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COACHING ESSENTIALS

Coaching Essentials

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Table of Content
How to Coach New Managers at Induction By Juliette Robertson Tips for Entering the Coaching Profession By Randy Brown Magnify Coaching Skills - Coaching Conversations By James Gehrke Coaching at Work By Julia Mcvey Basic Coaching Skills - 13 Important Skills For Successful Coaching By Brenda Zeller Coaching Tools - End Education Stagnation and Take Action By Suzan Schmitt Coaching - Different Strokes for Different Folks or One Size Fits All? By Alun Richards Bringing Science to the Art of Coaching By Jack Zenger and Kathleen Stinnett Coaching Methods - How to Boost Your Coaching Conversion Rates Right Through the Roof By Sean R Mize Why You Need to Keep Track of Your Conversion Rates By Issamar Ginzberg Warning Signs For Coaches - When to Say No to Clients By Jayne Warrilow Trust Your Intuition - A Vital Tool For Powerful Coaching By Jayne Warrilow The Question That Could Change Your Business By Julie Anne Jones Powerful Coaching Questions By Jayne Warrilow 06

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Secret Reasons That Coaches Kill Their Own Coaching Businesses By Suzan Schmitt Is It Time For Coaches To Offer A Guarantee? By Olivia Stefanino Your Coaching Questions Answered By Natalie Manor Coaching Gen Y? Don't Be Like the Wolf in Sheep's Clothing By Juliette Robertson 4 Coaching Solutions That Ensures Personality Development By M. Onggo Ego Has No Place In Professional and Positive Coaching – Success Comes With Positive Application By PaTrisha-Anne Todd Performance Coaching - Learn About The New Techniques By Laura Brasnan Executive Coaching - Dispelling the 13 Myths and All You Need to Know About Having a Coach By Mark Buchan The Role of the Executive Coach - Developing the Best Talent By Roger M Ingbretsen Perfect Pitch of Executive Coaching - Establishing the Client Value Proposition By Suzi Pomerantz and Dr. Steve Gladis The Business Case For Executive Coaching - The ICF Coaching ROI Global Study By Maynard Brusman Coaching in the Eye of the Storm - Developing a More Intuitive Approach to Executive Coaching By Jayne Warrilow

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How to Coach New Managers at Induction
By Juliette Robertson Executive Coaching may have traditionally been reserved for more senior executives and middle managers but as an Executive Coach and Workplace Coach Trainer I believe that instilling a coaching mindset needs to begin early and even be built into Induction Programs for companies keen to fast track a coaching culture change. We know that the first 90 days in any role is a time of proving yourself and Gen Y knows that well. However new managers often win roles based on their technical skills and are given very little guidance and training on how to manage the day to day people issues that they face. For progressive companies that recognize the importance of leadership, teaching new managers coaching skills early not only fast tracks their personal results but has a huge roll on affect for the company culture. New managers in their 20's benefit most by learning coaching skills early in their career for 2 reasons. 1) They are courageous. They are so keen to improve themselves and make their mark that they have the courage to embrace new skills and practice what they learn and they are grateful for the opportunity. 2) They are the leaders of the future and as they master these coaching skills and use them throughout their careers, they will positively influence and develop more and more up and coming leaders in their care. We are introducing a powerful cycle of growth and change here. I have had the privilege to coach and train managers at varying levels of seniority. Senior Executives and many middle managers love the 1:1 attention and focus and support that Executive Coaching provides them but find it very tough to adapt their leadership style to demonstrate those same coaching principles with their teams and nor do they want to. For many, it becomes too difficult to change styles. My experience has been that even after managers dedicate full days of training to learn how to coach their staff and experiencing inspiring breakthrough moments in the training room, the inspiration of new skills is quickly diminished and often vanishes by the intrusions of a working day. The challenge has always been how to help managers embed the skills over time. Having trained close to 800 leaders face to face over the years, I knew there had to be a better way and I found it by changing my target market and my method of delivery. That involved delivering on-line to new managers, supervisors, team leaders and project leaders and what we've found is that this is attracting managers and inquiry
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from all over Australia, Singapore, Hong Kong and New Zealand but it's the combination of theory, practical workplace coaching assignments and live on-line tutorial support that is unique. Companies who are committed to helping managers embed Coaching skills, not just learn the theory will see quick results but choose your course wisely. Look for courses that are structured to give managers support over many weeks and even months as they coach their staff and gain confidence and skill. And if its online, it's affordable for everyone and very attractive to Gen Y. When you reach them early in their careers and give them access to easy Workplace Coaching Skills, a light goes on and new managers suddenly see how meaningful a role they can play in developing their staff. It's very inspiring to unleash their potential. Juliette Robertson is an Executive Coach offering webinar based Coach Training for new managers in "How to Coach Your Staff to Step Up and Seize Opportunities". This action based 7 module coach training includes webinar lectures, coaching sessions with your staff and phone based coaching tutorials. It is globally accessible on-line - perfect for busy new managers who want the benefits of step-by-step elearning plus access to qualified coaching tutors to help fast track their coaching skills.

To register for 60 minutes of free webinar based Coach Training, visit http://www.howtocoachyourstaff.com.au On-line e-books and expert interviews are also available. Affiliate Partners and Joint Venture partners are also sought to help spread these coaching skills to new managers. Excellent commissions are available for those with good business databases. See base line of web site for details. Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?How-to-Coach-New-Managers-atInduction&id=4531874 How to Coach New Managers at Induction

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Tips for Entering the Coaching Profession
By Randy Brown Sports play a huge role in our daily life. As our kids participate in sports the role of the coach becomes important. Unlike many professions, coaching does not have a preparation path as do most other professions. This article looks at key questions and considerations for those interested in becoming a coach.

For many college students the degree the work so hard for does not guarantee a life time of work in their chosen field. The type of profession we start with is rarely the one we stay with for many years. I am asked often by prospective basketball coaches how a coaching degree or certification can be attained. This question is asked by people of all ages and backgrounds. Here is a set of issues to consider if you are interested in coaching, from the preps to high school and beyond.

1. Research --Find out all you can about coaching and decide if it is for you. If so, develop a plan to prepare for your coaching.

2. Examine--Take a look at all options for coaching, from grade school to college basketball to see which one fits you the best.

3. Education--Decide if going back to school is something you would be willing to do.

4. Finances/Family considerations--Analyze your family/financial situation relative to pursuing a job in coaching, as there are many considerations to evaluate.

5. Soak in the art of coaching--Learn as much basketball as possible. Read, watch, and study the game. Start with the fundamentals of basketball because they apply to every level.

6. Characteristics of a good coach--Study good coaches at any level and figure out what makes them so good. Talk with them and ask questions. If you have good local coaches or former coaches of yours, that is a good place to start.

7. Keep it simple--Keep things simple as you study the game because there is a tendency to get too complicated too fast. In the end the kids are hurt by a coach not having a sound, fundamental base to his coaching. This is happening all over our
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country today because of the emphasis put on playing games OVER learning the game.

8. Be a volunteer coach--Volunteer to help coach a local grade school, middle school or high school team to get hands on experience in all aspects of the game. Once you gain experience you can gauge whether the next level is for you. Your rise in the coaching profession has a lot to do with your love for coaching kids and a love for the game itself.

My expertise is in mentoring coaches at all levels. Specifically, I have mentored over 90 coaches into jobs in college basketball. Whether you desire to be a YMCA youth coach or a Division I college coach, the process is the same. Once you follow these eight easy steps you will be well on your way to a career in coaching.

Randy Brown has passion for the game of basketball. He works as a basketball consultant and mentor for coaches. Visit him at http://www.coachrb.com for free resources, Q & A, newsletter, and coaching programs. A speaker and writer, he has authored 75 articles on coaching and is nationally published. His 18 years in college basketball highlights a successful 23-year career. Mentored by Basketball Hall of Fame coach Lute Olson at Arizona. Resume includes positions at Arizona, Iowa State, Marquette, Drake, and Miami of Ohio, 5 Conference Championships and 5 NCAA appearances. His efforts have helped develop 12 NBA players including Steve Kerr, Sean Elliott, and Jaamal Tinsley. To contact Randy, email him at rb@coachrb.com Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?Tips-for-Entering-the-CoachingProfession&id=853362 Tips for Entering the Coaching Profession

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Magnify Coaching Skills - Coaching Conversations
By James Gehrke Each coach has their own natural approach to coaching. Unfortunately, they often rely exclusively on this approach rather than adapting to the needs of the individual being coached. This does not lead to successful outcomes since the coachee's needs are not appropriately met. There are three dimensions to effective coaching, including; how to coach, when to coach and what to coach. A coach can improve her effectiveness as a coach by adapting her approach in each dimension to the needs of the coachee.

How to coach. A coach should take a directive or a non directive approach to coaching, not based on which his natural style, but rather, based on the needs of the "coachee". Hersey and Blanchard propose in their theory of Situational Leadership that the leader should adapt her leadership style based on the readiness level of the employee. If the employee is new to a task, insecure, or unable to perform the task, the leader should take a much more directive style. If the employee has more experience and is more able to perform the task, then the leader should take a more non directive approach (Hersey, Blanchard and Johnson). Each individual has different needs and attitudes. An effective coach adapts his approach to meet those needs and attitudes. He can be directive; giving advice, telling and/or teaching what to do and how to do it, or non directive; asking questions and helping the individual come to their own conclusions, depending on the preference and needs of the "coachee". When to coach. Coaches can chose to provide a programmatic, ongoing approach to coaching and/or provide circumstantial coaching in response to a specific need and or circumstance. Programmatic coaching is utilized to develop skills or behaviors over time. For example, a sales coach may provide selling skills coaching to a sales representative over time, or an executive coach may provide coaching to high potential managers to prepare him for further responsibility in the future. Circumstantial coaching is less formal and given at any time in response to a specific need. What to coach. A coach may decide to coach on specific tasks, skills, or behaviors or she may take a holistic approach, showing more concern about the person's overall growth and development. For example, the sales coach may provide coaching on specific coaching skills, while the executive coach may be looking at the whole needs of an individual to help them take on a broader leadership role. I once worked with a peer who preferred a very direct style of coaching. He was a busy executive who felt only direct and immediate feedback had impact on his team. He only coached when he felt the circumstances demanded. Furthermore, he only
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focused on the behaviors and skills needed to get the job done and never took a holistic look at the needs of his team. This individual had a reputation of getting results; however, he scared away and/or offended many along the way. Those who needed a more non directive, programmatic and/or holistic approach soon left the organization, or worse, became unproductive and resentful. In the long term, this executive became less effective, and was finally asked to leave. As Kouzes and Posner explain: "...forever erase from your minds the image of the coach as that stern-faced, chairthrowing, dirt-kicking, ass-chewing tough guy who yells orders to the players. Maybe it makes good sports theater, but it definitely does not produce outstanding business performance. What you'll get instead is a demoralized group of disengaged constituents who'd rather quit than excel. Success in the one-to-one leadership context is dependent on the ability of the leader to build a lasting relationship in which the talent sees the coach as a partner and a role model" (Goldsmith and Lyons, p. 137). One of the best ways for a coach to build that lasting relationship is by adapting his coaching style and approach to the needs of the individual he is coaching. References:

Hargrove, R.A., (2003). Masterful coaching. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass/Pfeiffer.

Hersey, P., Blanchard, K.H., and Johnson, D., (2001). Management of Organizational behavior: Leading human resources - Eighth Edition. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall. Marshall, G. and Lyons, L (2006). Coaching for leadership: The practice of leadership coaching from the world's greatest coaches. San Francisco: Pfeiffer.

James Gehrke is the President of Magnify Leadership and Development. After various promotions in Sales, Sales Operations, Training & Development, and Sales Management and Training, he headed Pfizer’s Learning & Development for all of Europe, Canada, Africa, & the Middle East where he was instrumental in the development of a global management curriculum and other training initiatives to enhance organizational effectiveness for over 30,000 employees. He has worked on many high levels, cross functional teams addressing issues such as Field Force Effectiveness, Change Leadership, Leader Behavior Development, Executive Coaching and many others. Since starting his own training company, James has developed and trained both public and private leadership, coaching, targeting and territory management
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sessions for hundreds of participants in various industries. James is bilingual and can teach in both English and Spanish http://www.magnifyleadership.com Magnify Leadership and Development 6232 South Vinecrest Drive • Murray, Utah 84121 • Phone: 801-266-0849 Email: info@magnifyleadership.com Website: http://www.magnifyleadership.com Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?Magnify-Coaching-Skills---CoachingConversations&id=677223 Magnify Coaching Skills - Coaching Conversations

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Coaching at Work
By Julia Mcvey A major factor when considering investment in coaching is the cost savings that it can bring a company. These cost savings are significant and will provide an excellent return on the investment in coaching. At the moment there are companies who are suffering losses due to increased absence, poor staff retention and the high cost of recruiting quality people for their organisation. An employer with a workforce of 180 (fte) earning an average of £12,500 pa will lose £112,478 per year if the absence level due to sickness is 5%. For many employers the reality of failing to invest in their internal customers is much worse than the figure quoted above with some industries quoting absence as high as 18%, attrition at 43% and the cost of recruiting one junior member of staff being £10,000 before the company gains a return on investment. In addition to this, the stark reality is that this is only the tip of the iceberg with businesses also losing money due to lack of motivation and no true feeling of value at all levels within organisations. For example, it is now twenty years since the first Call Centre was established and during this period how companies do business with their customers has been revolutionised. It has become the norm to speak to someone in a Call Centre to buy anything from a holiday to a mortgage. Further to this, we have progressed into a new phase of off-shoring our Call Centres to places like India and Malaysia and yet one thing has not evolved and this is the image of a Call Centre. Working in a Call Centre in the 21st century still has the image of a "poor career option", with many Call Centres trapped in a cycle of reduced investment in coaching, training and development, with an increasing number of customers served poorly by burnt-out advisors, who lack loyalty to the company they work for. The result is apathy, absence, poor performance and high staff turnover, with internal customers moving from one call centre to another hoping that the next one will be better than the last. In this environment career progression is limited, as the structure within the industry is very flat, with opportunities for supervisory or management roles being the only option. This contributes to high attrition rates with the average 'shelf life' of a telephone advisor being two years, unless their skills base is broadened to include variety in their role. Sporadic sickness costs the industry millions of pounds each year and is a symptom of the anonymity and lack of value felt by employees. For telephony staff, the work can be hard, dealing with long queues of customers, all with important issues to be dealt with. Some customers are frustrated, and this can be taken out on the
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telephony advisor. Two or three calls like this in a day and stress levels begin to rise. At management level, stress levels rise when there is a risk of losing business when customers have to queue. Planned development activities for staff are usually the first thing to be sacrificed in order to support the customer. This results in a diluted service, delivered by tired and disillusioned staff. External coaching in such environments can help to change this negative image, below are listed five key areas. 1. Change the Culture It is a well known fact that people do not remember what you say and will remember how you make them feel. Coaching can help managers at all levels create a culture where people enjoy coming to work and will tell others about their experience. A coach will work closely with managers and senior executives to handle stress in their own environment helping to facilitate the move away from the 'parent-child' model of communication. Coaching can help senior managers and executives feel more confident when dealing directly with staff. By helping the client to examine what they want to achieve, the coach allows the client to focus on a positive experience that will promote well-being for all. 2. Make people feel valued Most people will do much more than is expected of them if they get recognition and feel valued by the people who are important to them. Sadly, often this recognition does not come from management. It is more likely that this comes from a peer group. When you ask a Call Centre employee what they like about the company they work for the answer is usually "the people". If Call Centres are truly serious about becoming an 'employer of choice' their goal should be to change this answer to "I love working for this company". Investing in coaching as a reward for internal customers is very powerful and will produce loyalty as well as motivate and encourage those concerned. This will lead to employees feeling that the contribution made to a company is visible and recognised. When this happens expectations will be surpassed. 3. Include coaching in the training programme There are very few of us who would like to do the same tasks day in and day out. If a company wants to attract the type of employee who will provide value for the business and positively enhance the working environment, a structured training and development programme is crucial. To invest thousands of pounds to train people to deliver the company brand and not embed the changes with coaching is not economically sound. Having said this, there are many companies out there who will feel that they provide adequate internal coaching for their staff. The reality is a line manager with little knowledge of how to coach, there is focus on areas of underperformance and the session is in fact a "feedback or tell session" which provides little or no value. According to the CIPD's Training and Development Survey 2004 "only 6% of organisations using coaching have a written strategy on coaching for all staff". Coaching can deliver real benefits for organisations which can have a positive effect on the bottom line, specifically in reduction of employee costs. 4. Recognise and Reward
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Employers who are prepared to identify the skills base of internal customers can introduce a fast track coaching programme which will help to, unleash potential, realise career goals and visual a clear development path. This will bring motivation and enthusiasm to the working environment. 5. Promote Successes Investing in the internal image by an employer is crucial if the negative image of the Call Centre is to change. This is long overdue, and is essential if companies want to deliver quality to internal and external customers. A company committed to coaching all members of staff will significantly change its culture, to one of a progressive forward-thinking company that people will want to work for. External coaching can provide motivation and enthusiasm for internal customers at all levels, including providing support for senior executives. The impact on investing in the well-being of an organisation's internal customers will not only reduce cost, it will also improve the company's image in the external marketplace. A recent article in Coaching at Work published by the CIPD mentions that after introducing coaching to the BUPA call centres they have entered for the first time the Times Best 100 Companies to Work For. This is a fantastic achievement and is a clear indication that coaching does work and can help to change the image of the call centre as a poor career choice. By using Call Centres as an example, I have described the benefits that can be obtained from external coaching if applied to any workplace. For those companies who deliver their own internal coaching this may be perfectly adequate depending on what they wish to achieve. On the other hand the CIPD's Training and Development Survey 2005 found that when asked about the effectiveness of coaching, businesses felt that 84% of coaching by line managers was effective, while 92% believed that external coaching was effective and a more effective way to bring tangible results to the business. There is a word of caution to any company who may believe that employing an external coach will resolve all their issues. This will not happen unless there is real internal senior-level support, and a belief that an investment in coaching is right for the company. A 'one size fits all' will not be successful as each coaching programme is unique to each organisation and will only produce the desired results if coaching is made available at all levels within the workplace. A key advantage of coaching in the way it allows support to be 'customised' for the different staff members, with personal development tailored to the individual needs, talents, strengths and weaknesses - and, not least, the personal preferences - of individual staff members. This gives coaching a particular advantage over more traditional methods of training and development. In conclusion, coaching within the workplace is a very powerful tool that can and does produce real tangible results for a company, which can be measured. An
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effective and well-trained coach is a professional who can move individuals and forward thinking businesses to places that they had never thought possible. The power of commitment, self-belief and the use of metaphors are all tools that a professional coach will effectively use to obtain results for the client. If an organisation truly wishes to become an "employer of choice", coaching is a powerful profession that will take them on this journey. This journey will not be without bumps and twists in the road, and the culture of the organisation will have to be committed to embracing the positive changes that coaching will bring. Once this is established, the rewards will hold no bounds.

Julia McVey is a professional coach with many years experience working at senior management level. Her passion is to release the hidden potential in people. http://www.u-cancoachingservices.com Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?Coaching-at-Work&id=315860 Coaching at Work

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Basic Coaching Skills - 13 Important Skills For Successful Coaching
By Brenda Zeller With the influx of folks becoming coaches it's important for those interested in not only becoming a coach but also those interested in using a coach to know what skills are important for the prospective coach to have. A lot of people call themselves coaches when in fact they take on more of a consulting role with their clients. True coaching includes these skills: Design an Alliance - the coach works with the client so the client can design their alliance to the work. It's up to the client to decide how their coach can best support and serve them while holding them accountable. Accountability - a coach will hold a client's feet to the fire, so to speak. The coach holds the client accountable that they will do what they say they will do between sessions. Even if the client doesn't complete their tasks at hand, the coach will work with that client towards taking responsibility as to why they didn't complete the work all done in a caring and understanding way. Adopt the Client's Agenda - the coach comes to each session impartial and without judgment. It's all about the client and never about the coach. The coach doesn't give answers but assists the client in finding the answers themselves. Highlight the Positive - the coach seeks out the client's strengths and draws attention to them through the coaching process. The coach is the client's cheerleader and best supporter, helping them stay optimistic and on track with their goals and promises. Challenging - the coach challenges the client to extend themselves out of their comfort zone and into bigger and better. The coach helps the client move through and past any self-imposed limits. Holds the Focus - often the client gets distracted when feelings and situations intimidate them and pull them off track. The coach helps maintain the focus to keep the client on track and on purpose. Inquiry - the coach is always in a place of inquiry and curiosity with the client. This inquiry doesn't come across like an interrogation but an interested wonderment at what's going on - allowing the client to open up to deeper understanding of themselves. Clarity - anytime there is anything nebulous or gray, the coach will ask for clarification, drilling down to the client's bottom line. Sometimes it requires re-framing a phrase or statement or having the client become more articulate about what they
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are saying. Each point of clarity takes the client deeper into insightful knowledge of themselves. Forward the Movement - the coach works with clients who are ready and eager to take their life, career, or relationship in a better direction. The coach helps to keep that direction moving forward, keeping the client from falling back into the past. Powerful Questioning - the coach provides the open ended questions that powerfully deepen the client's learning and shift them forward into actions needed to achieve their goals. Requesting - the coach makes requests of the client - the client has the right to accept the request, deny the request or negotiate the request with the coach. All requests adhere to the client's agenda and help them move towards their objective. Truth Seeker - in every situation there is the client's truth, the coach's truth and THE truth. The coach suspends their truth, acknowledges the client's truth and always allows for THE truth to come to the surface. Reflective Listening - this is one of the most powerful skills a coach uses in with clients. The coach mirrors information back to the client to help the client increase and deepen their insight, clarity and understanding of themselves and the tasks at hand.

As you can see, the skills listed here are compelling and designed to help clients achieve their goals faster than they can do on their own. If you are aspiring to be a coach, pay close attention to these skills. If you are a client, watch for them when you are interviewing your prospective coach. The final achievement comes from these skills being used effectively and successfully!

Brenda Zeller, NCTMB Vital Life and Extraordinaire! . Relationship Coach, Energy Therapist, Virtual Assistant

Visit my website http://www.vitallifecoaching.com to sign up for my free newsletter and to access lots of fun and free assessments! © 2008 - Brenda Zeller, NCTMB - all rights reserved. This article may be reprinted freely online or in print, as long as the entire article and this resource box are included.

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Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?Basic-Coaching-Skills---13-Important-SkillsFor-Successful-Coaching&id=1309899 Basic Coaching Skills - 13 Important Skills For Successful Coaching

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Coaching Tools - End Education Stagnation and Take Action
By Suzan Schmitt There are several challenges that hold coaches back from creating the thriving coaching business they desire. Make certain that you are not falling prey to this thinking. If you have subscribed to this thinking then you can quickly change once you have identified it. Education Stagnation Months of learning in coaching school and tons of role playing session just does not cut it when it comes to confidence in your ability to coach another person who comes to you for help. I don't know a single coach who graduates from coaching school feeling that they are really qualified to coach clients and have no reservations about their skill level. Many coaches have a hard time hanging up their sign and inviting clients to coach with them because they lack the inner confidence they need to ask others to pay for their services. So instead of getting started coaching they decide they will be a better coach if they take one more coaching course or get, one more certification, or learn one more coaching technique. The end result is thousands of dollars and months or years later their coaching business is still nonexistent and they are not helping others with their coaching skills and education. What a waste of skill, education, time and money! To feel confident as a coach you must get out and start coaching. That is the only way I know of to truly build your coaching confidence and skill level. You have to coach a lot of people to become the confident and skillful coach you desire to be. Make a Plan and Take Action To have a successful coaching business you have to have a plan and you have to take action on that plan. If you fail to do either one of those two things will most likely result in a failed coaching business. You must have a marketing plan for your coaching business and you must have strategies to implement your plan. Decide what you want your coaching business to look like. Ask yourself who you want to coach. How many coaching clients to you want per week and what income would you like to generate with your coaching business. Begin with the end. Describe your realistic vision of your coaching business in one year. Write down the goals you would like to achieve in one year for your coaching business the work backwards by quarter to define the goal that must be achieved each quarter to real the goal you have set for the year.
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Now work forward from month one to month twelve to determine what goals you want to achieve each month. Last, go month my month and fill in the actions you will need to take to reach your goals each month. If you have a mentor that person will be able to direct you as to each step that you will need to take to get the greatest results in the shortest amount of time. Your mentor will also help you determine the specific strategies you need to use and the best time to use them.

Go to http://www.thecoachmarketer.com and get Suzan's free Coaching Business Blast Off eCourse. You can get tons more actionable information and tools from Suzan Schmitt: The Coach Marketer when you visit her blog at http://www.zeecoachmarketer.com Suzan's blog contains many valuable posts, links to courses and classes, and links to free resources and her FREE weekly teleclass. Article Source: [ http://EzineArticles.com/?Coaching-Tools---End-EducationStagnation-and-Take-Action&id=2390463 ] Coaching Tools - End Education Stagnation and Take Action

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Coaching - Different Strokes for Different Folks or One Size Fits All?
By Alun Richards This article examines whether with coaching we should use a different approach to clients from different cultures, or are in fact coaching concepts globally acceptable to all? So the question is - is coaching a universal process, are its methods and structures universal, or should the coaching approach be adapted to fit with different cultures, to ensure its success? According to a Coaching Federation survey of 2006, 76.6% of coaches operated in the US, UK, Canada or Australia. From this statistic, it's pretty clear where the majority of coaches are. So let's admit it, with coaching, we're talking about a predominantly US-originated discipline which has successfully made the transition to the UK and Europe. But are the underlying assumptions and principles universal, or are some of them best adapted when using coaching with other cultures? But what is this thing called coaching? Well, to help us, let's distinguish the coaching process from the coaching approach. The Coaching Process It's hard to argue that at least the core coaching process is not universal. Who can argue that defining your current state or situation, your desired state and the possible paths that will get you there is not accepted globally. This is simply an outline of any generic change process. Coaching Approach But aside from this, the coaching approach also involves drawing out solutions from the coachee, and holding them accountable for actions that they said they'd carry out. The coaching process is a facilitative one, where the most is made of the resources held by the coachee. We often contrast coaching with consultancy, where there is an implied imbalance of knowledge, skills and experience between the consultant and the client. We assume that in coaching, there is a meeting of equals, with both sides bringing their unique experience and perspectives to the relationship. And if we think further
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about how the traditional coaching relationship works, we can see there are a number of unspoken assumptions. Coaching Assumptions The coaching relationship, for example, assumes:

The coachee will take responsibility for their actions, to commit to a plan agreed between coach and coachee. The coachee is able to determine whether they have the skills to carry out a series of actions. The coachee will keep his or her word. That coach and coachee are normally held as equals in the partnership. The coachee is a self-reliant self-starter, working under their own influence. People who can take decisions about their own future, without checking endlessly with other people, like family, friends and colleagues. That the coachee is goal or outcome oriented, that change and achievement is important to them.

The question is, are these assumptions universal, or do they vary to any significant degree across cultures? What does the research tell us? Geert Hofstede is an influential Dutch researcher and writer on the differences that exist between national cultures. Hofstede demonstrated that there are national and regional cultural groupings that affect the behaviour of individuals and that are persistent across time. His initial research focused on four dimensions, and these are:

Power-distance (Low vs. High) The degree to which subordinates expect and accept that power is distributed unequally. Individualism vs. Collectivism

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The extent to which people are expected to stand up for themselves, or alternatively act predominantly as a member of a group or organisation. Masculinity vs. Femininity Masculine cultures value competitiveness, assertiveness, ambition, and the accumulation of wealth and material possessions, whereas feminine cultures place more value on relationships and quality of life. Uncertainty avoidance Reflects the extent to which a society attempts to cope with anxiety by minimizing uncertainty. Cultures that scored high in uncertainty avoidance prefer rules e.g. about religion, food and structured circumstances, and employees tend to remain longer with their present employer.

OK, so there are differences between cultures - so how might this affect our coaching? US/UK Cultural Characteristics We've already said that coaching is a product of the US that has successfully transferred to the UK (and Canada and Australia). So what do we know about the culture of the US and the UK? According to Hofstede the cultural characteristics of the US & UK are: Low power-distance: individuals predominantly relate to others as equals. High Individual: individuals are very self-reliant, little influenced by extended family & social groupings. High Masculine: they value competitiveness, assertiveness, ambition, and the accumulation of wealth and material possessions. High tolerance of uncertainty: individuals reject rules and their imposition.

I'm going to argue that these largely unconscious preferences do in fact influence how we coach, and need to be considered when we coach individuals from other cultures. Implications for coaching For example, if the culture is one of respect for rules, formal and informal, with a low tolerance of uncertainty - France, for example - it might be harder to persuade our
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coachee to change if the changes might not be in full alignment with the accepted rules. If there is high collectivism, where individuals are very influenced by their extended family and work ties - Spain or Latin American - they may find their work on themselves impeded by the need to conform to group norms. Or at least they may seek to consult with the group on changes that affect them, and so may affect the group. A consultative approach here might result in longer times to take decisions, and the appearance of indecision on the part of our coachee. In a culture where there is a high power-distance indicator - India, for example - it might mean that the more successful mode of getting someone to do something is to be in a position of power over them, and might involve telling them to do something. If the culture was very feminine, with a greater value on relationships, caring and quality of life, the drivers for change, as well as the likely content and scope of the coaching, may well vary considerably. Specific Example Imagine you are coaching a Spaniard with the expected high femininity, high collectivism and high power-distance. One might expect that as a coach you might gain more credibility and authority if you are seen as high-ranking and powerful, with power derived from hierarchy. It may benefit you, therefore, to get your initial introduction via an officer at the highest level of the company possible. It might also benefit if you met your coaches needs for collectivism. That might mean being introduced informally to his colleagues, spouse, boss and extended family. This might seem long-winded to us, but may actually gain your coachee more results in a shorter time. To address the feminine aspects of the culture, consider back-peddling the emphasis on hard goals, especially financial ones, and place more value on your coachees' need to form meaningful relationships, and be alert to their aspirations in relation to their quality of life - inside and outside work. Summary Although the coaching process may be seen as universal, the approaches you take while coaching in other cultures will determine your success or failure. The historical coaching approaches in the US, UK, Canada and Australia can be seen as products of our shared culture. Hofstede's work on characterising four major dimensions of cultural can make a critical difference to our understanding of the often unconscious cultural norms.

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When you coach in a different culture, the awareness of these differences in preferences can make the difference between coaching success and failure.

© Copyright Alun Richards 2007. All Rights Reserved. You may freely distribute this article providing you do so in its entirety; ensuring the copyright and contact details above are included. Alun Richards helps coaches find and reach their coaching niche. Discover yours with the free mini-course, “Discover Your Coaching Niche”, available from http://www.brandingyou.org/ecoursesales.html Article Source: [ http://EzineArticles.com/?Coaching---Different-Strokes-for-DifferentFolks-or-One-Size-Fits-All?&id=684946 ] Coaching - Different Strokes for Different Folks or One Size Fits All?

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Bringing Science to the Art of Coaching
By Jack Zenger and Kathleen Stinnett Interest in helping leaders to become better coaches is at an all time high. Surveys show that employees want a great deal more coaching than they receive and there are signs that corporate America is finally trying to respond in two ways: first, they are training managers to be better coaches and second, they are using external coaches. With all this investment, what can be done to insure that it pays off with the highest possible return? There is great inconsistency in the quality and effectiveness of coaches, and the field is attracting more people at a rapid rate. To expand and improve the art of coaching triggers a series of extremely important questions for which we've not had good answers. Yet, the future success of coaching may lie in our ability to find answers to these basic questions. The purpose of this paper is to highlight how many of these questions may be addressed in large part by:

Applying research from a variety of allied disciplines Applying lessons learned from other successful initiatives that are closely related to coaching Using research conducted in business and public service organizations

THE KEY QUESTIONS The questions are:

To what degree does coaching really pay off? Or, is this just one more in a long line of management fads? How can we increase the effectiveness of each coaching session? How can the process of coaching be made more consistent? What is the appropriate goal for coaching, and how much change can we expect? What is it about the coaches' personality or behavior that makes the most positive impact?

THE NEED FOR EVIDENCE In the book Hard Facts, Dangerous Half-Truths, and Total Nonsense: Profiting from Evidence-Based Management, Pfeffer and Sutton show how companies can improve performance and overcome their competition through evidence-based management. They point out that a very small percent of what managers do is based on any solid data. This analysis appears to have been spawned by the research on medicine from Dr. David Eddy who suggested that in 1985 only 15% of what physicians did had any scientific evidence to support it, and that now that number has risen to somewhere between only 20 to 25%.
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Let's face it. The practice of coaching in our industry is relatively new. Until recently, most coaching happened somewhat informally. Before that, some organizations offered more formal coaching to those leaders who needed "fixing." It is not surprising, therefore, that corporations and large public agencies have not made much investment in pushing the state of this art into a more scientific realm. As the practice of coaching continues to grow, more and more organizations are attempting to measure the benefits of coaching and calibrate their return on investment. This leads to a heightened interest in improving the process and making results more predictable. The good news is that there are related disciplines that have conducted extremely relevant research. Corporate coaching practice may benefit from the application of these related disciplines in which greater budgets exist for such research, and where the consequences of success and failure are so enormous. This paper attempts to reach out and tap into that relevant research that addresses our key questions and issues. QUESTION 1. DOES COACHING REALLY MAKE A DIFFERENCE? Our research within corporations and public agencies provides useful answers to this first question. Analysis of hundreds of thousands of 360-degree feedback instruments sheds light on the effectiveness of coaching. When we study leaders who are most effective at coaching, we can see some clear correlations between a leader's coaching effectiveness and its impact on his or her direct reports. Consistently, our data show strong correlations between a leader's coaching effectiveness and measures of employee commitment and engagement. Much has been written on the importance and impact of having highly committed and engaged employees. Studies have shown that an increase in employee satisfaction typically leads to an increase in customer satisfaction, which ultimately impacts the bottom line of the organization. So how do leaders impact employee satisfaction? It appears that one very strong lever that leaders can use is to improve how well they coach and develop their employees. In a competitive job environment, many organizations focus on attracting and retaining talent. We know that one of the best predictors of people leaving an organization is their indication that they frequently think about quitting. (The only other more powerful predictor of turnover is when people actually announce their intention to leave.) When we correlate coaching effectiveness with intention to stay, we find that effective coaching more than doubles the likelihood that people won't even consider leaving the organization. In our research, we also found that the results produced by the highest performing coaches were correlated with the following outcomes: • Greater willingness to "go the extra mile" for the organization.
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Increased levels of employees reporting that the company is "a good place to work." Increased employee satisfaction with decisions impacting their work. Increased feelings of being valued as an employee by the organization. More than double the number of employees who were inspired to "put forth a great deal of effort every day." Increased employee's perception that his/her supervisor was doing a good job.

While this is just a sampling of hard data that confirms the impact of coaching, we hope such data convinces every leader that this is not a current fad lacking serious business consequences. Coaching is not something that should be perceived of as merely "nice to do." QUESTION 2. HOW CAN WE INCREASE THE EFFECTIVENESS OF EACH COACHING SESSION? On this topic we turn to research from the world of counseling and therapy. As we do, however, let's be extremely clear that we are not suggesting that a manager who conducts a career discussion with an employee is performing the same role as a trained therapist. The differences are huge. Research from the world of counseling and therapy suggest that two important actions taken by the counselor can have a significant impact on the effectiveness of the therapy:

Asking the client what he or she would like to discuss. Asking the client for feedback at the end of each session.

When these relatively simple actions are implemented, success soars upward. These steps increase the likelihood that the client will take action and also continue working with the therapist. FOCUSING THE CONVERSATION The first action implies that the coach should talk about things that are of greatest interest and value to the person being coached. While this concept seems obvious, our experience is that most leaders feel it is their right (or possibly their duty) to set the agenda in coaching conversations. Leaders often talk about issues that are of concern to them or that they believe would be of value to the person being coached, but these are often not in response to any direct question to the person being coached. To assist coaches in ensuring that the conversation is focused on topics most important to their direct reports, a checklist could be given to the employee, with the request that the employee review the topics on that list and come to the first scheduled coaching discussion with four or five selected topics. This sends several important messages:
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The coach wants the person being coached to feel some control of the process The coach respects the employee's wishes This is not just an event, but the beginning of a long-term coaching relationship designed to be of help to the person being coached

By having a series of topics identified with the direct input of the employee, the conversation is now guaranteed to focus on topics that are of genuine interest to the person being coached. This does not suggest that there shouldn't be times when the coach should suggest a topic that would be of value to be person being coached. Indeed, we strongly recommend that. However, when topics discussed are ones selected by the person being coached, success generally goes up. ASKING FOR FEEDBACK Duncan and Miller conducted research that provides strong evidence that when therapists asked for and received immediate feedback from their patients, attrition rates were cut in half and effectiveness improved 65%. Duncan and Miller's work can be found at: rel=nofollow [http://www.talkingcure.com]www.talkingcure.com. The implication for coaches is clear. If coaches open themselves up to personal feedback they will have more effective coaching discussions and they will also become much better coaches. Our own research confirms that the best leaders-as-coaches not only excel at providing feedback, but also excel at asking for feedback. The very nature of asking for feedback allows the coaching relationship to embody the spirit of a collaborative, two-way conversation. QUESTION 3. HOW CAN THE PROCESS OF COACHING BE MADE MORE CONSISTENT? The answer to this question may come in part from studying another type of conversation that organizations pay a great deal of attention to: the selection interview. Much research has pointed to the evidence that behavioral interviewing, or performance-based interviewing, can be a predictive method for determining the future success of a job candidate. This technique calls for the interviewer to ask specific questions regarding past activities and behavior, rather than the more vague "tell me about yourself" or "describe your most positive qualities" questions. For example, the behavioral interview asks how people handled a specific situation in the past or it poses a specific hypothetical situation and asks the interviewee how he or she would handle that. The more specific the question, the more reliable and therefore more predictive the answer will be. Interviewers are prepared with a set of scripted questions that elicit more precise answers and do that more consistently with each candidate. Behavioral interviewing and coaching have several common elements.

Both consist of an interview/dialog that has a clear purpose.
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These conversations or dialogues usually occur sporadically for the typical business leader. There is seldom much formal training on how to conduct these conversations. Opportunities for practice are not easy to find; therefore, "practice" usually happens in real time. Each of them provides a huge payoff when done extremely well. Both employees and organizations are the beneficiaries.

To apply the lessons learned from behavioral interviewing to the practice of coaching, we might suggest the following:

Provide leaders with training and the opportunity to practice applying the process and skills necessary to facilitate effective coaching conversations. Ensure that the training focuses on effective questioning and listening skills, designed to thoroughly discover the situation from the coachee's point of view. Provide line managers with a clear structure to follow in coaching conversations. This structure may be as simple as the FUEL formula:

FRAME THE DISCUSSION, explaining what is hoped for in terms of outcomes, issues of confidentiality, and what role each person will play. UNDERSTAND THE CURRENT STATE, which entails clarifying the current situation as seen by the person being coached. (This is where a checklist can help launch the discussion in an optimum direction.) EXPLORE THE DESIRED STATE. This involves the coach helping the person to think about what ideally would occur from that person's point of view. LAY OUT A PLAN OF ACTION that will enable the person being coached to achieve that goal.

While such a structure is obviously broad and general, it provides a needed framework for the coach to follow. Coaching improves when the leader-as-coach has a clear track to run on, versus operating in a completely unstructured, free-wheeling approach to the discussion. QUESTION 4. WHAT IS THE APPROPRIATE GOAL FOR COACHING, AND HOW MUCH CHANGE CAN WE EXPECT? In the coaching process, the coach is trying to help bring about the greatest amount of positive change in the person being coached. In most cases, positive change is defined by what the person being coached wants to achieve, though it may be defined in part by what the coach sees needing to be changed. Assuming positive change as our objective and measure, we certainly aren't the only people with that as our goal. One group that is extremely focused on producing measurable change is counselors working with drug and alcohol addicts. Because of the social and economic significance of their work, along with the number of people
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engaged in doing it, they have engaged in extensive research. Their findings appear to have enormous relevance to what a corporate coach is attempting to do. One prominent researcher is James Prochaska at the University of Rhode Island. He and his colleagues collected data on over 6,000 cases of drug and alcohol addiction. His work has been given the somewhat overwhelming title of a "transtheoretical model," which comes from the fact that he was trying to rise above any one model of therapy to see what universal principles might underlie them all. His conclusion was simple and yet extremely powerful. Change is not one giant leap, but a series of successive steps. He identified the following stages in the change process:

Pre-contemplation (I've not thought about it, or I'm not ready yet) Contemplation (I'm ready to seriously consider some change) Preparation (I have a plan) Action (I'm now ready to take action) Maintenance (I'm willing to keep at it)

Prochaska's research concluded that counselors who saw their task as moving someone in a giant leap over these five stages had the least success. Those with greatest success saw their role as helping people to move from one stage to the next, while always showing great respect for where the person was in the change process. It seems to us that this links nicely to the research from the Corporate Leadership Council regarding what organizations could do to effectively develop leaders. One of the two most powerful steps shown from their research was for each leader to have a personal plan of development to which the leader was personally committed. The implication of that research, as we see it, is that most leaders today don't possess such a personal plan for their own development of leadership skills. In fact, our research suggests that less than 10% do. Thus, most leaders are at Prochaska's Stage 1, they are not even thinking about it. (No wonder they don't become better leaders.) Being given some feedback (often from 360-degree or multi-rater instruments) and receiving help in creating a plan helps moves them from Stage 2 to Stage 3. They then must take personal responsibility and move from Stage 3 to Stage 4 and ultimately to Stage 5. The irony is that organizations desperately need more leaders to be at Stage 5, while the reality is that most have not suited up to even enter the race. As more baby-boomers retire and the quest for talent becomes more intense, this problem will be compounded. One of the helpful roles a coach plays is to help the person move through each of these changes, monitor the frequent backward lapses and create a greater sense of accountability to make personal change happen. QUESTION 5. WHAT IS IT ABOUT THE COACHES' PERSONALITY OR BEHAVIOR THAT MAKES THE MOST POSITIVE IMPACT?
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We reiterate here that there are many groups in other helping fields interested in helping people change. These include counselors, psychiatrists, psychologists, priests, pastors, and social workers. Let us hasten again to note that there are major differences between what these helping professionals do and what coaches in industry should be doing. However, there are also some commonalities. All are involved in conducting "motivational interviews" with people. William Miller and Stephen Rollnick have compiled an enormous body of research on what leads to success in conducting such interviews, including the attitudes and behavior of the person conducting them. Their conclusion is that three key elements create the necessary conditions for successful change to occur. These elements include:

Collaboration between the people involved in contrast to contention between those parties. The "helper" seeks ideas and insights from the person being helped, in contrast to assuming the posture of educating the patient. Maintaining the autonomy of the person being helped (meaning the right and capacity for self-development) in contrast to the helper displaying authority over them.

While these again sound deceptively simple, they hold great messages for the coach in a business setting:

Coaching will not be as apt to succeed if there is tension or contention between the parties. Coaching is not something you can do "to" someone, but it succeeds best when it is done "with" the person. If the helper assumes a position of power or status and conveys the message, "I have the answers, and I'm going to teach you these correct ideas," there will be less success than if the coach continually seeks ideas and insights from within the individual. Indeed, the greatest success comes when the client's view of coaching issues, the potential solutions, and the ideas about the best process for change all come together to form a theory for the client, and that the helper uses the client's theory of change to assist the client in moving through the change process. In this context, the helper serves to reinforce the client's theory for change, apply experience to it, help to interpret it, and generally use the client's thinking in place of the helper's own agenda. The more the coach plays the "I'm the boss" card, the less effective the coaching will be. Yes, there are times, especially if it involves a performance issue, that this may be inevitable or appropriate. Difficult discussions regarding performance issues should occur less than 15% of the time in the grand scheme of corporate coaching.

Finally, the work of these two researchers identifies an interesting phenomenon. The greatest improvement they observed did not occur during sessions they had with their patients, but in between sessions. The translation of that into corporate
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coaching seems obvious. We've long known that most of what people learn is absorbed casually and informally on the job, but virtually nothing has been done to enhance that and recognize its power. Helping people to be more observant about what takes place daily on the job, and to attempt new behaviors in the course of daily work would appear to be some obvious applications of this insight. Another important insight from this research is that the greatest gains come in the early stages of any counseling relationship. Short-term therapy is becoming increasingly popular in the world of counseling. Corporate coaches should anticipate that some of the greatest gains will occur within the first sessions of coaching on a given topic, and that there will normally be a leveling off in the change process on that topic. CONCLUSION Coaching, like the broader disciplines of leadership and management, will always contain many characteristics of an art form. No two people will practice it exactly the same way. The applications are so complex and different, merely being responsive to the situation calls for new and different behavior. It will never be a pure science. The world of coaching in business organizations and large public agencies can gain a great deal from embracing good ideas and practices from every source, including the major helping professions. Only in that way will it ever achieve its potential contribution to every organization.

To learn more, please visit http://www.zengerfolkman.com/extraordinary-coach.html Jack Zenger, D.B.A - CEO and Co-founder of Zenger Folkman Kathleen Stinnett - Master Certified Executive Coach http://www.zengerfolkman.com Article Source: [ http://EzineArticles.com/?Bringing-Science-to-the-Art-ofCoaching&id=5667581 ] Bringing Science to the Art of Coaching

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Coaching Methods - How to Boost Your Coaching Conversion Rates Right Through the Roof
By Sean R Mize What if you discovered how easy it is to convince your subscribers to get inside your coaching using the power of certain online tools? Here are 3 simple steps to get you started... Step 1 - Let them interact with you for free to know your style. Step 2 - Consider conducting free teleseminars for your subscribers on regular basis. Step 3 - Also make sure to setup a free webinar for your clients. Here are step by step details that you can apply quickly and easily... Step 1 - Let them interact with you for free to know your style. The most important step to achieve massive coaching success is to make sure that your clients trust you as an expert in your niche. Therefore it is important that you allow them to communicate with you absolutely free and make them believe that you are an expert in your field. Here is how you can get them to communicate with you and help them to solve their problems... Step 2 - Consider conducting free teleseminars for your subscribers on regular basis. If you allow your subscribers to speak with you and help them out to solve their problems this will have a terrific impact and this will build solid trust and relationship. At the end of the call when you promote your coaching program it will have a very high conversion rates because your clients now know you and respect your expertise. It is important to setup a free webinar to train your clients... Step 3 - Also make sure to setup a free webinar for your clients. Setting up a free webinar for your subscribers will allow them to hear your voice as well as watch your computer screen and learn exactly what you are doing, which will ultimately help them to solve their problems. This will boost your relationship with them tremendously and will finally allow them to take you up on your coaching.

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By the way, do you want to learn more about using articles like this to drive traffic to your website and increase online conversions? If so, I suggest you check this out: [ http://www.insiderarticlemarketing.com ]article marketing traffic. Article Source: [ http://EzineArticles.com/?Coaching-Methods---How-to-Boost-YourCoaching-Conversion-Rates-Right-Through-the-Roof&id=2709153 ] Coaching Methods - How to Boost Your Coaching Conversion Rates Right Through the Roof

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Why You Need to Keep Track of Your Conversion Rates
By Issamar Ginzberg Every time you make a call, for example, if you're a life coach and you're talking to people on the phone, you want to keep track of how many people there are - if for every two people that call you, you end up having one come in for a free session, you are getting a 50% conversion rate on your calls. Keeping track will help you to do things. 1. You will start realizing by getting feedback, even by people you didn't do business with, why they didn't do business with you. 2. By doing this, and you know that one out of every two leads to a free session, what's really happening is every time you make a call that doesn't work, instead of being discouraged about it, realize that your statistics show that the next one is going to work. I originally started out in mortgages. They told us to keep track of every call you make. In the beginning they told us if we make 100 calls, we would get one "yes." For every yes we made a lot of money because we were talking about malls, shopping centers, things that have big mortgages. If you make 99 calls that said no, even though it's silly to think this way, you just knew the next one you were going to make would work. It really never worked like that because by the time you got to 17 or 18 calls, you had somebody interested, or somebody who wanted more information. It wasn't really like that, but instead of being discouraged, we just knew there was one closer. Once you keep track, you're going to start seeing your record of what is working and what people are responding to better. You can start thinking about what you're doing and use different tactics and techniques when you're talking to them. Once that statistic is going up, you're obviously doing more business, but at the same time, if you're converting only 1 out of every 4 calls it means you only have a 25% rate. 25% conversion rate on a free product is pretty terrible. What you're offering them is free so why should it be so hard to get them to do it? If that's the case, you might want to figure out if you're saying something over the phone, selling them too hard. Maybe you should have them call a number where they will hear a free message or get a free thing in the mail. By the time they call you, they're already presold on the idea that they know who you are. It's not so hard to actually sell to them because they have more background on you when they start.

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Rabbi Issamar Ginzberg is an Award-Winning Entrepreneur and Business Strategist. Visit his site today at http://www.issamar.com and see how Issamar can add zeros to your bottom line. Article Source: [ http://EzineArticles.com/?Why-You-Need-to-Keep-Track-of-YourConversion-Rates&id=3056029 ] Why You Need to Keep Track of Your Conversion Rates

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Warning Signs For Coaches - When to Say No to Clients
By Jayne Warrilow "It may be that when we no longer know what to do we have come to our real work and that when we no longer know which way to go we have begun our real journey. The mind that is not baffled is not employed. The impeded stream is the one that sings." ~ Wendell Berry How do we know as coaches when we are crossing a boundary with our clients? When the coaching moves into unchartered territory and we need to draw the line with clients, or even fire them? This can be a challenging area for many coaches as we often feel in service of our clients and so are used to giving ourselves and our services freely. Sometimes though this can be damaging to our clients and our professional reputation and these are the times when we have to feel confident in letting go. Coaching individuals towards personal change can raise many issues which may need to be addressed within the coaching relationship. Many coaches who do not have psychological training often ask about "red flags" which can signal if coaching is likely to bring poor outcomes or may even question whether coaching is in fact an appropriate way forward for the individual. Here are some major warning signs that you can use to alert you to possible issues which may need to be addressed with you client and would benefit from discussion with your coaching supervisor. When you, as coach:

feel overly invested in your client's outcomes feel too involved in the client's emotions or sense of well-being think you are doing most of the work within the session talk more than your client feel there maybe some deep rooted psychological issues preventing the client from moving forward When the client:

regularly misses or cancels sessions continually moves the goalposts is unwilling to receive feedback regardless of how diplomatic you may be as a coach shows extreme emotions, such as distress or anger, and is unable to move through the emotion within the session adopts the role of victim and refuses to take responsibility for their own actions continues to ask for help to change yet does not act on any of the guidelines presented
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comes to sessions with high levels of anxiety, which prevents them from learning admits to any form of substance abuse shows signs of depression that are clearly affecting their life and work performance appears dependent on you as coach, or seeks approval or permission for their actions Mentor coaches and supervisors are specially trained to consider all aspects of your coaching, including the energetic connections that you make with your clients. I would recommend all to engage with a supervisor since there are no clear boundaries which can be identified to fit all clients. Every client and every situation is unique. We can all benefit from that objective perspective to enable us to focus on our coaching at a deeper level. To unpack the dynamics involved and help you identify the best way forward, enabling you to generate more sustainable results with clients at an accelerated pace and more importantly to learn when to say "No!"

If you would like a free audio to help you build your coaching business visit http://www.maxurbiz.com Jayne Warrilow is CEO of three international brands: 1. Max Executive Coaching, a collaborative coaching company working with senior executives across the globe 2. Max Coaching Academy, specializing in Intuitive Energy development with coaches and individuals, helping them to achieve accelerated results using energy and flow http://www.maxcoachingacademy.com 3. Max Intuitive Entrepreneur, introducing entrepreneurs to the power of energy to prepare them for explosive business growth Article Source: [ http://EzineArticles.com/?Warning-Signs-For-Coaches---When-toSay-No-to-Clients&id=4770062 ] Warning Signs For Coaches - When to Say No to Clients

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Trust Your Intuition - A Vital Tool For Powerful Coaching
By Jayne Warrilow Trusting your intuition is critical to your achievements as an exceptional coach. It will make you exceptionally powerful as a coach. But knowing you are intuitive and trusting your intuition are two very different things. And in the beginning, it helps to develop your intuitive awareness outside of your coaching sessions. Get to know your own intuition first. As a society, we have learned to recognize and validate scientific truths but are not as practiced in recognizing our intuitive truths. There is no right or wrong way to be intuitive, so relax! Because intuition involves making decisions on the basis of inadequate facts, we tend to think that the knowledge it brings to us isn't legitimate. Intuitive insights often come in a form that we don't recognize. They do not relate to our usual concepts of time, space and even personal identity. Thus they are easy to dismiss as we don't understand their message or their intention. Numerous studies have shown that the use of intuition in any number of fields is often what separates the experts from the amateurs. It is this quantum quality that gives an individual an edge over the others in their field and boosts them to a higher level of power to be recognized as powerful by those around. It explains why certain stockbrokers seem to have an uncanny knack for picking investment winners or how publishers know best-sellers or a police officer can zero in on a crime suspect that no one else considers. The same is true for coaches. All of our challenges are completely solvable, but we can't afford to remain deaf to the messages of our intuition. Intuition is directly linked to your core energy, your life force. Its job is to know every detail of what makes you tick, what makes your heart leap with joy, and what drains your life-force until you are physically leaking energy from your very pores. Intuition is a truth detector. You can learn to tune into it. A good place to start is by listening. I want you to start listening. Really listening. Listen to your inner voice of intuition. Use it to listen to others. What is it telling you? How do you know when you can trust it? Check your hunches out. Listen and learn. I guarantee your energy will grow. Being able to sense and direct our life-force gets our positive energy moving; we exude it, attract it and can read it in others. The real power of intuition is that it gives us, at every moment, the ability to connect directly with our energy, allowing us to know when to radiate and when to protect our energy (yes, even from our clients!) - giving us the ultimate capacity to accelerate our progress so we are in a better place to transform the lives of our clients.

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If you would like to know more about your intuitive energy and your coaching business, take our free 3 min quiz http://www.iequiz.com Jayne Warrilow is CEO of three international brands: 1. Max Executive Coaching, a collaborative coaching company working with senior executives across the globe 2. Max Coaching Academy, specializing in Intuitive Energy development with coaches and individuals, helping them to achieve accelerated results using energy and flow http://www.maxcoachingacademy.com 3. Max Intuitive Entrepreneur, introducing entrepreneurs to the power of energy to prepare them for explosive business growth Article Source: [ http://EzineArticles.com/?Trust-Your-Intuition---A-Vital-Tool-ForPowerful-Coaching&id=4769804 ] Trust Your Intuition - A Vital Tool For Powerful Coaching

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Coaching Essentials

The Question That Could Change Your Business
By Julie Anne Jones Lately I've had several coaching conversations that center on results, specifically around recruiting. What each and every client has come to understand is that, while recruiting tools and the actions they take to implement them are important, their focus is really the key. Let me ask you a question (and be honest with yourself); when it comes to recruiting and your team, do you most often focus on what you want (i.e. who you would like to be attracting and how awesome your team and business will be once you build a team of these amazing people) or what you don't want (i.e. who's not working in your life and business right now)? If you're like most people, it tends to be easier to focus on what you don't want. As one of my mentors James Ray says, "Energy flows where attention goes." And energy equals results. In other words, you get what you focus on. So if you're constantly complaining about your unmotivated, draining, negative team of people who aren't working, don't be surprised if you're building a team of unmotivated, draining, negative people who aren't working. Get it? Change your focus! Ask yourself "What are the top five adjectives that would describe my ideal recruit lead or team member?" Then make a list of those words and put them where you can see and read them every day....and one last thing. If you read that list and ask yourself "who does this describe at their best?" the answer will most likely be... you! So as you show up and focus on who you want to be as a leader, manifesting all the best qualities in yourself, you'll begin attracting others to you vibrationally as well. How cool is that?

WANT TO USE THIS ARTICLE FOR FREE IN PRINT OR ONLINE? You may, as long as you do not alter it and include the following information (with active links as appropriate): Julie Anne Jones is direct sales corporate consultant, keynote speaker, and trainer, and the CEO of Julie Anne Jones, Inc. She is known for her authentic and easy-to-use scripting and specializes in specific language and tools for success in direct sales. To learn more about Julie Anne and her products and services, and to read more blog posts, visit her at [http://www.julieannejones.com]http://www.julieannejones.com .
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Julie Anne Jones Direct Sales Corporate Consultant, Keynote Speaker, and Trainer CEO, Julie Anne Jones, Inc. Article Source: [ http://EzineArticles.com/?The-Question-That-Could-Change-YourBusiness&id=5219512 ] The Question That Could Change Your Business

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Powerful Coaching Questions
By Jayne Warrilow Coaches often ask me to relate what I think is the most powerful coaching question to ask a client. Now the question itself seems like an anomaly to me since there couldn't be just one question which would be powerful for all clients - or could there? And what if there were, what would it be? (You can almost hear my inner coach jumping up and down with my own limiting belief here!) So I decided to ponder on this a little more. On reflection I began to realise that at the very heart of this question lies an age old issue which many of us at least try to attempt at some point in our careers as coaches: that is to be in control of our own thinking, moment to moment; to be present with our clients whilst also being present with ourselves; to be present and know intuitively what the most powerful question would be in response to our clients comments. Now wouldn't that be great? So I started to consider many questions which over the course of my coaching career have had a powerful effect on clients, in many different circumstances and for many different reasons. Here are some that I remember: What do you want to believe about this? What would you like to believe about yourself? How much worse does it need to get before you do something about it? What would you want NOT to be afraid of? What is the question you would least like to be asked right now? What is the next question I should ask you right now? What would others feel least comfortable about telling you? What have you done today to make your dream a reality? What are you not telling (me, yourself, whoever)? What are the risks to you being successful? Where do you get your energy from? How do you feel (an emotion) - how do you know? Obviously without the context - they seem a little lost. You see within the coaching conversation, context is everything, as is your client. Everyone and every context is different which is why as a coach it is your job to be the mirror for your client, the empty vessel which creates a soft place for them to land with their thoughts or the challenge that they need to stimulate them into action. Each client needs different approaches at different times too. To be a great coach you do not need to cultivate your own coaching style and then stick to it, you need to develop a flexibility of style in response to your client, right there in the moment. Which is why I would advocate a flexibility of questions for your toolkit. I have certainly realized that often the most powerful things to do as a coach is to invite in silence. This can often startle clients into responding to the absence of a
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question, often rushing in to fill the silence with more words, which in itself can lead to interesting conversations. However, to return to the original issue - if pushed, my most powerful question would probably be a one word response, offered at different times in different tones and inflection. Do you want to know what it is? Well, my most powerful question (right now at least) is "Really?":)

Jayne Warrilow is founder and CEO of 2 international companies: the Max Coaching Academy and Max Executive Coaching. Jayne specializes in working with senior executives across the globe combining a flair for strategic thinking with a passion for harnessing the clients own intuitive power. She has over 15 years coaching experience and is passionate about coaching as the singular, most effective path for individualized leadership development. She enjoys guiding coaches towards their learning edge so that when they step into the unknown with their client, and allow their intuition to step forward - the results are simply staggering. Her research is offering new insights into leading cross-culturally. For more info visit http://www.MaxExecutiveCoaching.com The Max Coaching Academy is an exceptional place to help coaches achieve accelerated results using the power of energy and flow.To get your free audio CD by mail and receive the Academy's bi-weekly newsletters visit [ http://www.MaxCoachingAcademy.com ]. Article Source: [ http://EzineArticles.com/?Powerful-CoachingQuestions&id=4272068 ] Powerful Coaching Questions

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Secret Reasons That Coaches Kill Their Own Coaching Businesses
By Suzan Schmitt Statistics show that ninety percent of coaches make less than ten thousand dollars a year coaching. Why is that true? I think it is because too many coaches don't get out and seek clients. They are busy taking more courses to become a better coach or networking with other coaches. This article takes a look at the emotions behind this issue. Perfectionism Far too many coaches fail to get off the launching pad because they have an underlying desire to be perfect. This perfectionist attitude can stop you from starting anything if you don't think you can do it flawlessly. What happens if you coach someone and their life does not change? What if you coach someone and "bad" things happen to them? What if the solutions you help them find only create more challenges? First let's remember that coaching is fluid and it is not all about you and how you coach. I firmly believe that you could be a monkey and be a good coach as long as you were a monkey that had good listening skills. Think about how many people just need someone to listen to them with good listening skills! I believe that if you sat through an entire coaching session and did nothing more than listen to your client and encourage them to keep talking through their issues the client would receive great value from you as a coach. So don't let yourself believe the lie that coaching is totally dependent upon you or your coaching skills. The fact is that if you want to get better at coaching you have to coach a lot. That means that you start now and go get some coaching clients. No, you will not be perfect and yes, you will make some mistakes but that is how we learn and improve our skills. I can guarantee that your skills as a coach will not increase until you begin coaching lots of clients. Information Stagnation Another perfectionist attitude I hear from coaches is I can't start marketing and doing things like the Internet or giving workshops because I don't have enough training. Coaches are people who are curious and like to learn but this is a trap many coaches fall into and I call it "Information Stagnation". The thinking behind information stagnation is that one does not have the skills to do something perfectly
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therefore, one must take more classes and learn more before beginning a coaching business. Wrong, the best way to learn is to be practicing coaching while getting information al input. You can get better at coaching by taking courses and I highly suggest it but you can also get in a rut of taking classes and never coaching. I suggest you take a course implement the learning then do not allow yourself to take another course until you have implemented the information from the last course. Don't let perfectionism and information stagnation hold you back from having the coaching business you desire. I you catch yourself falling into this type of thinking and behavior stop yourself and start marketing your business. When you market your business you will get coaching clients then your coaching skills and confidence will rise dramatically.

Suzan Schmitt: The Coach Marketer. I have been in marketing and advertising for over 25 years. I am a Life Coach and marketer. Suzan doesn't claim to be an expert or guru just someone who wants to help other coaches be successful by share what has worked for me and what what I have had to re-think. Her information and suggestions are immediately applicable and easy to follow go get my FREE eCourse at http://www.thecoachmarketer.com or Check out my home study program for new coaches Coaching Business Blast Off at http://www.coachingbusinessblastoff.com Article Source: [ http://EzineArticles.com/?Secret-Reasons-That-Coaches-Kill-TheirOwn-Coaching-Businesses&id=2536778 ] Secret Reasons That Coaches Kill Their Own Coaching Businesses

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Is It Time For Coaches To Offer A Guarantee?
By Olivia Stefanino As coaching grows ever-more popular, it's hardly surprising that the demands for regulation get ever-louder. Of course, the unwary and the unsuspecting must be protected from the unscrupulous - and yet if coaching is to stand the long term test of time, it's the market place which will dictate its future - not the regulating bodies. As a discipline, coaching is future-based and results oriented. So far, so good. And yet when it comes to proving just how powerful coaching can be, there seems to be little agreement in the best way to go about it. While you'd think that most companies should have a duty to their stakeholders to prove that coaching provides an at-least-decent return on investment, few (it appears) have any effective, replicable "success" measurement systems in place. And it's not that every company should use the same measurement system - but it would be encouraging to think that every company running a coaching programme would have at the very least, a passing interest in its efficacy. It was the same in the "good old days" of advertising and marketing - when it was a matter of long lunches and schmoozing the client. The argument always used to be that both disciplines were "creative" which meant that they couldn't and shouldn't be measured in terms of what new business the campaigns actually brought in. But as the whispers of "Emperor's New Clothes" grew to a crescendo, the "fat cat" days of the 80s drew to a close. Who was behind the whispering programme? None other than those advertising and marketing agencies who were brave enough to recognise that their days were numbered unless they could find a way to prove their value. The result? Now we see fewer "pretty" ads and more information-based ads which guide us to a buying decision. And that's before we even investigate the social networking phenomenon in which "real people" are effectively marketing to each other via comments they leave on forums and on their own blogs. As we travel even further into the "information age", it really is becoming a matter of "power to the people". And the "people" - whether they're individuals or the face of the corporate community - vote with their hard-earned cash. And isn't it up to them to choose where - and on what - they want to spend that cash?
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In the end, it's going to be the market that decides whether coaching represents good value for money. And because coaching is future-oriented, it's actually quite easy to see whether a desired outcome has been reached, within a designated time frame, or not. So if coaching is here to stay - rather than fade out as another passing fad - then it's up to us in the industry to get our own marketing house in order. Rather than just extolling the benefits of coaching in an airy-fairy manner, perhaps it's time for us to SHOUT about the results we're getting. And even more important than that, perhaps it's also time we all offered a 100% no quibble guarantee on the work we do. If the client puts in the effort but doesn't get the results, he or she shouldn't pay! Simple. That way, we're taking the risk, not our clients. It will be up to us then, and not some nebulous regulating body, to decide what's realistic and achievable. And as each client is different, it's up to all the individuals involved in the coaching programme to agree an appropriate set of fair and realistic measures. If you're worried that you're going to attract a load of freeloaders who will simply use your coaching and refuse to pay, rest assured that in all the time (nearly 10 years) I've been offering guarantees on my coaching in this way - to both corporate and personal clients - I've never once been asked to refund my fees. However, while absolutely encouraging clients to fulfill their full potential, I am pretty realistic too. If I don't believe that I can help a client achieve his or her aims, then I don't take them on! (And of course, even without a guarantee, I would never take on a client that I didn't sincerely believe that I could help anyway.) If it became common practice for all coaches to offer a guarantee, you can bet your bottom dollar that any coaching "con artists" out there soon wouldn't be seen for dust. And finally, perhaps we should also take into consideration that it's not just your clients' money that you're taking - but also his or her time. As time is the one commodity that can never be replaced, maybe we should really "up the ante" and offer a "double your money back" guarantee! Are there any coaches out there daring enough to join me in this "brave new world"?

Author & Coach Olivia Stefanino is Principal of "The Quantum School for Therapists". Join today and receive £500 worth of free gifts ' including a 9 CD audio library, 9 workbooks & a 2-hour coaching session! Visit [ http://www.thequantumschool.com/ ]

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Article Source: [ http://EzineArticles.com/?Is-It-Time-For-Coaches-To-Offer-AGuarantee?&id=1142410 ] Is It Time For Coaches To Offer A Guarantee?

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Your Coaching Questions Answered
By Natalie Manor Many people need the resources of a good business coach. Here are some guides on how to use coaching as a success strategy. The questions cover hiring the right coach who will help you increase your confidence, influence and success. Here are what we consider to be the most important points in hiring a coach for yourself, your team and/or your organization. Using a coach can be such a great experience. He or she is someone who can offer you a different perspective, support you in achieving your goals and dreams and help you design your roadmap to extraordinary success. There are a few items that you need to consider before hiring a coach for you, your team or your organization. Here is what I suggest, what has been successful for the clients I have coached and executive teams/organizations that have looked to bringing on a coach for their work: 1.Experience - Make sure your coach has the experience you need. That means that if you are hiring an executive coach, they need to have some good business experience so they understand your needs and issues...ROI; turnover; retention; coaching your team; profitability; productivity; career transitions, sometimes within the same organization; succession; business strategies. Your coach should know and have successful experience in coaching these issues. Business can be complicated. You need someone who can look at the whole business landscape with you. 2.Speed and Availability - You need a coach who can work at the speed of business now and is easily available when you need them. Most coaching takes place via the phone. Some clients want to be on IM with me. We do lots of sharing of information and building our coaching call agendas via email. We use all the forms of communication that will serve us best and we use it often during the week and during the coaching engagement. 3.Technology - Your coach should be clearly aware and cognizant of business trends around technology and have their technology reliable, fast and up-to-date. 4.Chemistry - You should have a good "gut" feeling about who is coaching with you. Chemistry is everything when you are being told something that is key for your learning and might not be easy to hear. You need to be able to trust the information and the communication without hesitation. Rapport and chemistry with your coach produces that for you. 5.Course of Action - You want to develop a clear and detailed process for the coaching engagement. Your coach needs to be able to outline a course of action with you based on your conversations together. You want defined outcomes that can be measured and that will produce sustainable results for you. I always begin my coaching engagements with a leadership and
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communication assessment, which I have found is vital to developing viable and measurable outcomes for the coaching engagement. You take the assessment online and it provides you with a snapshot of whom you are right now. It also provides key behavioral elements of how you are perceived as a leader and communicator. 6.References - Please do not engage a coach without checking references. You will learn lots from speaking to people who have used a coach to support their issues/success and, about how the coaching worked for them. A coach can explain, all day long, the value of coaching, but a reference can give you first person stories of what and why the coaching worked. The basis of coaching is momentum, measurable outcomes and trust in the guidance and conversations. I have seen miracles and I have seen changes that people thought would be impossible to make. Many times I get the credit for these changes, but you are the one that does the work and achieves your desired results. A coach can be your silver bullet. My coach has helped me grow at a rate that my team and I would have thought impossible a year ago. You have all the resources you need at your fingertips. One of these resources is our Pre-Coaching Questionnaire. It will help you define for yourself what it is you want and need for your coach and the coaching process. My team of coaches and I would be delighted to work with you. You deserve to have the personal and professional life you have always dreamed of. Let us help you design your roadmap to extraordinary success!

This article may be copied and used in your own newsletter or on your website as long as you include the following information: "Written by Natalie R. Manor, CEO, author, speaker and executive coach. NMA, Natalie Manor & Associates is your ultimate resource for leadership and communication development for managers and executives to maximize your potential and increase your productivity. Success@NatalieManor.com , (800) 666-2230, [ http://www.NatalieManor.com]http://www.NatalieManor.com © Copyright 2009 by Natalie Manor. All rights reserved. Article Source: [ http://EzineArticles.com/?Your-Coaching-QuestionsAnswered&id=2418202 ] Your Coaching Questions Answered

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Coaching Gen Y? Don't Be Like the Wolf in Sheep's Clothing
By Juliette Robertson The story I'm about to share with you is over 2,600 years old, yet its morals still apply to any manager today. It was told by the Greek fabulist named Aesop; you may have heard of him. He was a slave who lived in sixth century BC and eventually was freed by his master. This fable is called " The Wolf in Sheep's Clothing." A hungry wolf stalked a flock of sheep, but couldn't grab one as his next meal because the shepherd protected them so well from the predators in order to feed his family. Having a plan, the wolf found a discarded sheepskin, placed it over his fur and crawled into the middle of the flock without the shepherd noticing. Instead of pouncing on the nearest lamb and making his escape, the wolf decided to wait until nighttime when the flock was safely locked up and the shepherd was eating supper with his family. "I'll have my pick of the flock," the wolf thought, "Enjoy a most delicious meal, and slip away unseen." (c) 2009 Heritage House Publishing, Inc. But, that evening, the shepherd decided to have a feast with his family and friends from the neighboring village. So he went to the sheep pen in the dark, reached in and grabbed the first sheep he could put his hands on, which turned out to be the wolf- who also turned out to be dinner. That's the wolf in sheep's clothing. The first moral of Aesop's fable is "Things aren't always as they appear" and there is a second moral which is "strike while the iron is hot" Let's address the first one because you may have come across managers who are like wolves in sheep's clothing. They want you to believe that they are genuinely interested in people but really, their intentions are more focused on what they want from you rather than what might be best for you. They try to appear sincere but their real focus is elsewhere. And if you are Gen Y I suspect that you would have seen straight through their pretense. If you are managing staff aged 20 - 30, typically Generation Y, what I'm about to say is very important and you can read a lot more about this in the research done by Peter Sheahan, arguably the leader on Gen Y in Australia. "Gen Y are typically impatient to get the best they can as quickly as they can and they will move on to find it if you don't deliver. They are impatient for the best and to get it as fast as possible
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They are very tech savvy, they have grown up with technology and find it easy and have a real need to be connected. They see ways to fast track everything and make them more efficient and find short cuts and exploit loopholes to get there faster. What they value is work life balance - meaningful work, money, technology. If they are going to spend their time at work it had better be meaningful. They Value People who ACT, don't just talk Generation Y will test you to see if you are for real, if you will hold them accountable. If you do, they respect you more. They have a natural inclination to question everything They have what Peter Sheahan describes as highly developed built in BS detectors on their foreheads which ring loudly at any insincerity, ulterior motive or dishonesty. It's the way they are wired. They respond very well to coaching because they get to speak their mind and make decisions about their future. In fact they thrive in a coaching environment. These are the leaders of tomorrow. If you are one of them or are leading one of them, know that coaching skills will fast track this generation because they respond so well to it. They will model and adopt your coaching behavior and share it with others. The part YOU play can therefore have a huge impact on the leaders of tomorrow. Managers, who are up front, tell the truth and have a genuine interest in their staff's development - proven by the way they act, will make great. However, if your intention is to use coaching to get them to do what you want them to do, then your coaching will be ineffective. So are you a wolf or are you ready to be a Coach who honestly has your staff's interest at heart? It's a choice all managers must make.

Juliette Robertson is an Executive Coach offering webinar based Coach Training for new managers in "How to Coach Your Staff to Step Up and Seize Opportunities". This action based 7 module coach training includes webinar lectures, coaching sessions with your staff and phone based coaching tutorials. It is globally accessible on-line - perfect for busy new managers who want the benefits of step-by-step elearning plus access to qualified coaching tutors to help fast track their coaching skills. To register for 60 minutes of free webinar based Coach Training, visit http://www.howtocoachyourstaff.com.au/register.php .

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Affiliate Partners are also sought to help spread these coaching skills to new managers. Excellent commissions are available for those with good business databases. http://www.howtocoachyourstaff.com.au/affiliates.php. Article Source: [ http://EzineArticles.com/?Coaching-Gen-Y?-Dont-Be-Like-the-Wolfin-Sheeps-Clothing&id=2925363 ] Coaching Gen Y? Don't Be Like the Wolf in Sheep's Clothing

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4 Coaching Solutions That Ensures Personality Development
By M. Onggo People, nowadays, are getting more conscious with their well-being, not only in their physical appearances but with their way of dealing with others, as well. It is obvious now that people are becoming more "educated;" that dealing with others can make or break the kind of person that they really are. That idea gave birth to the concept of coaching and mentoring. Find out how personal coaching can change the way you deal with people, and ultimately, change the kind of person that you are. Coaching is making its way to fame not so recently. While most of us think that only those who belong to the "elite" group (political figures, Hollywood superstars, businessmen and the likes) are the only ones who need mentoring, most coaches beg to disagree. Ordinary people need coaching as well, for they too have some "needs" that should be addressed. A personal coach, who uses some of the proven techniques in Psychology like the Neuro-linguistic Programming, is a professional who can address your personality needs. Generally, coaching is a method of assessing and reassessing your personality - exploring your strengths and weaknesses, identifying dilemmas that hinder your way to being productive, and creating a scheme that can bring out the best in you. Although most professional coaches claim that, there are no stiff rules that apply to addressing your problems, these coaching solutions focus on "individualized" approach. They are holding on to the idea that every individual is unique as well as the experiences that each of us has so it follows that every technique in coaching should be individualized, too. Here are 4 of the many coaching solutions that are concerned of about the personality development of a person. Each of them caters to the various areas that a person would want to empower - Personal life, success in career, business growth, and executive advancement. Read on to find out which of the following programs are suitable for you.

Personal and Life Coaching. As the name implies, personal and life Coaching focuses on the improvement of the personal life of an individual. This kind of coaching teaches about life skills that can help a person combat the daily stresses of living. Life coaching is necessary to those who are lacking the motivation to achieve better due to passiveness, shyness and just being plain careless. The primary goal here is to achieve a personal contentment and a positive outlook in life.

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Career Success Coaching. This kind of mentoring primarily caters to the needs of clients involving their search for the most fulfilling career. Career success coaching helps in making a person become a highly productive individual. Those who are aching to gain a better productivity level in their jobs can enroll in this kind of mentoring. Business Coaching. Business Coaching deals with the aspect of making your business take a good turn to better performance. Business owners and other business professionals like managers and executive officers can opt this kind of mentoring. Executive Coaching. Executives usually resort to this kind of mentoring purposely for the sake of improving their leadership and executive abilities. Leading a team of employees can be a tedious task. However, executive coaching can change the way you look at leadership. It can teach you how to handle "hard" employees and make them succumb to you.

People need some kind of "comforting" after all the hard days' work. It is always a necessity for us human beings to speak of what we see, hear, feel, or think. It is always soothing to know that somebody cares. That somebody is willing to listen. That somebody can be a personal coach who is more than willing to box out the negativity that hinder your way to a better you through coaching solutions that caters to your specific needs. Finding a life coach is a beneficial decision. Be inspired to reach out to the world through coaching solutions and take your life to the next level.

Article Source: [ http://EzineArticles.com/?4-Coaching-Solutions-That-EnsuresPersonality-Development&id=4601404 ] 4 Coaching Solutions That Ensures Personality Development

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Ego Has No Place In Professional and Positive Coaching - Success Comes With Positive Application
By PaTrisha-Anne Todd Ego, the opinion you hold of yourself can when allowed to move to the forefront ruin the trust and respect a client holds of you. Professional coaching demands that the coach's ego remains firmly removed from the client coaching experience. Life coaching, business, Christian, spiritual coaching whatever area of coaching you may specialise in - true coaching is always about the client's core belief system and the goals and experiences they have and desire for their future. You'll be on a downward road if you allow any of your emotion, sense of self and judgment become part of the coaching process. Moral issues and legalities are not what I'm speaking about. Of course when you originally set up your coaching practice you would have worked on your business plan and marketing plan, both of these documents would have been based upon your interests, ethics, personal goals and level of passion for coaching certain individuals within particular eco and socio areas of the community plus your personal likes and dislikes. All of your 'ego / core beliefs' stuff would have been reviewed, compartmentalised and sorted so that your ideal coaching business planning could incorporate your personal ambition of why you wanted to be in the coaching profession in the first place. Those two documents - the business and marketing plans, would as I've just indicated given you the foundation of your client base characteristics, thus eliminating any confusion from the word go. Looking at what I've discussed above here is an example of how a coach / client relationship can begin to deteriorate and quite often break down completely. A client may declare a belief system point, a thought that is important to them. You respond with an agreeing comment that the statement the client has just made is in fact an important point for them, but, you then allow your core belief system to rise up and you begin discussing that the statement aforementioned perhaps is quite negative as you add on more 'ifs' and 'buts', then before you realise what you are saying out loud to your client, you have actually given them your point of view to what they initially stated as a positive statement. Wow. You just messed up big time as a working coach! Allowing your own points-of-view to mix in with what your client has to declare is a step backwards it does not add to the coaching process. The coaching moment you've both just experienced is a flipside move in the trusting and respectful relationship you previously started out with.
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Coaching Is Non-Directive Personal development is a sensitive and worthwhile building process, however it's in a coach's remit to portray true leadership by championing their coaching clients without letting your ego show itself, but rather using personal examples of selfmanagement, bringing to life the good old stable of 'lead by example', while providing working tools, tips, methodologies, strategies and techniques that allow the client to focus and activate their own confidence in order to build their competence levels to a higher elevation that fits their personality while moving out of their current comfort zone towards the transformation that they desire and dream about. Coaching Models The easiest way to 'coach' a client is to remain detached from your own feelings and keep your opinions and judgment to yourself. (Your coach training would have given you the models to adopt for positive and stunning outcomes. There are many coaching models that offer different outcomes.) What you think and believe to be true is not necessarily what your client holds as gospel. Your behaviour can be potentially damaging to your coaching business as you'll find that your client base will steadily decrease as your reputation grows that your style of 'coaching' does not move the client forward, but rather, can potentially have the client stuck without direction, lacking in motivation with low or no levels of energy, thus remaining in the circumstances they had in point of fact wanted to change. The clients current state of affairs is the result of certain habits which have either supported them to reach the condition they are currently in or habits that have created a negative situation which the client has come to realise they no longer wish to be in, and had with deliberate intent sort you out to coach them in order to achieve a different outcome. Enjoy Coaching and Succeed Therefore don't make coaching difficult be smart and remain congruent, true to your craft, coach the client in alignment with using constructive and encouraging self improvement techniques which give them the opportunity to capture their inner power and focus positively, so that they might succeed in the coaching methodologies you utilise with them. That they are able to voice their true goals without losing sight of their core beliefs and have the conviction to understand and agree to their purpose by taking action towards their personal goals.

PaTrisha-Anne Todd, LCSi Your personal coach for success. Author 'Life Coaching A-Z'. How can I help you? LCSi-Coaching Leads To Success a 90 days guaranteed success plan.
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The Six Step Coaching Model for instant and forward moving results. http://www.lcsieducation.com/sixstepcoachingmodelsystem.html For personal dynamic fast coaching for success contact PaTrisha-Anne. Article Source: [ http://EzineArticles.com/?Ego-Has-No-Place-In-Professional-andPositive-Coaching---Success-Comes-With-Positive-Application&id=5536151 ] Ego Has No Place In Professional and Positive Coaching - Success Comes With Positive Application

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Performance Coaching - Learn About The New Techniques
By Laura Brasnan Performance coaching is a becoming very popular all around the world and with its help one can really learn various new techniques that would surely help them in life. In order to improve your performance in any field, it is highly essential for you to join a performance coaching class or hire a personal coach who would help you in various ways. There are various businessmen who are now taking the help of life and performance coaching in order to learn about new strategies and tactics that would help them to deal with their clients and staff members. If you really want to achieve all your goals and desires then you must try out this option. In this article, I would like to tell you how performance coaching can help you in many ways to achieve your career path. 1. Exploring your goals Performance coaching can help you to recognize your goals that you want to achieve through your career. A life coach would help you in deciding the correct career path for an individual. The coaches have great experience and skills with the help of which they can evaluate the performance of the clients. You have to be completely focused if you really want to get the desired results with the help of performance training. The clients are motivated to increase their level of performance through hard work and efforts. 2. Understanding the needs and desires of the clients A coach would only be able to help the client if they understand their needs and desires to the fullest. The teacher needs to find a purpose which the students can follow. Assignments are given to the students on a regular basis which they have to complete after research and experimentation. You need to be consistent and efficient in order to increase the gains or your enterprise. 3. Ability to coach others In addition to the experience, you also need the ability to coach beginners who have just started their business. You should have the positive attitude to correct inefficient behavior and instill positive behavior. Performance coaching classes contain interactive communication sessions that helps in developing good relationships between clients and staff members. Continuous improvement can really be achieved with the help of regular performance coaching sessions. If you really want to achieve success in your business endeavors then above stated are some highly important points that you must surely follow. I am sure this article would provide you all the important information that you need about performance coaching.
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If you are a manager or executive looking to improve your performance, increase your productivity, build your leadership skills or advance your career, then go for [ http://www.executivecoachinghq.com/performance-coaching ] performance coaching or [ http://www.executivecoachinghq.com ] executive coaching services they can definitely help you do that. Article Source: [ http://EzineArticles.com/?Performance-Coaching---Learn-AboutThe-New-Techniques&id=5698008 ] Performance Coaching - Learn About The New Techniques

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Executive Coaching - Dispelling the 13 Myths and All You Need to Know About Having a Coach
By Mark Buchan 1. MYTH: Executive coaching takes up a lot of time FACT: This is not true, but it does depend on your point of view. Every executive that I coach values their time highly. Executives who are serious about their personal development quickly appreciate that the time spent with their executive coach is valuable and delivers many tangible and intangible benefits. Not only is the coaching of great value to them but it also delivers great improvements to their organisation as the executive becomes more inspired and fulfilled in their role. These effects are felt by the executive's team, their peers, their clients, their stakeholders and their bosses. Also, executive coaching is a form of personal development specifically designed for busy executives who want to become better than they are right now. To attain maximum benefit from the coaching the sessions take place at the client's workplace and last from 90 minutes to two hours, depending on the needs of the executive or the coachee (the person receiving the coaching). Sessions take place every four to six weeks. Again this frequency of meeting is tailored to meet the needs of the executive and organisation. Many other executive coaching practitioners spend an hour a week with their executive clients, but research at Ashridge School of Business has shown that it is more effective to allow four to six weeks between the coaching sessions and to ensure that each session is a maximum of two hours. This is the model we employ at New Thought Leader. After each coaching session the executive will have some follow-on activities to complete. Some coaches call this homework but I like to call it job-work as the assigned tasks usually relate to the work that the executive is currently engaged in. There might be some additional tasks that the executive may not normally perform, such as completing an assessment or a reflective journal that captures their thoughts or feelings as they are engaging in a new behaviour. These activities are designed with the executive's schedule in mind and can usually be completed with a maximum of two hours effort between the sessions. The total time that would be committed by the executive during a typical six month engagement can be achieved within 22 hours. This works out to a little under an hour a week on average. So now I ask you the question - is an hour a week too much time to invest in your professional development? 2. MYTH: It is impossible to measure the outcomes of executive coaching FACT: This myth is a sort of half truth. Very often organisations fall into the trap of wanting measurable and verifiable outcomes from all of the coaching in which they
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have invested. Many of the outcomes of coaching are predictable and measurable, especially in a programme of behavioural or skills coaching. Some forms of coaching however are less predictable and are often not measurable or verifiable, such as coaching contracts that are based on exploration and discovery. Contracts such as these are only ever verifiable by the coachee who will know when they have achieved the goals of their coaching. Another point to mention here is not all of the outcomes of coaching are predictable. This is because the business of coaching deals with human nature, which is probably one of the most unpredictable forces on this planet. A coaching engagement will commence with all the best intentions of achieving certain goals but even the most skilled of executive coaches cannot forecast all the possible outcomes of coaching. That is the nature of change and uncertainty involved in the process. As coaches, we are skilled at managing change and the chaos that can arise from the change-work, but we can't say with 100% certainty that the outcomes that we anticipate at the outset of the coaching will transpire. The fact is that many executives who participate in a programme of executive coaching receive more benefit than they bargained for. One final point here is that coaching provides so many intangible benefits that it can be challenging or dare I say it, impossible to measure them all. Where possible the coach and the organisation paying for the coaching should agree in advance which outcomes of the programme can be realistically predicted and quantified and agree the method of measurement and verification. 3. MYTH: Successful executives don't need executive coaching FACT: This is definitely not true. In fact quite the opposite is true. Some of the most successful executives in top FTSE 100 companies have their own executive coaches. The most savvy of executives knows that there is always room for improvement. We have no way of measuring the maximum potential that anyone can aspire to, but executive coaching provides the keys to unlock the latent talent within an executive while building on the talent that they are consciously aware of.

4. MYTH: Everyone is coachable FACT: This is not true. Every executive coach would like to believe that it is true, but in reality some people are more coachable than others. Executive coaching works best for executives who are open minded and are willing to change. The type of executive who benefits from coaching is someone who takes responsibility for their own development and knows that they are capable of achieving more. I always recommend to my organisational clients that before we engage in a programme of coaching, an assessment be carried out by the organisation, with some guidance from myself, to determine the level of coachability of the potential coachee. This ensures that the results of the coaching programme are always high and meet the expectations of the sponsor (the organisation paying for the coaching) and the coachee.

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5. MYTH: Executive coaching is about the coach telling me what to do and how to run my business FACT: Absolutely not! An executive coach is in no way qualified to tell you how to run your business. As an executive you may hire an executive coach to streamline your thinking or to provide assistance as a sounding board for your ideas, but an executive coach cannot advise you on how to run your business. The executive coach is qualified to be a coach and as a coach they will also help you overcome obstacles or achieve goals. They are qualified in the art of coaching, not in running their clients' business. As part of the coaching, the coach will be able to offer their coachee a different perspective or new insights into an existing problem or situation. The executive can then choose whether to act on or dismiss that information, so the executive is always fully in control and fully responsible for their actions. 6. MYTH: The executive coach can help take up some of the executive's workload FACT: It is definitely not the role of the executive coach to do the executives "dirty washing", make his tea or act as his PA. The executive coach may help the executive in reducing their workload by helping them to delegate more effectively. The primary role of the executive coach is to facilitate and assist in the executive's development. 7. MYTH: Executive coaching is the same as life coaching FACT: Most definitely not! I am quite passionate about this subject as I have witnessed a shocking growth of unregulated, poorly-trained and under-qualified life coaches who are given certificates after a weekend workshop. These people are given such low exposure to the real nature of coaching and little if any practical experience in coaching. Their work is unsupervised and very rarely have they even had the experience of being coached by a skilled coach themselves. These poorly informed life coaches, who may mean well, are giving coaching a bad reputation. Professional coaches on the other hand are very skilled at what they do. They are knowledgeable about the psychology and models that underpin their work. They are very self aware and passionate about their own personal development and understand the value of continual self development. To give you a practical application of this, I undertake supervision on a regular basis. This allows me the time necessary to reflect on my own practice as a coach so that I can continually improve and provide greater value to my clients. I also have my own coach who helps me improve my performance among other things. I walk my talk. So if you are considering hiring an executive coach, make sure that they are accredited by one of the appropriate coaching bodies, the EMCC or the ICF for example. All of New Thought Leader's coaching staff are active members of professional coaching bodies. Also, all of them receive regular supervision and coaching. In summary, I believe in the power and potential that quality coaching can bring to individuals and organisations, so I insist on the very highest standards in the executive coaches that I work with. They need to demonstrate excellence and continual improvement in their art. I settle for nothing less - why should you?
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8. MYTH: Executive Coaching is only for use when executives are failing FACT: Not so! Coaching used to be viewed as a remedial activity to "fix" a problem person in the organisation or as a defence used by HR to say "...well we tried to help the guy....", just before letting them go. Executive coaching can also be used to provide assistance to executives who admit to having challenges, but only they will benefit once they take responsibility for their change and own the issues that they are faced with. Executive coaching has a diverse range of applications for executives including improving their effectiveness and performance, advancing their communication skills, collaborating with them to create a compelling vision, provide assistance in applying their time to strategic issues and so on. Executive coaching is now being offered to top executives as a perk that improves retention within the organisation. 9. MYTH: Executive coaching is the same as therapy and counselling FACT: Definitely not! The words therapy and counselling may have many meanings for an individual. If therapy means lying on a couch talking about your mother or father while the therapist nods a lot and speaks in Germanic accent, then no coaching is not therapy. There are many reasons why executive coaching is not therapy. Here are just a few: in therapy the therapist is considered the expert, coaching views the coach and client as co-experts in the relationship. As such the plan for coaching is designed as an alliance by the coach and coachee. In therapy the the therapist plans the treatment. Therapy is problem-oriented and involves spending many hours examining the problem, whereas coaching is solution-oriented with a much smaller amount of time spent examining the problem. Therapy tends to focus on people with major mental or emotional issues. Coaching is about working with a functioning individual with the goal of working to the executives strengths. Having presented these facts, it is only fair to point out that there is some overlap with coaching and therapy. Both the coach and therapist have many skills in common, such as listening and helping the clients find insights. Both the coach and therapist utilise the clients past experience in helping them to make sense and to then move forward taking action while utilising new knowledge. Also the coach and therapist work with emotional material that their client brings as a means to facilitating their growth. 10. MYTH: A successful executive coach needs to have similar experience to the executive being coached FACT: This is not necessarily so. It may be of help to the executive to know the coach has been through what they have been through, in which case a programme of mentoring may be of value to the executive. However, an executive coach will bring a whole new set of skills that the executive may be unlikely to possess. The executive coaching relationship works best when both the executive and the coach are engaged in the learning process. So the balance of the executive's knowledge coupled with the coach's skill at being able to provide learning strategies to assist them create a powerful alliance. 11. MYTH: Executive coaching is just a management fad
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FACT: Certainly not! It is true to say that coaching has been the subject of a remarkable trend since the turn of the millennium but fads come and go - just like corduroy flares or mullets! Executive coaching has been around in many guises (but not under this label) for over twenty years. Popularity and demand for executive coaching has increased in the last ten years or so mainly due to the accelerated rate of business change. This rapid rate of change has forced organisations to reconsider the business paradigms that they have operated within for many years. As a result organisations are now understanding the need for continuous learning that remains adaptive to the current and future needs of the marketplace. This new paradigm shift has also brought about the need for a new type of leadership where emotional intelligence and collaboration are more highly valued. Executive coaching provides these new leaders and organisations with the tools to operate more effectively in the ever changing business environment, something that traditional training or business schools are failing to deliver. Executive coaching is here to stay and will continue to go from strength to strength as more and more executives and organisations discover its power and potential. 12. MYTH: Executive coaching is expensive FACT: Expensive is a relative term so let's compare the cost of coaching to training. Firstly finding space in the busy executive's diary for training is a task requiring much patience and tenacity on the part of the training organisation. Once the training has been delivered, one of the major challenges facing the executive is they are left to apply the knowledge learned from the training on their own. The result is that little, if any, of the training is applied when the executive returns to their day to day role. Research has shown that potentially up to 90% of an organisation's training budget is wasted because it is rarely applied. Executive Coaching on the other hand, provides a tailored form of continuous education and learning which enables the executive to immediately apply the learnings from the coaching and discuss their observations about the application with the coach at the next session. This ensures value is derived from the coaching. Studies have also shown that coaching can provide as much as 500% return on investment (coachingfederation.org) so coaching can actually make money for your organisation and thereby become less of a cost and more of an investment. 13. MYTH: Mentoring is another word for executive coaching FACT: This is untrue and arises from a misunderstanding of the differences between an executive coach and a mentor. While there are large overlaps among the skills of a mentor and an executive coach, there are some fundamental differences that you need to be aware of to determine whether mentoring or executive coaching is the most appropriate course of action. The first major difference is that a mentor tends to be someone in-house who is qualified to act as a mentor because they model the ideal work behaviours, attitudes and beliefs that the organisation places value on. A mentor acts as a role models for their mentee (a person being mentored), instructing them on ways to behave and think in certain circumstances. Executive coaching as a process tends to be less directive than mentoring and relies heavily on the executive coach bringing the best out of the coachee, by assisting them in finding the answers
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within themselves rather than supplying them the answers. Does this mean an executive coach never instructs or provide answers? Preferably not, but in the instances where the coachee has hit a plateau or a brick wall, the executive coach may offer carefully framed suggestions or advice that facilitates the forward movement of the coachee. In mentoring, there are always right or appropriate answers and the mentor knows them. With executive coaching, the only answers are those that the coachee offers and these are not judged by the coach as being right or wrong. The job of the coach, as stated earlier, is to facilitate the coachee's access to their answers from within themselves. In this way, coaching fosters independence in the coachee whereas mentoring can foster dependence on the mentor. Another difference is that mentoring relies heavily on the mentor's expertise of the subject matter, whereas executive coaching relies on the coach facilitating the advanced learning and/or the improved performance of their coachee. The agenda of the mentoring relationship is mainly set by the organisation. The agenda of coaching is mainly set by the coachee, in collaboration with their organisation and coach. In summary, mentoring is a valid tool for directing the learning of individuals so that they behave, think and communicate in a way that is aligned with the mentor. If you require creativity and free thinking to provide an extra edge in performance and effectiveness, then executive coaching is a more appropriate tool for this outcome Summary Executive coaching is a remarkable trend that continues to grow globally. As a result, many myths have been formed about what it is or isn't and whether it can deliver enough benefits to justify the investment of time and money. This leaves executives and HR professionals wondering if it can bring long lasting and tangible benefits to their organisations.

Mark Buchan is one of Britain's most sought after coaches. He coaches executives and business owners from a wide range of business sectors. His ability to facilitate change, raise awareness, explore context and identify the keys issues with his clients is fast earning him the reputation of Worlds Best Coach. Mark provides free executive coaching taster sessions to allow people the chance to experience the benefits of coaching for themselves. Click here to find out more: http://www.newthoughtleader.com/free-executive-coaching-session.php New Thought Leader is a team of professionals dedicated to improving organisational and personal performance. Visit our website today to review other interesting topics around the area of organisational and personal development. http://www.newthoughtleader.com/knowledgebase/knowledgebase.php Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?Executive-Coaching---Dispelling-the-13Myths-and-All-You-Need-to-Know-About-Having-a-Coach&id=1429718 Executive Coaching - Dispelling the 13 Myths and All You Need to Know About Having a Coach
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The Role of the Executive Coach - Developing the Best Talent
By Roger M Ingbretsen Top athletes have used the experience of a coach for decades. Today more and more business executives are taking advantage of coaching services. They see the benefit a coach can have in assisting them in reaching higher levels of performance. They view coaches as a valuable asset in their continuing executive development. Today's economic environment is demanding even more from the individuals holding executive leadership positions. Doing more with less is the mantra of most organizations. The executive coach serves as an extra pair of eyes, ears and added experience to aid in new and different approaches executives used to meet organizational goals. Many baby-boomer executives will continue retiring leaving a void which in many instances is hard to fill. Mid-level management - the typical grooming period for the next generation of executives - was decimated in the last two decades resulting in a large gap of those prepared to move effectively to the executive role. The executive coach can play an important role in the selection and transition of new people into key executive positions. The most direct and important benefit derived from solid executive coaching is the development of the organizations present and future leaders. Therefore, to be most effective, executive coaching must be both strategic and individualized. Executive coaching that is focused on the business strategy of the organization and on the development needs of the individual is the key to achieving the desired results. Since executive coaching is strategic, special care must be taken by the organization to select for coaching those individuals who bring strengths to the table. Executive coaching must not be viewed as a "fix it program" for those who exhibit weak leadership skills. Investing in mediocre performers will not bring about a good return on your investment. When you force coaching on a mediocre individual you will be disappointed in your decision. Only invest in your best! They will appreciate your interest in their executive development and will become engaged in the executive coaching experience. Executive coaching is not about process or a program... its all about results! The role of the executive coach is to identify the most important outcomes the organization and the person being coached wants to achieve. The executive coach must influence the client to think, communicate and lead in ways that will improve personal and organizational results. Executive coaching is an art, not a science. Good executive coaches have developed the ability to influence and guide their clients to think and act more effectively.
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The executive coach must tailor each encounter with a client as a unique relationship. One set model or program does not work for all clients. Yes, there will be many assessment tools that will apply as a baseline; however, each coaching relationship starts with a blank sheet of paper, developing over time specific approaches so the client learns how to play off their unique strengths and mitigates issues which keep them from achieving the desired results. The executive coach must tailor each encounter with a client as a unique relationship. One set model or program does not work for all clients. Yes, there will be many assessment tools that will apply as a baseline; however, each coaching relationship starts with a blank sheet of paper, developing over time specific approaches so the client learns how to play off their unique strengths and mitigates issues which keep them from achieving the desired results. The effective executive coach provides the client with different perspectives and new approaches they can use so they can change their thinking and get the desired and needed results the organization expects for its leaders. Very often the executive coach serves as a sounding board which the client can use to think through ideas and approaches to both immediate and long-range issues. Bottom line... Executive coaching is most often the single best method for improving the effectiveness of the organizations leadership talent. Effective executives create a sustainable and growing organization through more satisfied employees; satisfied employees perform at their best creating improvements, innovation, more satisfied customers and higher profits. Executive coaching is not an expense... its an investment in the future of the organization.

About Ingbretsen Consulting LLC: Coach and author Roger Ingbretsen is a certified executive coach and organizational developer, providing organizational and career guidance to professionals, managers, supervisors and all individuals looking for "real world" career development and business information. His entrepreneurial approach will help you learn how to plan, lead and succeed in your career. Roger is the creator of the "Leadership Development Coaching Experience©" and author of the personal development reference eBooks, "Plan Your Career Now: The Survival Guide for the American Workplace" and "Master Your Career: Proven Strategies for Career Success©." To know more and claim dozens of Rogers free articles go to http://www.ingbretsen.com or call 509 999 7008. Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?The-Role-of-theExecutive-Coach---Developing-the-Best-Talent&id=3431486 The Role of the Executive Coach - Developing the Best Talent

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Perfect Pitch of Executive Coaching Establishing the Client Value Proposition
By Suzi Pomerantz and Dr. Steve Gladis While coaching is not and has never been all about money, the "money is important if only for financial reasons," as Woody Allen once quipped. Many coaches find setting rates for their coaching services to be a challenge. The conversation about money with sponsoring organizations and clients has to be thoughtful and based on a deep sense of value and respect between the coach and the client. Such value is less about benefits or features-and more about results. So, talking about the 10 different services that will come with the coaching package (a 360 assessment, weekly meetings, quarterly reports, periodic evaluations, etc.), is far less compelling to a sponsor-the person or organization hiring the coach, than what he or she views as essential to the organization-solving the perceived or stated problem. Some sponsors are very strategic and hire coaches to help the organization and its leaders grow toward a vision; however; most a however, are tactical and come to executive coaches when they identify a pain point. Often, it's an executive with a behavioral challenge rather than a technical issue. In fact, competency issues are usually easier and faster to solve. A sponsor can buy a particular software system or send the employee to school or for training, and that, along with some experience, usually solves the problem. However, behavioral issues are much harder to solve because they've often been ingrained for years and might even remain invisible to the client. If a particular client has been a procrastinator, an arrogant know-it-all, or abusive in his work relationships, he's often not even conscious of what he is doing or the impact of his behaviors. As the saying goes, "Fish are the last ones to discover water." As we've seen time and again, clients are often the last ones to discover their true behavioral challenges, partly due to lack of awareness, and often because nobody will give them direct and honest feedback. So, when a sponsor, typically the CEO or HR department, contacts an executive coach about an executive, his or her troublesome behavior has likely begun to interfere with corporate progress, morale, or culture. Alternatively, if it's not about a problem behavior per se, the CEO might want the client to be coached to get to the next level of leadership. But in either case, there's a perceived issue or behavior that needs to be changed or developed, either a potential career de-railer or a bottomline enhancer. This perception precipitates the conversation between coach and sponsor. Often the conversation revolves first around the sponsor describing the employee and the issue surrounding performance. The description might sound like this fictional account: "Jack's a great COO, but he has a way of talking down to people that makes them feel stupid and eventually angry. He has a big ego-a smart guy sure-but at times, a lot of time actually, he's dismissive and comes across as, well, arrogant."
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The coach might ask for some examples and pose specific probing questions to help get a sense of the issue(s). When the sponsor finishes describing the situation, he will invariably ask the coach, "Can you help?" Here's where you get to choose the path that will help you seal the deal that's a win for the sponsor, the client, and the coach. Most coaches will first describe their particular process, which usually involves a number of steps from helping the client through several phases: 1) self awareness and understanding; 2) goal setting and accountability; 3) action learning and execution; and, 4) Evaluation and reestablishing new goals. In such discussions, coaches often will use both hypothetical and real, but unnamed previous clients, as a way of demonstrating how their process works.. In a number of cases, former clients often agree to serve as direct references for the coach, which is even more powerful. In this article, we'd like to offer you an alternative road to travel because the sponsor may not, at this point, be ready for or interested in the process or the benefits of your coaching methodology. Often, the sponsor may not yet be aware of, or convinced of, the value proposition -- the what's-at-stake-for-the-organization and how you, as a coach, can help. The Price Discussion Back to the path more traveled: After much discussion, the question of cost arises. This is the make-or-break point in the discussion and requires keen attention. If all that has been discussed is the problem and the coach's solution, no matter how clean and effective, a discussion about money can break the deal at this point, unless the coach finds what we're calling "perfect pitch." Not pitch like baseball or sales pitch, perfect pitch as in harmonious music. Such a pitch is based on value-first to the sponsor, then to the coach. In marketing, the customer value proposition is the relationship between an offering by a vendor to a customer and the relative worth of the service or product. Simply put, if you come into my store and buy a bag of groceries, you expect that what I sell you is worth the price you pay. In coaching the value proposition is similar, yet different. Coaches offer experience in the coaching process-the ability to take an executive on a journey of self-discovery and change. In a real sense, it's the hero's journey, where the coach acts as trusted guide, not so much wise teacher or even mentor. The coach becomes a trusted partner to whom the client must remain faithful to a promise of self- improvement. So, what does the coach provide? Answer: A safe place for the client to explore change. Whether on the phone or in a private office, it's the only place where an executive can come to grips with a challenge that may have plagued him or her for years-something that has likely cost both the client and the company large amounts of time, money, and aggravation. This cost to the sponsor, client, and the organization is one of the center pieces of "perfect pitch." Remember, pitch in this case is not an advertising pitch, rather it's tuning into the sponsor's wavelength to help understand the true value of the coaching experience.

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To illustrate where coaches often take a detour from perfect pitch, let's look at a conversation between a coach (C) and a sponsor (S) after both have spent an hour or so discussing a potential executive client to be coached. Remember the sponsor could be the CEO, the HR department head, or another leader but is not necessarily the person to be coached-the client. S: So, now that you know about our situation and we know about you, how much will the coaching cost?" C: I typically only coach for 6 months or longer. S: OK, what's your 6-month rate? C: It's $X (this number varies so greatly on the executive coach, you can fill in your own number from $5,000 to $100,000) S: Wow, that's steep. C: Remember, I do a 360-assessment, we have regular coaching sessions, I set up an evaluation to determine progress after 4 months, I.... This conversation continues with the sponsor trying to mentally fill his value bag with your itemized coaching offerings. The problem with this approach is that it is coachfocused, not organization-focused or client-focused. Invariably, sponsors try to relate the service to hours invested-like lawyers-which is a broken model for our purposes. Further, such sponsors never seem to fill the bag to their satisfaction largely because they don't understand the process or have enough experience with it to feel like they're ever getting the commensurate level of value back. In a sense, the sponsors and coach are on two different levels of pitch-and largely out of tune, even if the sponsor finally, begrudgingly agrees. The Cost Discussion So, how do they both get on the same pitch, a perfect pitch? This brings us to the other central piece of the puzzle-the sponsor's ultimate goal or vision for the organization that is potentially threatened, impeded, or halted by the behavior of the individual being discussed. By bringing the sponsor's awareness to the positive purpose, the thing the organization is working towards accomplishing, and what that potential upside is worth to the organization, the coach can create the container in which the sponsor can start to see the value. In other words, the sponsor's or organization's ultimate goal or vision is the grocery bag itself. The simple answer to creating perfect pitch is to get the sponsor to articulate the organization's goals and pursuits and to define what the current problems are costing the organization. Start with the organization, not you, the coach. Here's how that conversation might go: S: So, now that you know about our situation and we know about you, how much will the coaching cost?"

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C: I need some more information to answer that accurately. First, let's look at what you are trying to accomplish. What is the organization's major objectives or goals for the next year or two? S: Well, we have to prepare for the mass exodus of retiring boomer executives, and our goal is successful and seamless succession planning and leadership development for our emerging leaders, plus rapid on-boarding so we can meet our production goals. C: Great! What's the potential business outcome of that happening? In other words, when you've got leadership bench strength and a strategic succession plan in place to seamlessly transition your retiring leaders out and your emerging leaders into action, what is either the cost savings or bottom line increase that will create for your company? S: Well, if I had to guess, I'd say a cost savings of about $1.2 million when you factor in the costs of attrition, training, on-boarding, and uninterrupted production schedules. C. OK, and on the flip side, can you describe in some detail how the problem we've been discussing surfaces in the workplace? S: Jack's the COO, like I said. He's often impatient, even brutal with young executives. C: How so? Can you describe what he actually does? S: In briefings, he says things like "What stupid proposition." Or "I can't believe you said that. Or, what planet are you living on?" C: What's the fallout from such encounters? S: We're starting to lose young executives. C: Who and how many? S: The smartest ones. In the last year 5 of our rising stars have left for other "opportunities." C: What's that costing your company? S: The HR department calculates roughly 4 times their annual salaries, so in this case about $2 million in the past year. C: Two million. I see. And this pattern has been going on for how long? S: Certainly, since I've been here, now going on 5 years. C: So at this point, in just this area, you're talking about a $10 million dollar loss to the company?
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S: I never thought of it that way. But yes, 2 times 5...yes I guess that's accurate. Wow. $10 million! C: Now, add onto that your previous estimate of $1.2million dollars worth of costsavings if you succeed in the healthy transfer of leadership. So, you're looking at a potential business impact of $11.2 million dollars, is that correct? S: Yes, that's sound right. Wow. I never tallied it up like that. C: Would it be worth it to you to spend a small percentage of that on executive coaching to create a solution that saves the company a good portion of that $11.2 million dollars? In this case, the coach has helped, in a sense coached, the sponsor to hear himself or herself actually say the words--$11.2 million dollars - and feel the weight and magnitude of that amount. The coach has helped the sponsor quantify the size of the problem. Actually, this conversation might have gone on for a much longer time as the two discussed other impacts in the company of the client's challenge, for example, Jack's impact on the board of directors, other senior executives, and even customers. Typically, such a challenge like this in a senior executive gets multiplied many times as it trickles down, then avalanches down throughout an organization. Think that the $2 million a year cost of such a challenge sounds very high? Consider that many major law firms typically lose roughly 20% of their associates each year, many of whom are salaried at well more than $100,000 a year! It's become almost an industry standard. The larger law firms are spending their capital at high rates, but consider it a cost of doing business. The cost of customer relations and retention, retraining, and culture adjustment, not to mention reputation has deep impact well beyond even these numbers. So, then what does the conversation look like once the client has been helped to define the scope and size of the problem? Let's see: C: That sounds like a big problem. Last year I worked with a company with a similar problem. It wasn't easy. S: So what happened? C: It took a year. The executive fought the process for the first several months until I said I wouldn't continue unless we came to an agreement. S: And he did? C: Yes, she finally did. We re-started the process from square one. In a year, she wasn't perfect, but things had begun to change. S: How did you know that?
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C: I conducted an evaluation with senior management, peers, and subordinates. The numbers showed strong forward motion and the number of turnovers reduced. S: So do you guarantee that? C: I can't guarantee change because it's in the hands of the client. What I do guarantee is that I'll manage the process, measure results, and will be there for the client. In my years of coaching, I've rarely found someone committed to change who doesn't make significant headway. S: So, what's all this cost? C: For a problem of this size, say $11 million, I charge a flat rate of $X thousand dollars for a year of coaching solutions, which works out to be a very small percentage of the scope of problem you just laid out (calculate and articulate x%). If it is worth that percentage to you to control a problem that could ultimately cost you an extraordinary amount of time, talent and money in your company, then we can look at the process for getting started. S: That sounds good. Conclusion: The Perfect Pitch "That sounds good." Consider how this is a very different place to enter into the contracting phase of coaching rather than "Wow...that's steep!" If experienced, knowledgeable, effective coaches are to earn a respectable living, it's necessary to charge professional rates. In order to do that, coaches will need to frame the customer value proposition in terms of the customer's needs and the results that will speak to the client and organization. However, often customers have never quantified the size and scope of the problem caused by a destructive or lacking executive behavior. Not having done so denies them the opportunity of conducting a rational cost-benefit analysis relative to the fee structure from an experienced professional coach. The net result is that either the coach bargains down the cost, loses the contract to someone cheaper, or the sponsor over-expects or feels unsure and skeptical. In any case, the starting place is not a realistic, helpful, or healthy one. In such a case, both sponsor and coach are singing a song on two very different keys-and out of tune with each other. Framing the issue's size, importance and cost to the organization, starts the discussion at a very different place-a realistic, rational one. Permitting the sponsor to frame the scope of the problem, allows both sponsor and coach to actually "hear" the value proposition as it occurs in the sponsor's reality. Thus, the two talk with each other, not at each other. It is a collaborative co-creation that utilizes the coach's best coaching skills. Therefore, sponsors and coaches get to hear each other's valuebased words of relevance, meaning, and true cost of the coaching bottom-line. Coaches need to learn how to have conversations about money-how to talk with business executives who have strategic, financial, political, and accountability concerns. Coaches have to not only put themselves in the shoes of the corporate
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sponsors they serve, but also help those sponsors " hear," in their own words, the scope and cost of a problem as well as the scope and upside value to the solution. Yes, coaches are there to help, and there is a commercial reality that coaches cannot deny. The value proposition is not only what's in it for the organization (and sponsor and client), but there is a coach's side to the value equation as well, and that's where the money comes in. When coaches are catering to the value of the results that can be co-created in the client's reality while pricing coaching services professionally and commensurate with the magnitude of the solutions, then there is equal value. Only then can both coach and sponsor get in perfect pitch.

Suzi Pomerantz, MT., MCC. is an award-winning, international master certified coach for executives and teams worldwide. She is the author of 25 publications on ethics, coaching, and business development, including her book, Seal the Deal. She is the founder of The Leading Coaches' Center, and co-founder of the Library of Professional Coaching. Her work as an executive coach, facilitator, and author helps leaders and teams find clarity at the intersection of leadership and business development. Find free articles, videos, and podcasts at http://www.suzipomerantz.com Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?Perfect-Pitch-of-Executive-Coaching--Establishing-the-Client-Value-Proposition&id=4234919 Perfect Pitch of Executive Coaching - Establishing the Client Value Proposition

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The Business Case For Executive Coaching The ICF Coaching ROI Global Study
By Maynard Brusman The Business Case for Executive Coaching Are you working in a company or law firm where executive coaches help leaders develop their leadership capability? Does your company or law firm provide executive coaching and leadership development for high potentials and high performing leaders? One of the most powerful questions you can ask is "Does providing executive coaching for company leaders have a direct effect on the company bottom line?" Emotionally intelligent and socially intelligent organizations provide executive coaching and leadership development for authentic leaders at all levels of the organization. Approximately 25 to 40 percent of Fortune 500 companies use executive coaches, according to the Hay Group, an international human-resources consultancy. According to a survey by Manchester, Inc., a Jacksonville, Florida, career management consulting firm; about six out of ten organizations currently offer coaching or other developmental counseling to their managers and executives. Another 20 percent of companies said they plan to offer coaching within the next year. Although it was once used as an intervention with troubled staff, coaching is now part of the standard leadership development training for executives in such companies as IBM, Motorola, J.P. Morgan Chase, Hewlett-Packard and many others. Brokerage firms and other sales-based organizations such as insurance companies use coaches to bolster performance of people in high-pressure, stressful jobs. The ICF Coaching ROI Global Study The 2009 International Coach Federation (ICF) Global Coaching Client Study reported the median coaching ROI to be 700%. The results of the study is rather dramatic providing much needed metrics for this popular leadership development strategy.. The International Coach Federation conducted a qualitative and quantitative global client survey and interview research project between May to December 2008. The full research report was made available to the public on June 11, 2009. Highlights related to the return on investment from coaching are reported here. This is a crucial research topic -- what do coaching clients say is the value of coaching?

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The design phase of the research consisted of three components: First, fourteen indepth interviews were conducted with an international sample of coaches to assist with the design of the questions to be utilized in the qualitative and quantitative study. Second, the qualitative research phase consisted of five focus groups with a total of 41 clients participating. The focus groups allowed for in-depth probing of qualitative issues. Third, the quantitative research component consisted of 2,165 coaching clients from 64 countries participating in a 20 minute online survey. What do clients say motivates them to begin coaching? The clients cited career opportunities and business management as their most important reasons for seeking coaching services. Both coaches and consumers of coaching services are interested in Return on Investment (ROI) studies on coaching. An often cited ROI study of executive coaching, Coaching for Increased Profitability: How to Deliver and Demonstrate Tangible Results to the Bottom Line by Merrill C. Anderson, Ph.D. MetrixGlobal (2003) had reported an ROI from coaching of 788%. In an apparent confirmation of that finding, the ICF Global Coaching Client Study Executive Summary (April 2009) reports, "The vast majority (86%) of those able to provide figures to calculate company ROI indicated that their company had at least made their investment back. In fact, almost one fifth (19%) indicated an ROI of at least 50 (5000%) times the initial investment while a further 28% saw an ROI of 10 to 49 times the investment. The median company return is 700% indicating that typically a company can expect a return of seven times the initial investment." Source: ICF Global Coaching Client Study, Executive Summary, April 2009, in consultation with PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP, and Association Resource Centre inc. Working with a seasoned executive coach trained in emotional intelligence and incorporating leadership assessments such as the Bar-On EQ-i and CPI 260 can help company leaders improve their leadership capability. You can become a leader who models emotional intelligence and social intelligence, and who inspires people to become fully engaged with the vision and mission of your company or law firm.

Subscribe to Working Resources Newsletter at http://www.workingresources.com . Visit Maynard's Blog at http://www.WorkingResourcesBlog.com. The Society for Advancement of Consulting (SAC) awarded two rare Board Approved designations for Dr. Maynard Brusman in the specialties of Executive Coaching & Leadership Development and Trusted Advisor to Attorneys and Law Firms. Dr. Maynard Brusman, Consulting Psychologist & Executive Coach Working Resources Help Companies Assess, Select, Coach, and Retain Emotionally Intelligent Leaders
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Box 471525 San Francisco, California 94147-1525 Tel: 415-546-1252 E-mail: mbrusman@workingresources.com Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?The-Business-Case-For-ExecutiveCoaching---The-ICF-Coaching-ROI-Global-Study&id=2498753 The Business Case For Executive Coaching - The ICF Coaching ROI Global Study

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Coaching in the Eye of the Storm - Developing a More Intuitive Approach to Executive Coaching
By Jayne Warrilow Every New Year encourages us to look to the year ahead, to harness our expectations, to plan ahead to ensure that we will have improved our market position, revenue, career or even our life by this time next year. However as 2010 dawned with the weight of expectation for a deepening sense of gloom as we continue with the economic downturn which is known as the first recession to be experienced on a global scale, there is no doubt in every leader's mind that these are challenging times and how individual leaders respond to that challenge will be many and varied. So how can organisations support their leadership in these times of adversity and how can we as executive coaches ensure we can support them to stay on track and maintain organisational performance at a time when it has never mattered more? In the current environment leaders are placed firmly in the spotlight, as the world scrutinizes their every move to see who is struggling and who is flourishing. Across countless organisations people are looking to their leaders for reassurance, to know that their jobs are safe, at least for today. They are looking to them for security, support and clarity of how to navigate the labyrinth of never ending challenges, and in return they expect leaders who are calm and in control, who can undoubtedly show resilience in the face of adversity. In short, they are looking for leaders they can trust, those who will get them through this global recession, intact and alive. The problem arises then when you consider that these are unprecedented times, many leaders and managers are finding themselves facing challenges which they have never faced before - they are, possibly for the first time in their career, in unchartered waters. All of their leadership development, MBA's, past experience and training that has equipped them so well for previous business scenarios, is found lacking when dealing with the breadth of uncertain challenges currently facing most organisations. This in itself can provide a context which is ripe for leadership derailment. Rapidly changing economies means that our greatest resource is under even greater pressure right now, and that is our energy. Everyone feels pulled in an ever increasing spiral of directions and it can feel as though we are out of control and being forced into situations to do what we must do. Many executives are feeling the pressure build and are flexing their resilience muscles to stay on track. These are challenging times which we will look back on as the first tentative steps towards evolution.

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The face of leadership is changing, it is no longer enough to be a good leader, exceptional times call for exceptional leaders and executive coaching is no different. In 2007 I competed a small research study to find out what leaders really wanted from Executive Coaching and despite the comparatively small numbers of my qualitative study, the results were really interesting and highlighted some key trends. Scope: 139 people - 52 coaches / 87 executive clients - over a 4 month period (2007/2008) 69 women / 70 men - different nationalities - from the US to the Far East majority were European Combination of internet forums, emails and interviews All clients had received coaching for a minimum of 3 months, all coaches had been executive coaching for a minimum of 2 years 3 questions:

What makes the difference between good and great coaching? How would you describe great coaching? What specifically do you want from your coaching for you to consider it "great"? Key Themes: Coaching Intelligence I Intuition Insights Inspiration Influence Innovative Integrated Coaching is undergoing an evolution. It seems to me that to deliver these aspects of great coaching we as coaches need to develop our presence. To invite our clients into the eye of the storm, where there is space and stillness and to connect energetically with our clients and to use our intuition to coach from this place in a mindful and conscious way. The above qualities will challenge most coaches to remain at their learning edge as by their very nature they are dynamic, highly subjective and constantly changing. The Path to Intuitive Energy Mindfulness is the path to immortality. Negligence is the path to the death. The vigilant never die, Whereas the negligent are the living dead.
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With this understanding, The wise, having developed a high degree of mindfulness, Rejoice in mindfulness, Paying heed to each step on the path. The Buddha Intuitive energy - it's not what you think! Literally speaking of course...there is no doubt that exceptional leaders understand themselves and trust their intuition, the same goes for exceptional coaches. But how do you develop this? The exciting thing about this area is reflected in the following quote: "You cannot teach humans anything. You can only help them to discover it within themselves." Galileo In a recent workshop I asked delegates to raise their hands if they recalled seeing aspects of themselves in those they were advising, in one way or another, as clients. Most of the people in the group raised their hands and admitted to guiding their clients towards a piece of advice that they acknowledged they should have been following themselves. The very existence of our own needs and attachments creates some level of risk that we may fail to be attentive to the real needs of people we are working with. Thus we need to understand our own subtle biases and motivations which originates from our core energy, and we need to use our intuition to connect to theirs. Once this information began to take root in my own mind, I was staggered to learn that these influences have already made their way into the Executive coaching taking place in many C-suites of large corporate organizations. Now to let you into a secret, I have been doing this work myself for over 5 years, but as most of you will realise I have not marketed it as such for fear of scaring away the corporate executives and environments who benefit so much from it. At last things are changing, and I know from my own experience that executive coaches who understand and can work with energy are in high demand, not least because of the accelerated results which this type of coaching produces. You are already intuitive. Your clients are already intuitive. The truth is we all have intuition. Your physical body automatically reads the energy of everyone around you. Every living being is made up of energy and all this energy contains information. Your physical body is surrounded by an energy field that is both an information clearing centre and a highly sensitive perceptual system. Within your mind you merely need to open yourself up to be present and receive this channel of communication.There are many different influences which come together under the title of Intuitive Energy including the fields of psychology, sociology, somatics,
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transpersonal psychology, energy psychology, energy healing, energy medicine, and eastern therapies. Beyond this article, a community is developing around these ideas and an evolution is taking its first tentative steps into our corporate and coaching reality. Perhaps this is your year to join the evolution?

Jayne Warrilow is founder and CEO of the Max Coaching Academy and Max Executive Coaching. The Academy is an exceptional place to help coaches achieve accelerated results using the power of energy and flow. Jayne specializes in working with senior executives across the globe combining a flair for strategic thinking with a passion for harnessing the clients own intuitive power. She has over 15 years coaching experience and is passionate about coaching as the singular, most effective path for individualized leadership development. She enjoys guiding coaches towards their learning edge so that when they step into the unknown with their client, and allow their intuition to step forward - the results are simply staggering. To get your free audio CD by mail and receive the Academy's bi-weekly newsletters visit http://www.MaxCoachingAcademy.com 2010 Max Coaching Academy. All rights reserved. Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?Coaching-in-the-Eye-of-the-Storm--Developing-a-More-Intuitive-Approach-to-Executive-Coaching&id=4437650 Coaching in the Eye of the Storm - Developing a More Intuitive Approach to Executive Coaching

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And, now, a word from the sponsor…… >>>

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HRD Gateway Professional Certification Series

The ICF ACC Certified Coach Program
the 60-hour training program for the ICF ACC credential at Genting View Resort, Genting Highlands, Malaysia on 21 to 26 June, 2011

(approximately 2,344 SGD, 6,112,000 IDR, 55,640 THB, 38,300,000 VND) Program Normal cost at RM 6,400, inclusive of food and lodging
Program supported by

Complete the mandatory ICF ACSTH at affordable prices Program Early Bird cost at RM 5,600 per pax inclusive of hotel stay (twin sharing) and food

Objective

The objective of this ICF mandatory 60-hour residential program is to advance the art, science, and practice of professional coaching by offering a program that has been designed and delivered by competent coaching professionals, a program that is completely aligned to the International Coach Federation (ICF) competencies and code of ethics, and adheres to ICF international standards. It is designed to equip participants with the competencies to become Coaches, and to encourage them to seek the ACC (and later, PCC) credential. Those planning to become life coaches can also join this program.

Who should attend?
ICF ACC/PCC candidates, HR professionals, Managers, Consultants, Coaches, Therapists, Counselors, Academicians - just about anybody who needs to coach others

Training methodology
The training methodology will be interactive and will include facilitator presentation, group discussion, peer-coaching practice sessions, assessment quizzes, and self-paced reading. Since the focus of the course is to build coaching skills, participants will be encouraged to practice extensively and will receive peer and facilitator feedback. The primary delivery method is classroom interaction. Batch size is limited to ensure skills building opportunity for each person.

Language of Delivery
English

You will receive three certificates after the 60-hour ACSTH program

A Great Program at a Great Location

The beautiful Genting View Resort

Residential Program Contents - A Brief Overview
Module One: The Competent Coach (30 hours) - This course lays the foundation of the concepts and skills that coaches need as per ICF guidelines. It will establish what coaching is as compared to therapy or counseling, and managerial task direction. It uses the eleven ICF competencies to introduce the framework of the coaching process and the skills needed. The topics include: understanding coaching, establishing the coaching agreement, establishing trust and intimacy, building a coaching presence, active listening, powerful questioning, direct communication, creating awareness, designing actions, planning and goal setting, and managing progress and accountability. Upon completion of this module, participants will have: learned the ICF competency framework that is the foundation for the ACC / PCC level credential; practiced the skills and behaviours needed to put the framework in action in coaching conversations; and, will be able to start coaching their clients according to guidelines that will help them move towards the ACC / PCC credential. Module Two: The Coach Practitioner (30 hours) - This course builds on the foundation course by creating a deeper understanding of the organizational aspects of coaching and creating a culture of coaching. Some of the topics covered include: coaching models and tools, developing a coaching niche, workplace performance coaching, understanding human behaviour, positive psychology and coaching, setting up the coaching practice, managing culture and diversity, and the ICF credentialing process. At the end of this second module, participants will gain a better understanding of the field of coaching. They will learn how to adapt and apply their skills in an organizational context; they will practice and refine their coaching skills for a variety of situations and increasing complexity. They will complete the ICF requirements for coach specific training hours, thereby enabling them to enter the ACC credentialing process.

Lead Faculty
Dr. Ajay Nangalia PCC Ajay Nangalia is a founder and Managing Director of Global Coach Trust. He has 25 years of experience in sales & marketing, HR & OD consulting. Dr. Nangalia has a PhD in Organizational Leadership from Northcentral University (USA). His research theme is the impact of country and societal culture on management theory and practice. He earned an MS degree from Capella University (USA) in HPI and Training. Dr. Nangalia is credentialed as an International Coach Federation (ICF) PCC level coach. He is an assessor for the ICF for the ACC oral exam; and is part of the ICF international workgroup on credentialing and process improvements. Lina Nangalia PCC Lina Nangalia, a founder director of Global Coach Trust, brings over 22 years of experience in sales, systems, learning & development and HR at large organizations. She is an Economics graduate from St. Xavier’s College, Bombay and has a Master’s in Training & Development from Griffith University in Brisbane, Australia. She is currently pursuing her PhD in Organization Behavior from XLRI, Jamshedpur. She is credentialed by the International Coach Federation (ICF) as a PCC level coach. Lina coaches heads of business and functions in the areas of individual and team performance, managing relationships, work-life balance issues, and career development. Her areas of expertise and experience include leadership development, performance management, enhancing employee engagement, learning and development systems, and executive coaching.

The complete ICF ACC journey in a nutshell a. ACSTH: 60-hour mandatory ICF ACSTH training program in two modules: The Competent Coach (foundation level of 30 hours); The Coach Practitioner (intermediate level of 30 hours). Training delivered by ICF credentialed mentor coaches b. ICF dues: Candidates pay directly to ICF when they are ready to take the oral exam: membership fees (USD 200) + exam fee (USD 225) + additional fee (USD75) = total USD 500 c. 100-hour coaching: deliver 100 hours of actual coaching within one year of program; can take up to 3 years to complete. Minimum of 75 paid hours; minimum of 8 clients. d. Mentor coaching: 10-hour mentor coaching, including the 2 reference letters from qualified coaches. Coaching delivered by ICF credentialed mentor coaches. (Dr Ajay and Lina Nangalia can offer this coaching to ACC candidates at a special fee of RM 1,400; coaching via telephone, Skype, etc. It is suggested that you commence this mentor coaching when you have reached the 70th hour of your 100 hours of actual coaching requirement) e. Oral assessment: ICF will assign the examiner; the exam will be a telephonic one; it comprises of a live coaching session of 30 min that the candidate has to do. No written test or knowledge test. The above comprises the complete ACC requirement Want to work towards PCC? Attend another mandatory 62-hour program. Call/email us for info. Note: This information is correct as of production of this document
Questions regarding program fees, logistics, hotel stay, venue, etc., please contact: G K Lim at gk@gklim.com +6-03-61005992; +6-019-2268987, or Danniel Lim at Danniel@hrdgateway.com ; +6-03-23811060; +6-012-3020869 Questions regarding ICF certification guidelines, processes, and ICF fees may be directed to Dr. Ajay Nangalia at ajaynangalia@globalcoachtrust.com; +91 9845012972

Useful Links
The ICF Certification
All about earning an ICF credential http://www.coachfederation.org/research-education/icf-credentials/ The 219-page ICF Credentialing Policy Manual Version 7-30-09 http://www.coachfederation.org/includes/media/docs/Credentialing-Policy-Manual--For-Web-Site.pdf All about ACC http://www.coachfederation.org/research-education/icf-credentials/acc/ ICF Credential application form https://nnf.coachfederation.org/applications/credential/credential_Form.aspx Guide for online application http://www.coachfederation.org/includes/media/docs/ACC-PA.pdf Minimum skill requirements competency for ACC credentialing http://www.coachfederation.org/includes/media/docs/icfaccexampassagestandardswithchanges1.pdf Credential requirements http://www.coachfederation.org/includes/media/docs/Credentialing-Requirements-Chart-%289-2008%29.pdf Road to ICF Credentialing http://www.coachfederation.org/includes/media/docs/The-Road-to-Credentialing-Presentation1.pdf

The ICF Credentialed Trainers
About Dr Ajay… http://globalcoachtrust.webs.com/ Dr Ajay certified by ICF to conduct ACSTH http://www.coachfederation.org/research-education/coach-training-programs/tpss/ Dr Ajay’s accent http://www.4shared.com/audio/kx8uoV5R/Judges_-_Jepthah_6_March_2011.html

The Venue
Genting View Resort www.gentingview.com.my

Best suited for international participants
Very cost effective (especially with many budget airlines flying from your city to KL) Interact with others from other countries, Great hill resort and training venue

Program dates
21 to 26 June, 2011 8 to 13 November, 2011 10 to 15 April, 2012

Call / email us for 2012 and 2013 dates Dates subject to change

REGISTRATION FORM
Yes! Please register me for one of the two packages:

[ ] Package A

ACSTH: The 60-hour mandatory ICF ACSTH residential training program in two modules, at Genting View Resort, Genting Highlands, Malaysia, on 21 to 26 June, 2011 Investment: Early Bird: RM 5,600, inclusive of food and lodging (twin sharing) Normal RM 6,400, inclusive of food and lodging

[ ] Package B (complete package)

ACSTH: The 60-hour mandatory ICF ACSTH residential training program in two modules, at Genting View Resort, Genting Highlands, Malaysia, on 21 to 26 June, 2011 Mentor coaching: 10-hour mentor coaching, including the 2 reference letters from qualified coaches Investment: Early Bird: RM 7,000, inclusive of food and lodging (twin sharing) for the ACSTH Normal RM 7,800, inclusive of food and lodging

Register before 21 May 2011 for Early Bird discounts
Contact us for group discounts
Name:(Dr/Mr./Mrs./Ms): Full Address: Email: Tel: Mobile: If this is a corporate registration: Approving Manager: Title: Company/Organization: Address: Email: PAYMENT DETAILS: Tel: Email:

Please make cheque payable to HRD Gateway Sdn Bhd and mail to us, or bank payment into Account Name: HRD Gateway Sdn Bhd Bank Name: Malayan Banking Berhad, Wisma Sime Darby Branch, Kuala Lumpur Account No: 514299128474 Bank Key/Number: 2714299 Swift Code: MBBEMYKL
CANCELLATION: A service charge of RM 785 will be levied for cancellation of registrations. However, participant is welcome at no extra charge if you are unable to attend the program you have registered for. a substitute

Mailing address : HRD Gateway Sdn Bhd, A2-03-04, Kempas A2, Genting View Resort, 69000, Genting Highlands, Malaysia Tel.: +6-03-61005992; +6-03-23811060; +6-019-2268987 Email: kelly@gklim.com ; azura@hrdgateway.com, Website: www.gklim.com
Creative Consultant : Prof. (Dr.) Sudhi Ranjan Dey Pic source: 123rf.com