3BR, 1 3/4bath
split level w/open floor plan, HW flrs, wood burning stove,
garage located on a quiet street. Add’l lot included in
sale.
DEB R. 714-5802
10-2246
Spacious 4BR home w/formal DR, HW
flrs, huge LR w/fireplace, 2nd floor laundry.
NANCY PALUMBO 714-9240
10-1343
Pretty affordable starter home w/
private drive on deep lot. LR, DR, FR & 2st floor laundry.
DEANNA 696-0894
11-308
Move-in condition 3BR Cape w/large
eat-in kitchen w/all appls, LR/DR with W/W carpet, 2 car
plus garage, large lot & more.
MATT 714-9229
11-272
2BR home w/large LR, FR w/laminate floor, eat-
in kitchen, semi-modern bath, large lot.
MATT 714-9229
11-561
The Dispatch
LOCAL PROS
1-800-273-7130 for Local Pros
SNOW REMOVAL
Robert Smith-Owner
570-602-LAWN• 570-602-5296
West Pittston
Shrub Trimming • Grass Cutting • Mulching
• Insured • Senior Discount
• Spring Cleanup
&
L
a
w
n
Services, In
c
.
G
a
rd
e
n
Village Landsca
p
in
g
CONSTRUCTION
CHRIS LATONA
General Contractor
Ceramic Tile Work - Kitchens
- Bathrooms - Garages
- Replacement Windows
- New Homes - Additions - Doors -
Complete Remodeling
FREE Estimates - Insured
457-8145 or 655-0777
Quality Works at Affordable Prices
PA008322
TRAVEL
Overnight Junket to
Atlantic City’s
Trump Marina!
Tuesday, May 10 & 11
Complementary room, transportation
& baggage handling. Food, Beverages
& Snacks served on bus.
$25 per person.
Al Lispi: 570-814-3137
or 570-823-9578
LAWN CARE
LAWN MAINTENANCE
570-654-1557
Lawns cut, shrubs pruned, small
landscaping projects & odd jobs.
Find A NewFriend
In The Times Leader Classified
To place an ad call 829-7130
953Houses for Rent
WEST PITTSTON
SINGLE FAMILY
HOME
622 Foundry Street,
Available immedi-
ately, 3 bedrooms, 1
bathroom, refrigera-
tor and stove pro-
vided, washer/dryer
hookup, pets ok,
Fenced in yard.
Great neighbor-
hood. $725.00/per
month, plus utilities,
$$725.00/security
deposit. Call
(570) 239-4102
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
WILKES-BARRE
MONARCH RENTALS
STUDENT HOUSING
3 bedrooms,
all appliances
provided.
Call 570-822-7039
WILKES-BARRE
Parsons
143 Stucker Ave.
3 Bedroom 1-1/2
Bath. 1,900 square
foot Modern Home
in Great Neighbor-
hood. Includes all
Appliances. Large
fenced in yard with
deck & shed. Off
Street Parking. No
smokers / pets.
$875 / month + utili-
ties. Security, Cred-
it Check & Refer-
ences Required.
570-332-6003
965 Roommate
Wanted
SCRANTON/SOUTH
Quiet Block
4 private bedrooms
plus shared kitchen
& baths, ample
closets.
$420/month
570-575-6280
1000
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
1057Construction &
Building
GARAGE DOOR
Sales, service,
installation &
repair.
FULLY INSURED
HIC# 065008
CALL JOE
(570)606-7489
(570)735-8551
1093 Excavating
All Types Of
Excavating,
Demolition &
Concrete Work
Large & Small Jobs
FREE ESTIMATES
(570) 760-1497
1135 Hauling &
Trucking
A.S.A.P Hauling
Estate Cleanouts,
Attics, Cellars,
Garages, Fire &
Flood Damage.
Free Estimates,
Same Day
Service!
570-822-4582
Wanna make a
speedy sale? Place
your ad today 570-
829-7130.
1165 Lawn Care
JOHN’S
LAWN SERVICE
Insured.
Reasonable
rates.
Free Estimates.
570-991-7150
1204 Painting &
Wallpaper
A.B.C. Professional
Painting
36 Yrs Experience
We Specialize In
New Construction
Residential
Repaints
Comm./Industrial
All Insurance
Claims
Apartments
Interior/Exterior
Spray,Brush, Rolls
WallpaperRemoval
Cabinet Refinish-
ing
Drywall/Finishing
Power Washing
Deck Specialist
Handy Man
FREE ESTIMATES
Larry Neer
570-606-9638
1234 Pressure
Washing
DONE-RIGHT
Pressure
Washing
Patios, decks, sid-
ing, concrete. Serv-
ing Lackawanna &
Luzerne Counties.
570-655-4004
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
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