Warm-Up Game: Musical Hoops

MICHAEL PROCTOR, 16778072, PDHPE SEMESTER 1H Early Stage 1, Kindergarten

Set Up/Equipment: If possible, instruct students in setting up the following: -25 hoops scattered about a field, court or even large indoor area -If required, use cones to mark a large area around the scattered hoops -CD player/Radio etc. with music -A pile of at least 25 sashes Explanation: Students jog/walk around the area marked with cones whilst music is playing. The teacher randomly turns the music off, at which point, students run to the centre of a hoop. Only one student is permitted to claim a hoop whilst others who were unsuccessful put on a sash from the pile to indicate that they are out. One hoop is then removed and all students continue playing. Students with sashes continue playing in order to prevent students without from claiming hoops. The last student without a sash wins. Why is this game important for this stage? -Students will develop and demonstrate an understanding of language used in games such as walking, jogging and sprinting. -Students will develop gross motor skills whilst walking, jogging and sprinting. -The game promotes the maintenance of a healthy weight, strong bones and muscles. -Prompted questioning will promote the students problem solving skills. What are the PDHPE skills involved in this game? How? -COES1.1: Communicating- Students will adhere and respond to the simple instructions and rules of the game. -DMES1.2: Decision making- When prompted with questioning, students will generate a number of possible solutions to a problem within the game, for example, how will the students without sashes claim hoops before the students with? -MOES1.4: Moving- Students will become aware of the varying speeds they will be required to adopt from jogging or walking whilst the music is playing to running or sprinting when the music stops. Teaching cues: When and where possible, prompt students with questions to engage them in critical and high order thinking, for example: -How are the sashes going to prevent the non-sashes from claiming hoops? -How are the students who are still in going to claim a hoop before others? Where do they hope to be when the music stops?

Warm-Up Game: Teacher Says

Early Stage 1, Kindergarten

Set Up/Equipment/Explanation: This game is a variation of Simon says and will be used as a fun pedagogical alternative to traditional warm-up stretches. Essentially, the teacher will give commands to the students randomly as follows; Teacher says: -Walk/Jog/Run/Sprint on the spot -Do 10 star jumps -Find a partner and skip around whilst holding hands -Hop on the spot with one leg -Balance with only left or right leg and stretch (stretches thigh muscles) -Stretch as high as possible (stretches upper body) -Stretch as high as possible on your tippy toes (stretches hamstring calf and thigh muscles) -Sit on the floor and touch your toes (stretches hamstring, calf and thigh muscles) -Very rarely, depending on how well ES1 correctly listens and implements commands, the teacher could do the wrong command to fool students. The students who got the command wrong could do a lap around a small marked area. -It is important to incorporate a mixture of cardio-vascular stimulating commands and stretches so as not to wear out students for the main body of a lesson. However, a five minute warm-up with only the stretches as commands leading to a ten minute game could be an alternative method. Why is this game important for this stage? -Students will expand their vocabulary of various muscle names and language used in games such as, walk, jog, run, sprint and hop. -Students will learn to respond to simple commands and instructions. -Students will develop and maintain their flexibility through the stretches. -The game promotes cardio-vascular fitness, healthy growth and development.

What are the PDHPE skills involved in this game? How? -COES1.1: Communicating- Students will learn to understand and implement commands/responses the teacher creates whilst also expanding their vocabulary such as, walk, jog, run, sprint and of various muscles. -INES1.3: Interacting- Whilst engaging in partner work (holding hands and skipping) students will learn to relate positively whilst also using self-control to deal with excitement. -MOES1.4: Moving- Students will practice balancing skills through maintaining stillness of head and trunk whilst standing and hopping on one foot. Teaching cues: -The teacher should use the correct terminology for muscles when stretching so as students learn the correct name. -Use enthusiasm and encouragement to engage students. -The teacher could also incorporate music into the game.

Warm-Up Game: Rain Dishes

Stage 1, Year 1

Set Up/Equipment: Instruct students in setting up the following: -35-40 rounded markers scattered about a field, court or large indoor area, half upright and half the opposite -Divide students into two teams, rain catchers and non-rain catchers (do not use team captains) -Use sashes for one team -Make the students imagine it is raining to enforce the concept of turning the markers upright to catch the rain and vice versa Explanation: On the teacher’s whistle, students cooperate with their respective team mates in turning the rounded markers either upright or upside down. At any time the teacher may blow their whistle and introduce rules such as, holding a team mates hand or hopping on left/right foot whilst playing the game. If one team is losing by far or bunching together too much, prompt questioning on team communication and spreading out. Why is this game important for this stage? -Students will learn the importance of communication and team work as they are paramount skills required to win the game. -The game provides opportunities through teamwork for students to make new friends. -The game allows students to develop their understanding of physical changes during and after physical activity such as, heart racing, breathing quickly and feeling flustered. What are the PDHPE skills involved in this game? How? -INS1.3: Interacting- Students will display cooperation within teams such as, listening and responding to communication from peers. -MOS1.4: Moving- Whilst engaging in the variations of movement, students will practice hopping on both their preferred and nonpreferred foot. -PSS1.5: Problem solving- When prompted, students will not only identify problems that their teams are facing during the game, but also, may suggest possible solutions to these problems through critical and high order thinking. Teaching cues: When and where possible, prompt students with questions to engage them in critical and high order thinking, for example: -If one team is winning significantly, how is the losing team going to recover? -Are teams communicating? If not ask them how this could help. -Encourage students to spread out rather than bunching and going for the same rounded markers.

Warm-Up Game: Bean Bag Mix Up

Stage 1, Year 2

Set Up/Equipment: Instruct students in setting up the following: -16 hoops (4 red, 4 blue, 4 green and 4 yellow if possible, otherwise improvise) scattered about a field, court or large indoor area -20+ bean bags which colours correspond to the hoops and put into a pile -Divide students into two teams, the ‘goodies’ and the ‘smugglers’ (do not use team captains) -Use sashes for one team Explanation: On the teacher’s whistle, students cooperate with their respective team mates to either put the bean bags in their corresponding coloured hoops (goodies) or to put them in the wrong hoops (smugglers). Bean bags are permitted to be taken from hoops at any given time and rearranged according to the student’s goal until the teacher blows their whistle for time up. Bean bags are not to be thrown. The teacher may also alternate rules at any time, for example, only hopping on left/right foot or skipping allowed. Why is this game important for this stage? -The game promotes communication and teamwork between students which is pertinent to win the game. -Fast sorting abilities and problem solving capabilities will be enhanced. -The game promotes cardio-vascular fitness, healthy growth and development. What are the PDHPE skills involved in this game? How? -INS1.3: Interacting- Students will display cooperation with team mates through communication and response. -MOS1.4: Moving- Students will learn to repeat movements to form a sequence when hopping, skipping and running. -PSS1.5: Problem Solving- Students will learn to suggest possible solutions to problems within the game when prompted. Obviously the ‘smugglers’ will be faster than the ‘goodies’ as no sorting is required on their behalf and, therefore, how could this be resolved? Teaching cues: When and where possible, prompt students with questions to engage them in critical and high order thinking, for example: -How are the goodies going to sort faster? Will this involve communication? -Will each goodie allocate a colour to themself and only sort that colour in order to promote the sorting speed within the game? -Encourage team communication throughout the game. -If the game is too one sided put a few more students on the goodies team. Make sure all students have had a go at being on both teams.

Warm-Up Game: Pac-Man

Stage 2, Year 3

Set Up/Equipment: Instruct students in setting up the following: -This game requires netball, basketball or volleyball court lines or even any patterns elsewhere that could be improvised. If this is not available, instruct students with chalk to draw various lines over a large paved area -3 soft balls, or the like -2 Red sashes, and a pile of other colours, select two students at random to be ‘ghosts’ and wear a red sash each Explanation: Students are only permitted to run on marked lines and may jump to alternate lines when necessary. The ‘ghosts’ must chase the ‘Pac-Men’ around these marked lines. Once a Pac-Man is tagged they too become a ghost and must put on a sash helping in tagging the remainder of the class. The soft balls may only be used by Pac-Men to throw at ghosts, which, once hit, do a lap around the court etc., drop their sash and are Pac-Men once again. The two ghosts that were originally chosen cannot be changed to Pac-Men and must wear an alternate coloured sash (red) to indicate this. Why is this game important for this stage? -The game promotes fast paced problem solving and communicating skills when running away, chasing, dodging and when deciding which lines to run on. -The game promotes the maintenance of a healthy weight, strong bones and muscles. -Students will develop gross motor skills whilst walking, jogging and sprinting. What are the PDHPE skills involved in this game? How? -INS2.3: Interacting: Students must learn to help one another in order to win the game as the ghosts will learn to communicate and help one another to tag the entire class through strategic planning. Students could be questioned to prompt this planning. -MOS2.4: Moving- Students will practice throwing overarm proficiently in order to hit ghosts. -PSS2.5: Problem solving- Students will learn to identify what needs to be done in order to achieve the goal of winning the game (collaborated with INS2.3). Teaching cues: When and where possible, prompt students with questions to engage them in critical and high order thinking, for example: -If there are quite a few ghosts, what will the Pac-Men do? And vice a versa. -Encourage students that communication is vital. -If necessary, the teacher can introduce more balls into the game or more permanent ghosts.

Warm-Up Game: Four-Sided Bull Rush

Stage 2, Year 4

Set Up/Equipment: Instruct students in setting up the following: -A court, field or large inside area with a fairly large marked squared area. If this is not possible, use lines, cones or rounded markers to form this area -Enough Velcro belts with 2 oztags per student -Randomly select one student to be a tagger -Divide the remaining students into groups of 6-8, each group starts at a different side; North, South, East and West (do not use team captains) Explanation: Essentially, on the teacher’s whistle students must run toward their opposite side, for example, the North group must get to the South side and vice versa. The tagger(s) must strip two tags off a student in order for them to also become a tagger, however, if one tag is pulled off, the student does not become a tagger until the other is also stripped from them. Strategy is complex for both the taggers and ‘bulls’ as there are four sides to take into account. Why is this game important for this stage? -Students will develop gross motor skills through sprinting. -The game will promote fast paced, high order problem solving skills in order for students to achieve their goals as bulls or taggers. -The game promotes cardio-vascular fitness, healthy growth and development. -The game promotes the maintenance of a healthy weight, strong bones and muscles. What are the PDHPE skills involved in this game? How? -DMS2.2: Decision making- Students will learn to assist the group with communication in order to achieve consensus within the group goal and strategy settings. -INS2.3: Interacting- Students will practice working independently and/or within groups in order to devise simple plans for strategy. -PSS2.5: Problem solving- When prompted, students will learn to initiate problem solving on an individual and/or group basis. Teaching cues: When and where possible, prompt students with questions to engage them in critical and high order thinking, for example: -What strategies will the bulls and taggers adopt in the beginning, middle and nearing the end of the game? -Encourage students to communicate with their respective team mates. Have at least one huddle during the game. -Encourage bulls and taggers to spread out rather than bunching together.

Warm-Up Game: Bombardment

Stage 3, Year 5

Set Up/Equipment: Instruct students in setting up the following: -Rounded markers for a field, court or large indoor area to outline a large space -A variety of 6 Soft throw-able equipment such as, balls, large balls, frisbees and vortexes -Select six students at random to be bombardment throwers Explanation: Bombardment involves six throwers that must stand on a line throwing their balls etc. in order to hit the students in the centre (similar to dodge ball). If a target is missed, the ball is only to be re-collected by the thrower who must, in addition, do a small lap around the centre area before returning to the throwing line. Why is this game important for this stage? -The game promotes gross motor skills and aim when throwing. -Students will practice throwing with a variety of equipment and, therefore, must cater for power and the way they throw each. -The game promotes fast paced thinking and problem solving as there are 6 throwers. What are the PDHPE skills involved in this game? How? -COS3.1: Communicating- When prompted, students will communicate ideas through movement, demonstrating possible alternatives that may be used to dodge the variety of equipment. -MOS3.4: Moving- Students will practice various throwing actions to cater for the variety of throw-able equipment. -PSS3.5: Problem solving- When prompted, students will select appropriate solutions to the problems experienced within the game. Students will also learn to reflect on the outcomes of their solutions. Teaching cues: When and where possible, prompt students with questions to engage them in critical and high order thinking, for example: -What strategies will the throwers adopt? Will they aim for students bunching together to have a greater chance of hitting someone? -What strategies will the students in the middle adopt? -encourage students to communicate and participate in team work.

Warm-Up Game: Islands, Pirates and Sharks

Stage 3, Year 6

Set Up/Equipment: Instruct students in setting up the following: -12 hoops (4 red, 4 blue and 4 yellow if possible, otherwise improvise) scattered about a field or court to create coloured islands -Select two students at random to be sharks -The remainder of the class are pirates -Enough Velcro belts with 2 oztags per pirate Explanation: The teacher begins by calling out the colour red, blue or yellow and then blowing their whistle. The pirates must manoeuvre themselves away from the sharks and onto the corresponding coloured island. Any amount of pirates may occupy an island as long as all students fit inside the hoop. If a shark strips two oztags from a pirate’s belt, the pirate becomes a shark. The game repeats until there is a winner. Why is this game important for this stage? -The game promotes the maintenance of a healthy weight, strong bones and muscles. -Prompted questioning will promote students problem solving skills. -The game allows for critical communication and vital teamwork. -The game provides opportunities for students to make new friends What are the PDHPE skills involved in this game? How? -COS3.1: Communicating- When prompted, students will communicate ideas through movement, demonstrating possible manoeuvres and strategies that may be used to dodge the sharks. These ideas should alternate depending on the amount of sharks. -MOS3.4: Students will learn to vary their running patterns to cater for sprinting away from, side stepping and dodging the sharks in order to get to an island. -PSS3.5: When prompted, students will learn to engage in solving problems within the game through establishing meaningful solutions that can be reflected on. Teaching cues: When and where possible, prompt students with questions to engage them in critical and high order thinking, for example: -How will the sharks work together to tag the pirates? -Where are the pirates going to run? Will there be a decoy? -The teacher should allow intervals for pirates and sharks to collaborate within their teams in order to produce meaningful group strategies and tactics.

Invasion Game: Big Ball Strike

Stage 2, year 3

Set Up/Equipment: Instruct students in setting up the following: -Half a field -1 or 2 giant soft balls (depending on resources available) -Rounded markers or cones to establish 2 goals on either side of the half-field -Enough sashes for 2 teams -Divide the class into 2 teams (do not use team captains) Explanation: The game begins with two (depending on resources available) giant soft balls in the middle of the field. Students are permitted to manoeuvre and pass the balls in any way, for example, kicking or rolling. In order to score, a team must strike a ball into the opposing team’s goals. Both attacking and defending is crucial within this game due to the two balls. Why is this game important for this stage? -The game promotes communication and teamwork amongst the students as they are paramount in order to win the game. -Students will develop efficient ways of utilising equipment which can be transferred into many other sports and game skills. -Students will learn that cooperation is essential when attacking and defending. -Two balls within the game establish high order critical thinking whereby half the team may have to attack and the other defend. Alternatively if one team has both balls the team should strategize using this advantage wisely. What are the PDHPE skills involved in this game? How? -DMS2.2: Decision Making- Students will practice assisting in group huddles in order to achieve consensus within group goal and strategy setting. -INS2.3: Interacting- When prompted, students will learn to devise simple plans in order to strategize within the game. -MOS2.4: Moving- Students will practice kicking, striking and manoeuvring the giant ball proficiently for strategy and distance. Teaching cues: It is crucial to find 2-3 opportunities where group huddles would be necessary in order for students to negotiate strategies. -Encourage students to find open space and not bunch. -Encourage students that some of the team should be attacking whilst others defending. -Question students when in group huddles such as, If your team has both balls what will you do with that advantage?

Invasion Game: Soccer Square

Stage 2, year 4

Set Up/Equipment: Instruct students in setting up the following: -A field with lines (or cones and rounded markers) to create a very large square -4 cricket wickets, bins, marked goals or the like to establish a goal in the North, South, East and West of the square -Enough coloured sashes for 4 teams -Divide students into 4 teams of 6-8 in each (do not use team captains) -2 soccer balls Explanation: The game begins with two soccer balls in the middle of the square. Each team can go for either or both balls and are challenged to hit any team’s wickets except for their own in order to score. Teams must alternate between both attacking and defending. There should not be any one goalie, the idea is for everyone to participate in preventing the ball from getting anywhere near their goal in the first place. Why is this game important for this stage? -The game promotes communication and teamwork amongst the students as they are paramount in order to win the game. -Students will develop efficient ways of utilising equipment which can be transferred into many other sports and game skills. -Students will learn that cooperation is essential when attacking and defending. -Two balls within the game establish high order critical thinking whereby half the team may have to attack and the other defend. Alternatively if one team has both balls the team should strategize using this advantage wisely. What are the PDHPE skills involved in this game? How? -DMS2.2: Decision making- Students will learn to assist in group participation in order to achieve consensus in group goal setting. -INS2.3: Interacting- When prompted, students will learn to devise simple plans in order to strategize. -MOS2.4: Moving- Students will practice kicking and striking the soccer ball proficiently for distance and aim. Teaching cues: It is crucial to find 2-3 opportunities where group huddles would be necessary in order for students to negotiate strategies. -Encourage students to find open space and not bunch. -Encourage students that some of the team should be attacking whilst others defending. -If the game becomes too hectic or confusing the teacher should remove a ball.

Invasion Game: Rob The Nest Set Up/Equipment: Instruct students in setting up the following: -2 hoops, one at each end of a field -6 footballs, three stationary in each hoop -Divide students into two teams (do not use team captains) -Enough Velcro belts with 2 oztags per student

Stage 3, Year 5

Explanation: Essentially, teams must manoeuvre themselves into enemy territory whereby stealing one football per student from the nest. If a student has both oztags stripped from them, with or without the football, they must return to their side of the field before beginning again and drop the football. Students must run with the football back to their nest with both oztags intact in order to score. Students are permitted to throw the football to one another. The team with the most footballs in their nest at set intervals score a point. Therefore, if a defender intercepts a football or strips the attacker’s oztags, their goal is to take the football back to their teams nest. The idea is for both teams to attack and defend simultaneously. Tactics and strategy are paramount in order to win. Why is this game important for this stage? -The game revolves around strategy, without one a team would be less likely to perform well and therefore, communication, problem solving, team work and team huddles are an absolute necessity to win. -The game allows students the opportunity to make new friends and ask people they normally wouldn’t for their opinion strategy wise. -The game promotes cardio-vascular fitness and the maintenance of a healthy weight, strong bones and muscles. What are the PDHPE skills involved in this game? How? -COS3.1: Communicating- In huddles, students learn to negotiate, communicate, justify and reflect on strategies within team activities. -MOS3.4: Moving- Students will learn to manoeuvre into enemy territory via alternate running patterns to cater for sprinting, distance running, side stepping, dodging and defensive marking. -PSS3.5: Problem solving- When prompted in team huddles, students will learn to select the most appropriate solution to a given problem and will reflect on the outcomes of these solutions. Teaching cues: It is crucial to find 2-3 opportunities where group huddles would be necessary in order for students to negotiate strategies. -Encourage students to find open space and not bunch. -Encourage students that some of the team should be attacking whilst others defending.

Invasion Game: Wicket Bounce Ball Set Up/Equipment: Instruct students in setting up the following: -A court -2 cricket wickets, one at either end of the court -2 basketballs -Enough sashes for 2 teams -Divide the class into two teams (do not use team captains)

Stage 3, Year 6

Explanation: Both teams start with a basketball and on the teacher’s whistle can only bounce the ball to dribble, pass and score. In order to score the basketball must be bounced at the opposing teams wickets. No throwing is permitted at any time. A team that has possession of both balls would inevitably have an advantage and should use this strategically. The ball can be intercepted by the defending team. There is not to be any one goalie the idea is for everyone to be attacking or defending. Why is this game important for this stage? -Students will develop efficient ways of utilising equipment which can be transferred into many other sports and game skills. -Students will learn that cooperation and teamwork are essential when attacking and defending. -Two balls within the game establish high order critical thinking whereby half the team may have to attack and the other defend. Alternatively if one team has both balls the team should strategize using this advantage wisely. What are the PDHPE skills involved in this game? How? -INS3.3: Interacting- Within group huddles students will learn to use negotiating skills in regards to forming strategies. -MOS3.4: Moving- Students will learn to vary running patterns to cater for sprinting, distance running, side stepping, dodging and defensive marking. -PSS3.5: Problem solving- Within group huddles and when prompted, students will select the most appropriate solution to a problem within the game and will learn to reflect on these chosen solutions. Teaching cues: It is crucial to find 2-3 opportunities where group huddles would be necessary in order for students to negotiate strategies. -Encourage students to find open space and not bunch. -Encourage students that some of the team should be attacking whilst others defending.

LESSON 1/3- Nutrition: Healthy Food Related lesson outcomes (PDHPE & other KLAs): Knowledge and Understanding: PHES1.12: Displays basic positive health practices.

Early Stage 1, Kindergarten

Skills: COES1.1: Expresses feelings, needs and wants in appropriate ways. DMES1.2: Identifies some options available when making simple decisions. INES1.3: Relates well to others in work and play situations. PSES1.5: Seeks help as needed when faced with simple problems. Values and Attitudes: V2: Respects the rights of others to hold different values and attitudes from their own. V4: Increasingly accepts responsibility for personal and community health. Cross Curricula: Numeracy: This will be achieved through students using one to one correspondence to complete the worksheet, “How Many Fruits?” Part & Timing Content (WHAT) What is healthy food? Teaching & learning strategies (HOW) Resources

Introduction 10 Minutes

-The teacher will begin the lesson via the YouTube clip, Smart board. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KBMxpDbp51A, on the smart board. The Sesame Street clip, essentially, uses ‘Cookie Monster’ to sing about healthy food whilst also showing visuals of this food. Teacher cue: Encourage the students to sing the chorus of the song. -After the clip, the teacher is to lead discussion with the following questions: • Who can name some of the healthy foods that Cookie Monster sang about? • Does anybody know any other healthy foods?

• •

Has anybody brought healthy food with them for recess or lunch? If so, what is it? Why is it important to eat healthy food?

Body 30 Minutes

Identifies healthy food.

-Once ideas have been discussed, students will begin the worksheets, “How Many Fruits?”, “The Colour of Vegetables” and “Find the Healthy Foods”. • In, “How Many Fruits?” students will use one to one correspondence in order to circle the correct number of fruit, proceeding to colour in. • In, “The Colour of Vegetables” students will colour in the vegetables to the corresponding colour named beneath them. • In, “Find the Healthy Foods” students will circle the healthy food. Note that ‘sometimes food’ will be covered in the second lesson. Teacher cue: Assist the students that are having difficulties. -Students should now be well equip for identifying healthy foods which is necessary to begin group work within their allocated tables (being kindergarten some students will have obvious difficulties in cooperation skills and may benefit doing this task individually). -Students will begin by, individually, cutting out healthy food from the magazines in order to create a group collage. Teacher cue: Encourage group cooperation whilst assisting with students that are having difficulties.

The following worksheets: -How Many Fruits? -The Colour of Vegetables and, -Find the Healthy Foods. Safety scissors and glue for the class. 5 Large coloured pieces of cardboard for group work (have extra smaller pieces available for students with difficulties in cooperation). Food magazines, preferably at least 3 per table.

Conclusion 10 Minutes

Discusses healthy food choices.

-The teacher will gather the class to sit on the floor whilst groups will be allocated 1-2 minutes to show the class their collage. The teacher will question and evaluate each group with: • Why did your group choose these pictures? • What healthy foods are in your collage? • Did everybody help in the group?

-Encourage students to try at least one new healthy food to report back in the next lesson. -Collages may be hung around the room for parents to see and to remind students of healthy food. Lesson Evaluation: -Did all the students actively participate throughout the entire lesson, in the sing-a-long, throughout discussion and in group work? -Was the group work effective? Could the groups be smaller to ensure on-task behaviour? -Was the collage effective for Early Stage 1? -Were students engaged in the lesson? What pedagogical approaches could be improved? -Did all students achieve the aim of the lesson when evaluated via the collages? If not, what alternative activities could be used in order to achieve this knowledge?

LESSON 1/3: Road Safety- Pedestrian Safety Related lesson outcomes (PDHPE & other KLAs):

Stage 1, Year 2

Knowledge and Understanding: SLS1.13: Recognises that their safety depends on the environment and the behaviour of themselves and others. Skills: COS1.1: Communicates appropriately in a variety of ways. INS1.3: Develops positive relationships with peers and other people. PSS1.5: Draws on past experiences to solve familiar problems. Values and Attitudes: V4: Increasingly accepts responsibility for personal and community health. V6: Commits to realising their full potential. Cross Curricula: Literacy: This will be achieved through students associating the name of the pedestrian crossing to the correct image in the “Pedestrian Puzzle” worksheet and when implementing their reading of, “Safe Crossing Procedure”- stop, look, listen and think via role-play. Part & Timing Content (WHAT) Identifies places to cross the road safely. Teaching & learning strategies (HOW) Resources

Introduction 10 Minutes

-The teacher will begin the lesson with a mind map, “places to cross Smart Board. the road” where students will be encouraged to brainstorm and write their ideas on the board. The teacher will also briefly discuss each place to cross, why they are important and the danger that they can prevent. Teacher cue: Assist the students in correctly spelling and identifying places to cross the road safely. -After brainstorming the teacher will follow up with an internet game via, http://talesoftheroad.direct.gov.uk/safer-place-to-cross.php, on the smart board. Essentially, the player must manoeuvre the avatar to the finish by crossing various roads in safe places, which, are named as

he walks across them. The teacher will move the avatar where the students decide for him to go. The teacher should also move him in an unsafe way so that the students are exposed to the dangerous environment of the road as the avatar is hit by a car. Teacher cue: Prompt students with relevant questioning when playing the game.

Body 35 minutes

Further identifies and names safe crossings. Practices safe crossing procedures as a pedestrian.

-Once safe crossings have been discussed, students will begin a two part worksheet, “Pedestrian Puzzle”. Essentially, students will cut out the words and match them to their correct image such as, zebra crossing, school patrol officer- ‘lollipop lady’, traffic lights, pedestrian subway and footbridge. Students will then paste these images with words to the road puzzle in order to allow them a safe route across the roads to the finish. Teacher cue: Assist students who are having reading difficulties by sounding out words with them. -The teacher will then pose a general question for discussion, “Who knows how to cross these places safely?” -The discussion will be followed up with the 30second YouTube clip, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zP3DcpSSH34, on the smart board. The clip “Stop, Look, Listen and Think” is the same ad that has been displayed on television featuring ‘Thingle Toodle’ which many children should be able to relate with. -Students will then be separated into table groups where they must use equipment available, chairs and tables to create a road and crossing. Teacher cue: Can use this time to prepare the final role-play area with the zebra crossing and road from the kit. -Each group will receive the handout, “Safe Crossing Procedure” to aid their group in practice whilst the “Stop, Look, Listen and Think” clip is played at intervals to guide students using hand signs in their practice. The handout explains this procedure as:

Pedestrian Puzzle worksheet. Safety scissors and glue for the class. Smart board. Equipment available for set up: -Coloured hula hoops -Cones/rounded markers Role-play road safety kit: Includes zebra crossing mat, road mat, patrol officer uniform and lollipop.

• Stop- one step back from the kerb • Look- for traffic to your right, left and right again • Listen- for the sounds of approaching traffic • Think- whether it is safe to cross Teacher cue: Walk around to each group and guide them through the procedure with the correct hand signs, e.g. ‘Listen’- hand behind ear.

Conclusion 5 Minutes

Demonstrates using a safe crossing as a pedestrian with correct procedures.

-Each group will demonstrate through role-play, in front of the class, Role-play road safety kit. the correct procedure of crossing a road using the zebra crossing. When evaluating, students must use hand signs and call out and demonstrate each part of the procedure in correct order. Teacher cue: Reinforce the importance of using the procedure even at a zebra crossing or lights as no road crossing is 100% safe due to the drivers of the road. -Encourage students in their own time to cross a real road using the procedure WITH an adult. Also, when being driven around, to call out the correct term of safe crossings to the driver.

Lesson Evaluation: -Did all the students actively participate throughout the entire lesson, in the discussions, group work and when practicing safe crossing procedures? -Was the group work effective? Could the groups be smaller to ensure on-task behaviour? -Was there too much content for one lesson? Would it be easier to make this a two part lesson? -Was the role-play effective for Stage 1? -Were students engaged in the lesson? What pedagogical approaches could be improved? -Did all students achieve the aim of the lesson when evaluated via the role-play? If not, what alternative activities could be used in order to achieve this knowledge?

LESSON 3/5: Relationships- Bullying Related lesson outcomes (PDHPE & other KLAs):

Stage 2, Year 4

Knowledge and Understanding: IRS2.11: Describes how relationships with a range of people enhance wellbeing. Skills: COS2.1: Uses a variety of ways to communicate with and within groups. DMS2.2: Makes decisions as an individual and as a group member. INS2.3: Makes positive contributions in group activities. PSS2.5: Uses a range of problem solving strategies. Values and Attitudes: V1: Refers to a sense of their own worth and dignity. V2: Respects the right of others to hold different values and attitudes from their own. V3: Enjoys a sense of belonging. Cross Curricula: Literacy: This will be achieved through student’s involvement in discussing and answering questions from the picture book, “The Juice Box Bully: Empowering Kids To Stand Up For Others”, when writing about bullying with the sentence starters and also when reading the bullying scenarios, establishing solutions to them, answering the accompanying questions and presenting their findings. Part & Timing Content (WHAT) Identifies threatening behaviours and who can help. Teaching & learning strategies (HOW) Resources

Introduction 10 Minutes

-The teacher will gather the class to sit on the floor and begin the Picture book, The Juice Box lesson reading the picture book, “The Juice Box Bully: Empowering Kids Bully: Empowering Kids To To Stand Up For Others”. The book, essentially, explores bullying and Stand Up For Others”. the term ‘bystanders’ through fictional characters and plot. Teacher cue: Prompt students with general literary techniques such as, “what do you think will happen next?” -After the reading, the teacher is to lead discussion with the following questions:

What is bullying? Who was bullied in the book? What type of bullying happened in the book? • (Multi-faceted nature via) Is bullying only physical? • What is a bystander? Who were the bystanders in the book? • Who did they call for help? • What should you do if someone is being bullied? Who should you call? Who should you talk to about it? Teacher cue: Make sure students understand that bullying of any type is not to be tolerated under any circumstances!

Body 35 Minutes

Identifies and discusses methods and people that can help when witnessing or experiencing threatening behaviours.

-Following this discussion, students will begin the worksheet on bullying which includes the following sentence starters: *If I see someone being bullied I should… *If I am being bullied I should… *When standing up for myself I should say… Teacher cue: Briefly discuss STOPS= Stand up to the bully and tell them to stop hurting you, T= Take action to get away from the bully or get an adult, O= Open up to a trusted teacher or parent, and, P= Protect yourself from bullies. -Students will then be separated into table groups to create posters on bullying involving the STOP theory. -After creating the posters, in groups students will be handed a scenario either the:

Bullying worksheet with sentence starters, prepared before the lesson. Overhead with the STOP theory written up. 5-6 sheets of cardboard for groups to create posters. Material to create posters such as, coloured pencils, markers or crayons, glue, scissors and coloured materials.

*Cyber Bullying Scenario: A group of three year 6 girls (from the same class) had a slumber Bullying scenarios, prepared party at Jessica’s house. Jessica suggested that they choose a boy before the lesson with the from their class to make a list of the “Ten Things They Hate” about discussion questions. him. Debbie and Julie were unsure and hesitant about it. Jessica said that she wouldn’t be their friends anymore if they didn’t. Finally, Debbie and Julie joined in. The next hour was spent creating a hate

list about a boy named Richard in their class and emailing it to other girls. One girl posted a Facebook status of the hate list for everyone to see. Another girl printed the list out and brought it into school on Monday to show more girls in the class. Richard saw the list and was so upset that when he went home and told his mum and dad that he wanted to move schools but would not tell them why. *Playground Bullying Scenario: The second graders are outside and playing during recess. A group of three boys, Scott, Brent and Paul are playing by themselves. Another boy, Carl, approaches them and asks if he can play with them. Scott and Brent say, “yes” but Paul instead says, “no”. Paul says that they have formed a club and since Carl is not a member he cannot play with them. Carl keeps asking if he can join but Paul is persistent and says, “no, it is a cool club and Carl is not cool”. Carl asks again and Paul says, “only if Carl smears mud on his face”. Carl does so and asks if he can join. Scott and Brent say, “yes” but Paul says, “no, not until you beat up a year 1 kid”. Carl is very upset and does not know what he should do. -After the groups have read their allocated scenario they are to discuss and answer the following questions in their group: • Who was the bully? Who was being bullied (the victim)? Who were the bystanders? • List the ways that the victim was bullied. • What could the bystanders have done? • Who could the bystanders have told? • If no adults were around, what could the bystanders and victim have done? • What should the victim have done (hint: apply STOP) • How do you feel reading this? How would you have felt if you were the victim? • If you see bullying happening what will you do? (Remember that when standing up for yourself and others you should not resort to

bullying!)

Conclusion 10 Minutes

Devises plans and solutions to bullying scenarios.

-The teacher will gather the class to sit on the floor whilst groups will be allocated 2 minutes to discuss their solutions to the questions to the class. The teacher will question and evaluate each group with questions relative to the scenario similar or the same to those as above. -Posters may be hung around the room for parents to see and to remind students of the STOP protocol and bullying. -Encourage students to not be bystanders and to use STOP if bullying does occur in the playground.

Lesson Evaluation: -Did all the students actively participate throughout the entire lesson, in the discussions, group work and when presenting their solutions to the scenarios? -Was the group work effective? Could the groups be smaller to ensure on-task behaviour? -Were the scenarios effective for Stage 2 to comprehend the multi-faceted nature of bullying? -Were students engaged in the lesson? What pedagogical approaches could be improved? -Did all students achieve the aim of the lesson when evaluated via their findings? If not, what alternative activities could be used in order to achieve this knowledge?

LESSON 4/5- Personal Identity: Influences on Body Image Related lesson outcomes (PDHPE & other KLAs):

Stage 3, Year 6

Knowledge and Understanding: GDS3.9: Explains and demonstrates strategies for dealing with life changes. Skills: COS3.1: Communicates confidently in a variety of situations. INS3.3: Acts in ways that enhance the contribution of self and others in a range of cooperative situations. PSS3.5: Suggests, considers and selects appropriate alternatives when resolving problems. Values and Attitudes: V2: Respects the right of others to hold different values and attitudes from their own. Cross Curricula: Information and Communications Technology (ICT). This will be achieved through the YouTube clip, researching information via the internet and compiling these findings into a PowerPoint presentation. Part & Timing Content (WHAT) What influences body image and how? Teaching & learning strategies (HOW) Resources

Introduction 10 Minutes

This Lesson is to be booked into the computer labs.

Computer lab.

-Students are to be put into groups of 2-3 per computer, in gender Overhead projector screen segregated groups, with boys on one half of the room and girls on the or smart board. other. Teacher cue: Before the YouTube clip, discuss and question the students with: • What is body image? • What does influence mean? • What does body image influence mean? -The teacher will follow the introductory discussion via the YouTube clip, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qBNaAPwJOAs, on an overhead

projector screen/smart board. The clip, essentially, conveys how the media and our culture construct body image. -After the clip, the teacher is to lead discussion with the following questions: • What were some of the negative body image influences in the clip? • Can you think of any celebrities or television ads that are a negative body image influence (anorexia, drugs/steroids)? • How do these negative body images influence us? Why? Why not? • What were some of the positive body image influences in the clip? • Can you think of any celebrities or television ads that are a positive body image influence? • How do these positive body images influence us? Why? Why not?

Body 30 Minutes

Recognises a wide range of influences and prepares a multimedia presentation to show this understanding

-Once ideas have been discussed, students will begin researching Computer, internet information and images on the internet relevant to the handout connection and PowerPoint questions: presentation. Boys handout: • Find 2-3 male celebrities (football players or superheros) that have a positive body image influence. Why? • Find an image of each of these men that best shows their positive body influences. • What do these images have in common? • Find 1 male celebrity (football player or superhero) that has a negative body image influence. Why? • Find an image of this male that best shows their negative body influences. • Compare this male’s negative body influence to your other 3 positive body influences. What is different? Why? • How do you know they have a negative/unhealthy body image influence? Has it been talked about in the media? If possible, find a newspaper article on this. Handouts with questions that are different for the boys and girls, prepared before the lesson. Students must bring their own USB drive!

Girls handout: • Find 2-3 female celebrities (models or singers) that have a positive body image influence. Why? • Find an image of each of these women that best shows their positive body influences. • What do these images have in common? • Find 1 female celebrity (model or singer) that has a negative body image influence. Why? • Find an image of this female that best shows their negative body influences. • Compare this female’s negative body influence to your other 3 positive body influences. What is different? Why? • How do you know they have a negative/unhealthy body image influence? Has it been talked about in the media? If possible, find a newspaper article on this. Teacher cue: Assist each group that is having difficulties. Make sure students in each group are all helping one another, even if one students thinks ahead of celebrity examples whilst others research. -After research has been conducted, the teacher is to place students into larger groups of 4-6 with a mix of both boys and girls to share findings (jigsaw puzzle approach). -Each group will collaborate in order to produce a PowerPoint presentation relevant to their findings. The presentation must address both genders handout questions. *The idea is that the boys and girls will be researching body image influences that are relevant to them rather than both, however, they will learn about the opposite genders via group collaboration as a jigsaw approach.

Conclusion 10 Minutes

Discusses both negative and positive body image influences.

-Each group is to discuss their findings in front of the class via their PowerPoint presentation on the overhead projector screen/smart board. -One slide per student to discuss. Teacher cue: At the end, reinforce the idea that a healthy body may not necessarily look like the positive influences students found as a healthy body is one that exercises regularly and eats right.

Overhead projector screen or smart board.

Lesson Evaluation: -Was the jigsaw puzzle approach to learning effective? -Did separating the students via gender work well for this lesson topic in particular? -Did all the students actively participate throughout the entire lesson, in the discussions, group work and when presenting their groups findings? -Was the group work effective? Could the groups be smaller to ensure on-task behaviour? -Was using PowerPoint effective for Stage 3? -Were students engaged in the lesson? What pedagogical approaches could be improved? -Did all students achieve the aim of the lesson when evaluated via the presentations? If not, what alternative activities could be used in order to achieve this knowledge?

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