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Credits and Creative Rights Disclaimer: All of the sources included in this remix adhere to established guidelines on Creative

Rights. Materials used are in the Public Domain or licensed through Creative Commons. Items included in remix that fall under copyright protection follow established guidelines on Fair Use, especially those published in the “Documentary Filmmaker’s Guidelines for Best Practices in Fair Use,” which include . . . Best Practices for Fair Use (from Center for Social Media) Whenever possible, you should: a. Attribute where the clip came from (either on screen or in the credits)

b. Try to take material from a range of sources not just one source c. Make sure you are using only as much as absolutely necessary to make your point

d. Not include quoted material merely to avoid the cost or inconvenience of shooting equivalent footage. (Statement of Best Practices)

Materials labeled “Public Domain” are “Public domain refers to creative works for which copyright protection has expired, or, for pre-1978 works, works that lost copyright protection because of failure to comply with a legal formality (such as registration, or publication with a copyright notice). A public domain work may be used freely, in any form, without permission from the creator. Public domain works generally include those published before 1923, as well as works produced by the U.S. government (and certain other governments). It does not, however, include any and all creative works found on the Internet; just because creative works are easily accessible (i.e., downloadable from the Internet), does not mean they are public domain.” (Digital Citizen)

Materials labeled with “Creative Commons” license most often hold “Share Alike” and “Attribution” CC licenses, which means “[quote from website regarding what it means].” Unless otherwise indicated, these are the CC licenses the source materials hold. Materials labeled
“Fair Use” appear to be subject to copyright projection but the use here passes the test for Fair Use, which means“Fair use is the section of copyright law that protects the rights of creators who want to

incorporate other people’s copyrighted material into their work.” (Center for Social Media)
• Did the unlicensed use "transform" the material taken from the copyrighted work by using it for a different purpose than that of the original, or did it just repeat the work for the same intent and value as the original?

• Was the material taken appropriate in kind and amount, considering the nature of the copyrighted work and of the use?

If the answers to these two questions are "yes," a court is likely to find a use fair. Because that is true, such a use is unlikely to be challenged in the first place. Texts Smith, Bobbie. “The Commute.” Memories of Old E.T. Tarpley, Fred, Ed. Commerce, TX: Silver Leos Writers Guild, 2010. 122-131. [Fair Use] Music "Magic Ghost." Trance w Solid Steady Beat. Dan-O. http://www.danosongs.com Royalty free music. [Creative Commons License: Attribution]

Images “1892 Governor Hogg visit.” Red River County Historical Society. Digital Collections, James G. Gee Library, Texas A&M University-Commerce. May 7,1892. [Fair Use] “1921 ticket.” Commerce Public Library Historical Archives. Digital Collections, 2008.17James G. Gee Library, Texas A&M University-Commerce. September 26, 1921. [Fair Use] “1985 - Norris Reunion, N.C. and Daryl Wilburn.” African American History Collection. 2008.17, James G. Gee Library Special Collections, Texas A&M UniversityCommerce. 1950. [Fair Use] “Abernathy House.” ." Northeast Texas Rural Heritage Museum. Digital Collections, James G. Gee Library, Texas A&M University-Commerce. Circa 1896. [Fair Use] "Aerial View of East Texas State Teachers College." University Photograph Collection, collection 2008.17, James G. Gee Library Special Collections, Texas A&M UniversityCommerce. 1950. [Fair Use] "African American Students at Unknown School." Northeast Texas Rural Heritage Museum. Digital Collections, James G. Gee Library, Texas A&M University-Commerce. ND. [Fair

Use] “Campus Ice Storm 1950s.” University Photograph Collection, collection 2008.17, James G. Gee Library Special Collections, Texas A&M University-Commerce. c. 1950s. [Fair Use] “Center Point Community Sawmill.” Northeast Texas Rural Heritage Museum. 1938-1940. [Fair Use] “Close-up of employees of the St. Louis Southwestern (Cotton Belt) Railroad standing beside steam engine.” Commerce Public Library Historical Archives. Digital Collections, 2008.17James G. Gee Library, Texas A&M University-Commerce. Circa early 1900’s. [Fair Use] “Commerce Railroad Workers in Commerce Railroad Yard.” Commerce Public Library Historical Archives. Digital Collections,2008.17James G. Gee Library, Texas A&M University-Commerce. ND. [Fair Use] “Commerce Roundhouse pool.” Commerce Public Library Historical Archives. Digital Collections,2008.17James G. Gee Library, Texas A&M University-Commerce. 1916. [Fair Use] “Commerce Train Wreck.” Commerce Public Library Historical Archives. Digital Collections,2008.17James G. Gee Library, Texas A&M University-Commerce. Early 1900s. [Fair Use] “Cotton Belt Engine #927.” Commerce Public Library Historical Archives. Digital Collections,2008.17James G. Gee Library, Texas A&M University-Commerce. ND. [Fair Use] “Cotton Belt Passenger Train 1948.” Commerce Public Library Historical Archives. Digital Collections,2008.17James G. Gee Library, Texas A&M University-Commerce. 1948. [Fair Use] “Cotton Belt Steam Engine #517.” Commerce Public Library Historical Archives. Digital Collections,2008.17James G. Gee Library, Texas A&M University-Commerce.

September 24 or 25, 1953. [Fair Use] “Les Choisites Annual Ball 1933.” University Photograph Collection, collection 2008.17, James G. Gee Library Special Collections, Texas A&M University-Commerce. 1933. [Fair Use] “Paving Main Street .” Northeast Texas Rural Heritage Museum. Digital Collections, James G. Gee Library, Texas A&M University-Commerce.1916. [Fair Use] “Postcard Collection.” ET Ephemera Collection, collection 2009.02, James G. Gee Library Special Collections, Texas A&M University-Commerce. Circa 1943. [Fair Use] “Sadie Hawkins day 1950.” University Photograph Collection, collection 2008.17, James G. Gee Library Special Collections, Texas A&M University-Commerce. November, 1950. [Fair Use] “Sadie Hawkins day publicity shots.” University Photograph Collection, collection 2008.17, James G. Gee Library Special Collections, Texas A&M University-Commerce. 1945. [Fair Use] “School dance 1940s.” University Photograph Collection, collection 2008.17, James G. Gee Library Special Collections, Texas A&M University-Commerce. Circa 1940s. [Fair Use] “Shotgun Houses Owned by Dr. David Graham Hall.” Bertha Voyer Memorial Library & HallVoyer Foundation. ND. [Fair Use] Creative Commons License
Shaping the future portfolio by Eric B. is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. <a rel="license" href="Creative'>http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-ncsa/3.0/">Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License</a>.