Page 1 of 5 

Covered Call – Buy Write Strategy 
By Matthew Brown 
Matthew Brown is an Authorized representative (Authorized Rep number 319961) of Halifax Investment 
Services Limited (AFSL 225973) 

The following document is an excerpt from the Covered Call article published on the FMR Analysts 
website. Click Here to go directly to the complete article. 

Article Contents: 
1.0 
2.0 
3.0 
4.0 
5.0 
6.0 
7.0 
8.0 
9.0 
10.0 
11.0 
12.0 
13.0 
14.0 
15.0 
16.0 
17.0 
18.0 
19.0 
20.0 
21.0 
22.0 
23.0 
24.0 
25.0 

Introduction .................................................................................................................... 2 
Strategy Outline .............................................................................................................. 2 
Terminology ........................................................................ Error! Bookmark not defined. 
Selling Options ................................................................................................................ 3 
Covered Call.................................................................................................................... 4 
Buy Write........................................................................................................................ 4 
Breakeven, Profits and Losses ............................................... Error! Bookmark not defined. 
Why Write a Covered Call Option?.......................................... Error! Bookmark not defined. 
Time Decay ......................................................................... Error! Bookmark not defined. 
Which option to write? (OTM, ITM, ATM) ................................. Error! Bookmark not defined. 
Volatility ............................................................................. Error! Bookmark not defined. 
Risks of writing a covered call................................................ Error! Bookmark not defined. 
Margins .............................................................................. Error! Bookmark not defined. 
Assignment/Exercise ............................................................ Error! Bookmark not defined. 
Covered Call/Buy Write guidelines.......................................... Error! Bookmark not defined. 
Analyzing for a Covered Call/Buy Write position ....................... Error! Bookmark not defined. 
Placing orders...................................................................... Error! Bookmark not defined. 
Exiting................................................................................ Error! Bookmark not defined. 
Roll­up/Roll­down/Roll­out .................................................... Error! Bookmark not defined. 
Covered Call/Buy Write don’ts ............................................... Error! Bookmark not defined. 
Trader Tips.......................................................................... Error! Bookmark not defined. 
Case Studies ....................................................................... Error! Bookmark not defined. 
Resources ....................................................................................................................... 5 
Books ............................................................................................................................. 5 
Disclaimer....................................................................................................................... 5

© Copyright FMRAnalysts, 2007.  All rights reserved. 

Page 2 of 5 

1.0  Introduction 
In the “Creating Income from Stock using Options” article, we introduced the concept of Writing Options 
with the strategy of Covered Calls, or the alternative strategy, the Buy Write. 
We will further explore these strategies throughout this document, analyzing and evaluating how to 
choose a stock, what option to write, and what action to take. 
The Covered Call, or Buy Write strategy, is one of the best option strategies for beginners to ease into 
using Options. Instead of buying and selling options on a regular basis, you can use your existing stock 
positions to create an additional income, or purchase stock and write an option against it. 
But before anyone begins writing calls against existing shares, or goes out and purchases shares to write 
options against, they should completely understand the pros and cons of the strategy. Knowing what 
action to take, how this will affect your position, and not panicking will make you a far more profitable 
investor. 

2.0  Strategy Outline 
Action: Purchasing stock and Selling (Writing) Call options 
Expectation: Stock/Market will be Neutral/Mildly Bullish 
Benefits: Produce additional income from Call premiums 
Profit: Capped by the strike price of the written Call option 
Loss: Limited to value of stock, but lower due to premium received for writing the Call option 
Breakeven: Strike price – premium received 
Time Outlook: Medium to long­term 

Before discussing the strategy, we must first understand the components of the strategy. There are 2 
actions required to hold a Covered Call/Buy Write position.
·
·

First, we either own stock or must purchase stock.
Secondly, we Sell an option against that stock. 

Majority of investors are familiar with the concept of owning stock, so we will not discuss this function 
here. However, selling (or writing) options is a concept that not many readers might be familiar with. Let’s 
discuss the concept of Selling Options.

© Copyright FMRAnalysts, 2007.  All rights reserved. 

Page 3 of 5 

4.0  Selling Options 
An Options contract is an agreement between 2 parties. 
For every option transaction, there is a Buyer (known as the Taker), and a Seller (known as the Writer). 
Takers will buy call options because they expect the underlying share price to rise. The option is cheaper 
than the stock, offering a Leveraged rate of return. 
Writers sell call options for one of two reasons: 1) to offer limited protection, and 2) to earn additional 
income. 

The function of selling an option is where an investor creates a contract and offers it for someone to buy. 
In this case, the contract is a Call option. Contracts are standardized, so the writer cannot choose the 
terms. The Option Clearing Corporation (OCC) is responsible for issuing and standardizing all US exchange 
traded options. 
The definition of a Call contract is:
·
·
·
·

The right to buy shares, at a set price, on or before a set date.
The Buyer (Taker) has the right to this contract (and therefore the right to purchase shares), 
whereas
The Writer (Seller) is obliged/committed to the contract (must sell shares to the Taker if 
Exercised)
For the right of this contract, the Buyer (Taker) pays the Writer (Seller) a premium. 

Example 
Investor A wants to buy MSFT shares. Investor B owns MSFT shares. Currently, the price of MSFT is 
trading at $35.00 per share. 
Investor A likes the price of $35, but does not have the money to purchase the shares right now. Investor 
A will have the money to purchase 100 shares in 3 months time, and so decides to purchase a MSFT 3­ 
month $35.00 Call option which is trading at $0.70 per share. 
Investor B owns MSFT shares and had purchased them at $25. Investor B is unsure if MSFT will continue 
to rise over the next 3­months, and decides to write (sell) the MSFT 3­month $35.00 Call Option to offer 
limited protection. 
The option contract is sold to Investor A for $0.70 per share. 
Investor A, who has paid (taken/bought) for the option contract, has the right, but not the obligation, to 
purchase the shares if he wishes to exercise the contract. Investor B must fulfil that contract if Exercised, 
selling 100 shares at $35. 
Investor A: has bought a contract to Buy 100 MSFT shares at $35 within 3­months. 
Investor B: must sell 100 MSFT shares at $35, if the call option is Exercised, but has received $0.70 per 
share.

© Copyright FMRAnalysts, 2007.  All rights reserved. 

Page 4 of 5 

For share owners, you can write a Call option, receive Premium (income) for the contract, and establish a 
sell price for the future. This lowers your average purchase price (due to the premium received), but locks 
you into a maximum sell price (in this example $35). 
Writing options carries risk. The Call option contract could be Exercised and you would need to offer up 
shares. If you did not own shares, you would have to purchase them at market price (this is known as 
Naked Writing and is high Risk), which could result in a greater loss than the premium received. 

If you require more information about how an option contract is used, we suggest reading the “Options 
Explained” article found on the FMR Analysts website: Click Here to go to the site. 

5.0  Covered Call 
The Covered Call strategy is simple. If you own stock, you can write Call options against them. 
A covered call is a strategy where the investor buys stock and then sells a call against it. By selling the 
call, you are giving the Taker (buyer) the right to buy your stock at a fixed price. It is referred to as 
“Covered” because the written call option is covered by you owning the stock. 
You receive Premium for writing this option, which is the main benefit of conducting the strategy. 
For example: 
You own 100 shares in MSFT company. You had purchased them at $25 per share. 
You write 1 x $25 Call option against MSFT, receiving $0.70 per share (there are 100 shares per contract) 
This means you have paid $25, but received $0.70. Therefore, your average purchase price (or breakeven 
level), is $24.30 per share. 

6.0  Buy Write 
The Buy Write strategy is exactly the same as a Covered Call position, except, you do not own the shares 
to start with. To enter into the strategy, you need to purchase the shares and write the option at the 
same time. 
The only difference between the Buy Write and the Covered Call is your evaluation of profit and breakeven 
levels. For the Buy Write, you calculate your profit and breakeven based on the current stock/option 
prices, while the Covered Call is evaluated based on the original purchase prices. 
For all purposes throughout this article, except where indicated, when referring to a Covered Call, we will 
also be referring to a Buy Write position. 

Traders Tip: 

As Covered Call/Buy Write option writers, we need to be 
Premium Hungry! Our goal is to write call options for 
“premium income”, managing risk by purchasing stock 
against the written call. But we must only be Premium 
Hungry on stocks that are fundamentally strong, and have a 
lower probability of falling in value.

© Copyright FMRAnalysts, 2007.  All rights reserved. 

Page 5 of 5 

23.0  Resources 
The information contained in this article portrays all the basic information you require to understand 
options. However, your understanding may not yet be completely clear. 
Most of the information you will need to completely understand options is available for free on the 
internet. FMR Analysts has researched the best resources for you to complete your learning of options. 

Chicago Board Options Exchange – Learning Centre 
Go straight to the exchange to learn about options. At the CBOE online Options Institute, you can: 
View self­guided online tutorials 
Conduct self­paced interactive online courses 
Watch live interactive educational webcasts, or 
Book to attend a live seminar. 
http://www.cboe.com/LearnCenter/default.aspx 

24.0  Books 
There are many books written on options, and how to understand them. The following are selections FMR 
Analysts recommends for the beginner: 
Options for Equity Investors 
Author: Wendy Newton 

The Secrets of Writing Options 
Author: Louise Bedford 

Options: A complete guide for Australian investors and traders 
Author: Guy Bower 

FMR Bookstore: http://fmranalysts.blogspot.com/2006/09/bookstore.html 

25.0  Disclaimer 
Trading involves risk of loss and may not be suitable for you. Past performance is no guarantee or reliable 
indication of future results. This advertisement is of the nature of general information only and must not 
in any way be construed or relied upon as legal, financial or professional advice. No consideration has 
been given or will be given to the individual investment objectives, financial situation or needs of any 
particular person. The decision to invest or trade and the method selected is a personal decision and 
involves an inherent level of risk, and you must undertake your own investigations and obtain your own 
advice regarding the suitability of this product for your circumstances. Please ensure you obtain and read 
the current offer  documentation prior to acquiring the products advertised herein, so you are fully 
informed regarding the key risks and costs associated with these products. 

Matthew Brown (author) is an Authorized representative (Authorized Rep number 319961) of Halifax 
Investment Services Limited (AFSL 225973)

© Copyright FMRAnalysts, 2007.  All rights reserved.