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Quick guide to the new course

Four parts to the course


Part 1: Language in cultural context

Part 2: Language and mass communication

Part 3: Literature - texts and contexts

Part 4: Literature - critical study


What texts will we
study?

50% media/ non fiction

50% literary texts


Text types for Parts 1 and 2
A wide range of text types should be included to help students with analysis
and production. The list of suggestions below is not exhaustive.

Advertisement Appeal Biography Blog Brochure/leaflet

Cartoon Chart Database Diagram Diary Editorial

Electronic texts Encyclopedia entry Essay Film/television

Guide book Interview Letter (formal) Letter (informal)

Magazine article Manifesto Memoir News report

Opinion column Parody Pastiche Photographs Radio broadcast

Report Screenplay Set of instructions Song lyric Speech

Textbook Travel writing


Text types for Parts 3 & 4
At both SL and HL two genres, two places and two periods must be
included in the schoolʼs syllabus for parts 3 and 4. The definitions of
“period” and “place” are included in the PLA for the language A studied.

Up to your teachers but could be something like:

ʻOthelloʼ by William Shakespeare (Elizabethan play) PLA

ʻBrave New Worldʼ by Aldous Huxley (20th Century Novel) PLA

ʻOne Day in the Life of Ivanʼ Denisovich Solzhenitsyn, A (Novel in


translation) PTL

ʻSelected poemsʼ Carol Ann Duffy (Contemporary Poetry)


What will the assessment be?

60% analytical skills


40% structure and writing
skills
What will the assessment be?

60% analytical skills


40% structure and writing
skills
How will we be assessed?
Part 1: Language in cultural context /Part 2: Language and
mass communication
(a) 90 min exam on 2 unseen media texts - 25%
(b) 2 oral activities (best one is used) - 15%

Part 3: Literature - texts and contexts


(c) 90 min exam essay from 6 questions based on two texts studied - 25%

Part 4: Literature - critical study


(d) Oral commentary -15%

(e) Written tasks 800-1000 words (3 completed one submitted) - 20%


Examples of written tasks
The following are examples of possible types of written tasks.
These are intended for guidance only and are neither
exhaustive nor compulsory.
A newspaper article in which are shown the dangers of
stereotyping particular social groups
An additional episode that takes place before the beginning of a
novel and provides context for the opening sequence
A letter from one fictional character to another, which reveals
a change in the relationship between the two characters
An opinion column that emphasizes the pervasiveness of
advertising and how certain brands are promoted for the
purpose of raising company profits