TS

INCH-POUND

DOE-STD-1090-99 March 1999 Superseding DOE-STD-1090-96 September 1996

DOE STANDARD HOISTING AND RIGGING (Formerly Hoisting and Rigging Manual)

U.S. Department of Energy Washington, D.C. 20585

AREA SAFT

DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited.

This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000.

DOE STANDARD HOISTING AND RIGGING (Formerly Hoisting and Rigging Manual)

Summary of Changes as of March 1999

U.S. Department of Energy Washington, D.C. 20585

AREA SAFT

DOE-STD-1090-99 Summary of Changes

INTENTIONALLY BLANK

DOE-STD-1090-99 Summary of Changes

Introduction
The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hoisting and Rigging Standard is intended as a reference document to be used by supervisors, line managers, safety personnel, equipment operators, and any other personnel responsible for safety of hoisting and rigging operations at DOE sites. The standard quotes verbatim or paraphrases (with minor editorial changes for consistency) the requirements of the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and the American National Standards Institute (ANSI). It also encompasses, under one cover, hoisting and rigging requirements, codes, standards, and regulations, eliminating the need to maintain extensive (and often incomplete) libraries of hoisting and rigging standards throughout DOE. As indicated in the History and Background section, the use of the imperative voice (as in “Never use discarded load chain for slings”) or the word “shall” denotes a mandatory action, whereas use of the word “should” denotes a recommended action in keeping with best management practices. From chapter to chapter, the reader may notice what appears to be excessive repetition. Such repetition, however, is by design, enabling the use of each chapter, if needed or convenient, as a stand-alone document. The standard occasionally goes beyond the minimum general industry standards established by OSHA and ANSI; and also delineates the more stringent requirements necessary to accomplish the extremely complex, diversified, critical, and oftentimes hazardous hoisting and rigging work found within the DOE complex. In doing so, it addresses the following items which are not covered in detail in the general industry standards: 1. Management responsibility and accountability 2. Operator/inspector training and qualification requirements 3. Definition of critical lifts and the additional requirements for making them 4. The need and responsibilities of a person-in-charge for critical lifts 5. The need and responsibilities of a designated leader for ordinary lifts 6. The definition and special requirements for preengineered production lifts 7. Special requirements for the testing, inspection, and maintenance of hoisting equipment in hostile environments 8. Nondestructive testing/nondestructive examination requirements for such items as hooks, welds, and spreader bars 9. Special requirements for inspection and load-testing of hoisting and rigging equipment/accessories 10. Hook latch requirements for cranes, slings, and rigging accessories 11. Design standards for such equipment as cranes, forklifts, and hooks 12. Operating practices for hoisting and rigging operations

Changes - 1

DOE-STD-1090-99 Summary of Changes 13. Rigging information and load tables 14. Good and bad rigging practices. Because the possibility of serious accidents resulting in personnel injury or death or significant property damage exists whenever hoisting and rigging take place, the requirements for these operations must be clearly defined and precautions ensured, including proper preplanning, extreme care, attention to detail, teamwork on the part of trained operators/riggers, and the use of equipment that is reliable, properly designed, inspected, and maintained. Although not mandatory at all DOE sites and locations, this standard has been used for many years by DOE and its contractors as a valuable resource for conducting hoisting and rigging safely and efficiently and as the standard against which to judge all hoisting and rigging programs. The full implementation of the requirements and recommendations of this standard will dramatically strengthen hoisting and rigging programs throughout the DOE complex and will significantly decrease the probability of serious accidents resulting in personnel injury or death or severe property damage. When organizations operating under nuclear energy programs are required to use DOE document NE F8-6T, those organizations shall use a combination of it and The DOE Hoisting and Rigging Standard. Where conflicts exist, this standard shall be given priority since it is being kept current and NE F8-6T has not been revised since 1985. To propose improvements to the standard, please use the copy of the form at the back. All requests or suggestions for improvement should be submitted to: Hoisting and Rigging Project Manager U.S. Department of Energy EH-51, 270 CC 19901 Germantown Road Germantown, MD 20874-1290

CHAPTER 1 TERMINOLOGY AND DEFINITIONS
CRANE: A machine used for lifting and lowering a load vertically and moving it horizontally and that has a hoisting mechanism as an integral part of it. CRANES, TYPES OF: Automatic Crane: A crane that, when activated, operates through a preset cycle or cycles. Cab-Operated Crane: A crane controlled by an operator in a cab located on the bridge or trolley. Cantilever Gantry Crane: A gantry or semigantry crane in which the bridge girders or trusses extend transversely beyond the crane runway on one or both sides. Floor-Operated Crane: A crane whose operation is controlled by use of a pendant in the hands of an operator on the floor or on an independent platform. Gantry Crane: A crane similar to an overhead crane, except that the bridge for carrying the trolley or Changes - 2

DOE-STD-1090-99 Summary of Changes trolleys is rigidly supported on two or more legs running on fixed rails or other runway. Jib Crane: A fixed crane with a vertical rotating member supported at the bottom (also at the top in some types) from which an arm extends to carry the hoist trolley. Jib cranes are most commonly mounted on a vertical column, supplied as part of the jib crane, or on existing structural members (e.g., a wall-mounted jib crane). Mobile Crane: For the purposes of this chapter, mobile cranes are defined as wheel-mounted cranes, truck cranes, and crawler cranes. Note: Figures 15-1 through 15-10 are located in Chapter 15 “Constructon Hoisting and Rigging Equipment Requirements”) o A wheel-mounted crane consists of a rotating structure with power plant, operating machinery, and boom, mounted on a base or platform equipped with axles and rubber-tired wheels for travel. The base is usually propelled by an engine in the superstructure, but it may be equipped with a separate engine controlled from the superstructure (see Figures 15-1, 15-3, 15-5, 15-6, 15-7, 15-9, and 15-10). A truck-mounted crane consists of a rotating superstructure with power plant that operates machinery and boom, mounted on an automotive truck equipped with a power plant for travel. Commercial truck-mounted cranes are included in this category (see Figures 15-3, 15-7, 15-9, and 15-10). A crawler crane consists of a rotating superstructure with power plant, operating machinery and boom, mounted on a base equipped with crawler treads for travel (see Figures 15-2 and 15-8).

o

o

Overhead Traveling Crane: A crane with a movable bridge carrying a movable or fixed hoisting mechanism and traveling on an overhead fixed-runway structure. Power-Operated Crane: A crane whose mechanism is driven by electricity, air, hydraulics, or internal combustion. Pulpit-Operated Crane: A crane operated from a fixed operator station that is not attached to the crane. Remote-Operated Crane: A crane controlled by an operator not in a pulpit or a cab attached to the crane, by any method other than pendant or rope control (e.g., radio-controlled crane). Semigantry Crane: A gantry crane with one end of the bridge rigidly supported on one or more legs that run on a fixed rail or runway, the other end of the bridge being supported by a truck running on an elevated rail or runway. Wall-Mounted Crane: A crane having a jib, with or without a trolley, supported from a side wall or line of columns of a building. It is a traveling-type crane and operates on a runway attached to the side wall or line of columns. Wall-Mounted Jib Crane: See Cranes, Types Of, Jib Crane.

Changes - 3

DOE-STD-1090-99 Summary of Changes CRITICAL DIAMETER: Diameter of the smallest bend for a given wire rope that permits the wires and strands to adjust themselves by relative movement while remaining in their normal positions. PRECISION LOAD POSITIONING DEVICES: A rigging accessory designed specifically to precisely raise and lower a load through a limited range of lifting/lowering motion (stroke). Standards units typically have 12 in. (30 cm) stroke and can position a load within 0.001 in. (0.025 mm). These devices commonly include a built-in load scale and in such cases may also serve as a load-indicating device.

CHAPTER 2 CRITICAL LIFTS
2.2 Critical-Lift Requirements

f. The procedure and rigging sketches shall be reviewed and approved by the responsible manager (or designee) and the responsible oversite organization (such as safety, quality assurance, or quality control) before the lift is made. g. A pre-lift meeting involving participating personnel shall be conducted prior to making a critical lift. The critical lift plan/procedure shall be reviewed and questions shall be resolved. h. If required by the critical lift procedure, a practice lift shall be done before the critical lift. Conditions for a practice lift should closely simulate actual conditions involving: weight, rigging selection and configuration, load movement path, and other relevant factors. Practice lifts should be done by the same crew, using the same lifting equipment.

CHAPTER 4 LIFTING PERSONNEL
4.1 General

a. These special procedures shall be followed when lifting personnel: 23. After the personnel platform is positioned, all brakes and locks on the lift crane shall be set before personnel perform any work. 24. No lifts shall be made on another of the crane’s load lines while personnel are suspended on a platform.

CHAPTER 6 PERSONNEL QUALIFICATIONS AND TRAINING
6.3.4 Forklift Truck Operators
a. Only qualified and authorized operators shall be permitted to operate powered forklift trucks. Operator trainees may operate powered forklift trucks under the direct supervision of a qualified operator or trainer and only where such operations does not endanger the trainee or other employees. Changes - 4

3. Changes . 5.DOE-STD-1090-99 Summary of Changes b. Engine or motor operation. Operating limitations. and precautions for the type of forklift truck the operator will be authorized to operate. 9. What they do. 6. Visibility. 12. 4. 1. Fork and attachment adaptation. Practical training (demonstrations performed by the trainer and practical exercises performed by the trainee). The initial training of operators shall include: 1. interactive computer learning. Where they are located. A combination of formal instruction (e. 13. operation.5 . and witnessing a demonstration of the operator's skills. Forklift truck inspections and maintenance that the operator will be required to perform. 8. 10. How they work. iii. The following checklist contains basic factors with which a forklift truck operator should be familiar.. and use limitations. Forklift truck controls and instrumentation: i. Traveling with and without a load. This checklist must be tailored to suit actual conditions. Differences between the forklift truck and the automobile. Forklift truck stability and load dynamics. video tape. Operating instruction.g. lecture. Steering and maneuvering. or precautions listed in the operator’s manual for the type of forklift truck that the employee is being trained to operate. 2. 11. discussion. warning. 7. written material). ii. c. warnings. 3. Forklift truck capacity and load weight determination. 2. Any other operating instructions. including restrictions due to loading. 14. Evaluation of the operator’s performance in the workplace including results of written and oral evaluation. Refueling and/or charging and recharging of batteries.

16. d. Parts found to be defective during any inspection or nondestructive examination shall be replaced or repaired as directed by the responsible line manager or that person's designated representative. 5. Changes . There shall be no apparent damage. 20. The operator has been involved in an accident or near-miss incident. 2. All safety devices. Refresher training in relevant topics shall be provided to the operator when: 1. A condition in the workplace changes in a manner that could affect the safe operation of the forklift truck. and other operating parts of the equipment shall be checked during each inspection and shall be in good working order. Emergency procedures. The operator is assigned to drive a different type of forklift truck. CHAPTER 7 OVERHEAD AND GANTRY CRANES 7. 24. or deformation of any load-bearing part of the equipment. 4. Lifting personnel. Terminology and definitions. The operator has been observed to operate the forklift truck in an unsafe manner.DOE-STD-1090-99 Summary of Changes 15. 21.6 . Brakes shall work satisfactorily and load brakes shall be designed to hold any load up to at least 125 percent of the rated stable capacity of the equipment without slipping or overheating. Lessons learned. 23. Hand signals. excessive wear. Modifications. 18. 25. Critical lifts.1 General a. Records and documents. 17. 3. Operating practices. 22. The operator has received an evaluation that reveals that the operator is not operating the forklift truck safely. 19. controls. Applicable standards and regulations. Fire protection. load indicators.2.

7.2 Rated Load Test a. Yearly--365 days.1 Operational Tests a. Daily--24 hours. Lifting and lowering. c. Semi-annually--184 days. or routine maintenance requiring only operational testing. modified. 4. all new.3.3. 2. modified. 7. Prior to initial use. repaired. Trolley travel. extensively repaired. Bridge travel. or modified cranes shall be tested by a designated person to ensure compliance with this chapter. Limit switches/devices. limiting. or modification as determined by a qualified person. 3. 4. The replacement of rope is excluded from this requirement. reinstalled. Violations of inspection periods may be granted on a case by case basis. all new or reinstalled cranes and cranes in which the load sustaining parts have been altered. 6. including the following functions: 1. Weekly--7 days. 7. reinstalled. However. provided there is a preestablished site specific policy. A written report shall be furnished by the inspector confirming the load rating of the crane. 2.3 Initial Inspection Prior to their initial use. Locking. A designated or authorized person shall determine if repairs made to a crane are extensive. Inspections of repaired and modified cranes may be limited to the provisions affected by the alteration. or whose rated capacities have been affected shall be tested by or under the direction of a qualified inspector. or extensively repaired cranes shall be inspected by a qualified inspector to ensure compliance with applicable provisions of this chapter.7 . Frequency notation as used in dates for frequent and periodic inspections should be defined as follows: 1. 5. if provided. or replaced. Dated and signed inspection reports shall be kept on file and shall be readily available. Prior to initial use. Quarterly--92 days. 3. requiring a rated load test. 5. all new.DOE-STD-1090-99 Summary of Changes b. repair.2. and indicating devices. The load rating should Changes . Monthly--31 days. a functional test of the crane under a normal operating load should be made prior to putting the crane back in service.

repaired. Extensively repaired or modified cranes shall be tested in accordance with paragraph 7. If wire rope clips or wedge socket end connection are installed during wire rope installation: 1. g. However. Test loads shall not be less than 100% or more than 125 percent of the rated capacity.3. an operational test of the crane shall be made in accordance with para. Operational testing of altered.3.1 prior to putting the crane back in service.2. If a wedge socket is used. The replacement of load chain and rope is specifically excluded from this requirement. then verify that the rope is properly seated. then check and retighten nuts to the wire rope clip or wire rope manufacturer’s recommended torque value. Personnel shall be kept clear of the test load while it is suspended.DOE-STD-1090-99 Summary of Changes not be more than 80 percent of the maximum load sustained during the test. unless otherwise recommended by the manufacturer or a qualified person. Lower the test load. shall be done insofar as interfering equipment/structures permit and in accordance with recommendations from the manufacturer or a responsible engineering organization. or modified cranes whose load sustaining parts or rated capacities have not been affected may be limited to the functions affected by the alteration. The transporting of test loads as required by paragraphs 7. b. If wire rope clips are used. A written report confirming the rated load testing of the crane shall be furnished by the inspector. 2. test loads should not be carried over critical systems or components. Test weights shall be accurate to within -5 percent.a above. however. or modification as determined by a qualified person. 3. repair.3.1. i. d. stopping by the brakes.1. and in the other direction with the trolley as close to the extreme left-hand end of the crane as practical. f.a. The crane should be cycled several times with a load equal to or greater than the maximum operational load.2.3. 3. Transport the test load by means of the trolley for the full length of the bridge.a or 7. c. 7.b above insofar as interfering equipment/structures permit and in accordance with recommendations from the manufacturer or a responsible engineering organization. 4.8 . +0 percent of stipulated values. in one direction with the trolley as close to the extreme right-hand end of the crane as practical. 2. Hoist the test load a sufficient distance to ensure that the load is supported by the crane and held by the hoist brakes. Testing shall consist of the following operations as minimum requirements: 1. Transport the test load by means of the bridge for the full length of the runway. e. h. normally 100% of the rated capacity. b. The rated load test for new cranes shall consist of the following operations as minimum requirements: c. Changes .

Load test crane at 125% of rated capacity. nick. b. 4. d. + 0% of stipulated values. b. or modified cranes prior to initial use. Daily--24 hours. Heat affected zones of flame cut wire rope shall not be allowed to bear load.9 . 3. or induce sharp bends in it.1 General a. Frequency notation as used in dates for frequent and periodic inspections should be defined as follows: 1. Test weights shall be accurate to -5%. Semi-annually--184 days. extensively repaired. Quarterly--92 days.2. c. avoid dragging the rope in dirt or around objects that will scrape. During installation. Flame-cutting wire rope is prohibited. crush. Monthly--31 days. 6. Yearly--365 days. Load test shall be performed on all new. Violations of inspection periods may be granted on a case by case basis. EXHIBIT I (continued) Page 2 of 4 BRIDGE CRANE AND FOLLOW UP CHECKS NOTES: 1. Changes . In no case shall the load test exceed 125% of rated capacity. 4. 2. Craftsmen shall initial all steps completed below. Qualified inspector shall verify all steps below.4. use some method to prevent unlaying the strands. Before cutting rope. 2. 3. provided there is a preestablished site specific policy. Store rope to prevent damage or deterioration. CHAPTER 8 HOIST 8.DOE-STD-1090-99 Summary of Changes 7. Unreel or uncoil rope as recommended by the rope manufacturer and with care to avoid kinking or inducing a twist. Weekly--7 days.2 Wire-Rope Maintenance Personnel using wire rope shall ensure proper care by doing the following: a. 5.

replaced. a functional test of the hoist should be made in accordance with Section 8. with a test load of at least 125 percent of the rated load. the user shall be notified and the test shall be accomplished at another location or job site by a qualified inspector or under the direction of that inspector. A designated or authorized person shall determine if repairs made to a hoist are extensive.3. The applied test load shall not be less than 100 percent of the rated capacity of the hoist or more than 125 percent of the rated capacity of the hoist.3.or Air-Powered Hoists”). unless otherwise recommended by the manufacturer or a qualified person.” prior to putting the hoist back in service. and b.1.1. If the manufacturer cannot test the hoist. b. or modified hoists shall be inspected by a qualified inspector to ensure compliance with the applicable provisions of ASME B30.2 Hand-Chain-Operated or Manual-Lever-Operated Hoists a.3.3. All tests shall be done by a qualified inspector or under the direction of that inspector as detailed in the following paragraphs. Hoists in which load suspension parts have been modified. b. and require a rated load test. B30. 8. 8. A designated or authorized person shall determine if repairs made to a hoist are extensive and require a rated load test or are routine maintenance and require only an operational test.1 Electric.2.3.2 Initial Inspection Prior to their initial use. The manufacturer shall dynamically test new hoists as specified in Section 8.1.DOE-STD-1090-99 Summary of Changes 8. replaced. a functional test of the hoist under a normal operating load should be made in accordance with 8..2 or 8. If the manufacturer cannot test the hoist.2.1 (“Electric.3.1. however. or extensively repaired as specified in Section 8.3. The replacement of load chain and rope is specifically excluded from this hoist test.3 (“Hand-Chain-Operated Hoists” and Changes . or routine maintenance and require only an operational test.3.21.3.11. extensively repaired. A qualified inspector shall test hoists in which load suspension parts have been modified. or extensively repaired shall be tested statically or dynamically by or under the direction of a qualified inspector.2 Proof-Load Test Test anchorages or suspensions shall be approved by a qualified person. by or under the direction of a qualified inspector. the user shall be notified and the test shall be accomplished at another location or job site by a qualified inspector or under the direction of that inspector.2. and a record of the test should be kept..1. and b.16. and a record of the test should be made. The applied test load shall not be less than 100 percent of the rated capacity of the hoist. 8.or Air-Powered Hoists a. All modified or extensively repaired hoists or hoists that have not been used within the preceding 12 months shall be tested before being placed in service.1 Operational Tests All new hoists shall be tested by the hoist manufacturer. or more than 125 percent of the rated capacity of the hoist unless otherwise recommended by the manufacturer or a qualified person. and B30. Dated and signed inspection records shall be kept on file and shall be readily available. The manufacturer shall dynamically test new hoists with a test load of at least 125 percent of the rated capacity. 8.1. however. all new. The replacement of load chain is specifically excluded from this hoist load test.10 . steps a. “Operational Tests. steps a.

4.2. abnormal vibration. b. Changes .” respectively). and other operating parts of the equipment shall be checked during each inspection and shall be in good working order. Violations of inspection periods may be granted on a case by case basis. binding. Yearly--365 days. 2. provided there is a preestablished site specific policy. Weekly--7 days. Semi-annually--184 days. Under specific conditions. Quarterly--92 days. Equipment shall operate with a smooth. gross shimmy. such as during crane assembly. Cranes shall not be operated without the ballast or counterweight being in place as specified by the crane manufacturer. 9. CHAPTER 9 MOBILE CRANES 9. There shall be no apparent damage. b. controls. 5. Store rope to prevent damage or deterioration. excessive wear. the crane manufacturer’s recommendations for the amount of ballast or counterweight shall be adhered to. All safety devices. etc. Unreel or uncoil rope as recommended by the rope manufacturer and with care to avoid kinking or inducing a twist. regular motion without any hesitation.1. or deformation of any load-bearing part of the equipment. Ballast or counterweight as specified by the manufacturer shall not be exceeded.1 General a. b. 4. Daily--24 hours. 9. boom angle and radius indicators. Monthly--31 days. 6. c. 3. prior to putting the hoist back in service. unusual boom configurations.3 Wire-Rope Maintenance Personnel using wire rope shall ensure proper care by doing the following: a.7 Counterweight a. or irregularity.DOE-STD-1090-99 Summary of Changes “Manually Lever-Operated Hoists. load indicators. Frequency notations as used in dates for frequent and periodic inspections should be defined as follows: 1.11 .

Ensure that the load is attached to the load-block hook by means of slings or other approved devices. waste. In the absence of crane manufacturer’s instructions regarding maximum wind speeds for operation. Avoid two-blocking. Keep boom high enough to swing clear of cab. except as approved by the crane manufacturer. Do not wrap the hoist rope around the load.. crush. be sure to play out the hoist line when extending and spool in the hoist line when retracting. no loads shall be lifted over the front area. extra fuses.DOE-STD-1090-99 Summary of Changes c. the boom-hoist pawl or other positive locking device shall be engaged. Take care to make certain that the sling clears all obstacles. d. When a crane is to be operated at a fixed radius. s.5. d. v. w. y. x. z. On truck-mounted cranes. shape and weight of the load can be safely lifted. Changes . When lowering heavy loads. 9. avoid dragging the rope in the dirt or around objects which will scrape.1 Conduct of Operator r.5. On hydraulically telescoping booms. Tools. Crane cabs. caused when the hook block makes contact with boom-point sheaves. Use a safety pawl on the boom-hoist drum when not lowering. t. Use power lowering when lowering loads. Ensure that the hoist rope is free from kinks or twists. 9. Before cutting a rope. u. operations undertaken at wind speeds in excess of 25 mph should be evaluated by a qualified person to determine if the size. oil cans. nick. Lock carrier air brakes ON when operating. and shall not be permitted to lie loose in or about the cab. c.12 . Heat-affected zones of flame cut wire rope shall not be allowed to bear load. necessary clothing and personal belongings shall not interfere with access or operations. place seizing on each side of the place where the rope is to be cut use some method to prevent unlaying the strands. A continuing pull on the hoist lines can break the rope or pull the boom back over the cab on some types of booms.7 Attaching the Load a. Flame-cutting wire rope is prohibited. Ensure the load is well secured and properly balanced in the sling or lifting device before it is lifted more than a few inches. or induce sharp bends in it. and other necessary articles shall be stored in the tool box. keep the hoist brake as reserve. During installation. b. Watch out for the carrier-cab on truck-mounted units when swinging the boom. and check the pressure of the air brakes frequently.

use some method to prevent unlaying of the strands. j. Unreel or uncoil rope as recommended by the rope manufacturer or a qualified person and with care to avoid kinking or inducing a twist.6 “Safety Standard for Rough Terrain Forklift Trucks” are incorporated. unless required to do so by an approved emergency procedure. guidelines for ensuring safety of the work shall be established through consultation with the appropriate safety organization. Do not leave your position at the controls while the load is suspended.” g.2 Proof-Testing a.5.8 Moving the Load e.2. f. 11.3.1 “Safety Standard for Low Lift and High Lift Trucks” and B56.13 . CHAPTER 11 WIRE ROPE AND SLINGS 11. Flame-cutting wire rope is Changes . Work on suspended loads is prohibited under normal conditions. or traveling shall be done while anyone is on the load or hook. the operator shall hold the drum from rotating in the lowering direction by activating the positive controllable means of the operator’s station. Do not lower the load below the point where less than two full wraps of rope remain on the hoist drum. If the load must remain suspended for any considerable length of time. All other sling assemblies shall be proof. “Lifting Personnel. Before cutting a rope. swinging.DOE-STD-1090-99 Summary of Changes 9. CHAPTER 10 FORKLIFT TRUCKS Chapter 10 was totally re-written to ensure all applicable requirements of 29 CFR 1910. Test the brakes each time a load approaching the rated capacity is handled by raising the load a few inches and applying the brakes. c.” ASME B56. except as noted in Chapter 4.2. i.178 “Powered Industrial Trucks. When the responsible manager decides that it is necessary to work on a suspended load. No hoisting. lowering. k. Store rope to prevent damage or deterioration.5 Wire-Rope Maintenance Personnel using wire rope shall ensure proper care by doing the following: a. All swaged socket and poured socket sling assemblies shall be certified as having been proof-tested. b.tested when specified by the purchaser. Suspended loads that must be worked on shall be secured against unwanted movement. Avoid carrying loads over people. h.

Note the effect of very low hook height and wide leg spreads. condition of chain and other components. 11. CHAPTER 12 RIGGING ACCESSORIES 12. Eyebolts permanently installed on engineered equipment are acceptable for their intended use so long as they pass normal visual inspection before use.2.3. Ordinary Lifts 11. Avoid handling hot material with wire-rope slings. Table 11-10 shows safe loads in pounds per leg which can be carried by various chain-sling arrangements. Ensure that all personnel stand clear of the suspended load. oblong links. The safe-load level of any chain sling is a function of three basic factors: size and number of legs.4 Eyebolts a. In some cases the intended use is obvious to an experienced craftsman in other cases engineering review of vendor information may be necessary. Use protector pads or blocking at sharp corners. 15. welded or mechanical coupling links and other attachments shall have a rated capacity at least equal to that of the alloy steel chain with which they are used or the sling shall not be used in excess of the rated capacity of the weakest component. 18. Do not use damaged slings. This section specifies requirements for eyebolts that are used as rigging hardware during normal hoisting and rigging activities. and sling angle between legs and horizontal. Heat-affected zones of flame cut wire rope shall not be allowed to bear load. 12. k. and they may not meet all requirements specified for rigging hardware. Eyebolts designed for and permanently installed on existing engineered equipment are considered part of the engineered equipment.3 Alloy Steel-Chain Slings. ensure that the load is balanced to prevent slippage. Ensure that the weight of the load is within the rated capacity of the sling. Attachments: Hooks. 11.3. l. When questions arise regarding the use of Changes . 13. In a basket hitch.14 . CAUTION: Eyebolts installed by the manufacturer to lift only parts of the engineered equipment are not suitable for lifting the completed piece of equipment.DOE-STD-1090-99 Summary of Changes prohibited. pear shaped links. 17. Avoid shock loading. 16. Keep hands and fingers out of the area between the sling and the load. It is important to know how the manufacturer or engineered equipment intends permanently installed eyebolts to be used. rings.3 Operations a. 14.

all new. b. stamped.4 Frequent Inspection a. maintained. 12.2. confirming the load rating. Eyebolt marking: 1. or inscribed into each eyebolt by the manufacturer or the owner. Eyebolts shall have a minimum design factor of 5:1. CHAPTER 13 LOAD HOOKS 13. Operation at heavy service coupled with abnormal operating conditions. Normal service—monthly. A precision load positioning device in the load path shall have a design factor of no less than 5:1.15 . Prior to initial use. and altered precision load positioning devices shall be load tested.. and a written report shall be furnished. b. based on ultimate strength of the device’s load bearing components. If the load test is not performed by the manufacturer. 2. Eyebolts used for hoisting shall be fabricated from forged carbon or alloy steel. (i.DOE-STD-1090-99 Summary of Changes manufactured-installed eyebolts. A permanently attached metal tag bearing the same information may also be used. Carbon Steel Eyebolts shall have the manufacturer’s name or identification marked forged in raised characters on the surface of the eyebolt. A precision load positioner shall be operated. Operation at less than 85 percent of rated capacity except for isolated instances. repaired. it shall be done under the direction of a designated or authorized person in strict compliance with the manufacturer’s instructions. 2. the equipment custodian or cognizant engineer shall be consulted. corrosive atmospheres. c. calibrated and tested in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions.) Changes . Special attention should be paid to the manufacturer’s instructions concerning testing of devices equipped with load gages as they may be damaged during the load test. Operators or other designated personnel shall visually inspect the hook at the following intervals (records are not required) : 1. c.9 Precision Load Positioners a. Heavy service—weekly to monthly.e. Alloy Steel Eyebolts shall have the symbol “A” (denoting alloy steel) and the manufacturer’s name or identification mark forged in raised characters on the surface of the eyebolt. d.. 3. etc. Severe service—daily to weekly. Operation at 85 to 100 percent of rated capacity as a regular specified procedure. extreme temperatures. The vertical safe-working load shall be forged.

2 Qualified Operators of Forklift Trucks a. Modified or repaired lifting devices shall be tested before initial use to ensure compliance with the requirements of this section (test reports kept on file).000 Pounds (4.”] 14.20.000 lb or more that are used for radioactive materials must be tested in accordance with ANSI N14. Vacuum lifting devices.000 lb or more that are used for radioactive materials are may be governed by ANSI N14.000 lb or more that are used for radioactive materials may be governed by ANSI N14. a. Structural and mechanical lifting devices. Remote-operated magnets.”] a.000 Pounds (4.6 [“Standard for Special Lifting Devices for Shipping Containers Weighing 10.500 kg) or More for Nuclear Materials. 3.2. such as spreader bars.16 . 2. Below-the-hook lifting devices are arranged in the following groups because of the diversity of types: 1.6. Changes . 4. lifting yokes. 14. Close-proximity-operated magnets.3.1 General a. Special lifting devices for shipping containers weighing 10. Testing shall include the following: CHAPTER 15 CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT HOISTING & RIGGING REQUIREMENTS 15.6 Testing 14.6 [“Standard for Special Lifting Devices for Shipping Containers Weighing 10.6.DOE-STD-1090-99 Summary of Changes CHAPTER 14 BELOW-THE-HOOK LIFTING DEVICES This chapter provides the requirements for below-the-hook lifting devices used in hoisting and rigging.” NOTE: Special lifting devices for shipping containers weighing 10. Physical qualifications shall be based on specific job requirements. This section implements the requirements of ASME B30. and lift fixtures.2.500 kg) or More for Nuclear Materials.1 Operational Test NOTE: Special lifting devices for shipping containers weighing 10. “Below-the-Hook Lifting Devices.

d. 7. 4. Fork and attachment adaptation. Operators shall be required by the employer to pass a practical operating skill evaluation. Visibility. Changes . including restrictions due to loading. Engine or motor operation. lecture. 9. A combination of formal instruction (e. 6. Operator trainees may operate powered forklift trucks under the direct supervision of a qualified operator or trainer and only where such operations does not endanger the trainee or other employees. Operating instruction. 8. Forklift truck capacity and load weight determination. Forklift truck controls and instrumentation: i.17 . Evaluation of the operator’s performance in the workplace including results of written and oral evaluation. Qualification shall be limited to the type of forklift for which the operator is being evaluated. 10.DOE-STD-1090-99 Summary of Changes b. 2. and precautions for the type of forklift truck the operator will be authorized to operate. Differences between the forklift truck and the automobile. Forklift truck stability and load dynamics. 3. The initial training of operators shall include: 1. 5. video tape. and use limitations.g. operation. The actual or simulated operation shall enable operators to demonstrate basic knowledge and skills at a level that ensures the safety of personnel and equipment. written material). 3. iii. What they do. warnings. 1. Only qualified and authorized operators shall be permitted to operate powered forklift trucks. discussion. Practical training (demonstrations performed by the trainer and practical exercises performed by the trainee).. Forklift truck inspections and maintenance that the operator will be required to perform. This checklist must be tailored to suit actual conditions. e. ii. interactive computer learning. and witnessing a demonstration of the operator's skills. 2. How they work. c. f. The following checklist contains basic factors with which a forklift truck operator should be familiar. Steering and maneuvering. Where they are located.

repair. Any other operating instructions. The operator is assigned to drive a different type of forklift truck. No repairs.4 Forklift Trucks— Inspection a. Operating limitations. Equipment with deficiencies that may affect the safety of the operation shall not be allowed to operate at DOE installations. or precautions listed in the operator’s manual for the type of forklift truck that the employee is being trained to operate. or additions that affect the capacity or safe operation of the equipment shall be made by the contractor without the manufacturer's written approval. consult the manufacturer's recommendations. Refueling and/or charging and recharging of batteries. and adjust forklift trucks. these services shall be preformed in accordance with manufacturer's specifications. 13.4. 4.4. 8.18 . modifications.DOE-STD-1090-99 Summary of Changes 11. Prior to initial use. or repaired forklifts shall be inspected by a qualified inspector to ensure compliance with the provisions of this section. warning. Load-bearing components shall be examined for deformation and loadbearing welds shall be visually examined for cracks. Dated and signed records shall be kept on file. g. maintain. Mechanical or hydraulic components shall be inspected and maintained in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions. and lubrication program shall be followed. 5. 15.1 General c. Where manufacturer’s specifications are not available. c. modified. 9. Attachments shall be included in a scheduled maintenance/inspection program. The operator has been involved in an accident or near-miss incident. 2. The operator has been observed to operate the forklift truck in an unsafe manner. Inspection steps shall be tailored for the attachment. Refresher training in relevant topics shall be provided to the operator when: 1. the limitations assigned to the equipment shall be based on the determinations of a qualified engineer. Changes . 3. Fork inspection shall be carried out by a qualified inspector with the aim of detecting any damage. all new. b. maintenance. Attachments shall be inspected not less than annually and the inspection should be documented. The operator has received an evaluation that reveals that the operator is not operating the forklift truck safely. 15. Items listed in the following paragraphs shall be regularly inspected. A scheduled planned inspection. A condition in the workplace changes in a manner that could affect the safe operation of the forklift truck. Only trained and authorized personnel shall be permitted to inspect. 12. 10.

g. or other condition that might impair safe use. A fork that shows any of the following defects shall be withdrawn from service. and shall not be returned to service until it is satisfactorily repaired by the fork manufacturer or an expert of equal competence.A thorough visual examination for cracks and. Forklift trucks shall be load tested by or under the direction of a qualified person and in accordance with the manufacturer's recommendations. fork tine inspections shall be done in accordance with manufacturers requirements. non-destructive crack detection. the fork shall be withdrawn from service until satisfactory repairs are made. other than repair or replacement of positioning locks or marking. Fork Tine Inspection . Positioning Lock . Load tests shall be performed after major repair or modification to components that affect the load-carrying ability of the truck. e. Section 7. which shall correspond to 2. Fork Marking .5 times the rated capacity marked on the fork. The manufacturer should be consulted if questions arise as to whether a load test is appropriate.19 . with special attention to the heel and to the welds that attach the mounting components to the fork blank. iii. h.25. the support face of the top hook and the retaining faces of both hooks shall be checked for wear. If any fault is found. Changes . A load test shall not be conducted in locations such that the lift meets the definition of critical lift in Section 15.4. f. "Forks. which lists loading and method of test for forks.5 Forklift Trucks—Testing Forklift truck load tests are not routinely required. ii. Fork Hooks Wear ." Item 3. and other local deformations.When fork hooks are provided. deformation. b. Fork inspection shall include: i. Test weights shall be accurate to within -5 percent. c. if considered necessary. Load-test records shall be maintained and shall be made available for examination by the construction management contractor.When fork marking is not clearly legible. A fork that has undergone repair. crushing. d.Examination for straightness of blade and shank. For these reasons.Confirm that the Positioning Lock (when provided). v. Inspection for cracks shall include any mounting mechanisms of the fork blank to the fork carrier. Forks shall not be returned to service if surface cracks are detected.2. it shall be renewed. a. Difference in height of fork tips may vary from manufacturer to manufacturer and with tine length. +0 percent of stipulated values.1. fork angle (upper face of blade to load face of the shank).DOE-STD-1090-99 Summary of Changes failure. shall be subject to a load test as described in ASME B56. Marking shall be renewed per instructions from the original fork supplier. Load tests shall not be conducted until verification that inspection and maintenance is up to date. except for the test load. is in good repair and in correct working order. 15. iv. fork blade and shank wear. Surface Cracks .

and any other material-handling devices (slings. Make only vertical lifts. heavy loads in strong winds.DOE-STD-1090-99 Summary of Changes i. c. level ground.20 . Outriggers shall be fully extended and lowered so that all wheels are clear of the ground. Avoid rapid changes in velocity while hoisting. or other manufacturer’s data serves as capacity verification. Tackle assemblies. The tackle shall be proof-tested prior to making a critical lift if proof-testing cannot be verified. wind direction. 7. Remember that the radius is measured from center of rotation. operations undertaken at wind speeds in excess of 25 mph should be evaluated by a qualified person to determine if the size.4.) from the gross capacity of the crane to determine if the load can be lifted safely. Know the rated capacity of the crane. In the absence of crane manufacturer’s instructions regarding maximum wind speeds for operation. b. 3. handling fixtures. or lowering the load. shape and weight of the load can be safely lifted. Subtract the weight of hooks. and rigging accessories for critical-lift service shall have an initial proof-load test of 2 times the rated capacity. 4. these can cause overloads when operating at or near the crane's capacity. boom angle. bulkiness of the load. Load tests are not routinely required since a catalog cut. Load capacity of an attachment shall be verified by the manufacturer or by a load test at 100 % capacity that is performed onsite. Test loads shall be accurate to within -5 percent. 2. unless otherwise specified on the manufacturer load charts for the crane. “on rubber” load charts shall be used. Always use the shortest boom possible. Follow these suggestions to avoid structural failure or tipping: 1. Changes . swinging. +0 percent of stipulated values.9 Rigging Accessories Testing a. blocks. Never use signs of tipping to determine if a load is within a crane's capacity. 2. and stopping loads. etc. and observe these precautions with any boom length: 1. Otherwise. Load chart ratings are based on operating the machine on firm. not from the boom foot pins. Operating by the “seat of the pants” is an unacceptable practice. A safe lift depends on boom length. Tackle assemblies. 15. Never pull the load sideways.2 Mobile Cranes/Boom Trucks a. and rigging accessories that have been modified or extensively repaired shall be proof-tested again to 2 times the rated capacity prior to making a critical lift. Wind loading can be critical depending on boom length. and wind velocity. and working radius. Keep speed slow in lifting. 15. b. Always operate within the rated capacity of the machine.5. boom angle. shackles. spreader bars. c. lowering. handling fixtures. 5. 6. user’s manual. decals on attachment. Do not lift large. Know the radius of the load.

e. 15.7 Lifting Personnel k.” which is caused when the hook block collides with boom-point sheaves.6 Critical Lifts f. be sure to play out the hoist rope when extending and reel in the hoist rope when retracting. These special procedures shall be followed when lifting personnel: Changes . h. Attach a tag line to the load to control the swing. the crane manufacturer’s recommendations for the amount of ballast or counterweight shall be adhered to. 15. A reinspection or load test is required after repairs are complete. etc. Keep near-capacity loads as close to the ground as possible.2. Cranes shall not be operated without the ballast or counterweight being in place as specified by the crane manufacturer. load movement path. unusual boom configurations. d. except as approved by the crane manufacturer. Rotate the crane slowly to avoid an outward swing of the load.5. such as during crane assembly.) Boom contact with any object shall require an engineering evaluation prior to putting the crane back in service. h.2. (Boom contact could dent or bend the lower boom chords and may cause a total boom collapse. as is a recertification by the construction management contractor at the subcontractor's expense indicating that the unit can return to service. Practice lifts should be done by the same crew. g. a practice lift shall be done before the critical lift. Ballast or counterweight as specified by the manufacturer shall not be exceeded. Watch for boom kickback. i. rigging selection and configuration. f. Damage to the crane sustained during operation shall be repaired according to manufacturer’s specifications using certified welders. If required by the critical lift procedure.5. quality assurance. Do not let the load strike the boom or outriggers and never allow a crane boom to hit or touch any structure. using the same lifting equipment. Continuous pull on hoist ropes can break the ropes or might pull the boom over the cab. and other relevant factors. On truck-mounted cranes. Allow maximum clearance between the hook block and boom point sheaves. 4. The procedure and rigging sketches shall be reviewed and approved by the responsible manager (or designee) and the responsible oversight organization (such as safety. The critical lift plan/procedure shall be reviewed and questions shall be resolved. or quality control) before the lift is made. Never operate with the boom at a higher angle than shown on the capacity chart. On hydraulically telescoping booms. 5.DOE-STD-1090-99 Summary of Changes 3. Conditions for a practice lift should closely simulate actual conditions involving: weight. A pre-lift meeting involving participating personnel shall be conducted prior to making a critical lift. Avoid “two-blocking. no loads shall be lifted over the front area. Keep the boom high enough to swing clear of the cab when rotating the crane on truck-mounted units.21 . Under specific conditions. g.

a corrosion-resistant nameplate with the following information is required: i. d. 19. Cranes and derricks with variable-angle booms shall be equipped with a boom-angle indicator that is readily visible to the operator. all brakes and locks on the lift crane shall be set before personnel perform any work. Serial number on hydraulically actuated attachments iii. any area of the body affected by contact with battery electrolyte shall be flushed with water immediately and all acid spills must be cleaned up at once. 15. c. Maximum hydraulic pressure (on hydraulically actuated attachments) iv. or open flames are prohibited. The following instructions (or equivalent). Since the load rating for forklifts may be based on stability or hydraulic/structural competence. After the personnel platform is positioned. Whenever battery maintenance is performed. Know the rated capacity of the forklift and always operate within that capacity. On every removable attachment (excluding fork extensions). operation. operation. Wear eye protection. tags. Capacity vi. When a forklift truck is equipped with an attachment. Verify the location and operability of eyewash and shower facilities before maintenance is performed. tags. 18. and rubber aprons. Capacity. 2. Capacity. or decals shall be changed accordingly. the rated capacity shall not be exceeded in operational application. Attachments almost always affect rated capacity of the truck. rubber gloves. and maintenance instruction plates." NOTE: The above information should be provided by the attachment manufacturer. Signs of tipping shall never be used to determine if a load is within the forklift's capacity. Weight v. Changes . Model number ii. or decals shall be changed accordingly.5. No lifts shall be made on another of the of the crane’s load lines while personnel are suspended on a platform. "Capacity of truck and attachment combination may be less than capacity shown on attachment. sparks. Modifications or additions that affect capacity or safe operation shall not be performed without prior written approval from the forklift truck manufacturer. Consult truck nameplate.22 . b. the rated capacity of the truck/attachment combination shall be established by the truck manufacturer.DOE-STD-1090-99 Summary of Changes 17. The rated capacity of an attachment/truck combination shall not be exceeded. and maintenance instruction plates. 1.3 Forklift Trucks a. Ensure that battery recharging and maintenance takes place in designated areas where smoking.

Before operating any truck. Do not put any part of the body outside the operator compartment of the truck.23 . Do not permit passengers to ride on powered industrial trucks unless a safe place to ride has been provided by the manufacturer. Keep hands and feet inside the operator’s designated area or compartment. any of its functions or attachments. which appears at the end of this chapter. Ensure that personnel stand clear of the rear swing area before conducting turning maneuvers.DOE-STD-1090-99 Summary of Changes 15. i. e. k. and other locations where pedestrians may step into the path of travel of the truck. To safeguard pedestrians.6m) from the truck. Ensure that fire aisles. understand the truck’s limitations and observe the following precautions: 1. Never put any part of the body within the reach mechanism of the truck or other attachments. h. (7. 2. Report all accidents and "near misses" promptly. which remains in his view. 3. c. b. The operator shall be familiar with the operation and function of all controls and instruments before operating the truck.5.3. f. m. Do not allow anyone to stand or pass under the elevated portion of any truck. the truck. doorways. Do not drive a truck up to anyone standing in front of an object. d. Avoid reaching through the mast for any purpose. Do not start or operate the truck. Bring truck to a complete stop. A sample Pre-operational inspection checklist is included as Exhibit 1.1 General a. the operator shall be familiar with unusual operating conditions which may require additional safety precautions or special operating instructions. The operator shall develop safe working habits and also be aware of hazardous conditions in order to protect himself. Before leaving the operator’s position the operator shall perform the following : 1. Safe operation is the responsibility of the operator. j. other personnel. from any place other than from the designated operator’s position. Be certain the truck has successfully passed a preuse inspection. and other material. or whenever the operator leaves the truck and it is not in his view. n.1. access to stairways. g. A powered industrial truck is considered unattended when the operator is more than 25 ft. Changes . Exercise particular care at cross aisles. whether empty or loaded. and fire equipments is kept clear. l. 4.

Do not move railroad cars with a powered industrial truck. in order to prevent damage to the doors and/or fork truck by heavy impact forces. Fully lower load-engaging means. The entire door opening operation shall be in full view of the operator. Maintain a safe distance from the edge of ramps. w. Wheel stops. platforms. t. The brakes of highway trucks shall be set and wheel chocks placed under the rear wheels to prevent the Changes . Place directional controls in neutral. 2. 3. Care should be exercised when engaging the railroad car door with the door opening device. 4. The design of the door-opening device shall require the truck to travel parallel to the railroad car. when leaving the truck unattended the operator shall perform the following: 1. 3. boxcars. v. p. 3. Inspect floors on trucks. Whenever a railroad car door requires an abnormal force to open. or platforms before start of operation. Consider both the truck and load weight when operating in railcars and semitrailers. If the truck must be left on an incline. o. 2. or other recognized positive protection shall be provided to prevent railroad cars from moving during loading or unloading operations. Fully lower the load-engaging means. The fork truck shall always be positioned to safeguard the dock attendant while removing the door lock pin. unfamiliar ramps.24 . Load arrangements and spacing issues should be determined before the forklift enters the truck. Unless the truck utilizes a device specifically designed for opening and closing railroad car doors and the operator is trained in its use. Do not use a truck for operating or closing railroad car doors except as follows: 1. 5. with the force applied in a direction parallel with the door travel. hand brakes. the truck operator shall report the condition to his supervisor. unless supporting an elevated platform. Fixed jacks or supports may be needed to prevent upending or corner dipping when powered industrial trucks are driven on and off semitrailers that are not coupled to the tractor. 6. r. Other workers should not be inside the truck when the forklift truck is performing loading or unloading operations. q. and other similar working surfaces. Stop the engine or turn off the controls. 4. Apply the parking brake. In addition.DOE-STD-1090-99 Summary of Changes 2. block the wheels. s. u.

j. Avoid turning if possible. 5. Railroad tracks shall be crossed diagonally whenever possible. except if the load being carried obstructs forward view. on plant roads . measure. 5. d. Never travel with forks raised to unnecessary heights. operate the truck at a speed that will permit it to be brought to a stop in a safe manner. Use low gear or slowest speed control. c. Changes . Do not park closer than 6 ft (1800 mm) to the nearest rail or a railroad track. establish eye contact with approaching pedestrians or vehicle drivers before continuing. blind spots. ramps. Operate unloaded trucks with the load-engaging means downgrade. 6. Face in the direction of travel. The load and load-engaging means shall be tilted back. e. etc.25 . Care shall be taken to not contact overhead installations such as lights. y. l. Approximately 4 to 6 inches (10 to 15 cm) above floor level is adequate. drive loaded rider trucks with the load upgrade. Do not indulge in stunt driving or horseplay. In such cases travel with the load trailing. or direction reversals in a smooth manner so as not to shift load and/or overturn the truck. Unless facility-specific procedures state otherwise. When ascending or descending grades. if applicable and raised only as far as necessary to clear the road surface. stops. sprinkler systems. Make starts.DOE-STD-1090-99 Summary of Changes trucks from rolling while they are boarded. Slow down and sound horn at cross aisles and other locations where vision is obstructed.1. turns. be cautious of rear end swing and keep clear of the edge of loading docks. the guideline is: within plant buildings .5.5 mph. or at other locations where vision is obstructed. Motorized hand trucks shall not be ridden unless they are of the hand/rider design. i. While turning. Yield the right of way to pedestrians and emergency vehicles.15 mph.2 Traveling a.3. and normally travel straight up and down. g. 3. Whenever possible. In excess of 5 percent grade. and inclines: 1. 4. Drive slowly around curves. b. k. x. pipes. If in doubt. wiring. f. Observe all traffic regulations and under all travel conditions. h. Do not pass another truck traveling in the same direction at intersections.

Drive carefully and slowly across the dockboard or bridge plate. g. the mast shall be carefully tilted backward to stabilize the load. h. The designated person shall ensure that the weight of a load approaching the rated capacity (combination of weight and location of the center of gravity) has been determined within -10 percent.26 . It is advisable that all other personnel leave the elevator before truck is allowed to enter or leave. be sure that it is properly secured. Unless a towing hitch is supplied by the manufacturer. and then enter squarely after the elevator car is properly leveled. place controls in neutral position.DOE-STD-1090-99 Summary of Changes m. neutralize the controls. d. Do not drive trucks onto any elevator unless specifically authorized to do so. return the forklift truck to its assigned parking place. shut off the power. Before driving over a dockboard or bridge plate. use it. turn ignition off.3. s. o.1. and never exceed its rated capacity. Approach elevators slowly. Always spread the forks to suit the load width. set brakes. Do not exceed the capacity of the elevator. i. If the truck is equipped with a seat belt. Since the load rating for forklifts may be based on stability or hydraulic or structural competence. fully lower load-engaging means. n. do not use forklift trucks as tow trucks. Stability and maneuverability may be adversely affected. q. p. The forks shall be placed under the load as far as possible. At the end of the operator's shift. In cases operation are authorized: 1. Caution shall be exercised when handling off-center loads which cannot be centered. Only stable. e. b. Slow down for wet and slippery floors. Block and secure them if necessary. unless a secure area has been provided and designated by the user. Once on the elevator. c. Do not transport loads or miscellaneous items within the operator’s compartment or other areas of the truck. A load backrest extension shall be used whenever necessary to minimize the possibility of the load or Changes . Extra caution is required when handling loads exceeding the dimensions used to establish truck capacity. and secure the key. f. 2. 15. 3. and set brakes. 4. +0 percent before it is lifted. safely arranged loads shall be handled. When a towing hitch is provided. use tow bars rather than wire rope for towing. do not exceed the rated capacity in operational application.5. r.3 Loading a.

Do not rig loads from the tines of a forklift truck. l. or alarm stations when stacking loads. o. Operate trucks equipped with attachments as partially loaded trucks when not handling a load. 5. (110-cm) around its upper periphery and including a midrail. Use a lift platform manufactured for the purpose of lifting personnel with a forklift truck. take the following precautions: a. extra care shall be taken in securing.5. or chains may be used if proper positioning is easily accomplished and a secured condition is discernible. use only enough backward tilt to stabilize the load. fire protection sprinklers. Standard hand signals are shown in Figure 15. The platform shall include: 1.27 . k.3. Do not attach or operate any attachment on a forklift truck that has not been approved for use by the forklift truck manufacturer. Use guides and signalers as necessary. Never lift with one fork without an engineering analysis and approval. Fork length should be at least two thirds of the load length." t. Guard rails and access openings shall be capable of withstanding a concentrated force of 200 lb (91 kg) in any direction. (90-cm) or more than 42 in. r. 2. q. When attachments are used. 3.4 Lifting of Personnel f a work platform is used on forklift trucks designed and intended for handling materials. Changes .DOE-STD-1090-99 Summary of Changes part of it from falling rearward. positioning. (10-cm) minimum height toe plate provided on the work platform. (attaching rigging to the forks to support a suspended load) without written management approval. An access opening in the guard rail maybe hinged or removable. If in doubt. s. Do not tilt forward with forks elevated except to pick up or deposit a load over a rack or stack. A restraining means such as a guard rail having a height above the platform floor of not less than 36 in. The floor of the platform located not more than 8-in (20-cm) above the upper face of the supporting truck fork blade. Use extreme care when tilting load forward or backward. and transporting the load. When stacking or tiering. n. check the conditions personally before proceeding. j. manipulating. 15.17 "Hand Signals. p. particularly when high tiering. m. Do not block fire extinguishers. A 4-in. 4.

(25-cm) on either side. maximum load including personnel and equipment. and personnel shall not exceed one-half of the capacity as indicated on the nameplate of the truck on which the platform is used. Emergency-lowering means available at ground level should be provided. The following information should be prominently indicated on the platform: I. 7. and only at their request. load. Means shall be provided to render inoperative all operating controls on the elevating platform. iii. d. Floor dimensions that neither exceed two times the load center distance listed on the truck nameplate. Take the following precautions whenever personnel are elevated with a forklift truck: 1. 2. 8. Whenever a truck (except for high-lift order-picker trucks) is equipped with vertical hoisting controls elevateable with the lifting carriage or forks. Changes . Means to correctly locate the platform centered laterally on the truck. 6. 2. Avoid overhead obstructions and electric wires. Means shall be provided whereby personnel on the platform can shut off power to the truck. Place all travel controls in neutral and set parking brake. 9. when the controls on the elevating platform have been selected for use. 3. Move truck and/or platform slowly. minimum capacity of the truck on which the platform can be used. 3. only one location of controls shall be capable of being operated at one time. and only at their request. 8. Ensure the mast is vertical . b.DOE-STD-1090-99 Summary of Changes 6. mark area with cones or other devices to warn of work by elevated personnel. 7. measured parallel to the longitudinal center plane of the truck. nor have a width greater than the overall width of the truck (measured across the load bearing tires) plus 10 in. 4. such means shall be protected against misuse. Means to securely attach the platform to the lifting carriage or forks in such a manner that it cannot slide or bounce off the forks. weight of empty platform. only for minor adjustments in horizontal positioning when personnel are on the platform. Lift and lower personnel smoothly.28 . Keep hands and feet clear of controls other than those in use. Ensure the truck has a firm and level footing. Before elevating personnel.do not operate on a side slope. c. 5. ii. The combined weight of the platform. with caution. take the following additional precautions to protect personnel: 1.

28-1990. or DIESEL FORKLIFT CHAPTER 16 REFERENCES American National Standards Institute ANSI A10. 14. 16. The use of railings. etc. shall be provided.. engage the parking brake and block the wheels..2b . Derricks.DOE-STD-1090-99 Summary of Changes 9. 13. Be certain that the lifting mechanism is operating smoothly throughout its entire lift height. The platform is horizontal and never tilted forward or rearward when elevated. if provided. Railings and Toe Boards. Be certain that required restraining means such as railings. body belts with lanyards.1992 ASME B30. B30.1991 B30. Lower platform to floor level for personnel to enter and exit. The operator shall remain in the control position of the forklift truck. ASME B30. Single or Multiple Girder. Do not transport personnel from one location to another while they are on the work platform. Overhead and Gantry Cranes (Top-Running Bridge. 15. on the platform for the purpose of achieving additional reach or height is prohibited.2a . 12. are functional. planks. Means shall be provided to protect personnel from moving parts of the forklift truck that present a hazard when the personnel platform is in the normal working position. 19. or deceleration devices. EXHIBIT I OPERATORS PRE-SHIFT INSPECTION (sheet 1 of 2) ELECTRIC FORKLIFT (sheet 2 of 2) GAS. are in place and properly used. Personnel are to remain on the platform floor.5-1994. Changes .2-1990. 18. Floor and Wall Openings. ladders. 11. Ensure personnel and equipment on the platform do not to exceed the available space. ASME B30. 10. etc. Overhead protection. Work Platforms Suspended From Cranes or Derricks.18-1983.29 . Mobile and Locomotive Cranes. ANSI A10. both empty and loaded. as necessary for operating conditions. cable. chains. Top-Running Trolley Hoist). When not in the operating position. LP. and that lift limiting devices and latches. 17. Do not climb on any part of the truck in attempting to enter or exit.6-1990.

Side Boom Tractors.1992 B30. B30.1988 B56. Overhead Hoists (Underhung). B30.1990 ASME B30.17-1992. B30.21d .6d .11-1993.1992 B30.21b . Hooks.14b .1992 B30.1993 ASME B30.12-1992.1993 ASME B30.21c .21a . B56.1992 B30. Handling Loads Suspended from Rotor craft. ASME B30.1990 B30. Rough Terrain Fork Lift Trucks. Base-Mounted Drum Hoists.1994 ASME B30.14a .6a .6-1993.6a .1991 B30.22-1993.21-1989.30 . Guided Industrial Vehicles. ASME B56.6c .1993 ASME B30. B30.9a . Slings. B30.1993 B30.20-1993. B30.20d . Below-The-Hook Lifting Devices.1991 B30. Overhead and Gantry Cranes (Top Running Bridge.1-1993 Safety Standard for Powered Industrial Trucks—Low Lift and High Lift Trucks.6b .20c .16a . ASME B56. ASME B30. ASME B56.1994 ASME B30.6b .9b . ASME B30. Underhung Hoist).9-1990.DOE-STD-1090-99 Summary of Changes B30.20a .1989 B30. Articulating Boom Cranes. Manually Lever Operated Hoists.7-1994.10-1993.14-1991. Single Girder. ASME B30.5-1993.1987 B30.20b .1992 ASME B30. Monorail Systems and Underhung Cranes.1990 Changes .1988 B30.16-1993.17a .

Performance Standard for Manually Lever Operated Chain Hoists. Performance Standard for Electric Wire Rope Hoists. Single Girder. ANSI/ASTM Specification E-165. Specifications for Underhung Cranes and Monorail Systems. ANSI/AWS D14. ASME HST-1M-1989. 70-1994. Special Notice 6-88 ASME B56. ANSI N14. ANSI MH 27. ANSI/ASME HST-4M-1991.7. Performance Standard for Hand Chain Manually Operated Chain Hoists. Standard Practice for Magnetic Particle Examination.000 Pounds (4500 kg) or More for Nuclear Materials. Changes . Forks and Fork Carriers for Powered Industrial Fork Lift Trucks.31 . Performance Standard for Air Chain Hoists. ANSI/ASME HST-5M-1991. CMAA No.Nuclear Overhead and Gantry Cranes . ANSI/ASME NQA-1-1989. ANSI/ASTM Specification A391. 74-1987. Quality Assurance Program Requirements for Nuclear Facilities. Industrial Crane Trucks. Performance Standard for Air Wire Rope Hoists. Electric Overhead Traveling Cranes. Specification for Top Running and Under Running. ANSI/ASME HST-3M-1991. Multiple Girder) 1a .4-1992. ASME HST-2M-1989.11.1990 1b . ANSI/ASME HST-6M-1986.1 . ASME CRANES FOR NUCLEAR FACILITIES: ASME . ASNT-TC-1A. Specification for Electric Overhead Traveling Cranes.1992 ASME . Specification for Alloy Steel Chain. Rules for Construction of Overhead and Gantry Cranes (Top Running Bridge. American Welding Society ANSI/AWS D1. Hook Type.DOE-STD-1090-99 Summary of Changes ASME B56. Standard for Special Lifting Devices for Shipping Containers Weighing 10. Specification for Welding of Industrial and Mill Cranes and Other Material Handling Equipment.NUM American Society for Nondestructive Testing Recommended Practice No.1-1994.1994 Structural Welding Code—Steel Crane Manufacturers' Association of America CMAA No. ANSI/ASTM Specification E-709.Nuclear Underhung and Monorail Cranes . Standard Practice for Liquid Penetrant Inspection Method. Performance Standard for Electric Chain Hoists.1-1981.6-1993.NOG-1-1989.

Worker Protection Management for Federal and Contractor Employees Change 3 . Type Designation and Areas of Use.9-20-91 Department of Labor 29 CFR 1910. Crane Structure. Occupational Safety and Health Standards for General Industry. National Fire Protection Association ANSI/NFPA 505-1987. SAE J874-1986.1. APPENDIX A PROCUREMENT GUIDELINES Changes .32 . Method of Test. Internal-Combustion-Engine-Powered Industrial Trucks. Department of Transportation 49 CFR 391. Power Crane and Shovel Association PCSA-4. Electric-Battery-Powered Industrial Trucks.41. National Electrical Code. 440. Crane Load Stability Test Code. Load-Indicating Devices in Lifting Crane Service. SAE J987-1985.4. 29 CFR 1926. NFPA 70. UL 583-1991. Occupational Safety and Health Regulations for Construction. Underwriters' Laboratories UL 558-1991. Center of Gravity Test Code. and Health Protection Standards.DOE-STD-1090-99 Summary of Changes Department of Energy DOE 5480. Environmental Protection. Society of Automotive Engineers SAE J376-85. Powered Industrial Trucks. Physical Qualification for Drivers. SAE J765-1990. Safety. Mobile Power Crane and Excavator Standards and Hydraulic Crane Standards.

. . . . . . . . . . .6 Use . . . . . . . . . . . . . . and Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3. . . . . . . . .2. . Maintenance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . 3. . . . . . 3. . . . . . . . . .3 Preparation and Revision . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Approval . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Hazards Evaluation .6. PREENGINEERED PRODUCTION LIFTS CHAPTER 3 3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . i 3-1 3-2 3-2 3-2 3-2 3-2 3-3 3-3 3-3 3-3 3-3 3-4 3-5 3-5 3-5 3-5 3-6 3-6 3-6 3-7 3-8 3-8 3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4.4. . . .1 Content . . .2 TERMINOLOGY AND DEFINITIONS CRITICAL LIFTS 2-1 2-2 CRITICAL-LIFT DETERMINATION . . . . . . . . . . 3. . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Modification and Repair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . . . 3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PROCEDURES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . .6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3. . . .1 Load Identification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . . . . . .3. . . . 3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 3.2. . . . . . .2 Task Determination . . TRAINING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.DOE-STD-1090-99 CONTENTS HISTORY AND BACKGROUND ACKNOWLEDGMENT INTRODUCTION CHAPTER 1 CHAPTER 2 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4. . . . . .4. . . . . . . . . DESIGNATED LEADER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Inspection and Testing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Storage. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3. . . . .5 Review . . . . . CRITICAL-LIFT REQUIREMENTS .2 Fabrication . . . . . .5 3. 3. . .1 Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 GENERAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 3. . .4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Development . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . OPERATION EVALUATION . . .3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 3. . 3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Equipment Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3. . . . . .4 Equipment/Rigging Selection . . . . . . . . . . . . LIFTING FIXTURES . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CHAPTER 6 6. . . . .6. . . . . . . . . . .4 Procedure . . . . . . . 6. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .DOE-STD-1090-99 3. . . . . . . . .2 PERSONNEL QUALIFICATION AND TRAINING GENERAL . . . .3 4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Person-In-Charge (PIC) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6. . . .3 . . . 6. . . . . . . . .6 Riggers . . . . . 6. . . . . . . . . .3. . . . . . . . . . . . .1 5. 6. . . . . . . . . . .2 GENERAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . PERSONNEL PLATFORM . . . . . . . . .2 Inspection and Testing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Operators of Mobile Cranes . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 CHAPTER 4 4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . .12 Maintenance Personnel . . . and Floor-Operated Cranes . . . . . . . . . . ii 6-1 6-2 6-2 6-2 6-2 6-3 6-4 6-4 6-4 6-4 6-4 6-4 6-4 6-5 6-6 6-6 6-6 6-7 6-7 6-8 6-9 6. . . . . . . . . . . .1 General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Riggers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . LIFTING PERSONNEL 3-8 GENERAL . . . . . 6. . . . . . . . . . QUALIFICATIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . .9 Inspectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6. . . . .2. . . . . . 6. . . . . . . . . . . OVERHEAD CRANES . . . . . . . . .1 6. . . Pulpit-Operated. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Mobile Crane Operators . .2 Operators of Cab-Operated. . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . . . . . . .4 Operators of Floor-Operated Cranes . . .3. . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . 5. . . . . . . . . . . . 6. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 General . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . . . . . 5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . .11 First-Line Supervisors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6. . . . . . 6. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Inspectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-1 5-2 5-2 5-2 5-4 Exhibit I Hostile Environment Plan . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Marking and Posting . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 Instructors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Forklift Truck Operators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6. . . . . . . . MOBILE CRANES . . . . . . . . .2 Operators of Cab-Operated and Pulpit-Operated . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Operators of Forklift Trucks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . HOSTILE ENVIRONMENTS 4-1 4-3 4-4 4-5 CHAPTER 5 5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 4. . . . . . . . . . . 6. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Designated Leader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TRAINING . . .2. . . . . . . . .2. . . . 6. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . HOSTILE ENVIRONMENT PLAN . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-9 6-10 6-11 REQUALIFICATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7. . . . . .3. . . . . . .3 Modification . . . . . . . . . .5 Instructors . . . . . . . . . . .1 Operational Tests .3 Chain (Welded Link) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Hoist-Limit Switch . . . . . .1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7. . . . . . . . . . .5 Size of Load . . . . . . . . . . .9 Maintenance History . .6 Power Shutoff . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Rated Load Test .1 Conduct of Operator . . 7. . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Cranes . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Wire-Rope Maintenance . iii 7-1 7-1 7-1 7-1 7-1 7-1 7-1 7-5 7-5 7-5 7-6 7-6 7-6 7-6 7-6 7-6 7-7 7-7 7-7 7-8 7-8 7-9 7-10 7-11 7-11 7-11 7-12 7-12 7-12 7-13 7-13 7-13 7-14 7-15 7-15 7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 7. . . . . . . .7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 General . . . . . .3 Initial Inspection .2. . . . . . . . . . .6 Frequent Inspection . . . 7.7 Periodic Inspection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7. . . .2.1. .1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TESTING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7. . .2. . . . . . . . . . . 7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4. . . . . . .4 Daily Preoperational Check . . . . . . . . . . RECORDS .8 Cranes Not in Regular Service . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7. . . . . . . . . 7. . 7. . . . . . . . . . 7. . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Crane Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Operating Equipment . . . .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7.3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7. MAINTENANCE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Monthly Rope. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Identification of Signalers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7. . . . 7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7. .1 GENERAL . . . . . . .2 7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . OVERHEAD AND GANTRY CRANES CHAPTER 7 7. . . . . .2. 7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . OPERATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . 7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 6. . .DOE-STD-1090-99 6. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7. . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . . 7. . . . . . . . 7. .7. . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . . . . .1 Operator Training/Qualification . . . . . . .1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7. . . . . .7. . . . . . . . . .4 Chain (Roller) . . . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . . . .2. .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Standard Hand Signals . . . . .2 Wire Rope . . . . . . INSPECTIONS . . . . . .5 . . . .2 Rated-Load Marking . . . . .1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Hoist Brakes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 6. . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . .8 Load Limits . .5. . Chain and Hook Inspection . . . . . . . . . . . . 7. 7. . . . 7. . . . . . .2 Hoist-Limit Switch/Device . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 7. . . . . . . . . . . . 7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Egress . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . 8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Hand-Chain-Operated or Manual-Lever-Operated Hoists . . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . . . . . . . .1. . .1.1 Hoist Service . . . . .1. . . . . . . . . Ordinary Lifts . . . . . . . . .1 HOISTS GENERAL . . . . . . . . . 8. . . . .1. .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Operator Training/Qualification .6. . . . . .3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8. . .8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. .3 Welded-Link Chain . . . . . . . . . . . 8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8. . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . 8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Lower-Limit Switches/Devices . . . . . . . 8. . . .1. . . . . .1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . . .1. .1 Electric-Powered Hoists . . . . . . .6. . . . . .13 Location . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . . . . . . . . .2 . . . . . . . . . Gantry Crane Load Test and Inspection . . . . . .4 Roller Chain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8. . . 8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. .1. . . .1. . . . . . 8. . . 8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Frequent Inspection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Air-Powered. . . . . . Moving the Load . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Load Chain .1. . . . . . . . . . .3 Daily Inspection . .1 Hoists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Load-Braking/Load-Controlling Mechanisms . . . . . . . .14 Load Rating . 8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . . . . .1. . . . . . . . . . . .4 Manual-Lever-Operated Hoists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 Support . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . .10. . . . . . . . . . . . . .10. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CHAPTER 8 8. . . . . . . . . . . 8. . . .10 Overtravel Protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Electric. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8. . . . . . . . . . .or Air-Powered Hoists .6. . . . . . . . . . . . 8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . and Manual-Lever-Operated Hoists . Critical Lifts . . . 8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8. .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . .5 Periodic Inspection . 8. .3 Hand-Chain-Operated Hoists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8. . . . . . . . 8. . . . . .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-15 7-15 7-16 7-16 7-19 Exhibit I Bridge. . . . . . . . . . . 8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Electric-Powered. . . . .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8. . . .2. . . . . . . . . . .1. .1. . . .9 Attaching the Load . . . . .4 Design Standards . . . . . . . .1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . .2. . . . . . . 8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 7. . 8. . . . . . . . . . 8. . . .7 7. . . . . . . . .11 Travel Warning Devices . . . . . . . . .2 Air-Powered Hoists .2 Wire Rope . . . . . . . . . . 8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8. . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8. . . . . . . .7 Wire Rope . . . . .5 Synthetic-Web Strap . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . . . .6. . . . . . . . .1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .DOE-STD-1090-99 7. . . . . . . . . . 8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . INSPECTIONS . . . .5. . .1. . . . . . . . . .3 Warning Labels . . . . . . . .2 Initial Inspection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Design Factors . . . . iv 8-1 8-4 8-4 8-4 8-4 8-4 8-5 8-5 8-5 8-5 8-5 8-5 8-6 8-6 8-6 8-6 8-6 8-7 8-7 8-7 8-7 8-7 8-7 8-7 8-7 8-8 8-8 8-8 8-8 8-8 8-8 8-9 8-9 8-10 8-11 8-12 8. . . . . . . . . .9 Web Strap . . . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . Wall. . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Upper-Limit Switches/Devices . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Marking . . . . . . . . . 8. . . . . . . .2 Hand-Chain-Operated Hoists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . .8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8. . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Electric. . . . . .2. . . . . . .1. . .3 Manual-Lever-Operated Hoists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . .1.3 Hoists Not in Regular Service . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Preoperational Check . . . . . .3. . . . . . . . .1 Electric. . . . . . . 8. . .1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Hoist-Limit Switch . . . . . . . . . 8. . . . . v 9-1 9-1 9-1 9-1 9-5 9-5 9-5 9-5 9-5 9-5 9-5 9-6 9-6 9-6 9-6 9-6 9-6 9-7 9-7 9-7 9. 9. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. . . . 9. .6. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8. . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . .3 Load Rating Chart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8. . . . . . . . . . .6 Periodic Inspection . . . . .1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9. . . . .or Air-Powered Hoists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . 9. . . . . . . . . .7 Critical Lifts .5 Exhibit I Hoist Load Test and Inspection . . .6. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . .4 8. . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 Design Standards .1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Load Limits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 Maintenance History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.3 Attaching the Load . . . .1 Operator Training/Qualification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Power-Controlled Lowering .2.6 8. . . .1 MOBILE CRANES GENERAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9. . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Size of Load . . OPERATION . 8. . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Operational Tests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . 9. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . .1 Cranes . . . . . . .2 Proof-Load Test . . . . . . 8. . . . . . . . . .5. . .6 Ordinary Lifts . . . . . 8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . .3. . . . . . . INSPECTIONS . . . . . .2 Hand-Chain-Operated or Manual-Lever-Operated Hoists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . .1. . . . . . .5 Frequent Inspection . . .1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8. . . .5. . . . . 8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Booms . . . . 9. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Initial Inspection . . . . . . . . . . .1 Conduct of Operator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8. . .2. . . . . . . . .1 General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MAINTENANCE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . and Tubing . . . . 8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Load Hoist Brakes . . . . . . .1. . . . . .DOE-STD-1090-99 8. . .3. . . . . . . . . . 8. . . . . . . . . . . .or Air-Powered Hoists . . . . . . . . 8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . . . .2 Hydraulic and Pneumatic Hose. . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-12 8-13 8-13 8-13 8-13 8-13 8-13 8-13 8-13 8-14 8-15 8-15 8-15 8-15 8-15 8-16 8-16 8-17 8-19 TESTING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fittings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . 9. . . . . . . . . . . .2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CHAPTER 9 9. . . .4 Monthly Inspection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9. . . . . . . . . 9. . . . .7 Counterweight . . . 8. . . .8 Rerating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Moving the Load . . . . . 9. . . . . . . . .2 Hand-Chain-Operated Hoists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9. . . . . . .1. . . . . 9. . . .2. . . . 9. . . . . . . . . . . .1. .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . .1 Operational Tests . . . . . . . .6. . . . . . . . . . . . . 9. . . . .5 Identification of Signalers . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9. . .5. . . . . . . . .7 9. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Load Hoods/Load Blocks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Wire-Rope Maintenance . .5. Crane Operating Less Than Erected/Fully Extended Boom Length Away From Prohibited Zone . .2 Operating Near Power Lines and Transmitter Towers . . . . . . . . MAINTENANCE . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9. . . . . . . . . 9. . . . . . . .4 Observing Boom-Length Precautions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Attaching the Load . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Power Lines Energized. .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9. . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . . . 9. . . . . . .8 9. .3 Ensuring Stability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. . . .6. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9. . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . 9. . 9. .4 9. . . . . . . . . . . .4. . . .2. . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Hoist-Limit Switch . . . . . . . 9. . . .6 Hydraulic Filters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cranes Not in Regular Use . 9. . . . . . . . . .5 Crane Operations Near Transmitter Towers . . . . . . . . . . . 9. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . 9. .1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9. . . .1 GENERAL .4 Crane in Transit with no Load and Boom Lowered . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9. . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Preventive Maintenance . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . .3 Hydraulic and Pneumatic Pumps and Motors . . .6. . . . . . .4 Hydraulic and Pneumatic Valves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Conduct of Operator . . . . . . . .4. . . . . . . . . . .2 Making Adjustments or Repairs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . . . . . . .2. . .5. . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Hydraulic and Pneumatic Cylinders . . . . . . . . . .7 Wire Rope . . . . . . . . . . .5 9-16 9-19 9-19 9-19 9-19 9-22 9-22 9-22 9-22 9-22 9-26 9-26 9-29 Exhibit I Mobile Crane Load Test and Inspection . . . . . . . . . .1 Crane Operations De-energized and Grounded Electrical Power Lines . . 9. 9-8 9-8 9-8 9-8 9-8 9-9 9-9 9-10 9-10 9-10 9-11 9-11 9-11 9-11 9-12 9-12 9-13 9-13 9-14 9-14 9-14 9-16 TESTING . . . . . . . . . .6. . . . .2. . . . . . . . 9. . . . .4 Standard Hand Signals . . . . . . . . . 9. . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Moving the Load .5. . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 9. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . .6.9 Ordinary Lifts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 Critical Lifts . . . . . . . . .1 Traveling the Machine . . . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . . . .2 Maintenance Procedures . .2. . . 9. . . . . . . . . . .2 Rated Load Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . vi 10-1 . . .3 Crane Operations are Within the Prohibited Zone and the Power Lines are Energized . . . . 9. . . . . . . . . . . . 9. . . . . . . . . . . . 9. .4. . . . . . . . 9. . . . . . . .DOE-STD-1090-99 9. . . . . CHAPTER 10 FORKLIFT TRUCKS 10. . .6 Size of Load . . 9. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . OPERATION . .

. . . . . . . . . 10. . . .4 Forks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 INSPECTIONS . . . . . . .2 Rated Capacity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. .2 Fork Inspections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4. . . . 10. . . . .2 Fork Load Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Fork Load Rating . . . . . .7 Overhead Guards . . . . . .1. . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . . .2 Hazardous Locations . . . . . . . . . . . .4. . . . . . . . . . 10-27 Exhibit II Forklift Load Test and Inspection Form (Example Only) . . .1 Forklift Truck Load Test . . . . . . . . . . .5. . .1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Lifting of Personnel . . . . . 10. .4 Attachments . 10. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Conduct of Operator . . . . . .1. . . . . .1.3 Fork Repair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4. 10. . . . . . . . . .5. .9 Work Atmosphere . . . .1. . . . . . .1. . 10. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10. .2 Initial Inspection of New and Rented Equipment . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10. . . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . . . . . . . 10. .3 Standard Hand Signals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Critical Lifts . . .1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . . . .DOE-STD-1090-99 10. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 TYPE DESIGNATIONS AND AREAS OF USE . . . . . . . . . . . .5. .2. . . .1 Fork Arm Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10. . 10. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Nameplate(s) and Markings . 10. . . . . . . . 10. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 General . . .4 Ordinary Lifts . . . . . . . . .1. . . .5. . . . . . . . . . . .3 Inspection and Maintenance . . . . . .5. . . . 10. . . . . . .4 TESTING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Battery Maintenance . .6 Warning Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . 10. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10. . . . . . . . . . 10.3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10. . . . . . . . 10. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 History File . 10. . . . . . . . . . . .3 Loading . . . .1. . . .1 Daily Preoperational Check . .3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Nonhazardous Locations . . . . . . . .5 Modifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10. . . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . 10. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10. . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Equipment Qualifications . . .4. . . .5 OPERATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10.3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Attachments Load Test . . .1. . 10.2 Specific Areas of Use . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10. . . . . . . . 10-29 vii . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10. . . .1 Type Designation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10. . . . . . . . . 10. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Operator Training/Qualification .2. . . . . .2 Traveling . . . .3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . .4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Fire Hazard Areas . . . . . . . . . . . 10. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10. . . . . . . . . . . . 10. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10. . . . 10-1 10-1 10-1 10-1 10-1 10-2 10-2 10-2 10-2 10-2 10-10 10-10 10-10 10-10 10-10 10-14 10-14 10-14 10-14 10-15 10-15 10-15 10-16 10-16 10-16 10-18 10-18 10-18 10-18 10-19 10-19 10-19 10-20 10-21 10-22 10-23 10-23 10-24 10-24 Exhibit I Operations Pre-Shift Inspection Form (Example Only) . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11. .3. . . . . . . . .3. . . . .3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . . . . . . . .5 Synthetic-Web Slings . . . . 11. . . . . . . . . . . . . .3.3 SLINGS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 6 × 19 Classification . . . . . . . . . 11. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11. . . . .2 Proof-Testing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. .2 Wire-Rope Slings . . . . . .2 WIRE ROPE . . . . . . . . .3.3 Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11. . . . . . . . .2 Proof-Testing . . . 11. . . .3.2. . . . . . . . . . . .1 General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . .1. . . .DOE-STD-1090-99 CHAPTER 11 WIRE ROPE AND SLINGS 11-1 11-4 11-4 11-4 11-5 11-5 11-5 11-5 11-5 11-8 11-8 11-8 11-8 11-10 11-10 11-10 11-10 11-19 11-19 11-19 11-22 11-23 11-25 11-25 11-25 11-26 11-29 11-29 11-29 11-30 11-32 11-36 11-36 11. . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. .1 Wire-Rope Lays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Wire-Rope Cores . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . .1 Inspections . 11. . . . . . . . . . .3 Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11. . . . . . . . . .3 Wire Rope for General Purposes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 6 × 37 Classification . . . . . .3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Sling Care . . . . . . . . .5. .3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11. . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. 11. .3 Alloy Steel-Chain Slings . . . . . . .1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11. . . . . . . .2 Safe Load . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Exhibit I Rigging Tackle Annual Inspection (Wire-Rope Slings) .3. . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Sling Storage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Operation .3. . . 11. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-41 Exhibit III Rigging Tackle Periodic Inspection (Synthetic-Web Slings) . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Annual Inspections . . . . . .5 Wire-Rope Maintenance . . . 11-43 CHAPTER 12 RIGGING ACCESSORIES 12-1 12. . . . . . . .3 Proof-Testing . . . . . . 11. . .3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11. . . . . . . . . . . . . viii . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . . . . . . . .4. . . .1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. .4 Metal-Mesh Slings . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Inspections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 GENERAL . . . . . . 11. . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . 11. .3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-39 Exhibit II Rigging Tackle Annual Inspection (Chain) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . 11. . 11. .1 Load Angle Factor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . 11. . . . .2. . . . . .1 Inspections .4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Wire-Rope Inspections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11. . . . . . . . . . . . . 11. . . . . . .1 GENERAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Pre-Use Inspections . . . .3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . . 11. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. 11. . . . . . . . . 11. . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . .2. . . . . . 11. . . .4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . 11. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1.3. . . . . . . . . . .3 Design Factor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Proof-Testing . .

. .1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Marking . . . . .2 RIGGING HOOKS . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13. . . . . . . . . .1 Hook Service . . . . . .5 TURNBUCKLES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Load Limits . . . . . . . . . . .1. . .2. . . . 12. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Inspections . 12-23 CHAPTER 13 LOAD HOOKS 13-1 13-1 13-1 13-1 13-1 13-2 13-2 13-2 13-2 | 13. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . 12-19 12. . . .) . . .1. . . . .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-11 12. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Shackles. . . . . .1 GENERAL . . . .2. 12. .3 Load Limits . . .6 LINKS AND RINGS . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Initial Inspection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 SHACKLES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . . . 13. . . . . . . . . 12. . . . .2. .2. . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12. . . . . . . . . . . .2 Attachments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-14 12. . . . . . .DOE-STD-1090-99 12. . . . . . . . . 12. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ix . . . . . . . . . . .4 EYEBOLTS .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Construction . . . . . . .5. . . . . . .4 Periodic Inspection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Daily Inspection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5.1 Initial Inspection . . Accessories Load Test and Inspection (Hooks. . . . . . . . . . . . . 12. . . . . . . . . . 13. . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Daily Inspection . . . . . 12. . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12. . . . . . . . . 13. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 LOAD-INDICATING DEVICES .2. .2 Testing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12. . . . . . . . . . Tackle. . . . . . . . .3 Good and Bad Rigging Practices .1. . . . . . .7 Maintenance . . . . . . . . 13. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12.1. . Rings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12.6 Testing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-1 12-3 12-3 12-6 12-6 12-6 12-6 12-6 12-6 12-6 12-6 12-6 12-8 12-8 12-8 12-8 12-9 12. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12. . . . . .2 INSPECTIONS . .7 METAL-PLATE CLAMPS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Marking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-20 Exhibit I Rigging. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . 12-18 12. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Design . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . 12. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-16 12. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . 13. . . . . . . . . . .9 PRECISION LOAD POSITIONERS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . etc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Frequent Inspection . . . . .4 Hook Standards . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Inspections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . . . . 12. .

. . . . . . . . . .1 GENERAL . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 MAINTENANCE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Testing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . . . .4 NONDESTRUCTIVE TESTING (NDT) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13. . . . . . . .1 Initial Inspection . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . .3 Periodic Inspection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 OPERATION . . . . . . .3 Modification/Rerating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Marking . .5 Discontinuity Removal . . . . .5. .5. . . . .3. . . . . . . 14. 14-9 14. 14-10 14. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Rated Load Test . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . .3 Periodic Inspection . . . . . .3 Installation . . . 14. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CHAPTER 14 BELOW-THE-HOOK LIFTING DEVICES 13-2 13-2 13-4 13-6 13-6 13-6 13-6 13-6 13-6 13-8 13-9 14. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Inspections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . .4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-7 14. . . . . . . . 14-9 14. . . . . . . . . .3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14. . . . .3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 STRUCTURAL AND MECHANICAL LIFTING DEVICES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-10 14. . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . .6. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 VACUUM LIFTING DEVICES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Initial Inspection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Design/Fabrication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-9 14. . . . . . . . .2. . . . . .2 NDT Records . . . . . . 14. . . 14-10 x . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14. . . . . . . . . . .4. . .7 Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . .4 Inspections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13. . 14. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14. . . . . . . . . . .3 NDT Methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Operational Test . . . . . 13. . . . . . . . . 14-1 14-2 14-2 14-2 14-2 14-2 14-2 14-2 14-2 14-5 14-5 14-5 14-5 14-6 14-6 14-6 14. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13.6. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . 13.1 Design/Fabrication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13. . . . . . . . . .3. . . . . . . . . . . .1 NDT Requirements .8 Training/Qualification . . .4. . . . . . . .2 Marking .2 Frequent Inspection . .3. . . . . . . . .2 Frequent Inspection . . . . . . . . . .2. .4 Acceptance Criteria . . . . .9 Operation . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4. . . . . . . . . . .4. . 14. . . . . . . . . . 14-9 14. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. . . . 14-7 14.3. . . . .2 Rated Load Test . . .3. . .6 Testing . . . 14. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . 14-9 14. . . 13. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 TESTING . . . . 14. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Periodic Inspection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . .4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14. . . . . . . . . .2. . 13. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13. . . . 14. . . . . . .2. . . . .2.DOE-STD-1090-99 13. . . .4 Guarding . . . .4. . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Frequent Inspection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Operational Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-7 14. . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . 14. . .3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Marking . . . . . . . . . . . 14. . . . . . . . . . . . . 14. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Training/Qualification . . . . . . . . . .4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. 14. . . . . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . . . 14. . . . . . . . . . . 14. . . . . . .4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Testing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14. . . .4 Manually Controlled Permanent Magnets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4. . . . . . . . . . . .5 MAGNETS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4. . .4. . . . . . .2 DEFINITIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 GENERAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14. . . . . . . . . . 14. . . . . . 14.8. . . . 14. . . . . .3 Electrically Controlled Permanent Magnets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Operation . . . . . . . 14. . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Operation . . . . . . REMOTE-OPERATED . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14. . . . . . . . . . . . 14. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4. . 14. . . . . . .4. . . . . . 14. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . .4. . . . .8. . . . . . . . . .6 Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4. . . . . . 14. . .5. . . . . . . 14. . . . . . .1 Operational Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Operational Test .4. . . . . .1 External-Powered Electromagnets . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Rated Load (Capacity) . . . . . .4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Maintenance . . . . . . 14-11 14. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14. . . . . . .4. . . .2 Controls . . . . .4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . . . . . 14. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14. . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. . . . .5. . . . .5 Testing . . . . . .4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8. . . . . . . . . . . 14. . . . . .8. . . . . . . . .2 Marking . .2 Frequent Inspection .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Training/Qualification . .2 Rated Load Test . .3 Periodic Inspection . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14. . . . . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . .4. . 14-10 14. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Frequent Inspection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Initial Inspection . . . 14. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Initial Inspection . . .4. . . . CLOSE-PROXIMITY-OPERATED . . . . . . . .3 Periodic Inspection . . . . . .1 Design/Fabrication . 14. . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Inspections . . 14-12 14-12 14-12 14-12 14-12 14-12 14-14 14-14 14-14 14-14 14-14 14-14 14-14 14-15 14-15 14-16 14-16 14-16 14-16 14-16 14-17 14-17 14-17 14-17 14-17 14-17 14-17 14-17 14-19 14-19 14-19 14-19 14-20 Exhibit I Lifting Bars and Spreaders Load Test and Inspection . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . . . xi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15. 14-10 14. . . . . . .5. . . . . . . .4. .4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Design/Fabrication . .4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Installation . . . . . . . . . .8 Operation . .2 Battery-Operated Electromagnets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14. . . . . . . . .4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-22 CHAPTER 15 CONSTRUCTION HOISTING AND RIGGING EQUIPMENT REQUIREMENTS 15-1 15-2 15. 14. 14. . . . . . . .5. . . . . .4 MAGNETS. . . .4. . . . 14. .7 Training/Qualification . . . . . . . . . . . . .DOE-STD-1090-99 14. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . .4. . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Inspections . . . . . . . . . . . . 14. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. . . .

. . . 15. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Slings—Testing . . .3 Monthly Inspection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15. . . . . . . . . . . . . .4. . .2. . . . . .5. . . . 15. . . . .4 Frequent Inspection .6. . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7. .3 Hydraulic and Pneumatic Valves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . .2 Daily Inspection . . . . .1 Wire Rope . . . . .4. . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Conduct of Operator . . . . .2. . . . . . . .2. . . . . . .2 Hydraulic and Pneumatic Pumps . . . . . . . .2. . . . 15. . . . . . . . . . . 15. . . .6.5 Periodic Inspection . . . .6. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15. . . . . . .5. . .4. . . . . . . .2. . . 15. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15. 15. . . .5 Hydraulic Filters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 OPERATION . . . . . .7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15. . . . .6 Cranes Not in Regular Use . . . . . . . . . . . . .4. . . .5. .4. . . . . .4. . . . . . . . . . . . .2.4 Person-in-Charge (PIC) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4. . . . .5 Forklift Trucks—Testing .3 Qualified Riggers . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . 15. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. .4. .5. . . . . . .4 INSPECTION AND TESTING . . . . . .4 Forklift Trucks—Inspection .3 Steel Chain . . . . . . . . .5. .3. . . .1 Crane Operations Near De-energized and Grounded Electrical Power Lines .6 Wire Ropes . . . . . .3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . .4. . .4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. . .2 Synthetic Web . . . . . . . . . . 15. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4. .2 Mobile Cranes/Boom Trucks . . . . . . . . . . . . 15. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15.2. . . 15. . . . . . .6 Slings—Inspection . . .2. . . . . . . . . 15. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15. . .2 Synthetic Web Slings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15. . . . . . . . . 15. . . . . . . .4. . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4. .1 General .4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 PERSONNEL QUALIFICATIONS . . . .4. . 15. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15. . . .4. . . .4 Operating Near Power Lines and Transmission Towers . . .8 Rigging Accessories—Inspection . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . .5.3 Traveling the Machine . . . . . . 15. . . . . . . . . . . . 15. . .4 Hydraulic and Pneumatic Cylinders . . . . . . . .4.4. . . . . . . . . . . 15. . . . . . . .5. . . . . . 15. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . 15. . . . . . . .4. . . . . .5 Designated Leader . . . . . . . . . .1 Wire Rope . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15. . . . . . . . . .3. . . . . . . . . . .4. . . . 15. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4. 15. .4. . . .4. . . . . . . 15. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. . . 15. . . . . . . . . . .4. . . . . . . . .DOE-STD-1090-99 15. . .3. . . . . . .7 Load Hooks/Load Blocks . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5.3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Initial Inspection . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . 15. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Qualified Operators of Mobile Cranes . . . .5. . . 15. .3 Mobile Cranes/Boom Trucks—Testing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 Rigging Accessories—Testing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . .1 Attaching the Load . . 15. . . . . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . .7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . .4. . . . 15. . . . .4. .1 Cranes . Crane Operating Less than Erected/Fully Extended Boom Length away xii 15-7 15-7 15-8 15-9 15-9 15-9 15-10 15-10 15-10 15-10 15-10 15-10 15-11 15-11 15-11 15-12 15-12 15-12 15-12 15-12 15-13 15-14 15-14 15-14 15-15 15-16 15-16 15-16 15-16 15-17 15-17 15-17 15-17 15-18 15-18 15-19 15-19 15-20 15-23 15-23 15-24 15-24 15-25 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Power Lines Energized. . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Qualified Operators of Fortlift Trucks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15. . . . . . . . . . . .2 Mobile Cranes/Boom Trucks—Inspection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Moving the Load . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15. . . . . . . .4. . 15. . .4. .5. . . . . .3 Alloy Steel Chain . . . . . . . . .

. .5. . 15.5. . . . . .2. . . . . .2. . . . . 15-45 CHAPTER 16 APPENDIX A REFERENCES PROCUREMENT GUIDELINES | xiii . . . . . . .2 Traveling . . . . . . .6 Critical Lifts . . . . . .3 Forklift Trucks . . .2. . . . . . . . . 15. . . . . . .4 Crane in Transit with No Load and Boom Lowered . . . . . . . . 15. . . . . . . .3. . . . . . . . . . . .4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15. . . . . . .3 Loading . . 15. . . . .1 Operating the Unit . . . . . . . . 15.1. .5 Crane Operations Near Transmitter Towers 15. .3. . . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . .5. . . .5. .4. . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . . 15-25 15-29 15-29 15-29 15-29 15-32 15-33 15-35 15-36 15-36 15-38 15-39 15-39 15-41 15-41 | | | | | Exhibit I Operator Pre-Shift Inspection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . . . . 15. . . . . .4. . . . .5. . . . . . 15. . .5. . . . . . . .2 Ordinary Lifts . . . . . .5. . . . .5.3.7 Lifting Personnel . . .3 Critical Lifts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Lifting Personnel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15. . . . .3. . . . . . . .5. . . . . 15. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15.5. . . . . .3 Crane Operations are within the Prohibited Zone and the Power Lines are Energized . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15. . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Ordinary Lifts . . . . . .3.1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 General . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15. . . . . . . . . . .1. . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .DOE-STD-1090-99 from the Prohibited Zone . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . .

DOE-STD-1090-99 INTENTIONALLY BLANK xiv .

all changes must be approved by the DOE Hoisting and Rigging Committee. and the like. once requested. and others. an arrangement where the manual must be specifically requested from the originating source. did not contain the detail necessary to adequately accomplish the extremely complex. are sent to individuals on the distribution list. which incorporates the previous supplements plus the most recent unpublished changes approved by the committee. comply with OSHA and ANSI B-30 changes. Safety.1 . updates are automatically received through an actively maintained distribution list. only the changed pages. The manual that was developed at that time incorporated the minimum requirements of OSHA. Each phase of the manual was then critically reviewed by DOE and contractor personnel. In the years that minor revisions occur. it was determined that these documents. The complete reformatting of each section into major equipment categories so that the handbook is easier to use. improve format. the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) B-30 series. with the OSHA requirements having priority where conflicts exist. in all probability. enabling sites to tailor training programs to their particular characteristics. A final draft was completed in 1978 and implemented on a trial basis. In this case. existing. such as hoisting and rigging over nuclear reactors and other locations containing critical equipment. After two to three such supplements. without any intervening supplements. Criteria to be evaluated in training programs have likewise been expanded. Department of Energy (DOE) Headquarters (HQ) met to discuss the need for a DOE hoisting and rigging manual. Subsequently. Prior to inclusion in the manual. Some of the most notable changes in the current standard include: 1. 1993.4. cognizant safety and health personnel at the U. such as the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) 29 CFR 1910. it was decided that a DOE hoisting and rigging manual was not only desirable but absolutely necessary. however. Full compliance with OSHA and ANSI requirements. a decision was made to formally issue and distribute the manual under controlled distribution. 3. standards. particularly concerning those areas that are not defined or are only generally defined by Federal and national standards. At that meeting. the supplements were omitted because of the numerous improvements incorporated within the very short time period. The use of double-column format along with a slightly larger font size which improves readability.” Updates and improvements have been made over the years on an approximately annual basis. applicable hoisting and rigging codes. 2.DOE-STD-1090-99 History and Background In 1975. Because of the high potential for accidents that could result in significant property loss or serious personnel injury or death. History and Background . The double-column format has the added advantage of placing figures and tables closer to their referencing text. eliminate obsolescence. while adequate as minimum general industry standards. which has safety responsibility for DOE hoisting and rigging. An example is the complete revision issued in 1993 followed by another complete revision in 1995. Expansion of Chapter 6 to include greater detail on qualifications for a larger number of positions. and by the Headquarters Office of Occupational Safety and Health Policy. In June 1980. Revisions have occurred in 1984. 4. 1995. and Health Protection Standards. Preliminary work on the manual was initiated in 1976. 1989. 1988. delete needless redundancy. ANSI. were reviewed in detail. which meets semi-annually. at other government agency and private sectors throughout the country. and hazardous hoisting and rigging operations being performed at DOE sites. The Committee is also a major source for input into the manual. strengthen wording. the manual was included as a reference standard in DOE 5480. and those concerning the DOE's unique operational environment.S. such as training and qualification. and regulations. In 1982. usually 8 to 10. 1985. 1986. the manual is reissued in its entirety. critical. “Environmental Protection. and similar documents and also included additional more stringent requirements deemed necessary to adequately control hoisting and rigging work processes throughout DOE. and 1996 to clarify intent.

which reduces. These differences have been compared. the standard is and will continue to be the standard by which the excellence of DOE hoisting and rigging programs are judged. After further review.2 . many DOE organizations have. much of its content.” indicates a mandatory requirement even if the word “shall” is not present in the sentence. In addition. adopted the standard as mandatory to ensure safe and proper hoisting and rigging operations at their facilities. To improve readability. History and Background . bad practice drawings so that the information being conveyed is immediately apparent. Whether mandatory or not. such as hand signals. Labeling of the side-by-side good practice. These have been retouched. ANSI/ASME. 8. The DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) reclassified the manual as a handbook and was issued as DOE Hoisting and Rigging Handbook (DOE-HDBK-1090-95). While The Hoisting and Rigging Standard is in itself a best practice document. This document contains many common element requirements which differ slightly in wording when applied to a specific equipment type. Also.DOE-STD-1090-99 5. in some cases portions of drawings containing key information. The reader should note that the use of the active (imperative) voice. on their own initiative. finger positions were difficult to discern. OSTI has reclassified the handbook as a DOE Technical Standard and the September 1996 edition is now issued as DOE STANDARD HOISTING AND RIGGING (Formerly Hoisting and Rigging Manual). the use of the word “shall. DOE-STD-1090-96 (Rev-1). 6. such as the OSHA. the writing style has been changed to the active voice. is mandatory within DOE. to some extent. such as “ensure that. check for. the most comprehensive (and clearest) wording has been used. and whenever appropriate. 7. and Crane Manufacturers Association of America standards.” indicating a mandatory requirement. The reissued June '95 edition marked a change in classification. use only.

which has been provided gratuitously.2. which has met semi-annually since 1980. While it is convenient to have focused. In keeping with this philosophy. “Hooks” ANSI B30. and spelling have improved the standard to what we believe is the equivalent of desktop-publishing quality and in doing so increased its usefulness to the hoisting and rigging community. only those portions of standards and regulations dealing with safety. uncontrolled distribution is available through the Acknowledgment . particularly those deemed most relevant to DOE operations. Locomotive.5.9. Other significant contributors include the two editors. perhaps more than any other person. Inc. “Forks and Fork Carriers for Powered Industrial Fork Lift Trucks” Construction Safety Association (CSA) of Ontario "The Rigging Handbook" Society of Automotive Engineers. Beginning with this edition. The Department is also greatly indebted to Kay Johnson. now retired. “Overhead and Gantry Cranes (Top Running Bridge." and 29 CFR 1926. indepth hoisting and rigging safety information concentrated into one document. was responsible for developing the standard into the truly invaluable document that it is today. In the past.16. “Overhead Hoists (Underhung)” ANSI B56. They include: American Society of Mechanical Engineers ANSI B30." have been paraphrased or reproduced verbatim throughout. this group has provided advice and clarification of the codes and standards that form the underlying basis for this document. have been included.10.DOE-STD-1090-99 Acknowledgment The Department of Energy (DOE) acknowledges the many organizations whose documents provided important source material for the standard. during his 10-year tenure as program coordinator. DOE issued and disseminated the Hoisting and Rigging Standard using controlled distribution list. not a design. whose considerable efforts resulted in several of the substantive improvements described in the History and Background section. The standard is a safety. and whose changes regarding text. The contributions of DOE's Hoisting and Rigging Committee. "Occupational Safety and Health Standards for General Industry. there would be no standard. document intended for use by safety professionals and managers. format.4. “Slings” ANSI B30. Ingeborg Westfall and Marshall Henrie. the significance of the above source material is acknowledged. Applicable sections of 29 CFR 1910. and readers are strongly encouraged to review each of them so as to have a full de scription of the subject area covered. Without their time and talent. who.1. “Crawler. Representing many DOE sites. and Truck Cranes” ANSI B30. Multiple Girder)” ANSI B30. "Mobile Crane Working Area Definitions” Permission to reprint specific figures and illustrations was obtained from CSA and SAE.1 . (SAE) SAE J1028. is also recognized. “Low Lift and High Lift Trucks” ANSI MH11. "Occupational Safety and Health Regulations for Construction.

Department of Energy. U. and the National Technical Information Service. 5285 Port Royal Road.2 . fax: (301) 903-9823 to Federal agencies and their contractors. DOE appreciates the opportunity to share The Hoisting and Rigging Standard with a wider audience. Department of Commerce.S.DOE-STD-1090-99 ES&H Technical Information Services. to non-Federal agencies. Springfield. and the private sector. These organizations charge a fee for a copy of the document. (800) 473-4375. VA 22161. U. Acknowledgment . telephone (703) 605-6000.S.

eliminating the need to maintain extensive (and often incomplete) libraries of hoisting and rigging standards throughout DOE. 8. The standard occasionally goes beyond the minimum general industry standards established by OSHA and ANSI. 3. and rigging accessories Design standards for such equipment as cranes. and oftentimes hazardous hoisting and rigging work found within the DOE complex. From chapter to chapter. and regulations. whereas use of the word “should” denotes a recommended action in keeping with best management practices. 12. codes. and also delineates the more stringent requirements necessary to accomplish the extremely complex. The standard quotes verbatim or paraphrases (with minor editorial changes for consistency) the requirements of the U. Such repetition.S. 6. and spreader bars Special requirements for inspection and load-testing of hoisting and rigging equipment/accessories Hook latch requirements for cranes. diversified. slings.DOE-STD-1090-99 Introduction The U. and hooks Operating practices for hoisting and rigging operations Rigging information and load tables Good and bad rigging practices. the reader may notice what appears to be excessive repetition. Introduction . standards. under one cover. It also encompasses. 9.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and the American National Standards Institute (ANSI). and maintenance of hoisting equipment in hostile environments Nondestructive testing/nondestructive examination requirements for such items as hooks. As indicated in the History and Background section. equipment operators. it addresses the following items which are not covered in detail in the general industry standards: 1. welds. 10. Management responsibility and accountability Operator/inspector training and qualification requirements Definition of critical lifts and the additional requirements for making them The need and responsibilities of a person-in-charge for critical lifts The need and responsibilities of a designated leader for ordinary lifts The definition and special requirements for preengineered production lifts Special requirements for the testing. enabling the use of each chapter. 7. In doing so. forklifts. the use of the imperative voice (as in “Never use discarded load chain for slings”) or the word “shall” denotes a mandatory action. if needed or convenient. however. 11. inspection. is by design. critical. as a stand-alone document. 14.1 . 5. safety personnel. 2. and any other personnel responsible for safety of hoisting and rigging operations at DOE sites. line managers. 13. Department of Energy (DOE) Hoisting and Rigging Standard is intended as a reference document to be used by supervisors. 4. hoisting and rigging requirements.

and maintained. The full implementation of the requirements and recommendations of this standard will dramatically strengthen hoisting and rigging programs throughout the DOE complex and will significantly decrease the probability of serious accidents resulting in personnel injury or death or severe property damage.2 . and the use of equipment that is reliable. including proper preplanning. inspected. To propose improvements to the standard. extreme care. attention to detail. 270 CC 19901 Germantown Road Germantown.S. Although not mandatory at all DOE sites and locations.DOE-STD-1090-99 Because the possibility of serious accidents resulting in personnel injury or death or significant property damage exists whenever hoisting and rigging take place. the requirements for these operations must be clearly defined and precautions ensured. properly designed. Department of Energy EH-51. All requests or suggestions for improvement should be submitted to: Hoisting and Rigging Project Manager U. this standard has been used for many years by DOE and its contractors as a valuable resource for conducting hoisting and rigging safely and efficiently and as the standard against which to judge all hoisting and rigging programs. please use the copy of the form at the back. teamwork on the part of trained operators/riggers. MD 20874-1290 Introduction .

AUTHORIZED: Assigned by a duly constituted administrative or regulatory authority. causing it to take on the appearance of a birdcage.DOE-STD-1090-99 CHAPTER 1 TERMINOLOGY AND DEFINITIONS The following are specialized terms commonly used when discussing hoisting and rigging operations. rotating devices. ACCELERATION STRESS: Additional stress imposed due to increasing load velocity. ABRASION: Surface wear. socket. BAIL: A U-shaped member of a bucket. and booms. rams. and the like. load stabilizers. BRAKE: A device used for slowing or stopping motion by friction or electromagnetic means. AREA. or other fitting. BATTERY-ELECTRIC TRUCK: An electric truck in which the power source is a storage battery. BASKET OR SOCKET: The conical portion of a socket into which a splayed rope end is inserted and secured with zinc. BOOM (CRANE): A member hinged to the rotating superstructure and used for supporting the hoisting tackle. BOOM LINE: A wire rope for supporting or operating the boom on derricks. and the like. HOLDING: A brake that sets automatically and that prevents motion when power is off. DYNAMIC: A method of controlling crane motor speeds when in the 1-1 Chapter 1 Terminology and Definitions . The terms are arranged in alphabetical order. BRAKE. Illustrations are included for clarity. BRAKING. shovels. BRAKE. leading from the tower to the anchorage. When sheaves and drums are of suitable size. The outer strands form a “cage” and at times displace the core. BACK STAY: Guy used to support a boom or mast or that section of a main cable. PARKING: A device to prevent the movement of a stationary vehicle. Many may not be used in this standard but are included for general information. bending stress does not affect the normal life of the wire rope. ALTERNATE LAY: Lay of wire rope in which the strands are alternately regular and lang lay. ATTACHMENT: A device other than conventional forks or load backrest extension. COUNTER TORQUE: A method of stopping motion in which the power to the motor is reversed to develop torque in the opposite direction. Popular types are fork extension clamps. cranes. or cableway. AUXILIARY HOIST: Supplemental hoisting unit of lighter capacity and usually higher speed than the main hoist. side shifters. mounted permanently or removably on the elevating mechanism of a truck for handling the load. BECKET LOOP: A loop of small rope or a strand of rope fastened to the end of a large wire rope to facilitate installation. draglines. BIRDCAGING: The twisting of fiber or wire rope in an isolated area in the opposite direction of the rope lay. DRAG: A brake that provides stopping force without external control. ANSI: American National Standards Institute. BRAKE. BENDING STRESS: Stress on wires of a wire rope imposed by bending. This stress need not be added to direct load stresses. as on a suspension bridge. BIRDCAGE: A colloquialism describing the appearance of a wire rope that is forced into compression. METALLIC: Sum of the cross-sectional areas of individual wires in a wire rope or strand. BRAKING. APPOINTED: Assigned specific responsibilities by the employer or the employer's representative.

traveling vertically within the mast of a cantilever truck. 1-2 . MECHANICAL: A method of slowing motion by friction. a length of chain or wire rope. and a ratcheting lever. BREAKING STRENGTH: The measured load required to break a wire rope or chain. REGENERATIVE: A form of dynamic braking in which the electrical energy generated is fed back into the power system. railings. COME-ALONG: A portable. CABLE: A term loosely applied to wire ropes.DOE-STD-1090-99 overhauling condition to provide a retarding force. CLEVIS: A U-shaped fitting with pins. CLIP: A fitting used to clamp two parts of wire rope. and electrical conductors. wire strands. CAB: The operator's compartment. CHOKER ROPE: A short wire-rope sling used to form a slip noose around the object to be moved or lifted (see Figure 1-1). trucks. BRAKING. or the clear space between them. manila ropes. consisting of girders. such as forks (see Figure 10-3). generally roller-mounted. CLAMP. or when two moving cranes or trolleys come into contact. CENTER: A single wire or fiber in the center of a strand around which the wires are laid. that carries the trolley or trolleys. Choker rope. CLOSED SOCKET: A wire-rope fitting consisting of an integral becket and bail. CANTILEVER TRUCK: A self-loading counterbalanced or noncounterbalanced truck equipped with cantilever load-engaging means. Chapter 1 Terminology and Definitions Figure 1-1. COIL: Circular bundle of wire rope not packed on a reel. BRAKING. STRAND: A fitting used to form a loop at the end of a length of strand. CLEARANCE: The distance by which one object clears another. CENTER CONTROL: The position near the center of a truck cab from which the operator controls movement of the truck. hand-operated device consisting of a housing. CABLE-LAID WIRE ROPE: A type of wire rope consisting of several independent wire ropes laid into a single wire rope. CARRIAGE: A support structure for forks or attachments. CABLE CROWD ROPE: A wire rope used to force the bucket of a power shovel into the material being handled. the top ends of which terminate in a fitting that latches onto the lifting hook. BRIDGE: The part of a crane. CLOSING LINE: Wire rope that closes a clamshell or orange-peel bucket and then operates as a hoisting rope. BUMPER (BUFFER): An energy-absorbing device for reducing impact when a moving overhead crane or trolley reaches the end of its permitted travel. and drive mechanisms. two hooks. BRIDGE TRAVEL: Horizontal travel of the crane parallel with runway rails. CIRCUMFERENCE: Measured perimeter of a circle circumscribing the wires of a strand or the strands of a wire rope. consists of two grooved plates and bolts. BRIDLE SLING: A sling composed of multiple legs (branches). walkways. BULL RING: The main large ring of a sling to which sling legs are attached. COLLECTOR: Contacting device mounted on a bridge or trolley and used to collect current from the conductor system. that is used for miscellaneous pulling.

acids. and boom. or on existing structural members (e. and crawler cranes. tees. when activated. CORROSION: Chemical decomposition by exposure to moisture. CONSTRUCTION (WIRE ROPE): Refers to the design of wire rope. and arrangement of wires in each strand. COVER WIRES: The outer layer of wires. a wall-mounted jib crane). mounted on a base or platform equipped with axles and rubber-tired wheels for travel. It may be fiber. Gantry Crane: A crane similar to an overhead crane. 15-6. Jib cranes are most commonly mounted on a vertical column. but it may be equipped with a separate engine controlled from the superstructure (see Figures 15-1. CONICAL DRUM: Grooved hoisting drum of varying diameter.g. operating machinery. Mobile Crane: For the purposes of this chapter. 15-7. Floor-Operated Crane: A crane whose operation is controlled by use of a pendant in the hands of an operator on the floor or on an independent platform. Cantilever Gantry Crane: A gantry or semigantry crane in which the bridge girders or trusses extend transversely beyond the crane runway on one or both sides. CONTROLLER. supplied as part of the jib crane. Jib Crane: A fixed crane with a vertical rotating member supported at the bottom (also at the top in some types) from which an arm extends to carry the hoist trolley. or other destructive agents. except that the bridge for carrying the trolley or trolleys is rigidly supported on two or more legs running on fixed rails or other runway. 15-5. number of wires per strand. mounted on an automotive truck equipped with a power plant for travel. o A wheel-mounted crane consists of a rotating structure with power plant. Chapter 1 Terminology and Definitions o | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | 1-3 . CORING LINE: Wire rope used to operate the coring tool for taking core samples during the drilling of a well. A truck-mounted crane consists of a rotating superstructure with power plant that operates machinery and boom. TYPES OF: Automatic Crane: A crane that. 15-9. CONTROLLER: An operator's device for regulating the power delivered to a motor or other equipment.DOE-STD-1090-99 CONDUCTOR: Wire. CRANES. when released. CRANE: A machine used for lifting and lowering a load vertically and moving it horizontally and that has a hoisting mechanism as an integral part of it. bars. CORE: The center member of a wire rope around which the strands are laid. 15-7. Commercial truck-mounted cranes are included in this category (see Figures 15-3. The base is usually propelled by an engine in the superstructure. all the load is external to the polygon formed by the wheel contacts (see Figure 10-3). COUNTERBALANCED TRUCK: A truck equipped with load-engaging means wherein. and 15-10). Cab-Operated Crane: A crane controlled by an operator in a cab located on the bridge or trolley. SPRING RETURN: A controller that. truck cranes. angles. or an independent wire rope. alkalies. mobile cranes are defined as wheel-mounted cranes. will return automatically to a neutral position.. including number of strands. and 15-10). during normal transporting. CONTINUOUS BEND: Reeving of wire rope over sheaves and drums so that it bends in one direction (as opposed to reverse bend). operates through a preset cycle or cycles. 15-9. or special sections mounted to transmit current to the collectors. a wire strand. 15-3. CORRUGATED: A term used to describe the grooves of a sheave or drum when worn so as to show the impression of a wire rope.

Pulpit-Operated Crane: A crane operated from a fixed operator station that is not attached to the crane. piping subassemblies. with or without a trolley. or piece of equipment designated as critical by a purchaser or facility operator. fragility. Types Of. radio-controlled crane). Wall-Mounted Jib Crane: See Cranes. It is a traveling-type crane and operates on a runway attached to the side wall or line of columns. Power-Operated Crane: A crane whose mechanism is driven by electricity. usually measured at midspan as the depth from a chord joining the tops of the two supports. upset. heat exchangers. CRITICAL DIAMETER: Diameter of the smallest bend for a given wire rope that permits the wires and strands to adjust themselves by relative movement while remaining in their normal positions.. Chapter 1 Terminology and Definitions 1-4 . Wall-Mounted Crane: A crane having a jib. weight. DEFLECTION: o Sag of a rope in a span. or handling of critical items. component. because the dropping. or other unusual factors. the other end of the bridge being supported by a truck running on an elevated rail or runway. hydraulics. DIESEL-ELECTRIC TRUCK: An electric truck in which the power source is a generator driven by a diesel engine. Remote-Operated Crane: A crane controlled by an operator not in a pulpit or a cab attached to the crane. extreme susceptibility to damage. CRITICAL SERVICE: The use of equipment or tackle for hoisting. DOCKBOARD: A portable or fixed device for spanning the gap or compensating for the difference in level between loading platforms and carriers. or internal combustion. air. DECELERATION STRESS: Additional stress imposed on a wire rope due to decreasing the load velocity. Jib Crane. (c) result in significant release of radioactivity or other undesirable condition. supported from a side wall or line of columns of a building. Overhead Traveling Crane: A crane with a movable bridge carrying a movable or fixed hoisting mechanism and traveling on an overhead fixed-runway structure. Any deviation from a straight line.DOE-STD-1090-99 o A crawler crane consists of a rotating superstructure with power plant. (b) cause undetectable damage that could jeopardize future operation or the o DESIGN FACTOR: Ratio of ultimate strength to the design working stress. rigging. CRITICAL ITEM: A part. DIAMETER: Distance measured across the center of a circle circumscribing the wires of a strand or the strands of a wire rope. fuel assemblies. DESIGNATED: Selected or assigned by the employer or the employer's representative as being qualified to perform specific duties. mounted on a base equipped with crawler treads for travel (see Figures 15-2 and 15-8). or collision of it could: (a) cause damage that would result in schedule delay. operating machinery and boom.g. installation in close-tolerance receptors. assembly. by any method other than pendant or rope control (e. CYLINDRICAL DRUM: Hoisting drum of uniform diameter. DESIGNATED LEADER: “An individual assigned responsibility for hoisting and rigging activities requiring more than one person”. other primary-system components. or (d) present a potentially unacceptable risk of personnel injury or property damage. large radiation-shielded shipping casks. Critical items may include pumps. or other items that require special care in handling because of size. Semigantry Crane: A gantry crane with one end of the bridge rigidly supported on one or more legs that run on a fixed rail or runway. | | | | | | safety of the facility.

brake and gear case. ELASTIC LIMIT: Limit of stress beyond which a permanent deformation takes place within the material. FLAG: Mark or marker on a rope to designate position of load. used to engage and support loads. GALVANIZED ROPE: Rope made of galvanized wire. or gear cases used to propel bridge. trolley. FAIL-SAFE: A provision designed to automatically stop or safely control any motion in which a malfunction could occur. GAS-ELECTRIC TRUCK: An electric truck in which the power source is a generator driven by an LP-gas or gasoline engine. FORK HEIGHT: The vertical distance from the floor to the load-carrying surface adjacent to the heel of the forks with the mast vertical.DOE-STD-1090-99 DOG-LEG: Permanent short bend or kink in a wire rope caused by improper use. DRIVE: Motor. with the forks extended. FLATTENED STRAND ROPE: A wire rope with either oval or triangular strands that present a flattened rope surface. or hoist. coupling. FIBER CORES: Cords or rope made of vegetable fiber used in the core of a wire rope. railing. DRIVE GIRDER: A girder on which is mounted the bridge drive. END CONTROL: An operator-control position that is located at the end opposite the load end of the truck. DRAGLINE: Wire rope used to pull an excavating or drag bucket. FATIGUE: A term commonly applied to progressive fracture of any load-supporting member. FITTING: Any accessory used as an attachment for wire rope. EQUALIZING THIMBLES: A special type of fitting used as a component part of some wire-rope slings. This limit is approximately 55–65 percent of breaking strength of steel-wire ropes. GALVANIZE: To coat with zinc to protect against corrosion. normally suspended from the carriage. FIBER CENTERS: Cords or rope made of vegetable fiber used in the center of a strand. It may be smooth or grooved. EQUALIZING SLINGS: Slings composed of wire rope and equalizing fittings. EYE OR EYE SPLICE: A loop with or without a thimble formed in the end of a wire rope. FORKS: Horizontal tine-like projections. and in the case of reach trucks. FORKLIFT TRUCK: A high-lift self-loading truck equipped with load carriage and forks for transporting and tiering loads (see Figure 10-3). ELECTRIC TRUCK: A truck in which the principal energy is transmitted from power source to motor(s) in the form of electricity. FLAT ROPE: Wire rope made of parallel alternating right-lay and left-lay ropes sewn together by relatively soft wires. FLEET ANGLE: Angle between the position of a rope at the extreme end wrap on a drum and a line drawn perpendicular to the axis of the drum through the center of the nearest fixed sheave. walk. FIRST POINT: The first setting on the operator's controller that starts crane motion (slowly) in each direction. EQUALIZER: A device used to compensate for unequal length or stretch of a hoist rope. DRUM: A cylindrical-flanged barrel of uniform (cylindrical drum) or tapering (conical drum) diameter on which a wire rope is wound for operation or storage. and operator's cab. GALVANIZED WIRE: Wire coated with zinc. GROMMET: A seven-strand wire-rope sling made from one continuous length of strand or an endless synthetic-web sling. cross shaft. GALVANIZED STRAND: Strand made of galvanized wire. 1-5 Chapter 1 Terminology and Definitions .

including the load. similar to a left-hand screw. Rope: Rope in which the strands are laid in a helix having a right-hand pitch. usually galvanized. Left Lay: o Strand: Strand in which the cover wires are laid in a helix having a left-hand pitch. Figure 1-2. HIGH-LIFT PLATFORM TRUCK: A self-loading truck equipped with an elevating mechanism intended primarily for transporting and tiering loaded skid platforms (see Figure 10-3). HOIST. LAGGING: External wood covering on a reel of rope or a strand. IDLER: Sheave or roller used to guide or support a rope. spreader bars. or handling a component during fabrication. HOOK LOAD: The total live weight supported by the hook of a crane. o LIFT. Right Lay: Strand: Strand in which the cover wires are laid in a helix having a right-hand pitch. LANG-LAY ROPE: Wire rope in which the wires in the strands and the strands in the rope are laid in the same direction. HOIST: A device that applies a force for lifting or lowering. similar to a right-hand screw. similar to a left-hand screw. GUY LINE: Strand or rope. lower. components. shipping. or container designed specifically to facilitate supporting. or installation. for holding a structure in position. structure. LEVER OPERATED: A lever-operated manual device used to lift. slings. The hoisting of a load. storage. assemblies. Rope: Rope in which the strands are laid in a helix having a left-hand pitch. INDEPENDENT WIRE-ROPE CORE: Wire rope used as the core of a larger rope. similar to a right-hand screw. shipping fixture. o INTERNAL-COMBUSTION ENGINE TRUCK: A truck in which the power source is a gas or diesel engine. HANDLING FIXTURE: A cradle. or other hoisting equipment. loading. HIGH-LIFT TRUCK: A self-loading truck equipped with an elevating mechanism designed to permit tiering. Rope lay. and other tackle not part of the load but supported by the hook and required for the handling of the load. o HOLDING LINE: Wire rope on a clamshell or orange-peel bucket that holds the bucket while the closing line is released to dump the load. Popular types are high-lift platform trucks (see Figure 10-3). or pull a load and to apply or release tension. INNER WIRES: All wires of a strand except surface or cover wires. or other items Chapter 1 Terminology and Definitions 1-6 . GROOVES: Depressions in the outer surface of a sheave or drum for positioning and supporting a rope. lifting.DOE-STD-1090-99 GROOVED DRUM: Drum with grooved outer surface to accommodate and guide a rope. KINK: Permanent distortion of wires and strands resulting from sharp bends. LIFT: o Maximum safe vertical distance through which a hook can travel. o INTERNALLY LUBRICATED: Wire rope or strand having all wires coated with lubricant. CRITICAL: Lifting of parts. LAY LENGTH: The lengthwise distance on a wire rope in which a strand makes one complete turn around the rope's axis (see Figure 1-2). derrick.

upset. and other imperfections. within the elastic limit. MAN TROLLEY: A trolley having an operator's cab attached to it. detailed procedures. 1-7 Chapter 1 Terminology and Definitions . properties. or similar materials. LIFT. o o LIFT. and to measure geometrical characteristics. NONDESTRUCTIVE TESTING (NDT): See NONDESTRUCTIVE EXAMINATION.DOE-STD-1090-99 designated as critical because the effect of dropping. upset. would result in no more than stoppage of the equipment without causing dropping. upset. production-type lifting operation. and evaluate discontinuities. LOAD: The total weight superimposed on the load block or hook. in ways that do not impair future usefulness and serviceability. pins. in order to detect. rope. and independent review and approval of the entire process. MESSENGER STRAND: Galvanized strand or bronze strand used to support telephone and electrical cables. MARLINE SPIKE: Tapered steel pin used in splicing wire rope. or collision is reduced to a level acceptable to the responsible manager by preliminary engineering evaluation. heavy tape. and frame suspended by the hoisting ropes. Load-bearing parts which. sheaves. to assess integrity. upset. measure. ORDINARY: Any lift not designated as a critical lift or a preengineered production lift. LOAD-BACKREST EXTENSION: A device extending vertically from the fork carriage frame. LOAD CENTER (FORKLIFTS): The horizontal longitudinal distance from the intersection of the horizontal load-carrying surfaces and vertical load-engaging faces of the forks (or equivalent load-positioning structure) to the center of gravity of the load. LOAD-BEARING PARTS: Any part of a material-handling device in which the induced stress is influenced by the hook load. in which the probability of dropping. by wrapping with soft wire. MAGNET: An electromagnetic device carried on a crane hook and used to pick up loads. or uncontrolled motion of the load. LOAD BLOCK: The assembly of hook or shackle. under service or slack conditions. A primary load-bearing part is a part the failure of which could result in dropping. bearing. NONDESTRUCTIVE EXAMINATION (NDE): The development and application of technical methods to examine materials or components. Result in significant release of radioactivity or other undesirable conditions Cause undetectable damage resulting in future operational or safety problems Cause significant work delay LOW-LIFT TRUCK: A self-loading truck equipped with an elevating mechanism designed to raise the load only sufficiently to permit horizontal movement (see Figure 10-3). if failed. locate. operation-specific training. NONROTATING WIRE ROPE: See Rotation-Resistant Wire Rope. or collision of them could: o o Present a potentially unacceptable risk of personnel injury or property damage. LINE: A rope used for supporting and controlling a suspended load. specialized lifting fixtures. swivel. between a definite range of unit stress on a wire rope and the corresponding elongation. and composition. defects. NARROW-AISLE TRUCK: A self-loading truck intended primarily for right-angle stacking in aisles narrower than those normally required by counterbalanced trucks of the same capacity (see Figure 10-3). OPEN SOCKET: A wire-rope fitting consisting of a basket and two ears with a pin. MAIN HOIST: The hoist mechanism provided for lifting the maximum-rated load. MOUSING: A method of bridging the throat opening of a hook to prevent the release of load lines and slings. MODULUS OF ELASTICITY: Mathematical quantity giving the ratio. independent of the nature of the load to be lifted. PREENGINEERED PRODUCTION: Repetitive. or loss of control of the load are not considered to be primary load-bearing parts.

nonmotorized or motorized low-lift truck equipped with wheeled forks of dimensions sized to go between the top and bottom boards of a double-faced pallet. has successfully demonstrated an ability and competence to solve or resolve problems relating to the subject matter and work. QUALIFIED RIGGER: One whose competence in this skill has been demonstrated by experience satisfactory to the appointed person. hook. or above spaces in which critical items are located. certificate. Chapter 1 Terminology and Definitions 1-8 . power-driven vehicle used to carry. or other rigging tackle is designed to carry. or who. pull. stack. PALLET TRUCK: A self-loading. training. before being fabricated into the strands. shackle. PRECISION LOAD POSITIONING DEVICES: A rigging accessory designed specifically to precisely raise and lower a load through a limited range of lifting/lowering motion (stroke). and in no way relates to the worker's classification in any union or bargaining unit. These devices commonly include a built-in load scale and in such cases may also serve as a load-indicating device.DOE-STD-1090-99 ORDER-PICKER TRUCK. around. a rated capacity can be assigned that is less than the design-rated capacity. QUALIFIED ENGINEER/QUALIFIED ENGINEERING ORGANIZATION: An engineer or engineering organization whose competence in evaluation of the type of equipment in question has been demonstrated to the satisfaction of the responsible manager. and is intended for (manual) stock selection. competence. lift. Standards units typically have 12 in. PERSON-IN-CHARGE: The manager or other responsible person (other than the equipment operator) known to be qualified and appointed to be responsible for the safe handling of critical loads and for the safe handling of noncritical items in. which is movable. has a load-engaging means. by extensive knowledge. and experience. and skill. so as to raise the pallet off the floor for transporting (see Figure 10-3). push. PREFORMED STRAND: Strand in which the wires are permanently shaped. RATED CAPACITY: The maximum hook load that a piece of hoisting equipment is designed to carry. controllable by an operator stationed on a platform. PUBLIC CARRIER: A for-hire company engaged in the public transportation of goods. QUALIFIED INSPECTOR: One whose competence is recognized by the responsible manager and whose qualification to perform specific inspection activities has been determined. before being fabricated into the rope. in the safe operation of the equipment to be used. the wheels fitting into spaces between the bottom boards. The truck may be capable of self-loading and/or tiering (see Figure 10-3). NOTE: The term “rigger” or “qualified rigger” in this standard refers to the function performed. to the helical form they assume in the wire rope. including satisfactory completion of both written and operational tests to demonstrate knowledge. PEENING: Permanent distortion of outside wire in a rope caused by pounding. (30 cm) stroke and can position a load within 0. and attested to in writing. NOTE: At the option of the user. OVERHEAD GUARD: A framework fitted to a truck over the head of a riding operator. or professional standing.025 mm). verified. QUALIFIED: A person who.001 in. by possession of a recognized degree. (0. to the helical form they assume in the strand. HIGH-LIFT: A truck. also the maximum load that an industrial truck or a sling. POWERED INDUSTRIAL TRUCK: A mobile. or tier material. QUALIFIED OPERATOR: One who has had appropriate and approved training. PREFORMED WIRE ROPE: Wire rope in which the strands are permanently shaped. PROOF TEST: A nondestructive tension test performed to verify construction and workmanship of slings or rigging accessories. PRESTRESSING: Stressing a wire rope or strand before use under such a tension and for such a time that stretch that would otherwise | | | | | | | | | occur once the load is picked up is largely nonexistent.

SHEAVE. SHOULD: A word indicating a recommended action. regular-lay outer strands. called nonrunning because of its slight movement. having load-engaging means mounted so it can be extended forward under control to permit a load to be picked up and deposited in the extended position and transported in the retracted position (see Figure 10-3). SHEAVE: A grooved wheel or pulley used with a rope to change direction and point of application of a pulling force. REGULAR-LAY ROPE: Wire rope in which the wires in the strands and the strands in the rope are laid in opposite directions. having load-engaging means mounted in such a manner that it can be extended laterally under control to permit a load to be picked up and deposited in the extended position and transported in the retracted position (see Figure 10-3). 1-9 Chapter 1 Terminology and Definitions . SAFE WORKING LOAD: Load that a rope may carry economically and safely. SEALE: A strand construction having one size of cover wires with the same number of one size of wires in the inner layer and each layer having the same length and direction of lay. generally high-lift. REEVING: A system in which a rope travels around drums or sheaves. RUNNING SHEAVE: A sheave that rotates as the load block is raised or lowered. RIGGING: The hardware or equipment used to safely attach a load to a lifting device. SIDE PULL: That portion of a hoist pull acting horizontally when the hoist lines are not operated vertically. The art or process of safely attaching a load to a hook by means of adequately rated and properly applied slings and related hardware. generally high-lift. girders. SHEAVE. REEL: The flanged spool on which wire rope or strand is wound for storage or shipment. RUNNING: A sheave that rotates as the load block is lifted or lowered. Most common construction is one center wire. SIDE LOADER: A self-loading truck. SELF-LOADER: A truck with tires that can fit between the top and bottom boards of a double-faced pallet. SHACKLE: A type of clevis normally used for lifting (see Figure 1-3). lang-lay inner rope covered by right-lay. REVERSE BEND: Reeving of a wire rope over sheaves and drums so that it bends in opposite directions. SEIZING STRAND: Small strand.DOE-STD-1090-99 REACH TRUCK: A self-loading truck. and framework on which a crane operates. SERVE: To cover the surface of a wire rope or strand with a wrapping of wire. SEIZING WIRE: A soft-annealed-iron wire. and nine cover wires. ROTATION-RESISTANT WIRE ROPE: Wire rope consisting of a left-lay. usually of seven wires. nine inner wires. RIDER TRUCK: A truck that is designed to be controlled by a riding operator. made of soft-annealed-iron wire. SHALL: A word indicating that an action is mandatory. RUNWAY: Assembly of rails. Figure 1-3. SEIZE: To securely bind the end of a wire rope or strand with seizing wire or strand. the advisability of which depends on the facts in each situation. Shackle. NONRUNNING (EQUALIZER): A sheave used to equalize tension in opposite parts of a rope. ROLLERS: Relatively small-diameter cylinders or wide-faced sheaves used for supporting or guiding ropes. brackets.

SPIRAL GROOVE: Groove that follows the path of a helix around a drum. power-propelled truck used to carry.DOE-STD-1090-99 SLINGS: Wire ropes. SWITCH. axles. Also refers to making a loop or eye in the end of a rope by tucking the ends of the strands. often called the disconnect switch. LIMIT: A switch that is operated by some part or motion of a power-driven machine or equipment to alter the electrical circuit associated with the machine or equipment. POWERED INDUSTRIAL: A mobile. lift. TROLLEY TRAVEL: Horizontal travel of a trolley at right angles to runway rails. push. TROLLEY: A unit consisting of frame. SPLICING: Interweaving of two ends of rope to make a continuous or endless length without appreciably increasing the diameter. stack. THIMBLE: Grooved metal fitting to protect the eye of a wire rope (see Figure 1-4). TROLLEY GIRTS: Structural members that are supported on the trolley trucks and that contain the upper sheave assemblies. STEEL-CLAD ROPE: Rope with individual strands spirally wrapped with flat steel wire. and structural-supporting hoist mechanism and load girts. TRUCK. EMERGENCY STOP: A manually or automatically operated electric switch to cut off electric power independently of the regular operating controls. SLINGS. or tier material (see Figure 10-3). not grooved. bearings. breaking. Mechanical: A loop or eye formed in the end of a wire rope by pressing or swaging one or more metal sleeve over the wire rope junction. Thimble. MAIN: A switch controlling the entire power supply to a crane or other equipment. for handling loads. and metal mesh made into forms. face. BRAIDED: Very flexible slings composed of several individual wire ropes braided together. SPAN: The horizontal. SWITCH. pull. with or without fittings. similar to the thread of a screw. synthetic web. ELECTRIC: A device for making. SMOOTH-FACED DRUM: Drum with a plain. center-to-center distance of runway rails. TROLLEY TRUCK: An assembly consisting of wheels. trolley drive. TAG LINE: A rope used to prevent rotation of a load. Figure 1-4. Chapter 1 Terminology and Definitions 1-10 . and hoisting mechanism moving on the bridge rails in a direction at right angles to the crane runway. Splice. TIERING: The process of placing one load on or above another. chains. SWAGED FITTINGS: Fittings in which wire rope is inserted and attached by a cold-forming method. TINNED WIRE: Wire coated with tin. Splice. or changing the connections in an electrical circuit. Hand Tucked: A loop or eye formed in the end of a rope by tucking the end of the strands back into the main body of the rope in a prescribed manner. trucks. TAPERING AND WELDING: Reducing the diameter of the end of a wire rope and welding it to facilitate reeving. STRAND: An arrangement of wires helically laid about an axis or another wire or fiber center to produce a symmetrical section. SWITCH. SWITCH. STAINLESS-STEEL ROPE: Wire rope made of chrome-nickel steel wires having great resistance to corrosion.

and left-hand threaded bolts. WIRE (ROUND): Single continuous length of metal. VERIFICATION: A procedure in which a design. based on personal observation. The one or morepersons designated to sign verify.DOE-STD-1090-99 TURNBUCKLE: A device attached to wire rope for making limited adjustments in length. WHEEL LOAD: The load on any wheel with the trolley and lifted load (rated load) positioned on the bridge to give maximum-loading conditions. or document is checked and signed by one or more parties. WEDGE SOCKET: Wire-rope fitting in which the rope end is secured by a wedge. instruction. or direct reports. 1-11 Chapter 1 Terminology and Definitions . TWO-BLOCKING: The act of continued hoisting in which the load-block and head-block assemblies are brought into physical contact. calculation. WIRE ROPE: Wire strands laid helically around an axis or a core. that a specific action has been performed in accordance with specified requirements. WHEEL BASE: Distance between centers of outermost wheels for bridge and trolley trucks. report. cold drawn from a rod. thereby preventing further movement of the load block and creating shock loads to the rope and reeving system. drawing. It consists of a barrel and right. procedure. WIRE (SHAPED): A single continuous length of metal either cold drawn or cold rolled from a rod. certified records.

DOE-STD-1090-99 INTENTIONALLY BLANK Chapter 1 Terminology and Definitions 1-12 .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CRITICAL-LIFT REQUIREMENTS . . . . . .DOE-STD-1090-99 &+$37(5 &5. . . .&$//. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7.1 2. . . . . . . .2 CRITICAL-LIFT DETERMINATION . . . . . . . .)76 This chapter provides guidelines for critical-lift determination and requirements for planning and performing a critical lift safely and judiciously. . . . . . . . . . . 2-1 2-2 2-i Chapter 2 Critical Lifts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2. . .

DOE-STD-1090-99 INTENTIONALLY BLANK Chapter 2 Critical Lifts 2-ii .

1 CRITICAL-LIFT DETERMINATION a.DOE-STD-1090-99 2. high susceptibility to damage. weight. Damage that would result in unacceptable delay to schedule or other significant program impact such as loss of vital data. or dropping could result in any one of the following: 1. close-tolerance installation. upset. A lift shall be designated as a critical lift if collision. critical. Unacceptable risk of personnel injury or significant adverse health impact (onsite or offsite). 4. or other unusual factors. A lift should also be designated as critical if the load requires exceptional care in handling because of size. Undetectable damage that would jeopardize future operations or the safety of a facility. or preengineered production) prior to planning the lift. c. Significant release of radioactive or other hazardous material or other undesirable conditions. 3. 2-1 Chapter 2 Critical Lifts . 2. An appointed person shall classify each lift into one of the DOE categories (ordinary. b.

Load vectors. using the same lifting equipment. iii. rigging selection and configuration. Ensure that the requirements are met for ordinary lifts specified in each section of this standard for each particular equipment category.DOE-STD-1090-99 2. rigging accessories. and any hazardous or toxic materials that are present 2. f. vi. However. Other factors affecting equipment capacity. and below-the-hook lifting devices. and other relevant factors. Methods of attachment. vii. Boom and swing angles. the operator shall obey a STOP signal at all times. h. lifting bars. “Terminology and Definitions. and qualified as described in Chapter 1. The critical lift plan/procedure shall be reviewed and questions shall be resolved. Lifting points. The operating organization shall appoint a PIC for the entire operation. b. qualified signalers shall give signals to the operator. Chapter 2 Critical Lifts 2-2 . load movement path. or quality control) before the lift is made. d. designated. viii. a practice lift shall be done before the critical lift. The PIC shall ensure that a pre-job plan or procedure is prepared that defines the operation and includes the following: 1. quality assurance. e. and center of gravity of the load. no matter who gives the signal. Load-indicating devices. Identification of the items to be moved. g. Conditions for a practice lift should closely simulate actual conditions involving: weight. | | | | | | | | ii. dimensions.2 CRITICAL-LIFT REQUIREMENTS a. The procedure and rigging sketches shall be reviewed and approved by the responsible manager (or designee) and the responsible oversight organization (such as safety. Crane orientations. iv. Practice lifts should be done by the same crew.” and shall be present at the lift site during the entire lifting operation. c. ix. v. Experienced operators who have been trained and qualified to operate the specific equipment to be used shall be assigned to make the lift. the weight. This person shall meet the definitions of appointed. 4. If required by the critical lift procedure. Operating procedures and special instructions to operators including rigging precautions and safety measures to be followed as applicable. Sling angles. A pre-lift meeting involving participating personnel shall be conducted prior to making a critical lift. Identification and rated capacity of slings. Identification of operating equipment to be used by type and rated capacity 3. Only designated. Rigging sketches that include (as applicable): i.

. . . . .2 Fabrication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Equipment/Rigging Selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4. . . . . . . .4 Storage. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Equipment Operation . . . . . . . . 3-1 3-2 3-2 3-2 3-2 3-2 3-3 3-3 3-3 3-3 3-3 3-4 3-5 3-5 3-5 3-5 3-6 3-6 3-6 3-7 3-8 3-8 3-8 3. . .4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . .3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 3. . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . evaluation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3. . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . This lift designation may be used at the discretion of the contractor for selected operations. . . . . . . .3 Preparation and Revision . . . . . . . . . . . 3. . . . . . .3 Inspection and Testing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Task Determination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4. . . . . . . DESIGNATED LEADER . . . . . . . . .1 3. . . . . . . . PROCEDURES . . . . .2 GENERAL .1 Content . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6. . . . . . . . . .3 3. . . . . . . . . . . . . 3. . .3. . . . OPERATION EVALUATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3. . . .6. . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Hazards Evaluation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4. . . . . . .5 3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.6 Use . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3. . . . . . . . .5 Review . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3. . . .2. . . 3. .1 Load Identification . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Modification and Repair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maintenance. . 3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Development . . . . . . 3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3. . . . . . . . . . .1 Design . . . . TRAINING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 3-i Chapter 3 Preengineered Production Lifts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Procedure . and Control . . . . . . 3. . . . . . . . .DOE-STD-1090-99 CHAPTER 3 PREENGINEERED PRODUCTION LIFTS This chapter provides requirements for the design. . . . . . . . . . 3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . and performance of preengineered production lifts. . . . 3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3. . . . .3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . LIFTING FIXTURES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Approval . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

DOE-STD-1090-99 INTENTIONALLY BLANK Chapter 3 Preengineered Production Lifts 3-ii .

or dropping is reduced to a level acceptable to the responsible manager by preliminary operation evaluation. Also. upset.DOE-STD-1090-99 3.1 GENERAL a. The required procedures and controls ensure the safety of the operation and set this category of lift apart from traditional hoisting and rigging activities. operation-specific training. specialized lifting fixtures. b. A preengineered production lift is a repetitive. production-type lifting operation that is independent of the nature of the load to be lifted. The preengineered production lift is a specialized lift performed by production personnel. and performance of independent review and approval of the entire process. 3-1 Chapter 3 Preengineered Production Lifts . the probability of collision. detailed procedures.

class. etc. Other lifting operation details that affect safety and stability of the load. weight. upset.2. weight. speeds. b. rotation. Determine the dimensions. the load. and travel directions. 3. Lifting.2 OPERATION EVALUATION The following procedure should be used to determine if a lifting operation qualifies as a preengineered production lift. Determine the parameters of motion using the following as applicable: 1. Identify the identical items or group(s) of identical items to be repetitively lifted.2. and hazards. forklift. center of gravity. and center of gravity to be considered identical. a.DOE-STD-1090-99 3. task. and minimum capacity of lifting equipment (hoist. or dropping the load. b. crane. Items must have the same dimensions. Define the type of lifting fixtures required to safely accomplish the required task.4 Equipment/Rigging Selection 3. 2. 3.2 Task Determination a. Chapter 3 Preengineered Production Lifts 3-2 . and method of attachment of the items.2.3 Hazards Evaluation Determine the consequences that could result from collision.2. a.) required for the operation based on the identified load. Actions required with or adjacent to 3. Determine the type.1 Load Identification 3.

deterioration. “Below-the-Hook Lifting Devices”.10.) and the lifting fixture design requirements in Chapters 12 and 14 (“Rigging Accessories” and “Below-the-Hook Lifting Devices.) shall be inspected according to the appropriate section requirements in this standard for that type of equipment. etc. Personnel performing the lift shall visually inspect special lifting fixtures before use for visible signs of wear. etc.” B30. etc.4 a. Knowledgeable of special lifting fixture design requirements.3.).2 Fabrication a.” respectively).) when justification and documentation are provided and all other provisions of this section are met. “Hooks.20. Qualified in machine design. Occupational Safety and Health Standards for General Industry: 29 CFR 1926. be: The designer of special lifting fixtures shall Special lifting fixtures shall be fabricated according to the specifications of the approved design package. “Slings.9. f. including acceptance/rejection criteria and periodic inspection/test intervals. 1. c. Deviations in design that may result in design factors less than consensus standard requirements shall require documented justification and approval of the designer's manager and the manager of the responsible oversight organizations (safety. a qualified inspector shall perform a documented acceptance inspection and test on it. 2. Equipment to be used (cranes. etc. Store special lifting fixtures in an appropriate location to prevent damage or deterioration. Occupational Safety and Health Regulations for Construction. c. b. hoists.).1 Design 3. Special lifting fixture designs shall receive a documented review by another member of a qualified engineering organization and the responsible oversight organizations (safety. 3.3. Proof-testing as specified in the approved design package. quality assurance. documented inspections as required by the design organization.3 Inspection and Testing a. deterioration. These inspections shall include preuse inspection requirements (visible signs of wear. or damage) and a formal verification of the current configuration of the fixture against that specified in the approved design package. 3-3 Chapter 3 Preengineered Production Lifts . 3. b. Records are not required.3 LIFTING FIXTURES 3. Nondestructive examination as specified in the approved design package. A member of a qualified engineering organization.DOE-STD-1090-99 3. and Control Lifting fixture users shall do the following: 1. Before initial use of each special lifting fixture. quality assurance. d. The designer shall determine the requirements for initial and periodic inspections or tests.3. Special lifting fixtures and rigging accessories shall be designed according to recognized consensus standards (29 CFR 1910. forklifts. quality assurance.” B30. Applications not specifically addressed in the ASME standards or in this standard may be approved by the responsible manager and oversight organizations (safety. This process shall include: 1. d. ASME B30. or damage. Storage. deformation. etc. Verification of configuration of the fixture against the design drawing specifications. 2. A qualified inspector shall conduct periodic. 3.3. e. 3. Maintenance. deformation.

“Inspection and Testing. Perform and document periodic preventive maintenance as required by the design organization. Establish controls to ensure that special lifting fixtures are used only in the operations for which they were designed. hoists.” respectively).” and “Fabrication. and fabricated according to Sections 3.3. b. 3. the fixture shall be inspected and tested according to the initial use requirements in Section 3.5 Modification and Repair a. forklifts.DOE-STD-1090-99 2.2 (“Design.” Chapter 3 Preengineered Production Lifts 3-4 .3. etc. approved.3.3.) according to the appropriate section requirements in this standard for that type of equipment.3. Maintain equipment to be used (cranes. 3. 4. Following modification or repair of a load-bearing element of a special lifting fixture.1 and 3. Modification to special lifting fixtures shall be designed.

The change shall be evaluated to determine whether the revised procedure must be revalidated and reverified. 4. the procedure shall undergo a formal verification and validation process using walk-throughs or similar methods to ensure that the steps are appropriate and correct.4. These items should precede the step to which they apply and should appear on the same page as the step to which they apply. documents. Specific instructions for attachment of the lifting fixtures to the load and to the lifting equipment. up-to-date on required periodic inspections and maintenance. and accessories are operative. The sequence of procedural steps should conform to the normal or expected operational sequence.DOE-STD-1090-99 3. 6. 3. etc. Qualifications for procedure writers shall be considered. a. 3. cautions. Important factors should be highlighted. and are in good condition before the operation begins. b. or notes should be easily identifiable and should not contain any action statements. Procedures should be developed with consideration for the human-factor aspects of their intended use. and industry standards.) shall participate in the review process. Identification of the load to be lifted. At a minimum. step-by-step procedure shall be developed for the entire operation.3 Preparation and Revision 3. g.2 Development a.4. safety analysis documents. such as cranes and hoists. d. Appropriately trained personnel shall develop. vendor technical manuals. Any necessary warnings. should be clearly defined. c. e. fixtures. Verification that all equipment. references to components should exactly match drawing and label-plate identifiers. Any discrepancies found during this process shall be corrected and the process repeated until the procedure is correct.4. Procedures should reference applicable source documents. including operating organization and experience. approved procedure shall be performed according to the process specified above. 5. 2. Operating procedures should contain only one action per step. For example. approved. warnings.1 Content a. Before its first use in the actual production process. and units should be the same as those marked on applicable instrumentation. and cautions. c. The methods for developing new procedures. Parameters of motion required for the operation. b. each procedure shall contain the following information: 1. including standard procedure formats. Identification by class and capacity (if applicable) of the types of equipment to be used. Administrative procedures or writers guides should direct the development and review process for procedures at each site to ensure consistency at the site. such as operating limits. such as facility design 3-5 Chapter 3 Preengineered Production Lifts . The responsible oversight organizations (safety. Identification of the specific lifting fixtures to be used in the operation. 7. Specific instructions for removal of the lifting fixtures from both the load and the lifting equipment. f.4 PROCEDURES A detailed. review. quality assurance. Any changes to an existing. and approve a step-by-step procedure for each lifting operation. 3.

Representative of a qualified engineering organization. shall be approved before use. it shall be reviewed and approved by the following personnel: 1. a procedure change shall be initiated before operations continue. Representatives of the responsible oversight organizations (i.g. 3. Revisions of procedures shall receive the same depth of review and level of approval as the initial versions received. c. 5. a. The requirements for use of procedures should be clearly defined and understood by all personnel. Representative of a qualified engineering organization. Applicable procedures should be reviewed after an incident. Chapter 3 Preengineered Production Lifts 3-6 . safety. Management of the facility where the procedure will be performed. e. safety.4.DOE-STD-1090-99 3. b. A copy of the current issue of the approved procedure shall be in the work area when the operation is performed. a. c. procedures should be compared to source documents to verify their accuracy.5 Review a.e. either new or revised.4 Approval 3. Representatives of the responsible oversight organizations (e. Management of the production organization performing the procedure. 3..4. Before each procedure is validated. All procedures. d. b.4. Author of the procedure. The frequency of reviews should be specified for each procedure.6 Use 2. it may vary with the type and complexity of the activity involved. d. Author of the procedure. c. quality assurance). 4. Deviations from the approved procedure are not allowed during normal operations. it shall be reviewed and approved by the following personnel: 1. Approved procedures should be reviewed at periodic intervals to ensure that their information and instructions are technically accurate and that appropriate human-factor considerations have been included. If a procedure is determined to be deficient. During each review. b. 3. Personnel performing the procedure may take whatever action is necessary during emergency conditions to return the process to a safe and stable condition without first initiating a procedure change. After each procedure is validated. 2. quality assurance)..

4. Ensure that the equipment and accessories specified in the procedure are available. Ensure that equipment is properly set up and positioned. or clearly defined responsibilities within the crew's organizational structure. Direct the lifting operation to ensure that it is done safely and efficiently. Ensure that a signaler is assigned.5 DESIGNATED LEADER a. The designated leader's responsibility shall include the following: 1. 3-7 Chapter 3 Preengineered Production Lifts . specific verbal instruction for the particular job. b. and identified to the equipment operator. Stop the job when any potentially unsafe condition is recognized. Each time a preengineered production lift requiring more than one person is performed. 5. Ensure that the personnel involved have received proper and current training and qualification for the procedure. 8. c. 3. Direct emergency stabilization operations if an accident or injury occurs. 6. 7.DOE-STD-1090-99 3. 2. a designated leader shall be present at the lift site during the entire operation. if required. Survey the lift site for hazardous or unsafe conditions. Leadership designation may be by written instructions.

Personnel shall be trained and qualified in the proper execution of each specific procedure. A demonstration by the individual of operational competence in performance of the procedure. The equipment operation training shall include: 1.1 Equipment Operation a. 1. Equipment-operation training shall be repeated for personnel whenever a new or different type of equipment is introduced into the procedure. Documented evidence of the individual's knowledge of safety-related information. Documented evidence of the individual's knowledge of the steps and requirements of the procedure. This training shall be periodically reviewed and approved by the responsible operating and oversight organizations (safety. etc. 3. 3. Training on a procedure shall be repeated periodically or when a modification to the procedure results in a significant change in the operation.).DOE-STD-1090-99 3. b.6 TRAINING Specialized training shall be conducted for personnel involved in performing preengineered production lifts. 2. c. Chapter 3 Preengineered Production Lifts 3-8 . b. A demonstration of appropriate safe operating practices.2 Procedure 3. The procedure training shall include: a. Personnel shall be trained and qualified on the specific types of equipment required.6.6. quality assurance. c. 2. A demonstration by the individual of operational competence with the equipment.

. . . . . .1 4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . OVERHEAD CRANES . . . . 4-1 4-3 4-4 4-5 4-i Chapter 4 Lifting Personnel . . . . . . . . . . . . . .DOE-STD-1090-99 CHAPTER 4 LIFTING PERSONNEL This chapter describes requirements for lifting personnel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 GENERAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4. MOBILE CRANES . . . . . . . . . . .2 4. . . . . . . .3 4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PERSONNEL PLATFORM . . . . . . . . .

DOE-STD-1090-99 INTENTIONALLY BLANK Chapter 4 Lifting Personnel 4-ii .

550(g) “Cranes and Derricks” and ASME B30. stairway. unless the operator determines that the safety of the hoisted personnel is not affected. No interferences exist.5. NOTE: A single trial lift may be performed for all locations to be reached from a single setup position. A statement describing the operation and its time frame shall be included. A qualified signaler shall be appointed. Any modification to the personnel platform or rigging shall require retesting.DOE-STD-1090-99 4. The lifting and supporting shall be made under controlled conditions and under the direction of a designated leader. ii. The statement. Crane (mobile) footing is adequate. The lift route is changed. 6. These special procedures shall be followed when lifting personnel: 1.. and inspection requirements for the use of personnel lift platforms or baskets suspended from mobile or overhead cranes.” b. and hook block shall be proof-tested by a qualified inspector to twice the personnel platform's rated capacity by holding it suspended for 5 min with the test load suitably distributed on the personnel platform. after being approved by the authorizer. The trial lift shall be made from ground level (or any other location where employees will enter the platform) to each location at which the platform is to be hoisted and positioned. the qualified operator and signaler shall conduct a trial lift with the personnel platform loaded to at least the maximum anticipated load. After proof-testing. d. iv. aerial lift. Configurations necessary to reach work locations will allow the crane to remain under 50 percent of rated capacity. and dismantling of conventional means of reaching the work site (i. 3. Prior to use each working shift. The designated leader and the operator shall determine that: i. The manager specifically responsible for the overall work function to be performed shall determine that the erection. iii. the personnel platform. in accordance with the requirements for frequent inspections for the type of equipment being used. shall be corrected and another proof-test conducted. c.e. System controls and safety devices are activated and functioning properly. At each new job site (and at least annually) prior to hoisting personnel. or by the proof test. testing. Prior to lifting personnel and after the proof test. 4-1 Chapter 4 Lifting Personnel . NOTE: Materials and tools to be used during the actual lift. “Mobile Cranes. The crane (mobile) travels or is moved and set up in a new location or returned to a previously used location. if secured to prevent displacement. shall be retained at the job site. design. the personnel lift platform and rigging shall be inspected. can be in the platform for the test lift. This chapter specifies the operation. any deficiencies revealed by inspection. or elevating work platform) would be more hazardous or is not possible because of structural design or worksite conditions. This chapter implements the requirements of 29 CFR 1926. ladder. ii. use. scaffold. the manager responsible for the task shall authorize the use of a crane-suspended work platform and attest to the need for the operation through a written justification attesting to that need. rigging. The trial lift shall be repeated prior to hoisting employees whenever: i. | | 5.1 GENERAL a. For each personnel lifting procedure. The crane shall be inspected daily prior to lifting personnel. 4. 2.

24. cautious manner with no sudden movements of it or the crane. rigging. ice. 13. No lifts shall be made on another of the crane’s load lines while personnel are suspended on the platform. 20. Personnel shall not be hoisted unless the following conditions exist: i. | | | 9. Communications between the crane operator. 14. and the person responsible for overall worksite safety to plan and review procedures to be followed. Suspended personnel platforms shall be used only for personnel.DOE-STD-1090-99 7. qualified operator. Any defects found that create a safety hazard shall be corrected prior to hoisting personnel. 22. ii. or toeboard of the suspended personnel platform. snow. Procedures for entering and leaving the personnel platform or other device and the points at which persons will enter and leave the device shall be reviewed. all brakes and locks on the lift crane shall be set before personnel perform any work. 15. the electrode holders Chapter 4 Lifting Personnel 4-2 . moved. a meeting shall be held with the designated leader. The primary attachment is centered over the platform. prior to lifting personnel. Prior to the trial lift. and positioning to avoid pinch points. Tag lines shall be used unless their use creates an unsafe condition. 10. The employees being hoisted. or other adverse weather conditions that could affect the safety of personnel. Personnel shall keep all parts of their bodies inside the suspended personnel platform during raising. Personnel shall not stand on or work from the top rail. and personnel platform shall be conducted by a qualified inspector immediately after the trial lift. Employees working from a platform shall wear body belts/harnesses with lanyards attached to the lower load block or overhaul ball. their tools. After the trial lift and just before hoisting personnel. The lifting or lowering speed shall not exceed 100 ft/min (30 m/min). 18. Hoist ropes are free of kinks. 21. persons to be lifted. The operator shall remain at the controls when the personnel platform is occupied. A visual inspection of the crane. 19. or to a structural member within the platform that is capable of supporting a fall impact. midrail. iv. direct communication alone (such as a two-way radio) may be used. The crane shall be operated so that lowering will be power-controlled (no free-fall). If the personnel platform cannot be landed. In situations where direct visual contact with the operator is not possible and the use of a signaler would create a hazard for that person. controlled. 12. Personnel platforms should not be used in winds greater than 15 mph (25 km/h). 11. After the personnel platform is positioned. Ropes are properly seated on drums and sheaves. 23. shall be protected from contact with metal components of the personnel platform or basket. They shall not be used for transporting bulk materials. iii.106 (Occupational Safety and Health Regulations for Construction) shall also apply. sleet. When working above water. and persons being lifted shall be maintained throughout the lift. The total weight of the lifted load (including personnel) shall not exceed 50 percent of the crane rating under the planned conditions of use. or positioned shall remain in continuous sight of. and in direct communication with. When welding is done by personnel from the platform or basket. Multiple-part lines are not twisted around each other. the requirements of 29 CFR 1926. it should be tied to the structure before personnel get off or on. lowering. signaler. 17. 8. the platform shall be lifted a few inches and inspected to ensure that it is secure and properly balanced. electric storms. Movement of the personnel platform shall be done in a slow. the operator or signaler. signaler. and sufficient materials to do their work. 16.

“Personnel Platform. A positive-acting device shall be used that prevents contact between the load block or overhaul ball and the boom tip (anti-two-blocking device). 4-3 Chapter 4 Lifting Personnel . g.” the following requirements shall be met when lifting personnel with a mobile crane: a. In addition to the general requirements in Section 4.2 MOBILE CRANES Mobile cranes are designed and intended for handling materials. A personnel basket attached directly to the boom which is approved by the crane manufacturer. or an accurate determination of the load radius to be used during the lift shall be made prior to hoisting personnel. b. at all times. A personnel platform that is supported from the crane's hook which meets the requirements of Section 4. Cranes with outriggers shall have the outriggers fully extended and blocked. f. c. Cranes shall not travel while personnel are on a personnel platform or in the basket. Personnel are permitted to ride only in one of the following: 1.” 2. The crane shall be uniformly level within 1 percent of level grade and located on firm footing. Cranes with telescoping booms shall be equipped with a device to indicate clearly to the operator. the boom's extended length. not personnel. “General.1.DOE-STD-1090-99 4. Cranes and derricks with variable-angle booms shall be equipped with a boom-angle indicator that is readily visible to the operator. or a system shall be used that deactivates the hoisting action before damage occurs in the event of a two-blocking situation (two-block damage-prevention feature).4. d. e.

a.4. b. A hoist-limit switch/device shall be provided in the hoisting direction to stop the hoisting motion to prevent two-blocking.1. the following requirements shall be met when lifting personnel with an overhead crane. Chapter 4 Lifting Personnel 4-4 . In addition to the general requirements in Section 4. not personnel.3 OVERHEAD CRANES Overhead cranes are designed and intended for handling materials.DOE-STD-1090-99 4. Personnel are permitted to ride only in a personnel platform that is supported from the crane's hook which meets the requirements of Section 4.

Welds shall be inspected by a qualified inspector. The personnel platform shall have overhead protection when there is an overhead hazard. The personnel platform shall be limited to carrying six persons. (115 cm) high. When being supported by a crane. f. If access doors are installed. l. j. d. Rough edges exposed to contact by employees shall be surfaced (ground smooth) to prevent injury. Sufficient headroom shall be provided to allow employees to stand upright in the platform. b. The sides of the platform shall be enclosed from the toeboard to the midrail with solid construction or expanded metal having openings no greater than ½ in. and retaining pin may be used. the platform shall be attached to the hoist rope by a hook of a type that can be closed and locked.4 PERSONNEL PLATFORM Use only personnel platforms that are specifically designed and constructed for the purpose of suspending personnel according to the following: a.1 when welding is to be performed on load-sustaining members. No rigging accessories for attaching the personnel platform to hoist lines shall be used for any other purpose when not hoisting personnel.DOE-STD-1090-99 4. they shall open only to the interior of the personnel platform. g. and material specified in the design. Alternatively. (1. eliminating the hook throat opening. A grab rail shall be provided inside the personnel platform to minimize hand exposure. o. i. types. The personnel platform and rigging shall be capable of supporting. k. an alloy-steel anchor shackle with a bolt. the manufacturer shall provide welding procedures. The suspension system shall minimize inclination of the personnel platform due to the movement of personnel on it. h. Access doors shall be equipped with a device to prevent them from opening unintentionally. The personnel platform shall have perimeter protection consisting of a top rail approximately 45 in. The personnel platform shall bear a plate specifying its empty weight and the maximum number of persons and weight for which it is rated. The personnel platform shall be easily identifiable by high-visibility color or marking. 4-5 Chapter 4 Lifting Personnel . nut. m. c. Where special steels or other materials are used. The personnel platform shall be designed by a qualified person competent in structural design. n. a toeboard at least 4 in. All welding procedures and welding operator qualifications shall be in accordance with ANSI/AWS D1. and a midrail approximately halfway between the top rail and the toeboard. p. without failure. e. All welding of the platform shall be performed by a certified welder familiar with the weld grades.27 cm). All eyes in wire-rope slings shall be fabricated with thimbles. (10 cm) high. at least five times the maximum intended load.

DOE-STD-1090-99 INTENTIONALLY BLANK Chapter 4 Lifting Personnel 4-6 .

. . . . . . . . . . . . 5-i Chapter 5 Hostile Environments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Inspection and Testing .2 GENERAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . .DOE-STD-1090-99 CHAPTER 5 HOSTILE ENVIRONMENTS This chapter describes provisions for hoisting and rigging operations in hostile work environments. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Marking and Posting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5. . . . . . .1 5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5. . . HOSTILE ENVIRONMENT PLAN . . . . . 5-1 5-2 5-2 5-2 5-4 Exhibit I Hostile Environment Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

DOE-STD-1090-99 INTENTIONALLY BLANK Chapter 5 Hostile Environments 5-ii .

operations. and tests shall be done in accordance with regular provisions of this standard. Hoisting and rigging equipment or operations shall be reviewed by a designated person to determine compliance with the requirements of this standard. c. All hoisting and rigging operations shall be consistent with DOE's policy of as-low-as-reasonably achievable (ALARA) radiation exposure. or temperature extremes. Hoisting and rigging activities can usually be accomplished where the environment will allow normal operations with access for hands-on equipment contact. inspection.1 GENERAL a. a hostile environment plan shall be prepared to document alternative compliance methods and procedures. or test procedures cannot be followed as a result of radiation or radioactive contamination. maintenance. e. 5-1 Chapter 5 Hostile Environments . Safety of personnel shall remain the first priority. inspections. In those situations. d. This chapter contains the special provisions for hoisting and rigging operations and equipment in hostile environments where standard operating. b. maintenance.DOE-STD-1090-99 5. If it is determined to be impossible or unreasonable for the requirements of this standard to be met as a result of hostile environmental conditions. toxic/hazardous chemicals or gases.

equipment. inspection. testing. Handling fixtures and rigging accessories shall be qualified in accordance with Chapters 11. Responsible operations manager. approval by the following is recommended: 1. or other equipment is located and by responsible management of an overview organization such as safety or quality assurance. The difference between the requirement and actual conditions. 5. the responsible manager shall ensure that radiation exposure does not exceed 100. 6. and 14 (“Wire Rope and Slings. and tests to be performed whenever access is possible.000 rad during the life of the sling. Chapter 5 Hostile Environments 5-2 . 2. Justification for not meeting this standard's requirements. Detailed operation. a. Specific maintenance. and maintenance procedures that state specific requirements and acceptance criteria shall be prepared.QVSHFWLRQ DQG 7HVWLQJ 2. 12. DOE Field Office or equivalent (for information). be met. the plan shall be reviewed and approved by responsible management at the facility where the crane.” respectively) of this standard prior to being exposed to the hostile environment. b. based on the hostile environment plan. The responsible manager shall ensure that the approved hostile environment plan is distributed as follows: 1.” “Rigging Accessories. b. inspection. 3. and other organizations/ personnel affected by the plan. maintenance organizations.DOE-STD-1090-99 5. At a minimum. at the end of this chapter. it shall contain the following information: 1. hoist. 3. f. When it is necessary to use a nylon or polyester sling in a radiation area. See Exhibit I. d. At a minimum. The specific requirements that cannot Equipment the use of which is required by a hostile environment plan shall be posted with the following information: “Special Maintenance and Operating Instructions Required—see Hostile Environment Plan. Equipment operators. 3. The plan shall address only those actions or features that require deviation from the requirements of this standard due to a hostile environment. Equipment history file.” and “Below-the-Hook Lifting Devices. Cognizant engineer. inspections. 2. A statement of actions or features to be used to compensate for the differences. testing. and maintenance.2 HOSTILE ENVIRONMENT PLAN a. A hostile environment plan shall be prepared by a designated person and shall cover operations. Hostile Environment Plan. e. Equipment custodian.  0DUNLQJ DQG 3RVWLQJ c. Hostile environment plans in the equipment history file shall be readily available to appointed personnel.”  . While the site-specific organizational structure will determine other required reviews and approvals. 4. Nylon (rope or webbing) slings should not be used in a radiation area unless absolutely necessary. Replacement or retirement criteria for equipment that is designed to operate with little or no maintenance.

5-3 Chapter 5 Hostile Environments . Any other form that accomplishes the purpose is acceptable.DOE-STD-1090-99 Exhibit I is intended to be a sample form only and is not mandatory.

H&R standard requirement that will not be met Section number: (copy the applicable section) Location: 1.DOE-STD-1090-99 EXHIBIT I HOSTILE ENVIRONMENT PLAN Building: Type crane/hoist: (e..d. Justification for not meeting the standard requirement: 1. top-running bridge with underhung hoist.c. APPROVAL *Facility Manager: *Manager. maintenance.g. jib crane.b. Difference between standard requirement and what is to be allowed by this plan: 1. overhead top-running bridge and trolley.a. monorail hoist. or test considerations that apply to this equipment. Actions or features to compensate for differences: Include information regarding replacement or retirement criteria for this equipment. Oversight Organization: Other: (signature/date) Date: Date: Date: Date: Date: *means approval is mandatory Chapter 5 Hostile Environments 5-4 . overhead hoist) (Auxiliary): Capacity (main): Power method: Manufacturer: 1. Include information regarding any special design.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . . . . . . .2 Operators of Cab-Operated. . . . . .2 GENERAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 Inspectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6. . .3. .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6. . .2 Operators of Cab-Operated and Pulpit-Operated Cranes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Instructors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . QUALIFICATION . . . . . . . 6. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 6. . . . . . . . . 6. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6. . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6. . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . 6-11 6-i Chapter 6 Personnel Qualification and Training . . . . 6. . . . . . . REQUALIFICATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . 6. . . . . . . . . .8 Designated Leader . . . . . .10 Instructors . . . . . . . . . .2. . . .DOE-STD-1090-99 CHAPTER 6 PERSONNEL QUALIFICATION AND TRAINING This chapter describes personnel qualification and training. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Person-In-Charge (PIC) . . . . . . . . . . .4 Forklift Truck Operators . . .5 Riggers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Operators of Forklift Trucks . . . . . . . . .3. . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pulpit-Operated. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6. . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6. . . . . . . and Floor-Operated Cranes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 Maintenance Personnel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6. . 6. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6. . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Inspectors . . . . . . . . . 6. . . . . .3 Operators of Mobile Cranes . . . . . . . . . 6. . . . 6.2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 RECORDS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6. . . .6 Riggers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-1 6-2 6-2 6-2 6-2 6-3 6-4 6-4 6-4 6-4 6-4 6-4 6-4 6-5 6-6 6-6 6-6 6-7 6-7 6-8 6-9 6-9 6-10 6. . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 6. . . .2. . . .3. 6. . . .3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TRAINING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 First-Line Supervisors . . . . .1 General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Operators of Floor-Operated Cranes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 6. . . . .3 Mobile Crane Operators . . . . . . . . . . . . Only qualified personnel shall operate the equipment covered in this standard. . .

DOE-STD-1090-99 INTENTIONALLY BLANK Chapter 6 Personnel Qualification and Training 6-ii .

Personnel who are designated to operate equipment or perform work covered by this standard shall be qualified and trained to the level of proficiency consistent with assigned tasks. inspectors.1 GENERAL a. riggers. This chapter delineates the requirements for the qualification and training of operators.DOE-STD-1090-99 6. b. 6-1 Chapter 6 Personnel Qualification and Training . and trainers.

regardless of position. hoists. or powered forklift trucks: a. In these cases. Be able to distinguish colors. or which. b. if color differentiation is required for operation. Have physical strength. 3. Operators and operator trainees shall meet the following physical qualifications.3 Operators of Mobile Cranes a. with or without a hearing aid. Operators shall be required by the employer to pass a practical operating skill evaluation. Show no evidence of physical defects or of emotional instability that could be a hazard to themselves or others.DOE-STD-1090-99 6. medical judgments and tests may be required. the acceptability of a candidate shall be the decision of the supervisor. manual dexterity. and no tendencies to dizziness or similar potentially hazardous characteristics. 1. 7. 6. in the opinion of the examiner. 6. Have adequate hearing. The actual or simulated operation shall enable trainees to demonstrate basic knowledge and skills at a level that ensures the safety of personnel and equipment. Have vision of at least 20/30 Snellen in one eye and 20/50 in the other. or inspect cranes. 2. such evidence may be sufficient cause for disqualification. such Chapter 6 Personnel Qualification and Training 6-2 . or which. 6. could interfere with their safe performance. Show no evidence of being subject to seizures or to loss of physical control. in the opinion of the examiner. 8. such evidence may be sufficient cause for disqualification. In these cases. 6. Have normal depth perception. Show no evidence of being subject to seizures or to loss of physical control. with or without corrective lenses. for a specific operation. Understand spoken and written English or a language generally in use at the work location. 1. Have no detectable or known disease or physical restriction that would render them incapable of safely operating equipment or carrying out rigging duties. Where any deficiency of an upper or lower extremity exists. 4. such evidence shall be sufficient reason for disqualification. Be at least 18 years old. Qualification shall be limited to the type of equipment for which the operator is being evaluated. after consulting with the designated physician. with or without a hearing aid. field of vision. 2. coordination. under the direct supervision of qualified personnel. for a specific operation. 5. who meet the following requirements shall be allowed to rig. coordination. Have vision of at least 20/30 Snellen in one eye and 20/50 in the other. Show no evidence of physical defects or of emotional instability that could be a hazard to themselves or others. 5. Be able to distinguish colors.2. 3.1 General Only qualified personnel or trainees. regardless of position. Medical examinations may be required to determine these conditions.2. Have physical strength. and sufficient reaction speed to meet the demands of equipment operation. operate. Have adequate hearing. Operators and operator trainees shall meet the following physical qualifications. 4. Operators whose jobs do not require binocular vision (operation of cranes with television cameras or periscope optics) shall have distant visual acuity of 20/30 in one eye and no specific visual requirement for the other eye. with or without corrective lenses. could interfere with their safe performance. coordination. b. medical judgments and tests may be required.2 QUALIFICATION 6. if color differentiation is required for operation.2. and sufficient reaction speed to meet the demands of equipment operation.2 Operators of Cab-Operated and Pulpit-Operated Cranes a.

comprehend. Medical examinations may be required to determine these conditions. b. 4. 8. controls. including: 1. in the language of the crane manufacturer's operations and maintenance instruction materials. Loss of stability. coordination. Have normal depth perception. in the language of the crane manufacturer's operation and maintenance instruction materials. Operators shall be required by the employer to satisfactorily pass a written examination covering operational characteristics. Satisfactory completing of a written examination covering safety. c. The level of testing will be determined by the standard practice for the industry where the crane is employed and this test shall be confirmed by a recognized laboratory service. Satisfactory completion of a combination written and verbal test on load/capacity chart usage covering various crane configurations. demonstrating proficiency and basic knowledge in handling the specific type crane for which the operator is being evaluated. operational characteristics and limitations. Trainee qualification requirements shall include but not limited to the following: 1. 2. 10. a substance abuse test. The operator shall complete a practical operating skill evaluation test (actual or simulated).4 Operators of Floor-Operated Cranes a.DOE-STD-1090-99 evidence shall be sufficient reason for disqualification. Securing the crane. Physical qualifications shall be based on specific job requirements. g. Fire. Operators shall be required by their employer to pass a practical operating skill evaluation. 3. field of vision. Shutdown. 5. Shall successfully pass with a negative result. 4. Pre-start and post-start inspection. Qualification shall be limited to the type of equipment for which the operator is being evaluated. and controls of the type crane for which they are being qualified. 3. Have no detectable or known disease or physical restriction that would render them incapable of safely operating equipment or carrying out rigging duties. and exhibit arithmetic skills and load/capacity chart usage. 6-3 Chapter 6 Personnel Qualification and Training . handle) for the type crane for which qualification is being sought. after consulting with the designated physician. 9.2. Control malfunction. Demonstrate their ability to read. c. Operators shall demonstrate their ability to read. Qualification shall be limited to the type of equipment for which the operator is being evaluated. Operator physical examinations shall be required every three years or more frequently if supervision deems it necessary. 7. Maneuvering skills. Power line contact. write. comprehend and exhibit arithmetic skills and load/capacity chart usage. the acceptability of a candidate shall be the decision of the supervisor. and emergency control skills such as response to: 1. e. 2. As well as characteristic and performance questions appropriated to the crane type for which qualifications is sought. b. manual dexterity. The actual or simulated operation shall enable operators to demonstrate basic knowledge and skills at a level that ensures the safety of personnel and equipment. and no tendencies to dizziness or similar potentially hazardous characteristics. f. write. Where any deficiency of an upper or lower extremity exists. Operators shall satisfactorily complete a combination written and verbal test on load/chart usage that covers a selection of the configurations (the crane may be equipped to 6. 3. 2. d.

Exercise authority to start and stop work activities. Job efficiency and safety.8 Designated Leader The designated leader shall have sufficient knowledge and experience to accomplish the following responsibilities: a. 6.10 Instructors Instructors responsible for developing or presenting hoisting and rigging training programs shall meet the qualification standards specified by the responsible training organization. the PIC shall a.2. f. Necessary administrative requirements. Personnel assignments and responsibilities.2. Chapter 6 Personnel Qualification and Training 6-4 . g. c. The PIC shall understand the rules and procedures implemented at the site to ensure that the following are completed: a. h. b. Qualification shall be limited to the type of forklift for which the operator is being evaluated.2. 6. The actual or simulated operation shall enable operators to demonstrate basic knowledge and skills at a level that ensures the safety of personnel and equipment.6 Riggers Riggers shall be required to pass a practical rigging skill evaluation that requires the use of rigging equipment in safe configurations. c. b. Stop the job when any potentially unsafe condition is recognized. The actual or simulated operation shall enable personnel to demonstrate basic knowledge and skills at a level that ensures the safety of personnel and equipment.2.5 Operators of Forklift Trucks a. b. d. The supervisor shall be familiar with applicable rules and procedures implemented at the site to ensure that hoisting and rigging work under their control is done efficiently and safely. Ensure that equipment is properly set up and positioned. f. Ensure that the weight of the load is determined and that proper equipment and accessories are selected.9 Inspectors Qualified inspectors shall have the necessary knowledge and experience to properly inspect hoisting and rigging equipment. if required.DOE-STD-1090-99 6. Direct operations in the case of an accident. Recognition and control of hazardous or unsafe conditions. Supervisors should ensure that employees fully understand the importance of safety and that they recognize In addition. 6. 6. Ensure that a signaler is assigned.7 Person-In-Charge (PIC) The PIC shall have the necessary knowledge and experience of the specific type of equipment and the hazards of critical lifts to direct the safe completion of the operation. Operators shall be required by the employer to pass a practical operating skill evaluation. c. Direct operations if an accident or injury occurs. Physical qualifications shall be based on specific job requirements.2. 6. Survey the lift site for hazardous or unsafe conditions.2. with safety as top priority.11 First-Line Supervisors The first-line supervisor of hoisting and rigging operations should be knowledgeable of the specific types of hoisting and rigging operations under their supervision and their operational hazards. Selection of proper equipment/tools. b.2. Critical-lift documentation. d. 6. e. e. and is identified to the operator. Ensure that personnel involved understand how the lift is to be made. Direct the lifting operation to ensure that the job is done safely and efficiently.

2. 4. Maintenance and repair procedures recommended by the manufacturer or responsible maintenance/engineering organization. The tools to safely accomplish their 2. Manufacturers' recommendations as to points and frequency of lubrication and levels and types of lubricant to be used. Employees who perform maintenance activities on equipment covered by this handbook should have an understanding of the following criteria: 1. Documentation requirements for maintenance and repair. 3. Access to operating instructions to perform adjustments. Parts information furnished by the manufacturer or the responsible maintenance/engineering organization. work.12 Maintenance Personnel a. 6. 5.DOE-STD-1090-99 their own authority and responsibility to stop work when safety is questionable. 6. 6-5 Chapter 6 Personnel Qualification and Training . Wiring diagrams. 7.

Persons who may operate pendant-controlled cranes.1 General a. Traveling with load. 17. Emergency procedures. 2. The following checklist contains basic factors with which an operator should be familiar. 1. Traveling without load. pulpit-operated. and training by equipment manufacturer or commercial training companies. 8. capabilities. classroom training. Limit switches. to ensure that the personnel are competent to perform the operations. including a means of evaluation. Load weight estimation. 14. Lessons learned. 21. warning signals. Two-blocking. simulated field training. Environmental hazards—weather. Pulpit-Operated. 5. computer-aided training. on-the-job training (OJT). Management shall determine the course of action for persons receiving negative evaluations.3. manual hoists.3 TRAINING 6. Organizations that employ personnel who operate. 13. 16. 6. Applicant training on equipment for which qualification is sought. and floor-operated cranes. Applicable standards and regulations. limitations. Score standards shall be set for each examination by the training organization. The initial training of operators shall include: 1. Instructor review of the applicant's knowledge. Ropes and reeving. but is not limited to. This checklist must be tailored to suit actual conditions. 11. effects of variables. Load dynamics. and forklifts as an incidental part of their normal work assignment. Training programs for operators should address two levels of required performance. 4. 7. 19. 18.3. Operating characteristics. d. This may include. and operating procedures. Rigging. safety features. Operators should be able to demonstrate a knowledge of equipment operating characteristics. Inspections/tests.DOE-STD-1090-99 6. 10. 2. Only qualified and authorized operators or operator trainees under the direct supervision of a qualified operator shall be permitted to operate cab-operated. Persons whose principal assignment is the performance of hoisting and rigging work. The minimum passing score will depend on the subject. 12. rig. Safety features of equipment. b. Terminology and definitions. The training organization shall use training methods best suited for the students and the subject material. Chapter 6 Personnel Qualification and Training 6-6 . including results of written and oral evaluation. 6. or inspect equipment covered in this standard shall provide training programs. 2. under the direction of a qualified operator who is designated by management to instruct in the operation of hoisting equipment. 1. and test difficulty. 3. Lifting personnel. 9.2 Operators of Cab-Operated. Electrical hazards. b. 15. Critical lifts. 20. and Floor-Operated Cranes a. Hand signals. c. c. Records and documents. testing technique. and witnessing a demonstration of the operator's skills.

12. including restrictions due to loading. Operator aids. Stability. 7. 8. 3. Outriggers. Operating practices.3. Crane components. 6. | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | 6. c. Practical training (demonstrations performed by the trainer and practical exercises performed by the trainee). Warning devices. lecture. 2. 5. Crane setup. 1.g. video tape.3. | | | | | | | | | | | 9. Visibility. operation. The following checklist contains basic factors with which a forklift truck operator should be familiar. Lifting operations involving multiple cranes. ii. 6. Fork and attachment adaptation. warnings. Steering and maneuvering. iii. Where they are located. What they do. b. 3. and witnessing a demonstration of the operator's skills. Forklift truck controls and instrumentation: i. 4. discussion. 10. 2.DOE-STD-1090-99 22. 8. 24. A combination of formal instruction (e. 3. Forklift truck capacity and load weight determination. b. Fire protection. 23. 7. Forklift truck inspections and maintenance that the operator will be required to perform. and they should also be able to demonstrate an understanding of the following: 1. 2. interactive computer learning.b and c.4 Forklift Truck Operators a. Engine or motor operation. Operating instruction. and precautions for the type of forklift truck the operator will be authorized to operate.3 Mobile Crane Operators a.. 6-7 Chapter 6 Personnel Qualification and Training . Load charts.3. Operators shall meet the criteria specified in paragraphs 6. 25. Only qualified and authorized operators shall be permitted to operate powered forklift trucks. Evaluation of the operator’s performance in the workplace including results of written and oral evaluation.2. 26. Access and egress. Forklift truck stability and load dynamics. The initial training of operators shall include: 1. This checklist must be tailored to suit actual conditions. Assembly and disassembly. and use limitations. Refueling. written material). How they work. Differences between the forklift truck and the automobile. Operating limitations. Operator trainees may operate powered forklift trucks under the direct supervision of a qualified operator or trainer and only where such operations does not endanger the trainee or other employees. Refueling and/or charging and recharging of batteries. 6. 4. 11. 5. Only qualified and authorized operators or operator trainees under the direct supervision of a qualified operator shall be permitted to operate mobile cranes.

Lessons learned. Only qualified and authorized riggers or rigger trainees under the direct supervision of a qualified rigger shall be permitted to perform rigging functions. Assembly and disassembly. | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | 8. Critical lifts. Hand signals. 3. 15. 18. b. Environmental hazards—weather. 1. and witnessing a demonstration of the operator's skills. Terminology and definitions. Lifting personnel. The operator has been involved in an accident or near-miss incident. 16. 9. Stability (equipment). 17. 14. d. Modifications. Training programs for riggers should address two levels of required performance: 1. 18. Persons whose principal assignment is the performance of rigging work. Emergency procedures. warning. 19. c. | | | | | 2. The operator has been observed to operate the forklift truck in an unsafe manner. 20.3. 4. 22. 5. 2. 19. 10. Hand signals. 2. Critical lifts. Operating characteristics of equipment. 15. Lifting personnel. Rigging equipment selection. Emergency procedures. Applicable standards and regulations. The operator has received an evaluation that reveals that the operator is not operating the forklift truck safely. Persons who may perform rigging functions as an incidental part of their normal work assignment. 12. A condition in the workplace changes in a manner that could affect the safe operation of the forklift truck. 14. 7. Operating practices. Refresher training in relevant topics shall be provided to the operator when: 1. 13. Any other operating instructions. 6. 24. 3. Fire protection. Chapter 6 Personnel Qualification and Training 6-8 . 17. Terminology and definitions. Inspection/tests. Applicable standards and regulations. The operator is assigned to drive a different type of forklift truck. Records and documents.DOE-STD-1090-99 13. 21. 20. 6. Safety features of equipment. Traveling with and without a load. Initial training of riggers shall include the instructor's review of the applicant's knowledge. 5. Maintenance/storage of slings and rigging components. The following checklist contains basic factors with which a rigger should be familiar. Lifting operations involving multiple cranes. This checklist must be tailored to suit actual conditions.5 Riggers a. or precautions listed in the operator’s manual for the type of forklift truck that the employee is being trained to operate. Load dynamics. Load weight estimation. 16. including results of written or oral evaluation. 4. Electrical hazards. Traveling with load/load control. 23. 11. 25. Lessons learned.

c. and synthetic-web Rigging accessories. 28. 6. Rigging/operating practices. D/d ratio.6 Inspectors a. The following equipment categories for general inspection are examples that should be considered: 1. Wire-rope. 4. b. See Chapter 3. 24. workshops. 26. 25. 31. 6. 22. Mobile cranes (hydraulic and lattice boom). Instructors should attend recognized training courses.3. or seminars in order to remain current on industry practices and changes in applicable codes and standards. jib.3. 3. 5. 27. Instructors designated by management to be responsible for developing or presenting hoisting and rigging training programs shall develop technical competence by becoming familiar with the requirements of this standard and by satisfactorily completing documented training or technical experience in the hoisting and rigging discipline. Below-the-hook lifting devices. and other hoists. Inspector training shall include basic inspection techniques and acceptance/rejection criteria as specified in this standard and other applicable sources. “Preengineered Production Lifts.DOE-STD-1090-99 21. gantry. and polar cranes. 23. Overhead. Monorail. Ropes and reeving. Records and documentation. slings. Forklift trucks. Sling loading. Adjustments and repairs. Load-indicating devices.” 6-9 Chapter 6 Personnel Qualification and Training . 2. Personal protective equipment. Employees who perform required. Sling types and application. Rigging or hitch configuration.7 Instructors a. 6. b. 29. 30. documented inspections of equipment covered by this standard shall receive inspector training. chain.

A performance evaluation. and inspector qualification is for a period not to exceed 3 years. rigger. Operator. b. Chapter 6 Personnel Qualification and Training 6-10 .4 REQUALIFICATION a. unless the qualification is revoked sooner by the employee's manager. Completion of a written or oral evaluation relevant to the type of equipment used or participation in a refresher training program. The program for requalification shall include: 1. 2.DOE-STD-1090-99 6.

6-11 Chapter 6 Personnel Qualification and Training .5 RECORDS A record of training and skill evaluations shall be kept on file and shall be readily available.DOE-STD-1090-99 6.

DOE-STD-1090-99 INTENTIONALLY BLANK Chapter 6 Personnel Qualification and Training 6-12 .

. . . . . . .3 Initial Inspection . . .3 Chain (Welded Link) . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Egress . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-7 7. . . . . .DOE-STD-1090-99 CHAPTER 7 OVERHEAD AND GANTRY CRANES This chapter specifies operation. . . . . . . . 7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . .11 (“Monorail Systems and Underhung Cranes”). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . . . .1 Operational Tests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. 7. . . . . . . . . . . 7-6 7. 7-12 7. . . . . . 7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . .4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Cranes . . . . . . . . . . . Top-Running Trolley Hoist)”]. .4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-12 OPERATION . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Wire Rope . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2.2. . . . . . . . . . . .2 Wire-Rope Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 7-i Chapter 7 Overhead and Gantry Cranes . . . . . . . . . . . . .17 [“Overhead and Gantry Cranes (Top-Running Bridge. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Hoist-Limit Switch/Device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-6 7. . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7. . . .3 Modification . 7-7 7. . . 7. . . . . .7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-11 MAINTENANCE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-8 7. . . 7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7. . . . . . . . 7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 [“Overhead and Gantry Cranes (Top-Running Bridge. . . .1 Operating Equipment . . . . .5 Hoist Brakes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B30. . . 7. Single Girder. . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . 7-6 7. . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Rated Load Test . . . . . . 7. .3. . . . .1. Single or Multiple Girder. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Periodic Inspection . . . . . . .6 Power Shutoff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7. . . . . . . . . . . .4 Chain (Roller) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-6 7. 7-1 7-1 7-1 7-1 7-1 7-1 7-1 7-5 7-5 7-5 7. . . . .2 Crane Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-11 7. . . . .3 7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. 7-6 7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Operator Training/Qualification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Daily Preoperational Check .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7. . . . . . . and testing requirements for the use of overhead and gantry cranes and implements the requirements of ASME B30. .2 INSPECTIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Load Limits .2. . . . . . . . . . .4 7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . inspection.7 Hoist-Limit Switch .3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-6 7. .2 Rated-Load Marking . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Cranes Not in Regular Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Only equipment built to the appropriate design standards shall be used in DOE installations. . . . . . . . 7-8 7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2.1. 7-7 7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 GENERAL . . . . . . . .1 Conduct of Operator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Standard Hand Signals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-11 7. . . . . . . . .5 Monthly Rope. 7-13 7-13 7-13 7-14 7. . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . and B30. . . . . . . .1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7. . . .1. . . . . . . . . . . . maintenance. . . . .7. Chain and Hook Inspection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Frequent Inspection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-10 TESTING . Underhung Hoist”)]. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 Maintenance History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 General . . . . . . .5. . . . . 7-9 7. . . . . . . . . . . . 7-12 7.

. . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . . . . . Moving the Load . . .DOE-STD-1090-99 7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gantry Crane Load Test and Inspection . . . . Size of Load . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . Wall. . . . . Critical Lifts . . .7 7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 7. . . .8 7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. . . 7-19 Chapter 7 Overhead and Gantry Cranes 7-ii . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . .9 Identification of Signalers . .5. . Attaching the Load . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ordinary Lifts . . .6 7. . . . 7-15 7-15 7-15 7-15 7-16 7-16 Exhibit I Bridge. . . . . . . . . . .

7. and arranged to permit departure under emergency conditions. This device shall be mounted on the bridge or footwalk near the runway collectors. or pulpit-operated cranes. “Rated-Load Marking.3 Modification Cranes may be modified or rerated provided that the modifications or supporting structures are analyzed thoroughly by a qualified engineer or by a manufacturer of cranes. top-running single-girder bridge with underhung trolley hoists (Figure 7-2). each hoist shall have its rated capacity marked on it or on its load block. 7.4 Egress On cab-operated cranes. the holding brakes should set. Holding brakes on hoists shall be applied automatically when power is removed.5 Hoist Brakes a.1. trolley. If this is selected.or multiple-girder bridge with top-running trolley hoists (Figure 7-1). 7-1 Chapter 7 Overhead and Gantry Cranes . b. remote. remote from each other. Each independent hoisting unit shall be equipped with at least one holding brake applied directly to the motor shaft or some part of the gear train. and load block shall be legible from the ground or floor. There shall be provisions for locking the device in the OPEN position unless the crane is the only load on a lockable switch or circuit-breaker that is accessible from the floor. A means of opening this device shall be located within reach of the operator when the operator is in the operating position.” The new rated capacity shall be displayed in accordance with Section 7. 1. or near the pendant push-button station if magnetic controls are used.2 Rated-Load Marking The rated capacity shall be marked on each side of the crane. accessible from the floor. remote. b. the rope shall be suspended adjacent to the operating ropes if manual controllers are used. On floor. On cab-operated cranes. or one whose load-supporting components have been modified. the angle of whose worm prevents the load from accelerating as it is being lowered) shall be equipped with a controlled-braking means in addition to the holding brake to control speed of lowering. One of the following types of floor. a. and pulpit-operated disconnects shall be provided. c. Markings on the bridge. operated by an emergency stop button in the pendant push-button station or the pulpit. “Testing. The power supply for the runway conductors shall be controlled by a switch or circuit-breaker located on a fixed structure. “Personnel Qualification and Training. Modifications and reratings must be approved by the cognizant safety organization.1 GENERAL Overhead and gantry cranes include top-running single.1 Operator Training/ Qualification Operators of overhead cranes shall be trained and qualified as required in Chapter 6. When the operator opens this switch or circuit-breaker. Each independent hoisting unit (except worm-geared hoists. an enclosed switch or circuit-breaker (with provisions for locking in the OPEN position) shall be provided in the leads from the runway conductors.6 Power Shutoff 7. 7. 2. c.1. A rerated crane.1.1. there shall be at least two means of egress from the crane. shall be tested in accordance with Section 7.1. An under-voltage trip for a main circuit-breaker. If the crane has more than one hoisting unit. and monorails/underhung cranes (Figure 7-3).2. an enclosed disconnect device shall be provided in the leads from the runway conductors.3.” 7.” 7.1. and capable of being locked in the OPEN position.1. A nonconductive rope attached to the main disconnect device on a floor-operated crane.DOE-STD-1090-99 7.

DOE-STD-1090-99 )LJXUH  7RSUXQQLQJ VLQJOH RU PXOWLSOHJLUGHU EULGJH ZLWK WRSUXQQLQJ WUROOH\ KRLVW Chapter 7 Overhead and Gantry Cranes 7-2 .

DOE-STD-1090-99 Figure 7-2. Top-running single-girder bridge with underhung trolley hoist. 7-3 Chapter 7 Overhead and Gantry Cranes .

Monorails and underhung cranes.DOE-STD-1090-99 Figure 7-3. Chapter 7 Overhead and Gantry Cranes 7-4 .

8 Load Limits 7.1.1. Lower-travel limit switches/devices should be provided for all hoists where the load block enters pits or hatchways in the floor. 7-5 Chapter 7 Overhead and Gantry Cranes . the remote-control station. 7.7 Hoist-Limit Switch The crane shall not be loaded beyond its rated capacity except for test purposes. 7.DOE-STD-1090-99 3.3. b. A main-line contactor operated by a switch or push button on the pendant push-button station.9 Maintenance History The maintenance history of the crane shall be retained throughout its service life.1. a. or the pulpit. as described in Section 7. The hoisting motion of all cranes shall have an overtravel-limit switch/device in the hoisting direction to stop the hoisting motion.

Hooks for cracks.2 INSPECTIONS 7. Normal service—operating at less than 85 percent of rated load and not more than 10 lift cycles/hr except for isolated instances. or other deficiency that might reduce capacity or adversely effect the safety of the crane: 1. corrosive atmospheres). b. crushing. or repaired cranes shall be inspected by a qualified inspector to ensure compliance with applicable provisions of this chapter. Operators or other designated personnel shall examine deficiencies and determine whether they constitute a hazard and whether a more detailed inspection is required. gouges. all new. Hoist chain for nicks. Lower the hook block to its lowest position and examine for any condition that could result in an appreciable loss of strength. deformation and damage from chemicals (see Chapter 13. excessive wear. birdcaging. sprockets. wear. 7. 5. hoist rope or chain hooks 7.” for additional hook requirements).DOE-STD-1090-99 7.2. “Load Hooks. and the like. Hook latch. valves.4 Daily Preoperational Check a. controls. 7.1 General hoist has not been in regular service (records are not required): 1. load indicators.2. and other operating parts of the equipment shall be checked during each inspection and shall be in good working order. There shall be no apparent damage. Heavy service—operating at 85 to 100 percent of rated load or in excess of 10 lift cycles/hr as a regular specified procedure. wear. reinstalled.2. All safety devices. 4. Hoist rope for significant wear. and corrosion. Inspections of repaired and modified cranes may be limited to the provisions affected by the alteration. and Hook Inspection a. kinking. and other areas subject to wear or abrasion.5 | | | | | Monthly Rope.3 Initial Inspection Prior to their initial use. if used. 2. c. Dated and signed inspection reports shall be kept on file and shall be readily available. and corrosion. extreme temperatures. Parts found to be defective during any inspection or nondestructive examination shall be replaced or repaired as directed by the responsible line manager or that person's designated representative. 3. or modification as determined by a qualified person.2 Crane Service Crane service is defined as follows: a. 2. 7. for proper operation. 6. Severe service—operating at normal or heavy service under abnormal operating conditions (i. Chain. b. Operators or other designated personnel shall visually inspect items such as the following each day or prior to first use if the Chapter 7 Overhead and Gantry Cranes b. The inspection shall be made by running out as much of the rope or chain as is necessary to visually examine those portions that flex over sheaves. repair.e. and other parts of air systems for leakage. distortion. The operator or other designated person shall visually inspect the following items for damage. Controls and operating mechanisms for proper operation.2. 7-6 . modified.2. 7. or deformation of any load-bearing part of the equipment. Hoist upper-limit switch/device for proper operation at the beginning of each shift or prior to use if hoist has not been in regular service. Lines.. Brakes shall work satisfactorily and load brakes shall be designed to hold any load up to at least 125 percent of the rated capacity of the equipment without slipping or overheating.

limit switches. Components for deformation. or having more than 15 percent in excess of normal throat operating. “Daily Preoperational Check. h. Parts such as pins. 3. Normal service—monthly. rivets. and stops for wear. and corrosion. Heavy service—weekly to monthly. d. c. Heavy service—semiannually.” these inspections shall include the following: 1. locking and clamping devices. 7-7 Chapter 7 Overhead and Gantry Cranes . i. Brake-system parts. Chain-drive sprockets for excessive wear and chains for excessive stretch. or corrosion. and other indicators over their full range for any significant inaccuracies. Gasoline. Severe service—daily to weekly. Load. A sample load test and inspection form is included as Exhibit I. shafts. 2. distortion.6 Frequent Inspection a. Hoist braking system for proper operation. This form is intended to be a sample only and is not intended to be mandatory.. Hoist chain for nicks. Sheaves and drums for cracks or wear. e. bumpers. b. wind. gears. electric. deformation. b. g. gouges. contacts.2.1 Cranes 7. f. latch engagement (if provided). Hoist rope or chain reeving for compliance with hoist manufacturer's recommendations. The qualified inspector shall examine deficiencies and determine whether they constitute a safety hazard and whether the crane should be removed from service until it is repaired. c. cracks. rollers.7 Periodic Inspection a. 2. Operators or other designated personnel shall examine deficiencies and determine whether a more detailed inspection is required. 3. and push-button stations (not limited to these items).2.4. 7. and latches for excessive wear. Normal service—yearly. damage from chemicals. pawls.2. diesel.” periodic inspections shall include the following: a. or distortion.2. 7. A qualified inspector shall perform a complete inspection at the following intervals: 1.6. birdcaging. or other power plants for improper performance or noncompliance with other applicable standards. Hoist rope for significant wear. Signed and dated inspection records shall be kept on file and shall be readily available. c. b. wear. e.DOE-STD-1090-99 c. kinking.7. Hooks for cracks. linings. In addition to the requirements of Section 7. Observations during operation. Electrical apparatus for signs of any deterioration of controllers. cracks. Hooks for damage from chemicals. 2. which appears at the end of this chapter. deformation. f. cracks. “Frequent Inspections. nuts. and evidence of heat damage.2. d. In addition to the requirements of Section 7. Severe service—quarterly. d. and pins for being loose or absent. Dated and signed inspection records shall be kept on file and shall be readily available. Operators or other designated personnel shall visually inspect the crane at the following intervals (records are not required): 1. 3. Before the crane is returned to service. bearings. master switches. and corrosion. correct deficiencies that could reduce its capacity or adversely effect its safety. g. j. Bolts. crushing.

Wire Rope 6. or improperly applied end connections. Kinking. cutting. which interrupt power or cause a warning to be activated.2. A qualified inspector shall inspect all ropes at least annually. 2. Replacement rope and connections shall have a strength at least as great as the original rope and connections furnished by the crane manufacturer. 4. Function labels for legibility. Reductions from nominal diameter greater than those listed in Table 7-1.3 a. the crane manufacturer. 12 randomly distributed broken wires in one rope lay. A dated and signed report of the rope inspection. Nondestructive examination of hooks and of welds.2. including results. welds. grade. Sections of rope that are normally hidden during inspection or maintenance procedures. Never use discarded rope for slings. Wear of one-third of the original diameter of outside individual wires. c. Corroded or broken wires at end connections. Any deviation from the original size. Hook retaining nuts or collars and pins. 5. Chain (Welded Link) 4. 7. n. or riveting used to secure the retaining members for soundness. 1. Testing of motion limit devices. d. Kinking. birdcaging. or construction shall be specified by a rope manufacturer. percentage of capacity lifts. Reduction of rope size below nominal diameter. cause. k. bent.7. and observe the operation Chapter 7 Overhead and Gantry Cranes 7-8 . without detaching it from the hoist drum. No precise rules can be given for determining the exact time to replace rope because many variables are involved. Operate the crane under load in raising and lowering directions. or unstranding. bearings. This inspection shall include examination of the entire length of the rope. frequency rates of operation. and exposure to shock loads. crushing. Worn outside wires. The qualified inspector shall carefully note any deterioration such as described below resulting in appreciable loss of original strength and determine whether further use of the rope constitutes an acceptable risk. or other suspect load-bearing parts when required by the inspector. 3. e. internal or external corrosion. 3. such as parts passing over sheaves (these are points most subject to deterioration). The number and distribution or concentration of broken outside wires.b. 7. or any other damage resulting in distortion of the rope structure. l. or 4 broken wires in one strand in one rope lay. shall be filed. Evidence of heat damage from any 7. In running ropes. severity of environment. 2.7. Corroded. for proper performance (each motion shall be inched or operated at low speed into the limit device with no load on the crane).2 a. worn. Safety in this respect depends largely on the use of good judgment by an appointed person in evaluating remaining strength in a used rope. All rope on cranes that have been idle for 1 month or more due to shutdown or storage shall be inspected before the crane is returned to service. Conditions such as the following shall be sufficient reason for questioning rope safety and considering replacement: 1. More frequent intervals shall be determined by a qualified person and shall be based on such factors as expected rope life as determined by experience on the particular installation or similar installations. m. Safety of rope operation depends on this remaining strength. whether due to loss of core support. or wear of outside wires (see Table 7-1). 5. crushing. after allowance for deterioration disclosed by inspection. or a qualified person.DOE-STD-1090-99 or more than 10 degree twist from the plane of the unbent hook (see Chapter 13 for additional hook requirements). cracked.

jumps. using a caliper-type gauge. Load-chain links that pass over the load sprocket on edge (alternate to those that lie flat in the pockets) should be installed with the welds away from the center of the sprocket. weld spatter. Replacement chain shall be the same size. If the trouble persists. Measure the same number of links in the used sections and calculate the percentage of increase in length. The chain shall be installed without any twist between the hoist and an anchored end on either the loaded side or the slack side.. If instructions are not available. to 3/4 in. the chain shall be measured according to the crane manufacturer's instructions. (19 mm) Over 3/4 in. 3. clean and properly lubricate it. (8 mm) Over 5/16 in. or is noisy. the chain should be measured according to the hoist manufacturer's instructions. distortion. f. or distorted links. or damage. to 1/2 in. Maximum allowable reduction from Nominal diameter 1/64 in. disassemble and inspect the mating parts (sprockets. If the chain binds. This precaution is not required on idler sprockets.2. first see that it is clean and properly lubricated. inspect the chain and mating parts for wear. a.g. to 1 1/2 in. If the used chain exceeds a crane manufacturer's recommended length or. 2. g. (29 mm) Over 1 1/8 in. Discarded load chain shall not be used for slings. Maximum allowable rope reductions.4 mm) 1/32 in. replace the chain. 7. Slacken the chain and move adjacent links to one side to inspect for wear at the contact points. The existence of gouges. and construction as the original chain furnished by the crane manufacturer unless otherwise recommended by the manufacturer due to working conditions. Table 7-1. or other damage. nicks. inspect the chain and mating parts for wear. (1. If the chain binds. jumps.4 Chain (Roller) Rope diameter Up to 5/16 in. The chain should feed smoothly into and away from the sprockets.6 mm) 3/32 in. observing the operation of the chain and sprockets.8 mm) 3/64 in. If instructions are not available.4 mm) d. Test the crane under load in raising and lowering directions. Suspend the chain vertically under tension and. proceed as follows: 1. (2. nicks. unstretched length of the chain (e. or is noisy.5 percent longer than the unused chain for hand-operated chain. e. Examine visually for gouges. proceed as follows: Chapter 7 Overhead and Gantry Cranes 7-9 . b. distortion. (305 mm) to 14 in. b. Repairing the load chain by welding or any other means shall not be attempted by anyone other than the chain manufacturer. (356 mm) overall. in the absence of such a recommendation. If wear is observed or stretching is suspected.DOE-STD-1090-99 of the chain and sprockets. which change the direction but not the tension in the chain. to 1 1/8 in. If the trouble persists. The chain should be cleaned before inspection. and replace if necessary.5 percent longer than the unused chain for powered hoists or is 2. measure the outside length of any convenient number of links approximately 12 in.7. guides. (0. at the slack end). the used chain is 1. stripper) for wear. Select an unworn. h. If wear is observed or stretching is suspected. (13 mm) Over 1/2 in. 2.2 mm) 1/16 in. When a chain is replaced. (1. j. weld spatter. and distorted links. corrosion. Conditions such as the following shall be sufficient reason for questioning safety and for considering replacement: 1. (38 mm) c. corrosion. i. grade. (0.

b. pitting. shall not be used for slings.” Chapter 7 Overhead and Gantry Cranes 7-10 . Joints that cannot be flexed by easy hand pressure. Rollers that do not run freely with light finger pressure. nicks. ii. If elongation exceeds 1/4 in. iv.7. discarded or new.b.8 Cranes Not in Regular Service a. 5. or weld spatter. Corrosion. 3. (6. Roller chain.3 mm) in any 5-ft (1. Select a 12-in. (6. Repairing of roller chain by welding or heating shall not be attempted.52-m) section. Replacement chain shall be the same size. b. Inspect for twist. vi.2.2. c. d. Check for straightness in a plane perpendicular to the plane of the rollers.3 mm) in 12 in. “Periodic Inspection. Side plates that are spread open. “Frequent Inspection. Cranes that have been idle for 1 month or more but less than 6 months shall be inspected before being placed in service according to the requirements listed above in Section 7. Determine elongation by measuring with a caliper from the edge of one chain pin to the corresponding edge of another pin. f.DOE-STD-1090-99 1. Suspend the hoist in normal position and apply a light load of approximately 50 lb (23 kg).6 above are reason for questioning chain safety and considering its replacement.52-m) section exceeds 15 degrees.2. 1 through 5 above. Deficiencies as stated in paragraph 7. Replace if the twist in any 5-ft (1. Gouges. and construction as the original chain furnished by the crane manufacturer unless otherwise recommended by the manufacturer due to working conditions. e. Deficiencies such as those listed below shall be carefully examined and a determination shall be made as to whether they constitute a safety hazard: i.4.4. Pins turned from original position. Additional inspection shall be made by removing the chain from the crane and cleaning it thoroughly.7. (305-mm) section of chain that normally travels over the load sprocket. the chain shall be replaced. iii. 2. 7. g. Roller chain shall be replaced if any of the conditions exist as stated inparagraphs 7. or discoloration.2. v. (305 mm) compared to new or unstretched chain values. 6.. grade.2.6.7. Cranes that have been idle for 6 months or longer shall be inspected before being placed in service according to the requirements listed above in Section 7. Replace if the chain has a bow exceeding 1/4 in. 4.

Personnel shall be kept clear of the test load while it is suspended. Test loads shall not be less than 100 percent or more than 125 percent of the rated capacity. +0 percent of stipulated values. test loads should not be carried over critical systems or components. if provided. or modified cranes shall be tested by a designated person to ensure compliance with this chapter.DOE-STD-1090-99 7. 7. brakes. Transport the test load by means of the bridge for the full length of the runway. reinstalled. The transporting of test loads as required by paragraph 7. repaired.1. h.3 TESTING 7. repair. limiting. then verify that the rope is properly seated.3. e. and in the other direction with the trolley as close to the extreme left-hand end of the crane as practical. or replaced. Transport the test load by means of the trolley for the full length of the bridge.3. 3.a. However. The crane should be cycled several times with a load equal to or greater than the maximum operational load. Trolley travel. or whose rated capacities have been affected shall be tested by or under the direction of a qualified inspector b. an operational test of the crane shall be made in accordance with para. Limit switches/devices. c. If wire rope clips or wedge socket end connection are installed during wire rope installation: 1.3. 2. repaired. 4. b.a above. Lower the test load. | | | | | 2. If wire rope clips are used. The actuating mechanism of the upper-limit device shall be located so that it will trip the device under all conditions and in sufficient time to prevent contact of the hook or load block with any part of the trolley or crane. Lifting and lowering.3. Bridge travel. Prior to initial use. Locking. 7. repaired. 3. then check and retighten nuts to the wire rope clip or wire rope manufacturer’s recommended torque value. | | | | | 7-11 Chapter 7 Overhead and Gantry Cranes . A written report confirming the rated load testing of the crane shall be furnished by the inspector. modified. Hoist the test load a sufficient distance to ensure that the load is supported by the crane and held by the hoist brakes. stopping by the | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | a. unless otherwise recommended by the manufacturer or a qualified person. however.2. f. Operational testing of altered. Testing shall consist of the following operations as minimum requirements: 1. shall be done insofar as interfering equipment/structures permit and in accordance with recommendations from the manufacturer or a responsible engineering organization. i.1 Operational Tests 2. normally 100% of the rated capacity. d. in one direction with the trolley as close to the extreme right-hand end of the crane as practical. Test weights shall be accurate to within -5 percent. all new. including the following functions: 1. 3. Prior to initial use.1 prior to putting the crane back in service. The replacement of load chain and rope is specifically excluded from this requirement. g. all new or reinstalled cranes and cranes in which the load sustaining parts have been altered. 5. or modification as determined by a qualified person. The trip setting of hoist-limit devices shall be determined by tests with an empty hook traveling at increasing speeds up to the maximum speed. and indicating devices. or modified cranes whose load sustaining parts or rated capacities have not been affected may be limited to the functions affected by the alteration.2 Rated Load Test a. 4. If a wedge socket is used.

| | | 5. 7. 4. position. d. and types of lubricant to be used. If the runway remains energized. 7. use some method to prevent unlaying the strands. During installation. maintenance of lubricant levels. b. Move the crane to a location where it will cause the least interference with other cranes and operations. cranes and prohibit contact by the active cranes with the idle crane. Use warning signs and barriers on the floor beneath the crane where overhead maintenance work creates a hazard. or with the maintenance equipment. Dated records should be kept where readily available to appointed personnel. 3. or induce sharp bends in it. Check lubricating systems for delivery of lubricant. Heat affected zones of flame cut wire rope shall not be allowed to bear load. Ensure that lubricant applied as part of a maintenance program is compatible with the original lubricant and is also a type that does not hinder visual inspection.2 Wire-Rope Maintenance Personnel using wire rope shall ensure proper care by doing the following: a. nick. Unreel or uncoil rope as recommended by the rope manufacturer and with care to avoid kinking or inducing a twist. b. Maintain rope in a well-lubricated condition to reduce internal friction and prevent corrosion. Store rope to prevent damage or deterioration. avoid dragging the rope in dirt or around objects that will scrape. place stops or signalers full-time at a visual vantage point to observe the approach of active Chapter 7 Overhead and Gantry Cranes 7-12 . A preventive maintenance program shall be established and based on the recommendation of the crane manufacturer or a qualified person.4 MAINTENANCE 7. Place all controllers in the OFF Perform a lockout/tagout procedure. Those sections of rope located over sheaves or otherwise hidden during inspection and maintenance procedures require special attention when the rope is being lubricated. 6. Maintenance personnel shall take the following precautions before performing maintenance on a crane: 1. 2. All moving parts of the crane for which lubrication is specified shall be regularly lubricated.DOE-STD-1090-99 7.4. e. Install a guard or barrier between adjacent runways for the length of the established work area to prevent contact between persons performing maintenance and any crane on the adjacent runway. Replacement parts shall be at least equal to the original manufacturer's specifications. Place any attached loads on the ground or floor. crush.4. c. with persons performing maintenance. d. Before cutting rope.1 Operating Equipment a. c. Follow manufacturer's recommendations as to points and frequency of lubrication.

3 Standard Hand Signals The standard hand signals for DOE use shall be as specified in the latest edition of the ASME B30 standards for the particular type of crane or hoist being used (see Figure 7-4). c.1 Conduct of Operator a. b. g. or the first time the crane is used during a shift. Do not lift. Before closing the main switch. even though the combined load is within the crane's rated capacity. However. c. l. certain that any persons on the other cranes are aware of what action is to be taken. 7-13 Chapter 7 Overhead and Gantry Cranes .5. Exercise extreme care to avoid two-blocking. If adjustments or repairs are necessary. Operators shall be held directly responsible for the safe operation of their equipment.5. Do not engage in any practice that will divert your attention while operating the crane. The following shall apply to all personnel involved in overhead and gantry crane operation. At the initial stage of the planning process. Do not close the switch until the warning sign has been removed by the person who placed it there. When the wind-indicating alarm is given. If you are ordered to engage with or push other cranes. ensure that all controllers are in the OFF position.5 OPERATION a. or preengineered production). If there is a warning sign on the switch. Secure outdoor cranes before leaving them. If a lift is in progress during a shift change. immediately switch all controllers to the OFF position.2 Hoist-Limit Switch/Device a. report them promptly to the responsible supervisor. or travel the crane while anyone is on the load or hook. 7. If the switch/device does not operate properly. Your immediate supervisor shall participate in this determination. an operator has the authority to stop and refuse to handle loads until the matter has been resolved by supervisory personnel. Sound a warning signal (if furnished) during travel. f.5. adjust or repair them before operations begin. Lock and tag the main positive electrical control switch in the OPEN position before any crane maintenance is performed. m. At the beginning of each work shift. j. this testing requirement is considered to have been satisfied for the completion of that lift. test the limit switch again before the next lift. do this with particular care for the safety of persons on or below the cranes. anchor the bridge on outside cranes. an appointed person shall classify each lift into one of the DOE-specified lift categories (ordinary. e. notify the next operator of the defects at shift change. Ensure that a 10BC or larger fire extinguisher is installed in the cab of cab-operated cranes. do not remove it unless you placed it there. “inch” the block into the limit switch or run it in at slow speed. Do not hoist two or more separately rigged loads in one lift. p. The extinguisher shall be maintained in a serviceable condition. do not close it until it has been determined that no one is on or close to the crane. n.DOE-STD-1090-99 7. i. test the upper-limit switch/device of each hoist under no load. Become familiar with your equipment and its proper care. If a power failure occurs during operation. and only after making 7. h. or any defects are known. b. Whenever there is any question as to the safety of the activity. If any controls do not operate properly. k. critical. o. lower. Also. Do not use the final hoist-limit switch/ device that controls the upper limit of travel of the load block as an operating control. Operate all controls before beginning a new shift. particularly when approaching personnel. d. Do not operate cranes without complying with the requirements of Chapter 6. If you find the crane's main or emergency switch open when starting on duty. Contacts with runway stops or other cranes shall be made with extreme caution. immediately notify the supervisor. 7. b.

palms up. finger closed. (Hoist slowly shown as example.” Regular signals follow. hand open and slightly raised. BRIDGE. hold position rigidly. Extend arm. move hand in small horizontal circles. STOP. Extend arm downward. With forearm vertical. LOWER. forefinger pointing down. thumb pointing in direction of motion. Hold up one finger for block marked “1” and two fingers for block marked “2. TROLLEY TRAVEL. forefinger pointing up. Arm extended forward. Standard hand signals for controlling overhead crane operation. Use one hand to give any motion signal and place other hand motionless above hand giving the motion signal. EMERGENCY STOP. Chapter 7 Overhead and Gantry Cranes 7-14 . MULTIPLE TROLLEYS. Figure 7-4. Crane operator spreads both hands apart. palm down.DOE-STD-1090-99 HOIST. moving hand rapidly right and left. and move hand in small horizontal circles. Extend arm. jerk hand horizontally. make pushing motion in direction of travel.) MAGNET IS DISCONNECTED. MOVE SLOWLY. palm down. Palm up.

Where voice (direct or two-way radio) communication is used. Multiple-part lines shall not be twisted around each other. 4. it should be determined that the rope is properly seated on the drum and in the sheaves. Any slippage or downward motion is unacceptable. Ensure that the hoist rope is free from kinks or twists. Cranes shall not be used for side pulls except when specifically authorized by an appointed person who has determined that the stability of the crane is not endangered and that load-bearing parts of the crane will not be overstressed.3. 7-15 Chapter 7 Overhead and Gantry Cranes . The load does not contact any obstructions.4 Identification of Signalers 7.DOE-STD-1090-99 7. c.5 Size of Load a. orange gloves. 3. The load is lifted slowly until it clears the ground or other support to minimize swinging. d. Ensure the load is attached to the load-block hook by means of slings or other approved devices. d.6 Attaching the Load a. The relay signaler shall also be clearly identified by the items described in the previous paragraph. Do not wrap the hoist rope around the load. as required by the responsible manager): orange hardhat. except for authorized testing described in Section 7. a. The person appointed to direct the lift shall see that the load is well secured and properly balanced in the sling or lifting device before it is lifted more than a few inches.5.7 Moving the Load a. Hoist rope shall not be kinked. If there is a slack-rope condition. During hoisting.5. In those cases where the crane operator cannot see the signaler. Each time a load approaching the rated capacity is handled. All personnel including the qualified rigger shall be clear of the load. 7. e. 7. 3. This requirement may be waived by the responsible manager when the lift is very closely controlled or personnel are required to wear special clothing for protection from a hazardous environment. Avoid carrying loads above people. The hook shall be positioned above the center of gravity of the load in such a manner as to minimize swinging when the load is lifted.5. b. b. 2. Obey a STOP signal no matter who gives it. b. The operator shall obey signals only from the designated signaler. Before starting to hoist. The weight of the load shall be determined prior to making the lift. note the following conditions: 1. b. f. Take care to make certain that the sling clears all obstacles. not through a third person.5. All personnel acting as signalers during crane operations shall be clearly identified to the crane operator by using the following (one or more. c. take care to ensure that: 1. the signaler shall communicate directly with the operator. and orange vest. There is no sudden acceleration or deceleration of the moving load. 2. A “dry run” shall be conducted in areas where clearance is limited. The crane and rigging equipment shall not be loaded beyond its rated capacity. test the hoist brakes by raising the load a few inches and applying the brakes. c. 5. a second person (relay signaler) shall be stationed where he or she can see both the signaler and the crane operator and signals can be relayed to the operator.

DOE-STD-1090-99 g. Do not lower the hook below the point where less than two full wraps of rope remain on the hoisting drum. h. When the load or hook approaches personnel, sound the warning signal. i. Tag lines should be used as required to guide, snub, or otherwise control the load. j. Place any attached load on the ground or floor, place controls in the OFF position, and turn off the power source before leaving the crane unattended, unless required to do otherwise by an approved emergency procedure. k. Work on suspended loads is prohibited under normal conditions. If the responsible manager decides that it is necessary to work on a suspended load, guidelines for safe operation shall be established through consultation with the appropriate safety organization. Suspended loads that must be worked on shall be secured against unwanted movement. particular job, or clearly defined responsibilities within the crew's organizational structure. e. The designated leader's responsibility shall include the following: 1. Ensure that personnel involved understand how the lift is to be made. 2. Ensure that the weight of the load is determined, that proper equipment and accessories are selected, and that rated capacity is not exceeded. 3. Survey the lift site for hazardous/ unsafe conditions. 4. Ensure that equipment is properly set up and positioned. 5. Ensure that a signaler is assigned, if required, and is identified to the operator. 6. Direct the lifting operation to ensure that the job is done safely and efficiently. 7. Stop the job when any potentially unsafe condition is recognized. 8. Direct operations if an accident or injury occurs. f. The operator, or a designated person, shall ensure that the crane is still within the inspection interval. g. The operator, or a designated person, shall visually examine the crane in accordance with Section 7.2.4.

7.5.8

Ordinary Lifts

a. The requirements of all preceding paragraphs in Section 7.5, “Operation,” also shall apply to ordinary lifts. b. An appointed person shall classify each lift into one of the DOE categories (ordinary, critical, or preengineered production) before the lift is planned. c. Hoisting and rigging operations for ordinary lifts require a designated leader who shall be present at the lift site during the entire lifting operation. If the lift is being made by only one person, that person assumes all responsibilities of the designated leader. d. Leadership designation may be by written instructions, specific verbal instructions for the

7.5.9

Critical Lifts

See Chapter 2, “Critical Lifts,” for critical-lift requirements.

Chapter 7 Overhead and Gantry Cranes

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DOE-STD-1090-99

Exhibit I is intended to be a sample form only and is not mandatory. Any other form that accomplishes the purpose is acceptable.

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Chapter 7 Overhead and Gantry Cranes

DOE-STD-1090-99

INTENTIONALLY BLANK

Chapter 7 Overhead and Gantry Cranes

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DOE-STD-1090-99
EXHIBIT I BRIDGE, WALL, GANTRY CRANE LOAD TEST AND INSPECTION EQUIPMENT NO. MAKE RATED CAPACITY DATE Page 1 of 4

LOAD TEST INSPECTION REPORT The following checklist identifies the items to be inspected prior to the load test. Any unusual conditions observed during the inspection should be noted in the Remarks section. NOTES: NO. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 1. 2. Craftsmen shall initial and date all tests, work, and inspections completed below. Qualified inspector shall verify all steps prior to load test. DEFECT OK NO. CRANE ITEM DEFECT OK

CRANE ITEM Load Hook & Blocks Wire Rope and End Connections Handrails, Walkways, and Ladders Bridge and Trucks Bridge Wheels and Bearings Trolley and Rails Trolley Wheels and Bearings Crane Alignment Runway Rail & Clamps

18 Controllers 19 Relays and Coils 20 Conductors and Collectors 21 Panel Wiring 22 Resistors 23 Bypass Switches 24 Limit Switches 25 Contactor (Electrical) 26 Motors 27 Gauges 28 Lighting System 29 Heater and Switches 30 Operator's Cab 31 Safety 32 Chain and Sprockets 33 Structural 34 Wire Rope Drum and Machinery Foundation

10 Bumpers/Endstops 11 Brake System 12 Drive Shafts, Gears, Couplings & Bearings

13 Pawls, Ratchets, Spuds, & Windlocks 14 Sheaves 15 Warning Devices 16 Capacity Signs 17 Main Disconnect

REMARKS (Unusual conditions—noises, structural cracks, misalignment, etc.)

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Chapter 7 Overhead and Gantry Cranes

DOE-STD-1090-99
EXHIBIT I (continued) BRIDGE CRANE AND FOLLOW UP CHECKS NOTES: 1. 2. 3. 4. Craftsmen shall initial all steps completed below. Qualified inspector shall verify all steps below. Load test shall be performed on all new, repaired, or modified cranes prior to initial use. Load test crane at 125% of rated capacity. In no case shall the load test exceed 125% of rated capacity. Test weights shall be accurate to -5%, + 0% of stipulated values. Page 2 of 4

INITIAL 1. Set crane up for load test and qualified inspector verify inspection is complete prior to load test. The trip setting of hoist-limit devices shall be determined by tests, with an empty hook traveling at increasing speeds up to the maximum speed. The actuating mechanism of the limit device shall be located so that it will trip the device under all conditions and in sufficient time to prevent contact of the hook or load block with any part of the trolley or crane. Rig test weight to hoist hook using appropriate slings. Hoist the test load a sufficient distance to ensure that the load is supported by the crane and held by the hoist brakes. Transport the test load by means of the trolley for the full length of the bridge. Ensure during operation that the trolley runs true on the bridge. Check trolley motor, brake, and gear case for overheating. Transport the test load by means of the bridge for the full length of the runway, first in one direction with the trolley as close to the extreme right-hand end of the crane as practical and next in the other direction with the trolley as close to the extreme left-hand end of the crane as practical. Ensure that the bridge runs true on the runway rails and that no undue girder deflection occurs. Check for bridge motor, brake, and gear-case overheating. Move the test load back into the original position and lower the test load, stopping by the brakes. Hold the load for 10 min or the time required to check all primary load-bearing parts while under load for slippage, damage, or permanent deformation. Slowly lower the test load to the floor. At the completion of the load test, visually inspect the following load-bearing parts for signs of wear, deformation, and deterioration:

2.

3. 4.

5.

6.

7.

8. 9.

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DOE-STD-1090-99
EXHIBIT I (continued) DEFECTIVE/OK a. b. c. d. e. f. g. Bridge track Bridge wheels Trolley track Trolley wheels Gears Magnetic brakes Blocks. Page 3 of 4

Visually inspect rope in accordance with Chapter 11, “Wire Rope and Slings.” a. b. c. d. e. Rope diameter: (Previous) Wear Kinks Broken wires Other signs of deterioration. (Present)

Visually inspect the rope drum for: a. b. c. INITIAL 10. Qualified inspector shall perform nondestructive tests on hook by visual examination, liquid penetrant examination, or magnetic-particle examination. Acceptance: No cracks, linear indications, laps, or seams. Hooks with more than 15% normal (new hook) throat opening shall be replaced. Hooks with more than 10 degree twist from the normal (new hook) plane of the hook shall be replaced. Hooks having more than 10% wear in the throat section or 5% elongation of the shank shall be replaced. Lubricate hook bearing and latch pin as applicable. Establish three marks, A, B, and C, with a center punch. For ease in measuring, set distances on an even number of inches. Wear Deformation Deterioration.

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Chapter 7 Overhead and Gantry Cranes

DOE-STD-1090-99
EXHIBIT I (continued) BEFORE LOAD TEST Length AB Length BC AFTER LOAD TEST Length AB Length BC Check for: 1. Wear and deformation 2. Cracks and twisting 3. Signs of opening between Point A and Point B Load Test Inspection Date Qualified Inspector Operated By Actual Load Test lb in. in. in. in. Page 4 of 4

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CHAPTER 8 HOISTS
This chapter provides safety standards for inspecting, testing, and operating hoists not permanently mounted on overhead cranes and implements the requirements of ASME B30.11 (“Monorail Systems and Underhung Cranes”), B30.16 [“Overhead Hoists (Underhung)”], and B30.21 (“Manually Lever Operated Hoists”). 8.1 GENERAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.1.1 Operator Training/Qualification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.1.2 Marking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.1.3 Warning Labels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.1.3.1 Electric- or Air-Powered Hoists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.1.3.2 Hand-Chain-Operated or Manual-Lever-Operated Hoists . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.1.4 Design Standards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.1.5 Design Factors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.1.6 Load-Braking/Load-Controlling Mechanisms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.1.6.1 Electric-Powered Hoists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.1.6.2 Air-Powered Hoists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.1.6.3 Hand-Chain-Operated Hoists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.1.6.4 Manual-Lever-Operated Hoists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.1.7 Wire Rope . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.1.8 Load Chain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.1.8.1 Electric-Powered, Air-Powered, and Manual-Lever-Operated Hoists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.1.8.2 Hand-Chain-Operated Hoists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.1.9 Web Strap . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.1.10 Overtravel Protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.1.10.1 Upper-Limit Switches/Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.1.10.2 Lower-Limit Switches/Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.1.11 Travel Warning Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.1.12 Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.1.13 Location . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.1.14 Load Rating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . INSPECTIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.2.1 Hoist Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.2.2 Initial Inspection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.2.3 Daily Inspection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.2.4 Frequent Inspection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.2.5 Periodic Inspection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.2.5.1 Hoists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.2.5.2 Wire Rope . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.2.5.3 Welded-Link Chain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.2.5.4 Roller Chain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.2.5.5 Synthetic-Web Strap . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.2.6 Hoists Not in Regular Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-1 8-4 8-4 8-4 8-4 8-4 8-5 8-5 8-5 8-5 8-5 8-5 8-6 8-6 8-6 8-6 8-6 8-7 8-7 8-7 8-7 8-7 8-7 8-7 8-7 8-8 8-8 8-8 8-8 8-8 8-8 8-9 8-9 8-10 8-11 8-12 8-12

8.2

8-i

Chapter 8 Hoists

. . . . . . . . . . . . . 8. . . . . . . . . . . . . 8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .or Air-Powered Hoists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Exhibit I Hoist Load Test and Inspection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8. . . . . . Chapter 8 Hoists 8-ii . . . . 8. . . . . .3 Attaching the Load . .1. . . . . . .2 Hand-Chain-Operated or Manual-Lever-Operated Hoists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . 8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Proof-Load Test . . . . . . . . . . .5. .3. 8. . . . .3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Operational Tests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Ordinary Lifts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Hand-Chain-Operated Hoists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-13 8-13 8-13 8-13 8-13 8-13 8-13 8-13 8-14 8-15 8-15 8-15 8-15 8-15 8-16 8-16 8-17 8-19 8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8. .3.1. . . . . . . . . . OPERATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Critical Lifts . . . .3. . . .DOE-STD-1090-99 8. . .1 Conduct of Operator . . . . . . .1 Electric.or Air-Powered Hoists . . . . . . . .4 8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2.4 Moving the Load . . . . . . . .5 Hoist-Limit Switch . . . . .1. 8. . . . . 8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 TESTING . . . 8. . . .5. . . . .2 Size of Load . . . . . . . .3 Manual-Lever-Operated Hoists . . . . . . .3. .2. . . . . 8. . . . . . . . . . . . . MAINTENANCE . 8. . . . . . . . .1 Electric. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Jib cranes/hoists (floor and wall mounted). Figure 8-2. Hoists described in this chapter include hand-powered. chain. Systems used for transporting personnel and specially insulated hoists used for handling electrically energized power lines require special considerations and are not included in this chapter. 2.DOE-STD-1090-99 8. d. Monorail systems. Wire-rope ratchet and pawl lever-operated hoists should not be used for lifting service (see Figure 8-8). Figure 8-1.1 GENERAL a. b. Overhead hoists (underhung). 3. Electric/air-powered chain and wire-rope hoists. 4. c. and electric-powered hoists that are not permanently mounted on overhead cranes. air-powered. and web-strap types). 8-1 Chapter 8 Hoists . Hand-chain-operated hoists. Manual-lever-operated hoists (wire rope. This chapter applies to the following types of equipment (see Figures 8-1 through 8-6): 1.

Chapter 8 Hoists 8-2 .DOE-STD-1090-99 Figure 8-3. Manual-lever-operated hoist—wire-rope type. )LJXUH  0DQXDOOHYHURSHUDWHG KRLVW³FKDLQ W\SH Figure 8-5. Electric/air-powered wire-rope hoists.

Manual-lever-operated hoist—web-strap type. Recommended—hoists with friction brake type load-controlling mechanisms. Figure 8-7. 8-3 Chapter 8 Hoists . Figure 8-8. Not recommended—hoists with ratchet and pawl load-controlling mechanisms.DOE-STD-1090-99 Figure 8-6.

load block. 2.or Air-Powered Hoists Hoist operators shall be trained and qualified according to requirements found in Chapter 6. number.1 Operator Training/Qualification the requirement to maintain warning labels. Operating a damaged or malfunctioning hoist. 3. Manufacturer's model or serial 2. Electric-powered hoists shall be marked with: 1. “Personnel Qualification and Training. Operating damaged or malfunctioning 8.1. number. b.1. 7.3 Warning Labels Documented evidence of equivalent training of the user of the hoist. Operating a wire-rope hoist with a wire rope that is not properly seated in its grooves. 8. Lifting more than the rated load. 5. Name of manufacturer.2 Removing or obscuring warning Hand-Chain-Operated or Manual-Lever-Operated Hoists 3. number. Labels shall be affixed to the hoist.1. Operating a hoist with twisted.3. Circuit ampacity. Operating a hoist when the load is not centered under the hoist. 4. The rated capacity shall be permanently marked on the hoist or load block.DOE-STD-1090-99 8. Manufacturer's model or serial 2. b.1 Electric. 2. The label shall contain cautionary language against any of the following: 1. hoists. Manufacturer's model or serial Rated air pressure. labels.1.1. or damaged chain or wire rope. Lifting more than the rated load. Hand-chain-operated hoists shall be marked with: 1. Operating the hoist with twisted. 2. or damaged wire rope. 6. Name of manufacturer. 2. b. 4. will waive Chapter 8 Hoists 8-4 . kinked. kinked. 3. Manual-lever-operated hoists shall be marked with: 1. Voltage of AC or DC power supply and phase/frequency of AC power supply. c.3. 4. a. chain. or controls that display the word WARNING or other legend designed to bring the label to the attention of an operator.” 8. demonstrating that the information on the warning labels has been conveyed and understood by the user. Operating a hoist when it is restricted from forming a straight line with the direction of loading. Name of manufacturer. or webbing strap. Labels shall be affixed to the hoist or load block and shall display the word WARNING or other legend designed to bring the label to the attention of an operator. e. Air-powered hoists shall be marked with: 1. Manufacturer's model or serial a. 8. number. The label shall contain cautionary language against any of the following: 1. 3. d. Lifting personnel or lifting loads above personnel.2 Marking a. Name of manufacturer.

where necessary. “Performance Standard for Hand Chain Manually Operated Chain Hoists”.1.1. with or without power. “Performance Standard for Manually Lever Operated Chain Hoists”.6. 3. -4M. -2M. b. the braking system shall perform the following functions: 1. Stop and hold the load hook when controls are released. The braking system shall have thermal capacity for the frequency of operation required by the service.6 8. “Performance Standard for Electric Wire Rope Hoists”.6. 6. 8. 2.21. 7. Removing or obscuring warning 8. At a minimum. b. Limit the speed of the load during lowering. the braking system shall perform the following functions: 1. safety features and operation shall meet the provisions of ASME B30. Operating hoists with other than manual power (for hand-chain-operated hoists).16 and B30. where necessary. -5M. Stop and hold the load hook when controls are released.2 Air-Powered Hoists 8. load-suspending parts shall be designed so that the static stress calculated for the rated load will not exceed 25 percent of the average ultimate strength. The braking system shall have thermal capacity for the frequency of operation required by the service. Mechanical.4 Design Standards a. This requirement is commonly reflected by quoting a minimum design factor of 4:1. This requirement is commonly reflected by quoting a minimum design factor of 5:1. b. and -6M (“Performance Standard for Electric Chain Hoists”. electrical. 8-5 Chapter 8 Hoists . -3M.1 Load-Braking/LoadControlling Mechanisms Electric-Powered Hoists a.1.1. and “Performance Standard for Air Wire Rope Hoists. to a maximum of 120 percent of the rated lowering speed for the load being handled. to compensate for wear. Prevent an uncontrolled lowering of the load in the event of a loss of air pressure.5 Design Factors a. Operating a hoist with lever extensions (for lever-operated hoists). load-suspending parts of powered hoists shall be designed so that the static stress calculated for the rated load will not exceed 20 percent of the average ultimate material strength. The braking system shall have provision for adjustments.1.” respectively). c. 8. c. Lifting personnel or lifting loads above personnel. 8. 2. “Performance Standard for Air Chain Hoists”.or air-powered hoists.DOE-STD-1090-99 5. b. Under normal operating conditions with rated load and under test conditions with test loads up to 125 percent of rated load. For electric. For hand-chain-operated and manual-lever-operated hoists. to compensate for wear. and structural components of hoist design shall meet accepted hoist design standards contained in ASME HST-1M. a. Under normal operating conditions with rated load and under test conditions with test loads up to 125 percent of rated load. The braking system shall have provision for adjustments. Stop and hold the load hook in the event of a complete power failure. labels.

unless a lower-limit device is provided. Swaged or compressed fittings shall be applied as recommended by the rope. 8. The load chain shall be proof-tested by the chain or hoist manufacturer with a load at least equivalent to 1. Figure 8-9. and Manual-Lever-Operated Hoists a. b. c. Socketing shall be done in the manner specified by the manufacturer of the assembly or the rope. the tension on the parts shall be equalized. it will automatically stop and hold any test load up to 125 percent of the rated load.DOE-STD-1090-99 8. No less than two wraps of rope shall remain on the anchorage of the hoist load sprocket (drum) when the hook is in its fully extended position. Wire rope shall be of a construction specified by the hoist manufacturer or by a qualified person. wire-strand core. Load chain. If a load is supported by more than one part of load chain. Eye splices shall be made in a manner recommended by a qualified person. The hoist shall be designed so that when the actuating force is removed.8. or fitting manufacturer or a qualified person. The load-controlling mechanism shall perform the following functions under normal operating conditions with test loads up to 125 percent of rated capacity: 1. Chain shall be pitched (calibrated) so as to pass over all load sprockets without binding.7 Wire Rope a.6. b. Chapter 8 Hoists 8-6 . or other temperature-damage-resistant core if the rope will be exposed to ambient temperatures greater than 180 degrees F (82 degrees C). Use rope having an independent wire-rope. If a load is supported by more than one part of wire rope. Air-Powered.1. in which case one wrap shall remain on each anchorage of the drum hoist. The friction brake mechanism shall have provision for adjustment where necessary to compensate for wear. d. hoist.1.1.4 Manual-Lever-Operated Hoists a. c. 8. Stop and hold the load when the lever force is removed and the lever stroke is completed. The hoist shall be equipped with a load-controlling mechanism. f. The hand chain shall be of a shape and pitch to fit the hand-chain wheel without binding or jamming under normal operating conditions. c. The rope ends should be attached to the hoist in a manner to prevent disengagement throughout rated hook travel. b.2 Hand-Chain-Operated Hoists a. 2. e. 8. Load chain may be either roller or welded link type (see Figure 8-9).1.3 Hand-Chain-Operated Hoists g. Provide for incremental movement of the load when lifting or lowering.1.1.8. the tension on the parts shall be equalized.1 Load Chain Electric-Powered.8 8. Rope thimbles should be used in the eye. 8.6.5 times the hoist's rated load divided by the number of chain parts supporting the load.

or similar synthetic material. b.9 Web Strap a.1. the hoist shall not be installed where. f. The web strap shall be attached to the hoist in a manner to prevent disengagement throughout rated hook travel.1.or air-powered hoists. c. The hand chain shall be guarded to prevent disengagement from the hand-chain wheel.12 Support Support structures. either loaded or empty.1 Overtravel Protection Upper-Limit Switches/Devices The hoist shall be installed only in locations that will permit the operator to remain clear of the load at all times. an audible or visual warning means shall be provided. or with the rated load on the hoist. without permanent distortion. 8.10 8.1. 8. b.1. Web strap should be nylon. 8. For hand-chain-operated and manual-lever-operated hoists. The hand chain shall withstand. Lower-limit devices should be provided for hoists where the load block enters pits or hatchways in the floor. 8.10.1.14 Load Rating The rated capacity shall not be exceeded except for properly authorized tests.2 Lower-Limit Switches/Devices 8. In lieu of a limit switch. Eyes shall be made in a manner recommended by the hoist manufacturer or a qualified person. during normal operating conditions. The following applies for manual-lever-operated hoists: a. c.1. shall not exceed the upper limit of travel. If a load is supported by more than one part of web strap. polyester. e. before the load chain can be completely run out of the hoist.and remote-operated carriers. Nylon and polyester web straps shall not be exposed to an ambient temperature greater than 200 degrees F (93 degrees C). it shall be restrained in its fully extended position.10.1.11 Travel Warning Devices On cab. For electric.13 Location 8. the hoist shall be designed and constructed so that the load hook. the tension on the parts shall be equalized. unless it is impossible for personnel to work on the floor below the hoist. including trolleys and monorails. shall have a rated capacity at least equal to that of the hoist. the hook can be lowered beyond rated hook travel unless the hoist is equipped with a lower-limit device. d. a force of three times the pull required to lift the rated load. a mechanism such as a slip clutch may be used. no less than two wraps of web strap shall remain on the hoist load sprocket (drum) when the hook is extended to its full rated lift. End terminations shall be done in the manner specified by the manufacturer of the assembly or the web strap. 8-7 Chapter 8 Hoists . The restraint shall be such that the unloaded hoist can withstand a lowering hand chain or operating lever force equivalent to twice the pull required to lift the rated load.DOE-STD-1090-99 b. 8. For electric.or air-powered hoists.1. a hand chain or operating lever force equivalent to the pull required to lift the rated load.

4. Examine deficiencies and determine whether a more detailed inspection is required. wear. Hoist chain for nicks. Heavy service—weekly to monthly. Hoist upper-limit switch. Hooks for cracks.or air-powered hoists. 2. 2. 2. Hoist rope or chain reeving for compliance with hoist manufacturer's recommendations. b. repaired. corrosive atmospheres). A qualified inspector shall perform a complete inspection at the following intervals: 8-8 . broken stitching. and the like Observations during operation. as applicable. Normal service—operation with randomly distributed loads within the rated load limit. Synthetic web strap for abrasive wear.. 3. 8. these inspections shall include the following: 1. deformation. b. or uniform loads less than 65 percent of rated load for not more than 15 percent of the time for manual-lever-operated hoists or for not more than 25 percent of the time for electric. 5. and B30.16. acid or caustic burns. In addition to the requirements listed above in Daily Inspection. c.11. all new.2.1 Hoist Service 6. 7. Hook latch. 8.e.4 Frequent Inspection a. Chapter 8 Hoists c. (i. Heavy service—operation within the rated capacity that exceeds normal service.2. and corrosion. B30. knots. 8.5 Periodic Inspection a. 4.2.2 Initial Inspection Prior to their initial use. or tears. Severe service—daily to weekly. Dated and signed inspection records shall be kept on file and shall be readily available. birdcaging. 3. and corrosion. Hoist service is defined as follows: a. Operators or other designated personnel shall visually inspect the hoist at the following intervals (records are not required): 1. Lines. 8. Operators or other designated personnel shall examine deficiencies and determine whether they constitute a safety hazard.2.2. Normal service—monthly.21. for proper operation. or weld splatter.3 Daily Inspection a. cuts. 8. cracks. melting or charring. cracks. “Load Hooks. Hoist braking system for proper operation. extreme temperatures. or modified hoists shall be inspected by a qualified inspector to ensure compliance with the applicable provisions of ASME B30.” for additional hook requirements). Operators or other designated personnel shall visually inspect items such as the following at the beginning of each shift or prior to first use if the hoist has not been in regular service (records are not required): 1.DOE-STD-1090-99 8. Controls and operating mechanisms for proper operation.2 INSPECTIONS 8. and other parts of air systems for leakage. valves. 3. if used. Lever for bends. gouges. for proper operation. b. Severe service—operating at normal or heavy service under abnormal operating conditions. crushing. Hoist rope for kinking. distortion. and damage from chemicals (see Chapter 13.

2.2 Wire Rope magnetic-particle inspections (performed when required by the inspector). synthetic web strap. 2. Cracked or worn drums or sheaves. A sample load test and inspection form is included as Exhibit I.2. 6. and push-button switches. 8. such as parts passing over sheaves (these are points most subject to deterioration). Warning labels for illegibility or absence. Sections of rope that are normally hidden during inspection or maintenance procedures.4.2.2. Corroded. 5. A qualified inspector shall inspect running rope at least annually. c. corroded. 5. Corroded or broken wires at end connections. Dated and signed inspection records shall be kept on file and shall be readily available. such as described below. b. or riveting used to secure the retaining members. Heavy service—semiannually. 1. Hooks having more than 15 percent in excess of normal throat opening. load chains. In addition to the requirements listed in Section 8. Severe service—quarterly. Normal service—yearly. and chain stretch. 8. d. Supporting structures and trolleys. A number of broken outside wires and the distribution or concentration of such broken wires.DOE-STD-1090-99 1. bearings. which appears at the end of this chapter.5. The qualified inspector shall carefully note any deterioration. whether due to loss of core support. Worn. internal or external corrosion. 7. drums. severity of environment. More frequent intervals shall be determined by a qualified person and shall be based on such factors as expected rope life as determined by experience on the particular installation or similar installations.” periodic inspections of hoists shall include the following: 1. 8-9 Chapter 8 Hoists . percentage of capacity lifts. or improperly applied end connections. The qualified inspector shall examine deficiencies and determine whether they constitute a safety hazard and whether disassembly is required. such as dye-penetrant or 4. Excessive wear on motor or load a. or wear of outside wires (see Table 8-1). 3. 3. Reduction of rope size below nominal diameter. Excessive wear of chains.5. Electrical apparatus for signs of pitting or any deterioration of controller contactors. worn. Hook-retaining nuts or collars and pins. and clamping devices. resulting in appreciable loss of original strength and determine whether further use of the rope constitutes an acceptable risk. welds. Loose fasteners. brakes. rollers locking. ropes. 3. 12. 9. Suitable crack-detecting inspections for hooks. 10. or distorted parts such as pins. 11. 8. 6. load sprockets. gears. This form is intended to be a sample only and is not intended to be mandatory. This inspection shall include examination of the entire length of rope. Worn outside wires. shafts. 4. “Frequent Inspection. cracked.1 Hoists a. or more than 10 degree twist from the plane of the unbent hook (see Chapter 13 for additional hook requirements). bent. for continued ability to support the imposed loads. without detaching it from the hoist drum. if used. sheaves. and exposure to shock loads. cracked. Deterioration or damage of end connections and terminations of wire rope. and synthetic web. limit switches. frequency rates of operation. 2.

12 randomly distributed broken wires in one rope lay. 2. proceed as follows: i. resocket or replace the rope.5. The chain should feed smoothly into and away from the sprockets. Kinking. Safety depends largely on the use of good judgment by an appointed person in evaluating remaining strength in a used rope. or construction shall be specified by a rope manufacturer.DOE-STD-1090-99 7. Those portions of the rope subjected to reverse bends and operation over small-diameter drums or sheaves shall be closely examined. 3. Make sure that. to 1 1/8 in. to 1 1/2 in. Replacement rope and connections shall have a strength rating at least as great as the original rope and connections furnished by the hoist manufacturer. 4. A qualified inspector shall do the following during periodic inspections: 1. 5. Maximum allowable rope reductions. or unstranding. Select an unworn. corrosion. Reductions from nominal diameter greater than those shown in Table 8-1. if the chain binds. The chain should cleaned before inspection.2. or a qualified person. grade. If the trouble persists. Any deviation from the original size. inspect the chain and mating parts for wear. (0. Slacken the chain and move adjacent links to one side to inspect for wear at the contact points. No precise rules can be given for determining the exact time to replace wire rope because many factors are involved. cause.. In hoist ropes. or is noisy. Evidence of heat damage from any ii. (13 mm) Over 1/2 in. jumps. 3. after allowance for deterioration disclosed by inspection. Resocketing shall not be attempted if the resulting rope length will be insufficient for proper operation. to 3/4 in. f.4 mm) d. or other damage. Operate the hoist under load in raising and lowering directions. 2.4 mm) 1/32 in. birdcaging. Table 8-1. c. to 1/2 in.g. first clean and properly lubricate it. distortion. Never use discarded rope for slings. gouges. crushing. The qualified inspector shall give special attention to end fastenings and shall examine ropes frequently at socketed fittings. at the slack end).2 mm) 1/16 in. unstretched length of the chain (e. Kinking. Conditions such as the following shall be reason for questioning rope safety and considering replacement: 1. on the development of two broken wires adjacent to this point. (19 mm) Over 3/4 in. Examine visually for cracks. Wear of one-third of the original diameter of outside individual wires.6 mm) 3/32 in. the hoist manufacturer. measure the chain according to the hoist manufacturer's instructions. (8 mm) Over 5/16 in. (2. (1. (0. using a b. Suspend the chain vertically under tension and. If instructions are not available. Maxim um allowable reduction from nominal diameter 1/64 in.3 a. (38 mm) 8. and observe the operation of the chain and sprockets. If you observe wear or suspect stretching. (29 mm) Over 1 1/8 in. cutting. (1. crushing. Welded-Link Chain Rope diameter Up to 5/16 in. Safety of rope operation depends on this remaining strength. or 4 broken wires in one strand in one rope lay.8 mm) 3/64 in. nicks. weld spatter. Chapter 8 Hoists 8-10 . e. and distorted links. or any other damage resulting in distortion of the rope structure.

or distorted links.3 mm) in any 5-ft (1. If the used chain exceeds a hoist manufacturer's recommended length. 6. iv. This precaution is not required on idler sprockets. which change the direction but not the tension in the chain. (356 mm) overall. (305 mm) to 14 in. Any of these conditions shall be sufficient reason for questioning safety and considering replacement. weld spatter.4 Never use discarded load chain for Roller Chain a. distortion. guides. inspect the chain and mating parts for wear. Determine elongation by measuring with a caliper from the edge of one chain pin to the corresponding edge of another pin. Make additional inspections by removing the chain from the hoist and cleaning it thoroughly. or in the absence of such a recommendation. clean and properly lubricate it. and replace if necessary. Carefully examine deficiencies 8-11 Chapter 8 Hoists . replace the chain. or is noisy. v. grade. When a chain is replaced. Measure the same number of links in the used sections and calculate the percentage of increase in length. jumps.52-m) section. If instructions are not available. iii. measure the outside length of any convenient number of links approximately 12 in. Replace if the chain has a bow exceeding 1/4 in. 8. iv. 9. Ensure that replacement chain is installed without any twist between the hoist and an anchored end on either the loaded side or the slack side. corrosion. unless otherwise recommended by the hoist manufacturer due to working conditions. (305 mm) compared to new or unstretched chain values. and construction as the original chain furnished by the hoist manufacturer. Examine the chain for gouges. Select a 12-in.3 mm) in 12 in. ii. If the chain binds. Ensure that replacement chain is the same size. (6. nicks. Replace if the twist in any 5-ft (1.5. 7. If the trouble persists. No one except the chain manufacturer shall repair the load chain by welding or any other means.5 percent longer than the unused chain for hand-operated hoists. slings. 2. or damage. stripper) for wear. 3. Check for straightness in a plane perpendicular to the plane of the rollers. if the used chain is 1. A qualified inspector shall do the following during periodic inspections: 1. v.5 percent longer than the unused chain for powered hoists or is 2. Inspect for twists. disassemble and inspect the mating parts (sprockets. If elongation exceeds 1/4 in. (305-mm) section of chain that normally travels over the load sprocket. proceed as follows: i. Safety in this respect depends largely on the use of good judgment by an appointed person in evaluating the degree of damage. If you observe wear or suspect stretching. Load-chain links that pass over the hoist-load sprocket on edge (alternate to those that lie flat in the pockets) should be installed with the welds away from the center of the sprocket. observing the operation of the chain and sprockets.DOE-STD-1090-99 caliper-type gauge. replace the chain. Test the hoist under load in raising and lowering directions. (6.52-m) section exceeds 15 degrees. Suspend the hoist in normal position and apply a light load of approximately 100 lb (46 kg). 8. 5.2. measure the chain according to the hoist manufacturer's instructions. iii. 4.

Weld spatter. A hoist that is not in regular service (idle for a period of 1 month or more. Damaged eyes or fittings.2. A hoist that is not in regular service (idle for a period of 1 year or more) shall be inspected before being placed in service according to the requirements listed above in Section 8. Corrosion.2. b. 8. Joints that cannot be flexed by easy hand pressure. Gouges. Never use discarded or new roller chain for slings. Cuts or tears. v. 3. 3. Side plates that are spread open. Broken stitching. Conditions such as the following shall be a. Abrasive wear. or weld spatter. Distortion of the web-strap structure. reason for questioning continued use of the web strap or increasing the frequency of inspection: 1. nicks. or discoloration. vi. Safety depends largely on the use of good judgment by an appointed person in evaluating remaining strength in a used web. 4. i.6 Hoists Not in Regular Service a.6. Melting or charring. No precise rules can be given for determining the exact time to replace web strap.2. 4.” b. grade. 8. Acid or caustic burns.2. ii. Evidence of any heat damage. Knots. Ensure that replacement chain is the same size.” Chapter 8 Hoists 8-12 . 2. Rollers that do not run freely with light finger pressure. 5. “Periodic Inspection. and construction as the original chain furnished by the hoist manufacturer unless otherwise recommended by the hoist manufacturer due to working conditions. Pins turned from original position. after allowance for deterioration disclosed by inspection. 2. 6. but less than 1 year) shall be inspected before being placed in service according to the requirements listed above in Section 8. 5. c.5. pitting.DOE-STD-1090-99 such as those listed below and determine whether they constitute a safety hazard. Do not attempt to repair roller chain by welding or heating. The web strap shall be removed from service when damage such as the following is discovered: 1. Severely worn end connections. iii.5 Synthetic-Web Strap 7. “Frequent Inspection. iv.5. Any deficiencies are reason for questioning chain safety and considering its replacement. 6. 8.

a functional test of the hoist should be made in accordance with Section 8. The replacement of load chain is specifically excluded from this hoist load test.1. and b. Check all functions of the hoist with the hoist suspended in an unloaded state.or Air-Powered Hoists a.DOE-STD-1090-99 8. The applied test load shall not be less than 100 percent of the rated capacity of the hoist or more than 125 percent of the rated capacity of the hoist. and a record of the test should be kept. Check all functions of the hoist.2 Hand-Chain-Operated or Manual-Lever-Operated Hoists a. replaced. All tests shall be done by a qualified inspector or under the direction of that inspector as detailed in the following paragraphs.1. by or under the direction of a qualified inspector. unless otherwise recommended by the manufacturer or a qualified person. A qualified inspector shall test hoists in which load suspension parts have been modified.or Air-Powered Hoists shall be notified and the test shall be accomplished at another location or job site by a qualified inspector or under the direction of that inspector. The applied test load shall not be less than 100 percent of the rated capacity of the hoist. “Operational Tests.1.2. or more than 125 percent of the rated capacity of the hoist unless otherwise recommended by the manufacturer or a qualified person. 8. Determine the trip-setting of limit devices by tests under no-load conditions.1. Chapter 8 Hoists a. steps a.2 Hand-Chain-Operated Hoists a. a functional test of the hoist under a normal operating load should be made in accordance with 8.. including lifting and lowering.1. the user shall be notified and the test shall be accomplished at another location or job site by a qualified inspector or under the direction of that inspector. or repaired shall be tested statically or dynamically by or under the direction of a qualified inspector. the user 8-13 . The replacement of load chain and rope is specifically excluded from this hoist test.1 (“Electric. if practical. A designated or authorized person shall determine if repairs made to a hoist are extensive.2 Proof-Load Test Test anchorages or suspensions shall be approved by a qualified person. Hoists in which load suspension parts have been modified.2. After testing unloaded.3 Manual-Lever-Operated Hoists a.1. A designated or authorized person shall determine if repairs made to a hoist are extensive and require a rated load test or are routine maintenance and require only an operational test. c. and b. Conduct tests first by hand.3.1.1 Electric. steps a.3. The manufacturer shall dynamically test new hoists with a test load of at least 125 percent of the rated capacity. apply a load of at least 50 lb (23 kg) multiplied by the number of load-supporting parts of chain to the hoist to check proper load control. however. Test with increasing speeds up to maximum speed. 8. Check operation of brakes. however.3.3. 8.1 Electric. or routine maintenance and require only an operational test.” respectively).1 Operational Tests All new hoists shall be tested by the hoist manufacturer. b.3. The manufacturer shall dynamically test new hoists as specified in Section 8.3. 8.3 (“Hand-Chain-Operated Hoists” and “Manually Lever-Operated Hoists.” prior to putting the hoist back in service.or Air-Powered Hoists”).3 TESTING 8. 8. and then under slowest speed obtainable. and require a rated load test. b. b.1.3. 8. or repaired as specified in Section 8. After testing unloaded. with the hoist suspended in an unloaded state. Check lifting and lowering (testing through complete rated lift length is not required).3. b.3.1. and a record of the test should be made. replaced..3.3. b. If the manufacturer cannot test the hoist.3. apply a load of at least 100 lb (46 kg) multiplied by the number of load-supporting parts of load line to the hoist to check proper load control. prior to putting the hoist back in service. If the manufacturer cannot test the hoist. All modified or repaired hoists or hoists that have not been used within the preceding 12 months shall be tested before being placed in service. with a test load of at least 125 percent of the rated load.2 or 8.

4 MAINTENANCE a.DOE-STD-1090-99 8. A preventive maintenance program shall be established and be based on the hoist manufacturer's recommendations. Chapter 8 Hoists 8-14 . Replacement parts shall be at least equal to the original manufacturer's specifications. b.

2. sign. report it promptly to the appointed person. Do not operate equipment if you are physically or mentally unfit. do not energize the equipment until the tag. adjust or repair them before beginning operations. Test all controls before beginning a shift. 3. consult with responsible management before handling the load. or lock on electric. Do not touch a welding electrode to the chain. c.5. Before starting the hoist. Do not engage in any practice that will divert your attention while engaged in operating the hoist. The load does not contact any obstructions. Do not operate a hoist that bears an out-of-order sign or is otherwise tagged out-of-service. Do not close the main line disconnect device on powered equipment until you are certain that no one is on or adjacent to the hoist or carrier.5 OPERATION a.or air-powered equipment. Whenever there is doubt as to safety. Hoist ropes or chains are not kinked or twisted. Do not operate hoists until the hook is positioned above the center of gravity of the Chapter 8 Hoists 8. 8. If any controls do not operate properly. wire rope.5. Do not wrap the hoist rope or chain around the load. b.3 Attaching the Load a. Do not use a lever extension (“cheater”) on manual-lever-operated hoists. f. be certain that all personnel are clear of the equipment. sign. Operate hand-chain-operated hoists with hand power only and with no more than one operator per hand chain. c. ensure that the rope or chain is properly seated on the drum.2 Size of Load Know the weight of the load and do not load the hoist beyond the rated capacity. or sprockets. The supporting structure or anchoring means shall have a load rating at least equal to that of the hoist.5. 8. d. Use hoists only in areas that will allow you to be clear of the load. Multiple-part ropes or chains are not twisted around each other. sheaves. Familiarize yourself with the equipment and its proper care. i. d. The following shall apply to all personnel involved in hoist operations. 8.3. e. Properly seat the slings or other approved devices in the saddle of the hook before carrying out hoisting operations. h. Do not use chain or wire rope as a ground for welding. Correct deficiencies before resuming normal operation. “Testing. g. e. If adjustments or repairs are necessary or any damage is known or suspected. or preengineered production). b. d. At the initial stage of the planning process. h. g. or any other part of the hoist or monorail system. an appointed person shall classify each lift into one of the DOE-specified categories (ordinary. Operators are responsible for those operations under their direct control. Attach the load to the hook using slings or other approved devices. f. b.4 a. c. Before starting to hoist. b. except as provided for in Section 8. Notify the next operator of the problem upon changing shifts. If there is a tag.DOE-STD-1090-99 8.1 Conduct of Operator a.5. critical.” 8-15 . or lock is removed by the person who placed it there or by an authorized person. Moving the Load Take care in hoisting to be certain that: 1.

test it with no load before lowering any load that could bring the lower-limit switch into Chapter 8 Hoists 8-16 . snub. immediately place all controllers in the OFF position. h. 2. and avoid unnecessary stops and starts. test the upper-limit switch of each hoist under no load conditions. “Overhead and Gantry Cranes. Stop the job when any potentially unsafe condition is recognized. If the limit switch does not operate properly. Do not perform side pulls with hoists except as specifically authorized by a qualified person. 4. 8. check operating motions for proper direction. that proper equipment and accessories are selected. that person assumes all responsibilities of the designated leader. lower. n. Lift the hoist load block above head level for storage when the equipment is not in use. Ensure that personnel involved understand how the lift is to be made. The designated leader shall be present at the lift site during the entire lifting operation. inch the block into the limit switch or run in at slow speed. Ensure that the weight of the load is determined. Leadership designation may be by written instructions. 5. Hoisting and rigging operations for ordinary lifts require a designated leader. Do not lift. p. and is identified to the operator. f.5 Hoist-Limit Switch a. notify the designated person immediately. i. Direct the lifting operation to ensure that the job is done safely and efficiently. Exercise extreme care. k.5. However. Ensure that a signaler is assigned. c. The designated leader's responsibility shall include the following: 1. 8. Do not move or lift a load more than a few inches until it is well balanced in a sling or lifting device. test the limit switch again before the next lift. g. If the hoist has a lower-limit switch. Avoid carrying loads above personnel. Do not lower a loaded wire-rope hoist drum beyond the point where less than two full wraps of wire rope remain on the drum. Tag lines should be used as required to guide. j. Do not leave a suspended load unattended unless specific precautions have been instituted and are in place. m. b. If power goes off during operation of cab-operated equipment. Ensure that equipment is properly set up and positioned. o. except when specifically authorized by an appointed person who has determined that the components of the hoist and its mounting will not be overstressed. and that rated capacity is not exceeded. Before reuse. 7. Take signals from only one person using the standard hand signals shown in Chapter 7. Survey the lift site for hazardous/unsafe conditions.5. b. if required. operation. At the beginning of a shift.DOE-STD-1090-99 load. 3. 6.6 Ordinary Lifts a. Inch the hoist into engagement with a load. specific verbal instructions for the particular job. Continue the lift only after you are sure that the braking system is operating properly. If a lift is in progress during a shift change. or clearly defined responsibilities within the crew's organizational structure. e. Never use the hoist-limit switch that controls the upper limit of travel of the load block as an operating control. c. l. this testing requirement is considered to have been satisfied for the completion of that lift. If the lift is being made by only one person. Test the brakes each time a load approaching the rated capacity is handled by raising the load just enough to clear the floor or supports and checking for brake action. or otherwise control the load.” Obey a STOP signal regardless of who gives it. or travel the hoist while anyone is on the load or hook.

f.2. A qualified person shall examine any deficiencies and determine whether they constitute a hazard.5.DOE-STD-1090-99 8. Direct operations if an accident or injury occurs.” for critical-lift requirements.” e. Load lines shall be checked after strain is put on them. “Critical Lifts. 8. before the load is lifted clear of the ground. If not plumb. 8-17 Chapter 8 Hoists . “Inspections. The operator or other designated person shall visually examine the hoist in accordance with the requirements for a daily inspection described in Section 8. Correct these deficiencies before operating the hoist. d.7 Critical Lifts See Chapter 2. the slings or equipment shall be repositioned so that the lines are plumb before continuing.

Chapter 8 Hoists 8-18 .DOE-STD-1090-99 Exhibit I is intended to be a sample form only and is not mandatory. Any other form that accomplishes the purpose is acceptable.

measure a length of 15 links. Perform load test using the required test weights (see Note 1) and appropriate slings. 2. at 125% of rated capacity. 1. b. Test weights shall be accurate to within -5%. measure the diameter. 3. e. and inspections completed below. 4. Lower test weight to floor. c. cams. Observe hoist and trolley. idler sprockets. all new hoists or hoists in which load-sustaining parts have been modified. Check: a. 5. Repair as needed. Observe performance of all load-bearing components. repaired. or replaced. Where applicable. Note performance of hoist during lowering operation.DOE-STD-1090-99 EXHIBIT I HOIST LOAD TEST AND INSPECTION INSPECTED BY HOIST ID# LOCATION DATE Page 1 of 2 NOTES: 1. ELECTRIC. Check for broken. ensure that the load chart is legible. IF HOIST IS EQUIPPED WITH A TROLLEY: 1. 2. Qualified inspector shall verify all steps as listed below. If wire rope is used. Remove rigging. +0% of stipulated values. Check unit for proper operation. f. 3. Measure a length of the load chain under tension. 8-19 Chapter 8 Hoists . 2.AND AIR-POWERED HOISTS. work. or stretched pawl springs. 4. worn pawls. and drums or sheaves External evidence of wear on motor or load brake Electrical apparatus for signs of pitting or any deterioration of visible controller contacts All anchorage or hoist suspensions. Mount hoist on a monorail. or ratchets. All functional operating mechanisms for misadjustment interfering with proper operation Limit switches or devices for proper operation External evidence of damage or excessive wear of load sprockets. Load test prior to initial use. d. Test the function of the overload device. Set hoist up for load test and inspection. or contaminated disks. HAND-CHAIN-OPERATED HOISTS ONLY. Perform load test moving weight along monorail. corroded. Check brake mechanism for work glazed. 3. Craftsmen will initial all tests. Load test at 100% of rated capacity hoists with overload devices. Perform the annual periodic inspection. Rig test weight to load hook (see step 4 above).

1. Wear and deformation 2. LOAD HOOK: Qualified Inspector Verify Qualified Inspector Verify Throat Opening Hook Twist PREVIOUS PRESENT Page 2 of 2 2. set distances on an even number of inches. Establish three marks. Cracks 3. laps. or seams. with a center punch. in.DOE-STD-1090-99 EXHIBIT I (continued) HOIST LOAD TEST AND INSPECTION At the completion of the load test. Equipment Operator Actual Load Test lb Qualified Inspector Verify Load Test Date in. Hooks having more than 10% wear in the bowl section or 5% elongation of the shank shall be replaced. stretch. linear indications. Check for deformed or broken links. SUSPENSION HOOK: Qualified Inspector Verify Qualified Inspector Verify Throat Opening Hook Twist Qualified inspector shall perform nondestructive tests on hook by visual examination. inspect the following items. and C. etc. Signs of opening between Point A and Point B. A. Visually inspect and remeasure the load chain and/or hoist rope after the load test. in. Lubricate hook bearing and latch pin as applicable. Acceptance: No cracks. For ease in measuring. Hooks with more than 10 degree twist from the normal (new hook) plane of the hook shall be replaced. or magnetic particle examination. Inspect load hook and suspension hook for bending or twisting. BEFORE LOAD TEST Length AB Length BC AFTER LOAD TEST Length AB Length BC Check for: 1. Chapter 8 Hoists 8-20 . liquid penetrant examination. Hooks with more than 15% normal (new hook) throat opening shall be replaced. B. in.

. . . . . . . . . . . . 9. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-1 9-1 9-1 9-1 9-5 9-5 9-5 9-5 9-5 9-5 9-5 9-6 9-6 9-6 9-6 9-6 9-6 9-7 9-7 9-7 9-8 9-8 9-8 9-8 9-8 9-9 9-9 | 9.1 Preventive Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Maintenance Procedures . . . . . . . . .3 TESTING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 OPERATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9. . . . . . . . . . . .1 GENERAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Hydraulic Filters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9. . . . . . . . . . .1.6. . . . . . . 9. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Hydraulic and Pneumatic Valves . . .4 Monthly Inspection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Frequent Inspection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Cranes . . . 9. . . 9. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6. . . . . . . . . . . . 9. . . . . . . 9-12 9. . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Load Rating Chart . . . . . . . . . . and testing requirements for the use of mobile cranes and implements the requirements of ASME B30. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Conduct of Operator . . . . . . . . . . . . .6. . . . .1. . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . .6 Booms . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . 9. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . 9. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6. . . . . . . . 9. . . . . 9. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-13 Chapter 9 Mobile Cranes 9-i . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . .3 Wire-Rope Maintenance . . . .7 Wire Rope . . . . .1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Traveling the Machine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1.2 Hydraulic and Pneumatic Hose. . . . . . . . . . 9-11 9-11 9-11 9-11 9. . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Preoperational Check . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . . and Tubing . . . . . . . 9. . 9. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . inspection. . . . . .4. . . .3. . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Rated Load Test . . . . . . . . . .7 Load Hooks/Load Blocks . . . . . . . 9. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fittings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . .2. .4. . . . . . . . . . . .2 Initial Inspection . . . . . . . .3 Hydraulic and Pneumatic Pumps and Motors . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9. . . . . . . . .2.2 9. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . . .2. . 9. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 (“Mobile and Locomotive Cranes”). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2.8 Cranes Not in Regular Use . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Hydraulic and Pneumatic Cylinders . . . . 9-10 9. . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . 9. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Power-Controlled Lowering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.10 Design Standards . 9. . . . . . . . . .1 General .7 Counterweight . . . 9. . . . . . . . 9. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . maintenance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-10 MAINTENANCE .4. . . . 9. . . . . . . . 9-12 9. . . . . . . . . . .DOE-STD-1090-99 CHAPTER 9 MOBILE CRANES This chapter specifies operation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Periodic Inspection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-10 9. . . . . . . . . . . . . 9. . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . .8 Rerating . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Operator Training/Qualification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6. . . . . . . .4 Load Hoist Brakes . . . . . .2 Load Limits . . 9. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . INSPECTIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . . . . .4 9. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Operational Tests . . . . .6. . . . . . Only equipment built to appropriate design standards shall be used at DOE installations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 Maintenance History . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .DOE-STD-1090-99 9. . . .8 9. . . . . .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Crane Operations De-Energized and Grounded Electrical Power Lines . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . . . . . . . Size of Load . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-29 Chapter 9 Mobile Cranes 9-ii . . . . . . . Attaching the Load . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5.6 9. .5. . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Crane in Transit with no Load and Boom Lowered . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 Exhibit I Mobile Crane Load Test and Inspection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Observing Boom-Length Precautions . . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Making Adjustments or Repairs . . .4 9.5 Crane Operations Near Transmitter Towers . . . . . Critical Lifts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Moving the Load . 9. . . . . . . 9. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5.5. . . . . . . .5.9 9. . .5. . . .5. .1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9. . . Standard Hand Signals . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . .2 9. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 9. . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . 9. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ordinary Lifts . .3 9. . . . . . . . 9. . . 9-13 9-14 9-14 9-14 9-16 9-16 9-19 9-19 9-19 9-19 9-22 9-22 9-22 9-22 9-22 9-26 9-26 9. . .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . . Identification of Signalers . .1. . . . . .3 Crane Operations are Within the Prohibited Zone and the Power Lines are Energized . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Power Lines Energized. . . . . . . . . . Crane Operating Less Than Erected/Fully Extended Boom Length Away From Prohibited Zone . . . . . . .5. . . . . Operating Near Power Lines and Transmitter Towers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 9. . Hoist-Limit Switch .3 Ensuring Stability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. .2.5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

or factors other than stability.1 GENERAL This chapter applies to commercial truck-mounted cranes. In areas where no load is to be handled. A durable rating chart with legible letters and figures shall be provided with each crane and attached in a location accessible to the operator while at the controls.DOE-STD-1090-99 9.1 Operator Training/Qualification Operators of mobile cranes shall be trained and qualified as required in Chapter 6. 4. Position of the gantry and requirements for intermediate boom suspension. the appointed person shall ensure that the weight of a load approaching rated capacity has been determined within -10 percent.1. whether free-fall is available. the following information shall be shown either on the rating chart or in the operating manual: 1.2 Load Limits a. or boom and jib combinations. A full and complete range of manufacturer's crane load ratings at all stated operating radii. including indication of the least stable direction. where applicable. 7. Whether the hoist-holding mechanism is automatically controlled or manually controlled. Where ratings are limited by structural. wheel-mounted cranes. hydraulic. type. 9. When loads are to be handled that are limited by hydraulic or structural competence rather than by stability. but not be limited to. the work area figure and load rating chart shall state that information. b. the limitations shall be shown and emphasized on the rating charts. 6. load ratings established by the manufacturers shall not be exceeded in operational application.1. Tire pressure. 4. may be raised or lowered. crawler cranes.3. The data and information to be provided on these charts shall include. 9. 2. size. See Table 9-1 for a sample load rating chart. except for load test purposes as described in Section 9. “Testing. single control station. where applicable.1. Cautionary or warning notes relative to limitations on equipment and operating procedures. where applicable. Recommended parts of the hoist reeving.3 Load Rating Chart a. 9-1 Chapter 9 Mobile Cranes . work areas. and all stated boom lengths and configurations. The maximum telescopic travel length of each boom telescopic section. the following: 1. Instructions for boom erection and conditions under which the boom.” 9. 2. 3. boom angles. multiple control stations. and length of rope. Recommended boom hoist reeving diagram. Whether sections are telescoped with power or manually. +0 percent before it is lifted. 5. jib lengths and angles (or offset). b. and any variation that retains the same fundamental characteristics. and whether any combination of those exists. Since the load rating for mobile cranes may be based on stability and hydraulic or structural competence. A work area chart for which capacities are listed in the load rating chart (see sample in Figure 9-1). These cranes have a superstructure capable of rotating 360 degrees mounted on a carrier and have boom raising and lowering capabilities. In addition to the data required on the load rating chart. 9. such as outriggers and extra counterweights. as well as alternate ratings for use and nonuse of optional equipment on the crane. Recommended reeving for the hoist lines shall be shown.” c. No crane shall be loaded beyond its rated capacity. 8. “Personnel Qualification and Training. 3. 5. that affect ratings. and size and type of rope for various crane loads. wheel-mounted cranes. locomotive cranes.

b. use cambered center section. Above ratings are maximum recommended working loads. Loads outside solid lines are limited by strength of boom. with machine on firm. For booms 80 ft and longer. for booms 100 ft and longer. Manitowoc Model 3900 Liftcrane Extra-Heavy Boom Working radius 12 14 16 18 20 22 24 26 28 30 32 34 36 38 40 42 44 46 48 50 52 54 56 58 60 65 70 75 80 85 90 95 100 110 120 50' 120 000 111 200 104 200 97 800 93 200 87 800 83 400 75 900 68 100 61 700 56 500 52 000 48 100 44 700 41 700 39 100 36 800 34 700 32 900 31 200 60' 120 000 110 800 103 600 97 400 92 400 86 800 81 200 75 500 67 700 61 300 56 100 51 600 47 700 44 300 41 300 38 700 36 400 34 300 32 500 30 800 29 300 27 900 26 500 25 300 24 200 70' 80' lbs. 90' 100' 120' 140' 109 000 102 700 97 000 91 600 85 800 80 300 74 700 67 300 60 900 55 700 51 200 47 300 43 900 40 900 38 300 36 000 33 900 32 100 30 400 28 900 27 500 26 100 24 900 23 800 21 300 19 300 100 000 96 600 90 600 84 800 79 400 73 900 66 900 60 500 55 300 50 800 46 900 43 500 40 500 37 900 35 600 33 500 31 700 30 000 28 500 27 100 25 700 24 500 23 400 20 900 18 900 17 100 15 700 95 000 92 500 89 600 83 800 78 700 73 200 66 400 60 000 54 800 50 300 46 400 43 000 40 000 37 400 35 100 33 000 31 200 29 500 28 000 26 600 25 200 24 000 22 900 20 400 18 400 16 600 15 200 13 900 12 700 90 000 86 000 82 800 77 800 72 600 65 800 59 400 54 200 49 700 45 800 42 400 39 400 36 800 34 500 32 400 30 600 28 900 27 400 26 000 24 600 23 400 22 300 19 800 17 800 16 000 14 600 13 300 12 100 11 100 10 200 83 000 80 000 75 200 70 500 64 000 58 500 53 300 48 800 44 900 41 500 38 500 35 900 33 600 31 500 29 700 28 000 26 500 25 100 23 700 22 500 21 400 18 900 16 900 15 100 13 700 12 400 11 200 10 200 9 300 6 800 4 500 66 500 63 100 59 800 56 400 52 300 47 800 43 900 40 500 37 500 34 900 32 600 30 500 28 700 27 000 25 500 24 100 22 700 21 500 20 400 17 900 15 900 14 100 12 700 11 400 10 200 9 200 8 300 5 600 3 840 NOTES: a.DOE-STD-1090-99 Table 9-1. This table is an example of the type of load rating chart that should be included in each crane. Loads between solid lines are computed at 75% of tipping load across treads. level ground. Chapter 9 Mobile Cranes 9-2 . use deep section inserts. Sample load rating chart.

DOE-STD-1090-99 )LJXUH  6DPSOH ZRUN DUHD FKDUW 9-3 Chapter 9 Mobile Cranes .

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 Chapter 9 Mobile Cranes 9-4 .

4 Load Hoist Brakes When power-operated brakes that have no continuous mechanical linkage between the actuating and braking means are used.1. b.” 9. 9. Booms. “Crane Structure.7 Counterweight a.1. A rerating test report shall be readily available. an automatic means shall be provided to set the brake to prevent the load from falling in event of loss of brake-actuating power.” c.1. truck. | | | | | | | | 9. Cranes shall not be operated without the ballast or counterweight being in place as specified by the crane manufacturer. at a minimum. When rerated.8 Rerating 9. The sequence and procedure for extending and retracting the telescopic boom section. b.1.DOE-STD-1090-99 10. Lattice booms shall meet the performance requirements of SAE J987. 12. The maintenance history of the crane shall be retained throughout its service life. Under | | | | | 9-5 Chapter 9 Mobile Cranes . The safety features and operation shall conform. 9. Hydraulic relief valve settings specified by the manufacturer. b. mechanical. and jibs shall be clearly identified and shall be used only for the purpose recommended by the manufacturer. No cranes shall be rerated in excess of the manufacturer's original load ratings. to the provisions of ASME B30. and wheel-mounted cranes shall be tested in accordance with SAE J765. a. “Mobile and Locomotive Cranes.1. Such action must be approved by the cognizant safety organization. Structural. etc. Cranes may be modified or rerated providing such modifications are analyzed thoroughly by a qualified engineer or manufacturer of cranes. Maximum loads permitted during the actual boom-extending operation and any limiting conditions or cautions. crawler.5. such as PCSA-4. boom sections. the crane manufacturer’s recommendations for the amount of ballast or counterweight shall be adhered to. “References”).1. d. and electrical components of the crane design shall meet accepted crane design standards.10 Design Standards a.6 Booms 9.5 Power-Controlled Lowering A power-controlled lowering system shall be provided and shall be capable of handling rated loads and speeds as specified by the manufacturer of the crane.1. Ballast or counterweight as specified by the manufacturer shall not be exceeded.” b. 11. 9. Method of Test” (see Chapter 16. “Crane Load Stability Test Code. such as during crane assembly. “Mobile Power Crane and Excavator Standards and Hydraulic Crane Standards.9 Maintenance History a. specific conditions. unusual boom configurations.

and contamination by lubricants or other foreign matter that could interfere with proper operation. Signed and dated inspection records shall be kept on file and shall be readily available.2 INSPECTIONS 9. 3.2 Initial Inspection Prior to initial use. wear. Lines. “Preoperational Check. All control mechanisms for maladjustment interfering with proper operation.DOE-STD-1090-99 9. 5. birdcaging. Hoist ropes. 9. Operators or other designated personnel shall examine deficiencies and determine whether they constitute a safety hazard. f. latch engagement (if provided). damage from chemicals. and two-block damage prevention systems for proper operation. and evidence of heat damage. All control mechanisms for maladjustment. tanks. Lower the hook block to its lowest position and examine for any condition that could result in an appreciable loss of strength.2. or irregularity. Booms for damage or deformation of structural components. two-block warning. regular motion without any hesitation. 2. 2. 9. Hydraulic systems for proper oil 9. deformation. Operators or other designated personnel shall visually inspect the crane at daily to monthly intervals (records are not required).2. Chapter 9 Mobile Cranes 9-6 . Critical items such as brakes and crane hooks. and corrosion.2. Before the crane is returned to service. 2. Operators or other designated personnel shall visually inspect items such as the following each day or prior to use if the crane has not been in regular service (records are not required): 1. 7. c. Hoist ropes for kinking. load indicators. binding.3 Preoperational Check a. correct deficiencies that could reduce its capacity or adversely effect its safety. e. valves. 6. level. b. all new or modified cranes shall be inspected as required in Section 9. and wear. in addition to the requirements of Section 9.2.2.2. These inspections shall. cracks. or deformation of any load-bearing part of the equipment.” by a qualified inspector to ensure compliance with the applicable provisions of this chapter.” include the following: 1. Dated and signed inspection reports shall be kept on file and shall be readily available. d. All safety devices. 4. crushing. gross shimmy. “Periodic Inspection. Rope reeving for noncompliance with crane manufacturer's recommendations. b.6 shall be removed from service and replaced. Crane hooks and latches for deformation.5 Frequent Inspection a.2. 4. controls. boom angle and radius indicators. All safety devices for malfunction. signs of excessive deterioration. Electrical apparatus for malfunctioning. The operator or other designated person shall visually inspect the following items for damage. and other operating parts of the equipment shall be checked during each inspection and shall be in good working order. There shall be no apparent damage. or other deficiency that might reduce capacity or adversely effect the safety of the crane: 1. Hooks for cracks.4 Monthly Inspection Equipment shall operate with a smooth. and other parts of air or hydraulic systems for leakage.3. and accumulation of dirt or moisture. b. excessive wear. abnormal vibration. Anti-two-block.2.1 General 9. excessive wear.6. a. pumps. 3. A hoist rope with any of the conditions noted in the replacement criteria in Section 9.

4 . and environment. improper performance. “Load Hooks. e. electrical. “Monthly Inspection. d.6 Periodic Inspection a.” include the following. which appears at the end of this chapter. Cracked or worn sheaves and drums. or fitting (means shall be taken to eliminate the interface of elements in contact or to otherwise protect the components). Operators or other designated personnel shall examine deficiencies and determine whether a more detailed inspection is required. and locking devices. c. Evidence of leakage at the surface of the flexible hose or its junction with the metal couplings. Inspect for: a. magnetic-particle. or cracks. for malfunctioning. d. and other operating aids over their full ranges for any significant inaccuracies (if calibration is required.2. Loose bolts or fasteners. Evidence of excessive abrasion or scrubbing on the outer surface of a hose. cracked. Hooks damaged from chemicals. Dated and signed inspection records shall be kept on file and shall be readily available. Excessively worn or damaged tires. or missing structural members or parts. i. This form is intended to be a sample only and is not intended to be mandatory. 9. f. b. Boom sections for damaged. deformation. or other suitable crack-detecting inspections should be performed at least once a year. d. Excessive wear of chain drive sprockets and excessive chain stretch. see Chapter 13. g. Gasoline. bearings. in addition to the requirements of Sections 9. rollers. for leakage. h. Steering. Shaft seal leaks. Deformed.” for additional hook requirements).” and 9. braking.2. shafts. Excessive wear on brake and clutch system parts. it shall be done by a qualified person). linings. 9-7 Chapter 9 Mobile Cranes . c. depending on the crane's activity. deformed. or corroded members in the crane structure and entire boom. Load.2. pawls. severity of service.to 12-month intervals. l. boom angle. gears.DOE-STD-1090-99 5. c.5. or distorted parts such as pins. “Frequent Inspection. Tires for recommended inflation pressure. rigid tube. 6. cracked. j. or blockage of air passages. b.  +\GUDXOLF DQG 3QHXPDWLF +RVH )LWWLQJV DQG 7XELQJ Inspect for: a. Blistering or abnormal deformation of the outer covering of the hydraulic or pneumatic hose. e. and locking devices. diesel. b. Worn. k. b. The qualified inspector shall examine deficiencies and determine whether they constitute a hazard. or other power plants for improper performance or noncompliance with safety requirements.  +\GUDXOLF DQG 3QHXPDWLF 3XPSV DQG 0RWRUV Inspect for: a. c. These inspections shall. A sample load test and inspection form is included as Exhibit I. or having more than 15 percent in excess of normal throat opening or more than 10 degree twist from the plane of the unbent hook (dye-penetrant. Leaks at joints between sections. c. and ratchets.  &UDQHV m. Complete inspections of the crane shall be performed by a qualified inspector at 1. Rust on piston rods and control valves when crane has been idle. Radiators and oil coolers. Leakage at threaded or clamped joints that cannot be eliminated by normal tightening or recommended procedures. Loose bolts or rivets.

DOE-STD-1090-99 d. Leaks at spools or joints. (19 mm) Over 3/4 in. Drifting caused by fluid leaking across the piston.2 mm) 1/16 in. and exposure to shock loads. Loss of pressure. Rod seal leakage. such as described below. f. 6. crushing. Table 9-2. The qualified inspector shall carefully note any deterioration. worn. Evidence of rubber particles on the filter element may indicate deterioration of the hose.6 mm) 3/32 in. More frequent intervals Chapter 9 Mobile Cranes 9-8 .4 mm) (8 mm) Over 5/16 in. Sections in contact with saddles. or other sheaves where rope travel is limited. (0. percentage of capacity lifts. c. Failure of relief valves to attain correct pressure setting (relief valve pressures shall be checked as specified by the manufacturer).4 mm) b. Unusual noises or vibration. Loss of operating speed. Worn outside wires.8 mm) 3/64 in. Improper return of spool to neutral position. cracked. (29 mm) Over 1 1/8 in. Leaks at welded joints. or other rubber components. The number and distribution or concentration of broken outside wires. such as in the following: 1. Maximum allowable rope reductions. e. cutting. Cracks in valve housing. b. 1. g.  +\GUDXOLF )LOWHUV 2. Corroded or broken wires at end connections. (1. +\GUDXOLF DQG 3QHXPDWLF 9DOYHV  Inspect for: a.  +\GUDXOLF DQG 3QHXPDWLF &\OLQGHUV Inspect for: a. The qualified inspector shall take care when inspecting running rope where rapid deterioration could occur. d. This inspection shall include examination of the entire rope length without detaching it from the drum. c. to 1 1/2 in. 3. A qualified inspector shall inspect wire ropes at least annually. (38 mm) 1/32 in. Excessive heating of the fluid. d. 5. 1/64 in. whether due to loss of core support. nicked. a. or wear of outside wires (see Table 9-2). Dented case (barrel). internal or external corrosion. or cylinders. or improperly applied end connections. e. (0. to 1 1/8 in. Scored. Metal chips or pieces on the filter may denote failure in pumps. Maximum allowable reduction Rope diameter from nominal diameter Up to 5/16 in. shall be determined by a qualified person and shall be based on such factors as expected rope life as determined by severity of environment. to 3/4 in. that results in appreciable loss of original strength and determine whether further use of the rope constitutes an acceptable risk. (1. to 1/2 in.  :LUH 5RSH 4. Reduction of rope size below nominal diameter. (13 mm) Over 1/2 in. Further checking will be necessary to determine the origin of the problem before corrective action can be taken. “O” ring. equalizer sheaves. motors. Corroded. or dented cylinder rods. b. bent. or unstranding. frequency rates of operation. f. Sticking spools. Kinking. (2. e. Loose or deformed rod eyes or connecting joints.

In rotation resistant ropes. 7. Safety in this respect depends largely on the use of good judgment by an appointed person in evaluating remaining strength in a used rope. One outer wire broken at the point of contact with the core of the rope that has worked its way out of the rope structure and protrudes or loops out from the rope structure. g. A crane that has been idle for 1 month or more but less than 6 months shall be given an inspection according to the requirements of Section 9. unless otherwise recommended by a rope or crane manufacturer due to actual working-condition requirements. A crane that has been idle for more than 6 months shall be given a complete inspection according to the requirements of Section 9. 6. 3. grade. c. additional inspection of this part of the rope is required. Sections of the rope at or near terminal ends where corroded or broken wires may protrude. because of the difficulties of inspection and the important nature of these ropes.6. d. In standing ropes. or 3 broken wires in one strand in one rope lay. two randomly distributed broken wires in six rope diameters or four randomly distributed broken wires in thirty rope diameters. 6 randomly distributed broken wires in one rope lay. birdcaging. 9-9 Chapter 9 Mobile Cranes . e. The qualified inspector shall take care when inspecting certain ropes such as the following: 1. A written and dated report of the rope condition shall be filed. c. In order to establish data as a basis for judging the proper time for replacement. more than two broken wires in one lay in sections beyond end connections or more than one broken wire at an end connection. Reduction from nominal diameter greater than the amounts listed in Table 9-2. 2. All rope that has been idle for a month or more due to shutdown or storage of a crane on which it is installed shall be inspected before it is placed in service. Safety of rope operation depends on this remaining strength. Never use discarded wire rope for slings.6 before being placed in service.2. This inspection shall be for all types of deterioration and shall be performed by an appointed person whose approval shall be required before further use of the rope. and construction as recommended by the crane manufacturer.8 Cranes Not in Regular Use a. Wear of one-third the original diameter of outside individual wires. a continuing inspection record shall be maintained. In running ropes. Conditions such as the following shall be sufficient reason for questioning wire-rope safety and for considering replacement: 1.7 Load Hooks/Load Blocks Load hooks/load blocks that have been changed out shall be inspected by a qualified inspector before returning the crane to service. Rotation-resistant ropes. according to the requirements of Section 9.2.2. 9. 2. Kinking. Inspection records shall be retained throughout the service life of the hook or load block and shall be readily available. b. because of their higher susceptibility to damage. Evidence of heat damage from any 8.2. 5. after allowance for deterioration disclosed by inspection.2. Replacement rope shall be the same size.5 before being placed in service. cause. 9. Standby cranes shall be inspected at least semiannually. h. Boom hoist ropes. f. No precise rules can be given for determining the exact time to replace wire rope because many factors are involved.DOE-STD-1090-99 2. or any other damage resulting in distortion of the rope structure. 4. Cranes exposed to adverse environments should be inspected more frequently. The internal deterioration of rotation-resistant ropes may not be readily observable. i. crushing.

replaced. Test weights shall not exceed 110 percent of the rated capacity and shall be accurate to within -5 percent. Test reports shall be kept on file and shall be readily available to appointed personnel. a functional test of the crane under a normal operating load should be made prior to putting it back in service.1 Operational Tests The following shall be tested during an initial test: a. d. +0 percent of stipulated values. or repaired shall be load-tested by a qualified inspector or under the direction of that inspector. c. b. c. Safety devices.3. However. Prior to initial use. A designated or authorized Chapter 9 Mobile Cranes 9-10 . Boom lifting and lowering mechanisms. Boom extension and retraction mechanism.DOE-STD-1090-99 9. e. A written report shall be furnished by the inspector showing test procedures and confirming the adequacy of repairs or alterations.3 TESTING 9. person shall determine if repairs made to a crane are extensive and require a rated load test. “Terminology and Definitions”). f. 9.2 Rated Load Test a.3. all cranes in which load-sustaining parts have been modified. b. Travel mechanism. The replacement of rope is excluded from this requirement. NOTE: Load tests shall not be conducted in locations where the lift meets the definition of a critical lift (see Chapter 1. or if repairs are routine maintenance and require only operational testing. Swinging mechanism. Load lifting and lowering mechanisms.

maintenance personnel shall take the following precautions as applicable: 1. 3. Before starting adjustments or repairs on a crane. and maintenance equipment is removed. c. For locomotive cranes: 1. Ensure starting means are rendered inoperative. flags. All moving parts of the crane for which lubrication is specified shall be regularly lubricated. Ensure that lubricant applied as part of a maintenance program is compatible with the original lubricant. During installation. maintenance of lubricant levels. b. b. 2. When an operating rope shows greater wear at its ends than on the remainder. f. c.4. Relieve hydraulic oil pressure from all hydraulic circuits before loosening or removing hydraulic components. 4. nick. safety devices are reactivated.4.3 Wire-Rope Maintenance 9. A preventive maintenance program based on the crane manufacturer's recommendations should be established. Employ blue flag protection on each side of the crane (except dead ends). 9. Store rope to prevent damage or deterioration. 6.1 Preventive Maintenance a. Signs or flags shall be removed only by authorized personnel. Dated records should be made available. Place the crane where it will cause the least interference with other equipment or operations in the area. trapped air has been removed from the hydraulic system. c. Warning or out-of-order signs shall be placed on the crane controls. Lubricant applied shall be of the type that does not hinder visual inspection. Place all controls in the OFF position and secure all operating features from inadvertent motion by brakes. Unreel or uncoil rope as recommended by the rope manufacturer and with care to avoid kinking or inducing a twist.4. Heat-affected zones of flame cut wire rope shall not be allowed to bear load. a. 3. Maintain rope in a well-lubricated condition to reduce internal friction and to prevent corrosion. d.2 Maintenance Procedures Personnel using wire rope shall ensure proper care by doing the following: a. Lower the lower load block to the ground or otherwise secure it against dropping. Those sections of rope that operate over sheaves or are otherwise hidden during inspection and maintenance procedures require special attention when the rope is lubricated. and derails. Operators and maintenance personnel shall follow the manufacturer's recommendations as to the points and frequency of lubrication. if possible. or otherwise secure it against dropping. Place derails not less than 50 ft from the crane on each side (except dead ends).DOE-STD-1090-99 9. 2. Lubricating systems should be checked for proper delivery of lubricant. use some method to prevent unlaying the strands. its life can be extended (in cases where a reduced rope length is adequate) by cutting off the worn end. or induce sharp bends in it. Allow only authorized personnel to remove warning signs. Replacement parts shall be at least equal to the original manufacturer's specifications. and types of lubricant to be used. or other means. b. thus shifting the wear to different areas of the rope.4 MAINTENANCE 9. 7. pawls. d. Stop the power plant or disconnect it at the power takeoff. the crane shall not be returned to service until all guards have been reinstalled. crush. avoid dragging the rope in the dirt or around objects which will scrape. After adjustments and repairs have been made. e. 5. Lower the boom to the ground. | | | | 9-11 Chapter 9 Mobile Cranes . Before cutting a rope. Consult the rope manufacturer when in doubt.

or preengineered production). rigging of the load. Use extreme caution when operating the crane near workers in elevated areas. s. Do not engage in any practice that will divert your attention while operating the crane. f. On hydraulically telescoping booms. h. n. and the movements to be made. If at any time a lifting device is found to be in need of repair. Replace broken windows. l. Watch for boom kickback. snow. m. d. and debris that could cause your hands or feet to slip from the controls. Never operate with the boom at a higher angle than shown on the capacity charts. e. watch out for centrifugal force. Store fuel in safety cans in safe locations. A continuing pull on the hoist lines can break the rope or pull the boom back over the cab on some types of booms. and steering mechanisms. oil. Do not operate the crane if you do not meet the requirements contained in Chapter 6 or if you are experiencing a condition resulting in reduced physical or mental capabilities. When swinging the crane. c. caustics. Determine that no one is working on the crane or is close to it before starting the engine or beginning to operate the crane. brakes. i. That person shall also determine the necessity to reduce crane ratings.5.DOE-STD-1090-99 9. and speed of movement. Fire extinguishers shall be maintained in a serviceable condition. horn. superstructure of the crane to prevent anyone from being struck or crushed by the crane. or is in any way unsafe. g. stop the engine(s) and ensure that smoking or open flames are not permitted within 25 ft of the fueling area.5 OPERATION a. o. p. j. lights. Ensure that alternate egress routes are not locked on mobile units with operating enclosures. controller. position of load. acids. be sure to play out the hoist line when extending and spool in the hoist line when retracting. and limit switches). It may be necessary in certain situations to use heavy timber mats to build a good working foundation. chains. The following shall apply to all personnel involved in mobile crane operation. q. critical. battery. Swing the crane slowly to avoid an outward swing of the load. keep the hoist brake as reserve. At the initial stage of the planning process.1 Conduct of Operator a. 9. Attach a tag-line to the load if necessary to control the swing. Barricade accessible areas within the swing radius of the rear of the rotating Chapter 9 Mobile Cranes 9-12 . an appointed person shall classify each lift into one of the DOE-specified lift categories (ordinary. boom location. Use a safety pawl on the boom-hoist drum when not lowering. That person shall analyze the operation and instruct all personnel involved in the proper positioning. Do not hoist two or more separately rigged loads in one lift. Do not store gasoline. b. Ensure proper functioning of tires. Avoid two-blocking. When two or more cranes are used to lift one load. r. b. When fueling the crane. even though the combined load is within the crane's rated capacity. k. caused when the hook block makes contact with boom-point sheaves. Position the crane on a solid and level footing. Keep the operating cab windshields clean and free of anything that obstructs vision. or cleaning solvents that emit toxic fumes in operating cabs. is defective. Ensure that a 10BC or larger fire extinguisher is installed at all operator stations. hoist rope. ground support. Keep the operating area free of water. lift system (including load-engaging means. When lowering heavy loads. Use power lowering when lowering loads. report it immediately to the designated authority and take the unit out of service until it has been restored to safe-operating condition or a determination has been made by the responsible manager that the deficiency will not adversely affect the safe operation of the unit. one designated person shall be responsible for the operation. ice.

 0DNLQJ $GMXVWPHQWV RU 5HSDLUV a. Keep boom high enough to swing clear of cab. 4. engage swing-jaw clutch before releasing brakes. 5. always move with the load behind. ropes.DOE-STD-1090-99 t. 3. never travel with near-capacity loads. Replace all guards and shields before resuming operation. Lower the boom or secure it against dropping. Display proper warning signs on controls of machine. Use a house lock or swing brake. no loads shall be lifted over the front area. operations undertaken at wind speeds in excess of 25 mph should be evaluated by a qualified person to determine if the size. m. Keep hands well away from the fan drive while engine is running. On soft surfaces. f. Safeguard the crane oiler. overhead lines. g. Always set swing brakes when the unit is idle or holding loads for a period of time. and clothing away from gears. z. Lock starter and remove ignition key to make the machine inoperative. Never back up until it is determined that everyone is clear of the machine. Secure the boom and hook block. snub the load to prevent swaying if possible. extra fuses. In the absence of crane manufacturer’s instructions regarding maximum wind speeds for operation. d. l. k. make sure they will support the weight of the machine. 11. when side clearances are tight. do not resume operation until a positive ALL CLEAR signal has been given. or any overhead obstruction. | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | j. except as approved by the crane manufacturer. Watch out for the carrier-cab on truck-mounted units when swinging the boom. and check the pressure of the air brakes frequently. feet. and other necessary articles shall be stored in the tool box. When traveling with a load. When a crane is to be operated at a fixed radius. 7. the boom-hoist pawl or other positive locking device shall be engaged. b. x. be sure they are blocked to prevent downhill movement before shifting steering clutches. Never travel a rubber-tired unit with a load over the side. 9. Check bridges before crossing. When traveling the machine: a. e. Block treads when moving uphill. and sheaves. if a ramp is not available. u. and lower boom into the rack to prevent swing. if swinging during travel is necessary. oil cans. Check river depths before fording. necessary clothing and personal belongings shall not interfere with access or operations. use blocking to build one. install a barrier or post a lookout. Crane cabs. Position the boom in the direction of travel for long moves. especially on slopes. Lock the turntable before traveling on a highway. Lock carrier air brakes ON when operating. v. shape and weight of the load can be safely lifted. Keep hands. i. Tools. c. w. Use a bar or stick to guide wire rope onto drums.  7UDYHOLQJ WKH 0DFKLQH h. 2. When loading machine on the trailer. Never put hands on wire rope when climbing to the top of the cab. 6. On truck-mounted cranes. Neutralize all controls. 8. waste. drums. and shall not be permitted to lie loose in or about the cab. it helps to raise the leading end of the crawlers and makes traveling safer. When making adjustments or repairs: 1. always use a ramp. and make certain there is sufficient clearance for tail swing. 10. y. 9-13 Chapter 9 Mobile Cranes . Stop the machine. Check clearances under overpasses.

5. Know the radius of the load. Do not back crane away from the load while carrying a maximum load. or sudden braking. Do not let the load strike the boom or outriggers. Do not handle large. Avoid hitting anything with the boom. c. Know the rated capacity of the crane and the weight of the load. g. Follow these requirements to avoid buckling the boom or tipping: 1. a. Lift load slightly off the ground and stop. b. if machine has hydraulic controls.DOE-STD-1090-99 b. 4.e. Keep near-capacity loads as close to the ground as possible. g. and any material-handling devices. Always use outriggers when making lifts (with pick-and-carry units). Always operate within the rated capacity of the machine. 3. if necessary. Before disconnecting oil lines. concrete bucket. Lower outrigger jacks until the tires clear the ground. magnet lifter. boom angle. hoists. and never lift a load forward of the front outriggers. f. never pull the load sideways. A safe lift depends on many factors including boom length. not from the boom foot pin. Test stability before lifting heavy loads. h. Recheck and. c. reset outriggers between heavy lifts. unless allowed on manufacturer's load chart. be sure to place boom on the ground or in the boom rest. Avoid fast swings.  (QVXULQJ 6WDELOLW\ d. the radius is measured from center of rotation. heavy loads in strong winds. the machine is already overloaded for that working radius. e. d. Always fully extend outrigger beams unless otherwise specified on the manufacturer's load charts for the crane. Check outrigger footing. check counterbalance clearance. the wind can catch the load and create an unstable condition. load line. Make only vertical lifts. Check the machine for movement and check to be sure the brakes hold with the load elevated.. c. Ratings are based on operating the machine on firm. Place blocking or other adequate supports under the boom before beginning boom disassembly operations. b. outriggers should be properly extended and lowered before operation.). The gross capacity includes weight of hook. f. Keep speed slow in lifting and lowering loads.  2EVHUYLQJ %RRP/HQJWK 3UHFDXWLRQV a. Do not reach into hydraulic-boom holes unless the sections are securely anchored together. Never stand under or on the boom during this work.5. and level the unit to reach the machine's full capacity. It is advisable to perform the work so there is no possibility of the crane. or load becoming a conductive path.2 Operating Near Power Lines and Transmitter Towers It is recognized that operating mobile cranes where they can become electrified from electric power lines is an extremely hazardous practice. Chapter 9 Mobile Cranes 9-14 . etc. Allow maximum clearance between the hook block and boom-point sheaves. Always release any air supercharge on the hydraulic reservoir and shut off the engine (or declutch pumps) before disconnecting oil lines. d. (i. these can cause overloads. this may cause the crane to tip. Swing carefully and slowly. level ground. h. e. subtract the weight of all these to find the true weight (net capacity) the crane can handle safely. and avoid boom or jib “whipping”. 6. Always use the shortest boom possible. If there are any indications of tipping. block. 9. 2. (Figure 9-2). an engineering analysis shall be made before putting the crane back in service if this occurs. and load radius. slings. Never use machine stability to determine capacity. then move the pedals and control levers to equalize pressures within the cylinders.

DOE-STD-1090-99 Figure 9-2. Danger zone for cranes and lifted loads operating near electrical transmission line 9-15 Chapter 9 Mobile Cranes .

The (electric) Power Marketing Administrations in DOE may deviate from the requirements of Table 9-3. b. or load: a. A qualified representative of the owner of the lines or a designated representative of the electrical utility shall be on site to verify that steps (a) and (b) have been completed and that the lines are not energized. load. c. providing the work is done according to line management-approved procedures that do not conflict with statutory or approved variances from these regulations. Crane operators shall not rely on the coverings of wires for their protection. Cranes shall not be used to handle materials stored under electric power lines unless any combination of the boom. c. Any overhead wire shall be considered to be an energized line unless and until the person owning the line or the electrical utility authorities indicate that it is not an energized line.1 m) is maintained between the crane or the load being handled and energized power lines. Durable signs shall be installed at the operator's station and on the outside of the crane. warning that electrocution or serious bodily injury may occur unless a minimum clearance of 10 ft (3.  3RZHU /LQHV (QHUJL]HG &UDQH 2SHUDWLQJ /HVV WKDQ (UHFWHG)XOO\ ([WHQGHG %RRP /HQJWK DZD\ IURP WKH 3URKLELWHG =RQH VHH )LJXUH . or machine component cannot enter the prohibited zone. e. load line. f. Exercise caution when working near overhead lines having long spans as they tend to move laterally or vertically due to the wind.DOE-STD-1090-99 The following steps shall be taken to minimize the hazard of electrocution or serious injury as a result of contact between the energized power lines and the crane. d. load line. These signs shall be revised but not removed when a local jurisdiction requires greater clearances. which could cause them to breach the safety zone.  &UDQH 2SHUDWLRQ 1HDU 'HHQHUJL]HG DQG *URXQGHG (OHFWULF 3RZHU /LQHV marked at the job-site location. Greater clearances are required because of higher voltage as stated in Table 9-3.

f. The horizontal and vertical distance of movement of long span lines due to the wind shall be added to the minimum clearance distance as specified in Table 9-3.. The following steps shall be taken to assure de-energization of the power lines has occurred: a. The lines shall be visibly grounded to avoid electrical feedback and appropriately Chapter 9 Mobile Cranes 9-16 . shall utilize tag lines of a non-conductive type. etc. The operator should avoid operating the crane. in this area. a. c. Load control. The power company or owner of the power lines shall de-energize the lines. Devices such as ribbons. g. load line. with or without a load. The specified clearance between the power lines and the crane. h. should be attached by a qualified person to the power lines to improve visibility. Operation of boom and load over electric power lines is extremely dangerous. b. b. A qualified representative of the owner of the lines or a designated representative of the electrical utility shall be consulted for specific distances. A designated signaler. whose sole responsibility is to verify that the required clearance is maintained shall be in constant contact with the crane operator. This is the preferred condition under which the operation can be performed safely. due to perception of distance and multiple contact points as viewed from the position of the operator and /or position of the designated signaler. or equivalent means employed to aid in location of the prohibited zone. when required. No one shall be permitted to touch the crane or the load unless the designated signaler indicates it is safe to do so. An on-site meeting between project management and a qualified representative of the owner of the lines or a designated representative of the electrical utility shall take place to establish the procedures to safely complete the operations. balls. e. and load shall be maintained at all times as specified in Table 9-3. d. The hazard of injury or death due to electrocution has been remove.

7 m) (13.6 m) (10. When operating near high-voltage power lines: Normal voltage (phase to phase) Minimum required clearance Over Over Over Over Over 50 200 350 500 750 to to to to to to 50 kV 200 kV 350 kV 500 kV 750 kV 1000 kV 10 ft 15 ft 20 ft 25 ft 35 ft 45 ft ( 3.2 m) (1. Safe working distance from power lines.6 m) ( 6. a.3 m) (3.1 m) ( 4.5 m) (4.7 m) b.75 kV 50 kV 345 kV 700 kV 1000 kV 4 ft 6 ft 10 ft 16 ft 20 ft (1.1 m) 9-17 Chapter 9 Mobile Cranes .9 m) (6.75 Over 50 Over 345 Over 750 to to to to to 0. While in transit with no load and boom or mast lowered: Normal voltage (phase to phase) Minimum required clearance Over 0.DOE-STD-1090-99 Table 9-3.1 m) ( 7.

DOE-STD-1090-99 Figure 9-3. Chapter 9 Mobile Cranes 9-18 . Danger zone for cranes and lifted loads operating near electrical transmission line.

DOE-STD-1090-99  &UDQH 2SHUDWLRQV DUH :LWKLQ WKH 3URKLELWHG =RQH DQG WKH 3RZHU /LQHV DUH (QHUJL]HG  &UDQH LQ 7UDQVLW :LWK 1R /RDG DQG %RRP /RZHUHG VHH )LJXUH .

shall be in constant contact with the crane operator. the effect of speed and terrain on the boom and crane movement shall be considered. The person responsible for the operation shall alert and warn the crane operator and all persons working around or near the crane about hazard of electrocution or serious injury and instruct them on how to avoid the hazard. which are not a part of nor an attachment to the crane and which will not allow contact between the energized electric power lines and the crane. whose sole responsibility is to verify that the clearances established are maintained. No one shall be permitted to touch the crane or the load unless the signaler indicates it is safe to do so. e. Insulated barriers. after visiting the site. Non-conductive barricades to restrict access to the crane work area. All non-essential personnel shall be removed from the crane work area. The following guidelines should be required: 1. b. load lines. Before such operations take place. Crane/load grounded to a neutral line by the utility. f. d. or load. Cranes in transit with no load and boom lowered shall maintain clearance as specified in Table 9-3. When planning transit of the crane. Electrical system protective devices that automatically re-energize the circuit after a power line contact occurrence should be blocked or disengaged to inhibit this function. b. and set minimum required clearances and procedures for safe operations. 3.  &UDQH 2SHUDWLRQ 1HDU 7UDQVPLWWHU 7RZHUV VHH )LJXUH . These operations shall be under their supervision. a. a qualified person together with a qualified representative of the utility or an engineer qualified in power line transmission shall. 2. A designated signaler shall be assigned to observe the clearance and give warning before the crane approaches the above limits. a. c. 4. shall utilize tag lines of a non-conductive type. determine if this is the most feasible way to complete the operation. A designated signaler. Load control. c. when required.

Inch each motion into its limit switch to ensure that two-blocking does not occur during the test.5. 9. 9-19 Chapter 9 Mobile Cranes . The following precautions shall be taken when necessary to dissipate induced voltages: 1. the transmitter shall be deenergized or tests shall be made to determine if electrical charge is induced on the crane. 3. However. if supplied. Prior to work near transmitter towers where an electrical charge can be induced in the equipment or materials being handled. test the limit switch again before the next lift. Ground jumper cables shall be attached to materials being handled by boom equipment when electrical charge is induced while working near energized transmitters. If a lift is in progress during a shift change. crews shall be provided with nonconductive poles having large alligator clips or other similar protection to attach the ground cable to the load. 2. Combustible and flammable materials shall be removed from the immediate area prior to operations. without a load on the hook at the beginning of each work shift or the first time the crane is used that shift. this testing requirement is considered to have been satisfied for the completion of that lift. The equipment shall be provided with an electrical ground directly to the upper rotating structure supporting the boom.3 Hoist-Limit Switch Check all limit switches. a.

DOE-STD-1090-99 Figure 9-4. (See Table 9-3 for minimum radial distance of prohibited zone.) Chapter 9 Mobile Cranes 9-20 . Danger zone for cranes and lifted loads operating near electrical transmission line.

9-21 Chapter 9 Mobile Cranes . Danger zone for cranes and lifted loads operating near electical transmission line.DOE-STD-1090-99 Figure 9-5.

8 Moving the Load a. Ensure that the hoist rope is free from kinks or twists. All personnel acting as signalers during crane operations shall be clearly identified to the crane operator by the use of the following (one or more. There is no sudden acceleration or deceleration of the moving load. d.5. 2.5. A “dry run” shall be conducted in areas where clearance is limited. In those cases where the crane operator cannot see the signaler. and orange vest. 5. Obey a STOP signal no matter who gives it.DOE-STD-1090-99 9.5 Identification of Signalers 9. Hoist rope shall not be kinked. c. orange gloves. “Lifting Personnel. swinging.4 Standard Hand Signals The standard hand signals for DOE use shall be as specified in the latest edition of the ASME B30 standards for the particular type of crane or hoist being used (see Figure 9-6). note the following conditions: 1. Multiple-part lines shall not be twisted around each other. f.7 Attaching the Load a. Avoid carrying loads over people. b. take care to ensure that: 1. Load does not contact any obstructions. The appointed person directing the lift shall make certain that the load is well secured and properly balanced in the sling or lifting device before it is lifted more than a few inches. The operator shall obey signals only from the designated signaler. e. The relay signaler shall also be clearly identified by the items described in the previous paragraph. a. Cranes shall not be used for side pulls. as required by the responsible manager): orange hardhat. b. All personnel including the qualified rigger shall be clear of the load. | | | 9. except when specifically authorized by a designated person who has determined that the stability of the crane is not endangered and that various parts of the crane will not be over stressed. The hook shall be positioned above the center of gravity of the load in such a manner as to minimize swinging when the load is lifted.5. This requirement may be waived by the responsible manager when the lift is very closely controlled or personnel are required to wear special clothing for protection from a hazardous environment. Where voice (direct or two-way radio) communication is used. lowering. Do not wrap the hoist rope around the load. d. 9. c. a second person (relay signaler) shall be stationed where he or she can see both the signaler and the crane operator and can relay the signals to the operator. c. Ensure that the load is attached to the load-block hook by means of slings or other approved devices.3. 2. 3. d. or traveling shall be done while anyone is on the load or hook. Take care to make certain that the sling clears all obstacles. Ensure the load is well secured and properly balanced in the sling or lifting device before it is lifted more than a few inches. b. it should be determined that the rope is properly seated on the drum and in the sheaves. except for authorized testing described in Section 9. During hoisting. except as noted in Chapter 4. 4. 9. Before starting to hoist. No hoisting.” | | | | Chapter 9 Mobile Cranes 9-22 .5. the signaler shall communicate directly with the operator.5. Following any slack-rope condition. not through a third person.6 Size of Load The crane shall not be loaded beyond its rated capacity.

thumb pointing up.DOE-STD-1090-99 HOIST. MOVE SLOWLY. With arm extended. forefinger pointing up. flex fingers in and out as long as load movement is desired. then use regular signals. Use one hand to give any motion signal and place other hand motionless above the hand giving the motion signal. Extend arm. flex fingers in and out as long as load movement is desired. LOWER BOOM. move hand in small horizontal circles. Tap elbow with one hand. thumb pointing upward. With arm extended downward. Figure 9-6. LOWER THE BOOM AND RAISE THE LOAD. 9-23 Chapter 9 Mobile Cranes . then use regular signals. (Hoist slowly shown as example. Standard hand signals for controlling mobile crane operation. forefinger pointing down. With arm extended. LOWER. RAISE BOOM. Extend arm. fingers closed. USE MAIN HOIST. USE WHIPLINE (Auxiliary Hoist).) RAISE THE BOOM AND LOWER THE LOAD. With forearm vertical. move hand in small horizontal circles. thumb pointing downward. fingers closed. Tap fist on head. thumb pointing down.

palms down. Use both fists in front of body. Chapter 9 Mobile Cranes 9-24 . TRAVEL (Both Tracks). Extend arm. Clasp hands in indicating direction of travel. move arms back and forth horizontally. Figure 9-6. Lock the track on side indicated by raised fist. making a TRAVEL. make DOG EVERYTHING. EMERGENCY STOP. front of body. move arm back and forth horizontally. thumbs pointing toward each other. Both arms extended. RETRACT BOOM (Telescoping Booms). thumbs pointing outward. open and slightly raised. body. hand circular motion about each other. rotated EXTEND BOOM (Telescoping vertically in front of body (for land Booms). STOP. (continued). palm down.DOE-STD-1090-99 SWING. Hold both fists in front of body. Hold both fists in front of cranes only). Extend arm. Extend arm forward. TRAVEL (One Side Track). Travel opposite track indicated by circular motion of other fist. forward pushing motion in direction of travel. point with finger in direction of swing of boom. or backward (for land cranes only).

DOE-STD-1090-99

EXTEND BOOM (Telescoping Boom). One-hand signal. Hold one fist in front of chest, thumb tapping chest.

RETRACT BOOM (Telescoping Boom). One-hand signal. Hold one fist in front of chest, thumb pointing outward and heel of fist tapping chest.

Figure 9-6. (continued).

9-25

Chapter 9 Mobile Cranes

DOE-STD-1090-99 g. Test the brakes each time a load approaching the rated capacity is handled by raising the load a few inches and applying the brakes. h. Do not lower the load below the point where less than two full wraps of rope remain on the hoist drum. i. Do not leave your position at the controls while the load is suspended, unless required to do so by an approved emergency procedure. j. If the load must remain suspended for any considerable length of time, the operator shall hold the drum from rotating in the lowering direction by activating the positive controllable means of the operator’s station. k. Work on suspended loads is prohibited under normal conditions. When the responsible manager decides that it is necessary to work on a suspended load, guidelines for ensuring safety of the work shall be established through consultation with the appropriate safety organization. Suspended loads that must be worked on shall be secured against unwanted movement. l. Tag lines should be used as required to guide, snub, or otherwise control the load. 2. Ensure that the weight of the load is determined, that proper equipment and accessories are selected, and that rated capacity is not exceeded. 3. Survey the lift site for hazardous/ unsafe conditions. 4. Ensure that equipment is properly set up and positioned.

| | | | |

5. Ensure that a signaler is assigned, if required, and is identified to the operator. 6. Direct the lifting operation to ensure that the lift is completed safely and efficiently. 7. Stop the job when any potentially unsafe condition is recognized. 8. Direct operations if an accident or injury occurs. f. The designated leader shall inspect all cranes to ensure that they are still within the inspection interval. g. The designated leader shall inspect all lifting devices to ensure that the rated capacity of these items of equipment will not be exceeded. h. The operator shall inspect for damage and defects in accordance with Section 9.2.3, including observations during operation. A qualified person shall examine deficiencies and determine whether they constitute a hazard. i. Check hoist-limit switches, if provided, according to Section 9.5.3, “Hoist-Limit Switch.” j. Ensure that basic operating instructions of power-operated equipment, together with charts, tables, or diagrams showing the rated capacity, boom angle, swing, and stability data are posted in convenient view of the operator. k. Check load lines after strain is put on them but before the load is lifted clear of the ground; if load lines are not plumb, reposition the slings or equipment so that the lines are plumb before continuing.

9.5.9

Ordinary Lifts

a. The requirements of all preceding paragraphs in Section 9.5, “Operation,” also shall apply to ordinary lifts. b. An appointed person shall classify each lift into one of the DOE categories (ordinary, critical or preengineered production) before the lift is planned. c. Hoisting and rigging operations for ordinary lifts require a designated leader who shall be present at the lift site during the entire lifting operation. If the lift is being made by only one person, that person assumes all responsibilities of the designated leader. d. Leadership designation may be by written instructions, specific verbal instructions for the particular job, or clearly defined responsibilities within the crew's organizational structure. e. The designated leader's responsibility shall include the following: 1. Ensure that personnel involved understand how the lift is to be made.
Chapter 9 Mobile Cranes

9.5.10 Critical Lifts
See Chapter 2, “Critical Lifts,” for critical-lift requirements.

9-26

DOE-STD-1090-99

Exhibit I is intended to be a sample form only and is not mandatory. Any other form that accomplishes the purpose is acceptable.

9-27

Chapter 9 Mobile Cranes

DOE-STD-1090-99

INTENTIONALLY BLANK

Chapter 9 Mobile Cranes

9-28

DOE-STD-1090-99
EXHIBIT I MOBILE CRANE LOAD TEST AND INSPECTION LICENSE OR EQUIPMENT NO. HOUR METER-ODOMETER TOTAL MAKE DATE Page 1 of 4

RATED CAPACITY

LOAD TEST INSPECTION REPORT The following checklist identifies the items to be inspected prior to the load test. Any unusual conditions observed during the inspection should be noted in the Remarks section. Equipment shall be inspected by maintenance personnel prior to load test. NOTES: 1. 2. Qualified inspector shall verify the inspection is completed. Craftsmen shall initial and date all tests, work, and inspections completed below. DEFECT OK NO. CRANE ITEM DEFECT OK

NO. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

CRANE ITEM Wire Rope Cracked or Worn Sheaves & Drums Limit Switch (Anti-Two-Blocking) Boom Master Clutch Steering Clutches Hydraulic Pump Hydraulic Controls Hydraulic Hoses

13 Hoist Clutch Lining 14 Hoist Drum Brake Bands 15 Open Gears 16 Boom Jibs (Where Applicable) NO. CARRIER ITEM 1 2 3 4 Steering Gears and Connections Brakes (Service and Hand) Tires and Wheels General Lubrication OPERATING TEST OVERALL CONDITION DEFECT OK

10 Mechanical Controls 11 Drive Chains 12 Swing Clutches

REMARKS (Unusual conditions—noises, structural cracks, misalignment, etc.)

SAFETY ITEMS: (Fire extinguisher, signs, guards, etc.)

9-29

Chapter 9 Mobile Cranes

DOE-STD-1090-99
EXHIBIT I (continued) MOBILE CRANE LOAD TEST AND FOLLOWUP CHECKS NOTES: 1. 2. Craftsman shall initial all steps completed below. Qualified inspector shall verify all steps below. 1. 2. Set crane up for load test and inspection. Perform operations test without load to verify proper function of the following: o o o o o o 3. Load lifting and lowering mechanisms Boom lifting and lowering mechanism Boom extension and retraction mechanisms Swinging mechanism Travel mechanism Safety devices. Page 2 of 4

Test loads shall not exceed 110% of rated capacity. Refer to load chart for load test capacity at maximum and minimum working radius. Check boom angle indicators for accuracy. Rig test weights to hook using appropriate slings. Hoist the test load a sufficient distance to ensure that the load is supported by the crane and held by the hoist brakes. Hold the load for 10 min or the time required to check all primary load-bearing parts while under load without slippage, damage, or permanent deformation. At least once during the lifting portion of the hoisting cycle and once during the lowering cycle, power to the hoisting equipment shall be completely turned off. There shall be no slippage of the load or overheating of the brakes.

4. 5.

6.

7. Lower the load to approximately 2 in. off the ground to check for swing-roller operation and outrigger stability. Slowly swing test load between outrigger locations. 8. 9. Move the load back to the original position and slowly lower to ground. At the completion of the load test, inspect the following: Visually inspect rope in accordance with Section 9.2.6.

Chapter 9 Mobile Cranes

9-30

DOE-STD-1090-99
EXHIBIT I (continued) MOBILE CRANE LOAD TEST AND FOLLOWUP CHECKS DEFECTIVE/OK a. b. c. d. e. Rope diameter: (Previous) Wear Kinks Broken wires Other signs of deterioration. (Present) Page 3 of 4

Visually inspect the rope drum for: a. b. c. d. Wear Deformation Deterioration Have qualified inspector perform nondestructive tests on hook by visual examination, liquid penetrant examination, or magnetic-particle examination. Acceptance: No cracks, linear indications, laps, or seams.

Hooks with more than 15% normal (new hook) throat opening shall be replaced. Hooks with more than 10 degree twist from the normal (new hook) plane of the hook shall be replaced. Hooks having more than 10% wear in the bowl section or 5% elongation of the shank shall be replaced. Lubricate hook bearing and latch pin, as applicable. Establish three marks, A, B, and C, with a center punch. For ease in measuring, set distances on an even number of inches. BEFORE LOAD TEST Length AB Length BC AFTER LOAD TEST Length AB Length BC Check for: 1. 2. 3. Wear and deformation Cracks and twisting Signs of opening between Point A and Point B. in. in. in. in.

9-31

Chapter 9 Mobile Cranes

DOE-STD-1090-99
EXHIBIT I (continued) MOBILE CRANE LOAD TEST AND FOLLOWUP CHECKS This information should be retained with the equipment. Record the following: BLOCK WEIGHT TEST WEIGHT RADIUS/CENTER PIN TO LOAD PARTS LINE BOOM LENGTH Load Test Inspection Date Qualified Inspector Operated By ft quantity ft lb lb Page 4 of 4

Chapter 9 Mobile Cranes

9-32

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10. . . . . . . .2 Specific Areas of Use . . . . . . 10. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4.1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10. . . testing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10. . . . . .1. . . . . . . .3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4. . .1. . . . . . . . 10. . . .3 10. . . . . . . .1 Daily Pre-Operational Check . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4. . . .3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4. . . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10. . 10. . . . . . . . 10. . . . . . . . . . . . . and maintenance requirements for forklift trucks powered by internal-combustion engines or electric motors and implements the requirements of ASME B56. . . . . . . . . . . .1 Forklift Truck Load Test . . . .2. . . . .7 Overhead Guards . . 10. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10. . . . . . . . 10. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . .DOE-STD-1090-99 CHAPTER 10 FORKLIFT TRUCKS This chapter specifies operation. . . . . . . .2 Fork Inspections . . .3 Hazardous Areas .6 (“Rough Terrain Fork Lift Trucks”). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10. . . . .2. . . . .5 Modification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . . . . . . . . . INSPECTIONS . . . . . . . .3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10. . . . . . . . . . inspection. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Battery Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10. . . . . . . . .3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10. . . . . . . . 10. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . .4 Forks . . . . . . . . .6 History File . . . 10. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TYPE DESIGNATION AND AREAS OF USE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Operator Training/Qualification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Non-Hazardous Areas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 10-i Chapter 10 Forklift Trucks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Fork Load Test . . . . . .2 10. . . . . . . .1. . . . . . . . . . . .4 Attachments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10.3. . . . . . . . . . . . . 10. . . . . . . . .2. . . . .1 (“Safety Standard for Powered Industrial Trucks—Low Lift and High Lift Trucks”) and B56. . . . . .1 Fork Arm Data . . . . .1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . 10. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10. . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Attachment Load Test . .3 Fork Repair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . .4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10. . . . . . . .1. . . . . . . .6 Warning Devices . . . . .3. . 10.8 Fire Hazards . .1 Fork Load Rating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 GENERAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Inspection and Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Nameplates and Markings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-1 10-1 10-1 10-1 10-1 10-1 10-2 10-2 10-2 10-2 10-2 10-10 10-10 10-10 10-10 10-10 10-14 10-14 10-14 10-14 10-15 10-15 10-15 10-16 10-16 10-16 10-18 10-18 10-18 10-18 10. . . . . . . 10. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Rated Capacity . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . .9 Work Atmosphere . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Initial Inspection of New and Rented Equipment . . TESTING .1 Type Designation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . and ANSI/UL 558 (“Internal-Combustion-Engine-Powered Industrial Trucks”) and 583 (“Electric-Battery-Powered Industrial Trucks”). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3 Loading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10. . . . . .4 Ordinary Lifts . . . . 10. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . 10. . 10-27 Exhibit II Forklift Load Test and Inspection Form (Example Only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . . . 10. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . . .DOE-STD-1090-99 10. . . . . . . . . . . 10. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Critical Lifts . . . 10-29 Chapter 10 Forklift Trucks 10-ii . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-19 10-19 10-19 10-20 10-21 10-22 10-23 10-23 10-24 10-24 Exhibit I Operators Pre-Shift Inspection Form (Example Only) . . . .5. . . . . . . . . . 10. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10. . . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . .6 Equipment Qualifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5.1 General . . . . .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10. . . . . . . . . . .2 Lifting of Personnel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Standard Hand Signals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 OPERATIONS . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Conduct of Operator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Traveling . 10. . . . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5. 10. operation. Serial number on hydraulically actuated attachments 3.” For forklift trucks purchased after December 1984. legibly inscribed with the following information: a.1. and trucks intended for hazardous locations (see ASME B56. Weight Capacity d." applicable to the manufacturer. and Factory Mutual Research Corporation. and maintenance requirements for industrial trucks powered by electric motors or internal-combustion engines.DOE-STD-1090-99 10-1 GENERAL This chapter specifies operation. but training. Capacity.1 Fork Arm Data 10. Maximum hydraulic pressure (on hydraulically actuated attachments) 4. 5. Model number Every truck shall have appended to it a durable. 10. and testing requirements for non-powered equipment shall be based on the manufacturer's instructions and recommendations. or decals shall be changed accordingly. testing. "Safety Standard for Low and High Lift Trucks.1. 2. maintenance.3 Nameplate(s) and Marking Attachments almost always affect rated capacity of the truck. b On every removable attachment (excluding fork extensions). “Personnel Qualification and Training.500-lb (680-kg) capacity at 24-in.1. e. Section 7. When a forklift truck is equipped with an attachment. For example.1. 10. the designation 1500 @ 24 means 1. b. See Figures 10-3 for examples of powered industrial trucks.1 Operator Training/ Qualification Operators of forklift trucks shall be trained and qualified as described in Chapter 6. Batteries for use in electric trucks shall have the battery weight legibly stamped on the battery tray near the lifting means as follows: Service Weight _____lb(kg). such as those prescribed 10-1 Chapter 10 Forklift Trucks . Rated capacity. Type designation to show conformance with the requirements. f. Inc.1.4 Attachments Rated capacity is the maximum weight the truck can transport and stack at a specified load center and for a specified load elevation. c.1. "Nameplates and Markings").3. the rated capacity of the truck/attachment combination shall be established by the truck manufacturer. Trucks shall not be used or tested above their rated capacities. corrosion-resistant nameplate(s). additional information is required (and allowed) on nameplates on high-lift trucks. (600-mm) load center. In addition to the above requirements. by Underwriters Laboratories.1. Designation of compliance with the mandatory requirements of ASME B56. each fork arm shall be clearly stamped with its rated capacity in an area readily visible and not subject to wear. operating.. and maintenance instruction plates. a corrosion-resistant nameplate with the following information is required: 1.2 Rated Capacity 10. The rated capacity of an attachment/truck combination shall not be exceeded. a. tags. inspection. Guidelines may also be taken from this chapter regarding pallet trucks and other small miscellaneous non-powered lift trucks (see Figure 10-4). electric trucks. Weight of truck. Truck model and truck serial number. inspection.

6 Warning Devices a. Backup or motion alarms that sound continuously may be warranted in special cases but generally are less effective than operator-controlled devices. b. The bottom of the top tiered load is not higher than 72 in. 1.7 Overhead Guards An overhead guard is intended to offer protection to the operator from falling objects. Only stable (preferably interlocked. 10. b.1. Consult truck nameplate. iii. The using organization shall determine if operating conditions require the truck to be equipped with additional sound-producing or visual devices (such as lights or blinkers). Concentrations of these materials in the work location must meet the requirements of 29 CFR 1910. There is protection against falling objects from adjacent high stack areas. 2. but it cannot protect against every possible impact. unless the following conditions are met: Work Atmosphere a. it should not be considered a substitute for good judgement and care in load handling. b. auxiliary directional lighting shall be provided on the truck. Capacity.1. Vertical movement of the lifting mechanism is restricted to 72 in. (3000 mm) from the ground where tiered.9 10. Rough terrain forklift trucks shall be fitted with an overhead guard manufactured in accordance with ASME B56.1000. Therefore. gong. Occupational Safety and Health Standards for General Industry. and maintenance instruction plates. 10. 10. or decals shall be changed accordingly. The operation of forklift trucks may effects the concentrations of carbon monoxide and oxygen in the work location. including order picker trucks. unitized or containerized) loads are handled. whistle.1. or other sound-producing device(s)." NOTE: The above information should be provided by the attachment manufacturer. (1800 mm) and the top is not more than 120 in. Chapter 10 Forklift Trucks 10-2 . and shall be responsible for providing and maintaining such devices.1. 10. shall be equipped with an overhead guard manufactured in accordance with ASME B56. ii. a. operation.8 Fire Hazard Areas Powered forklift trucks for operation in fire hazard areas shall be of the type recommended in ANSI/NFPA 505 (“Powered Industrial Trucks.DOE-STD-1090-99 6. High lift rider trucks. Type Designation and Areas of Use”). Where general lighting is less than 2 lumens per square foot. Every truck shall be equipped with an operator-controlled horn.1. Table Z1 Limits For Air Contaminants. "Capacity of truck and attachment combination may be less than capacity shown on attachment. tags.1.5 Modifications Modifications or additions that affect capacity or safe operation shall not be performed without prior written approval from the forklift truck manufacturer. (1800 mm) or less from the ground. The truck will be operated only in an area where: i. The following instructions (or equivalent).6.

(Sheet 1 of 6) 10-3 Chapter 10 Forklift Trucks . Types of Trucks.DOE-STD-1090-99 Figure 10-3.

DOE-STD-1090-99 Figure 10-3. (sheet 2 of 6) Chapter 10 Forklift Trucks 10-4 . Types of Trucks.

Types of Trucks. (sheet 3 of 6) 10-5 Chapter 10 Forklift Trucks .DOE-STD-1090-99 Figure 10-3.

(sheet 4 of 6) Chapter 10 Forklift Trucks 10-6 . Types of Trucks.DOE-STD-1090-99 Figure 10-3.

Types of Trucks. (sheet 5 of 6) 10-7 Chapter 10 Forklift Trucks .DOE-STD-1090-99 Figure 10-3.

Types of Trucks.DOE-STD-1090-99 Figure 10-3. (sheet 6 of 6) Chapter 10 Forklift Trucks 10-8 .

Manually Operated Pallet Trucks G A 99 0 02 8 .S m a ll M isc e lla n e o u s Tru ck G A99 0029 10-9 Chapter 10 Forklift Trucks .DOE-STD-1090-99 Figure 10-4.

under certain conditions.2 Specific Areas of Use The atmosphere or location where the powered 10-10 . type EX units are specifically tested and classified for use in Class I. fuel..1. b. These markers shall be distinctive in shape.1 Type Designation a. and electrical systems.3 Hazardous Areas The following units are suitable for use in hazardous areas since they are equipped with additional safeguards (i. Underwriters Laboratories (UL) or Factory Mutual (FM)]. Type E Forklifts — electrically powered units having minimum acceptable safeguards against inherent fire and electrical shock hazards c. National Electrical Code f.2.2 TYPE DESIGNATIONS AND AREAS OF USE 10. constructed. Type DY Forklifts — diesel-powered units that have all the safeguards of the type DS units except that they do not have any electrical equipment. fuel. It is essential to use proper equipment in hazardous (explosive) areas. Type GS Forklifts — gasoline-powered units that. they are equipped with temperature-limitation features c. Type EX Forklifts — electrically powered units that differ from type E. or the truck shall be clearly marked as to the area(s) it is not to enter.1.. dusts. are provided with additional safeguards to the exhaust.2.2. Type ES Forklifts — electrically powered units that are provided with all the requirements for the type E units and that have additional safeguards to the electrical system to prevent emission of hazardous sparks and to limit surface temperatures d. and that also have electric motors and all other electrical equipment completely enclosed e.2 Non-Hazardous Areas The following units are not suitable for use in hazardous areas since they include only minimum safeguards against inherent fire hazards: a. are provided with additional safeguards to the exhaust. Group D. fuel. and assembled so that the units may be used in atmospheres containing specifically named flammable vapors. in addition to all the requirements for the type G units. in addition to the requirements for the type LP units. The entrance to hazardous areas shall be posted with a sign to identify the type of forklift truck permitted. and electrical systems g.g. special exhaust.e. 10. Type LPS Forklifts — liquefied-petroleumgas-powered units that.2. ES. Durable markers indicating the designation of the type of truck for use in hazardous areas shall be applied to each side of the vehicle in a visible but protected area. Trucks approved for use in hazardous areas shall have the manufacturer’s label or some other identifying mark indicating approval for the intended use by a recognized national testing laboratory [e. a. Type D Forklifts — diesel-powered units having minimum acceptable safeguards against inherent fire hazards b. Type LP Forklifts — liquefied-petroleumgas-powered units having minimum acceptable safeguards against inherent fire hazards 10. Type DS Forklifts — diesel-powered units that are provided with all the requirements for the type D units and that have additional safeguards to the exhaust. or for Class II. Group G locations as defined in NFPA 70. Type EE Forklifts — electrically powered units that are provided with all the requirements for the type E and ES units. and. and electrical systems b. fibers. as indicated in Figure 101. see Figure 10-2. or EE units in that the electrical fittings and equipment are designed. fuel. Hazardous-Area Signs. Type G Forklifts — gasoline-powered units having minimum acceptable safeguards against inherent fire hazards d. including ignition. or electrical systems) or other modifications against inherent fire hazards: Chapter 10 Forklift Trucks 10.DOE-STD-1090-99 10.

c. b. Class II — locations that are hazardous because of the presence of combustible dust. Class III — locations where easily ignitable fibers or filings are present but are not likely to be suspended in quantities sufficient to produce ignitable mixtures.DOE-STD-1090-99 forklift is to be used shall be classified. Unclassified — locations not possessing atmospheres defined as Class I. 10-11 Chapter 10 Forklift Trucks . Class I — locations in which flammable gases or vapors are present or may be present in the air in quantities sufficient to produce explosive or ignitable mixtures. d. Location classifications are described as follows: a. or III locations. II.

DOE-STD-1090-99 NOTE: The markers for EE. and DY are 5 in. Markers to identify type of industrial truck. Chapter 10 Forklift Trucks 10-12 . The signs shall have black borders and lettering on a yellow background.7 cm) high. (12. Figure 10-1. EX. The rest are 4 in. (10 cm) square.

Building signs for posting at entrance to hazardous areas. (28 cm). (40 cm). shall be installed on the sign. NOTE: The minimum width of the sign is 11 in. 10-13 Chapter 10 Forklift Trucks . The sign shall have the word “caution” in yellow letters on a black background. the minimum height is 16 in. A marker identical to the one used on the side of the truck as shown in Figure 10-1. The body of the sign shall have black letters on a yellow background.DOE-STD-1090-99 Figure 10-2.

all new or newly arrived rental equipment. A scheduled planned inspection. check its condition. Standard instructions will be suitable for most forklift trucks. maintain.3. warning devices. lights. which appears at the end of this chapter. control mechanisms. d. approved safe-operating features are preserved by maintenance. f. maintenance. b. and lubrication program shall be followed. This inspection shall be documented and should be retained in the forklift truck's history file. which appears at the end of this chapter. Carefully inspect all parts of lift and tilt mechanisms and frame members and maintain them in a safe-operating condition. Conditions adversely affecting safety shall be corrected before the forklift truck is placed into service.DOE-STD-1090-99 10. steering mechanisms. Fuel system(s) n. Battery f. guards. Chapter 10 Forklift Trucks 10-14 . however. consult the manufacturer's recommendations. and safety devices regularly and maintain them in a safe-operating condition. Only trained and authorized personnel shall be permitted to inspect.1 Daily Pre-operational Check 10. A sample load test and inspection form is included as Exhibit II. Condition of the tires b. j. For new equipment. Tire inflation. these services shall be preformed in accordance with manufacturer's specifications. Before operating the truck. lift-overload devices. governors. No repairs shall be made while the truck is in a hazardous (explosive/classified) area. Brakes l. c. 10.3. ensure that the original. an initial inspection shall verify that requirements of the purchase order (or rental agreement) have been met and that the equipment is suitable for its intended use. Inspect brakes. operating conditions may require additional instructions. and adjust forklift trucks. Additional items as specified by the manufacturer or that are unique to the facility at which the truck is operated.3 INSPECTIONS 10. e. It is recommended that the instructions be attached to the equipment.3. Lift and tilt systems h.2 Initial Inspection of New and Rented Equipment Instructions for pre-operational inspections shall be readily available to the operator. Forks or other load-engaging means i. repair. if pneumatic tires c. or modified forklifts shall be inspected by a qualified inspector to ensure compliance with the provisions of this chapter. Controls Prior to initial use. giving special attention to the following: a. A sample Pre-operational inspection checklist is included as Exhibit 1. Chains and cables Limit switches k. Lights e. This form is intended to be a sample only and is not intended to be mandatory. Warning and safety devices d. For special trucks or devices designed and approved for operation in hazardous areas. g.3 Inspection and Maintenance Inspection and maintenance of powered forklift trucks shall be performed in conformance with the following practices: a. Steering mechanism m.

Inspect and maintain batteries. l. electrical conductors. m. operation safety.4.0. Load-bearing components shall be examined for deformation and load-bearing welds shall be visually examined for cracks. protective devices.4 10. Maintain capacity. When temperature of any part of any truck is found to be in excess of its normal operating temperature the vehicle shall be removed from service and not returned to service until the cause for such overheating has been eliminated. Industrial trucks originally approved for the use of gasoline for fuel may be converted to liquefied petroleum gas fuel provided the complete conversion results in a truck which embodies the features specified for LP or LPS designated trucks. Water mufflers shall be filled daily or as frequently as is necessary to prevent depletion of the supply of water below 75 percent of the filled capacity. motors. A fork that shows any of the following defects shall be withdrawn from service.DOE-STD-1090-99 g. r. Check fuel systems for leaks and for the proper condition of the parts. deformation. in regards to safety. Inspect and maintain all hydraulic systems.2 Fork Inspections a. and connections. Take action to prevent use of the truck until the leak has been corrected. Any vehicle that emits hazardous sparks or flames from the exhaust system shall immediately be removed from service.3. Vehicles with mufflers having screens or other parts that may become clogged shall not be operated while such screens or parts are clogged. Fork inspection shall include: 1. o. failure. and maintenance-instruction plates. non-destructive crack detection. tags. k. and not returned to service until the cause for the emission of such sparks and flames has been eliminated.3. q.1 Forks Fork Load Rating Forks used in pairs (the normal arrangement) shall have a rated capacity of each fork at least half the manufacturer's truck rated capacity at the center distance shown on the forklift truck nameplate. 10.A thorough visual examination for cracks and. n. 10. and other similar parts to ensure that drift or leakage has not developed to the extent that it would create a hazard. All parts that require replacement shall be replaced only with parts that are equivalent. Severe use applications require more frequent inspection at an interval set by facility management. Conversion equipment and the recommended method of installation shall be approved by the manufacture. p. or other condition that might impair safe use. Give special consideration in the case of a fuel system leak. b. Check tilt cylinders. Forks in use (single shift operation) shall be inspected at intervals of not more than 12 months or whenever any defect or permanent deformation is detected. if considered necessary. Attachments shall be included in a scheduled maintenance/inspection program. or decals in legible condition. j. Trucks in need of repairs to the electrical system shall have the battery disconnected prior to such repairs. Inspection steps shall be tailored for the attachment. Mechanical or hydraulic components shall be inspected and maintained in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions. Hooks that are included as part of attachments shall be inspected as specified for hooks on cranes/hoists (see Chapter 13. Pay special attention to the condition of electrical insulation. h. “Load Hooks”). s. with Chapter 10 Forklift Trucks 10-15 . to those used in the original design. Surface Cracks . Those repairs to the fuel and ignition systems of industrial trucks which involve fire hazards shall be conducted only in locations designated for such repairs. i.3. controllers. and shall not be returned to service until it is satisfactorily repaired by the fork manufacturer or an expert of equal competence. Attachments shall be inspected not less than annually and the inspection should be documented. valves. limit switches.4. Fork inspection shall be carried out by a qualified inspector with the aim of detecting any damage.

water shall not be poured into acid. is in good repair and in correct working order. modification. the fork shall not be returned to service until repaired in accordance with paragraph 10. 10. d.When fork marking is not clearly legible. Chapter 10 Forklift Trucks 10-16 . Inspection procedures and inspections records. Reinstalled batteries shall be properly positioned and secured in the truck. Difference in height of fork tips may vary from manufacturer to manufacturer and with tine length. Documentation for replacement forks. Fork Hooks Wear . for fire protection. 2. f. When introducing electrolyte into batteries. When resetting repairs are required. Marking shall be renewed per instructions from the original fork supplier. Waivers applicable to the forklift truck.3. Records of repair. the fork shall be withdrawn from service until satisfactory repairs are made. c. A typical history file would contain the following types of documentation. 5. A conveyor. and for adequate ventilation for dispersal of fumes from gassing batteries. Forks shall not be returned to service if surface cracks are detected. b.Examination for straightness of blade and shank.Confirm that the Positioning Lock (when provided). 3. Facilities shall be provided for flushing and neutralizing spilled electrolyte. For these reasons. A history file should be maintained for each forklift truck. c. and overhaul. and other local deformations. If any fault is found. Tools and other metallic objects shall be kept away from the top of uncovered batteries.3.5 Battery Maintenance a. If clearance between the fork and the fork carrier becomes excessive. maintain. 10. Manufacturer's operation and maintenance manuals. Fork Tine Inspection . and evaluate the forklift truck. Precautions shall be taken to prevent open flames.4. the support face of the top hook and the retaining faces of both hooks shall be checked for wear.DOE-STD-1090-99 special attention to the heel and to the welds that attach the mounting components to the fork blank. Documentation from the manufacturer authorizing modifications to the forklift truck. Trucks shall be properly positioned and brake applied before attempting to change or charge batteries. h. e. crushing. fork blade and shank wear. test. Smoking shall be prohibited in the charging area. i. 10. sparks or electric arcs in battery charging areas.4. the fork shall be subject to heat treatment.3. A carboy tilter or siphon shall be provided for handling electrolyte. f.6 History File Only the manufacturer of the fork or an expert of equal competence shall decide if a fork may be repaired for continued use. it shall be renewed. j. for protecting charging apparatus from damage by trucks. acid shall be poured into water. or equivalent d. overhead hoist. The battery (or compartment) cover(s) shall be open to dissipate heat. The history file should contain information necessary to operate. g. 4.3 Fork Repair material handling equipment shall be provided for handling batteries.3. Fork Marking . Care shall be taken to assure that vent caps are functioning.3. and the repairs shall only be carried out by such authorities. e. fork tine inspections shall be done in accordance with manufacturers requirements. Surface cracks or wear should not be repaired by welding. as applicable: a. b.When fork hooks are provided. fork angle (upper face of blade to load face of the shank). Positioning Lock . Inspection for cracks shall include any mounting mechanisms of the fork blank to the fork carrier.

DOE-STD-1090-99 g. Fork inspection records, including record of fork repair. h. Authorization from truck manufacturer to use specifically identified attachments. NOTE: For forklift trucks on rental, ensure that a suitable maintenance and inspection program is established for the duration of the rental period. For rental equipment onsite for 6 months or less, a history file is not recommended.

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Chapter 10 Forklift Trucks

DOE-STD-1090-99

10.4
10.4.1

TESTING
Forklift Truck Load Test
that shows test procedures and confirms the adequacy of repairs or alterations. Test reports shall be retained in the truck's history file.

Forklift truck load tests are not routinely required. a. Load tests shall not be conducted until verification that inspection and maintenance is up to date. b. Load tests shall be performed after major repair or modification to components that affect the load-carrying ability of the truck. c. The manufacturer should be consulted if questions arise as to whether a load test is appropriate. d. Forklift trucks shall be load tested by or under the direction of a qualified person and in accordance with the manufacturer's recommendations. e. Test weights shall be accurate within -5 %, +0 % of stipulated values. f. After a load test is performed, a written report shall be furnished by the qualified person

10.4.2

Fork Load Test

A fork that has undergone repair, other than repair or replacement of positioning locks or marking, shall be subject to a load test as described in ASME B56.1, Section 7.25, "Forks," Item 3, which lists loading and method of test for forks; except for the test load, which shall correspond to 2.5 times the rated capacity marked on the fork.

10.4.3

Attachment Load Test

a. Load capacity of an attachment shall be verified by the manufacturer or by a load test at 100 % capacity that is performed onsite. Load tests are not routinely required since a catalog cut, user’s manual, decals on attachment, or other manufacturer’s data serves as capacity verification.

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DOE-STD-1090-99

10.5 OPERATIONS
The following shall apply to all personnel involved in forklift operations. At the initial stage of the planning process, an appointed person shall classify each lift into one of the DOE-specified categories (ordinary, critical, or preengineered production). precautions: 1. Do not drive a truck up to anyone standing in front of an object. 2. Ensure that personnel stand clear of the rear swing area before conducting turning maneuvers. 3. Exercise particular care at cross aisles, doorways, and other locations where pedestrians may step into the path of travel of the truck. 4. Do not allow anyone to stand or pass under the elevated portion of any truck, whether empty or loaded. k. Do not permit passengers to ride on powered industrial trucks unless a safe place to ride has been provided by the manufacturer. l. Ensure that fire aisles, access to stairways, and fire equipments is kept clear. m. A powered industrial truck is considered unattended when the operator is more than 25 ft. (7.6m) from the truck, which remains in his view, or whenever the operator leaves the truck and it is not in his view. n. Before leaving the operator’s position the operator shall perform the following : 1. 2. 3. Bring truck to a complete stop. Place directional controls in neutral. Apply the parking brake.

10.5.1

Conduct of Operator

The following requirements shall be observed by the operator when operating forklift trucks. 10.5.1.1 General

a. Safe operation is the responsibility of the operator. Report all accidents and "near misses" promptly. b. The operator shall develop safe working habits and also be aware of hazardous conditions in order to protect himself, other personnel, the truck, and other material. c. The operator shall be familiar with the operation and function of all controls and instruments before operating the truck. d. Before operating any truck, the operator shall be familiar with unusual operating conditions which may require additional safety precautions or special operating instructions. e. Be certain the truck has successfully passed a preuse inspection. f. Do not start or operate the truck, any of its functions or attachments, from any place other than from the designated operator’s position. g. Keep hands and feet inside the operator’s designated area or compartment. Do not put any part of the body outside the operator compartment of the truck. h. Never put any part of the body within the reach mechanism of the truck or other attachments. i. Avoid reaching through the mast for any purpose. j. To safeguard pedestrians, understand the truck’s limitations and observe the following

4. Fully lower load-engaging means, unless supporting an elevated platform. o. In addition, when leaving the truck unattended the operator shall perform the following: 1. controls. Stop the engine or turn off the

2. If the truck must be left on an incline, block the wheels. 3. means. Fully lower the load-engaging

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Chapter 10 Forklift Trucks

DOE-STD-1090-99 p. Maintain a safe distance from the edge of ramps, platforms, and other similar working surfaces. Do not move railroad cars with a powered industrial truck. q. Do not use a truck for operating or closing railroad car doors except as follows: 1. Unless the truck utilizes a device specifically designed for opening and closing railroad car doors and the operator is trained in its use. 2. The design of the door-opening device shall require the truck to travel parallel to the railroad car, with the force applied in a direction parallel with the door travel. 3. Care should be exercised when engaging the railroad car door with the door opening device, in order to prevent damage to the doors and/or fork truck by heavy impact forces. 4. The entire door opening operation shall be in full view of the operator. 5. The fork truck shall always be positioned to safeguard the dock attendant while removing the door lock pin. 6. Whenever a railroad car door requires an abnormal force to open, the truck operator shall report the condition to his supervisor. r. Wheel stops, hand brakes, or other recognized positive protection shall be provided to prevent railroad cars from moving during loading or unloading operations. s. Consider both the truck and load weight when operating in railcars and semitrailers. t. Inspect floors on trucks, boxcars, unfamiliar ramps, or platforms before start of operation. u. Other workers should not be inside the truck when the forklift truck is performing loading or unloading operations. Load arrangements and spacing issues should be determined before the forklift enters the truck. v. Fixed jacks or supports may be needed to prevent upending or corner dipping when powered industrial trucks are driven on and off semitrailers that are not coupled to the tractor. w. The brakes of highway trucks shall be set and wheel chocks placed under the rear wheels to prevent the trucks from rolling while they are boarded. x. Care shall be taken to not contact overhead installations such as lights, wiring, pipes, sprinkler systems, etc. If in doubt, measure. y. Motorized hand trucks shall not be ridden unless they are of the hand/rider design. 10.5.1.2 Traveling

a. Observe all traffic regulations and under all travel conditions, operate the truck at a speed that will permit it to be brought to a stop in a safe manner. Unless facility-specific procedures state otherwise, the guideline is: within plant buildings - 5 mph; on plant roads - 15 mph. Drive slowly around curves. b. Yield the right of way to pedestrians and emergency vehicles. Whenever possible, establish eye contact with approaching pedestrians or vehicle drivers before continuing. c. Do not pass another truck traveling in the same direction at intersections, blind spots, or at other locations where vision is obstructed. d. Slow down and sound horn at cross aisles and other locations where vision is obstructed. e. Railroad tracks shall be crossed diagonally whenever possible. f. Never travel with forks raised to unnecessary heights. Approximately 4 to 6 inches (10 to 15 cm) above floor level is adequate. g. Do not park closer than 6 ft (1800 mm) to the nearest rail or a railroad track. h. Face in the direction of travel, except if the load being carried obstructs forward view. In such cases travel with the load trailing. i. When ascending or descending grades, ramps, and inclines: 1. In excess of 5 percent grade, drive loaded rider trucks with the load upgrade. 3. control. Use low gear or slowest speed

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10-20

DOE-STD-1090-99 4. Operate unloaded trucks with the load-engaging means downgrade. 5. The load and load-engaging means shall be tilted back, if applicable and raised only as far as necessary to clear the road surface. 6. Avoid turning if possible, and normally travel straight up and down. j. While turning, be cautious of rear end swing and keep clear of the edge of loading docks. k. Make starts, stops, turns, or direction reversals in a smooth manner so as not to shift load and/or overturn the truck. l. Do not indulge in stunt driving or horseplay. m. Slow down for wet and slippery floors. e. Always spread the forks to suit the load width. f. Extra caution is required when handling loads exceeding the dimensions used to establish truck capacity. Stability and maneuverability may be adversely affected. g. The forks shall be placed under the load as far as possible; the mast shall be carefully tilted backward to stabilize the load. h. Do not transport loads or miscellaneous items within the operator’s compartment or other areas of the truck, unless a secure area has been provided and designated by the user. i. A load backrest extension shall be used whenever necessary to minimize the possibility of the load or part of it from falling rearward. j. Do not attach or operate any attachment on a forklift truck that has not been approved for use by forklift truck manufacturer. k. When attachments are used, extra care shall be taken in securing, manipulating, positioning, and transporting the load. l. Operate trucks equipped with attachments as partially loaded trucks when not handling a load. m. Fork length should be at least two thirds of the load length. s. it. If the truck is equipped with a seat belt, use Loading

10.5.1.3

a. Since the load rating for forklifts may be based on stability or hydraulic or structural competence, do not exceed the rated capacity in operational application. b. The designated person shall ensure that the weight of a load approaching the rated capacity (combination of weight and location of the center of gravity) has been determined within -10 percent, +0 percent before it is lifted. c. Only stable, safely arranged loads shall be handled. Block and secure them if necessary. d. Caution shall be exercised when handling off-center loads which cannot be centered.

n. Before driving over a dockboard or bridge plate, be sure that it is properly secured. o. Drive carefully and slowly across the dockboard or bridge plate, and never exceed its rated capacity. p. Do not drive trucks onto any elevator unless specifically authorized to do so. In cases operation are authorized: 1. elevator. Do not exceed the capacity of the

2. Approach elevators slowly, and then enter squarely after the elevator car is properly leveled. 3. Once on the elevator, neutralize the controls, shut off the power, and set brakes. 4. It is advisable that all other personnel leave the elevator before truck is allowed to enter or leave. q. Unless a towing hitch is supplied by the manufacturer, do not use forklift trucks as tow trucks. When a towing hitch is provided, use tow bars rather than wire rope for towing. r. At the end of the operator's shift, return the forklift truck to its assigned parking place, set brakes, fully lower load-engaging means, place controls in neutral position, turn ignition off, and secure the key.

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Chapter 10 Forklift Trucks

DOE-STD-1090-99 n. Use extreme care when tilting load forward or backward, particularly when high tiering. o. Do not tilt forward with forks elevated except to pick up or deposit a load over a rack or stack. p. When stacking or tiering, use only enough backward tilt to stabilize the load. q. Do not rig loads from the tines of a forklift truck, (attaching rigging to the forks to support a suspended load) without written management approval. r. Never lift with one fork without an engineering analysis and approval. s. Use guides and signalers as necessary. If in doubt, check the conditions personally before proceeding. Standard hand signals are shown in Figure 10.5 "Hand Signals." t. Do not block fire extinguishers, fire protection sprinklers, or alarm stations when stacking loads. 5. Guard rails and access openings shall be capable of withstanding a concentrated force of 200 lb (91 kg) in any direction. 6. Means to securely attach the platform to the lifting carriage or forks in such a manner that it cannot slide or bounce off the forks. 7. Means to correctly locate the platform centered laterally on the truck. 8. Floor dimensions that neither exceed two times the load center distance listed on the truck nameplate, measured parallel to the longitudinal center plane of the truck, nor have a width greater than the overall width of the truck (measured across the load bearing tires) plus 10 in. (25-cm) on either side. 9. The following information should be prominently indicated on the platform: i. maximum load including personnel and equipment;

ii. weight of empty platform;

10.5.2

Lifting of Personnel

Only operator-up high lift trucks have been designed to lift personnel. If a work platform is used on forklift trucks designed and intended for handling materials, take the following precautions: a. Use a lift platform manufactured for the purpose of lifting personnel with a forklift truck. The platform shall include: 1. A 4-in. (10-cm) minimum height toe plate provided on the work platform. 2. The floor of the platform located not more than 8-in (20-cm) above the upper face of the supporting truck fork blade. 3. A restraining means such as a guard rail having a height above the platform floor of not less than 36 in. (90-cm) or more than 42 in. (110-cm) around its upper periphery and including a midrail. 4. An access opening in the guard rail maybe hinged or removable, or chains may be used if proper positioning is easily accomplished and a secured condition is discernible.

iii. minimum capacity of the truck on which the platform can be used. b. The combined weight of the platform, load, and personnel shall not exceed one-half of the capacity as indicated on the nameplate of the truck on which the platform is used. c. Whenever a truck (except for high-lift order-picker trucks) is equipped with vertical hoisting controls elevateable with the lifting carriage or forks, take the following additional precautions to protect personnel: 1. Means shall be provided whereby personnel on the platform can shut off power to the truck. 2. Means shall be provided to render inoperative all operating controls on the elevating platform, when the controls on the elevating platform have been selected for use; only one location of controls shall be capable of being operated at one time. 3. Emergency-lowering means available at ground level should be provided; such means shall be protected against misuse.

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10-22

DOE-STD-1090-99 d. Take the following precautions whenever personnel are elevated with a forklift truck: 1. footing. Ensure the truck has a firm and level 16. Overhead protection, as necessary for operating conditions, shall be provided. 17. Do not transport personnel from one location to another while they are on the work platform. 18. When not in the operating position, engage the parking brake and block the wheels. 19. Be certain that required restraining means such as railings, chains, cable, body belts with lanyards, or deceleration devices, etc., are in place and properly used.

2. Place all travel controls in neutral and set parking brake. 3. Before elevating personnel, mark area with cones or other devices to warn of work by elevated personnel. 4. Lift and lower personnel smoothly, with caution, and only at their request. 5. Avoid overhead obstructions and electric wires. 6. Keep hands and feet clear of controls other than those in use. 7. Move truck and/or platform slowly, only for minor adjustments in horizontal positioning when personnel are on the platform, and only at their request. 8. Ensure the mast is vertical - do not operate on a side slope. 9. The platform is horizontal and never tilted forward or rearward when elevated. 10. Personnel are to remain on the platform floor. The use of railings, planks, ladders, etc., on the platform for the purpose of achieving additional reach or height is prohibited. 11. Ensure personnel and equipment on the platform do not to exceed the available space. 12. Lower platform to floor level for personnel to enter and exit. Do not climb on any part of the truck in attempting to enter or exit. 13. The operator shall remain in the control position of the forklift truck. 14. Be certain that the lifting mechanism is operating smoothly throughout its entire lift height, both empty and loaded, and that lift limiting devices and latches, if provided, are functional. 15. Means shall be provided to protect personnel from moving parts of the forklift truck that present a hazard when the personnel platform is in the normal working position.

10.5.3

Standard Hand Signals

a. Standard hand signals for use at DOE locations shall be as specified in the latest edition of the ANSI standards for the particular forklift being used (see Figure 10-5). b. The operator shall recognize signals only from the designated signaler. However Obey a STOP signal no matter who gives it. c. For operations not covered by standard hand signals, special signals shall be agreed on in advance by both the operator and the signal person, and should not conflict with the standard signals.

10.5.4

Ordinary Lifts

a. The requirements of all preceding paragraphs in Section 10.5, “Operation,” shall also apply to ordinary lifts. b Hoisting and rigging operations for ordinary lifts require a designated leader who shall be present at the lift site during the entire lifting operation. If the lift is being made by only one person, that person assumes all responsibilities of the designated leader. c. Leadership designation may be by written instructions, specific verbal instructions for the particular job, or clearly defined responsibilities within the crew's organizational structure. The designated leader's responsibility shall include the following:

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Chapter 10 Forklift Trucks

DOE-STD-1090-99 1. Ensuring that personnel involved understand how the lift is to be performed. 2. Ensuring that the weight of the load is determined, that proper equipment and accessories are selected, and that rated capacity is not exceeded. 3. Surveying the lift site for hazardous/ unsafe conditions. 4. Ensuring that equipment is properly set up and positioned. 5. Ensuring that a signaler is assigned, if required, and is identified to the operator. 6. Directing the lifting operation to ensure that the job is performed safely and efficiently. 7. Stopping the job when any potentially unsafe condition is recognized. 8. Directing operations if an accident or injury occurs.

10.5.5

Critical Lifts

See Chapter 2, “Critical Lifts,” for critical-lift requirements.

10.5.6

Equipment Qualification

To qualify for operation, a forklift truck should have the following: a. A record of successful inspections and maintenance. b. A frequent (preuse) inspection instruction available to the operator. c. A qualified operator.

d. Proper type designation for working in a classified hazardous area, if applicable.

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10-24

TILT MAST FORWARD. palm down. RAISE THE TINES. DOG EVERYTHING. thumb extended. With forearm vertical. STOP. horizontal circle.DOE-STD-1090-99 Figure 10-5. point forefinger in direction of movement. thumb down. With LOWER THE TINES. Clasp hands in front of body. MOVE TINES IN DIRECTION FINGER POINTS. With arm extended. move hand in small lower arm vertically. With arm extended. Extend both arms. palm down. With forearm vertical. TILT MAST BACK. palms down. jerk thumb over shoulder. 10-25 Chapter 10 Forklift Trucks . forefinger arm extended. lower arm vertically. Standard Hand Signals for Controlling Forklift Operation. pointing up.

DOE-STD-1090-99 INTENTIONALLY BLANK Chapter 10 Forklift Trucks 10-26 .

attached Safety warnings ._____________________________ Shift _______________ Type and Model___________________________________________________ Hour Meter _________ OK VISUAL CHECKS Leaks . Mast chains & Stops Finger guards .Located on truck and legible Capacity Plate .Hydraulic Oil. Inspected by:_________________________________ Custodian:___________________________________ 10-27 Chapter 10 Forklift Trucks .Forward and Back Hoist & Lowering Control Attachment Control Horn Lights Back-Up Alarm Hour Meter Battery Discharge Gauge Maintenance Needed-Reported to: Daily Pre-Shift Inspections are an OSHA requirement.Buckle and retractor working smoothly OPERATIONAL CHECKS -Unusual Noises Must be Reported Immediately Accelerator Linkage Parking Brake / Deadman Steering Drive Control . Battery Tires .attached. We recommend that you document that these inspections have been made. Seat Belt .Forward and Reverse Tilt Control .DOE-STD-1090-99 EXHIBIT I Typical Preuse Inspection Procedures (sheet 1 of 2). information matches Model & Serial Nos. and attachments.solid attachment Hydraulic hoses.attached and legible Operators manual . OPERATORS PRE-SHIFT INSPECTION (ELECTRIC FORKLIFT) Date_____________________ Vehicle No. Top Clip retaining pin and heel .Condition Load Backrest Extension .Condition and pressure Forks.

Battery.attached Safety warnings . Top Clip retaining pin and heel .Forward and Back Hoist & Lowering Control Attachment Control Horn Lights Back-Up Alarm Hour Meter Maintenance Needed-Reported to: Daily Pre-Shift Inspections are an OSHA requirement. Mast chains & Stops Finger guards . LP. or DIESEL FORKLIFT) Date_____________________ Vehicle No. and attachments. Hydraulic Leaks . Inspected by:__________________________________ Custodian:___________________________________ Chapter 10 Forklift Trucks 10-28 .Condition and pressure Forks. OPERATORS PRE-SHIFT INSPECTION (GAS.attached.DOE-STD-1090-99 EXHIBIT I Typical Preuse Inspection Procedures (sheet 2 of 2). information matches Model & Serial Nos. Fuel Tires .Forward and Reverse Tilt Control .Condition Load Backrest Extension .Hydraulic Oil.Located on truck and legible Capacity Plate . Seat Belt . Radiator ._____________________________ Shift _______________ Type and Model___________________________________________________ Hour Meter _________ OK VISUAL CHECKS Fluid Levels -Oil .solid attachment Hydraulic hoses.Buckle and retractor working smoothly OPERATIONAL CHECKS -Unusual Noises Must be Reported Immediately Accelerator Linkage Parking Brake Steering Drive Control .attached and legible Operators manual . We recommend that you document that these inspections have been made.

Prior to initial use. Craftsmen shall initial all tests. Immediate action shall be taken to take the forklift out of service until the leak is corrected. or as required by the manufacturer. laps. and inspections completed below. 9. valves. Check all hydraulic systems including tilt cylinders. Performs nondestructive test (NDT) on the right angle joint of the fork once every 12 months. warning devices. hoist chain for damage and excessive wear. 2. and 10 to perform visual examination. and other similar parts to ensure “drift” has not developed. with special attention paid to the condition of electrical insulation. or magnetic particle examination. 9. motors. work. Ensure capacity. Check brakes. or seams. 4. lift overload devices. steering mechanisms. lights. Acceptance: No cracks. electrical conductors and connections. Check batteries. CRAFTSMAN INITIAL 1. limit switches. Check that tires are secured properly and are level with each other. but not limited to. Special consideration shall be given in the case of a leak in the fuel system. linear indications. and maintenance-instruction plates. or decals are legible. governors. 10.DOE-STD-1090-99 EXHIBIT II FORKLIFT LOAD TEST AND INSPECTION INSPECTED BY LOCATION INSPECTION: EQUIPMENT NUMBER DATE Forklifts shall be inspected when assigned to service and at least every 12 months thereafter. Check for forks being secured properly and level with each other. modified. operation. Check fuel system for leaks and condition of parts. liquid penetrant examination. such as. Qualified inspector shall verify inspections have been complete prior to load test. all new. guards. Performs NDT on the load or stress-bearing welds that attach the tines to the forklift once every 12 months. Check for proper tire inflation (where applicable). tags. and safety devices. 8. controllers. 6. Qualified inspector shall use the criteria for Items 8. 10-29 Chapter 10 Forklift Trucks . protective devices. 7. or extensively repaired forklifts shall be inspected. 5. Check all parts of lift and tilt mechanisms and frame members to ensure safe operating conditions. 3.

Check system for leaks while undergoing test. 2. EQUIPMENT OPERATOR Date Page 2 of 2 Chapter 10 Forklift Trucks 10-30 . Perform load test using the required weight (see Note 3). QUALIFIED INSPECTOR: Shall verify all steps below. or repaired shall be load tested prior to initial use. 2. vertically and 1 in. Load slippage for this equipment shall not be greater than a maximum of 3 in. Set forklift on solid. 3. EQUIPMENT NUMBER Qualified Inspector Verify (Load Test) Weight 1. level ground. Load test all forklifts at 100% rated capacity. 4. Read all steps below prior to load test. replaced. horizontally at the cylinder. Static Test: Forklift trucks shall demonstrate ability to withstand the appropriate test load for a period of at least 10 min without permanent deformation or apparent damage. 3. Forklifts in which load-sustaining parts have been altered.DOE-STD-1090-99 EXHIBIT II (continued) FORKLIFT LOAD TEST LOAD TEST NOTES: 1.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11. . . . 11. . 11. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11. . . . . . . SLINGS . . . . .1 Inspections . . . . . . . . . . 11. . . . . . . . . . . . . .2.1 General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. .2 Proof-Testing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Wire-Rope Slings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4. . . . . 11. . . . 11. . . . . . . . .3. . . . . . .4 Sling Care . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 6 × 37 Classification . . . . . . .1.3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Operation . . .3 Exhibit I Rigging Tackle Annual Inspection (Wire-Rope Slings) . . . .3. . . . 11. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . .1 Pre-Use Inspections . . . . . . . . .3. . . . . . . . . . 11-39 Exhibit II Rigging Tackle Annual Inspection (Chain) . . . . . . . 11. . . . . . . . . . . . 11. .3. . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Safe Load . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11.3 Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Sling Storage . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . . . . . . . . . .2 GENERAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 11. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . .5. . . 11. . .4 Operation . . . . . . . 11. . . . . . . 11. . .3. . . . . . . 11. . . . . . . . . . . . 11. . . . . . . . . . .1 6 × 19 Classification . . . . . . . . . . . . WIRE ROPE . . . . . . 11. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . . . .3. . . . . . .1 Wire-Rope Lays . . . . . . . . . . 11-1 11-4 11-4 11-4 11-5 11-5 11-5 11-5 11-5 11-8 11-8 11-8 11-8 11-10 11-10 11-10 11-10 11-19 11-19 11-19 11-22 11-23 11-25 11-25 11-25 11-26 11-29 11-29 11-29 11-30 11-32 11-36 11-36 11. . . . . . . . . . .3 Design Factor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Proof-Testing . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . . . . .5 Synthetic-Web Slings . . . . . . 11-41 Exhibit III Rigging Tackle Periodic Inspection (Synthetic-Web Slings) .1 Inspections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . . . . . . . . 11. . 11. . .1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2.4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Wire-Rope Inspections .1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . . . . . .1 Inspections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11. . . . . . 11. . . 11. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . 11. .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Metal-Mesh Slings . .2 Wire-Rope Cores . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-43 11-i Chapter 11 Wire Rope and Slings .5. . . . . . . . . . .1 Load Angle Factor .3. . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . .3. . . . . . . . . 11. . . . . . . .3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11. . .3. . . 11. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Wire-Rope Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Proof-Testing . . .3. . . .3 Wire Rope for General Purposes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . . . 11. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Annual Inspections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . . . .DOE-STD-1090-99 CHAPTER 11 WIRE ROPE AND SLINGS This chapter provides requirements for the fabrication and use of wire rope and slings used in hoisting and rigging. . . . . . . . . . . .3.3 Proof-Testing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Operation . . . . . . . .3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Alloy Steel-Chain Slings . . . . . . . . .

DOE-STD-1090-99 INTENTIONALLY BLANK Chapter 11 Wire Rope and Slings 11-ii .

g. Determine the center of gravity of the load as accurately as possible: 1. reduction of service life.. steel-chain. corner) about which the wire rope is being bent to the diameter (d) of the rope. and vibration. When the ratio of the diameter of the bend to the nominal rope diameter (D/d ratio) is small. 11-1 Chapter 11 Wire Rope and Slings . Bending a wire rope over a fixed object such as a pin or a shackle has an effect on the capacity of the rope: the outside wires and strands of a bend have to stretch farther and therefore take a greater percentage of the load. if the load is still on a truck or railroad car. The angle between the horizontal 2. Wire rope and slings that have been irreversibly damaged or removed from service shall be made unusable for hoisting and rigging operations before being discarded. a sling leg completely doubled back on itself constitutes two sling legs. f. By calculation. By weighing. surface of the load and the sling leg—The smaller the angle. k. 2. 3. 2. Load tables do not take into account such factors as abnormal temperatures. allowing for: The number of sling legs—Note that 1. e. d. This is not a rigging textbook. Wear—The reduction in strength of 3. j. From drawings or other documentation.1 GENERAL a. From drawings or other documentation. The information in this section provides guidance for safely handling lifted loads. From markings on the load.DOE-STD-1090-99 11. including physical damage to the rope. Determine the weight of the load: 1. wire-rope. the smaller the lifting capacity of the equipment. Note that the efficiency decreases quickly as the ratio of the diameters decreases. From markings on the load. Load tables are representative only and are not exact for all materials or all manufacturers. i. There is a convenient method for estimating the efficiency of the rope as it passes over the bend. g. 3. This method uses the ratio (R) of the diameter (D) of the object (sheave. The efficiency of the bend can then be estimated using the formula shown in Figure 11-1. Determine the appropriate ratings of the device to be used. the information should be applied only by qualified riggers. Aside from efficiency. excessive corrosion. there are other reasons to avoid sharp bends in wire rope. Determine the best method to attach the load and select the appropriate lifting devices (e. metal-mesh. and damage to the object about which the rope is bent. or synthetic-web slings). using the load dimensions and the weights of common materials in Table 11-1. b. 4. c. h. the strength efficiency factor is lower than when the D/d ratio is relatively large. the equipment due to normal wear. Diagrams are used to illustrate hoisting and rigging principles and good and bad rigging practices. By calculation. pin.

broken Coal. rolled Copper. commercial Mercury. solid Coal.204 450 480 712 846 655 490 458 1. common Cement. quick (ground loose) Limestone Marble Plaster of paris (cast) Sand Sandstone Shale Slate Terra-cotta Traprock Water Weight (lb/ft3) 160 150 125 100–120 70–90 80–100 55–75 156 15–34 110 120–150 93. Poplar Weight (lb/ft3) 166 418 613 504 523 550 555 1. Portland (packed) Cement. slag (packed) Cement. wrought Lead.DOE-STD-1090-99 7DEOH  :HLJKWV RI FRPPRQ PDWHULDOV Name of metal Aluminum Antimony Bismuth Brass. 60 degrees F Silver Steel Tin. Oak Pine.163 437 Name of material Bluestone Brick. slag (loose) Chalk Charcoal Cinder concrete Clay. solid Coal. Portland (loose) Cement. hard. loose Concrete or stone Earth. cast Iron. ordinary Coal. cast Copper. hard. rammed Granite Gravel Lime. rolled Gold. cast Uranium Zinc Name of wood Ash Beech Birch Cedar Cherry Chestnut Cork Cypress Ebony Elm Fir. soft. soft. pressed Brick. broken Coke.5 54 84 54 23–32 140–155 90–100 165–170 117–125 53 170 164 80 90–106 151 162 160–180 110 170 65 35 37 40 22 30 26 15 27 71 30 22 31 62 30 Chapter 11 Wire Rope and Slings 11-2 . Balsam Hemlock Maple. cast Brass. 24-carat Iron.

DOE-STD-1090-99 )LJXUH  (IILFLHQF\ RI ZLUH URSH ZKHQ EHQW DQG VWDWLFDOO\ ORDGHG WR GHVWUXFWLRQ RYHU VKHDYHV DQG SLQV RI YDULRXV GLDPHWHUV 11-3 Chapter 11 Wire Rope and Slings .

cotton and jute are sometimes used for the core. Independent Wire-Rope Core (IWRC)—The primary function of the core is to provide adequate support for the strands. In a right-lay rope. 11. 2. Figure 11-2 shows ropes with right and left lays combined with regular and lang lays. Wire-rope cores are carefully designed and must be precisely manufactured to close tolerances to ensure a perfect fit in the rope. The most common types of cores include the following (see Figure 11-3): 1.2. d.1 Wire-Rope Lays a. With few exceptions. unless otherwise stated. This type is generally confined to the smaller ropes as a substitute for IWRC. The strand core may or may not have the same cross section as the surrounding strands. As the name implies. Left-lay rope is a special-purpose rope. A standard wire rope. the strands twist to the left. Lay length is the lengthwise distance measured along a wire rope in which a strand makes one complete revolution about the rope's axis. the strands twist to the right around the core like a conventional screw thread. an IWRC is a separate small-diameter wire rope that is used as the core for a larger wire rope. When severe crushing or flattening of the rope is encountered. c. Wire rope consists of multistrand metal wires wrapped around a suitable core material. Fiber Core (FC) or Sisal Core— Sisalanna is the most common fiber that is used in the manufacture of wire-rope cores.DOE-STD-1090-99 11. is understood to be right regular lay.2. an IWRC is usually specified.2 Wire-Rope Cores a. A rope has a lang lay when the strands and the individual wires have the same lay direction. Strand Core—This type of core has a single strand used as the core. b. In smaller ropes. 3. e. all wire rope is made right lay. When the strands and the wires have an opposite lay direction.2 WIRE ROPE 11. the rope has a regular lay. in a left-lay rope. )LJXUH  :LUHURSH OD\V )LJXUH  :LUHURSH FRUHV Chapter 11 Wire Rope and Slings 11-4 .

2. the 6 × 16F makes an excellent rope for small draglines and similar uses. This rope is considered the perfect compromise between maximum abrasion resistance and maximum flexibility. Ensure that lubricant applied as a part of a maintenance program is compatible with the original lubricant and is also a type that does not hinder visual inspection. 6 × 16F—Slightly more abrasion resistant than the 6 × 19F. 6 × 29F—A 6 × 29F is used for applications requiring a flexible rope slightly more resistant to wear than the 6 × 37 2-operation rope. Heat-affected zones of flame cut wire rope shall not be allowed to bear load. Refer to other sections in this standard. | | | 11-5 Chapter 11 Wire Rope and Slings . diameter in the 6 × 37 classification. 6 × 19F—The most popular and versatile of all wire ropes and the most flexible is the 6 × 19F classification. and it is widely used for slushers and drag scrapers.4 Wire-Rope Inspections A qualified inspector shall inspect wire ropes at least annually. During installation. and in miscellaneous hoisting. d.5 Wire-Rope Maintenance Personnel using wire rope shall ensure proper care by doing the following: a.2. 3. Figure 11-4 shows four varieties of 6 × 19 wire ropes with FCs and IWRCs.2. 6 × 19 Seale—The 6 × 19 Seale is a rugged wire rope for applications involving heavy wear. Car pullers often use this rope. use some method to prevent unlaying of the strands. 6 × 19 Warrington—The alternating large and small outer wires make this rope an all-around performer. The 6 × 19 Warrington is used for general-purpose hoisting. c. b.3 Wire Rope for General Purposes 11. 2. 11. Unless prohibited by other considerations. 6 × 41—A 6 × 41 rope is used widely for ropes over 1-in. The resistance to wear is gained by a slight sacrifice in flexibility.3. 4. Those sections of rope in contact with sheaves or otherwise hidden during inspection and maintenance procedures require special attention when lubricating rope. Unreel or uncoil rope as recommended by the rope manufacturer or a qualified person and with care to avoid kinking or inducing a twist. The principal types of ropes in this classification include: 1. The object of rope lubrication is to reduce internal friction and to prevent corrosion. This construction is used on industrial equipment. Most applications can use a rope from this classification. e. nick. crush. maintain rope in a well-lubricated condition. Table 11-3 provides breaking strengths for 6 × 37 wire ropes with FC and IWRC cores.2. churn drills.3. b. based on the equipment being used. it is the most versatile of all ropes made. the ropes in this classification will show better performance than the coarser 6 × 19 construction. Inspection requirements vary depending on what type of equipment the wire ropes are used on. when abrasion is severe.1 6 × 19 Classification a. 6 × 37 2-operation—A 6 × 37 2-operation strand has 18 outer wires. for specific inspection requirements.DOE-STD-1090-99 11. b. for flexible slings. the small outer wires quickly show the effect. avoid dragging the rope in the dirt or around objects that will scrape. 11. Store rope to prevent damage or deterioration. Under conditions of repeated bending.2. or induce sharp bends. Before cutting a rope. they will outlast a 6 × 19 rope. The principal types of ropes in this classification include: 1. Table 11-2 provides breaking strengths for 6 × 19 wire ropes with FC and IWRC cores. When sheaves and drums are fairly small and abrasive conditions are not severe.2. and miscellaneous slings. Figure 11-5 shows three varieties of 6 × 37 wire rope with FC and IWRC cores. 3. 11.2 6 × 37 Classification a.

8 52.8 11. 6 × 19 classification of wire rope.69 0.0 210.7 3.51 0.44 0.7 48.6 2.0 163.3 1.11 0.0 113.0 208.1 5.0 152.31 0.10 0.65 5.0 73.6 14.5 81.0 305.0 235.) 3/16 1/4 5/16 3/8 7/16 ½ 9/16 5/8 3/4 7/8 1 1 1/8 1 1/4 1 3/8 1½ 1 5/8 1 3/4 1 7/8 2 2 1/4 2½ 2 3/4 6 × 19 (IWRC) Weight (lb per ft) 0.4 2.4 34.10 10.6 2.0 10.23 4.04 8.00 12.30 Breaking strength in tons of 2.0 138.8 4.0 128.90 1. Table 11-2.0 280.0 253.23 0.75 3.03 2.) 3/16 1/4 5/16 3/8 7/16 ½ 9/16 5/8 3/4 7/8 1 1 1/8 1 1/4 1 3/8 1½ 1 5/8 1 3/4 1 7/8 2 2 1/4 2½ 2 3/4 Weight (lb per ft) 0.0 Chapter 11 Wire Rope and Slings 11-6 .0 140.16 0.5 2.5 21.0 87.5 7.60 2.8 44.0 148.63 0.7 23.4 6.63 6.0 122. Breaking strength of wire rope (6 × 19 classification).0 88.0 119.0 7.8 12.4 40.0 328.0 301.33 3.40 8.1 95.0 226.0 60.25 0.0 65.000 lb Improved Plow steel plow steel 1.23 1.1 25.0 169.0 11.5 96.7 13.0 193.34 0.56 0.0 280.DOE-STD-1090-99 Figure 11-4.1 4.0 11.07 0.4 1.18 0.5 8.91 11.19 7.99 1.5 53.10 Breaking strength in tons of 2.39 6.6 30.5 23.76 2.0 103.0 166.0 111.4 5.0 8.60 4.1 57.1 17.40 0.1 103.0 130.4 79.9 4.3 15.03 3.000 lb Improved Plow steel plow steel 1.35 1.00 13.23 2.06 0.0 Rope diameter (in.8 6.0 64. 6 × 19 (FC) Rope diameter (in.0 16.3 16.0 154.96 4.90 5.0 260.5 70.0 41.0 182.8 28.0 38.6 10.50 3.3 32.

84 4.5 14.0 90.75 5.9 7.19 1.0 153.5 105.DOE-STD-1090-99 Figure 11-5.5 47.20 7.3 52.0 293.23 6.45 6.0 121.7 23.6 80.0 129.9 10.0 315.89 15.87 1.30 0.0 11-7 Chapter 11 Wire Rope and Slings .0 113.000 lb Improved Plow steel plow steel 2.22 0.5 74.0 61.69 11.4 8.2 2.2 36.1 96.0 139.7 4.42 2.0 201.11 0.5 16.1 88.33 0. Breaking strength of wire rope (6 × 37 classification).82 8.8 12.0 96.35 Breaking strength in tons of 2.39 0.9 29.5 38.85 9. Table 11-3.0 225.22 3.9 7.0 5.10 0.0 39.0 353. 6 × 37 classification of wire rope.55 1.0 Rope diameter (in.4 12.66 12.7 59.30 1.4 2.3 5.0 118.0 323.93 3.0 182.16 2.7 42.16 0.00 6.0 263.1 9.8 4.64 10.000 lb Improved Plow steel plow steel 2.2 21.) 1/4 5/16 3/8 7/16 ½ 9/16 5/8 3/4 7/8 1 1 1/8 1 1/4 1 3/8 1½ 1 5/8 1 3/4 1 7/8 2 2 1/4 2½ 2 3/4 3 Weight (lb per ft) 0.0 68.5 82.0 155.49 4.2 27.6 73.0 5.6 32.0 49.1 4.0 242.0 142.43 0.3 13.0 245.2 10.09 4.50 5.4 15.5 30.0 11.7 104.95 Breaking strength in tons of 2.0 55.18 0.5 3.66 3.54 0.0 347.67 0.0 130.0 379.0 167.1 65.96 1.0 289.5 6.5 9.0 196.) 1/4 5/16 3/8 7/16 ½ 9/16 5/8 3/4 7/8 1 1 1/8 1 1/4 1 3/8 1½ 1 5/8 1 3/4 1 7/8 2 2 1/4 2½ 2 3/4 3 6 × 37 (IWRC) Weight (lb per ft) 0.96 2.0 142.71 2.2 22.0 269.4 5.49 0.5 44.61 0.0 20.72 13.6 17. 6 × 37 (FC) Rope diameter (in.0 216.24 0.0 153.5 110.

1 General a.g. and then rig the load so that it will lift level and true. Features that affect the rated capacity of the sling and that shall be considered in calculating the design factor are: 1. 1. Slings shall be secured or terminated at the crane hook so that the sling does not reeve or slip through the hook. Published working loads for chain slings are usually based on 25–33 percent of the breaking strength. c. Each of the two legs would lift 500 lb if a vertical lift were made. Sling = 2-legged bridle.3. must have a rated capacity of at least 707 lb. the slings must be of unequal length.3 SLINGS 11. Select multiple-leg slings so as not to introduce a working load in direct tension in any leg greater than that permitted. straight pull. 2. Chapter 11 Wire Rope and Slings 11-8 . gravity. d. Angle of loading and load center of 6. or basket hitch). To make a level lift. Sling stresses and sling angles will also be unequal (see Figure 11-6). 1. Splicing or end-attachment efficiency. verified by a qualified rigger. giving a total of 707 lb (500 lb × 1. To attach the load. The following is an example of selecting a sling using the load angle factors shown in Figure 11-7.000 lb. All ratings are in pounds (lbs). Angle with horizontal = 45 degrees.414) tension in each sling leg. 11. The rated capacity or working load limit (WLL) of a sling varies depending on the type of hitch.. Each sling leg. Load angle factor from Figure 11-7 = 11.414.1. locate the center of gravity. For this reason. there is a 45 sling angle involved. Slings shall have a minimum design factor appropriate to the type of material as specified in the appropriate section. therefore. dangerous tilting will result and should be corrected at once. position the crane hook directly above the center of gravity. Therefore. the 500-lb load would be multiplied by the load-angle factor in the chart. 3. If rigging techniques. 2. Special rigging techniques verified by a member of a qualified engineering organization shall be required to prove that a load is evenly distributed over four or more sling legs. the load will not be uniformly distributed on all legs. The center of gravity of an object is a point around which the entire weight may be concentrated. b. Load = 1. 5.3. if the crane hook is too far to one side of the center of gravity. choker hitch. Number of parts in the sling. Type of hitch (e. 3.1. The rated capacity tables in this section show the applications for which the various safe loads apply when the slings are new. While slight variations are usually permissible. However. 4. Two legs should be considered to carry the load because in normal lifting practice.3. ensure that the load is evenly distributed then full use of three legs is allowed. when the center of gravity is closer to one point of the sling attachment than to the other. 4. Figures 11-8 and 11-9 provide information for determining the total rated capacity of 3-leg and 4-leg bridle slings.1 Load Angle Factor a.DOE-STD-1090-99 11. b. b. Diameter of curvature around which the sling is bent. the crane hook or point of suspension must be directly above this point. Nominal breaking strength of material from which it is constructed.2 Safe Load a.

DOE-STD-1090-99 Figure 11-6. 11-9 Chapter 11 Wire Rope and Slings . Figure 11-7. Relationship of load angle and lifting efficiency. Balancing loads.

The design factor for wire-rope slings shall be a minimum of 5:1 based upon breaking strength.1.3 Design Factor In general. In general. 4. or kinking. d. or multiple-part rope legs. Overloading shall be avoided. such as hooks (which will straighten without breaking) or links (which will deform beyond usefulness before breaking) cannot be assigned a definite numerical design factor. suitable safe loads are listed. These are divided into different groups or types as follows: 1. d.3. equalizing double-rope legs. Slings should be stored in racks (preferably vertical) and in designated locations when not in use.4 Sling Care Proper care and usage are essential for maximum service and safety. 11. The total load that can be safely lifted with slings depends on the rating of the slings and the manner in which they are attached to the load. e.DOE-STD-1090-99 11. Endless-loop slings (grommet construction) and single-part slings with single-rope legs. Do not store metal-mesh slings in areas where the temperature exceeds 550 degrees F (288 degrees C) or 200 degrees F (93 degrees C) if elastomer covered. Braided slings are made by braiding ordinary wire ropes together. b. moisture. 3. or multiple-part rope legs. 11. Two-leg bridle slings with single-rope legs. extreme heat. Slings may require segregated storage as determined on a case-by-case basis. Four-leg bridle slings. burlap padding. Three-leg bridle slings. Rotation-resistant wire rope shall not be used for wire-rope slings. wipe slings clean to remove as much dirt and abrasive grit as possible and relubricate wire rope and chain slings to extend their useful life. corrosive action.3. For smaller angles. The size of a braided sling is determined by the diameter of one wire rope and the number of ropes in the cross section of the sling. thus making them more flexible than wire-rope slings. Wire-rope slings shall be protected from sharp bends and cutting edges by means of corner saddles. c.5 Sling Storage Personnel using slings shall ensure that they are stored properly as follows: a.3. In such cases. wire-rope slings are made up of 6 × 19 or 6 × 37 classification wire rope. 2. certain sling fittings. However. Rated load in load capacity Tables 11-4 through 11-9 are for angles of 120 degrees or greater. 5. as shall sudden dynamic loading that can build up a momentary overload sufficient to break the sling.3.1. Do not store slings in a location where they will be subjected to mechanical damage. Chapter 11 Wire Rope and Slings 11-10 . c. Chains should not be lubricated when in use. Special slings and combinations. Consult (load) Tables 11-4 through 11-9 and Figure 11-10. Before storage and periodically during storage.1. 11. based on wide experience and sound engineering practice. reduce the rated load to the percentages given in Figure 11-10.2 Wire-Rope Slings a. b. When a wire rope sling is used in a choker hitch. Do not store synthetic-web slings where the temperature exceeds 200 degrees F (93 degrees C). a design factor of 5:1 is maintained throughout this section. or wood blocking. the normal angle formed in the rope body as it passes through the choking eye is 120 degrees or greater [do not confuse the choke angle with the angle of inclination of the load (see Figure 11-10)]. double-rope legs. Different kinds of slings have been developed for specific purposes.

Determination of capacity—4-leg bridle sling. Figure 11-9.DOE-STD-1090-99 Figure 11-8. Determination of capacity—3-leg bridle sling. 11-11 Chapter 11 Wire Rope and Slings .

600 19. Load capacity of wire-rope slings.000 32.000 8.000 5.400 3.000 26.000 48.840 2.000 92.000 50.000 12.000 28. Hand tuck splice (IWRC) in pounds Design Factor = 5:1 Dia.000 6. in inches 1/4 5/16 3/8 7/16 ½ 9/16 5/8 3/4 7/8 1 1 1/8 *1 1/4 *1 3/8 *1 ½ *1 5/8 *1 3/4 *2 1.000 52.000 58.000 84.000 1.000 7.000 8.000 4.800 19.000 36.400 11.400 14.000 30.000 112.000 18.800 22.600 12. in inches 1/4 5/16 3/8 7/16 ½ 9/16 5/8 3/4 7/8 1 1 1/8 *1 1/4 *1 3/8 *1 ½ *1 5/8 *1 3/4 *2 Vertical 1.800 4.400 5.000 36.000 38.100 1.DOE-STD-1090-99 Table 11-4.000 1.000 52.000 8.400 11.000 36.000 72.200 3.600 10.400 3.000 44.000 26.000 22.000 10.200 4.000 1.800 6.9) Notes: (1) These values only apply when the D/d ratio is 25 or greater (choker and basket hitches) D = Diameter of curvature around which the body of the sling is bent d = Diameter of rope (2) Choker hitch values apply only to choke angles greater than 120 degrees.400 6.600 20.200 24.000 4.000 26.000 6.000 44.000 5.000 Wire Rope/6 × 19 and *6 × 37 IPS IWRC (CFR 1910.800 2.000 42.000 42.600 15.200 3.800 15. Chapter 11 Wire Rope and Slings 11-12 .000 32.000 Dia.000 74.000 56.000 42.000 62.000 8.000 64.000 5.184/ANSI/ASME B30.000 32.000 32.600 2.000 70.000 28.500 2.280 1.400 11.200 4.400 3.000 36.600 7.000 18.000 56.400 24.200 4.000 22.000 14.000 36.600 2.200 9.800 8.000 16.000 5.000 14.000 820 Choker Basket or two legs 2.100 1.

000 52.040 4.000 5.400 5.600 7.000 44.800 10.600 3.400 16.000 Dia.000 34.800 10.600 17.600 7.000 48.000 90.000 48.000 30.600 9.600 4.000 80.000 74.000 30.200 2.000 52.000 26.800 20.000 68.200 9.400 8.000 34.200 15.184/ANSI/ASME B30.000 1.000 60. in inches 1/4 5/16 3/8 7/16 ½ 9/16 5/8 3/4 7/8 1 1 1/8 *1 1/4 *1 3/8 *1 ½ *1 5/8 *1 3/4 *2 1.000 14.000 3.800 26.200 6.000 28.600 7.400 13.800 20.000 6.700 2.000 40.000 56.000 52.800 14.400 2.400 13. in inches 1/4 5/16 3/8 7/16 ½ 9/16 5/8 3/4 7/8 1 1 1/8 *1 1/4 *1 3/8 *1 ½ *1 5/8 *1 3/4 *2 980 Vertical 760 Choker Basket or two legs 1.800 3.800 33.000 30.800 22.000 980 1.960 3.000 11.000 34.200 1.000 42.000 104.000 58.000 1.600 40.600 4.DOE-STD-1090-99 Table 11-5.000 34. Hand tuck splice (Fiber Core) in pounds Design Factor = 5:1 Dia.600 13.800 18.000 11.000 1.000 22.000 4.000 24.600 5.000 40.800 24.500 2.000 70.600 5. 11-13 Chapter 11 Wire Rope and Slings .800 4. Load capacity of wire-rope slings.600 5.500 2.000 34.400 8.800 3.200 11.000 28.000 42.200 3.600 6.000 24.400 3.600 20.9) Notes: (1) These values only apply when the D/d ratio is 25 or greater (choker and basket hitches) D = Diameter of curvature around which the body of the sling is bent d = Diameter of rope (2) Choker hitch values apply only to choke angles greater than 120 degrees.000 9.400 16.200 2.600 18.000 Wire Rope/6 × 19 and *6 × 37 IPS FC (CFR 1910.700 2.

DOE-STD-1090-99 Table 11-6.000 25.600 11.500 6.000 42.400 4.000 50. Chapter 11 Wire Rope and Slings 11-14 .200 5.400 5.000 42.000 32.000 36.800 3.100 1.000 70.800 9.000 840 Choker Basket or two legs 2.200 3.000 34.000 7.9) Notes: (1) These values only apply when the D/d ratio is 25 or greater (choker and basket hitches) D = Diameter of curvature around which the body of the sling is bent d = Diameter of rope (2) Choker hitch values apply only to choke angles greater than 120 degrees.000 82.400 3.000 42.000 128.400 3.580 2.600 13.000 13.000 50.800 7.000 4.000 30.000 66.000 30.000 64.000 106.300 24.700 2.400 26.300 1.000 17.000 86.000 58.800 9.000 1.000 Dia.000 28.000 30.000 50.500 3.500 6.200 7.200 5.000 17.000 20.800 8.800 16.600 18.100 1. in inches 1/4 5/16 3/8 7/16 ½ 9/16 5/8 3/4 7/8 1 1 1/8 *1 1/4 *1 3/8 *1 ½ *1 5/8 *1 3/4 *2 Vertical 1.700 13.800 12.000 50.940 3.000 64.600 4.700 9.400 4.600 18.600 9.800 22.000 25.200 9.000 64.000 1.000 72.000 100.860 2. in inches 1/4 5/16 3/8 7/16 ½ 9/16 5/8 3/4 7/8 1 1 1/8 *1 1/4 *1 3/8 *1 ½ *1 5/8 *1 3/4 *2 1.200 4.000 42. Mechanical splice (IWRC) in pounds Design Factor = 5:1 Dia.400 3.000 84.700 13.000 36.800 6.000 48.400 4.000 52.400 5.000 40.000 30.600 19.000 38.700 2.184/ANSI/ASME B30.000 (CFR 1910.000 1.800 15.000 32.800 11. Load capacity of wire-rope slings.400 24.000 34.000 60.000 20.

000 40. in inches *1/8 *3/16 3/16 1/4 5/16 3/8 7/16 ½ 9/16 5/8 3/4 7/8 1 Vertical 1.600 18.000 72.600 16.000 64.000 30.000 94.000 54.800 8.400 6.000 2.200 7.600 24.000 54.000 94.000 72.000 32.800 4.200 6.000 124.000 38.200 3.000 42.000 10.600 13.600 13.000 Choker 1.200 13.900 4.000 70.000 52.200 10.000 102.DOE-STD-1090-99 Table 11-7.000 54.000 38.000 24.000 28. in inches *1/8 *3/16 3/16 1/4 5/16 3/8 7/16 ½ 9/16 5/8 3/4 7/8 1 Wire Rope/6 × 19 IPS and *7 × 7 Galvanized Aircraft Grade (CFR 1910.600 7.000 30.9) Notes: (1) These values only apply when the D/d ratio is 25 or greater (choker and basket hitches) D = Diameter of curvature around which the body of the sling is bent d = Diameter of rope (2) Choker hitch values apply only to choke angles greater than 120 degrees.600 5.000 132.600 4. 8-part braided rope in pounds Design Factor = 5:1 Dia.000 34.000 Dia.000 2.184/ANSI/ASME B30.600 13.200 9.400 19.000 22. 11-15 Chapter 11 Wire Rope and Slings .000 1.400 26.900 4.000 52.000 92.000 162.600 18.600 24.000 42.000 76. Load capacity of wire-rope slings.200 3.800 18.400 6.000 Basket or two legs 3.200 9.400 3.

000 286.800 10.000 60.900 4.600 28.000 158.000 38.600 11.000 224.000 48.000 62.DOE-STD-1090-99 Table 11-8.000 44.000 202.600 7. in inches *3/8 *9/16 *5/8 3/4 15/16 1 1/8 1 5/16 1½ 1 11/16 1 7/8 2 1/4 2 5/8 3 Wire Rope/*7 × 6 × 7 and 7 × 6 × 19 IPS IWRC (CFR 1910.000 168.000 248.600 5.200 15.000 60.000 84.000 68.000 66.600 8.200 15.800 16.000 144.800 10.000 60.000 45 degrees 3.000 Basket or two leg 5.200 6.400 22.800 13.000 30.000 60 degrees 4.000 84.000 30. in inches *3/8 *9/16 *5/8 3/4 15/16 1 1/8 1 5/16 1½ 1 11/16 1 7/8 2 1/4 2 5/8 3 Vertical 2.000 11.9) Notes: (1) These values only apply when the D/d ratio is 10 or greater (choker and basket hitches) D = Diameter of curvature around which the body of the sling is bent d = Diameter of rope (2) Choker hitch values apply only to choke angles greater than 120 degrees.000 118.000 Dia.000 84. Load capacity of wire-rope slings.000 112.000 84.000 42.000 146.600 6.000 32.000 120.000 52.000 Choker 1.800 20.600 5.000 108.200 15.000 44.800 22.000 7.184/ANSI/ASME B30.800 22.000 144. Cable laid grommet-hand tucked in pounds Design Factor = 5:1 Dia.000 54.000 104.000 38.000 78.000 38.800 22.200 14.600 17.000 11.000 32.000 194.000 48.400 9.000 30 degrees 2. Chapter 11 Wire Rope and Slings 11-16 .000 36.000 98.000 112.000 84.000 28.

000 26.000 44.800 26.000 44.000 36.000 10.000 30.000 30.840 4.600 5.200 20.000 Basket or two leg 3.000 32.840 4.200 20.000 104. Load capacity of wire-rope slings.000 5.DOE-STD-1090-99 Table 11-9.000 62.000 Choker 1.000 52.000 12.000 36.000 52.000 38.000 90.200 7.000 10.000 88.600 8.000 72.000 52.000 62.000 28.000 52.000 64.000 34.000 72.000 22.800 15.000 66.000 76.000 45 degrees 2.000 15.200 18.400 22.000 Dia.000 7.000 136.000 11.000 98. in inches 1/4 3/8 ½ 5/8 3/4 7/8 1 1 1/8 *1 1/4 *1 3/8 *1 ½ *1 3/4 *2 Wire Rope/7 × 19 and *7 × 37 IPS IWRC (CFR 1910.000 28.9) Notes: (1) These values only apply when the D/d ratio is 10 or greater (choker and basket hitches) D = Diameter of curvature around which the body of the sling is bent d = Diameter of rope (2) Choker hitch values apply only to choke angles greater than 120 degrees.200 8.000 40.000 88. in inches 1/4 3/8 ½ 5/8 3/4 7/8 1 1 1/8 *1 1/4 *1 3/8 *1 ½ *1 3/4 *2 Vertical 1.000 30.800 15.000 52.000 52.184/ANSI/ASME B30.200 19.000 36.400 15.000 176. 11-17 Chapter 11 Wire Rope and Slings .000 68.000 30 degrees 1.000 44.200 22.000 120.000 124.000 60 degrees 3.800 10.320 3.000 152.000 7.000 26.000 14.000 68.000 88. Strand laid grommet-hand tucked in pounds Design Factor = 5:1 Dia.000 44.

Choker hitch rated capacity adjustment. Chapter 11 Wire Rope and Slings 11-18 .DOE-STD-1090-99 Figure 11-10.

Chapter 11 Wire Rope and Slings 5. 3.load for multiple-leg bridle slings shall be applied to the individual legs and shall be either 200 percent for mechanical splice or 125 percent for hand-tucked splice. Wear or scraping of one-third the original diameter of the outside individual wire.2. Ten randomly distributed broken wires in one rope lay or five broken wires in one strand in one rope lay. f. Slings shall be immediately removed from service if any of the following conditions are present: 1. 2.2. All other sling assemblies shall be proof. crushing. Kinking. In addition. e. c. Corrosion of the rope or end attachments. More frequent intervals should be established if necessary as determined by a qualified person based on: 1. or worn. c. 1. 2. Start and stop slowly. a periodic inspection (with records) shall be made at least annually by a qualified inspector. All swaged socket and poured socket sling assemblies shall be certified as having been proof-tested. d.1 Inspections a. chemicals. b. Experience gained on the service life of slings used in similar circumstances. hand-tucked slings.2 Proof-Testing a. Severity of service conditions. Test loads described above shall be accurate to within -5 percent. Frequency of sling use. 3. 125 percent of the vertical rated capacity for single-leg. Ensure that wire-rope slings are protected against weather. Hooks shall be inspected according to 11-19 . Do not pull a sling from under a load that is resting on the sling.tested when specified by the purchaser. Lift slowly until the load is suspended to minimize swinging. Evidence of heat damage. the proof load shall be equal to the rated capacity but shall not exceed: | 4. 3. deformed.3. This form is intended to be a sample only and is not intended to be mandatory. 200 percent of the vertical rated capacity for mechanical-splice single-leg slings and endless slings. birdcaging. Welded end attachments shall not be used unless proof-tested at 2 times rated capacity prior to initial use. 6. +0 percent of stipulated values. or any other damage resulting in distortion of the rope structure.3 Operation The following shall apply to all personnel who use wire-rope slings: a.3. A sample annual inspection form is included as Exhibit I at the end of this section. End attachments that are cracked. Master links to which multiple-leg slings are connected shall be proof-loaded to 200 percent times the force applied by the combined legs.2. sudden starts and stops dramatically increase the stresses in hoist ropes and slings. 1. The proof. times the vertical rated capacity of a single-leg sling.DOE-STD-1090-99 11. Ordinary Lifts Chapter 12. 11. e. d. As a minimum. solvents. Inspection records shall be readily available. Loads shall be set on blocks. Users shall carefully note any deterioration that could result in an appreciable loss of original strength and determine whether further use of the sling would constitute a safety hazard. 4. b. 2.3. Nature of lifts being made. 11. A written letter of certification by the manufacturer or a pull test witnessed and certified in writing by a qualified person is acceptable. “Rigging Accessories. 2. Wire-rope sling users shall visually inspect all slings each day they are used or prior to use if the sling has not been in regular service (records are not required).

18. Chapter 11 Wire Rope and Slings 11-20 . Obtain the manufacturer's written approval for use of wire rope slings of any grade at temperatures between 400 degrees F (204 degrees C) and -60 degrees F (-51 degrees C). 4. Do not use single-leg wire-rope slings unless proper precautions are taken to prevent suspended loads from rotating. Do not use wire-rope clips to fabricate wire-rope slings except where the application of slings prevents the use of prefabricated slings or where the specific application is designed by a qualified person. Store slings on racks away from | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | 25. Secure each leg of a wire-rope sling at the hook to prevent reeving of the sling through the hook. Follow the requirements of 29 CFR 1926. Extremely low temperatures (less than 0 degrees F) may cause brittle fractures. 17. 10. Use protector pads or blocking at sharp corners. iv. correct spacing. After the initial load is applied to the rope. 16. iii. Broken or cut wires or strands. Rope clip nuts should be retightened to the recommended torque periodically to compensate for further decrease in rope diameter during usage. Do not make a complete turn of wire rope around the crane hook. Ensure that the weight of the load is within the rated capacity of the sling. Do not use damaged slings. 21. the rating of the sling must be derated to 80 percent of the wire-rope rating to allow for the inefficiency of the clips. check wire-rope slings for: i. 23. discarded. 11. Kinks. 20. 19. Damage to swaged fittings. Slings made with wire rope clips should not be used as a choker hitch (see Figures 11-12 and 11-13). and torque. 26. Before use and before storage. v. The capacity of wire-rope slings is derated by the manufacturer by applying the efficiency factors such as those given in Figure 11-11. vi. In a basket hitch. Broken seizing wire. 9. Avoid handling hot material with wire-rope slings. ensure that the load is balanced to prevent slippage. 5. Do not use knotted slings. 22. removed from service. Rust or corrosion. 12. 8. Keep hands and fingers out of the area between the sling and the load. 13. 24. 7. Ensure that all personnel stand clear of the suspended load. retighten the clip nuts to the recommended torque to compensate for any decrease in rope diameter caused by the load. Double-saddle clips or fist-grip clips (Figure 11-14) may be used to make up general-purpose slings provided the sling is derated to 95 percent of wire-rope capacity.DOE-STD-1090-99 and high temperatures. 27. Ensure that damaged wire-rope slings are rendered unusable. 14. Avoid shock loading. ii. sudden loading should be avoided and the rope should be carefully observed while the load is being applied.251. 15. Permanently remove from service fiber-core rope slings that have been exposed to temperatures in excess of 180 degrees F (82 degrees C). and replaced with new slings. moisture and acids when not in use. Use shackles or adjustable choker hooks when making choker hitches. Under these conditions. Other signs of damage or abuse. Table H-20 or the manufacturer's recommendation (whichever offers the greater protection) for the number of clips required. When wire-rope clips are used. 6.

Wire-rope clips—wrong way. Wire-rope fastenings. Figure 11-12. Wire-rope clips—right way.DOE-STD-1090-99 Figure 11-11. Note that the base of the clip bears against the live end of the wire rope. 11-21 Chapter 11 Wire Rope and Slings . The “U” of the clips should not bear against the live end of the wire rope because of the possibility of the rope being kinked or crushed. Figure 11-13. while the “U” of the bolt presses against the dead end.

Use thimble eyes for slings to be 11. galvanized). Slings made of rope with 6 × 19 and 6 × 37 construction and cable-laid slings shall have a minimum clear length of rope 10 times the rope diameter between splices. or handling equipment. rigging. Wire-rope sling eyes with thimbles shall be made with a thimble having a ratio of thimble diameter (D) to rope diameter (d) of 3 or more (D/d greater than or equal 3).2. 7. Chapter 11 Wire Rope and Slings 11-22 . Other sling components are similar. Adequate clearance is maintained between the attached slings and other parts or surfaces of the component or equipment. The size is measured by the link stock. 3. v. Ensure that working loads of wire-rope slings do not exceed their rated capacities. Maximum accessibility to the eye is maintained. The plane of the slinging eye is coincident with the plane of the sling under loaded conditions within ±5 degrees. or end fittings. Do not splice slings together. vi. This information may be stenciled or stamped on a metal tag affixed to the sling. type. Braided slings shall have a minimum clear length of rope 40 times the component (individual) rope diameter between the loops or end fittings. As a minimum. Attached slings can converge over the center of gravity of the lift. b. Alloy Steel-chain slings differ from wire-rope slings in that components using wire are replaced by link chain. Double-saddle clips (drop-forged steel.” also shall apply to critical lifts. There is no interference with the functioning of hoisting. All provisions of paragraph 11.3. 5. Figure 11-14. iv. If chain other than this is used. Chain slings are more rugged and flexible. Proper stability can be maintained during lifting and positioning of the item at the installation site. it shall be used in accordance with he recommendations of the chain manufacturer.a. vii. and rated capacity. such as the reach. 4. but less shock resistant than wire-rope or braided slings. other items may need to be marked as determined on a case-by-case basis. (Stenciling or stamping on the swages of a sling eye is not recommended.DOE-STD-1090-99 joined end-to-end. 6. weight of the sling assembly.) 24. Grommets and endless slings shall have a minimum circumferential length of 96 times the body diameter of the grommet or endless sling. 26. b.3. 23. 8. 25. 1. Critical Lifts iii. Sling angles are not less than 45 degrees with the horizontal. In addition to marking requirements listed for ordinary lifts.3. Do not use wedge sockets or wire-rope clips on slings used for critical lifts. mark wire-rope slings with the rated capacity and inspection due date. Locate sling eyes so that: i. ii. This section applies to slings made from grade 80 alloy chain manufactured and tested in accordance with National Association of Chain Manufacturers welded steel chain specifications—1990. sleeves. 2.3 Alloy Steel-Chain Slings a. “Ordinary Lifts.

Chains should be cleaned periodically to remove abrasive grit and to facilitate inspection. Reject if discovered. pear shaped links. Chains should never be stored in damp or dirty places. The total load that can be lifted safely with steel-chain slings depends on the manner by which the slings are attached to the load. assemblies with such defects shall be reconditioned or repaired prior to return to service. Figure 11-15. The design factor for steel-chain slings shall be a minimum of 4:1 based upon breaking strength. f. condition of chain and other components. or markings tending to weaken the links. Attachments: Hooks. For long-term storage. or markings tending to weaken the links. Table 11-10 shows safe loads in pounds per leg which can be carried by various chain-sling arrangements. Extremely low temperatures (less than 0 degrees F) may cause brittle fractures. If all legs of a steel-chain sling are hooked back into the master link. Two basic types with many variations are used: basket type and hook type. Under these conditions. An example of each is shown in Figure 11-15. Remove from service assemblies with deformed master links or coupling links. sudden loading should be avoided and the load should be lifted a very short distance while the chains are carefully inspected. Do not straighten deformed hooks or other attachments on the job. g. remove the assembly from service. Conduct a link-by-link inspection for the following defects: bent links. Reject if discovered. e. 11. The safe-load level of any chain sling is a function of three basic factors: size and number of legs. Remove from service assemblies with cracked hooks or other end attachments. Check rings and hooks for distortion. | | | | | | | 11-23 Chapter 11 Wire Rope and Slings .3. e. abrasions. reduce working load limits in accordance with the chain manufacturer's recommendations. The ends of all empty chains should be hooked onto the hoist hook or bull ring. welded or mechanical coupling links and other attachments shall have a rated capacity at least equal to that of the alloy steel chain with which they are used or the sling shall not be used in excess of the rated capacity of the weakest component. If any link does not hinge freely with the adjoining link. corrosion. the safe-load capacity of the whole sling may be increased by 100 percent if the capacity of the master link is not exceeded. heat damage. Note the effect of very low hook height and wide leg spreads. Perform inspection on an individual-link basis.DOE-STD-1090-99 c. c. oblong links. and scores. When exposed to service temperatures in excess of 600 degrees F (315 degrees C). l. and sling angle between legs and horizontal. f.3. Chains should not be lubricated when in use because this might make them dangerous to handle.1 Pre-Use Inspections Steel-chain sling users shall visually inspect all slings before they are used as follows: a. j. cracks in any section of link. they should receive a coating of oil. b. d. rings. g. d. k. nor in places exposed to the weather. Remove from service assemblies if hooks have been opened more than 15 percent of the normal throat opening measured at the narrowest point or twisted more than 10 degrees from the plane of the unbent hook.000 degrees F (537 degrees C) after being received from the manufacturer. h. i. cracks in weld areas. heat damage. stretched links. scores. Alloy-steel-chain slings shall not be heated above 1. Chains should be stored in racks or in designated locations when not in use. Assemblies with such defects shall be reconditioned by the manufacturer or discarded. Types of chain slings.

000 25.700 72. Alloy steel chain slings in pounds Design Factor = 4:1 Size in inches 9/32 3/8 ½ 5/8 3/4 7/8 1 1 1/4 Single Leg 3.500 7.100 60° Two Legs 45° Two Legs 4.300 34.100 12.800 31.200 12.600 40.300 34.DOE-STD-1090-99 Table 11-10.400 102.300 6.900 10. (2) Chapter 11 Wire Rope and Slings 11-24 .500 7.000 17. Rating of multileg slings adjusted for angle of loading between the inclined leg and the horizontal plane of the load.400 67.600 125.100 28. Hi-Test (Grade 43) Chain and Transport (Grade 70) Chain.100 30° Two Legs Size in inches 9/32 3/8 ½ 5/8 3/4 7/8 1 1 1/4 12.000 59.184/ANSI/ASME B30.000 18.700 72.200 47.500 (CFR 1910.200 82.000 48.100 28.9) Notes: (1) Other grades of proof tested steel chain include Proof Coil (Grade 28).300 20.000 18.200 47.300 49. These grades are not recommended for overhead lifting and therefore are not covered in the applicable standards.200 3.

Shorten chain slings by hooking back into the chain. NOTE: For other sizes. Round out sharp transverse nicks by grinding. 5. Remove the assembly from service if wear at any point of any chain link exceeds that shown in Table 11-11.3. or with grab hooks. 2. 11. Place wooden blocks or other supports under the load to provide sufficient clearance for the chain. Nicks. Annual inspections shall be conducted by a qualified inspector. a. Test loads shall be accurate to within -5 percent. The proof load for multiple-leg bridle slings shall be applied to the individual legs and shall be 200 percent of the vertical rated capacity of a single-leg sling. Reject chain if it does not meet the requirements in the table. or inserting the tip of the hook into a link. Do not hammer a chain to force it into 4. When making choker hitches with chain slings. 11. gouges. consult chain or sling manufacturer.3 Proof-Testing a. 6. 3.) 1/4 3/8 ½ 5/8 3/4 7/8 1 1-1/4 Maximum allowable wear (in. b. cracks.) 3/64 5/64 7/64 9/64 10/64 11/64 12/64 16/64 Check for evidence of heat damage.DOE-STD-1090-99 11. b. always face the hook opening out and away from the pull of the sling so that the hooks will not slip out when slack is taken out of the sling. c. Check steel-chain slings for: i. Table 11-11. 4. an increase in length may be due to stretch (sign of overload or wear). remove the assembly from service. If grooving is noticed.3. Check for localized stretch and wear. Lift each link from its seat and visually inspect for grooving. Accurately measure the reach (inside of crane ring to inside of hook) under no load when new and at each inspection. if practicable. Either certification by the manufacturer or a pull test certified by a qualified person is acceptable. Do not set a load on a sling or pull a sling from under a load. This form is intended to be a sample only and is not intended to be mandatory. The following shall apply to all personnel who use steel-chain slings: 1. bolting. If the minimum dimensions are reduced below those values specified in Table 11-11. Single-leg and endless alloy-steel chain slings shall be certified as having been proof-tested to 200 percent of the rated capacity prior to initial use. +0 percent of stipulated values. position.3. verify stock diameter of link to be within the minimum safe dimensions in the table below.3. Hang chain in a vertical position. 11-25 Chapter 11 Wire Rope and Slings . 3. Chain should hang reasonably straight if links are not distorted. Use a suitable pad to prevent gouging or bending of the chain links. Master links to which multiple-leg slings are connected shall be proof-loaded to 200 percent multiplied by the force applied by the combined legs. In addition to criteria for daily inspections. into the master link. 5. for preliminary inspection. as well as possible scarring of the load. 2. and wear.4 Operation a. Maximum allowable wear of chains.3.2 Annual Inspections 6. and keep a record of increase in length. A sample annual inspection form is included as Exhibit II at the end of this section. the qualified inspector shall do the following for annual inspections: 1.3. twisting. Protect chain slings from sharp corners that might bend the links. Chain size (in. Do not shorten by knotting.

Avoid sudden loading of chain slings. check with the supervisor. Do not use makeshift or field-fabricated hooks on steel-chain slings. The carbon steel used in metal-mesh slings shall be processed to produce the required mechanical properties.4 Metal-Mesh Slings a. 17. 11. vii. rods. Do not carry loads on the point or tip of a hook. Manufacturer's grade. Bending. Type Designation Heavy duty Medium duty Light duty Classification Carbon steel Stainless steel Carbon steel Stainless steel Carbon steel Stainless steel 35-CS 35-SS 43-CS 43-SS 59-CS 59-SS 13. ii. 16. If a chain sling does not look safe. or other nonstandard attachments. Metal-mesh sling designations. or shearing of links. vi. Chapter 11 Wire Rope and Slings 11-26 . Do not weld or perform local repairs on chain slings. look for stretched links. and recertification. through a formal procedure. 15. Ensure that the working load does not exceed the rated capacity of the sling. iv. makeshift fasteners formed from bolts.3. vi. 8. 10. iv. iii. Ensure that steel-chain slings used in DOE-controlled areas are marked. If in doubt. stretching. Inspection due date. All defective chain slings should be returned. Sling manufacturer. repair. Reach. 12. 7. Avoid unbalanced loads. do not use it. Metal-mesh slings (Figure 11-16) shall be classified with the designations shown in Table 11-12. This information may be stenciled or stamped on a metal tag or tags affixed to the sling. Rust and corrosion. 11. 14. ensure that the tag is affixed to the master link. Number of legs. Evidence of heat damage. 9. Do not use homemade links. Table 11-12. Uneven lengths when sling legs are hanging free. based on types of duty and material classification. 18. to the manufacturer for examination. Size. v. Hook the ends of all empty chain onto the hoist hook or bull ring. with: i. at a minimum. iii. and the like. b. Bends or distortions in hooks. Maintain latches on hooks in good condition. 19. Rated load and angle on which the rating is based. Do not assume that a chain sling is safe because it looks new. Where slings have more than one leg. v.DOE-STD-1090-99 ii.

the sling manufacturer should be consulted for specific data. Except for elastomer-impregnated slings. properly derated for other than straight-pull configurations (Table 11-13). The handle shall be designed to ensure: At least the same rated capacity as the polyvinyl chloride (PVC).DOE-STD-1090-99 Figure 11-16. reduced. The load is evenly distributed across the width of the fabric. For operation at temperatures outside these ranges or for other impregnations. Sharp edges do not damage the fabric. c. The material used for stainless-steel metal-mesh slings shall conform. No visible permanent deformation after proof-testing. The coating shall not diminish the rated capacity of a sling. all metal-mesh slings covered by this section may be used without derating in a temperature range from -20 degrees F (-29 degrees C) to 550 degrees F (288 degrees C). h. or otherwise suitably coated. however. Other materials may be used. Metal-mesh slings may be painted. impregnated with elastomers such as neoprene or 11-27 Chapter 11 Wire Rope and Slings . The design factor for metal-mesh slings shall be a minimum of 5:1 based upon breaking strength. Metal-mesh slings shall not be used to lift loads greater than the rated capacity. d. to the American Iron and Steel Institute standards for Type-302 or Type-304 stainless steel. The rated capacity of the sling is not 2. Typical metal-mesh sling. k. plated. at least. The fabric and handles shall be so joined that: 1. consult the manufacturer for specific data. fabric. 3. g. 2. All metal-mesh slings covered by this section and impregnated with PVC or neoprene shall be used only in a temperature range from 0 degrees F (-18 degrees C) to 200 degrees F (93 degrees C). f. j. e. 1. When metal-mesh slings are produced from such materials. i.

000 10.000 7.500 9.000 12.000 14.000 20.500 12.000 5.000 14.000 8.000 5.300 14.000 15.400 2.200 5.9) Chapter 11 Wire Rope and Slings 11-28 .000 6.500 4.700 4.000 12.000 1.000 3.DOE-STD-1090-99 Table 11-13.000 2.600 8.500 6.700 4.) Heavy duty 10-ga 35 spirals/ft of mesh width 2 3 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 1.600 4.000 7.800 2.800 10.800 1.400 13.900 19.500 2.000 6.000 2.000 10.350 2.500 2.700 4.400 3.000 5.500 12.000 2.500 5.800 5.300 2.000 8.000 28.800 3.000 3.500 9.000 18.700 7.000 2 3 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 (CFR 1910.000 2 3 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 Medium duty 12-ga 43 spirals/ft of mesh width 2 3 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 1.900 1. Load capacity of carbon and stainless-steel metal-mesh slings in pounds Design Factor = 5:1 Sling width(in.000 16.000 2.800 4.000 32.700 6.000 6.000 2.400 9.100 3.500 6.900 10.000 8.400 8.400 13.800 17.200 27.184/ANSI/ASME B30.500 10.000 10.000 12.400 12.100 16.700 14.000 3.) Vertical or choker Basket or two legs 60° Basket or two legs 45° Basket or two legs 30° Basket or two legs Sling width(in.100 13.000 8.600 1.600 2.000 5.000 12.000 6.000 24.000 10.700 4.000 20.000 7.900 2.300 900 1.000 1.000 4.900 11.000 21.800 6.000 4.400 8.600 10.000 2.300 3.500 9.800 4.000 15.200 20.000 1.400 2.400 11.100 8.700 2.200 6.000 16.000 10.000 8.600 12.800 17.400 2.000 6.700 24.000 7.000 12.600 18.900 8.700 4.700 7.000 16.000 24.700 22.000 16.000 2 3 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 Light duty 14-ga 59 spirals/ft of mesh width 2 3 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 900 1.000 14.

+0 percent of stipulated values. b. Evidence of heat damage. o. ensure that the load is balanced.DOE-STD-1090-99 11. When this cannot be done.3. 9. 8. Coated slings shall be proof-tested prior to being coated. Any distortion or twisting of either end fitting out of its plane. In a choker hitch. Avoid shock loading. ensure that metal-mesh slings are long enough so that the female handle chokes freely on the mesh. b. 2.3. Reduction in wire diameter of 25 percent due to abrasion or 15 percent due to corrosion. h. Annual inspections shall be made by a qualified inspector. Keep hands and fingers out of the area between the sling and the load. d. A broken wire in any part of the 11. 7. p. A broken weld or brazed joint along the sling edge. Do not pull metal-mesh slings from under a load when the load is resting on the sling. Ensure that sharp corners are padded. n. c. Metal-mesh slings shall be removed from service if any of the following defects are present: 1. 2. mesh. In a choker hitch. 11. Securely hitch metal-mesh slings to the load. Either certification by the manufacturer or a pull test certified by a qualified person is acceptable. A 15 percent reduction of the original cross-sectional area of metal at any point around a handle eye. Distortion of the female handle so the depth of the slot is increased by more than 10 percent. k. never on the handle. Avoid twisting and kinking of the legs. Do not use damaged slings. consult the manufacturer for a derating factor or for other means of handling this type of load.2 Proof-Testing a. Lack of flexibility due to distortion of the mesh. f. Distortion of either end fitting so the width of the eye opening is decreased by more than 10 percent.4.4.3. l. 6. Users of metal-mesh sling shall visually inspect all metal-mesh slings before each use. Do not store metal-mesh slings in an area where they will be subjected to mechanical damage or corrosive action. or other unapproved methods. ensure that the load is balanced to prevent slippage. c. c. j. b. The following shall apply to all personnel who use metal-mesh slings: 1. 4. 10.1 Inspections a. Metal-mesh slings shall be certified as having been proof-tested to 200 percent of their rated capacity prior to initial use. 3. bolts. Cracked end fitting. Metal-mesh slings should be long enough to provide the maximum practical angle between the sling leg and the horizontal (minimum practical angle at the crane hook if vertical angles are used). In a basket hitch. Do not shorten metal-mesh slings with knots. g. 5. e. Ensure that all personnel stand clear of the suspended load.4. Ensure that the weight of the load is within the rated capacity of the sling. Chapter 11 Wire Rope and Slings 11-29 .3 Operation a. and inspection records shall be kept on file and be readily available. m. Do not use metal-mesh slings in which the spirals are locked or are without free articulation. i. Test loads shall be accurate to within -5 percent. Ensure that metal-mesh slings have suitable characteristics and rated capacity for the load and environment.

Synthetic-web slings are available in a number of configurations as follows (see Figure 11-17): Endless or Grommet Sling—Both 1. Synthetic-web slings may be coated with elastomers or other suitable material that will Chapter 11 Wire Rope and Slings 11-30 . They can be used as vertical hitches. Standard Eye and Eye—Webbing is 2. and increased coefficient of friction. assembled and sewn to form a flat-body sling with an eye at each end and the eye openings in the same plane as the sling body. or as basket slings. bridle hitches. r. In place of the sewn eyes. Free of all sharp edges that would in any way damage the mesh. Rated capacities are affected by the type of hitch used and by the angle from the vertical when used as multilegged slings or in basket hitches. sealing of pores. wear is evenly distributed and sling life is extended. 2. i. The stitching in all load-bearing splices shall be of sufficient strength to maintain the sling design factor. This configuration is also available with either full-width or tapered eyes. in choker arrangements. provide characteristics such as abrasion resistance. 2. s. Twisted Eye—An eye-and-eye type 3. 3. Ensure that all metal-mesh slings have a permanently affixed metal identification tag or tags containing the following information: 1. The eyes may either be full web width or may be tapered by being folded and sewn to a width narrower than the webbing width. g. Manufacturer's name or trademark. c. The sling manufacturer shall supply data on these effects. that has twisted terminations at both ends. e. Have uniform thickness and width. b. Combination hardware consists of a triangle for one end of the sling and a triangle/rectangle choker attachment for the other end. 11. The thread used in the manufacture of a synthetic-web sling shall be of the same type of material as the web. With this arrangement. The design factor for synthetic-web slings shall be a minimum of 5:1 based upon breaking strength. may be rigged. 3. Synthetic web shall possess the following qualities: 1.3. Because load contact points can be shifted with every lift. Never hammer a sling to straighten a spiral or cross rod or to force a spiral into position. and choker hitches.5 Synthetic-Web Slings a. both choker and basket hitches. Fittings shall be: 1. basket. They help reduce wear in the sling eyes and thus lengthen sling life. f. 3. Of sufficient strength to sustain twice the rated capacity without permanent deformation. Be of sufficient strength to meet the sling manufacturer's requirements. Have selvage edges and not be split from its woven width. The most common are triangle and choker hardware.DOE-STD-1090-99 q. 2. Metal-mesh slings used in pairs should be attached to a spreader beam. d. The eye openings are at 90 degrees to the plane of the sling body. Rated load in vertical. h. Of a minimum breaking strength equal to that of the sling. Inspection due date. ends of one piece of webbing are lapped and sewn to form a continuous piece. as well as straight hitches. synthetic-web slings are also available with metal end fittings (see Figure 11-18).

DOE-STD-1090-99 Figure 11-17. 11-31 Chapter 11 Wire Rope and Slings . Synthetic-web sling types.

. producing a risk of tearing (see Figure 11-20). They can be positioned on the sling where required. On the other hand. one edge of the web will take all the load. 11. 5. These treatments also increase the coefficient of friction. they should be used only with extreme caution because. This is necessary for certain applications where the sling edges are subject to damage. however.1 Inspections a.000 lb/in.184(h) shall be followed. Chapter 11 Wire Rope and Slings 11-32 . Despite their inherent toughness. shall be used in accordance with the sling manufacturer's recommendation. polyester round and kevlar fiber (yarn) slings]. Sleeve. b. or other materials that are sewn on the body of a sling protect against wear. Cotton-faced nylon webbing can be used for hoisting rough-surfaced material. nylon-web wear pads are more resistant to weathering. and 29 CFR 1910. Edgeguards consist of strips of webbing or leather sewn around each edge of the sling. Synthetic-web slings. CAUTION: Tiedown and/or ratchet strap shall not be used as synthetic-web slings.or sliding-tube-type wear pads are available for slings used to handle material having sharp edges. and most alkalis. do not move when the sling stretches. They are not recommended in lengths over 6 ft due to the different stretching characteristics of leather and webbing. 3. and inspection records shall be kept on file and readily available. of webbing width. and they stretch in the same ratio as the sling body. These coatings can be brightly colored for safety or load-rating purposes.3. The capacities are also based on a 5:1 design factor and assume that the end fittings are of adequate strength. but are subject to weathering and gradual deterioration. When it is necessary to use a nylon or polyester sling in a radiation area. Annual inspection shall be made by a qualified inspector. as the sling angle decreases. m. k. The synthetic-web sling capacities listed in Tables 11-14 and 11-15 are approximate only and are based on nylon webbing having breaking strengths between 6. Conventional three-strand natural or synthetic fiber rope slings are NOT recommended for lifting service and should be used only if conventional sling types are not suitable for a unique application. Although safe working loads for bridle hitches in the choker or double-basket configuration are provided.000 and 9. affording a better grip when loads with slippery surfaces are to be handled. and cover both sides of the sling.e. c. Users of synthetic-web sling shall visually inspect all slings before each use. 2. Reinforcing strips that double or triple the eye's thickness and greatly increase its life and safety can be sewn into the sling eyes. l. Other protective devices include: 1. grease. n. Coatings can be applied to provide added resistance to abrasion and chemical damage. the responsible manager shall ensure that radiation exposure does not exceed 100. synthetic-web slings can be cut by repeated use around sharp-cornered objects. There are. 4.000 rad during the life of the sling. Leather pads are the most resistant to wear and cutting.5. The requirements of ASME B30. They eventually show signs of abrasion when they are repeatedly used to hoist rough-surfaced products. other than those described in this section [i. adjust to the load.DOE-STD-1090-99 j. nylon. protective devices offered by most sling manufacturers that minimize these effects (see Figure 11-19). Only synthetic-web slings constructed from webbing approved for sling construction by the manufacturer or other qualified person shall be used at DOE locations.9 (“Slings”). 6. oils. Section 9-4. Buffer strips of leather.

Figure 11-19. 11-33 Chapter 11 Wire Rope and Slings .DOE-STD-1090-99 Figure 11-18. Web and edge protectors. Metal end fittings.

600 4.320 12.800 7.) Nylon Single Ply Web Slings (6.800 10.000 7.600 4. triangle fittings.800 8.200 9.300 10.800 7.200 9.600 5.800 6.184/ANSI/ASME B30. Choker hitch values apply only to choke angles greater than 120 degrees.800 2.800 4.400 5.400 7. twisted eye.200 24.480 16.500 1.600 20.600 14.000 10. basket hitch and corresponding leg angles.600 17.800 6.400 2.400 2.400 1 2 3 4 5 6 (CFR 1910.400 2.000 14. off vertical use rated load data for eye and eye sling.500 10.200 2.700 3.000 14.600 4.600 12.800 9.400 6.400 4. material) 1 2 3 4 5 6 2.080 4.200 2.600 12.DOE-STD-1090-99 Table 11-14.000 14.000 28.400 12.200 900 1. they vary from manufacturer to manufacturer.200 1 2 3 4 5 6 Nylon Double Ply Web Slings (6.700 3.240 8.9) (1) For an endless sling with vertical hitch carrying a load of such size as to throw the legs more than 5 deg.000 lb/in.100 6. Follow manufacturer's capacities. Load capacity of synthetic web slings in pounds Design Factor = 5:1 (eye and eye.600 8.800 5.500 5.600 12.400 4.000 20.400 4.800 3. choker fittings) Web width (in.400 19.000 3.800 25.000 lb/in. (2) (3) Chapter 11 Wire Rope and Slings 11-34 .200 9.) Vertical Choker Basket or two legs Web width (in. material) 1 2 3 4 5 6 1.400 3.400 3.400 1.200 13.160 6.800 7.000 7.200 1.200 9.

320 11.200 13.200 4.400 12.520 9.840 5.000 9.760 23.280 4.320 2.200 6.000 9. Follow manufacturer's capacities.270 19.040 11.860 16.540 11. choker fittings) Web width (in.600 1.560 3.775 23.600 12.) Vertical Choker Basket or two legs Web width (in.9) (1) For an endless sling with vertical hitch carrying a load of such size as to throw the legs more than 5 deg.120 7.800 16.260 28.120 6. triangle fittings.200 4.780 9.390 19.600 3.200 6. they vary from manufacturer to manufacturer.000 19.320 1 2 3 4 5 6 (CFR 1910.400 7.640 5.000 16. material) 1 2 3 4 5 6 1.680 3.400 8.100 9.040 28. (2) (3) 11-35 Chapter 11 Wire Rope and Slings .800 6.560 1.050 3.) Nylon Single Ply Web Slings (9. basket hitch and corresponding leg angles.300 13. off vertical use rated load data for eye and eye sling.520 14.200 6.660 24.210 11.260 4.000 32.050 6.400 9.400 8. material) 1 2 3 4 5 6 3.520 6.090 13.640 2.800 6.560 5.DOE-STD-1090-99 Table 11-15.540 8.600 1 2 3 4 5 6 Nylon Double Ply Web Slings (9.400 8.600 3.770 5.000 lb/in. Load capacity of synthetic web slings in pounds Design Factor = 5:1 (eye and eye.520 14.880 11.880 11. twisted eye.040 12.200 2.540 16.280 2.090 15.000 lb/in.400 8.800 17.000 16.184/ANSI/ASME B30. Choker hitch values apply only to choke angles greater than 120 degrees.

This form is intended to be a sample only and is not intended to be mandatory. 5.2 Proof-Testing a. 2. and environment. h. d. properly derated for other than straight-pull configuration. Figure 11-20. Do not use nylon slings where acid conditions exist. sharp edges. Melting or charring of any part of the Snags. o. d. 11. Do not use aluminum fittings where acid or caustic fumes. 4.5. When specified by the purchaser. b.3. Do not use polyester and polypropylene slings where caustic conditions exist. balance the load to prevent slippage. 11. i. j. 2. Effect of low sling angle. Distortion of fittings.5. sprays.3. Test loads shall be accurate to within -5 percent. Do not pull slings from under loads when a load is resting on a sling. hitch. e.3 Operation The following shall apply to all personnel who use synthetic-web slings: a. g. tears. Ensure that each sling is permanently marked to show: A sample periodic inspection form is included as Exhibit III at the end of this section. Determine the weight of the load. The proof load for multiple-leg bridle slings shall be applied to the individual legs and shall be 200 percent of the vertical rated capacity of a single-leg sling. k. 6. surface. Slings shall be removed from service if any of the following defects are visible: 1. Do not twist or tie slings into knots. punctures. 3. b. 1. or cuts. and highly abrasive surfaces. Acid or caustic burns. Chapter 11 Wire Rope and Slings 11-36 . l. Wear or elongation exceeding the amount recommended by manufacturers. mists or liquids are present. Select a sling having suitable characteristics for the type of load. In slings used in a basket hitch. web slings of all types shall be certified as having been proof-tested prior to initial use. m. n. The proof load for single-leg slings and endless slings shall be 200 percent of the vertical rated capacity. Store synthetic-web slings to prevent mechanical or chemical damage. f. Do not use polyester and nylon slings at temperatures in excess of 180 degrees F (82 degrees C). +0 percent of stipulated values. Master links to which multiple-leg slings are connected shall be proof-loaded to 200 percent times the force applied by the combined legs. Do not use synthetic-web slings to lift loads in excess of the rated capacity. Broken or worn stitches. vapors. Do not drag slings across the floor or over any abrasive surface. Ensure that slings with end fittings that are used in a choker hitch have sufficient length so that the choking action is on the body of the sling. Protect slings from being cut by sharp corners.DOE-STD-1090-99 Either certification by the manufacturer or a pull test certified by a qualified person is acceptable. c. nor polypropylene slings at greater than 200 degrees F (93 degrees C).

Type of synthetic-web material. Ensure that synthetic-web slings are marked with the inspection due date. NOTE: Slings may be marked with a serial number or other identifying number that can be used to determine capacity in situations where it becomes impossible to mark the sling as described 11-37 Chapter 11 Wire Rope and Slings . 2. Rated capacity for types of hitches above due to security classification of the loads to be lifted or for other valid reasons approved by the responsible manager. 4. Manufacturer's code or stock number. used. This information may be stenciled or stamped on a metal tag affixed to the sling. 3. p. Name or trademark of manufacturer.DOE-STD-1090-99 1.

Chapter 11 Wire Rope and Slings 11-38 . Any other form that accomplishes the purpose is acceptable.DOE-STD-1090-99 Exhibits I through III are intended to be sample forms only and are not mandatory.

or worn end attachments. Wear or scraping of 1/3 the original diameter of the outside individual wire. Corrosion of the rope or end attachments. +0% of the stipulated values. or any other damage resulting in distortion of the wire-rope structure. crushing. linear indications. or magnetic particle examination. NDT INSPECTION OF HOOKS/RINGS. ETC. QUALIFIED INSPECTOR DATE 11-39 Chapter 11 Wire Rope and Slings . 6. Etc. INSPECTION DATE Qualified inspector shall witness and verify all steps below. 5. birdcaging. or seams. Acceptance: No cracks. Page 1 of 1 Wire rope shall be immediately removed from service if any of the following conditions are present: INSPECTION 1. Ten randomly distributed broken wires in one rope lay or five broken wires in one strand in one rope lay. Cracked. 3. 4. Kinking. Proof-test to 200% of rated capacity to certify new equipment procured without manufacturer's certification. liquid penetrant examination. laps.) Actual Load Test REMARKS Qualified inspector shall inspect hook by visual examination. 2. Heat damage. Size: (Length. 2. Hooks that are cracked or opened more than 15% of normal throat opening measured at the narrowest point or twisted more than 10 degrees from the plane of the unbent hook. deformed. Capacity (SWL) lb 7.DOE-STD-1090-99 EXHIBIT I RIGGING TACKLE ANNUAL INSPECTION (WIRE-ROPE SLINGS) INSPECTOR NOTES: 1. Diameter. Test loads shall be accurate to within -5%.

DOE-STD-1090-99 INTENTIONALLY BLANK Chapter 11 Wire Rope and Slings 11-40 .

Chain slings shall be immediately removed from service if any of the following conditions are present: a. Lift each link from its seat and visually inspect for grooving. Check for localized stretch and wear. coupling links. Sharp transverse nicks should be rounded out by grinding. etc. 3. and keep a record of increase in length. for preliminary inspection.) 1/4 3/64 3/8 5/64 ½ 7/64 5/8 9/64 3/4 10/64 7/8 11/64 1 12/64 1-1/4 16/64 NOTE: For other sizes. + 0% of the stipulated values. 5. 2. Accurately measure the reach (inside of crane ring to inside of hook) under no load when new and at each inspection. If grooving is noticed. Table 11-11. Cracked or deformed master links. Check for evidence of heat damage. consult chain or sling manufacturer. verify stock diameter of links to be within the minimum safe dimension in the table below. 11-41 Chapter 11 Wire Rope and Slings . b.DOE-STD-1090-99 EXHIBIT II RIGGING TACKLE ANNUAL INSPECTION (CHAIN) INSPECTOR INSPECTION DATE Page 1 of 2 NOTES: 1. Qualified inspector shall witness and verify all steps below. Test loads shall be accurate to within -5%. Wear at any point of any chain link exceeding that shown in the table below. Hang chain in a vertical position. c. if practical.) (in. Maximum Chain size allowable wear (in. 4. Hooks that are cracked or opened more than 15% of normal throat opening measured at the narrowest point or twisted more than 10 degrees from the plane of the unbent hook. Chain should hang reasonably straight if links are not distorted. Proof-test to 200% of rated capacity to certify new equipment procured without manufacturer's certification. INSPECTION 1. 2. Maximum allowable wear at any point of link.

or magnetic particle examination. QUALIFIED INSPECTOR DATE Chapter 11 Wire Rope and Slings 11-42 . etc. liquid penetrant examination. Nondestructive test inspection of hooks/rings.DOE-STD-1090-99 EXHIBIT II (continued) RIGGING TACKLE ANNUAL INSPECTION (CHAIN) Size & Length Remarks Actual Load Test Capacity (SWL) Page 2 of 2 Qualified inspector shall inspect hook by visual examination.

b. Proof test to 200% of rated capacity to certify new equipment procured without manufacturer's certification. or cuts Broken or worn stitches Distortion of fittings Wear or elongation exceeding manufacturer's recommendation. f.DOE-STD-1090-99 EXHIBIT III RIGGING TACKLE PERIODIC INSPECTION (SYNTHETIC-WEB SLINGS) INSPECTOR INSPECTION DATE Page 1 of 1 NOTES: 1. e. 2. punctures. d. Test loads shall be accurate to within -5%. TYPE: Web Sling SIZE: (Length.) Capacity (SWL) Acid or caustic burns Melting or charring of any part of the sling surface Snags. REMARKS: QUALIFIED INSPECTOR DATE 11-43 Chapter 11 Wire Rope and Slings . c. Qualified inspector shall witness all steps below. Synthetic-web slings shall be immediately removed from service if any of the following conditions are present that would give doubt to the integrity of the sling: a. Diameter. + 0% of the stipulated values. tears. Etc.

DOE-STD-1090-99 INTENTIONALLY BLANK Chapter 11 Wire Rope and Slings 11-44 .

. .4 Load Limits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12. .3 Frequent Inspection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Shackles. .7 Maintenance . . . . . . rigging hooks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-18 LOAD-INDICATING DEVICES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tackle. . 12. . . . . . . . 12. . . . . .3 12. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12. . . . . . . 12. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 EYEBOLTS . . . .2 Marking . . . . 12. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Good and Bad Rigging Practices . . . . . . . . . . . .5. 12. . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 GENERAL . . . .2. . . .1. . . . .2. .2.5. . . . . . 12. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 12. . .1. . . . . and load-indicating devices. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. . . wire-rope clips. . . . . .2 Daily Inspection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-16 METAL-PLATE CLAMPS . . . . . . . .6 Testing . . . . . . .5 Inspections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 12. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Construction . . . . .2. . . . . 12. . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-14 LINKS AND RINGS . . . . . . . . . . 12. . . 12-11 TURNBUCKLES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . SHACKLES . . . eyebolts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . turnbuckles. . . . . . . .4 Periodic Inspection . . . . . . . . . . .2 Testing . . . . . . . . . . . 12-20 | Exhibit I Rigging. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-1 12-1 12-3 12-3 12-6 12-6 12-6 12-6 12-6 12-6 12-6 12-6 12-6 12-8 12-8 12-8 12-8 12-9 12. . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12. .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12. . . 12-23 12-i Chapter 12 Rigging Accessories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 12. . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . .) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Inspections . . . rings. . . .7 12. . . . . . . . . . . . Rings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12. . .4 12. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .DOE-STD-1090-99 CHAPTER 12 RIGGING ACCESSORIES This chapter provides requirements for rigging accessories used in hoisting and rigging—shackles. . . . . . . . . . . . Accessories Load Test and Inspection (Hooks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . etc. . . .8 Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. .8 12. . RIGGING HOOKS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-19 PRECISION LOAD POSITIONERS . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Initial Inspection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

DOE-STD-1090-99 INTENTIONALLY BLANK Chapter 12 Rigging Accessories 12-ii .

5. e. eyebolts or shackles). The operator or other designated person shall visually inspect rigging accessories at the beginning of each work shift or prior to use for the following (records not required): d. 5. A designated person shall perform nondestructive examinations according to applicable ASTM standards when needed by the responsible line manager or that person's authorized representative. From markings on the load. Any sign of incipient failure in shear for shackle pins. 6. Diagrams are used to illustrate hoisting and rigging principles and good and bad rigging practices. c.1 GENERAL a. b. Distortion or deformation exceeding 15 percent of new conditions. f.3.1. e. Nicks and gouges. “Shackles. 6. A designated person shall determine whether conditions found during the inspection constitute a hazard and whether a more detailed inspection is required. 12. The information presented in this chapter provides guidance for safely handling lifted loads. if the load is still on the truck or railroad car. Determine the weight of the load: 1. 2. Corrosion. This is not a rigging textbook. Load tables are representative only and are not exact for all materials or all manufacturers. From drawings or other documentation. By weighing.. 2. Wear. 4. A sample load test and inspection form is included as Exhibit I at the end of this chapter. From markings on the load. Excessive corrosion. the information should be applied only by qualified riggers. 12-1 Chapter 12 Rigging Accessories . Rigging accessories having any of the following conditions shall be removed from service: 1. 2. Wear exceeding 10 percent of original dimensions. By calculation. Rigging accessories that have been damaged or removed from service shall be made unusable for hoisting and rigging operations before being discarded.” 7. 3. 2.DOE-STD-1090-99 12.g. Determine the best method to attach the load and select the lifting devices (e. d. Cracks. c. By calculation. Distortion such as bending or Evidence of heat damage from any b. 3. Heat damage. 4. Cracks. 3. Determine the center of gravity of the load as accurately as possible: 1. twisting. 4. 3. 1.1 Inspections a. cause. From drawings or other documentation. Shackles not marked according to Section 12. using the load dimensions and the weights of common materials in Table 12-1. This form is a sample only and is not intended to be mandatory.

Oak Pine. commercial Mercury. hard. ordinary Coal. hard. rammed Granite Gravel Lime. Weight (lb/ft3) 166 418 613 504 523 550 555 1.204 450 480 712 846 655 490 458 1. solid Coal. Poplar Name of material Bluestone Brick. Balsam Hemlock Maple.5 54 84 54 23–32 140–155 90–100 165–170 117–125 53 170 164 80 90–106 151 162 160–180 110 170 65 Name of metal Aluminum Antimony Bismuth Brass.163 437 Weight (lb/ft3) 160 150 125 100–120 70–90 80–100 55–75 156 15–34 110 120–150 93. quick (ground loose) Limestone Marble Plaster of paris (cast) Sand Sandstone Shale Slate Terra-cotta Traprock Water 35 37 40 22 30 26 15 27 71 30 22 31 62 30 Chapter 12 Rigging Accessories 12-2 . Portland (loose) Cement. solid Coal. slag (loose) Chalk Charcoal Cinder concrete Clay. slag (packed) Cement. cast Copper. soft.DOE-STD-1090-99 Table 12-1. common Cement. broken Coke. cast Iron. wrought Lead. cast Uranium Zinc Name of wood Ash Beech Birch Cedar Cherry Chestnut Cork Cypress Ebony Elm Fir. 60 degrees F Silver Steel Tin. rolled Copper. loose Concrete or stone Earth. pressed Brick. Portland (packed) Cement. cast Brass. 24-carat Iron. rolled Gold. soft. Weights of common materials. broken Coal.

d.1. This also applies if they have not been used in the previous 6 months. If proof-testing cannot be verified. All calibrated devices shall have a tag affixed indicating date of calibration. All parts showing damage or permanent deformation as a result of load-testing shall be replaced.3 Good and Bad Rigging Practices Figure 12-1 illustrates some good and bad rigging practices. handling fixtures. and rigging accessories shall be tested as a unit when practical. by whom they were calibrated. and the date that the next calibration is due. 12-3 Chapter 12 Rigging Accessories .1.2 Testing a. Tackle assemblies. When necessary. and rigging accessories for critical-lift service shall have an initial proof-load test of 2 times the rated capacity. handling fixtures. Tackle assemblies. f. b.DOE-STD-1090-99 12. e. parts of such assemblies may be tested individually with the approval of the inspector. the tackle shall be proof-tested before being used to make a critical lift. c. Replacement parts shall be load-tested in accordance with this paragraph. +0 percent of stipulated values. Multileg lift assemblies shall be load-tested based on any two legs sharing the entire load. Attach legs not undergoing test in a manner to ensure that load stability is not lost during the test. Dynamometers and load cells shall be tested and calibrated at least once a year and when specified in the critical lift procedure before being used to make a critical lift. Test loads shall be accurate to within -5 percent. Discarded parts shall be destroyed. 12.

Chapter 12 Rigging Accessories 12-4 .DOE-STD-1090-99 Figure 12-1. Good and bad rigging practices.

DOE-STD-1090-99 Figure 12-1. 12-5 Chapter 12 Rigging Accessories . (continued).

Inspection procedure and record keeping requirements for hooks in regular service shall be determined by the kind of equipment in which they are used. 12. “Hook—Miscellaneous” (see Chapter 13.2 Marking The manufacturer's identification shall be forged. Cracks. for the following (records are not required): 1. or malfunction of latch (if provided). Heavy service—weekly to monthly. 12. Evidence of heat damage. The hook material shall have sufficient ductility to permanently deform before failure at the temperature at which the hook will be used. b. they shall take precedence over the requirements of this section. if the hook is not in regular service. When such requirements for hooks are stated in standards for the specific equipment.2 Daily Inspection a. A qualified inspector shall inspect all new and repaired hooks prior to initial use to ensure compliance with the applicable provisions of ASME B30.10 Section 10-2. or die-stamped on a low-stress and nonwearing area of the hook.2.2.2. Normal service—operation at less than 85 percent of rated capacity except for isolated instances. The operator or other designated personnel shall visually inspect the hook at the following intervals (records are not required): 1.3 Frequent Inspection a. 2.2. or other suspension members to which they are attached. Hook design shall meet generally accepted hook design standards and be compatible with the requirements of ASME B30.2.2.5.” for equipment load hook requirements.1 Design a. cast. The operator or other designated person shall visually inspect hooks daily or prior to first use. 3. Latch-equipped hooks shall be used unless the application makes the use of the latch impractical or unnecessary. Damage from chemicals. gouges. b.1 Initial Inspection a. Damage. 5. 3. b. See Table 12-2 for hook capacity. Severe service—daily to weekly.3 Construction a. Dated and signed inspection records shall be kept on file and shall be readily available.5. 12. Chapter 10-2.2. wire rope. nicks.2. 2. b.5 Inspections 12. 12. 12. Deformation.5.10.4 Load Limits A hook shall not be loaded beyond its rated capacity.DOE-STD-1090-99 12. engagement. Normal service—monthly. Rated capacities for hooks shall equal or exceed the rated capacity of the chain. 12.2 RIGGING HOOKS 12. Chapter 12 Rigging Accessories 12-6 .) b. A designated person shall examine deficiencies and determine whether they constitute a safety hazard and whether a more detailed inspection is required. Hook service is defined as follows: 1.2. “Load Hooks. except as is necessary to conform to the requirements for load testing of the sling or hardware to which it is attached. 4.

2 1. If the throat opening of any hook exceeds the dimension given above the corresponding diameter of the eye.0 4. The above values are for “Vulcan” and similarly designed standard hooks.7 1.8 8.5 0. The capacity can be found by the diameter of the hole in the eye of the hook.5 6.0 a.1 2.0 11.0 30.DOE-STD-1090-99 Table 12-2. Strength of standard sling hooks. Standard hook number 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 34a 35 36 38 Notes: Inside diameter of Eye A (in.0 20.) 3/4 7/8 1 1 1/8 1 1/4 1 3/8 1½ 1 5/8 1 3/4 2 2 3/8 2 3/4 3 1/8 3 1/4 3½ 4 4½ Throat Opening B (in. 12-7 Chapter 12 Rigging Accessories .7 5.6 0.) 1 1 1/16 1 1/8 1 1/4 1 3/8 1½ 1 3/4 1 7/8 2 1/16 2 1/4 2½ 3 3 3/8 3 5/8 4 4½ 5 Rated capacity (tons) 0.5 3. the hook has been over strained and must not be used. b.0 4.7 2.0 10.

d. Severe service—operation at heavy service coupled with abnormal operating conditions. b. and gouges by grinding longitudinally. Dated and signed inspection records shall be kept on file and shall be readily available. b.5. Hooks not attached to slings or other lifting hardware shall be proof tested to 200 percent of the rated capacity prior to initial use. 12. in addition to the requirements of Section 12.7 Maintenance a. 3. Normal service—yearly. 3. f. All other repairs shall be performed by the manufacturer.2. b. 4.2.8 Operation The following shall apply to rigging hook users: a.” include the following: 1. Throat opening—Any distortion causing an increase in throat opening exceeding 15 percent (or as recommended by the manufacturer). 12. A qualified inspector shall perform a complete inspection at the following intervals: 1. A designated person shall repair cracks. Severe service—quarterly. Wear—Any wear exceeding 10 percent (or as recommended by the manufacturer) of the original section dimension of the hook or its load pin. If a latch is provided and it becomes inoperative because of wear or deformation or fails to fully bridge the throat opening. fingers. Hooks having any of the following conditions shall be removed from service until repaired or replaced: 1. Heavy service—semiannually. following the contour of the hook. c. The test load shall be accurate to within -5 percent.4 Periodic Inspection a. Determine that the load or force required does not exceed the rated capacity of the hook's assembly. provided that no dimension is reduced more than 10 percent of its original value (or as recommended by the manufacturer).2. Chapter 12 Rigging Accessories 12-8 . the hook shall be removed from service until the device has been repaired or replaced and the throat opening has been determined not to exceed 15 percent (or as recommended by the manufacturer).5. No performance testing of hooks shall be required. The inspection shall include the requirements of Section 12. c. e. A qualified inspector shall examine deficiencies and determine whether they constitute a safety hazard. These inspections shall. 12.” d.6 Testing a. Keep hands.2. especially when considering special conditions such as choking or grabbing.3.2. Deformation—Any bending or twisting exceeding 10 degrees (or as recommended by the manufacturer) from the plane of the unbent hook. nicks. “Frequent Inspection. and body from getting between the hook and the load. 2. 3. b.5. 12. Heavy service—operation at 85 to 100 percent of rated capacity as a regular specified procedure. c.DOE-STD-1090-99 2.2. except as is necessary to conform to the requirements for the slings or rigging hardware of which they are a part. +0 percent of stipulated values. Cracks. Wear. Hooks shall receive a nondestructive examination according to applicable ASTM standards annually. g. A designated person shall examine deficiencies and determine whether a more detailed inspection is required.2. Avoid shock loading. 2. 2. Hook attachment and securing means. “Daily Inspections.

When shackles are used at load angles other than 90 degrees . Shackles that are not properly marked shall be permanently removed from service. Manufacturer's name or trademark. Avoid side pulls on the shackle body. 2. Shackles are made of drop-forged steel bent into shape. Each shackle body shall be permanently and legibly marked by the manufacturer. The size is specified by the diameter of the body. b. Raised or stamped letters on the side of the bow shall be used to show: 1. the safe-load rating shall be reduced accordingly. d. e. Do not substitute a bolt for the shackle pin. closed attachments that will not come unhooked.DOE-STD-1090-99 12. They are strong.3 SHACKLES a. 12-9 Chapter 12 Rigging Accessories . c. Rated capacity. Size. 3. Shackle pins should fit free without binding. Figure 12-2 shows shackles and provides examples of good and bad practices and inspection points.

Chapter 12 Rigging Accessories 12-10 . Shackles.DOE-STD-1090-99 Figure 12-2.

12-11 Chapter 12 Rigging Accessories 1. the equipment custodian or cognizant engineer shall be consulted. In some cases the intended use is obvious to an experienced craftsman in other cases engineering review of vendor information may be necessary. Destroy eyebolts that are cracked. Ensure shoulders seat snugly against the surface on which they bear. 3. Alloy Steel Eyebolts shall have the symbol “A” (denoting alloy steel) and the manufacturer’s name or identification mark forged in raised characters on the surface of the eyebolt. e. Ensure that the shank of the eyebolt is not undercut and is smoothly radiused into the plane of the shoulder or the contour of the ring for nonshouldered eyebolts. This section specifies requirements for eyebolts that are used as rigging hardware during normal hoisting and rigging activities. and drilled plates to make shouldered eyebolts. Check the condition of the threads in the hole to ensure that the eyebolt will secure and the shoulder can be brought down snug. f. where spreaders. Eyebolts designed for and permanently installed on existing engineered equipment are considered part of the engineered equipment. Use shouldered eyebolts for all applications. The following shall apply to eyebolt users: 1. d. Spot-face or slightly counterbore the surface of the item to which the eyebolt is fastened to the minimum depth needed for cleanup of the surface and complete bearing of the shoulder or spacer on the bearing surface. eyebolts may be used for angular lifting.4 EYEBOLTS a. bent. yokes. It is important to know how the manufacturer or engineered equipment intends permanently installed eyebolts to be used. except where it is not possible due to the configuration of the item to be lifted. However. Eyeballed marking: | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | Figure 12-3. do not use nuts. or have damaged threads. Carefully inspect each eyebolt before use. Use a flat spacer no thicker than 1/16 of the outside diameter and approximately the same diameter as the maximum axis of the eyebolt shoulder with the smallest inside diameter that will fit the eyebolt shank. or beams cannot be used. See . When unshouldered eyebolts are used. 7. 2. 9. Carbon Steel Eyebolts shall have the manufacturer’s name or identification marked forged in raised characters on the surface of the eyeballed. Eyebolts permanently installed on engineered equipment are acceptable for their intended use so long as they pass normal visual inspection before use. lifting yokes. 5. An angular lift is any lift in which the lifting force is applied at any angle to the centerline of the shank of the eyebolt. 4. When questions arise regarding the use of manufactured-installed eyebolts. spreader bars. Minimize the angle between the sling and the eyebolt axis. 8. if necessary. Do not use wire-type or welded eyebolts in DOE-lifting operations. Nuts on through-eyebolts shall be self-locking or shall be secured with lock wires or other suitable means to prevent loosening. provided that the limiting conditions in Table 12-3 are considered. 2. Eyebolts shall have Class II fit and have a minimum of one-and-one-half diameters thread engagement. 6. Eyebolts shall have a minimum design factor of 5:1. ensure that an engineering analysis of the loading and load vectors is made and approved before use. Eyebolts used for hoisting shall be fabricated from forged carbon or alloy steel. or lifting beams should be used to eliminate angular lifting. c. CAUTION: Eyebolts installed by the manufacturer to lift only parts of the engineered equipment are not suitable for lifting the completed piece of equipment. Where nonshouldered eyebolts must be used for a critical lift.DOE-STD-1090-99 12. b. In no case shall the eyebolt loading exceed the values shown in Table 12-3. and they may not meet all requirements specified for rigging hardware. to ensure proper seating of the eyebolt. Spacers may be used. When more than one eyebolt is used in conjunction with multiple-leg rigging. Visually inspect the hole to ensure that there has been no deformation. washers.

Chapter 12 Rigging Accessories 12-12 . Eyebolts.DOE-STD-1090-99 Figure 12-3.

200 10.400 75 degrees 60 degrees 45 degrees Less than 45 degrees Reduce vertical Reduce vertical Reduce vertical loads by 45% loads by 65% loads by 75% Note: The safe working loads for plain (shoulder less) eyebolts is the same as for shoulder bolts under vertical load. 12-13 Chapter 12 Rigging Accessories . Angular loading is not recommended.DOE-STD-1090-99 Table 12-3.500 5.200 21.200 2.200 7. EYEBOLTS — Shoulder Type Only — Forged Carbon Steel Stock diameter (in.200 3.000 15.) 1/4 5/16 3/8 ½ 5/8 3/4 7/8 1 1 1/4 1½ SAFE WORKING LOADS CORRESPONDING TO ANGLE OF PULL Vertical 500 800 1. Safe loading of eyebolts.

Turnbuckles used in applications where there is vibration shall be secured to the frame with locks. Before each use. jamb nuts.DOE-STD-1090-99 12. Approved turnbuckles shall be marked and identified for use with the sling set for which they were designed and shall be load-tested as part of the sling set. See Figure 12-4 for safe working load information and turnbuckle inspection areas.5 TURNBUCKLES a. Turnbuckles may be used in sling systems provided that they are engineered. or wires to prevent turning or loosening. or bent frame members make the unit unsuitable for use. and approved as a part of the sling system. pins. c. d. b. Jamb nuts or locking devices must be tightened or locked before making lifts with turnbuckles. Damaged threads. Turnbuckles shall be fabricated from forged alloy steel and shall have a minimum design factor of 5:1. designed. Chapter 12 Rigging Accessories 12-14 . turnbuckles shall be inspected for damage.

Turnbuckles.DOE-STD-1090-99 Figure 12-4. 12-15 Chapter 12 Rigging Accessories .

Chapter 12 Rigging Accessories 12-16 . Figure 12-5 shows typical rings and links. Rings and links.DOE-STD-1090-99 12.6 LINKS AND RINGS Links and rings are usually designed and manufactured as a part of the lifting hardware for a specific purpose. However. the rings and links may also be found on the load-attachment end of slings. Table 12-4 provides safe loads for weldless rings and links. such as the peak link on multiple-leg slings. Figure 12-5.

stock (in. each (lb) 2 3/4 3 1/2 3 5/8 6 1/2 7 10 Safe load.800 10.000 28.) (in.000 8... RINGS Dimensions Diam.000 19. wt. Safe loads for weldless rings and links. inside (in.300 10.200 4. per 100 (lb) 23 50 110 190 285 430 700 1125 Safe load.DOE-STD-1090-99 Table 12-4. wt.) 3/8 1/2 *5/8 *3/4 *7/8 *1 1 1/4 *1 3/8 Length.500 3. large end 1 1/4 1 5/8 2 1/2 3 3 1/2 4 3 3/4 5 1/2 Est. single pull (lb) 7. stock Diam.200 6. inside (in. END LINKS Diam.000 17.) 5/16 3/8 1/2 5/8 3/4 7/8 1 1 1/4 1 3/8 Inside length (in. per 100 (lb) 14 21 48 92 137 275 360 700 1000 Suggested safe loads (lb) 2.500 9. stock (in.800 6. small end 3/8 1/2 1 1/4 1 1/2 1 3/4 2 1 1/4 2 3/4 Inside width. wt.) 1/2 9/16 3/4 1 1 1/8 2 2 2 1/4 2 3/4 Est.000 12-17 Chapter 12 Rigging Accessories .000 SLING LINKS Diam.) 1 3/4 1 7/8 2 3/8 3 1/4 3 1/2 5 1/8 5 1/8 6 7/16 7 3/4 Inside width (in.) 2 1/2 3 3 3/4 4 1/2 5 1/4 6 6 8 1/4 Inside width.600 10.400 17...800 3.) 7/8 7/8 1 1 1/8 1 1/4 1 3/8 4 5 1/2 4 6 5 6 Est.000 20..200 5.000 30.300 14.500 *Sizes of sling links denoted by the asterisk are new and have the larger inside dimensions needed for 2-leg slings. single pull (lb) 1.800 22.000 12.

See Figure 12-6. or broken parts. Ensure proper orientation of the clamp. Ensure that the rated capacity of each plate clamp is stamped on its body.7 METAL-PLATE CLAMPS a. Their grip or hold is determined by the weight or pull of the load. Chapter 12 Rigging Accessories 12-18 . Metal-plate clamps are designed specifically for lifting metal plates. The following applies to users of metal-plate clamps: c. b. Plate clamps are suitable for handling only one plate at a time. d. g. Figure 12-6. Check plate clamps for wear in the jaws and for loose. e. They may also be used for lifting fiber sheets. Metal-plate clamps. f. Avoid side pulls on plate clamps.DOE-STD-1090-99 12. The plate shall be inserted all the way into the clamp to obtain a good grip. worn.

they must be constructed to provide a measure of safety and reliability equal to that of the associated rigging. Any combination where the safety factor of the dynamometer times the capacity of the dynamometer divided by the load equals 5 is acceptable. or a safety device must be installed to prevent dropping the load in the event of a failure. Dynamometers commonly have design factors of less than 5:1. 12-19 Chapter 12 Rigging Accessories . The device should be selected so that the estimated hook load lies between 10 and 70 percent of the instrument range. Load-indicating devices are not required in routine operations where loads of known and essentially consistent weight are to be handled. Rather.8 LOAD-INDICATING DEVICES a. b. an accuracy of 2 percent of full-scale reading within 10–70 percent of instrument range is recommended. load-indicating devices are required for use with loads of uncertain weight that could be within 90–100 percent of the rated capacity of the equipment or maximum working load of any part of the tackle. d. c.DOE-STD-1090-99 12. When dynamometers are used as load-bearing parts of rigging. Use load-indicating devices where the equipment/ tackle configuration could result in binding or friction of the load that could cause a greater stress in the hoist or tackle than would result from the apparent hook load. The accuracy of load-indicating devices shall depend on the requirements of the load system planned and shall not restrict the system requirements.

maintained. A precision load positioning device in the load path shall have a design factor of no less than 5:1. calibrated and tested in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions. Special attention should be paid to the manufacturer’s instructions concerning testing of devices equipped with load gages as they may be damaged during the load test. b. | | | | | | | | | | | | Chapter 12 Rigging Accessories 12-20 .DOE-STD-1090-99 12. If the load test is not performed by the manufacturer. A precision load positioner shall be operated. based on ultimate strength of the device’s load bearing components. | | | | | | | | c. and altered precision load positioning devices shall be load tested. confirming the load rating.9 PRECISION LOAD POSITIONERS a. repaired. and a written report shall be furnished. it shall be done under the direction of a designated or authorized person in strict compliance with the manufacturer’s instructions. Prior to initial use. all new.

12-21 Chapter 12 Rigging Accessories .DOE-STD-1090-99 Exhibit I is intended to be a sample form only and is not mandatory. Any other form that accomplishes the purpose is acceptable.

DOE-STD-1090-99 INTENTIONALLY BLANK Chapter 12 Rigging Accessories 12-22 .

Proof test to 200% of rated capacity for critical lift service to certify new equipment procured without manufacturer's certification. 15% more than normal opening 10% twist more than normal from the plane of the unbent hook 10% wear 5% elongation of the hook shank. Hooks. Heat damage. and the like. spreading. Corrosion. QUALIFIED INSPECTOR VERIFY DATE 12-23 Chapter 12 Rigging Accessories . or magnetic particle examination. damage. SHACKLES. corrosion. twists. or significant change in openings (1) (2) (3) (4) C. B. rings. liquid penetrant examination. laps. ACCESSORIES LOAD TEST AND INSPECTION (HOOKS. +0% of the stipulated values. rings. Accept/reject data should be to manufacturer's specifications. Size Rated Capacity (SWL) Type Tested to Serial Numbers Qualified inspector shall perform a nondestructive test by visual examination. linear indications. Wear. ETC. Qualified inspector shall witness all steps below. etc. shall be removed from service and discarded if any of the following conditions are present that would cause doubt of the integrity of the accessories: A.DOE-STD-1090-99 EXHIBIT I RIGGING. RINGS. or seams. and deformation (1) (2) 15% deformation of their new condition Shackle pins—any sign of incipient failure in shear. Test loads shall be accurate to within -5%. or undue wear Cracks. 2. 3. 4. Acceptance: No cracks. Shackles. TACKLE. A. shackles.) INSPECTOR INSPECTION DATE Page 1 of 1 NOTES: 1.

DOE-STD-1090-99 INTENTIONALLY BLANK Chapter 12 Rigging Accessories 12-24 .

. . . . . . . .3 13. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4. . . .1 Hook Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .” for rigging hook requirements. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 13. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chapter 10-1. . . . . . . . . . . . . .4. . . . . . . . . testing. . . . .1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 NDT Requirements . . . . 13. . MAINTENANCE . . . . .2. . “Hooks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13. . NONDESTRUCTIVE TESTING (NDT) . . . . . . . . . .1 GENERAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4. 13. . . . . . . . .4 13. 13. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . and maintenance of load hooks installed on cranes or hoists and implements the requirements of ASME B30. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13. . .4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13. .4 Frequent Inspection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4.” See Chapter 12. . “Rigging Accessories. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Acceptance Criteria . . . . . .1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Load Limits . . . . . . . 13. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Discontinuity Removal . . . 13-9 13-i Chapter 13 Load Hooks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 13. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .DOE-STD-1090-99 CHAPTER 13 LOAD HOOKS This chapter provides safety standards for the inspection. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Initial Inspection . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13.3 Daily Inspection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . INSPECTIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13. . . . . . . . . . TESTING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13. . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-1 13-1 13-1 13-1 13-1 13-2 13-2 13-2 13-2 13-2 13-2 13-4 13-6 13-6 13-6 13-6 13-6 13-6 13-8 13. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10. . .2 Attachments . .1 Marking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 OPERATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Hook Standards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 NDT Records . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Periodic Inspection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13. . . . . . .3 NDT Methods . 13. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

DOE-STD-1090-99 INTENTIONALLY BLANK Chapter 13 Load Hooks 13-ii .

10.1. When a latch is provided. providing that (1) the use of the hook is restricted to the application for which it is approved. 13. for measuring spread after load testing should be provided. Field-fabricated hooks shall meet the requirements of this section and shall be approved by the cognizant engineering and safety organizations. it shall be designed to retain such items as slings under slack conditions. Hook design shall meet generally accepted hook design standards and be compatible with the requirements of ASME B30.2 Attachments a. e. The latch is not intended to support the load. or hook gauges. welding shall be done prior to final heat-treating.DOE-STD-1090-99 13.4 Hook Standards a. cast.3 Load Limits Hooks shall not be loaded beyond rated capacity except during load tests of the equipment of which they are a part.1. d. If a handle or latch support whose design requires heat-treating is welded to the hook. Hoisting hooks shall be fitted with a latch to bridge the throat opening to prevent the accidental release of slings or attachments. 13-1 Chapter 13 Load Hooks . b. 13.1 Marking The manufacturer's identification shall be forged. or die-stamped on a low-stress and nonwearing area of the hook. The hook material shall have sufficient ductility to permanently deform before failure at the ambient temperatures at which the hook will be used. and (2) in questionable cases.1. Gauge points.1 GENERAL 13. The bearing surfaces of new hooks shall be the arc of a circle. 13. Hooks without latches may be used in special applications where the latch would interfere with the proper use of the hook. c.1. concurrence is obtained from the appropriate safety organization. b.

Severe service—daily to weekly.2. damage to or malfunction of latch (if provided).2 Initial Inspection a. A designated person shall examine deficiencies and determine whether they constitute a safety hazard and whether a more detailed inspection is required.2.) b. extreme temperatures.2 INSPECTIONS 13. c. Heavy service—weekly to monthly. Wear. Damage from chemicals. 3.e. A designated person shall examine deficiencies and determine whether they constitute a safety hazard. 2. Heavy service—operation at 85 to 100 percent of rated capacity as a regular specified procedure.DOE-STD-1090-99 13. | | | | | | | | 13. Severe service—operation at heavy service coupled with abnormal operating conditions. all new and repaired hooks shall be inspected by a qualified inspector to ensure their compliance with the applicable provisions of ASME B30. extreme temperatures. Normal service—monthly. Prior to initial use. Deformation. Operators or other designated personnel shall visually inspect the hook at the following intervals (records are not required) : 1.. 3. c.e. Evidence of heat damage. When such requirements are stated in standards for the specific equipment. Dated and signed inspection records shall be kept on file and shall be readily available.2. 13. b.2. Latch engagement. Normal service—yearly. Normal service—operation at less than 85 percent of rated capacity except for isolated instances. 3. (i. Operators or other designated personnel shall visually inspect hooks for deficiencies such as the following each day or prior to use if the hook has not been in regular service (records are not required): 1. and gouges.2. Cracks. b. 2.4 Frequent Inspection a.. nicks. The inspection shall include the Chapter 13 Load Hooks 13-2 .5 Periodic Inspection a. 5. etc. corrosive atmospheres.3 Daily Inspection a. (i.” include the following: 1. Operation at 85 to 100 percent of rated capacity as a regular specified procedure. Operation at heavy service coupled with abnormal operating conditions. they shall take precedence over the requirements of this section. Operation at less than 85 percent of rated capacity except for isolated instances. These inspections shall.2. 13.) b. etc. 13.2. corrosive atmospheres. c. A qualified inspector shall perform a complete inspection at the following intervals: 1. Severe service—quarterly. b. in addition to the requirements of Section 13. Hook attachment and securing means.1 Hook Service Hook service is defined as follows: a.3. Inspection procedure and record keeping requirements for hooks in regular service shall be governed by requirements for the kind of equipment in which they are used. A designated person shall examine deficiencies and determine whether they constitute a safety hazard and whether a more detailed inspection is required. 2. “Daily Inspection. 4. Heavy service—semiannually.10 Section 10-1. 2.

the hook shall be removed from service until the device has been repaired or replaced and the throat opening has been assessed as described above. twisting exceeding 10 (or as recommended by the manufacturer) from the plane of the unbent hook. A sample load test and inspection form is included as Exhibit I in Chapter 12. 5. “Rigging Accessories. f.DOE-STD-1090-99 requirements of Section 13. The surface condition may call for stripping the paint in such instances. Dated and signed inspection records shall be kept on file and shall be readily available. Throat opening—Any distortion causing an increase in throat opening exceeding 15 percent (or as recommended by the manufacturer). “Frequent Inspection. 4. Hooks shall receive a nondestructive test (NDT) according to Section 13. If a latch is provided and it becomes inoperative because of wear or deformation or fails to fully bridge the throat opening. 13-3 Chapter 13 Load Hooks .4.” d.” e. h. 3. Wear—Any wear exceeding 10 percent (or as recommended by the manufacturer) of the original section dimension of the hook or its load pin. Cracks.4. 2. g. “Nondestructive Testing.2. a visual inspection should take the coating into consideration. Surface variations can disclose evidence of heavy or severe service. If hooks are painted.” This form is intended to be a sample only and is not intended to be mandatory. Hooks having any of the following conditions shall be removed from service until repaired or replaced: Deformation—Any bending or 1.

or other relevant discrepancies. b. whichever is greater.DOE-STD-1090-99 13. When proof tests are used. No performance testing of hooks shall be required. castings shall be evaluated in accordance with ASTM E-165 (“Standard Practice for Liquid Penetrant Inspection Method. the hooks shall withstand the proof load application without permanent deformation when the load is applied for a minimum of 15 sec. unless the hook is designed for unbalanced loading. The proof load shall be shared equally between the two prongs of a sister hook. This condition is considered satisfied if the permanent increase in the throat opening does not exceed 0.25 mm). Each hook of 150-ton capacity or greater and a prototype of each hook design of less than 150-ton capacity shall be proof-tested by the manufacturer in accordance with Table 13-1.3 TESTING a. Chapter 13 Load Hooks 13-4 . inclusions. the proof load for the eye shall be in accordance with Table 13-1.5 percent or 0. d. For a duplex (sister) hook having a pin eye.01 in. except as is necessary to conform to the requirements for the equipment of which they are a part.”) e. c. Hooks that have been proof-tested shall be inspected by the magnetic-particle method in accordance with ASTM E-709 (“Standard Practice for Magnetic Particle Examination”) and shall show no cracks. (0.

288 45.288 40.040 90.360 54.000 lb) 1 2 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 0 100 116 137 166 188 200 233 266 333 399 465 532 598 665 kg 453.504 72.608 18. Rated load.536 9.400 136.2 kg For hooks with load ratings not shown above.235 124.216 31.2 1.144 27.072 18.378 241. tons (2. 2.760 181.752 36.080 158.072 13.600 kg 907.720 113.973 421.216 36.506 603.520 362.440 211.824 45.432 63.595 170.680 27.432 68.6 907.4 9.440 226.315 302.554 181.720 105. Proof test load.800 272. use the next lower load rating for determining the percent of rated load to be applied.630 542.648 90.360 54.814.000 lb) 0. tons (2.50 1 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 60 75 100 125 150 175 200 250 300 350 400 450 500 Above 500 % rated load 200 200 200 200 200 200 200 200 200 200 200 200 193 183 166 150 133 133 133 133 133 133 133 133 133 133 Proof load (minimum).000 lb) = 907.286 150.144 22.600 453.288 Note: 1 ton (short. 13-5 Chapter 13 Load Hooks .576 81.240 453.DOE-STD-1090-99 Table 13-1.848 482.160 317.880 408.098 361.2 4.

” are shown on Figures 13-1 and 13-2. Severe service: semiannually. is considered nonserious.e. Arc strikes (welding or electrical). 13.4 NONDESTRUCTIVE TESTING (NDT) 13. Two directions of discontinuity. For crane and hoist hooks of 10-ton rated capacity or greater that are assigned to heavy or severe service. In zone C.2 NDT Records Dated and signed NDT records. A qualified inspector or designated person shall perform NDTs in accordance with the following ASTM standards: 1. b. 13. an NDT shall be performed to evaluate the hook further. gently undulating surface. A designated person shall document and resolve the following relevant indications: a. ASTM E-165.4.. a qualified inspector shall perform an NDT at the following intervals: 1. Discontinuity “T. In zones B and D. regardless of its rated capacity or service classification. 13. discontinuity “T” may reduce the longevity of the hook.4. a twist. b.5 Discontinuity Removal a. Therefore. If visual examination reveals a surface intersecting discontinuity (i. long or longer. possibility of prod burns or arc strikes.DOE-STD-1090-99 13.3 NDT Methods a.4. c. “P” and “T. C. increased throat opening. The hook shall be reexamined by performing an NDT after grinding to verify removal of relevant discontinuities.4. A designated person or a qualified inspector shall perform an NDT for other hooks when deemed necessary for site-specific reasons. or any other defect. such grinding shall not reduce the original hook dimension by more than 10 percent. 2.” on the other hand. traceable to the hook by a serial number or other identifier. Under normal and proper application. c. when occurring in zones B.4. d. stress or fatigue cracks). zone A is an unstressed zone. or D. b. a coil. is transverse to the contour of the hook and is more serious. and does not require removal. or wet technique should be used to eliminate the Chapter 13 Load Hooks 13-6 . yoke. Use magnetic-particle testing or liquid-penetrant testing methods to inspect for surface intersecting discontinuities. Such a reduction will not affect the working load limit rating or the ultimate load rating of the hook. shall be kept on file as long as the hook remains in service and shall be readily available to appointed personnel.25 in. it is not required that discontinuities in that zone be ground out. c. For magnetic-particle testing. Discontinuities may be removed by grinding longitudinally following the contour of the hook to produce a smooth. d.1 NDT Requirements a. 13. Heavy service: annually. Surface intersecting discontinuities 0.4 Acceptance Criteria b. ASTM E-709. Discontinuity “P” parallels the contour of the hook. grinding shall not reduce the original dimension by more than 5 percent. 2. Perform an NDT with the hook in place unless conditions indicate that disassembly for thread or shank inspection is necessary.

Figure 13-2. Shank hook. Eye hook. 13-7 Chapter 13 Load Hooks .DOE-STD-1090-99 Figure 13-1.

and gouges by grinding longitudinally.5 MAINTENANCE a.DOE-STD-1090-99 13. All other repairs shall be performed by the manufacturer or a qualified person. following the contour of the hook. A hook latch that is inoperative or missing shall be replaced. c. b. Chapter 13 Load Hooks 13-8 . provided no dimension is reduced more than 10 percent (or as recommended by the manufacturer) of its original value. A designated person shall repair cracks. d. nicks. A hook with a latch that does not bridge the throat opening shall be removed from service until the latch is replaced or repaired and the hook is examined for deformation with special attention to the throat opening.

Do not use hooks in such a manner as to place a side. e. d. c. h. Center the load in the base (bowl or saddle) of the hook to prevent point loading of the hook. Load duplex (sister) hooks equally on both sides. b. f. Determine that the weight of the load to be lifted does not exceed the load rating of the hook. g. unless the hook is specifically designed for single loading. Keep hands and fingers from between the hook and the load. ensure that no portion of the load is carried by the bridging device. When using a device to bridge the throat opening of the hook.or backload on the hook. Avoid shock loading. 13-9 Chapter 13 Load Hooks . Do not load the pinhole in duplex (sister) hooks beyond the rated load of the hook.6 OPERATION Hook users shall do the following: a.DOE-STD-1090-99 13.

DOE-STD-1090-99 INTENTIONALLY BLANK Chapter 13 Load Hooks 13-10 .

.2. . . . . . . .3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 14. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Marking . .3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3.3. . . . . . . . . . . . .”] 14. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14. . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . .3 Installation . . . . . .5 Testing . .8 Training/Qualification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14.4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14.1 Design/Fabrication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . 14. . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . .1 Design/Fabrication . . . . . . . . . . . .9 Operation . . . .DOE-STD-1090-99 CHAPTER 14 BELOW-THE-HOOK LIFTING DEVICES This chapter provides the requirements for below-the-hook lifting devices used in hoisting and rigging. . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . . . . .4 14-i Chapter 14 Below-the-Hook Lifting Devices . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . STRUCTURAL AND MECHANICAL LIFTING DEVICES . .5. . . . . . . .2. . . .4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . .3. . . . . . . . .4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Training/Qualification . . . . . . .3 Periodic Inspection . . . 14. . . 14. . . . . . . .6 [“Standard for Special Lifting Devices for Shipping Containers Weighing 10. . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . .” NOTE: Special lifting devices for shipping containers weighing 10. . . . . . . . . . .2. . 14. . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Frequent Inspection . . . . .4 Guarding . .20. . . 14. . . . . . . . .2 GENERAL . . . . . .3 14. . . . . . 14. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4. . . . . . . . .1 Rated Load (Capacity) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Modification/Rerating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Design/Fabrication . . . .500 kg) or More for Nuclear Materials. . MAGNETS. . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . This section implements the requirements of ASME B30. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Initial Inspection .000 Pounds (4. . .6 Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Marking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14. . . 14. .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14. lifting yokes. . .5. . . . . . . . . . . .2 Marking .5 Inspections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Periodic Inspection . . . . .5. . 14. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Frequent Inspection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14. . . . .2. . . . . . .1 Initial Inspection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14. . . . . . . . . . 14. . . .4. . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14. . . . . .4 Inspections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Operation . . . . . . 14. . . . . . . . and lift fixtures. . . . . . . . .2. . . . “Below-the-Hook Lifting Devices.6 Testing . .3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14. . . . . . . .7 Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14. . VACUUM LIFTING DEVICES . . . . . . .3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . 14. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6. . . . . . . . . . 14. . . . . . . . . . 14. . . such as spreader bars. . . . . . .000 lb or more that are used for radioactive materials may be governed by ANSI N14. . . . . . .2 Rated Load Test . . . .5. .1 Operational Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . CLOSE-PROXIMITY-OPERATED . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14. . . .1 Operational Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . .2 Rated Load Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14. . . . . . . 14-1 14-2 14-2 14-2 14-2 14-2 14-2 14-2 14-2 14-5 14-5 14-5 14-5 14-6 14-6 14-6 14-7 14-7 14-7 14-9 14-9 14-9 14-9 14-9 14-10 14-10 14-10 14-10 14-10 14-11 14-12 14-12 14-12 14-12 14-12 | 14. . . . 14. . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . .2.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4. . . . . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Training/Qualification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14. . . .8. . . . . . . . . . . . .6 14. . . . . . . . . . .2 Rated Load Test . . . .5. . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . . Testing . . . .5 MAGNETS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4. . . 14. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14. . . .4. .4. . . . . . . . . . .5. 14. . . . . .3 Electrically Controlled Permanent Magnets . .4. . . . 14. . . . . . 14. . . . . .4 Inspections . . . . . . 14. . . . . .4. . . 14. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Training/Qualification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Periodic Inspection . . . REMOTE-OPERATED . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8. . . . . . . . .4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Frequent Inspection . . 14. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. . . . .4. . . . .5 Testing . . . . . . . . . . .5. . 14. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14. . . . . . . . . . . .2 Battery-Operated Electromagnets . . . . . . . . . . .1 Initial Inspection . . .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Manually Controlled Permanent Magnets . . . . . . . . . .3 Periodic Inspection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 14. . . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . .4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4. . . . .1 External-Powered Electromagnets . . .6 Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Initial Inspection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14. . . . . . . . . . .5. . . . .3 14. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4. . . .5. . . .4. . .4.8. . . . . . . . . .5. 14. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14. .1 Operational Test . . . . . . .4 Installation . . . . . . .4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . Inspections . . . . . . . . 14. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4. . . . . . . . . . . 14. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14. . . . . . . . . . .8. . . . . 14-12 14-14 14-14 14-14 14-14 14-14 14-14 14-14 14-15 14-15 14-16 14-16 14-16 14-16 14-16 14-17 14-17 14-17 14-17 14-17 14-17 14-17 14-17 14-19 14-19 14-19 14-19 14-20 14. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . . . .2 Frequent Inspection . . . .5 14. . .4. . . . . . . . . 14. . . . . . .8 14. . . . . . . . . .1 Operational Test . . . . . . . . Exhibit I Lifting Bars and Spreaders Load Test and Inspection . . . . . .4. . . . . . .4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4. . . . . . . . . . .5. . . 14. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .DOE-STD-1090-99 14. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14. . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-22 Chapter 14 Below-the-Hook Lifting Devices 14-ii . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Operation . . . . . . .1 Design/Fabrication . . . .2 Marking . . .4. . . . . 14. . . . .

Remote-operated magnets. Close-proximity-operated magnets. Slings and rigging accessories that may be components in a below-the-hook lifting device are covered in Chapters 11 and 12 (“Wire Rope and Slings” and “Rigging Accessories. 2. b.” respectively) of this manual. Below-the-hook lifting devices are arranged in the following groups because of the diversity of types: 1. 4. devices. 14-1 Chapter 14 Below-the-Hook Lifting Devices . Structural and mechanical lifting Vacuum lifting devices.DOE-STD-1090-99 14. 3.1 GENERAL a.

a nameplate. if it has not been in regular service. 3. each detachable from the assembly.2.3 Modification/Rerating a.6. This may be due to the security classification of the load to be lifted or other reasons approved by the responsible manager.2 STRUCTURAL AND MECHANICAL LIFTING DEVICES a. 14. Rerated or modified lift fixtures shall be load-tested as described in Section 14.2. covers. capacity and weight. such as gearing.2. Serial number (if applicable). Structural and mechanical lifting devices may be modified or rerated if the changes are analyzed by a qualified engineer or the manufacturer of the lifting device.20. Cases may exist where a lifting device cannot be marked with its rated capacity and weight. b. All operating mechanisms andb automatic hold-and-release mechanisms for misadjustments interfering with operation. or nameplates.2. 4.5.2. and its documentation shall describe both its rated Chapter 14 Below-the-Hook Lifting Devices 14-2 . “Periodic Inspection. Typical devices include: 1. cracks.” 14. 14. or repaired lifting devices to ensure compliance with Section 14.5.2.DOE-STD-1090-99 14. and rotating shafts. 2. a qualified inspector shall inspect all new. Deficiencies noted during the inspection shall be corrected before the lifting device is used. stops. for the following items or conditions (records are not required): 1.2. fasteners.2.5 Inspections 14. 4. Manufacturer's name (contractor's name if fabricated onsite). If the lifting device comprises several items. Cask lift fixtures (Figure 14-4). The operator or other designated person shall visually inspect each lifting device at the beginning of each shift or prior to use. In these cases. Friction-type pressure gripping lifting devices (Figure 14-2). that may be a hazard to personnel during lifting operations shall be guarded. chain drives.1 Initial Inspection Prior to their initial use. 14. A rerated lifting device shall be relabeled with the new rated capacity. Structural deformation. The rated capacity of each lifting device shall be marked on the main structure where it is visible and legible. Load-supporting lifting devices (Figure 14-1). 14.5.2.” below. b. c.2 Frequent Inspection a.3. 3. b.2.2.2.4 Guarding Exposed moving parts or pinch points. Loose or missing guards. 2. 20-1. 2. or excessive wear on any part. Lifting device weight (if over 100 lb). Structural and mechanical lifting devices are often one-of-a-kind designs. The operator or designated person shall carefully examine any deficiencies and determine whether they constitute a hazard. the lifting device shall be marked with an identification number.2 Marking a. At a minimum. each lifting device shall be marked with its rated capacity. or other permanent marker shall be affixed displaying the following data: 1. name tag. Indentation-type gripping lifting devices (Figure 14-3). modified.1 Design/Fabrication Structural and mechanical lifting devices shall be designed and fabricated according to the provisions of ASME B30. 14. Rated capacity. “Rated Load Test. 3.

c o r e g r ip B a r To n g M o t o r . e n d g r ip V e r t i c a l A x i s C o il G r a b Figure 14-2. R o ll g r a b . Load-supporting lifting devices.DOE-STD-1090-99 B a la n c e d p a l le t L iftin g b e a m ( s p re a d e r b e a m ) Te l e s c o p in g c o i l g ra b C o il liftin g h o o k b e a m Figure 14-1. 14-3 Chapter 14 Below-the-Hook Lifting Devices .d r i v e n r o l l g r a b . Friction-type pressure gripping lifting devices.

Typical cask lift fixture. Indentation-type gripping lifting device Figure 14-4. Chapter 14 Below-the-Hook Lifting Devices 14-4 .DOE-STD-1090-99 Automatic Latch Automatic Ingot Tong (2 point) Automatic Slab Tong (4 point) Figure 14-3.

modified.5. 14. Testing shall include the following: 1. cracks. sprockets. Inspect equipment at site of use unless external conditions indicate that disassembly should be done to permit detailed inspection.2. 4. Severe—operation at normal or heavy service under abnormal operating conditions. d.6. Excessive wear at hoist-attaching points and load-support shackles or pins. Cracked or worn gears. or other defects after the load test is completed.2. 3. The rated capacity shall not be more than 80 percent of the maximum load sustained during the test. Severe service—quarterly.6 Testing 14.1 Operational Test a. A qualified inspector shall inspect fixtures not in regular use according to periodic 14-5 Chapter 14 Below-the-Hook Lifting Devices . This form is intended to be a sample only and is not intended to be mandatory. 2. altered. All new. b. 2.” in addition to the following: 1. e. Personnel shall remain clear of suspended loads. Special or infrequent service—as recommended by a qualified person before the first such use and as directed by the qualified person for any subsequent uses. 3. Normal—operation with various weights within the rated load limit. Loose bolts or fasteners. A qualified inspector shall perform a complete inspection at the following intervals: 1. 4. and belts. or uniform loads less than 65 percent of rated load. c. Lifting device service is defined as follows: inspection requirements before placing them in service. 2. 5. A sample load test and inspection form is included as Exhibit I at the end of this section. “Frequent Inspection. This inspection shall include the items listed in Section 14. chains. Hoist the test load a sufficient distance to ensure that it is supported by the lifting device. Visually inspect the lifting device for deformation.2. 14. The rated load test shall consist of the following: 1. Heavy—operation within the rated load limit that exceeds normal service. sheaves. c. Inspect equipment at site of use unless external conditions indicate that disassembly should be done to permit detailed inspection. or apply the required load if the test is made using a testing machine.6. and other mechanical parts. Excessive wear of friction pads. Heavy service—semiannually. 2. 2.5. Lifting devices with manually operated or automatic latches shall be tested to verify that the latches operate in accordance with manufacturer's instructions.2.DOE-STD-1090-99 14. b.2. 1.3 Periodic Inspection a. Lifting devices with moving parts shall be tested to confirm that the lifting device operates in accordance with manufacturer's instructions.2 Rated Load Test a. Inspect equipment at site of use. Modified or repaired lifting devices shall be tested before initial use to ensure compliance with the requirements of this section (test reports kept on file). They shall be kept on file and shall be readily available.2. linkages. 3. The results of the test and inspection shall be documented in the equipment history file. Dated reports of each periodic inspection shall be prepared. Normal service—yearly. pulleys. or repaired lifting devices shall be tested and inspected before use. External evidence of damage to motors or controls. bearings. Test loads shall not be more than 125 percent of the rated capacity unless otherwise recommended by the manufacturer.

Instructions for not exceeding the rated capacity of the lifting device or the capacity of the hoisting equipment by the combined weight of the load. Do not remove “Danger—Do Not Operate” tags from lifting devices without the approval of the person who placed them or an authorized person. Replace missing or defaced markings or tags. Apply the lifting device to the load in accordance with established procedures.7 Maintenance a. Store the lifting device in a dry. properly store the lifting device before leaving. b. Do not use the lifting device for side pulls or sliding the load unless specifically authorized by a qualified person or by an approved procedure. that adapt it to various sizes or kinds of loads. 14. Only the following personnel shall operate structural and mechanical lifting devices: 1. 8. Trainees under the direct supervision of a qualified operator. 3. 12. bending. Observe the condition of the lifting device before use and during operation. remove it from service. adjust or repair them before operations begin. Place any attached load on the floor or ground and. Do not use a lifting device that is tagged “Danger—Do Not Operate” or otherwise designated as nonfunctional. inside location when not in use. duties. 6. 4. 2. Operators shall demonstrate the ability and competence to operate the lifting device as instructed before assuming responsibility for using it.2. 7. 9.2.DOE-STD-1090-99 14. 3. Before lifting. when it is necessary in the performance of their Chapter 14 Below-the-Hook Lifting Devices 14-6 . 4. 14. Replacement parts shall be equivalent to the original specifications. Application of the lifting device to the load and adjustments to the device. If any controls do not operate properly. 10.9 Operation a. ensure that lifting-device ropes or chains are not kinked and multiple-part lines are not interwoven. Condition of the load itself required for operation of the lifting device such as balance. surface cleanliness. b. 5. b. 2. The following shall apply to all personnel who operate structural and mechanical lifting devices: 1. “Personnel Qualification and Training. Ensure that markings or tags are not removed or defaced. 2. the lifting device. 3. if any. Inspectors of lifting devices. 11. A preventive maintenance program should be established and be based on recommendations made by the lifting device manufacturer or a qualified person. Any special operations or precautions. Below-the-hook lifting device operators shall be trained and qualified as required in Chapter 6. Do not load the lifting device in excess of its rated capacity (except for test loads) or handle any load for which it is not designed.2. If you observe a defect that affects the continued safe use of the lifting device.” At a minimum. 4. 5.8 Training/Qualification a. degree of order of stacked loads. Procedure for storage of lifting device to protect it from damage. Before they are used on each shift. Maintenance and test personnel. and the rigging. instruction should include the following: 1. test the lifting device controls. Qualified operators or riggers. Ensure that the load is correctly distributed for the lifting device being used. and load thickness. after use.

5. 7. 14-7 Chapter 14 Below-the-Hook Lifting Devices . Individual pads or groups of pads. and its documentation shall contain both its rated capacity and weight. 4. or other permanent marker shall be affixed to each lifter displaying the following data: 1. A label shall be affixed to each unit that directs the user to consult the manufacturer's manual if the size or shape of the unit prohibits the inclusion of the above markings. 11. Lifting people. 5.DOE-STD-1090-99 14. Moving loads above people. d.2 Marking a. the lifting device shall be marked with an identification number. Rated capacity. 3.1 Design/Fabrication Power. In these cases. Incorrect positioning of the lifting device on the load.3. Manufacturer's name. lifting-device weight. Electric power (when applicable). 8. The rated capacity. This may be due to the security classification of the load to be lifted or other reasons approved by the responsible manager. 10. Operating when vacuum indicators show insufficient vacuum. 3. 9. f. 4. A label or labels shall be affixed to each vacuum lifting device in a readable position that displays the word “WARNING” or other legend designed to bring the label to the attention of the operator. 14. Operating the unit when vacuum pads are not spaced for equal loading. Lifting loads higher than necessary and leaving suspended loads unattended.20. Operating a damaged or malfunctioning unit or a unit with missing parts. and minimum thickness of load shall be marked on the main structure where it is visible and legible. 2. for security or other reasons.3 VACUUM LIFTING DEVICES Typical power-operated and mechanically operated vacuum lifting and manipulating devices are shown in Figures 14-5 and 14-6. Removing/obscuring warning labels. 2. Model number or unit identification. be marked). which requires special design and construction. Manual shutoff valves on individual pads or groups of pads shall be marked to show operating position.3.and mechanically operated vacuum lifting devices shall be designed and fabricated according to the provisions of ASME B30. The label shall also contain information cautioning against: 1. Weight of lifting-device. maximum width and length. 20-2. Making alterations or modifications to the lifting device.2. e. 14. At a minimum. This section does not cover devices used to handle porous materials.2. Exceeding the rated capacity or lifting loads not specified in the manufacturer's instruction manual. Pressure and volume of compressed air (when applicable). Operating the lifting device when the rated capacity. b. or safety markings are missing (except in cases where the device cannot. name tag. Cases may exist where a lifting device cannot be marked with its rated capacity and weight. c. 6. g. shall be marked with the rated capacity of each pad or group of pads. 6. controlled by shutoff valves. a nameplate.

Tw o-pad mechanical vacuum lif ting device Single-pad mechanical vacuum lift ing device M ultiple-pad mechanical vacuum lift ing device Figure 14-6.DOE-STD-1090-99 Four-pad pow ered vacuum lifting device Four-pad pow ered vacuum lifting device manipulator Figure 14-5. Chapter 14 Below-the-Hook Lifting Devices 14-8 . Mechanical vacumm lifting devices. Powered vacuum lifting devices.

3. cracking.” 14. Normal—operation with various weights within the rated load limit. “Frequent Inspection. 3. 3. The operator or other designated person shall inspect each vacuum lifting device at the beginning of each shift or prior to use.2. “Periodic Inspection.1 Initial Inspection Prior to their initial use. The power supply to the vacuum lifting device shall be the same as that shown on the nameplate and shall be connected to the line side of the crane disconnect or to an independent circuit. Normal service—yearly. 3. Heavy service—semiannually. c.3. kinks. excessive wear.4. External evidence of looseness. b. Inspect equipment at site of use unless external conditions indicate that disassembly should be done to permit detailed inspection. motors.4. 2.3. Vacuum lifting devices shall be assembled and installed in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions. A qualified inspector shall inspect fixtures not in regular use according to periodic inspection requirements before placing them in service.4 Inspections 14.4.3. controls. and excessive wear of load-bearing parts. 4. Severe service—quarterly. if it has not been in regular service. Leaks or damage to the vacuum reservoir.3 Periodic Inspection a. 5. Special or infrequent service—as recommended by a qualified person before the first use and as directed by the qualified person for any subsequent occurrences. a qualified inspector shall inspect all new or repaired vacuum lifting devices to ensure their compliance with Section 14. Inspect equipment at site of use. Lifting device service is defined as follows: 14. 1. and foreign particles at vacuum pad seal rings. A qualified inspector shall perform a complete inspection at the following intervals: 1.2. 3. 4. b. Vacuum levels in the system shall not decrease by more than the manufacturer's specified rate. Failure of the entire vacuum system to function properly by attaching a nonporous. Cuts. Heavy—operation within the rated load limit that exceeds normal service. “Marking. 2. and other auxiliary components. Adequate vacuum generator output. c.4. Presence of warning label required by Section 14. 2. 14. The inspection shall be for the following (records are not required): 1.” in addition to the following: 1.” d.3. This inspection shall include those conditions or items specified in Section 14. Deformation.3 Installation a.3. 2.2 Frequent Inspection a. 6. or corrosion. clean test plate to the vacuum pads and then stopping the vacuum source. tears. Inspect equipment at site of use unless external conditions indicate that disassembly should be done to permit detailed inspection. or uniform loads less than 65 percent of rated load.3. External evidence of damage to supporting structure. Leakage. and collapsed areas of vacuum lines/connections. Severe—operation under normal or heavy service with abnormal operating conditions. b.DOE-STD-1090-99 14. The user shall check for correct rotation of all pumps. deformation. 14-9 Chapter 14 Below-the-Hook Lifting Devices .4. wear. cracks. cuts.3.3.

3. b. b. Test indicator lights.5. Replacement parts shall be equivalent to the original specifications. Dated inspection reports shall be prepared for each inspection. horns. 14. Test loads shall not be more than 125 percent of the rated capacity unless otherwise recommended by the manufacturer. Tests shall be performed by a qualified inspector or under the direction of that inspector to ensure compliance with the requirements of this section. 3. 8. Procedure for storage of lifting device to protect it from damage. A preventive maintenance program should be established and be based on recommendations made by the vacuum lifting device manufacturer or a qualified person. Condition of the load itself required for operation of the lifting device such as balance. The proper attachment of adaptors to vacuum lifting devices for handling of special loads. Dated reports shall be kept on file. 4. and hold it for 2 min. repaired. 2. Charging of the battery (if required). Instructions for not exceeding the rated capacity of the lifting device or the capacity of the hoisting equipment by the combined weight of the load. meters.6 Maintenance a. The rated capacity shall not be more than 80 percent of the maximum load sustained during the test. c. surface cleanliness. load. “Personnel Qualification and Training. and the rigging. 4. 6. Lower and release the load. All new. if any.1 Operational Test a. 2. 1. or repaired vacuum lifting fixtures shall be tested prior to use. Application of the lifting device to the load and adjustments of the device. Test and inspection results shall be documented and kept on file.3. 3. Tests and inspections shall be performed by a qualified inspector or under the direction of that inspector. 5. All new.5. reinstalled. Vacuum lifting device operators shall be trained and qualified as specified in Chapter 6. Chapter 14 Below-the-Hook Lifting Devices .3. Raise the test load a minimum distance to ensure that it is supported by the vacuum lifting device.” At a minimum.3. Inspection records shall be kept on file and shall be readily available. clean test plate to the vacuum pads and then stopping the vacuum source. Any special operations or precautions.2 Rated Load Test a. Vacuum level in the system shall not decrease by more than the rate specified by the manufacturer. The purpose of indicators. Seals and connections shall be tested for leaks by attaching a nonporous. 5. instruction should include the following (as applicable): 1.7 Training/Qualification a. c. 14. sealing rings. pointers. reinstalled. and filters should be maintained and cleaned according to the manufacturer's specifications. The rated load test shall consist of the following steps at a minimum: 1. 2. gauges. b. 7. or modified vacuum lifting devices shall be tested and inspected before use. vacuum pads. mufflers.5 Testing 14.DOE-STD-1090-99 e.3. modified. and load thickness. that adapt it to various sizes or kinds of loads. the lifting device. or other warning devices and vacuum level indicators for proper operation. bending. Testing shall include the following: 14. Visually inspect the vacuum lifting device for defects and correct any deficiencies prior to returning the device to service. Remain clear of the suspended load. 14-10 Attach pads to the designated test 14. or alarms on the vacuum lifting device. bells. The vacuum generator. degree of order of stacked loads.

Ensure that the load is correctly distributed for the lifting device being used. properly store the lifting device before leaving. verify that the vacuum lifting device has been correctly applied and a stable vacuum level exists by lifting the load a few inches and observing conditions. Store the lifting device in a dry. 13. controls. 6. 11. Do not use the lifting device for side pulls or sliding the load unless specifically authorized by a qualified person or by an approved procedure. Maintenance and test personnel. Do not remove “Danger—Do Not Operate” tags from lifting devices without the approval of the person who placed them or an authorized person. If any do not operate properly. 12. Inspectors of lifting devices. 3. if possible to do so. Before lifting. 4. Before they are used on a shift. 2. Trainees under the direct supervision of a qualified operator. 5. Place any attached load on the floor or ground and. if electrical power goes off while a load is being lifted. Users shall demonstrate the ability and competence to operate the lifting device as instructed before assuming responsibility for using it. Apply the lifting device to the load in accordance with established procedures. inside location when not in use. when it is necessary in the performance of their duties. Do not use a lifting device that is tagged “Danger—Do Not Operate” or otherwise designated as nonfunctional. ensure that lifting-device ropes or chains are not kinked and multiple-part lines are not interwoven. Ensure that markings or tags are not removed or defaced.3. Also. 14. If you observe a defect that affects the continued safe use of the lifting device. 15. Replace missing or defaced markings or tags. remove it from service.DOE-STD-1090-99 b. b. Before starting the lift. adjust or repair them before operations begin. 7. The following shall apply to all personnel who operate vacuum lifting devices: 1. 14. 4. test the lifting device controls. Only the following personnel shall operate vacuum lifting devices: 1. 10. Observe the condition of the lifting device before use and during operation. Warn all personnel in the vicinity of the lifting device and place the load on the floor or ground. Do not leave your position at the 2. 14-11 Chapter 14 Below-the-Hook Lifting Devices . Do not load the lifting device in excess of its rated capacity (except for test loads) or handle any load for which it is not designed. Qualified operators or riggers. 8. 3. verify that the “vacuum on” indicator has reached the required level.8 Operation a. 9. after use.

2 and 20-3. Exceeding magnet duty cycle and disconnecting the magnet with the power on (for externally powered electromagnets).1 Rated Load (Capacity) a. and deflection. 3. General-application magnets shall include the rated load (capacity) of the magnet on the lifting magnet or on a tag attached to it.2.” and “Drop. 5.4. Operating when the battery capacity is inadequate. Users shall ensure that: 14-12 . battery-powered and external-powered lifting electromagnets and electrically controlled permanent-magnet lifting magnets shall be marked with: 1. 2. Cold current. 2. 3. Weight.4. does not indicate a complete cycle (on electrically controlled permanent magnets). and shall display the following data: 1. The label shall also contain information cautioning against: 1. where applicable. CLOSE-PROXIMITY-OPERATED Close-proximity-operated magnetic lifting devices are used for single. and its documentation shall contain both its rated Chapter 14 Below-the-Hook Lifting Devices 14. c. 14. This capacity rating shall refer to the instruction manual for information relating to decreases in rating due to the load surface condition. The cold current or watts at 68 degrees F (20 degrees C) and rated voltage. 6.” “Off. percentage of contact with magnet. or other permanent marker shall be affixed to each lifting magnet. the name and address of the repairer/modifier.1 Design/Fabrication Close-proximity-operated magnetic lifting devices shall be designed and fabricated in accordance with the provisions of ASME B30. The voltage of the battery or primary power supply. if applicable. Cases may exist where a lifting device cannot be marked with its rated capacity and weight. Duty cycle. 4. Manufacturer's name. Typical close-proximity-operated magnetic lifting devices are shown in Figure 14-7.2. They are also used in situations where remotely operated magnets are operated close to people. a nameplate. metallurgical composition. 14.or multiple-steelpiece handling operations in which the operator of the magnet is required to manually guide the load during its movement.DOE-STD-1090-99 14. capacity and weight.2.4.3 Installation a. 20-3. b.4.4. d. Rated capacity. This capacity rating shall refer to the specific loads for which it applies. temperature. b. A label or labels shall be affixed to each lifting magnet in a readable position that displays the word “CAUTION” or other legend designed to bring the label to the attention of the operator.2 Controls The position of the control switch or handle of a lifting magnet shall be marked with “Lift. Specified-application magnets shall include the application load (capacity) of the magnet on the lifting magnet or on a tag attached to it. 14. thickness.20.” or equivalent terms indicating the mode of operation of the lifting magnet.3. 14. or if the magnet has been repaired or modified. At a minimum. Operating with the control handle not fully in the “Lift” position (on manually controlled permanent magnets). Also.2. This may be due to the security classification of the load to be lifted or other reasons approved by the responsible manager. name tag. Model or unit identification.2 Marking a. Close-proximity-operated magnetic lifting devices shall be installed according to the manufacturer's recommendations. In these cases. 2. the lifting device shall be marked with an identification number. 4. Operating if the internal control function indicator.4 MAGNETS. b.

14-13 Chapter 14 Below-the-Hook Lifting Devices .DOE-STD-1090-99 Close-proximity-operated lifting electromagnet Close-proximity-operated electrically controlled permanent magnet Close-proximity-operated manually controlled permanent magnet Figure 14-7. Close-proximity-operated magnetic lifting devices.

” 14. Severe—operation under normal or heavy service with abnormal operating conditions. 2. Electrical conductors.1 Operational Test a. where applicable. 7. fasteners. b. or repaired lifting magnets to ensure compliance with Section 14.2 Frequent Inspection a.4. 14. Operation and condition of electrical components (i. locks. Magnet coil tested for ohmic/ground readings and readings compared to manufacturer's standards. switches. Deformation. Current indicator. A qualified inspector shall inspect a lifting magnet that has been idle for 1 month or more according to periodic inspection requirements before placing it in service. meters. 14. Lifting magnet face for freedom from foreign materials and for smoothness. etc. and lifting parts. Control handle for proper condition and operation. 2. Normal—operation with various weights within the rated load limit. 2.3 Periodic Inspection a.2. continuity. All new. and indicators or meters for legibility. e.4. 3. for loose connections.4.4.5. Tests and inspections shall be Chapter 14 Below-the-Hook Lifting Devices 14-14 . Testing shall include the following: 1.4.DOE-STD-1090-99 1.4 Inspections 14. a qualified inspector shall inspect all new. corrosion. b. Labels. 6. Tests shall be performed by a qualified inspector or under the direction of that inspector. and corrosion of all members. Dated reports shall be kept on file. if applicable. Power conductors and controls are of adequate rating and are insulated or otherwise protected against accidental interruption or damage. wear. or repaired lifting magnets shall be tested and inspected before initial use. and alarms). Battery for correct electrolyte level and lack of corrosion of battery posts or connectors. Dated inspection reports shall be prepared for each inspection. 2.3. Severe service—quarterly. “Periodic Inspection. A qualified inspector shall perform a complete inspection with the equipment in place at the following intervals: 1. The inspection shall be for the following (records are not required): 1.2 Rated Load Test a.. 14. 2. warning labels. Lifting device service is defined as: 1. meters. Normal service—yearly. 5.4. or uniform loads less than 65 percent of rated load. 14. d.4. 3.4.5 Testing 14. and damage to insulation. A check to ensure that the lifting magnet contains no visible defects. 3. or repaired lifting magnets shall be tested prior to their initial use.e.5. b. All new. modified. A check for proper operation of all electrical protective equipment. markings. The operator or other designated person shall visually inspect each magnetic lifting device at the beginning of each shift or prior to use. This inspection shall include those items specified in Section 14. Lifting bail or sling suspension for proper condition. for proper condition and operation. Inspection records shall be kept on file and shall be readily available. 3.4. “Frequent Inspection. indicators.4. indicators. modified.4. 4. if it has not been in regular service. External power input is the correct voltage and amperage. Heavy—operation within the rated load limit that exceeds normal service.4.1 Initial Inspection Prior to their initial use. modified.” in addition to the following: 1. alarms. if applicable.4. Heavy service—yearly. c.4. 2.

Before adjustment and repairs are started on a lifting magnet or its controls. e.002 in.6 Maintenance a. 5. The application breakaway-force test shall establish the application breakaway forces of the lifting magnet under the variety of loading conditions for which the magnet is specified. degree of order of stacked loads. b. c. the lifting device. A preventive maintenance program should be established and be based on recommendations made by the manufacturer or a qualified person.3. Instructions for not exceeding the rated capacity of the lifting device or the capacity of the hoisting equipment by the combined weight of the load. The purpose of indicators./ft (0.4. bending. surface cleanliness. tagged out. General-application magnets are required to satisfy the rated breakaway-force test. “Personnel Qualification and Training. instruction should include the following: 1. The rated breakaway-force test shall establish the breakaway force required to vertically remove the lifting magnet from a low-carbon rolled-steel plate of the minimum thickness stated by the magnet manufacturer. Procedure for storage of lifting device to protect it from damage.127 mm) total. 8. Test and inspection results shall be documented and kept on file. maintenance personnel shall take the following precautions: 1. Ensure that all sources of magnet power are disconnected and locked out. if any. (0. Magnetic lifting device operators shall be trained and qualified as specified in Chapter 6. Operators shall demonstrate the ability and competence to operate the lifting device as instructed before assuming responsibility for using it. and load thickness.7 Training/Qualification a.2 × 10-3 mm) finish and be flat within 0. or flagged. and the rigging.05 mm/m). The breakaway forces measured in this test must exceed the specified application load (capacity) by a factor of at least 2. (3. Charging of the lifting magnet battery (if required). which shall be between 60 degrees F (15 degrees C) and 120 degrees F (50 degrees C). meters. 2. Dated records of repairs and replacements should be available.4. b. The proper attachment of adaptors to lifting magnets for handling of special loads. Repairs shall be done only by designated persons. 3. 2. 4. Condition of the load itself required for operation of the lifting device such as balance. Replacement parts shall be equivalent to the original specifications. 7.4. d. that adapt it to various sizes or kinds of loads. Any special operations or precautions. The portion of this plate in contact with the magnet shall have a 125-µin. The details of this test should be supplied by the manufacturer of the lifting magnet.” At a minimum. f.4. b. The breakaway force measured in this test must exceed the rated load (capacity) by a factor of at least 2. 6. Maintenance personnel shall ensure that any defective condition disclosed by the inspection is corrected before operation of the lifting magnet is resumed. e. the lifting magnet shall not be returned to service until it has been inspected according to Section 14. c. Only qualified personnel shall work on equipment when adjustments and tests are required.005 in. 14. d. Application of the lifting device to the load and adjustments of the device. g. The full operating face of the lifting magnet shall be in contact with the steel plate. After adjustments and repairs have been made. 14-15 Chapter 14 Below-the-Hook Lifting Devices . 14. Specified-application magnets are required to comply with the application breakaway-force test. Ensure that a magnet removed for repair is tagged as defective. or alarms on the lifting magnet. but not exceeding 0.DOE-STD-1090-99 performed by a qualified inspector or under the direction of that inspector. Battery-operated electromagnets and external-powered lifting electromagnets shall be operated at the manufacturer's recommended current.

Observe all meters and indicators on the lifting magnet to confirm proper operation prior to making a lift.4. when it is necessary in the performance of their duties. Open the ventilation lid before charging the battery. 2. 5. b. ensure that any adjustable input control is switched to the “FULL POWER” or “FULL ON” position and remains in this position until the load is removed. Do not use the lifting device for side pulls or sliding the load unless specifically authorized by a qualified person.8. Store the lifting device in a dry.4. d. ensure that any adjustable input control is switched to the “FULL POWER” or “FULL ON” position and remains in this position until the load is removed from the magnet. confirm that the device indicating correct current flow remains stable for a minimum of 5 sec. 3. Place any attached load on the floor or ground and. 14. Before they are used during a shift. b. Do not load the lifting device in excess of its rated capacity or handle any load for which it is not designed. 4. Only the following qualified personnel shall operate lifting devices: 1. 14. adjust or repair them before operations begin. The following shall apply to personnel who use close-proximity-operated magnets: 1. 2. 7.4. ensure that lifting-device ropes or chains are not kinked and that multiple-part lines are not interwoven. Before lifting.8. Before lifting. 13.DOE-STD-1090-99 14. 15. 6. Before raising the load more than 2 in. Inspectors of lifting devices. 14. Do not use a lifting magnet that is tagged “Danger—Do Not Operate” or otherwise designated as nonfunctional. Maintenance and test personnel. 9. 14. If any do not operate properly. For a lift of extended duration. to confirm proper operation of the lifting magnet. (50 mm). 14.4 Manually Controlled Permanent Magnets Before raising the load. Ensure that the temperature of the load does not exceed the maximum allowable limits of the lifting device.8. c. observe the device indicating correct current flow every 5 min. (50 mm). test all controls. Designated persons. 10. confirm that the control handle is in the “LIFT” or “ON” position and the control handle latch is operating. after use. lift the load a Chapter 14 Below-the-Hook Lifting Devices 14-16 . 12. Trainees under the direct supervision of a designated person.2 Battery-Operated Electromagnets a. Do not remove “Danger—Do Not Operate” tags from magnetic lifting devices without the approval of the person who placed them or an authorized person. few inches to establish that it is securely attached to the magnet. where applicable.3 Electrically Controlled Permanent Magnets Before raising the load. Apply the lifting device to the load in accordance with established procedures. Keep the lifting magnet face and the magnet contact area clean.4. 11. 3. inside location when not in use.4. Ensure that the load is correctly distributed for the lifting device being used. 8. 4. Before starting the lift. properly store the lifting device before leaving it.8. Ensure that the load to be lifted is within the magnet's rated capacity or application capacity and lifting equipment rated capacity. check the internal control function indicator.1 External-Powered Electromagnets Before raising the load more than 2 in.8 Operation a.

Lifting magnet face for smoothness or presence of foreign materials. Operators shall ensure that: 1. Special or infrequent service—as authorized by a qualified person before the first use and as directed by the qualified person for any subsequent occurrences. b. 2.5. 4. In these cases. 3.5. Manufacturer's name and address. Power conductors and controls are of adequate rating and are insulated or otherwise protected against accidental interruption or damage. REMOTE-OPERATED Typical remote-operated magnetic lifting devices are shown in Figure 14-8. 3. 5.4.2. b. a qualified inspector shall inspect all new. A qualified inspector shall perform a complete inspection of the lifting device with the equipment in place at the following intervals: 1. 14.3 Periodic Inspection a. Heavy service—quarterly. Cold current. External power input is of the correct voltage and amperage. The inspection shall be for the following (records are not required): 1. if applicable. and its documentation shall contain both its rated capacity and weight. if it has not been in regular service. Duty cycle. 14. Manufacturer's model or unit identification. The operator or other designated personnel shall visually inspect each magnetic lifting device at the beginning of each shift or prior to use.DOE-STD-1090-99 14.20. 14-17 Chapter 14 Below-the-Hook Lifting Devices .1 Initial Inspection Prior to their initial use. 2. 2.4.5 MAGNETS. This may be due to the security classification of the load to be lifted or other reasons approved by the responsible manager. 20-4. 2. Severe service—quarterly. 14.3. 14.5.5. or repaired lifting magnets to ensure compliance with Section 14. Cases may exist where a lifting device cannot be marked with its rated capacity and weight. Normal service—yearly.5. modified.5. Weight.4 Inspections 14.2. or if the magnet has been repaired or modified. Magnet suspension system. all new lifting magnets shall be provided with a nameplate. 3. All visible electrical conductors (without disassembly). At a minimum. 14. Remote-operated magnets shall be installed according to the manufacturer's recommendations.3 Installation a.4. or other permanent marker displaying the following information: 1.4.5. name tag. “Periodic Inspection. 4. if applicable.5. the name and address of the repairer/modifier.2 Frequent Inspection a.1 Design/Fabrication Remote-operated magnetic lifting devices shall be designed and fabricated in accordance with the provisions of ASME B30.2 Marking a.” 14. the lifting device shall be marked with an identification number. b.

Remote-operated magnetic lifting devices. Chapter 14 Below-the-Hook Lifting Devices 14-18 .DOE-STD-1090-99 Remot e-operat ed lif t ing elect romagnet -.rect angular Figure 14-8.circular Remot e-operat ed lif t ing Elect romagnet -.

1.7 Training/Qualification a. “Personnel Qualification and Training.3.” At a minimum. Lifting device service is defined as follows: original specifications. d. if any. and the rigging.4. e. 5. Any defective condition disclosed by the inspection shall be corrected before the lifting magnet is returned to service. or uniform loads less than 65 percent of rated load. Operators shall be trained and qualified as specified in Chapter 6. maintenance personnel shall take the following precautions: 1. Ensure that a magnet removed for repair is tagged as defective. 14.5. 3. c.5. 3. f. Severe—operation under normal or heavy service with abnormal operating conditions.5.5.2. Dated inspection reports shall be prepared for each inspection.DOE-STD-1090-99 b. A visual inspection of the lifting magnet for visible defects. degree of order of stacked loads. 4. or flagged. Application of the lifting device to the load and adjustments of the device. This inspection shall include those items specified in Section 14. or repaired lifting magnets shall be tested prior to initial use. Dated reports shall be kept on file. that adapt it to various sizes or kinds of loads. instruction should include the following: 1. Instructions for not exceeding the rated capacity of the lifting device or the capacity of the hoisting equipment by the combined weight of the load. A check for proper operation of all electrical equipment. A preventive maintenance program should be established and be based on the recommendations of the manufacturer or a qualified person.” in addition to the following: 1. d. c. the lifting device. wear.5 Testing 14. tagged out.6 Maintenance a. Replacement parts shall be equivalent to 14-19 .4. Any special operations or precautions. b. Deformation. 3. such as balance. Heavy—operation within the rated load limit that exceeds normal service. After repairs have been made. the lifting magnet shall not be returned to service until it has been inspected according to Section 14. Only qualified personnel shall work on equipment when maintenance and tests are required. Ensure that all sources of magnet power are disconnected and locked out. 2. Testing shall include the following: 1. Charging of the lifting magnet battery Chapter 14 Below-the-Hook Lifting Devices 14. modified. 2. Proper operation and condition of electrical components.1 Operational Test a. bending. Normal—operation with various weights within the rated load limit. “Frequent Inspection. Magnetic coil tested for ohmic/ground readings and compared to manufacturer's standards. and lifting parts. surface cleanliness. Before maintenance is started on a lifting magnet or controls. 2. b. and corrosion of all members.5. Tests shall be performed by a qualified inspector or under the direction of that inspector.5. 6. 2. Procedure for storage of the lifting device to protect it from damage. Inspection records shall be kept on file and shall be readily available. fasteners. and load thickness. g. Dated records of repairs and replacements should be available. Condition of the load itself required for operation of the lifting device. 14. 2.5. All new.

Before they are used during a shift. Only the following qualified personnel shall operate lifting devices: 1. 14. 3. Before lifting. Inspectors of lifting devices. test all controls. meters.8 Operation a. Chapter 14 Below-the-Hook Lifting Devices 14-20 . Do not remove “Danger—Do Not Operate” tags without the approval of the person who placed them or an authorized person.DOE-STD-1090-99 (if required). 8. Ensure that the load is correctly distributed for the lifting device being used. 11. after use. 9. The purpose of indicators.5. Trainees under the direct supervision of a designated person. 5. Do not load the lifting device in excess of its rated capacity or handle any load for which it is not designed. Do not use a lifting magnet that is tagged “Danger—Do Not Operate” or otherwise designated as nonfunctional. Place any attached load on the floor or ground and. ensure that lifting-device ropes or chains are not kinked and that multiple-part lines are not interwoven. 8. adjust or repair them before operations begin. Maintenance and test personnel. The following shall apply to all personnel who operate remote-operated magnets: 1. or alarms on the lifting magnet. 2. 3. The proper attachment of adaptors to lifting magnets for handling of special loads. properly store the lifting device before leaving it. when it is necessary in the performance of their duties. 2. Apply the lifting device to the load in accordance with established procedures. b. 7. Designated persons. 7. Store the lifting device in a designated location when not in use. 4. b. 6. Ensure that the temperature of the load does not exceed the maximum allowable limits of the lifting device. Do not use the lifting device for side pulls or sliding the load unless specifically authorized by a qualified person. Operators shall demonstrate the ability and competence to operate the lifting device as instructed before assuming responsibility for using it. 4. 10. If any do not operate properly.

14-21 Chapter 14 Below-the-Hook Lifting Devices . Any other form that accomplishes the purpose is acceptable.DOE-STD-1090-99 Exhibit I is intended to be a sample form only and is not mandatory.

laps. Proof-test to 200% of rated capacity for critical lift service. The test load shall be accurate to within -5%. +0% of stipulated values. Qualified inspector shall perform test by visual examination. or seams. linear indication. Type Rated Capacity (SWL) Serial Number Qualified Inspector Verify (Load Test) Remarks lb Size Actual Load Test lb Chapter 14 Below-the-Hook Lifting Devices 14-22 . Hook attachment welds shall be examined for cracks and signs of failure in tension. liquid-penetrant examination. STATIC TEST: Hold weight for 10 min and visually inspect for deformation. Qualified inspector shall witness all steps below. in 10 ft or twisted more than 5 degrees out of the original plan. INSPECTION Lifting bars and spreaders shall be checked for signs of incipient failure in bending and shall be replaced if permanently bent more than 1/2 in. or magnetic-particle examination.DOE-STD-1090-99 EXHIBIT I LIFTING BARS AND SPREADERS LOAD TEST AND INSPECTION INSPECTOR INSPECTION DATE Page 1 of 1 NOTES: 1. 2. Acceptance: No cracks.

. . . .2. .7 Slings—Testing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15. . .4. . . . . . . .4. . . . . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . .2. .4. . . . . . . . . 15. . . . . .4. . . . .5 Hydraulic Filters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4. . . .2. . . . . . . . .4. . . . .5 Designated Leader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Synthetic Web Slings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7. . . . . . . .6 Wire Ropes .5. . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . .6. . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Alloy Steel Chain . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Hydraulic and Pneumatic Valves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15. . . . . . . . . . . .4. . . .4.4. . . . . . . . . . . . .7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15. . . . .2. . .6 Cranes Not in Regular Use . . . . . . . PERSONNEL QUALIFICATIONS . . . . . . .2 Synthetic Web Slings . . . . .7 Load Hooks/Load Blocks . . . . . . . . . . 15. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Preoperational Check . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4. . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5.7.5. . . . . . . . .4. . . . . . .4. . . . . . . . . . 15. . . . 15. . . . . . . . . .4. . . . . . . 15. . . . . . . . 15. . . . . . . . . . . 15. . . . INSPECTION AND TESTING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4. . . . .4 Hydraulic and Pneumatic Cylinders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15.1 Wire Rope . . . . .2 Hydraulic and Pneumatic Pumps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15. . . . . . . . . . . .2 Qualified Operators of Forklift Trucks . . . . . . . . . .4. . .4. . . . . 15. . . .1 General . . . . .5. . . . . . .5. . . . .4. . DEFINITIONS . . . . . . . . .3. . . . .3. . . . . . .5 Periodic Inspection . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . .4. . .3 Monthly Inspection .4. . . . . . . . .4. . . .3. . . . . . . .4 Forklift Trucks—Inspection . . . . . . . . . . 15. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4. . .5 Forklift Trucks—Testing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15. . . . 15. . . . . . .1 Qualified Operators of Mobile Cranes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-1 15-2 15-7 15-7 15-8 15-9 15-9 15-9 15-10 15-10 15-10 15-10 15-10 15-10 15-11 15-11 15-11 15-12 15-12 15-12 15-12 15-12 15-13 15-14 15-14 15-14 15-15 15-16 15-16 15-16 15-16 15-17 15-17 15-17 15-17 15. . . . .3 Qualified Riggers . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15. . . . . . . . .1 Wire Rope .4. . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Person-in-Charge (PIC) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15. . . . .3 GENERAL . . . . . . . . .4 15-i Chapter 15 Construction Hoisting and Rigging Equipment Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15. . . . . . .DOE-STD-1090-99 CHAPTER 15 CONSTRUCTION HOISTING AND RIGGING EQUIPMENT REQUIREMENTS This chapter outlines the requirements for the safe use of hoisting and rigging equipment on construction projects at DOE installations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . 15. 15. . . . . . . . 15. . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . .1 Cranes . . .3 Mobile Cranes/Boom Trucks—Testing . . . . . . . . . .2 15. . . . . . . .4. . . . 15. . 15. . 15. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . . . . .4.6 Slings—Inspection . .3 Alloy Steel Chain . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . .6. 15. . . . .6. . . . . 15. . . . . .1 15. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Mobile Cranes/Boom Trucks—Inspection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Frequent Inspection . . . . .2. . .3. . . . 15. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4. . . . . .1 Initial Inspection . . . . . . . . . . 15. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . .3. . . . . .4. .1 General . . . . . .4. . . . 15. . . . . . .5 Crane Operations Near Transmitter Towers . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Critical Lifts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-45 | | | Chapter 15 Construction Hoisting and Rigging Equipment Requirements 15-ii . . . . . . . . .3. .4.5 Ordinary Lifts . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-18 15-19 15-19 15-20 15-23 15-23 15-24 15-24 15-25 OPERATION . . . . . . . . .2 Moving the Load . . . . . . 15. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15. . . . . . . . . 15. . . . . . . . . 15. . . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . 15. . . . 15-18 Rigging Accessories—Testing . .5. . . . . . .3. . . . . . . .6 Critical Lifts . . . .1 Crane Operations Near De-energized and Grounded Electrical Power Lines . . . . . .5. . 15. . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . .1 Attaching the Load . .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Ordinary Lifts . . . . 15. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3.3 Crane Operations are within the Prohibited Zone and the Power Lines are Energized . . .2. .2. . . . . . . . . . . .3. .5 Rigging Accessories—Inspection . . .2. . . . . . . . .5. 15. 15-25 15-29 15-29 15-29 15-29 15-32 15-33 15-35 15-36 15-36 15-38 15-39 15-39 15-41 15-41 | | | Exhibit I Operators Pre-Shift Inspection . . . . .DOE-STD-1090-99 15. . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Operating the Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Lifting Personnel . .5.1. . 15. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Conduct of Operator . . . . . . 15. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . .4 Operating Near Power Lines and Transmission Towers . .5. . . . . . . . 15. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . .2 Traveling . .2. . .1. .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Mobile Cranes/Boom Trucks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Forklift Trucks . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. . .3 Traveling the Machine . . . . . .2.4 Crane in Transit with No Load and Boom Lowered . . . . . .5. . .4. . . . . . . . . . . . .5.3. . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . .3 Loading . . .5. . . . Crane Operating Less than Erected/Fully Extended Boom Length away from the Prohibited Zone . .2. . .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Lifting Personnel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. . 15. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15. . .4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15. . . . . . . .5. .5. . . . . .8 15. . . . . . . . . .9 15.2. . . . . . . . . . . .2.2 Power Lines Energized. . . . . 15.4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. . . 15. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . 15. . . . . 15. . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . .4. . . . . . . . .5.

This chapter is designed for use as a stand-alone document and may be used as part of the procurement process. It outlines minimum requirements for the safe use of hoisting and rigging equipment on construction projects at DOE installations. 15-1 Chapter 15 Construction Hoisting and Rigging Equipment Requirements . however. can result in serious accidents. Improper and unsafe use.1 GENERAL The versatility of hoisting and rigging equipment makes it extremely useful on construction projects.DOE-STD-1090-99 15.

mounted on an automotive truck equipped with a power plant for travel. 15-7. A crawler crane consists of a rotating superstructure with power plant. 15-9. operating machinery and boom. o o CRITICAL ITEM: A part. LIFT. mounted on a base equipped with crawler treads for travel (see Figures 15-2 and 15-8). 15-9.DOE-STD-1090-99 15. or other unusual factors. 15-6. AUTHORIZED: Assigned by a duly constituted administrative or regulatory authority to perform a specific function. (b) cause Note: In the text. operating machinery. Chapter 15 Construction Hoisting and Rigging Equipment Requirements 15-2 . components. use of the imperative voice (as in “Ensure that the load is balanced”) or of the term “shall” refers to mandatory actions. but it may be equipped with a separate engine controlled from the superstructure (see Figures 15-1. or piece of equipment designated as critical by the responsible management. other primary-system components. and boom. 15-7. or © result in significant release of radioactivity or other undesirable material. or other items which require special care in handling because of size. fuel assemblies. heat exchangers. or collision could: (a) cause damage that would result in schedule delay. undetectable damage that could jeopardize future operation or the safety of the facility. or handling critical items. DESIGNATED: Selected or assigned by the employer or the employer's representative as being qualified to perform specific duties. mobile cranes are defined as wheel-mounted cranes. Commercial truck-mounted cranes are included in this category (see Figures 15-3. and 15-10). because its dropping. assembly. installation in close-tolerance receptors. DESIGNATED LEADER: “An individual assigned responsibility for hoisting and rigging activities requiring more than one person”. upset. truck cranes. or collision of them could: o o o o Cause significant work delay Cause undetectable damage resulting in future operational or safety problems Result in significant release of radioactivity or other undesirable conditions Present a potentially unacceptable risk of personnel injury or property damage. and crawler cranes. whereas the term “should” refers to recommended actions. Critical items may include pumps. CRANE. rigging. A truck-mounted crane consists of a rotating superstructure with power plant that operates machinery and boom. 15-5. mounted on a base or platform equipped with axles and rubber-tired wheels for travel. and 15-10). or other items designated as critical by the responsible management because the effect of dropping. weight. component. CRITICAL SERVICE: The use of equipment or accessories for hoisting.2 DEFINITIONS APPOINTED: Assigned specific responsibilities by the employer or the employer's representative. large radiation-shielded shipping casks. MOBILE: For the purposes of this chapter. CRITICAL: Lifting of parts. extreme susceptibility to damage. fragility. piping subassemblies. 15-3. upset. assemblies. The base is usually propelled by an engine in the superstructure. FORKLIFT TRUCK: A high-lift self-loading truck equipped with load carriage and forks for transporting and tiering loads (see Figure 15-11). o A wheel-mounted crane consists of a rotating structure with power plant.

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 )LJXUH  /RFRPRWLYH FUDQH 15-3 Chapter 15 Construction Hoisting and Rigging Equipment Requirements .

These illustrations show some types. or it may consist of a base boom from which one or more boom extensions are telescoped for additional length.DOE-STD-1090-99 General note for Figures 15-5 through 15-10: The boom may have a base boom structure of sections (upper and lower) between or beyond which additional sections may be added to increase its length. )LJXUH  :KHHOPRXQWHG FUDQH  WHOHVFRSLQJ ERRP 6LQJOH FRQWURO VWDWLRQ.

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Figure 15-11. High-lift truck, counterbalanced truck, Cantilever truck, rider truck, forklift truck.

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Chapter 15 Construction Hoisting and Rigging Equipment Requirements

DOE-STD-1090-99 LIFT, ORDINARY: Any lift not designated as a critical lift. PERSON-IN-CHARGE (PIC): The manager or other responsible person (other than the equipment operator) known to be qualified and appointed to be responsible for the safe handling of critical loads and for the safe handling of noncritical loads in, around, or above spaces in which critical items are located. QUALIFIED: A person, who, by possession of a recognized degree or certificate, or by professional standing, or who, by extensive knowledge, training, and experience, has successfully demonstrated an ability and competence to solve problems relating to the subject matter and work. QUALIFIED ENGINEER/QUALIFIED ENGINEERING ORGANIZATION: An engineer or engineering organization whose competence in evaluation of the type of equipment in question has been demonstrated to the satisfaction of the responsible manager. QUALIFIED INSPECTOR: One whose competence is recognized by the authority having jurisdiction and whose qualification to perform specific inspection activities has been determined, verified, and attested to in writing. QUALIFIED OPERATOR: One whose competence to operate equipment safely and effectively (including the ability to accurately spot and control loads) can be demonstrated to and accepted by responsible management. QUALIFIED RIGGER: One whose competence in this skill has been demonstrated by experience accepted as satisfactory by the responsible manager.

Chapter 15 Construction Hoisting and Rigging Equipment Requirements

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DOE-STD-1090-99

15.3 PERSONNEL QUALIFICATIONS
15.3.1 Qualified Operators of Mobile Cranes
a. Only qualified personnel or trainees, under the direct supervision of qualified personnel, who meet the following physical qualifications and requirements shall be allowed to operate mobile cranes: 1. 2. English. Be at least 18 years of age. Understand spoken and written with the designated physician. 11. Shall successfully pass with a negative result, a substance abuse test. The level of testing will be determined by the standard practice for the industry where the crane is employed and this test shall be confirmed by a recognized laboratory service. 12. Operator physical examinations shall be required every three years or more frequently if supervision deems it necessary. b. Prior to allowing mobile crane operations at DOE installations, the construction manager shall implement a program or ensure that the construction contractor has an acceptable program to evaluate crane operator qualifications. This program shall include written testing to evaluate operator knowledge and performance (“hands-on”) testing to evaluate operator skills. These tests shall include, but not be limited to applicable elements of the following: 1. Pre-use crane inspection.

3. Have vision of at least 20/30 Snellen in one eye, and 20/50 in the other, with or without corrective lenses. 4. Be able to distinguish colors, regardless of position, if color differentials required for operation. 5. Have adequate hearing, with or without a hearing aid, for a specific operation. 6. Have physical strength, coordination, and sufficient reaction speed to meet the demands of equipment operation. 7. Show no evidence of physical defects or of emotional instability that could be a hazard to themselves or others, or which, in the opinion of the examiner, could interfere with their safe performance; such evidence may be sufficient cause for disqualification. In these cases, medical judgments and test may be required. 8. Show no evidence of being subject to seizures or loss of physical control; such evidence shall be sufficient reason for disqualification. Medical examinations may be required to determine these conditions. 9. Have normal depth perception, field of vision, manual dexterity, coordination, and no tendencies to dizziness or similar potentially hazardous characteristics. 10. Have no detectable or known disease or physical restriction that would render them incapable of safely operating equipment. Where any deficiency of an upper or lower extremity exist, the acceptability of a candidate shall be the decision of the supervisor, after consulting

2. The crane's specifications, operator's manual, charts (e.g., load charts, work area charts), instrumentation, controls, operator aids, and operating characteristics. 3. Operating procedures under emergency conditions. 4. crane. Set-up, shut-down and parking of the

5. Crane attachments (e.g., jibs, boom extensions, heavy lift equipment). 6. Configurations and loading effects on the crane. 7. Standards, rules and regulations (e.g., hand signals, distances for working around electrical power lines). 8. 9. Rigging practices. Personnel lifting procedures.

NOTE: The means of determining operator qualifications shall be included in the contract

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Chapter 15 Construction Hoisting and Rigging Equipment Requirements

DOE-STD-1090-99 documents. Contract documents shall also include requirements for maintenance of testing records. Consideration should be given to local, state, or federal crane operator licensing requirements within the work jurisdiction as well as certification programs administered by recognized private organizations. 3. Forklift truck controls and instrumentation: i. ii. iii. Where they are located. What they do. How they work. | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | |

15.3.2 Qualified Operators of Forklift Trucks
a. Physical qualifications shall be based on specific job requirements. b. Operators shall be required by the employer to pass a practical operating skill evaluation. Qualification shall be limited to the type of forklift for which the operator is being evaluated. c. The actual or simulated operation shall enable operators to demonstrate basic knowledge and skills at a level that ensures the safety of personnel and equipment. d. Only qualified and authorized operators shall be permitted to operate powered forklift trucks. Operator trainees may operate powered forklift trucks under the direct supervision of a qualified operator or trainer and only where such operations does not endanger the trainee or other employees. e. The initial training of operators shall include: 1. A combination of formal instruction (e.g., lecture, discussion, interactive computer learning, video tape, written material). 2. Practical training (demonstrations performed by the trainer and practical exercises performed by the trainee). 3. Evaluation of the operator’s performance in the workplace including results of written and oral evaluation, and witnessing a demonstration of the operator's skills. f. The following checklist contains basic factors with which a forklift truck operator should be familiar. This checklist must be tailored to suit actual conditions. 1. Operating instruction, warnings, and precautions for the type of forklift truck the operator will be authorized to operate. 2. Differences between the forklift truck and the automobile.
Chapter 15 Construction Hoisting and Rigging Equipment Requirements

4. 5.

Engine or motor operation. Steering and maneuvering.

6. Visibility, including restrictions due to loading. 7. Fork and attachment adaptation, operation, and use limitations. 8. Forklift truck capacity and load weight determination. 9. Forklift truck stability and load dynamics. | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | 10. Forklift truck inspections and maintenance that the operator will be required to perform. 11. Refueling and/or charging and recharging of batteries. 12. Operating limitations.

13. Any other operating instructions, warning, or precautions listed in the operator’s manual for the type of forklift truck that the employee is being trained to operate. g. Refresher training in relevant topics shall be provided to the operator when: 1. The operator has been observed to operate the forklift truck in an unsafe manner. 2. The operator has been involved in an accident or near-miss incident. 3. The operator has received an evaluation that reveals that the operator is not operating the forklift truck safely. 4. The operator is assigned to drive a different type of forklift truck. 5. A condition in the workplace changes in a manner that could affect the safe operation of the forklift truck.

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DOE-STD-1090-99

15.3.3 Qualified Riggers
Qualified riggers shall meet the following requirements: a. b. Be at least 18 years of age. Understand spoken and written English.

d. Recognition and control of hazardous or unsafe conditions. e. f. Job efficiency and safety. Critical-lift documentation.

In addition, the PIC shall: a. Direct operations in the case of an accident.

c. Have basic knowledge and understanding of equipment-operating characteristics, capabilities, and limitations. Understand rigging principles as applied to the job for which they are to be qualified. d. Demonstrate to appropriate management personnel skill in using rigging principles. e. Be free of any detectable or known disease or physical restriction that would render them incapable of safe operation or rigging duties. Where any loss or loss of function of an upper or lower extremity exists, the acceptability of the candidate shall be the decision of the supervisor, after consulting with the designated physician. f. Have normal depth perception, field of vision, reaction time, manual dexterity, and coordination.

b. Exercise authority to start and stop work activities.

15.3.5 Designated Leader
The designated leader shall have sufficient knowledge and experience to accomplish the following responsibilities: a. Ensure that the personnel involved have received proper and current training and qualification for the procedure. b. Ensure that the equipment and accessories specified in the procedure are available. c. Survey the lift site for hazardous or unsafe conditions. d. Ensure that equipment is properly set up and positioned. e. Ensure that a signaler is assigned, if required, and is identified to the operator. f. Direct the lifting operation to ensure that the job is done safely and efficiently. g. Stop the job when any potentially unsafe condition is recognized. h. Direct operations if an accident or injury occurs.

15.3.4 Person-in-Charge (PIC)
The PIC shall have the necessary knowledge and experience of the specific type of equipment and the hazards of critical lifts to direct the safe completion of the operation. The PIC shall understand the rules and procedures implemented at the site to ensure that the following are completed: a. b. c. Necessary administrative requirements. Personnel assignments and responsibilities. Selection of proper equipment/tools.

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Chapter 15 Construction Hoisting and Rigging Equipment Requirements

DOE-STD-1090-99

15.4 INSPECTION AND TESTING
15.4.1 General
a. Only equipment that has been built to nationally recognized manufacturers' standards shall be used at DOE installations. Existing equipment shall be brought to an acceptable level of compliance as determined by the construction management contractor. In some instances, the requirements of this section exceed those of the references and in such instances the requirements of this section shall prevail. b. Prior to being used at a DOE installation, mobile cranes/boom trucks/forklift trucks shall be inspected and approved for operation by appropriate construction management contractor personnel or those having overall responsibility for ordinary hoisting operations. c. Equipment with deficiencies that may affect the safety of the operation shall not be allowed to operate at DOE installations. No repairs, modifications, or additions that affect the capacity or safe operation of the equipment shall be made by the contractor without the manufacturer's written approval. Where manufacturer’s specifications are not available, the limitations assigned to the equipment shall be based on the determinations of a qualified engineer. Dated and signed records shall be kept on file. d. Mobile cranes, boom trucks, and forklifts that have left the control of the construction management contractor and are then returned shall be reinspected prior to making a critical lift. has not been in regular service (records are not required): 1. All control mechanisms for maladjustment interfering with proper operation. 2. Crane hooks and latches for deformation, cracks, and wear. 3. level. 4. Lines, tanks, valves, pumps, and other parts of air or hydraulic systems for leakage. 5. Hoist ropes for kinking, crushing, birdcaging, and corrosion. 6. All anti-two-block, two-block warning, and two-block damage prevention systems for proper operation. b. The operator or other designated person shall examine deficiencies and determine whether they constitute a safety hazard. 15.4.2.3 Monthly Inspection a. The operator or other designated person shall visually inspect the following items for damage, wear, or other deficiency that might reduce capacity or adversely effect the safety of the crane: 1. Critical items such as brakes and crane hooks. 2. Hoist ropes. Hydraulic systems for proper oil

| | | | | |

15.4.2 Mobile Cranes/Boom Trucks—Inspection
15.4.2.1 Initial Inspection Prior to initially being used, all new, repaired, or modified cranes shall be inspected by a qualified inspector to ensure their compliance with the applicable provisions of this section. Dated and signed inspection reports shall be kept on file and shall be readily available. 15.4.2.2 Preoperational Check a. Operators or other designated personnel shall visually inspect items such as the following each day or prior to use if the crane

b. Lower the hook block to its lowest position and examine it for any condition that could result in an appreciable loss of strength. c. Hooks for cracks, deformation, damage from chemicals, latch engagement (if provided), and evidence of heat damage. d. A hoist rope with any of the conditions noted in the replacement criteria in Section 15.4.2.6 shall be removed from service and replaced. e. Signed and dated inspection records shall be kept on file and shall be readily available.

Chapter 15 Construction Hoisting and Rigging Equipment Requirements

15-10

DOE-STD-1090-99 f. Before the crane is returned to service, correct deficiencies that could reduce its capacity or adversely effect its safety. 15.4.2.4 Frequent Inspection a. The operator or other designated person shall visually inspect the crane at daily to monthly intervals (records not required). These inspections shall, in addition to the requirements of Section 15.4.2.2, “Daily Inspection,” include the following: 1. All control mechanisms for maladjustment, excessive wear, or contamination by lubricants or other foreign matter interfering with proper operation. 2. All safety devices for malfunction.

15.4.2.5.1 Cranes. Inspect for:
a. Deformed, cracked, or corroded members in the crane structure and the entire boom. b. c. Loose bolts or rivets. Cracked or worn sheaves and drums.

d. Hooks damaged from chemicals, deformation, or cracks, or having more than 15 percent in excess of normal throat opening or more than 10 degrees twist from the plane of the unbent hook. (Dye-penetrant, magnetic-particle, or other suitable crack-detecting inspections should be performed at least once a year. See Chapter 13 for additional hook requirements.) e. Worn, cracked, or distorted parts such as pins, bearings, shafts, gears, rollers, and locking devices. f. Excessive wear on brake and clutch system parts, linings, pawls, and ratchets. g. Load, boom angle, and other indicators over their full ranges for any significant inaccuracies. h. Gasoline, diesel, electrical, or other power plants for improper performance or noncompliance with safety requirements. i. Radiators and oil coolers for leakage, improper performance, or blockage of air passages. j. Excessive wear of chain drive sprockets and excessive chain stretch. k.. Travel steering, braking, and locking devices, for malfunctioning. l. Excessively worn or damaged tires.

3. Rope reeving for noncompliance with crane manufacturer's recommendations. 4. Electrical apparatus for malfunctioning, signs of potentially harmful deterioration, and accumulation of dirt or moisture. 5. Tires for recommended inflation pressure. 6. Boom sections for structural integrity.

b. The operator or other designated person shall examine deficiencies and determine whether a more detailed inspection is required. 15.4.2.5 Periodic Inspection a. Complete inspections of the crane shall be performed by a qualified inspector at 1- to 12-month intervals, depending on its activity, severity of service, and environment. b. The qualified inspector shall do the following during periodic inspections: 1. Examine deficiencies and determine whether they constitute a hazard. 2. Keep dated and signed inspection records on file and readily available. c. These inspections, in addition to the requirements of Sections 15.4.2.3, “Monthly Inspection” and 15.4.2.4, “Frequent Inspection,” shall include the following:

m. Rust on piston rods and control valves when crane has been idle. n. Inspect hydraulic and pneumatic hose, fittings, and tubing for: 1. Evidence of leakage at the surface of the flexible hose or its junctions with the metal couplings. 2. Blistering or deformation of the outer covering of the hydraulic or pneumatic hose.
Chapter 15 Construction Hoisting and Rigging Equipment Requirements

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DOE-STD-1090-99 3. Leakage at threaded or clamped joints that cannot be eliminated by normal tightening or recommended procedures. 4. Evidence of excessive abrasion or scrubbing on the outer surface of a hose, rigid tube, or fitting (means shall be taken to eliminate the interface of elements in contact or otherwise protect the components).

15.4.2.5.5 Hydraulic Filters.
Inspect hydraulic filters for evidence of rubber particles on the filter element that may indicate hose, “O” ring, or other rubber-component deterioration. Metal chips or pieces on the filter may denote failure in pumps, motors, or cylinders. Further checking will be necessary to determine the origin of the problem before corrective action can be taken.

15.4.2.5.2 Hydraulic and Pneumatic Pumps. Inspect for:
a. b. c. d. e. f. g.. Loose bolts or fasteners. Leaks at joints between sections. Shaft seal leaks. Unusual noises or vibration. Loss of operating speed. Excessive heating of the fluid. Loss of pressure.

15.4.2.5.6 Wire Ropes.
a. A qualified inspector shall inspect all wire ropes at least annually. More frequent intervals shall be as determined by a qualified person and shall be based on such factors as expected rope life as determined by severity of environment, percentage of capacity lifts, frequency rates of operation, and exposure to shock loads. The qualified inspector shall carefully note any deterioration, such as described below, that results in appreciable loss of original strength and determine whether further use of the rope constitutes an acceptable risk. This inspection shall include examination of the entire rope length without detaching it from the drum. 1. Reduction of rope size below nominal diameter, whether due to loss of core support, internal or external corrosion, or wear of outside wires (see Table 15-1). Table 15-1. Maximum allowable rope reductions. Maximum allowable reduction Rope diameter from nominal diameter Up to 5/16 in. 1/64 in. (0.4 mm) (8 mm) Over 5/16 in. to 1/2 in. (13 mm) Over 1/2 in. to 3/4 in. (19 mm) Over 3/4 in. to 1 1/8 in. (29 mm) Over 1 1/8 in. to 1 1/2 in. (38 mm) 1/32 in. (0.8 mm) 3/64 in. (1.2 mm) 1/16 in. (1.6 mm) 3/32 in. (2.4 mm)

15.4.2.5.3 Hydraulic and Pneumatic Valves. Inspect for:
a. Cracks in valve housing.

b. Improper return of spool to neutral position. c. d. Leaks at spools or joints. Sticking spools.

e. Failure of relief valves to attain correct pressure setting (relief valve pressures shall be checked as specified by the manufacturer).

15.4.2.5.4 Hydraulic and Pneumatic Cylinders. Inspect for:
a. Drifting caused by fluid leaking across the position. b. c. d. e. Rod seal leakage. Leaks at welded joints. Scored, nicked, or dented cylinder rods. Dented case (barrel).

f. Loose or deformed rod eyes or connecting joints.
Chapter 15 Construction Hoisting and Rigging Equipment Requirements

2. A number of broken outside wires and the distribution or concentration of such broken wires.

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such as in the following: 1. more than two broken wires in one lay in sections beyond end connections or more than one broken wire at an 8. because of their higher susceptibility to damage. 5. or other sheaves where rope travel is limited. because of the difficulty of inspection and the important nature of these ropes. All rope that has been idle for a month or more due to shutdown or storage of a crane on which it is installed shall be inspected before it is placed in service. Safety in this respect depends largely on the use of good judgment by an appointed person in evaluating remaining strength in a used rope. two randomly distributed broken wires in six rope diameters or four randomly distributed broken wires in thirty rope diameters. Rotation-resistant ropes. Reduction from nominal diameter greater than those listed in Table 15-1. This inspection shall be for all types of deterioration and shall be performed by an appointed person whose approval shall be required before further use of the rope. crushing. The qualified inspector shall take care when inspecting certain ropes such as the following: 1. h. 6. Safety of rope operation depends on this remaining strength. One outer wire broken at the point of contact with the core of the rope that has worked its way out of the rope structure and protrudes or loops out from the rope structure. 2. f. after allowance for deterioration disclosed by inspection. six randomly distributed broken wires in one rope lay. and construction as recommended by the crane manufacturer. d. equalizer sheaves. Boom hoist ropes.2. or unstranding.7 Load Hooks/Load Blocks. maintain a continuing inspection record covering the points of deterioration listed above. worn.5. 4. 15. g. 15-13 Chapter 15 Construction Hoisting and Rigging Equipment Requirements . Wear of one-third the original diameter of outside individual wires. crushing. 2. Worn outside wires. birdcaging. Corroded. cutting. i. To establish data as a basis for judging the proper time for replacement. b. 3. In standing ropes. unless otherwise recommended by a rope or crane manufacturer due to actual working condition requirements. c. The internal deterioration of rotation-resistant ropes may not be readily observable. Sections in contact with saddles. end connection. Sections of the rope at or near terminal ends where corroded or broken wires may protrude. Never use discarded rope for slings. Evidence of heat damage from any 4. 7. 5. or improperly applied end connections. cause. Ensure that replacement rope is the same size. cracked. In rotation resistant ropes. or any other damage resulting in distortion of the rope structure. No precise rules can be given for determining the exact time to replace wire rope because many variables are involved. additional inspection of this section is required. The qualified inspector shall take care when inspecting running rope where rapid deterioration could occur. bent. or three broken wires in one strand in one rope lay.DOE-STD-1090-99 3. Kinking. Kinking. Conditions such as the following shall be sufficient reason for questioning rope safety and considering replacement: 1. grade. e. 2.4. In running ropes. Inspection records shall be retained throughout the service life of the hook or load block and shall be readily available. 6. Load hooks/load blocks that have been changed-out shall be inspected by a qualified inspector before the crane is returned to service. A written and dated report of the rope condition shall be filed. Corroded or broken wires at end connections.

2. Boom lifting and lowering mechanisms. d.4. A crane that has been idle for 1 month or longer but less than 6 months shall be given an inspection according to requirements of Section 15. 4. valves. c. warning devices.4. Carefully and regularly inspect all parts of lift and tilt mechanisms and frame members and maintain them in a safe-operating condition.4. b.5. 2. For special trucks or devices that are designed and approved for operation in hazardous areas. modified. Test reports shall be kept on file and shall be readily available to appointed personnel. operation. maintenance. 2.DOE-STD-1090-99 15. 3. and adjust forklift trucks.2. governors. Chapter 15 Construction Hoisting and Rigging Equipment Requirements 15-14 . and maintenance | | | | 15.4.4. Swinging mechanism. 4. maintain. The inspector shall furnish a written report showing test procedures and confirming the adequacy of repairs or alterations. or repaired forklifts shall be inspected by a qualified inspector to ensure compliance with the provisions of this section. Load lifting and lowering mechanisms.4. approved safe-operating features are preserved by maintenance. b. control mechanisms. ensure that the original. guards.2.5. or repaired shall be load-tested by a qualified inspector or under the direction of that inspector. Items listed in the following paragraphs shall be regularly inspected.” before it is placed in service. Take action to prevent use of the truck until the leak has been corrected. 6. and lubrication program shall be followed. c. “Definitions. Give special consideration in case of a leak in the fuel system. Travel mechanism. these services shall be preformed in accordance with manufacturer's specifications. Inspect brakes. lift-overload devices. 3. However. “Frequent Inspection.2. Cranes exposed to adverse environments should be inspected more frequently. a functional test of the crane under a normal operating load should be made before the crane is put back in service. A scheduled planned inspection. Prior to initial use. 5. 6.6 Cranes Not in Regular Use a. and other similar parts to ensure that drift or leakage has not developed to the extent that it would create a hazard.” 15.” before it is placed in service. lights. c. Test weights shall not exceed 110 percent of the rated capacity and shall be accurate to within -5 percent. Boom extension and retraction mechanism.3 Mobile Cranes/Boom Trucks—Testing a. A crane that has been idle for more than 6 months shall be given a complete inspection according to the requirements of Section 15. +0 percent of stipulated values. Safety devices. replaced. b.2.4. Prior to their initial use. 5. Standby cranes shall be inspected at least semiannually. The replacement of rope is excluded from this requirement. tags. Inspect all hydraulic systems and maintain them in conformance with good practice. repair. The following shall also be tested as applicable during initial testing: 1.4 Forklift Trucks— Inspection a. Maintain instruction plates. Load tests shall not be conducted in locations where the lift meets the definition of critical lift given in Section 15. or decals for capacity. steering mechanisms. all new. Check fuel systems for leaks and for the condition of the parts. “Periodic Inspection. all cranes in which load-sustaining parts have been modified. Only trained and authorized personnel shall be permitted to inspect. consult the manufacturer's recommendations. 1. according to the requirements of Section 15. Check tilt cylinders. and safety devices regularly and maintain them in a safe-operating condition.

or other condition that might impair safe use. | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | v. c. the support face of the top hook and the retaining faces of both hooks shall be checked for wear. Fork inspection shall be carried out by a qualified inspector with the aim of detecting any damage.2. 8. Load-bearing components shall be examined for deformation and load-bearing welds shall be visually examined for cracks.25. Positioning Lock . with special attention to the heel and to the welds that attach the mounting components to the fork blank." Item 3. fork angle (upper face of blade to load face of the shank). is in good repair and in correct working order. a. failure.4. 7.Confirm that the Positioning Lock (when provided). The manufacturer should be consulted if questions arise as to whether a load test is appropriate. e. 15. Attachments shall be included in a scheduled maintenance/inspection program. crushing. g.When fork hooks are provided. 10.DOE-STD-1090-99 in legible condition.5 Forklift Trucks—Testing Forklift truck load tests are not routinely required. Mechanical or hydraulic components shall be inspected and maintained in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions. electrical conductors.When fork marking is not clearly legible. fork blade and shank wear. protective devices. Fork Hooks Wear . A load test shall not be conducted in locations such that the lift meets the definition of critical lift in Section 15. it shall be renewed. Fork inspection shall include: i. Attachments shall be inspected not less than annually and the inspection should be documented. the fork shall be withdrawn from service until satisfactory repairs are made. and shall not be returned to service until it is satisfactorily repaired by the fork manufacturer or an expert of equal competence. non-destructive crack detection. Inspection steps shall be tailored for the attachment. motors. Fork Marking . Surface Cracks . Fork Tine Inspection Examination for straightness of blade and shank. fork tine inspections shall be done in accordance with manufacturers requirements.A thorough visual examination for cracks and. if considered necessary. Section 7. controllers. which lists loading and method | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | ii. "Forks. Inspect batteries. and connections and maintain them in conformance with good practice. Pay special attention to the condition of electrical insulation. | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | iii. deformation. 9. Forklift trucks shall be load tested by or under the direction of a qualified person and in accordance with the manufacturer's recommendations. If any fault is found. Marking shall be renewed per instructions from the original fork supplier. h. Difference in height of fork tips may vary from manufacturer to manufacturer and with tine length. For these reasons. Inspection for cracks shall include any mounting mechanisms of the fork blank to the fork carrier. other than repair or replacement of positioning locks or marking. limit switches. iv. Forks shall not be returned to service if surface cracks are detected. f. b. and other local deformations. Load tests shall not be conducted until verification that inspection and maintenance is up to date. +0 percent of stipulated values. A fork that shows any of the following defects shall be withdrawn from service.1. A fork that has undergone repair. 15-15 Chapter 15 Construction Hoisting and Rigging Equipment Requirements . Load-test records shall be maintained and shall be made available for examination by the construction management contractor. shall be subject to a load test as described in ASME B56. d. Test weights shall be accurate to within -5 percent. Load tests shall be performed after major repair or modification to components that affect the load-carrying ability of the truck.

2 Synthetic Web Slings a. or five broken wires in one strand in one rope lay. | | | | | | | | | | | prior to use. 2. Load tests are not routinely required since a catalog cut. Users or other designated personnel shall visually inspect all synthetic-web slings each day Chapter 15 Construction Hoisting and Rigging Equipment Requirements 15-16 . Only synthetic-web slings constructed from webbing approved for sling construction by the manufacturer or other qualified person shall be used at DOE locations. Acid or caustic burns. scores. 4.4. Broken or worn stitches. b.6 Slings—Inspection 15. Wear or scraping of one-third the original diameter of outside individual wires.DOE-STD-1090-99 of test for forks.5 times the rated capacity marked on the fork. Reject if discovered. i. CAUTION: Tiedown and/or ratchet straps shall not be used as synthetic-web slings. user’s manual. corrosion. Perform inspection on an individual-link basis. Users or other designated personnel shall visually inspect all steel-chain slings each day before they are used as follows: 1. tears.6. If any link does not hinge freely with the adjoining link. cracks in weld areas. crushing. 3. 15. 6. Reject if discovered. 2. c. punctures. carefully noting any deterioration that could result in an appreciable loss of original strength and determining whether further use of the sling would constitute a safety hazard.6. except for the test load. or worn. 6. Users or other designated personnel shall visually inspect all wire-rope slings each day prior to use. 15.6. Corrosion of the rope or end attachments. carefully noting any deterioration that could result in an appreciable loss of original strength and determining whether further use of the sling would constitute a safety hazard. Ten randomly distributed broken wires in one rope lay. 3. 4. cracks in any section of link. or abrasions tending to weaken the ring or hooks. End attachments that are cracked. cause. b. or any other damage resulting in distortion of the rope structure. 15.1 Wire Rope a. 2. A synthetic-web sling shall be removed from service if any of the following defects are visible: 1. birdcaging. which shall correspond to 2. Conduct a link-by-link inspection for the following defects: bent or stretched links. Evidence of heat damage from any 5. Kinking.4. or abrasions tending to weaken the rings or hooks. Wear or elongation exceeding the amount recommended by manufacturers. Melting or charring of any part of the Snags. refer to the manufacturer for determination of whether continued use would constitute a safety hazard.3 Alloy Steel Chain a. Check rings and hooks for distortion.4. For other apparent defects that cause doubt as to the strength of the sling. Distortion of fittings. surface. 3.4. remove the assembly from service. Slings shall be immediately removed from service if any of the following conditions are present: 1. decals on attachment. scores. Hooks that have been opened more than 15 percent of the normal throat opening measured at the narrowest point or twisted more than 10 degrees from the plane of the unbent hook. or cuts. or other manufacturer’s data serves as capacity verification. Load capacity of an attachment shall be verified by the manufacturer or by a load test at 100 % capacity that is performed onsite. 7. 5. deformed.

7.) (in. Either certification by the manufacturer or a pull test certified by a qualified person is acceptable.4. b. Test loads described above shall be accurate to within -5 percent. e. Remove from service assemblies with deformed master links or coupling links.7. The proof load for single-leg slings and endless slings shall be 200 percent of the vertical rated capacity. The proof load for multiple-leg bridle slings shall be applied to the individual legs and shall be either 200 percent for mechanical-spliced or 125 percent for hand-tucked splice times the vertical rated capacity of a single-leg sling. Assemblies with such defects shall be reconditioned by the manufacturer.4. All other sling assemblies shall be proof-tested when specified by the purchaser.1 Wire Rope a. web slings of all types shall be certified as having been proof-tested prior to initial use. 2. Welded end attachments shall not be used unless proof-tested at 2 times the rated capacity prior to initial use. f. the proof load shall be equal to the rated capacity but shall not exceed: 1.7. 1. 15. When specified by the purchaser. Master links to which multiple-leg slings are connected shall be proof-loaded to 200 percent times the force applied by the combined legs. +0 percent of stipulated values. Test loads shall be accurate to within -5 percent. 125 percent of the vertical rated capacity for single-leg. d.7 Slings—Testing 15. +0 percent of stipulated values. If wear exceeds the values shown in Table 15-2. remove the assembly from service.) 1/4 3/64 3/8 5/64 ½ 7/64 5/8 9/64 3/4 10/64 7/8 11/64 1 12/64 1-1/4 16/64 NOTE: For other sizes. Table 15-2. Remove from service assemblies if hooks have been opened more than 15 percent of the normal throat opening measured at the narrowest point or twisted more than 10 degrees from the plane of the unbent hook. As a minimum. assemblies with repairable defects shall be reconditioned or repaired prior to being returned to service. All swaged and poured socket sling assemblies shall be certified as having been proof-tested. 15.3 Alloy Steel Chain a. 200 percent of the vertical rated capacity for mechanical-splice single-leg slings 15-17 . Remove from service assemblies with cracked hooks or other end attachments. 2. hand-tucked slings.4. Maximum Chain size allowable wear (in. Single-leg and endless alloy-steel chain slings shall be certified as having been proof-tested to 200 percent of the rated capacity prior to initial use.4. c.DOE-STD-1090-99 b. b. The proof load for multiple-leg bridle slings shall be applied to the individual legs and shall be 200 percent of the vertical rated capacity of a single-leg sling. e. and endless slings. consult chain or sling manufacturer. d. Maximum allowable wear at any point of link. Master links to which multiple-leg slings are connected shall be proof-loaded to 200 percent multiplied by the Chapter 15 Construction Hoisting and Rigging Equipment Requirements 15. A written letter of certification by the manufacturer or a pull test witnessed and certified in writing by a qualified person is acceptable.2 Synthetic Web Slings a. The proof load for multiple-leg bridle slings shall be applied to the individual legs and shall be 200 percent of the vertical rated capacity of a single-leg sling. Do not straighten deformed hooks or other attachments on the job. Master links to which multiple-leg slings are connected shall be proof-loaded to 200 percent times the force applied by the combined legs. c. b.

and rigging accessories that have been modified or repaired shall be proof-tested again to 2 times the rated capacity prior to making a critical lift. and similar items for wear. the surface condition may call for stripping the paint. and rigging accessories for critical-lift service shall have an initial proof-load test of 2 times the rated capacity.4. Chapter 15 Construction Hoisting and Rigging Equipment Requirements 15-18 .4. replace if permanently bent more than ½ in. A bend or twist exceeding 10 degrees from the plane of the unbent hook. Cracks. handling fixtures. lifting bars. Either certification by the manufacturer or a pull test certified by a qualified person is acceptable. Users or other designated personnel shall inspect shackles. Surface variations can disclose evidence of heavy or severe service. Hooks having any of the following deficiencies shall be removed from service until repaired or replaced: i. 15. Tackle assemblies. 3. as follows: 1. Inspect shackles. c. NOTE: If hooks are painted. iii. Replace them if deformation exceeds 15 percent of their new condition. spreading. +0 percent of stipulated values. remove the hook from service until the latch has been repaired or replaced. rings. 15. Test loads shall be accurate to within -5 percent. Tackle assemblies. 4. In such instances. c. The tackle shall be proof-tested prior to making a critical lift if proof-testing cannot be verified. 2. b. rigging assemblies. corrosion. Test loads shall be accurate to within -5 percent. Wear exceeding 10 percent of the original dimension. and deformation. Replace shackle pins if they show any sign of failure in shear. and hooks at the beginning of each shift in which they are to be used.9 Rigging Accessories— Testing a. rings. in 10 ft or if twisted more than 5 degrees out of the original plane. Examine hook-attachment welds for cracks and signs of failure in tension. iv. +0 percent of stipulated values.DOE-STD-1090-99 force applied by the combined legs. ii. eyebolts. Inspect lifting bars and spreaders for signs of failure in bending. If a latch is provided and it becomes inoperative because of wear or deformation or fails to fully bridge the throat opening.8 Rigging Accessories— Inspection a. Increase in throat opening exceeding 15 percent from the new condition. a visual inspection should take the coating into consideration. handling fixtures.

DOE-STD-1090-99 15. Keep the work area free of oil. m. l. its operation. snow. g. weight. f. and proper care. Undetectable damage that would jeopardize future operations or the safety of a facility. Keep a signaler in full view if you cannot see the load at all times. never refuel near an open flame. and never jump off. The safety of personnel and equipment is the first priority. barrels. However. Check the motion controls for proper functioning at the start of each shift or prior to use if the crane has not been in regular service. supervision of the operation must be exercised. b. and other hazards. shall be barricaded in such a manner as to prevent an employee from being struck or crushed by the crane. Unacceptable risk of personnel injury or significant adverse health impact (onsite or offsite). the equipment shall be withdrawn from service. strict 15-19 . k. do not permit smoking within 25 ft. Be sure that it is checked regularly (at least monthly) to ensure it is in proper working order. Never tamper with safety devices. Report or correct any unsafe condition immediately. 2. Replace all missing or broken guards and panels. b. An appointed person shall classify each lift into one of the DOE categories (ordinary or critical).1 Conduct of Operator a. high susceptibility to damage. Use only nonflammable solutions for cleaning. rags. i. Be a good housekeeper. or dropping could result in any one of the following: 1. or rain. upset. Keep metal funnels in contact with the filler tube to prevent static spark. Significant release of radioactive or other hazardous material or other undesirable conditions. Hand signals from only one person shall be obeyed. c. report it immediately to appropriate management and take the unit out of service until it has been restored to safe-operating condition or a determination has been made by the construction management contractor that the deficiency will not adversely affect the operation of the unit. Use caution when refueling. Use both hands to mount and dismount. etc. controllers. batteries. obey a STOP signal Chapter 15 Construction Hoisting and Rigging Equipment Requirements 15. either permanently or temporarily mounted. Damage that would result in unacceptable delay to schedule or other significant program impact such as loss of vital data. Ensure proper functioning of tires. and steering mechanisms. Be alert while operating and always keep your eye on the load. Accessible areas within the swing radius of the rear of the rotating superstructure of the crane. discontinue operation first. If the operator's visibility is impaired by dust. 3. brakes. If your attention must be directed elsewhere. Make certain that no one is working on or close to the machine before starting the engine or beginning to move. Stop the engine. and if necessary.5. lights. lift systems (including load-engaging means. close-tolerance installation. or other unusual factors. h. c.5 OPERATION The following shall apply to all personnel involved in construction hoisting and rigging operations. grease. horns. d. e. n.). Never operate the machine or allow anyone to operate it unless that person is thoroughly familiar with the machine. Be sure shoe soles are clean and dry before operating brakes. j. 4. fog. prior to planning the lift. even if the machine is stationary. Never get on or off a moving machine. Have a fire extinguisher on hand and know how to use it. a. A lift shall be designated as a critical lift if collision. buckets. If at any time a lifting device is found to be defective or in any way unsafe. A lift should also be designated as critical if the load requires exceptional care in handling because of size. Keep loose parts in a tool box. darkness. limit switches. Turn off the heater before fueling.

Always operate within the rated capacity of the machine.) from the gross capacity of the crane to determine if the load can be lifted safely. bulkiness of the load. First. Use the standard signals shown in Figure 15-12. unless otherwise specified on the manufacturer load charts for the crane. p. Subtract the weight of hooks. Always use the shortest boom possible. spreader bars. 3. and any other material-handling devices (slings.2 Mobile Cranes/Boom Trucks a. shape and weight of the load can be safely lifted. Never pull the load sideways. blocks. 4. Many machines have ratings limited by factors other than machine stability. Make only vertical lifts. e. Know the rated capacity of the crane. Never exceed the rated capacity. lowering. such as during crane assembly. Outriggers shall be fully extended and lowered so that all wheels are clear of the ground. Ballast or counterweight as specified by the manufacturer shall not be exceeded. 4. d. Never use signs of tipping to determine if a load is within a crane's capacity. heavy loads in strong winds. Attach a tag line to the load to control the swing. swinging. Cranes shall not be operated without the ballast or counterweight being in place as specified by the crane manufacturer. boom angle. boom angle. Otherwise. f. level ground. Damage to the crane sustained during operation shall be repaired according to manufacturer’s specifications using certified welders. Know the radius of the load. 7. 5. and stopping loads. o. Rotate the crane slowly to avoid an outward swing of the load. 2. not from the boom foot pins. operations undertaken at wind speed in excess of 25 mph should be evaluated by a qualified person to determine if the size. depending on boom length. In the absence of crane manufacturer's instructions regarding maximum wind speeds for operation. wind direction.5. determine the load weight and check it against the capacity chart. Do not let the load strike the boom or outriggers and never allow a crane boom to hit or touch any structure. “on rubber” load charts shall be used. or lowering the load. unusual boom configurations. Allow maximum clearance between the hook block and boom point sheaves. etc. 6. 3. these can cause overloads when operating at or near the crane's capacity. Keep the boom high enough to swing clear of the cab when rotating the crane on | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | 15. the crane manufacturer’s recommendations for the amount of ballast or counterweight shall be adhered to. Operating by the “seat of the pants” is an unacceptable practice. and observe these precautions with any boom length: 1. 5. Under specific conditions. Remember that the radius is measured from center of rotation. Check loads before moving them. Ensure that the hoist ropes are vertical and avoid sudden starts and stops. Avoid rapid changes in velocity while hoisting. as is a recertification by the construction management contractor at the subcontractor's expense indicating that the unit can return to service. Keep speed slow in lifting.DOE-STD-1090-99 regardless of who gives it. Follow these suggestions to avoid structural failure or tipping: 1. q. and working radius. 2. Be sure the load is well secured and the hoist ropes are not kinked. c. etc. Make a dry run in confined areas to help determine the safest way to operate under existing conditions.) Boom contact with any object shall require an engineering evaluation prior to putting the crane back in service. Keep near-capacity loads as close to the ground as possible. A reinspection or load test is required after repairs are complete. Do not lift large. and wind velocity. Load chart ratings are based on operating the machine on firm. Wind loading can be critical Chapter 15 Construction Hoisting and Rigging Equipment Requirements 15-20 . b. A safe lift depends on boom length. (Boom contact could dent or bend the lower boom chords and may cause a total boom collapse. shackles.

forefinger pointing up. (Hoist slowly shown as example. flex fingers in and out as long as load movement is desired. Figure 15-12. USE MAIN HOIST. move hand in small horizontal circles. thumb pointing up. then use regular signals.) RAISE THE BOOM AND LOWER THE LOAD. flex fingers in and out as long as load movement is desired.DOE-STD-1090-99 HOIST. Tap elbow with one hand. MOVE SLOWLY. thumb pointing down. Extend arm. USE WHIPLINE (Auxiliary Hoist). With arm extended downward. thumb pointing downward. With forearm vertical. fingers closed. With arm extended. LOWER BOOM. thumb pointing upward. RAISE BOOM. Use one hand to give any motion signal and place other hand motionless above hand giving the motion signal. Extend arm. move hand in small horizontal circles. then use regular signals. Standard hand signals for controlling crane operation. With arm extended. fingers closed. LOWER. Tap fist on head. forefinger pointing down. 15-21 Chapter 15 Construction Hoisting and Rigging Equipment Requirements . LOWER THE BOOM AND RAISE THE LOAD.

body. make DOG EVERYTHING. TRAVEL (One Side Track).DOE-STD-1090-99 SWING. Chapter 15 Construction Hoisting and Rigging Equipment Requirements 15-22 . Extend arm. or backward (for land cranes only). and move arms back and forth horizontally. Hold both fists in front of cranes only). Hold both fists in front of body. front of body. palms down. move arm back and forth horizontally. forward pushing motion in direction of travel. Extend both arms. (continued). Use both fists in front of body. Lock the track on side indicated by raised fist. thumbs pointing toward each other. RETRACT BOOM (Telescoping Booms). Travel opposite track indicated by circular motion of other fist. Extend arm. Clasp hands in indicating direction of travel. rotated EXTEND BOOM (Telescoping vertically in front of body (for land Booms). palm down. EMERGENCY STOP. thumbs pointing outward. hand circular motion about each other. STOP. making a TRAVEL. TRAVEL (Both Tracks). Figure 15-12. open and slightly raised. point with finger in direction of swing of boom. Extend arm forward.

make certain that it is well secured and properly balanced in the sling or lifting device before lifting it more than a few inches. determine that the rope is properly seated on the drum and is in the sheaves. If there are any indications of tipping. Avoid “two-blocking. Do not use cranes for side pulls except when specifically authorized by a designated person who has determined that the stability of the crane is not endangered and that the parts of the crane will not be over stressed. “Lifting Personnel. Never operate with the boom at a higher angle than shown on the capacity chart.” which is caused when the hook block collides with boom-point sheaves.2.5. h.1 Attaching the Load a. truck-mounted units. One-hand signal. b. Test stability before lifting heavy loads. Ensure that the hoist rope is free of kinks or twists and is not wrapped around the load. One fist in front of chest with thumb pointing outward and heel of fist tapping chest. Do not hoist. On truck-mounted cranes. Before starting to hoist. except as approved by the crane manufacturer. d. note the following conditions: 1. 15. Do not move loads above people. e. Never use machine stability to determine capacity. Continuous pull on hoist ropes can break the ropes or might pull the boom over the cab. One fist in front of chest with thumb tapping chest.2. Check outrigger footing. Attach the load to the load-block hook with slings or other approved devices. 3.2.5. g.2 Moving the Load a. Watch for boom kickback. lower. Figure 15-12. or travel while anyone is on the load or hook. 15. except as noted in Section 15. Test the brakes each time a load Chapter 15 Construction Hoisting and Rigging Equipment Requirements 15-23 . be sure to play out the hoist rope when extending and reel in the hoist rope when retracting. Multiple-part lines shall not be twisted around each other. One-hand signal. RETRACT BOOM (Telescoping Boom). Before moving the load. (continued). c. If there is a slack-rope condition. | | | b. i. c.DOE-STD-1090-99 EXTEND BOOM (Telescoping Boom). 2. Lift load slightly off the ground and stop.” f g.6. Check the machine for movement and check to be sure the brakes are holding. On hydraulically telescoping booms.5. the machine is already overloaded for that working radius. Make certain that the sling clears all obstacles. The hook shall be positioned over the load in such a manner as to prevent swinging when the load is lifted. no loads shall be lifted over the front area.

m.3 Traveling the Machine a. keep the hoist brakes as reserve. and lower boom into the rack to prevent swing. snub the load to prevent swaying if possible. Secure the boom and hook block. When lowering heavy loads. i. Check river depths before fording. Block treads when moving uphill to prevent downhill movement before shifting steering clutches. post a lookout and be sure there is clearance for tail swing. Power down when lowering loads. 15. guidelines for ensuring safety of the work shall be established through consultation with the appropriate safety organization. o. When loading machine on the trailer. or any overhead obstruction. Check bridges before crossing. l. d. On soft surfaces. Test all controls at the start of a new shift. Always release any air supercharge on the hydraulic reservoir and shut off the engine (or declutch pumps) before disconnecting oil lines. h. adjust or repair them before operations are begun. h. r. Block under the boom before disassembling. It is advisable to perform the work so there is no possibility of the crane. or load: b. or load becoming a conductive path. Always set swing brakes when the unit is idle or holding loads for a period of time. n. Avoid tipping by never backing the crane while carrying a maximum load. e. this helps to raise the leading end of the tracks and makes traveling safer. i.2. If adjustments or repairs are necessary. Do not leave your position at the controls while the load is suspended unless required to do so by an approved emergency procedure. s. position the boom in the direction of travel. especially on slopes. Check clearances under overpasses. Do not lower the load below the point where less than two full wraps of rope remain on the hoist drum. Do not reach into hydraulic-boom holes unless the sections are securely anchored together. use blocking to build one. p. If any controls fail to operate properly.DOE-STD-1090-99 approaching the rated capacity is handled by raising the load a few inches and applying the brakes. if a ramp is not available. If swinging during travel is necessary. and use a signaler when backup alarms are not provided. Use a house lock or swing brake. promptly report this to the appropriate level of management.4 Operating Near Power Lines and Transmission Towers It is recognized that operating mobile cranes where they can become electrified from electric power lines is an extremely hazardous practice. Chapter 15 Construction Hoisting and Rigging Equipment Requirements 15-24 . Be familiar with the equipment and its proper care. load line. For long moves. The following steps shall be taken to minimize the hazard of electrocution or serious injury as a result of contact between the energized power lines and the crane. Lock the turntable prior to highway travel. load line. always use a ramp. q. c. k.5. l. make sure they will support the weight of the machine. Use a safety pawl on the boom-hoist drum when not lowering. 15. When traveling with a load. Work on suspended loads is prohibited under normal conditions. j.2. (Figure 15-13). be sure to place the boom on the ground or in the boom rest. Before disconnecting oil lines. overhead lines. Never stand on or under the boom during this work. Never back up until everyone is clear of the machine. j. then move the pedals and control levers to equalize pressures within the cylinders. f. Tag lines should be used as required to guide. Suspended loads that must be worked on shall be secured against unwanted movement.5. Never travel a rubber-tired unit with a load over the side. if machine has hydraulic controls. k. When side clearances are tight. always move with the load behind. g. Never travel with near-capacity loads. snub or otherwise control the load. engage the swing-jaw clutch before releasing brakes. When the responsible manager decides that is necessary to work on suspended load.

when required. with or without a load. or equivalent means employed to aid in location of the prohibited zone. h. e.DOE-STD-1090-99 a. No one shall be permitted to touch the crane or the load unless the designated to perception of distance and multiple contact points as viewed from the position of the operator and /or position of the designated signaler. f. The specified clearance between the power lines and the crane. or machine component cannot enter the prohibited zone. b.1 m) is maintained between the crane or the load being handled and energized power lines. b. A qualified representative of the owner of the lines or a designated representative of the electrical utility shall be on site to verify that steps (a) and (b) have been completed and that the lines are not energized. c.4. and load shall be maintained at all times as specified in Table 153.5. c. These signs shall be revised but not removed when a local jurisdiction requires greater clearances. The operator should avoid operating the crane. 15-25 Chapter 15 Construction Hoisting and Rigging Equipment Requirements . The horizontal and vertical distance of movement of long span lines due to the wind shall be added to the minimum clearance distance as specified in Table 15-3. should be attached by a qualified person to the power lines to improve visibility.2 Power Lines Energized.2. c. etc.1 Crane Operation Near Deenergized and Grounded Electric Power Lines This is the preferred condition under which the operation can be performed safely. The lines shall be visibly grounded to avoid electrical feedback and appropriately marked at the job-site location.. g. Operation of boom and load over electric power lines is extremely dangerous. An on-site meeting between project management and a qualified representative of the owner of the lines or a designated representative of the electrical utility shall take place to establish the procedures to safely complete the operations. d. Devices such as ribbons. shall utilize tag lines of a non-conductive type. b. A qualified representative of the owner of the lines or a designated representative of the electrical utility shall be consulted for specific distances. d. Greater clearances are required because of higher voltage as stated in Table 15-3. Cranes shall not be used to handle materials stored under electric power lines unless any combination of the boom. f. in this area. The hazard of injury or death due to electrocution has been remove.5. whose sole responsibility is to verify that the required clearance is maintained shall be in constant contact with the crane operator. load line. Durable signs shall be installed at the operator's station and on the outside of the crane. The (electric) Power Marketing Administrations in DOE may deviate from the requirements of Table 15-3. A designated signaler. Load control.4. The power company or owner of the power lines shall de-energize the lines. due e. which could cause them to breach the safety zone. Crane operators shall not rely on the coverings of wires for their protection. providing the work is done according to line management-approved procedures that do not conflict with statutory regulations or approved variances from these regulations. load. signaler indicates it is safe to do so. The following steps shall be taken to assure de-energization of the power lines has occurred: a. Crane Operating Less than Erected/Fully Extended Boom Length away from the Prohibited Zone (see Figure 15-14) a. warning that electrocution or serious bodily injury may occur unless a minimum clearance of 10 ft (3.2. 15. Exercise caution when working near overhead lines having long spans as they tend to move laterally or vertically due to the wind. Any overhead wire shall be considered to be an energized line unless and until the person owning the line or the electrical utility authorities indicate that it is not an energized line. load line. balls. 15..

DOE-STD-1090-99 Figure 15-13. Danger zone for cranes and lifted loads operating near electrical transmission line Chapter 15 Construction Hoisting and Rigging Equipment Requirements 15-26 .

7 m) Over Over Over Over Over 50 200 350 500 750 b.3 m) (3.9 m) (6.7 m) (13. While in transit with no load and boom or mast lowered: Normal voltage (phase to phase) to to to to to 0.75 kV 50 kV 345 kV 700 kV 1000 kV Minimum required clearance 4 ft 6 ft 10 ft 16 ft 20 ft (1.2 m) (1.6 m) ( 6. Safe working distance from power lines.5 m) (4.1 m) ( 4.1 m) ( 7. a.75 50 345 750 15-27 Chapter 15 Construction Hoisting and Rigging Equipment Requirements .6 m) (10.1 m) Over Over Over Over 0. When operating near high-voltage power lines: Normal voltage (phase to phase) to to to to to to 50 kV 200 kV 350 kV 500 kV 750 kV 1000 kV Minimum required clearance 10 ft 15 ft 20 ft 25 ft 35 ft 45 ft ( 3.DOE-STD-1090-99 Table 15-3.

Chapter 15 Construction Hoisting and Rigging Equipment Requirements 15-28 .DOE-STD-1090-99 Figure 15-14. Danger zone for cranes and lifted loads operating near electrical transmission line.

5 Crane Operation Near Transmitter Towers (see Figure 15-16) a. The following guidelines should be required: 1. 2. 4.3 Crane Operations are Within the Prohibited Zone and the Power Lines are Energized a. The designated leader's responsibility shall include the following: Chapter 15 Construction Hoisting and Rigging Equipment Requirements 15. b. Electrical system protective devices that automatically re-energize the circuit after a power line contact occurrence should be blocked or disengaged to inhibit this function. The equipment shall be provided with an electrical ground directly to the upper rotating structure supporting the boom. An appointed person shall classify each lift into one of the DOE categories (ordinary or critical) prior to planning the lift. The person responsible for the operation shall alert and warn the crane operator and all persons working around or near the crane about hazard of electrocution or serious injury and instruct them on how to avoid the hazard.5.5. A designated signaler. 15. If the lift is being made by only one person. 3.4 Crane in Transit With No Load and Boom Lowered (see Figure 15-15) a. specific verbal instructions for the particular job. a qualified person together with a qualified representative of the utility or an engineer qualified in power line transmission shall. whose sole responsibility is to verify that the clearances established are maintained.DOE-STD-1090-99 15. c. Hoisting and rigging operations for ordinary lifts require a designated leader who shall be present at the lift site during the entire lifting operation. the effect of speed and terrain on the boom and crane movement shall be considered. shall be in constant contact with the crane operator. Ground jumper cables shall be attached to materials being handled by boom equipment when electrical charge is induced while working near energized transmitters.2. The following precautions shall be taken when necessary to dissipate induced voltages: 1. When planning transit of the crane.4. after visiting the site.4.4. Cranes in transit with no load and boom lowered shall maintain clearance as specified in 15-29 . d. load lines. b.5. when required. f.2. No one shall be permitted to touch the crane or the load unless the signaler indicates it is safe to do so. crews shall be provided with nonconductive poles having large alligator clips or other similar protection to attach the ground cable to the load. Combustible and flammable materials shall be removed from the immediate area prior to operations. shall utilize tag lines of a non-conductive type. Load control. and set minimum required clearances and procedures for safe operations. or load. d. 2. or clearly defined responsibilities within the crew's organizational structure. the transmitter shall be deenergized or tests shall be made to determine if electrical charge is induced on the crane.5. All non-essential personnel shall be removed from the crane work area. 3. Leadership designation may be by written instructions. c. 15. Insulated barriers. determine if this is the most feasible way to complete the operation. Table 15-3.2. A designated signaler shall be assigned to observe the clearance and give warning before the crane approaches the above limits. These operations shall be under their supervision.5 Ordinary Lifts a.2. Non-conductive barricades to restrict access to the crane work area. b. e. c. Crane/load grounded to a neutral line by the utility. Prior to work near transmitter towers where an electrical charge can be induced in the equipment or materials being handled. Before such operations take place. which are not a part of nor an attachment to the crane and which will not allow contact between the energized electric power lines and the crane. that person assumes all responsibilities of the designated leader.

Danger zone for cranes and lifted loads operating near electrical transmission line.DOE-STD-1090-99 Figure 15-15. (See Table 15-3 for minimum radial distance of prohibited zone.) Chapter 15 Construction Hoisting and Rigging Equipment Requirements 15-30 .

DOE-STD-1090-99 Figure 15-16. 15-31 Chapter 15 Construction Hoisting and Rigging Equipment Requirements . Danger zone for cranes and lifted loads operating near electrical transmission line.

rigging selection and configuration. Lifting points. This person shall meet the definitions of appointed. 15. Load vectors. and below-the-hook lifting devices. if required. and the presence of hazardous or toxic materials. The operating organization shall appoint a person-in-charge (PIC) of the lifting operation. Crane orientations. 2. Only designated. viii. 8. A pre-lift meeting involving participating personnel shall be conducted prior to making a critical lift. and other relevant factors. f. as described in Section 15. If required by the critical lift procedure. dimensions. vii. However. using the same lifting equipment. Practice lifts should be done by the same crew. The designated leader shall inspect all cranes to ensure that they are still within the inspection interval. d.” b. rigging accessories. The critical lift plan/procedure shall be reviewed and questions shall be resolved. The responsible manager or designee shall review and approve the procedure and rigging sketches before the lift is made. Conditions for a practice lift should closely simulate actual conditions involving: weight. Direct the lifting operation to ensure that the lift is completed safely and efficiently. 7. Operating procedures and special instructions to operators including rigging precautions and safety measures to be followed as applicable. Identification of the items to be moved.5. the weight. ix.2. vi. Experienced operators who have been trained and qualified to operate the specific equipment to be used shall be assigned to make the lift. lifting bars. 5. obey a STOP signal at all times no matter who gives the signal. Sling angles. “Definitions. Survey the lift site for hazardous/unsafe conditions.6 Critical Lifts a. center of gravity. The designated leader shall inspect all lifting devices to ensure that the rated capacity of these items of equipment will not be exceeded. ii. Boom and swing angles. Stop the job when any potentially unsafe condition is recognized. 6. | | | | | | | | Chapter 15 Construction Hoisting and Rigging Equipment Requirements 15-32 . The PIC shall ensure that a pre-job plan is prepared that defines the operation and shall include the following: 1. qualified signalers shall give signals to the operator. that proper equipment and accessories are selected. e. iv. c. 2. Ensure that equipment is properly set up and positioned. Load-indicating devices. Identification of cranes to be used by type and rated capacity.2. Identification and rated capacity of slings. designated. v. f. load movement path. Direct operations if an accident or injury occurs. iii. g. 4. 4. Methods of attachment. 3.DOE-STD-1090-99 1. and that rated capacity is not exceeded. and qualified. Ensure that personnel involved understand how the lift is to be made. Ensure that the weight of the load is determined. Rigging sketches that include (as applicable): i. and is identified to the operator. 3. Ensure that a signaler is assigned. e. Other factors affecting equipment capacity. a practice lift shall be done before the critical lift.

If access doors are installed. b. c. swing. eliminating the hook throat opening.5. The personnel platform shall be designed by a qualified person competent in structural design. shall be corrected. 8. The platform shall bear a plate specifying its empty weight and the maximum number of persons and weight for which it is rated. The person specifically responsible for the overall work function to be performed shall determine that there is no practical alternative machine or equipment to perform the work. 4. boom. 11. an alloy steel anchor shackle with a bolt. (1. 6. The sides of the platform shall be enclosed from the toeboard to the midrail with solid construction or expanded metal having openings no greater than ½ in. 2. or by the proof test. 15. a toeboard at least 4 in.DOE-STD-1090-99 15. 3.27 cm). The suspension system shall minimize inclination of the personnel platform due to the movement of personnel on the personnel platform.2. The platform shall have perimeter protection consisting of a top rail approximately 45 in. or personnel-lifting device attached to the crane hoist rope. Access doors shall be equipped with a device to restrain them from opening unintentionally. without failure. Rough edges exposed to contact by employees shall be surfaced (ground smooth) to prevent injury. the personnel platform. The platform shall be easily identifiable by high-visibility color or marking. 16. The personnel platform and rigging shall be capable of supporting. lower. and material specified in the design. and a midrail approximately half-way between the top rail and the toeboard. aerial lift. At each new job site (and at least annually) prior to hoisting personnel. or travel the crane or forklift while a worker is on the hook. nut. stairway. Chapter 15 Construction Hoisting and Rigging Equipment Requirements 15-33 . After proof-testing. Where special steels or other materials are used. Welds shall be inspected by a qualified inspector. or personnel hoist. When being supported by a crane. the construction management contractor shall be notified and will approve the requirement before the lift is made. 7. Sufficient headroom shall be provided to allow employees to stand upright in the platform. 14. the platform shall be attached to the hoist rope by a hook of a type that can be closed and locked.1 when welding is to be performed on load-sustaining members. and all welding of the platform shall be performed by a qualified welder familiar with the weld grades. rigging. The platform shall be limited to carrying six persons. The personnel platform shall have overhead protection when there is an overhead hazard. types. 12. (115 cm) high. d. 10. Any modification to the personnel platform or rigging shall require retesting. and rigging accessories for attaching the personnel platform to hoist lines shall not be used for any other purpose when not hoisting personnel. A grab rail shall be provided inside the personnel platform to minimize hand exposure. 13. All welding procedures and welding operator qualifications shall be in accordance with ANSI/AWS D1. and retaining pin may be used. (10 cm) high. Use only personnel platforms that are specifically designed and constructed for the purpose of suspending personnel according to the following: 1. and hook block shall be proof-tested by a qualified inspector to twice the personnel platform's rated capacity by holding it suspended for 5 min with the test load suitably distributed on the personnel platform. Alternatively. boom. any deficiencies revealed by inspection. Do not lift. load. personnel platform. they shall open only to the interior of the platform. 5. scaffold. the manufacturer shall provide welding procedures. All eyes in wire-rope slings shall be fabricated with thimbles. and another proof test conducted. such as a ladder. 9. If a determination is made that lifting by crane or forklift is required. at least five time the maximum intended load.7 Lifting Personnel a. or tines except as described in the paragraphs below.

and the person responsible for overall worksite safety to plan and review procedures to be followed. Crane (mobile) footing is adequate. A visual inspection of the crane. A qualified signaler shall be appointed. 2. g. signaler. In situations where direct visual contact with the operator is not possible and the use of a signaler would create a hazard for that person. and personnel platform shall be conducted by a qualified inspector immediately after the trial lift. 5. The primary attachment is centered over the platform.DOE-STD-1090-99 e. The crane shall be inspected daily prior to lifting personnel. The crane shall be operated so that lowering will be power-controlled (no free-fall). The employees being hoisted. 6. Prior to each working shift. 8. Hoist ropes are free of kinks. 3. qualified operator. 2. Ropes are properly seated on drums and sheaves. Multiple-part lines are not twisted around each other. The trial lift shall be made from ground level (or any other location where employees will enter the platform) to each location at which the platform is to be hoisted and positioned. direct communication alone (such as two-way radio) may be used. Personnel shall not be hoisted unless the following conditions exist: 1. Procedures for entering and leaving the personnel platform or other device and the points at which persons will enter and leave the device shall be reviewed. prior to lifting personnel. the platform shall be lifted a few inches and inspected to ensure that it is secure and properly balanced. signaler. 3. in accordance with the requirements for frequent inspections for the type of equipment being used. The designated leader and the operator shall determine that: 1. if secured to prevent displacement. The lift route is changed. Tag lines shall be used unless their use creates an unsafe condition. unless the operator determines that the safety of the hoisted personnel is not affected. Configuration necessary to reach work locations will allow the crane to remain under 50 percent of rated capacity. 2. Chapter 15 Construction Hoisting and Rigging Equipment Requirements 15-34 . 2. No interferences exist. NOTE: Materials and tools to be used during the actual lift. i. Prior to lifting personnel and after the proof test. k. the personnel lift platform and rigging shall be inspected. NOTE: A single trial lift may be performed for all locations to be reached from a single setup position. 3. can be in the platform for the test lift. The trial lift shall be repeated prior to hoisting employees whenever: 1. The lifting and supporting shall be made under controlled conditions and under the direction of a designated leader. a meeting shall be held with the designated leader. Any defects found that create a safety hazard shall be corrected prior to hoisting personnel. Communications between the crane operator. and in direct communication with. 4. 4. j. or positioned shall remain in continuous sight of. the electrode holders shall be protected from contact with metal components of the personnel platform or basket. the qualified operator and signaler shall conduct a trial lift with the personnel platform loaded to at least the anticipated load. rigging. Prior to the trial lift. The crane (mobile) travels or is moved and set up in a new location or returned to a previously used location. 4. h. moved. When welding is done by personnel from the platform or basket. persons to be lifted. These special procedures shall be followed when lifting personnel: 1. f. After the trial lift and just before hoisting personnel. and persons being lifted shall be maintained throughout the lift. 7. System controls and safety devices are activated and functioning properly. the operator or signaler.

24. the requirements of 29 CFR 1926. When working above water. b.3 Forklift Trucks a. midrail. 23. Movement of the personnel platform shall be done in a slow. 21. electric storms. a corrosion-resistant nameplate with the following information is required: i. 11. and maintenance instruction plates. Employees working from a platform shall wear body belts/harnesses with lanyards attached to the lower load block or overhaul ball. the boom's extended length. The rated capacity of an attachment/truck combination shall not be exceeded. ice. or to a structural member within the platform that is capable of supporting a fall impact. Signs of tipping shall never be used to determine if a load is within the forklift's capacity. Since the load rating for forklifts may be based on stability or hydraulic/structural competence. Cranes with outriggers shall have the outriggers fully extended and blocked. A positive-acting device shall be used that prevents contact between the load block or overhaul ball and the boom tip (anti-two-blocking device). Cranes with telescoping booms shall be equipped with a device to indicate clearly to the operator. operation. lowering. 17. 10. 13. at all times. Capacity. and sufficient materials to do their work. If the personnel platform cannot be landed. tags. the lifting or lowering speed shall not exceed 100 ft/min (30 m/min). 16. Personnel shall not stand on or work from the top rail. the rated capacity shall not be exceeded in operational application. Personnel platforms should not be used in winds greater than 15 mph (25 km/h). Personnel shall keep all parts of their bodies inside the suspended personnel platform during raising. After the personnel platform is positioned. the rated capacity of the truck/attachment combination shall be established by the truck manufacturer. or toeboard of the suspended personnel platform. The total weight of the lifted load (including personnel) shall not exceed 50 percent of the crane rating under the planned conditions of use. Attachments almost always affect rated capacity of the truck. They should not be used for transporting bulk materials. and positioning to avoid pinch points. Know the rated capacity of the forklift and always operate within that capacity.106 (Occupational Safety and Health Regulations for Construction) shall also apply. Cranes shall not travel while personnel are on a personnel platform or in the basket. 18. or an accurate determination of the load radius to be used during the lift shall be made prior to hoisting personnel. 14. or other adverse weather conditions that could affect the safety of personnel. 22. 12. snow. their tools. On every removable attachment (excluding fork extensions). or decals shall be changed accordingly. 15. No lifts shall be made on another of the crane’s load lines while personnel are suspended on a platform. all brakes and locks on the lift crane shall be set before personnel perform any work. The crane shall be uniformly level within 1 percent of level grade and located on firm footing.DOE-STD-1090-99 9. 19. it should be tied to the structure before personnel get off or on. When a forklift truck is equipped with an attachment. Cranes and derricks with variable-angle booms shall be equipped with a boom-angle indicator that is readily visible to | | | | the operator. or a system shall be used that deactivates the hoisting action before damage occurs in the event of a two-blocking situation (two-block damage-prevention feature). sleet. Suspended personnel platforms shall be used only for personnel.5. controlled. 15. 2. 1. The operator shall remain at the controls when the personnel platform is occupied. 20. cautious manner with no sudden movements of it or the crane. Model number Chapter 15 Construction Hoisting and Rigging Equipment Requirements | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | 15-35 .

any of its functions or attachments. c. Ensure that fueling of internal-combustionpowered forklift trucks takes place in designated areas. or open flames are prohibited. the operator shall be familiar with unusual operating conditions which may require additional safety precautions or special operating instructions.3. understand the truck’s limitations and observe the following precautions: NOTE: The above information should be provided by the attachment manufacturer. operation. any area of the body affected by contact with battery electrolyte shall be flushed with water immediately and all acid spills must be cleaned up at once. Be certain the truck has successfully passed a preuse inspection. The operator shall be familiar with the operation and function of all controls and instruments before operating the truck. d. or open flames shall be prohibited. Handling liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) fuel presents a unique hazard. and other material. Chapter 15 Construction Hoisting and Rigging Equipment Requirements | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | 15-36 . The vehicle engine must be turned off and smoking.DOE-STD-1090-99 ii. f. Ensure that battery recharging and maintenance takes place in designated areas where smoking. Capacity. i. Verify the location and operability of eyewash and shower facilities before maintenance is performed. or decals shall be changed accordingly. c. Before operating any truck. iv. To safeguard pedestrians. vi. j. Therefore. A sample Pre-operational inspection checklist is included as Exhibit 1. e. the truck. g. The operation of internal combustion-powered forklift trucks in confined spaces shall be prohibited unless special precautions are followed to preclude the buildup of carbon monoxide gas above prescribed levels. Keep hands and feet inside the operator’s designated area or compartment. Only qualified operators shall be permitted to operate forklift trucks. sparks. Serial number on hydraulically actuated attachments Maximum hydraulic pressure (on hydraulically actuated attachments) Weight Capacity The following instructions (or equivalent).1 Operating the Unit The following requirements shall be observed by the operator when operating forklift trucks. which appears at the end of this chapter. Avoid reaching through the mast for any purpose. d. "Capacity of truck and attachment combination may be less than capacity shown on attachment.5. sparks. 15. Modifications or additions that affect capacity or safe operation shall not be performed without prior written approval from the forklift truck manufacturer. rubber gloves. i. Do not put any part of the body outside the operator compartment of the truck. iii.1 General a. e.3. 15. Wear eye protection. Safe operation is the responsibility of the operator. Report all accidents and "near misses" promptly.1. from any place other than from the designated operator’s position. other personnel. to avoid injury while refueling with LPG fuel." | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | h. and maintenance instruction plates. f. No one shall operate the equipment other than the person to whom it is assigned. b. v. Consult truck nameplate. Report and correct any apparent mechanical deficiencies before operating the forklift truck. Never put any part of the body within the reach mechanism of the truck or other attachments. Whenever battery maintenance is performed. precisely follow the refueling procedure in the operator's manual for the vehicle. g. h. The operator shall develop safe working habits and also be aware of hazardous conditions in order to protect himself.5. tags. and rubber aprons. Do not start or operate the truck.

5. o. 3. block the wheels. If the truck must be left on an incline. 3. which remains in his view.6m) from the truck. Fixed jacks or supports may be needed to prevent upending or corner dipping when powered industrial trucks are driven on and off semitrailers that are not coupled to the tractor. or other recognized positive protection shall be provided to prevent railroad cars from moving during loading or unloading operations. The fork truck shall always be positioned to safeguard the dock attendant while removing the door lock pin. Bring truck to a complete stop. Apply the parking brake. n. with the force applied in a direction parallel with the door travel. | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | q. Do not drive a truck up to anyone standing in front of an object. and other similar working surfaces. Other workers should not be inside the truck when the forklift truck is performing loading or unloading operations. controls. The brakes of highway trucks shall be set and wheel chocks placed under the rear wheels to prevent the trucks from rolling while they are boarded.DOE-STD-1090-99 1. 4. k. doorways. Load arrangements and spacing issues should be determined before the forklift enters the truck. (7. m. unfamiliar ramps. Ensure that fire aisles. 3. Whenever a railroad car door requires an abnormal force to open. Consider both the truck and load weight when operating in railcars and semitrailers. 2. l. Unless the truck utilizes a device specifically designed for opening and closing railroad car doors and the operator is trained in its use. whether empty or loaded. r. t. u. v. and fire equipments is kept clear. Do not permit passengers to ride on powered industrial trucks unless a safe place to ride has been provided by the manufacturer. 4. Do not move railroad cars with a powered industrial truck. platforms. Stop the engine or turn off the 2. Ensure that personnel stand clear of the rear swing area before conducting turning maneuvers. hand brakes. Place directional controls in neutral. in order to prevent damage to the doors and/or fork truck by heavy impact forces. access to stairways. boxcars. 2. w. 2. Fully lower load-engaging means. Exercise particular care at cross aisles. A powered industrial truck is considered unattended when the operator is more than 25 ft. | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | 4. Wheel stops. Before leaving the operator’s position the operator shall perform the following : 1. The entire door opening operation shall be in full view of the operator. p. Do not use a truck for operating or closing railroad car doors except as follows: 1. Care should be exercised when engaging the railroad car door with the door opening device. when leaving the truck unattended the operator shall perform the following: 1. unless supporting an elevated platform. 15-37 Chapter 15 Construction Hoisting and Rigging Equipment Requirements . Do not allow anyone to stand or pass under the elevated portion of any truck. In addition. or platforms before start of operation. 6. Inspect floors on trucks. Maintain a safe distance from the edge of ramps. 3. or whenever the operator leaves the truck and it is not in his view. and other locations where pedestrians may step into the path of travel of the truck. s. the truck operator shall report the condition to his supervisor. Fully lower the load-engaging means. The design of the door-opening device shall require the truck to travel parallel to the railroad car.

When ascending or descending grades.1. 4. use 4. Yield the right of way to pedestrians and emergency vehicles. Observe all traffic regulations and under all travel conditions. Do not park closer than 6 ft (1800 mm) to the nearest rail or a railroad track. Unless a towing hitch is supplied by the manufacturer. Operate unloaded trucks with the load-engaging means downgrade. establish eye contact with approaching pedestrians or vehicle drivers before continuing. and normally travel straight up and down. e. the guideline is: within plant buildings . use tow bars rather than wire rope for towing. wiring. etc.5 mph. be sure that it is properly secured. fully lower load-engaging means. Do not pass another truck traveling in the same direction at intersections. p.5. or at other locations where vision is obstructed. Approximately 4 to 6 inches (10 to 15 cm) above floor level is adequate. s. return the forklift truck to its assigned parking place. shut off the power. When a towing hitch is provided. f. In excess of 5 percent grade. if applicable and raised only as far as necessary to clear the road surface. In cases operation are authorized: 1. Do not drive trucks onto any elevator unless specifically authorized to do so. If the truck is equipped with a seat belt.2 Traveling a. k. It is advisable that all other personnel leave the elevator before truck is allowed to enter or leave. Approach elevators slowly. on plant roads . If in doubt. and then enter squarely after the elevator car is properly leveled. Drive slowly around curves. sprinkler systems. place controls in neutral position. While turning. Care shall be taken to not contact overhead installations such as lights. b. Do not indulge in stunt driving or horseplay. h. Unless facility-specific procedures state otherwise. and inclines: 1. measure. Make starts. Use low gear or slowest speed n. or direction reversals in a smooth manner so as not to shift load and/or overturn the truck. m. and set brakes. Railroad tracks shall be crossed diagonally whenever possible. Once on the elevator.15 mph. In such cases travel with the load trailing. turn ignition off. Whenever possible. q. r. | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | shall be tilted back. Before driving over a dockboard or bridge plate. turns. The load and load-engaging means Chapter 15 Construction Hoisting and Rigging Equipment Requirements 15-38 . operate the truck at a speed that will permit it to be brought to a stop in a safe manner. 5. Do not exceed the capacity of the 2. Slow down and sound horn at cross aisles and other locations where vision is obstructed. except if the load being carried obstructs forward view. Avoid turning if possible. pipes. do not use forklift trucks as tow trucks. d.3. set brakes. Motorized hand trucks shall not be ridden unless they are of the hand/rider design. ramps. 3. stops. be cautious of rear end swing and keep clear of the edge of loading docks.DOE-STD-1090-99 x. Face in the direction of travel. elevator. and secure the key. it. At the end of the operator's shift. blind spots. Never travel with forks raised to unnecessary heights. o. drive loaded rider trucks with the load upgrade. neutralize the controls. y. | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | 15. i. control. c. j. g. l. 3. 6. Slow down for wet and slippery floors. Drive carefully and slowly across the dockboard or bridge plate. and never exceed its rated capacity.

Only stable.3. Extra caution is required when handling loads exceeding the dimensions used to establish truck capacity. The forks shall be placed under the load as far as possible. If the lift is being made by only one person. d. g. l. fire protection sprinklers. When attachments are used. Fork length should be at least two thirds of the load length. Do not block fire extinguishers. +0 percent before it is lifted. The designated leader's responsibility shall include the following: 1. q. e. When stacking or tiering. the mast shall be carefully tilted backward to stabilize the load. Do not attach or operate any attachment on a forklift truck that has not been approved for use by the forklift truck manufacturer. | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | 15-39 Chapter 15 Construction Hoisting and Rigging Equipment Requirements . s. 15. manipulating. specific verbal instructions for the particular job. A load backrest extension shall be used whenever necessary to minimize the possibility of the load or part of it from falling rearward. d.2 Ordinary Lifts a. b. Use guides and signalers as necessary. Operate trucks equipped with attachments as partially loaded trucks when not handling a load.3. Ensure that personnel involved understand how the lift is to be made. An appointed person shall classify each lift into one of the DOE categories (ordinary or critical) before the lift is planned. b.5. Always spread the forks to suit the load width. or alarm stations when stacking loads. Since the load rating for forklifts may be based on stability or hydraulic or structural competence. that person assumes all responsibilities of the designated leader. Do not transport loads or miscellaneous items within the operator’s compartment or other areas of the truck. r. or clearly defined responsibilities within the crew's organizational structure. m. (attaching rigging to the forks to support a suspended load) without written management approval. i.DOE-STD-1090-99 15. Block and secure them if necessary. use only enough backward tilt to stabilize the load. The designated person shall ensure that the weight of a load approaching the rated capacity (combination of weight and location of the center of gravity) has been determined within -10 percent. k. positioning." t. safely arranged loads shall be handled. Never lift with one fork without an engineering analysis and approval. Use extreme care when tilting load forward or backward. p. | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | n. c.3 Loading a. Hoisting and rigging operations for ordinary lifts require a designated leader who shall be present at the lift site during the entire lifting operation. Do not rig loads from the tines of a forklift truck.1. Stability and maneuverability may be adversely affected.17 "Hand Signals. Leadership designation may be by written instructions. o. Standard hand signals are shown in Figure 15.5. c. j. particularly when high tiering. h. f. Caution shall be exercised when handling off-center loads which cannot be centered. and transporting the load. unless a secure area has been provided and designated by the user. extra care shall be taken in securing. If in doubt. check the conditions personally before proceeding. do not exceed the rated capacity in operational application. Do not tilt forward with forks elevated except to pick up or deposit a load over a rack or stack.

LOWER THE TINES. With forearm vertical.DOE-STD-1090-99 RAISE THE TINES. With arm extended. Standard hand signals for controlling forklift operation. Extend both arms. STOP. thumb extended. palms down. lower arm vertically. lower arm vertically. point forefinger in direction of DOG EVERYTHING. With arm extended. jerk thumb over shoulder. Clasp hands movement. thumb down. MOVE TINES IN DIRECTION FINGER POINTS. With arm extended. palm down. TILT MAST FORWARD. in front of body. With forearm vertical. TILT MAST BACK. palm down. Figure 15-17. Chapter 15 Construction Hoisting and Rigging Equipment Requirements 15-40 . forefinger pointing up. move hand in small horizontal circle.

and below-the-hook lifting devices.DOE-STD-1090-99 2. 2. This person shall meet the definitions of appointed. ix. if required. or chains may be used if proper positioning is easily accomplished and a secured condition is discernible. iv. 4. 15. 3.” b. as described in Section 15. (90-cm) or more than 42 in. and the presence of hazardous or toxic materials.5. Only designated. viii. 4. Lifting points. 3. The platform shall include: 1. Ensure that the weight of the load is determined. The PIC shall ensure that a pre-job plan is prepared that defines the operation and shall include the following: 1. 3. v. and that rated capacity is not exceeded. d.5. Rigging sketches that include (as applicable): i. Operating procedures and special instructions to operators including rigging precautions and safety measures to be followed as applicable. qualified signalers shall give signals to the operator. that proper equipment and accessories are selected. 7. 2.2. 6. (110-cm) around its upper periphery and including a midrail.4 Lifting of Personnel If a work platform is used on forklift trucks designed and intended for handling materials. Identification and rated slings. 8. Survey the lift site for hazardous/unsafe conditions. Ensure that equipment is properly set up and positioned. However. Stop the job when any potentially unsafe condition is recognized. 5. Only experienced operators who have been trained and qualified to operate the specific equipment to be used shall be assigned to make the lift. A restraining means such as a guard rail having a height above the platform floor of not less than 36 in. e. Sling angles. Identification of the items to be moved. dimensions. lifting bars. Identification of forklifts to be used by type and rated capacity. 5. Methods of attachment. The responsible manager or designee shall review and approve the procedure and rigging sketches before the lift is made.3. The floor of the platform located not more than 8-in (20-cm) above the upper face of the supporting truck fork blade. vii. obey STOP signal at all times no matter who gives the signal. center of gravity. Other factors affecting equipment capacity. An access opening in the guard rail maybe hinged or removable. Boom and swing angles. the weight. Direct the lifting operation to ensure that the lift is completed safely and efficiently.3. 15. 4. “Definitions. c.3 Critical Lifts a. | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | ii. Guard rails and access openings shall Chapter 15 Construction Hoisting and Rigging Equipment Requirements vi. iii. Ensure that a signaler is assigned. take the following precautions: a. (10-cm) minimum height toe plate provided on the work platform. Use a lift platform manufactured for the purpose of lifting personnel with a forklift truck. rigging accessories. designated. A 4-in. The operating organization shall appoint one PIC of the lifting operation. Direct operations if an accident or injury occurs. Load vectors. Forklift orientations. 15-41 . and qualified. Load-indicating devices. and is identified to the operator.

both empty and loaded. Be certain that the lifting mechanism is operating smoothly throughout its entire lift height. 3. and that lift limiting devices and latches. The platform is horizontal and never tilted forward or rearward when elevated.do not operate on a side slope. with caution. are functional. planks. 2. take the following additional precautions to protect personnel: 1. load. only one location of controls shall be capable of being operated at one time. c. Take the following precautions whenever personnel are elevated with a forklift truck: 1. Avoid overhead obstructions and electric wires. and only at their request. 7. etc. 12. 14. 8. 15. Do not climb on any part of the truck in attempting to enter or exit. only for minor adjustments in horizontal positioning when personnel are on the platform. when the controls on the elevating platform have been selected for use. Means to correctly locate the platform centered laterally on the truck. Emergency-lowering means available at ground level should be provided. The following information should be prominently indicated on the platform: i. if provided. 6. on the platform for the purpose of achieving additional reach or height is prohibited. 3. 11. minimum capacity of the truck on which the platform can be used. Before elevating personnel. Ensure the mast is vertical . 9. 6. Chapter 15 Construction Hoisting and Rigging Equipment Requirements 15-42 . Means shall be provided to protect b. 5. measured parallel to the longitudinal center plane of the truck. such means shall be protected against misuse. Keep hands and feet clear of controls other than those in use. 8. The operator shall remain in the control position of the forklift truck. footing. 7. Means shall be provided whereby personnel on the platform can shut off power to the truck. weight of empty platform. 13. 4. Lower platform to floor level for personnel to enter and exit.. Whenever a truck (except for high-lift order-picker trucks) is equipped with vertical hoisting controls elevateable with the lifting carriage or forks. Floor dimensions that neither exceed two times the load center distance listed on the truck nameplate. Ensure personnel and equipment on the platform do not to exceed the available space. nor have a width greater than the overall width of the truck (measured across the load bearing tires) plus 10 in. Place all travel controls in neutral and set parking brake.DOE-STD-1090-99 be capable of withstanding a concentrated force of 200 lb (91 kg) in any direction. | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | d. maximum load including personnel and equipment. Ensure the truck has a firm and level | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | 2. The use of railings. Lift and lower personnel smoothly. and personnel shall not exceed one-half of the capacity as indicated on the nameplate of the truck on which the platform is used. Means shall be provided to render inoperative all operating controls on the elevating platform. 9. mark area with cones or other devices to warn of work by elevated personnel. and only at their request. Move truck and/or platform slowly. Personnel are to remain on the platform floor. ii. (25-cm) on either side. The combined weight of the platform. ladders. 10. Means to securely attach the platform to the lifting carriage or forks in such a manner that it cannot slide or bounce off the forks. iii.

body belts with lanyards. engage the parking brake and block the wheels. When not in the operating position. Be certain that required restraining means such as railings. 19. cable. or deceleration devices. etc. | | | | | | 15-43 Chapter 15 Construction Hoisting and Rigging Equipment Requirements . 17. | | | | | | | | | | | | 18.DOE-STD-1090-99 personnel from moving parts of the forklift truck that present a hazard when the personnel platform is in the normal working position.. chains. shall be provided. Do not transport personnel from one location to another while they are on the work platform. as necessary for operating conditions. 16. Overhead protection. are in place and properly used.

DOE-STD-1090-99 INTENTIONALLY BLANK Chapter 15 Construction Hoisting and Rigging Equipment Requirements 15-44 .

and attachments.Condition Load Backrest Extension .Buckle and retractor working smoothly OPERATIONAL CHECKS -Unusual Noises Must be Reported Immediately Accelerator Linkage Parking Brake / Deadman Steering Drive Control .attached and legible Operators manual . Battery Tires .Condition and pressure Forks. OPERATORS PRE-SHIFT INSPECTION (ELECTRIC FORKLIFT) Date_____________________ Vehicle No. Mast chains & Stops Finger guards .Hydraulic Oil._____________________________ Shift _______________ Type and Model___________________________________________________ Hour Meter _________ OK Maintenance Needed-Reported to: VISUAL CHECKS Leaks .attached Safety warnings .Forward and Reverse Tilt Control . We recommend that you document that these inspections have been made. information matches Model & Serial Nos. Inspected by:___________________________________ Custodian:___________________________________ 15-45 Chapter 15 Construction Hoisting and Rigging Equipment Requirements .Forward and Back Hoist & Lowering Control Attachment Control Horn Lights Back-Up Alarm Hour Meter Battery Discharge Gauge Daily Pre-Shift Inspections are an OSHA requirement.Located on truck and legible Capacity Plate .solid attachment Hydraulic hoses.attached. Seat Belt .DOE-STD-1090-99 EXHIBIT I Typical Preuse Inspection Procedures (sheet 1 of 2). Top Clip retaining pin and heel .

OPERATORS PRE-SHIFT INSPECTION (GAS. Seat Belt . information matches Model & Serial Nos.Located on truck and legible Capacity Plate . and attachments.attached and legible Operators manual .Hydraulic Oil.Condition Load Backrest Extension . Inspected by:___________________________________ Custodian:___________________________________ Chapter 15 Construction Hoisting and Rigging Equipment Requirements 15-46 .DOE-STD-1090-99 EXHIBIT I Typical Peruse Inspection Procedures (sheet 2 of 2).Forward and Reverse Tilt Control .Buckle and retractor working smoothly OPERATIONAL CHECKS -Unusual Noises Must be Reported Immediately Accelerator Linkage Parking Brake Steering Drive Control . LP.attached Safety warnings . Mast chains & Stops Finger guards . or DIESEL FORKLIFT) Date_____________________ Vehicle No.attached.solid attachment Hydraulic hoses. Hydraulic Leaks . Fuel Tires . Battery._____________________________ Shift _______________ Type and Model___________________________________________________ Hour Meter _________ OK Maintenance Needed-Reported to: VISUAL CHECKS Fluid Levels -Oil . Radiator .Forward and Back Hoist & Lowering Control Attachment Control Horn Lights Back-Up Alarm Hour Meter Daily Pre-Shift Inspections are an OSHA requirement.Condition and pressure Forks. Top Clip retaining pin and heel . We recommend that you document that these inspections have been made.

7.28. Guided Industrial Vehicles. Standard Practice for Magnetic Particle Examination. ANSI/ASME HST-4M. Side Boom Tractors.5.16.10. Hook Type.9.1. Performance Standard for Electric Wire Rope Hoists. Railings and Toe Boards. Manually Lever Operated Hoists. ASME B30. Work Platforms Suspended From Cranes or Derricks. ASME B30. fabrication. ANSI A10.6. ASME B56. ASME B56.1. Mobile and Locomotive Cranes.6. ASME B30. Rough Terrain Fork Lift Trucks. Underhung Hoist). Overhead and Gantry Cranes (Top Running Bridge.18.22. American National Standards Institute ANSI A10. Chapter 16 References | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | 16-1 . ANSI/ASME HST-3M. | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | American Iron and Steel Institute AISI Standards for Type-302 or Type-304 stainless steel. Overhead Hoists (Underhung). ASME B30. Floor and Wall Openings. ANSI/AWS D14. ASME HST-1M. ASME B30. Slings. Handling Loads Suspended from Rotorcraft.11. Performance Standard for Manually Lever Operated Chain Hoists. Hooks.DOE-STD-1090-99 CHAPTER 16 REFERENCES American Institute of Steel Construction AISC Specifications for the design.5.14. Performance Standard for Electric Chain Hoists. Specifications for Underhung Cranes and Monorail Systems. and erection of structural steel for buildings. Single Girder. Articulating Boom Cranes. Overhead and Gantry Cranes (Top-Running Bridge. Devices. Performance Standard for Hand Chain Manually Operated Chain Hoists. ASME B30. Specification for Welding of Industrial and Mill Cranes and Other Material Handling Equipment.20. Specification for Alloy Steel Chain. Base-Mounted Drum Hoists.2. ASME B30. ANSI/ASTM Specification E-709. ASME HST-2M.21. ASME B30.1 Safety Standard for Powered Industrial Trucks—Low Lift and High Lift Trucks. Top-Running Trolley Hoist). Industrial Crane Trucks. Monorail Systems and Underhung Cranes. Below-The-Hook Lifting | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | ASME B56. ASME B30.7.4. ANSI/ASTM Specification E-165. Performance Standard for Air Chain Hoists. ASME B30.11.12. ASME B30. Derricks. ANSI/ASME HST-5M. ASME B30. Special Notice 6-88 ASME B56. ASME B30. Single or Multiple Girder. ANSI/ASTM Specification A391. ASME B30. ASME B56. ANSI MH 27. Standard Practice for Liquid Penetrant Inspection Method. Forks and Fork Carriers for Powered Industrial Fork Lift Trucks. ANSI/ASME HST-6M.17. Performance Standard for Air Wire Rope Hoists.

American Society for Nondestructive Testing Recommended Practice No.41. UL 583. Physical Qualification for Drivers. Standard for Special Lifting Devices for Shipping Containers Weighing 10. ANSI/ASME NQA-1. | | | | | | | | Department of Energy DOE 440. Powered Industrial Trucks. American Welding Society ANSI/AWS D1. Mobile Power Crane and Excavator Standards and Hydraulic Crane Standards.DOE-STD-1090-99 ANSI N14. Method of Test. 74. CMAA No. Power Crane and Shovel Association PCSA-4. National Electrical Code. | | | Department of Labor 29 CFR 1910.1 Structural Welding Code—Steel. Load-Indicating Devices in Lifting Crane Service. Crane Load Stability Test SAE J874. Electric-Battery-Powered Industrial Trucks. 70. Single Girder. Worker Protection Management for Federal and Contractor Employees | | Underwriters' Laboratories UL 558. National Fire Protection Association ANSI/NFPA 505.1. Code. Department of Transportation 49 CFR 391. Crane Manufacturers' Association of America CMAA No.6.000 Pounds (4500 kg) or More for Nuclear Materials. Quality Assurance Program Requirements for Nuclear Facilities. Type Designation and Areas of Use. Specification for Electric Overhead Traveling Cranes. | | | Society of Automotive Engineers SAE J376-85. ASNT-TC-1A. Occupational Safety and Health Standards for General Industry. Internal-Combustion-Engine-Powered Industrial Trucks. NFPA 70. SAE J987. Center of Gravity Test Code. ASME Cranes for Nuclear Facilities: Nuclear Underhung and Monorail Cranes (NUM) Nuclear Overhead and Gantry Cranes (NOG) | | | | | | | | | | 29 CFR 1926. Occupational Safety and Health Regulations for Construction. Specification for Top Running and Under Running. Chapter 16 References 16-2 .SAE J765. Crane Structure. Electric Overhead Traveling Cranes.

.1. Some specific requirements listed in this appendix are more restrictive than consensus standard requirements. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . the requisitioner shall review applicable standards or specifications and identify requirements to which the manufacturer shall adhere. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . proof-load test certification. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . More specific information or requirements may be obtained by consulting the applicable section of this manual or an equipment manufacturer. .1 General Construction . . . . . . . . . 1. . . . . . . . . .3 Load Blocks . . . . . . . . . . . . The manufacturer shall provide requested documentation as appropriate (e. . . . . . A-1 A-1 A-1 A-1 A-2 A-3 A-3 A-3 A-3 A-3 A-4 A-5 A-5 A-6 A-i Appendix A Procurement Guidelines . . . . . but are recommended to ensure materials of adequate quality and workmanship are provided. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5. . . . . . . . . . . . Nationally recognized standards and specifications are referenced for listed items. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . .2 Hoist Hooks . . . . . . . Since this appendix contains only a partial listing of commonly used rigging hardware. . . . . . . . .1. . . . . . . . . . .1 MANUALLY OPERATED LEVER HOIST . . . . . . . . . caution should be used prior to procurement of special items in order to verify appropriate specification or standard reference and requirements. . 2.1. .4 Hoist Brakes . However. . . . . . . . 4. . . . . . 1. . . . . . . If the information provided in this appendix is used in the development of specifications for purchase of cranes or other special handling equipment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Load Controlling Mechanism . . . . . . . .1 MANUAL. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1.1 WIRE ROPE . . . . This appendix primarily contains procurement criteria for off-the-shelf type items. . . . . . ELECTRIC AND AIR OPERATED HOISTS .g. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Load Blocks . . . . . . . . . . . . . Quality receipt inspections should be provided for all received materials in order to verify compliance of all requirements stated on the purchase order. . . .1 BELOW THE HOOK STRUCTURAL AND MECHANICAL LIFTING DEVICES . . . . . . . . 2. . . . . . .1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . the appropriate engineering group should be consulted. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4. .1 Construction . . . . . 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Load Chain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . material certification). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The documentation shall be signed by the manufacturer's authorized representative.1. . . . .. . . . .1. . . . . . . 1. . . . .1 Load Chain . . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . . . . rated load certification. . . . . . . . .DOE-STD-1090-99 APPENDIX A PROCUREMENT GUIDELINES This appendix provides guidance in preparing purchase requisitions for hoisting and rigging materials and equipment. . . . . . . . . . 2. . . . . . . . . . . . .1 SHOP/FLOOR CRANES . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 HOIST RINGS. . .1 HOOKS . . 8. . . . . . . . . . . . A-10 10. . . . . . . . .1 TURNBUCKLES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-16 16. A-7 A-8 A-9 9. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Type III Rigging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 SWIVEL HOIST RINGS . .1 EYE BOLTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-13 13. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PEAR SHAPED LINKS . . .1 CHAIN SLINGS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-15 15. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-11 11. . . .1 WIRE ROPE CLIPS (Clamps) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .DOE-STD-1090-99 6. . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-17 Appendix A Procurement Guidelines A-ii . . . . . . . . . A-14 14. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-12 12. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 SYNTHETIC POLYESTER ROUND SLINGS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 SHACKLES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 SYNTHETIC SLINGS . . . .1 WIRE ROPE SLINGS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Load chain shall be proof tested by the chain or hoist manufacturer with a load test of 1-1/2 times the hoist rated load divided by the number of chain parts supporting the load.  +RLVW +RRNV If hooks are of the swiveling type. 3. load blocks shall be of the enclosed type. On electric. chains. Manufacturer shall supply instruction manual for each hoist. 4) Circuit ampacity C) Air Powered Hoist 1) Name of manufacturer 2) Manufacturer's model and serial number 3) Rated air pressure b. ELECTRIC AND AIR OPERATED HOISTS d. Load chain may be either roller or welded link chain. The rated load shall be marked on the hoist or load block. 2. On hand chain operated hoists.DOE-STD-1090-99 1. maybe supplied separately)  /RDG &KDLQ a. and provisions shall be made to guard against jamming of the load chain within the hoist mechanism under normal operating conditions. maintenance. Suggested requirements include but are not limited to the following: 1. electric and air operated hoists shall meet or exceed the requirements of ASME/ANSI B30. Load chain shall be pitched so as to pass over all load sprockets without binding. and means A-1 Appendix A Procurement Guidelines . Load sprockets shall have teeth or pockets to allow engagement of the load chain.or air-powered hoists. Refer to ASME/ANSI B 30. electric.16. shall be guarded.1 MANUAL. b. or air operated hoists shall have affixed to the hoist or load block a label or labels displaying precautionary information concerning operating procedures c. Operation 3. and repair 5. Hooks shall be equipped with latches unless the application makes the use of the latch impractical. Lubrication. c. All manual.  /RDG %ORFNV a.10. under slack conditions such items as. etc. but not limited to slings. they should rotate freely. b. Wiring diagram (electric powered only. When required. Manual. the manual shall include the following information and instructions: 1. a. a latch shall be provided to bridge the throat opening of the hook and retain. Installation 2. Shall be marked with identification as follows: A) Hand Chain Operated 1) Name of manufacturer 2) Manufacturer's model or serial number B) Electric-Powered Hoist 1) Name of manufacturer 2) Manufacturer's model or serial number 3) Voltage of AC or DC power supply and phase and frequency of AC power supply. Inspection and Testing 4. a means shall be provided to guard against load chain jamming in the load block under normal operating conditions.

limit the speed of load during lowering. b. stop and hold the load hook in the event of a complete power failure. Air-powered hoist. the braking system shall perform the following functions: 1. The braking system shall have provision for adjustments where necessary to compensate for wear. with or without power. Electric-powered hoist.  +RLVW %UDNHV by the service. Hand chain operated hoist(s) shall be so designed that. to a maximum speed of 120% of rated lowering speed for the load being handled. the braking system shall perform the following functions: 1. The braking system shall have provision for adjustments where necessary to compensate for wear. e. 2. a. under normal operating conditions with rated load and test conditions with test loads up to 125% of rated load. c.DOE-STD-1090-99 shall be be provided to guard against rope or load chain jamming in the load block under normal operating conditions. under normal operating conditions with rated load and test conditions with test loads up to 125% of rated load. 4. it will automatically stop and hold any test load up to 125% of the rated load. stop and hold the load hook when controls are released. when the actuating force is removed. 2. prevent an uncontrolled lowering of the load in the event of a loss of air pressure 3. The braking system shall have thermal capacity for the frequency of operation required by the service. d. Stop and hold the load hook when controls are released. The braking system shall have thermal capacity for the frequency of operation required Appendix A Procurement Guidelines A-2 . 3.

Shall be marked with identification as follows A) Name of Manufacturer B) Manufacturer's model or serial number 6.21.  /RDG %ORFNV a.1 MANUALLY OPERATED LEVER HOIST b. the tension on the parts shall be equalized. Suggested requirements include but are not limited to the following: 1. 2. and provisions shall be made to guard against jamming of the load chain with the hoist mechanism under normal operating conditions. the manual shall include the following information and instructions: 1. a label or labels displaying precautionary information concerning operating procedures. If a load is supported by more than one part of load chain. Shall be equipped with a load controlling mechanism. maintenance. 5. Provide for incidental movement of the load when lifting or lowering. 3.  /RDG &RQWUROOLQJ 0HFKDQLVP a. Shall have the rated load marked on the hoist or load block 3. shall be guarded.DOE-STD-1090-99 2. c. Operation 2. Lubrication. Shall have affixed to the hoist or load block in a readable position. Shall have identifications for controls to indicate function or direction of motion. 2. Load chain shall be proof tested by the chain or hoist manufacturer with a load test of 1-1/2 times the hoist rated load divided by the number of chain parts supporting the load.  &RQVWUXFWLRQ Shall have means to guard against load chain jamming in the load block under normal operating conditions. 1. Stop and hold the load when the lever force is removed and the lever stroke completed.  /RDG &KDLQ a. Shall be tested by the manufacturer with a test load of at least 125% of the rated load 4. Manufacturer shall supply instruction manual for each hoist. Manually operated lever hoists shall meet or exceed the requirements of ASME/ANSI B30. which shall perform the following functions under normal operating conditions with test loads up to 125% of the rated load. Friction brake shall have provision for adjustment where necessary to compensate for wear a. A-3 Appendix A Procurement Guidelines . and repair Load sprockets shall have pockets or teeth to allow engagement of the load chain. Inspection and Testing 3. Load chain may be either roller or welded link type and shall be pitched so as to pass over all sprockets without binding.

that has a capacity capable of sustaining the proof load of the unit. Shop cranes equipped with internal load limiting devices shall. or snagging hazards. 9. 3.1 SHOP/FLOOR CRANES 5. The operation of controls should be clear to the operator either by position. Shop/floor cranes not equipped with internal load limit devices shall be capable of performing a proof test of 150% of the rated capacity. Shall have required product warnings and markings a. 7. function. Suggested requirements include but are not limited to the following: 1. The load hook shall be provided with a latching mechanism. Because of the potential hazards associated with the misuse of equipment of this type.DOE-STD-1090-99 3. 2. when the load limiting device is deactivated. 4. Shall have a positive means to prevent the load from being lowered or raised beyond the design limit of travel. Shop/floor cranes shall be provided with a load hook and/or chain at the end of the boom extension. Operating controls shall be designed in such a manner that they are readily visible and accessible to the operator and so that the operator will not be subjected to pinch points. no alterations shall be made to the product. 6. The release system shall require intentional positive action by the operator for release to prevent accidental lowering. labeling or combination thereof. Shall meet or exceed the requirements of ASME PALD-1993. be capable of performing a proof load test of 125% of rated capacity. sharp edges. Appendix A Procurement Guidelines A-4 . 8.

2. Electrical equipment and wiring shall com ply with Article 610 of ANSI/NFPA 70. A load test.000 Pounds or More for Nuclear Materials). and confirmation of lifter load rating shall be supplied. and chain drives that constitute a hazard under normal operating conditions should be guarded. Suggested requirements include but are not limited to the following: 1. Guards for exposed moving parts such as. (45KG) D) Rated load Capacity  *HQHUDO &RQVWUXFWLRQ a. 5.DOE-STD-1090-99 4. e. 4. projecting shafts. A load test cetificate indicating the date of load test. Welding shall be in accordance with ANSI/AWS D1. Rated load should not be more than 80% of the maximum load sustained during the test.20.6 (Standard for Shipping Containers Weighing 10. these lifters shall also be marked with their individual rated loads. If the lifter is made up of several lifters. but not limited to gearing. 3. each detachable from the group. c. amount of load applied. Shall have a minimum design factor of 3 based on yield strength for all load bearing structural components. b.000 lbs or more that are used for radioactive materials maybe governed by ANSI N14. NOTE: Special lifting devices for shipping containers weighing 10. Shall have the rated load capacity marked on the main structure where it is visible. Shall have a complete or other permanent marking affixed to the lifter displaying the following: A) Manufacturer's Name B) Serial Number/Identification Number C) Lifter Weight if over 100 lbs.1 BELOW THE HOOK STRUCTURAL AND MECHANICAL LIFTING DEVICES 6. not to exceed 125% of the rated load unless otherwise recommended by a manufacturer shall be provided. Shall be designed to withstand the forces imposed by the rated load. a. d. A-5 Appendix A Procurement Guidelines . Shall conform to requirements of ASME/ANSI B30.

Macwhyte Company. Of America. core. Bridon American Corporation. Broderick & Bascom Rope Co. material number and the nominal breaking strength of a sample. the diameter. lay. and unless recommended otherwise by a crane or hoist manufacturer). Wire rope shall have documentation from the manufacturer traceable to the material furnished and signed by the manufacturer's authorized representative.e. grade. Shall be shipped lubricated and with a protective covering. number of strands. i.DOE-STD-1090-99 5.. a. Paulsen Wire Rope Corporation. manufacturer's lot/run number. Williamsport Wire Rope. Wire rope shall be made in the United States by a member of the Wire Rope Technical Board1 (except stainless steel. Documentation should reference as a minimum the purchase order number.1 WIRE ROPE d. Wire Rope Corp. c. Note: This list is not all inclusive and may not include subsidiary companies Appendix A Procurement Guidelines 1 A-6 . plastic or cardboard. The Rochester Company. Suggested requirements include but are not limited to the following: b. Union Wire Rope. e. Wire rope shall meet or exceed the requirements of Federal Specification RR-W410D or Mil Specification MIL-2-83420. Stainless steel wire rope shall be made in the United States and shall be 302 or 304 grade stainless steel unless otherwise recommended by a crane or hoist manufacturer.

manufacturer's grade. 8. 7. reach. A-7 Appendix A Procurement Guidelines . 4. 6. Hooks. pear-shaped links.184. rings. date of test.1 CHAIN SLINGS 5. The proof load for multiple leg slings shall be applied to the individual legs and shall be twice the rated load of a single leg sling. Alloy steel chain slings shall have permanently affixed durable identification stating size. Shall meet or exceed requirements of ASME/ANSI B30. 2. number of legs. welded or mechanical coupling links or other attachments shall have a rated load of at least equal to that of alloy steel chain with which they are used. and sling manufacturer. rated load and angle upon which the rating is based. 3. Suggested requirements include but are not limited to the following: 1. and amount of load applied. oblong links.DOE-STD-1090-99 6. Hooks attached to chain slings shall meet the requirements of ASME/ANSI B30. A certificate of proof test shall be provided by the manufacturer or supplier referencing the specific sling identification number.9 and 29 CFR 1910.10. All welded components in the sling assembly shall be proof load tested as components or as part of the sling assembly. (Employer shall retain a certificate of the proof test and shall make it available for examination. The welded components of all new slings shall be proof tested by the component or sling manufacturer to twice the rated load.) a.

Product warnings relative to the proper use. The LTC shall reference as a minimum the PO number.9. The proof load shall be two times the vertical rated load of a single leg sling. 14. 10. 11. B) uniform thickness and width. including selvage edges. sling capacity. and lot/run number.DOE-STD-1090-99 7. to prevent raveling.184 and ASME/ANSI B30. Suggested requirements include but are not limited to the following: 1. and maintenance shall accompany the shipment. Shall meet or exceed the requirements of 29 CFR 1910. Leather wear pads are not recommended. date of proof test. or other suitable means. D) webbing ends shall be sealed by heat. 3. End fittings shall have sufficient strength to sustain twice the rated load of the sling without permanent deformation. amount of load applied. 8. 6. D) Rated loads for the type of hitches used. NOTE: Hand written. Thread used in the manufacture of synthetic web slings shall be the same generic type yarn as the sling webbing. Multiple leg bridle slings shall have the proof load applied to the individual legs. Webbing shall have the following characteristics: A) sufficient certified tensile strength to meet the sling manufacturer's requirements. 4. featuring red core yarns. The LTC shall be signed by the manufacturers authorized representative. 9. C) Type of synthetic web material. C) full woven width. 12. Stitches shall be lock-stitched and preferably continuous. a. A load test certificate (LTC) shall be provided for each lot of slings supplied. Appendix A Procurement Guidelines A-8 . Fabric wear pads should be sewn into the bearing points of the sling eye's. B) Manufacturer's code or stock number. The load carrying splice shall be sewn with a pattern of sufficient strength to justify the manufacturer's rated capacities. 7. Traceability should be specific mill lots. it shall be back stitched at the ends to prevent raveling. Shall have a minimum design factor of 5. When not continuous. care. The manufacturer shall have on file a written system of sling traceability as well as a quality control procedure. 5. 2. 13. or ink embossed markings are not acceptable. Single leg and endless synthetic-web slings shall be proof tested to 200% of the rated load.1 SYNTHETIC SLINGS EACH SLING SHALL BE PERMANENTLY MARKED WITH THE FOLLOWING: A) Manufacturer's name or trademark. Should be manufactured from webbing specifically constructed for overhead lifting.

E) Length (reach) . Each polyester roundsling shall be permanently marked or labeled showing: A) Name or trademark of manufacturer. 10. The LTC shall reference a a minimum the PO number. 3. When the core and cover are of different fiber types. both fiber types shall be identified. When the cover is a different fiber type than the load bearing core.. 9. 11. a. All stitching shall be lock-stitched type and should be continuous. The design factor for new polyester roundslings and polyester roundslings incorporating fittings shall be a minimum of five (5). A-9 Appendix A Procurement Guidelines . (vertical. vertical basket) D) Core fiber type . Slings should meet or exceed requirements of the Web Sling and Tiedown Association. follow the manufacturer’s recommendations for use. 8. 2. 5. wound together on a plurality of turns. recommended specification for roundslings made of poleyster fibers used for general lifting purposes. amount of load applied. 4. Each manufacturer shall internally identify their product with name or trademark for traceability. The core(s) should be uniformly wound to ensure even distribution of the load. In. The core(s) shall be formed from one or more ends of yarn. C) Rated capacities for the three basic hitches. The cover should be made from one length of material.if cover(s) is of a different fiber type. Polyester roundslings including those incorporating welded fittings shall be proof tested to two (2) times the rated capacity. choker. date of proof test.DOE-STD-1090-99 8. sling capacity and lot/run number. A load test certificate (LTC) shall be provided for each lot of slings supplied. The LTC shall be signed by the manufacturers authorized representative. 6. Suggested requirements include but are not limited to the following: 1. the thread should be of the same fiber type as the cover.1 SYNTHETIC POLYESTER ROUND SLINGS 7. When the core and cover are of the same fiber. The cover(s) should be of the same fiber type as the load bearing core(s). When not continuous. the thread shall also be of that fiber type. they shall be back stitched or overstitched to prevent raveling.bearing point to bearing point. B) Manufacturer’s code or stock number.

and swaged socket or poured socket assemblies shall be load tested to two times the rated vertical load. 4. Wire rope shall meet the requirements of Federal Specification RR-W-410D or Military Specification MIL-W-83420. amount of load applied. Multiple leg bridle slings shall be tagged with a durable tag on the master link indicating the working load limit for the total combined legs for each individual sling in a vertical configuration.e. & lot/run number. 2. Suggested requirements include but are not limited to the following: 1. manufacturing lot/run number. Shall be individually tagged with a durable tag including the following information: A) WLL (Working Load Limit) B) Purchase order number or serial number C) Manufacturer's name or ID 11. 6. The purchase order number or serial number and the manufacturer’s ID should be supplied. Wire rope purchased to fabricate slings shall be made in the United States by a member of Wire Rope Technical Board (Except stainless steel). sling capacity. Slings should be either 6 x 19 or 6 x 37 classification. 12. lay. Shall have a minimum of 5 to 1 safety factor. Documentation shall reference as a minimum the PO number. Wire rope shall have documentation from the manufacturer traceable to the material furnished and signed by the manufacturer's authorized representative. hitch. date of proof test. 8. times the vertical rated load of a single leg sling of the same size. dependent upon the type of expected service due to the type of load. 7. Single leg hand tucked slings shall have a proof load equal to the rated load but shall not exceed 125% of the rated load. core. or environment. 13.184 and ASME/ANSI B30. Shall be shipped lubricated and with a protective covering.9. plastic or cardboard. Any master link to which multiple leg slings are connected shall be proof loaded to 2 times the force applied by the combined legs 14. i.1 WIRE ROPE SLINGS 9. Shall meet or exceed the requirements of 29 CFR 1910. a.DOE-STD-1090-99 9. and construction of rope.25 for hand tucked splice or 2 for mechanical splice. The LTC shall reference as a minimum the PO number. Stainless steel wire rope shall be made in the United States and shall be 302 or 304 Grade stainless steel. Consideration may be given to other grades or types of wire rope. Mechanical spliced single leg and endless wire rope slings. number of strands. grade. LTC shall be signed by the manufacturer's authorized representative. the diameter. master reel number and nominal breaking strength of sample. The proof load for multiple leg bridle slings shall be applied to the individual legs and shall be either 1. grade. 5. 3. 10. Shall have a load test certificate (LTC) for each lot of slings supplied. Slings should be made of wire rope produced from EXIPS (Extra Improved Plow Steel) with an IWRC (Independent Wire Rope Center). Appendix A Procurement Guidelines A-10 .

Shall be permanently and legibly marked with the size and manufacturer's identifying mark.DOE-STD-1090-99 10.1 WIRE ROPE CLIPS (Clamps) 2. a. Wire rope clips should be shipped with application instructions and product warnings for each type or size clip. A-11 Appendix A Procurement Guidelines . Shall meet or exceed requirements of Federal Specification FF-C-450D. Suggested requirements include but are not limited to the following: 1. 3.

" and ANSI/ASME B18. Alloy steel eye bolts shall have the symbol "A" (denoting alloy) and the manufacturer's name or identification forged in raised letters on the surface of the eyebolt. a.1 EYE BOLTS 2. Suggested requirements include but are not limited to the following: 1. 3.DOE-STD-1090-99 11. Shall be fabricated from forged carbon or alloy steel and shall meet or exceed the requirements of ASTM specification A489 for "Carbon Steel Eye Bolts" or ASTM F541 "Standard Specification for Alloy Steel Eyebolts. The safe working load shall have a safety factor of 5. Eye bolts used for lifting service shall have the manufacturer’s name or identification mark forged in raised characters on the surface of the eyebolt.15 "Forged Eye Bolts". Appendix A Procurement Guidelines A-12 .

DOE-STD-1090-99 12. 4.10. or die stamped on a low stress non wearing area of the hook. Hooks used for lifting service shall meet or exceed the requirements of ANSI/ASME B30. material.1 HOOKS 3. A-13 Appendix A Procurement Guidelines . When proof tests are used to verify manufacturing process. or configuration. Suggested requirements include but are not limited to the following: 1. hooks shall be able to withstand proof load application. 2. Proof loads for hooks up to 50 ton capacity shall be 200% of rated load. Manufacturer’s identification shall be forged cast. without permanent deformation when a load is applied for a minimum of 15 seconds. Performance testing of hooks shall not be required except where necessary to conform to requirements for the equipment of which they are a part of. a.

1 SWIVEL HOIST RINGS 4. All hoist rings shall be individually proof load tested to a minimum of 2 times the working load limit. 6. but no more than 2 1/2 times. Shall have the manufacturer's name or trademark permanently marked on the swivel hoist ring. Shall be permanently marked by the manufacturer with the WLL and recommended torque value. a. Suggested requirements include but are not limited to the following: 1.DOE-STD-1090-99 13. Shall have a proof load certificate supplied from the manufacturer with each swivel hoist ring. 2. 5. Shall be packaged with proper application instructions and warning information. Shall have a minimum safety factor of 4 based on ultimate breaking strength. Appendix A Procurement Guidelines A-14 . 3.

Note: NDT is not required for forged rings or links. Welded rings or links shall be subjected to a nondestructive weld test (NDT) and have documentation provided.DOE-STD-1090-99 14. A-15 Appendix A Procurement Guidelines . Shall have a minimum safety factor of 5 based on ultimate breaking strength. Should be marked by the manufacturer with the manufacturer's name or trademark and ring or link size. Suggested requirements include but are not limited to the following: 1.1 HOIST RINGS. a. PEAR SHAPED LINKS 3. 2. Rings shall be forged or welded from low alloy steel. 4. 5. Shall meet or exceed the requirements of RR-C-271-D.

shackle size. 3.1 SHACKLES C) Shackle markings shall be raised or stamped letters of the maximum height permitted by the size of the shackle component being marked. the fractured member shall show a permanent distortion before breaking. Shackles shall be sufficiently ductile so that.DOE-STD-1090-99 15. Class 2. B) Grade B high strength shackle pins and bolts shall be marked by the raised or stamped letters "HS" on the head. when fractured. Grade A shackles (Regular Strength). 8. Class 1. Safety Anchor. Type of shackles covered by this specification include: Class 1. a. 5. Class 3. Each shackle body shall be permanently and legibly marked in raised or stamped letters on the side of the shackle bow with the identifying manufacturer's name or trademark. 4. Round Pin Chain. together with their pins and bolts shall be forged from carbon steel. Screw Pin Anchor. 7. and the recommended safe working load. Shackle pins shall fit freely without binding and seat properly. Shackles shall meet or exceed the requirements of Federal Specification RR-C271D. A) Grade A regular strength shackle pins and bolts shall be unmarked. Appendix A Procurement Guidelines A-16 . 2. Suggested requirements include but are not limited to the following: 1. Shackles shall have minimum 5 to 1 safety factor. Round Pin Anchor. 6. Grade B shackles (High Strength) together with their pins and bolts shall be forged from alloy steel. and Class 3. Screw Pin Chain. Class 2. Shackle samples shall be subjected to proof loads of two times the working load limit. Safety Chain shackles.

Manufacturer's name or trademark and turnbuckle size shall be permanently marked on the body of the turnbuckle.DOE-STD-1090-99 16.1 TURNBUCKLES . 2. Turnbuckles shall have a minimum safety factor of 5 based on ultimate breaking strength. 7. 3. Shall be provided with a jam nut of a type which does not depend upon deformation of the threads for security. Proof test loads shall be one-half the specified breaking strength for the end pull. Certificate shall indicate as a minimum the size. WLL.9. Section 3. Turnbuckles used for rigging applications shall meet or exceed the requirements of Federal Specification FF-T791B. test weight. Certificate of proof test shall be A-17 Appendix A Procurement Guidelines . Suggested requirements include but are not limited to the following: 1. 6.3.Type III Rigging provided by the manufacturer for selected samples from each lot. Shall be fabricated from forged alloy steel. 5. 4. and date of test. a.

DOE-STD-1090-99 INTENTIONALLY BLANK Appendix A Procurement Guidelines A-18 .

DOE-STD-1090-99 Exhibit 1. A-19 Appendix A Procurement Guidelines .Purchase Requisition Example.

grade.PURCHASE REQUISITION Item No. Shall be shipped lubricated and with a protective covering. grade. and nominal breaking strength of sample. plastic or cardboard. Shall meet the requirements of RR-W-410D Federal Specification for Wire Rope and Strand or MIL-W-83420 for aircraft cable. FUNCTIONAL REQUIREMENTS FOR WIRE ROPE SLINGS: Wire rope purchased to fabricate slings shall be made in the United States by a member of the Wire Rope Technical Board. manufacturing lot/run number or master reel number and nominal breaking strength of sample.Purchase Requisition Example (continued) Appendix A Procurement Guidelines A-20 .e. Shall be mechanical flemish eye spliced.O. Wire Rope Shall have Documentation from the manufacturer traceable to the material furnished and signed by the manufacturer's authorized representative.DOE-STD-1090-99 CONTINUATION . number. state the diameter number of strands. number of strands. i. core. Acceptance Criteria: Quality receipt inspection shall verify that the manufacturer is a member of the Wire Rope Technical Board (for carbon steel). lay. Wire Rope shall have Documentation from the manufacturer traceable to the material furnished and signed by the manufacturer's authorized representative. grade. core. Documentation Shall reference as a minimum the P. i. manufacturing lot/run number. verify the diameter. Documentation Shall reference as a minimum the PURCHASE ORDER number.e. Shall be shipped lubricated and with a protective covering. master reel number. core and documentation as complete and meets or exceeds the requirements of this scope. lay. state the diameter. Shall meet the requirements of RR-W-410D Federal Specification for Wire Rope and Strand or MIL-W-83420 for aircraft cable. plastic or cardboard. EXAMPLE ONLY Unit Price Total Price GA99 0026 Exhibit 1 . lay. Quantity Unit Description (Salient Features) FUNCTIONAL REQUIREMENTS FOR WIRE ROPE: Carbon steel wire rope shall be made in the United States by a member of the Wire Rope Technical Board. Single leg slings Shall be either 6 x 19 or 6 x 37 classification.

DOE-STD-1090-99 CONCLUDING MATERIAL Review Activity: DOE DP EH EM RW ER Field Offices CH ID Project Number: NV SAFT-0068 OR RL SR Preparing Activity: DOE-EH-51 National Laboratories FERMILAB INEEL ORNL Area Offices Amarillo Area Office Princeton Area Office Rocky Flats Area Office .

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