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Introduction

BUS100 – Lecture One


 Lecturer – Chadinee Maneesoonthorn
Introduction to
organisations and management  Subject – BU100 Management
 Level – 1 - No prerequisite
Chapter 1  Email cmaneesoonthorn@studygroup.com

Robbins, Bergman, Stagg, Coulter: Foundations of Management 2e © 2006 Pearson Education Australia
Robbins, Bergman, Stagg, Coulter: Foundations of Management 2e © 2006 Pearson Education Australia 2

LEARNING OUTLINE
ASSESSMENTS Follow this Learning Outline as you read and study this chapter.
 2 Assignments
 1 Exam  Who are managers?
• Explain how manager differ from non-managerial
employees.
• Discuss how to classify managers in organisations.

 What is management?
• Define management.
• Contrast efficiency and effectiveness.
• Explain why efficiency and effectiveness are important to
management.

Robbins, Bergman, Stagg, Coulter: Foundations of Management 2e © 2006 Pearson Education Australia 3 Robbins, Bergman, Stagg, Coulter: Foundations of Management 2e © 2006 Pearson Education Australia 4

L E A R N I N G O U T L I N E (cont’d) L E A R N I N G O U T L I N E (cont’d)
Follow this Learning Outline as you read and study this chapter. Follow this Learning Outline as you read and study this chapter.

 What do managers do?  What is an organisation?


• Describe the four functions of management. • Describe the characteristics of an organisation.

• Explain Mintzberg’s managerial roles. • Explain how the concept of an organisation is changing.

• Describe Katz’s three essential managerial skills and how


the importance of these skills changes depending on  Why study management?
managerial level. • Explain the universality of management concept.
• Discuss the changes that are impacting managers’ jobs. • Discuss why an understanding of management is
• Explain why customer service and innovation are important important even if you don’t plan to be a manager.
to the manager’s job. • Describe the rewards and challenges of being a
manager.

Robbins, Bergman, Stagg, Coulter: Foundations of Management 2e © 2006 Pearson Education Australia 5 Robbins, Bergman, Stagg, Coulter: Foundations of Management 2e © 2006 Pearson Education Australia 6

1
An organisation... The changing organisation

 Has a Distinct Purpose

 Is Composed of People

 Has a Deliberate Structure

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Who are managers? Classifying managers

 First-line Managers:
Are at the lowest level of management and manage the
work of non-managerial employees.
 People who work with and through other
people by coordinating and integrating their
work activities in order to accomplish  Middle Managers:
organisational goals Manage the work of first-line managers.

 Top Managers:
Are responsible for making organisation-wide decisions
and establishing plans and goals that affect the entire
organisation.

Robbins, Bergman, Stagg, Coulter: Foundations of Management 2e © 2006 Pearson Education Australia 9 Robbins, Bergman, Stagg, Coulter: Foundations of Management 2e © 2006 Pearson Education Australia 10

Organisational levels What is management?

The process of coordinating work activities so that


they are completed efficiently with and through
other people

 Efficiency
“Doing things right”
Getting the most output for the least inputs

 Effectiveness
“Doing the right things”
Attaining organisational goals

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2
Efficiency and effectiveness in
management What do managers do?
Functional Approach

 Planning
Defining goals, establishing strategies to achieve
goals, developing plans to integrate and coordinate
activities.
 Organising
Arranging work to accomplish organisational goals.
 Leading
Working with and through people to accomplish
goals.
 Controlling
Monitoring, comparing, and correcting the work.

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Management functions Mintzberg’s management roles


Interpersonal roles

Figurehead Leader Liaison

Informational roles

Monitor Disseminator Spokesperson

Decisional roles

Entrepreneur Handler Allocator Negotiator

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Skills needed at different


management levels Conceptual skills

 Using information to solve business problems


 Identifying of opportunities for innovation
 Recognising problem areas and implementing
solutions
 Selecting critical information from masses of data
 Understanding of business uses of technology
 Understanding of organisation’s business model

Source: Based on American Management Association Survey of Managerial Skills and


Competencies, March/April 2000, found on AMA Web site (www.ama.org), October 30, 2002.

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Management 2ePearson
2003 © 2006 Pearson Education
Education Australia
Australia Figure 1.5 17 17 Robbins, Bergman, Stagg, Coulter: Foundations of Management 2e © 2006 Pearson Education Australia Table 1.3 18

3
Communication skills Effectiveness skills
 Ability to transform ideas into words and actions  Contributing to corporate mission/departmental
 Credibility among colleagues, peers, and objectives
subordinates  Customer focus
 Listening and asking questions  Multitasking: working at multiple tasks in parallel
 Presentation skills; spoken format  Negotiating skills
 Presentation skills; written and/or graphic formats  Project management
 Reviewing operations and implementing
improvements
 Setting and maintaining performance standards
internally and externally
 Setting priorities for attention and activity
Source: Based on American Management Association Survey of Managerial Skills and  Time management
Competencies, March/April 2000, found on AMA Web site (www.ama.org), October 30, 2002.
Source: Based on American Management Association Survey of Managerial Skills and
Competencies, March/April 2000, found on AMA Web site (www.ama.org), October 30, 2002.

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Interpersonal skills Management skills and functions matrix

 Coaching and mentoring skills


 Diversity skills: working with diverse people and
cultures
 Networking within the organisation
 Networking outside the organisation
 Working in teams; cooperation and commitment

Source: Based on American Management Association Survey of Managerial Skills and


Competencies, March/April 2000, found on AMA Web site (www.ama.org), October 30, 2002.

Robbins, Bergman, Stagg, Coulter: Foundations of Management 2e © 2006 Pearson Education Australia Table 1.3 21 Robbins, Bergman, Stagg, Coulter: Foundations of Management 2e © 2006 Pearson Education Australia Figure 1.6 22

Managerial functions:
distribution of time by level Organisational type
Top-level managers
Profit or non-profit, all have:
Leading Organising Planning Controlling
22% 36% 28% 14%
 political considerations
Middle-level managers  business constraints
 motivational issues
Leading Organising Planning Controlling
36% 33% 18% 13%

First-level managers

Leading Organising Planning Controlling


51% 24% 15% 10%

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4
Organisational size Importance of managerial roles

Small firms Large firms


Size influences: High
Spokesperson Resource allocator
 Importance of managerial roles
 Differences in degree and emphasis, but not
function Entrepreneur Liaison
Moderate Monitor
Figurehead
Leader Disturbance handler
Negotiator

Low Entrepreneur
Disseminator
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Changes Impacting
the Manager’s Job How The Manager’s Job Is Changing
Importance of Customers
 Customers: the reason that organisations exist
 Managing customer relationships is the responsibility
of all managers and employees.
 Consistent high quality customer service is essential
for survival.

Innovation
 Doing things differently, exploring new territory, and
taking risks
 Managers should encourage employees to be aware
of and act on opportunities for innovation.

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Value of managers Universal need for management

 Good managerial skills are scarce, therefore


remuneration is comparatively high for top managers
 First-line management positions are common, so
remuneration can be quite low.
 Shareholder activism is putting pressure on excessive
remuneration packages

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Becoming a manager Managing yourself
 Keep up with current business news
 Read books about good and bad examples of  Management work is performed by everybody in
managing the organisation
 Observe managers and how they handle people  Management ideas evolve and develop
and situations  It is paramount to keep developing and training to
 Talk to managers about experiences – good or bad improve management skills
 Get experience in managing by taking on
leadership roles in student organisations
 Start thinking about whether or not you would
enjoy being a manager.

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Rewards and challenges of being a


manager

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