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The Volunteer News
Group 1 will be hosting the SAR EVAL in June with practice in May. This is an important exercise for the wing so plan to attend if you are able.
A Newsletter of the Tennessee Wing Civil Air Patrol
Page 2 SLS / UCC Training Page 3 Emergency Services Response Time Page 4 State Director Time to Relax? Page 5 Aerospace Education N453CA Page 6 Safety SOLD Page 7-8 Cadet Programs Huntsville Trip West Point Page 9 Training Opportunities CISM Reminder Page 10 Chaplain Message Page 11 Awards New Members, Squadron and Staff Page 12 Wing Calendar Contact Information

March 2009

Legislative Visits in Washington D.C.
Col Barry Melton Having just returned from the Winter 2009 National Board Meeting in Washington, D.C., I want to relay a few of the highlights during the trip. The Tennessee Wing delegation consisted of Cadet Lt Col Marcos More’, our wings representative in this year’s Civic Leadership Academy, Lt Col Bill Lane and myself. The day prior to the convening of the National Board is dedicated to visiting Congressional offices by Wing Commanders, Governmental Affairs Officers and National or Regional officials. When visiting the legislators, it is important that we speak with a “united voice”, relaying the important issues that impact Civil Air Patrol nationally. During the meetings, we presented two or three “talking points” to our Congressmen and Senators. Tennessee Wing has enjoyed strong support from our congressional squadron for many years. All nine House members are members of the Congressional Squadron. Freshman 1st District Congressman Philip Rowe from Johnson City joined the Congressional Squadron the day following Lt Col Bill Lane’s visit. Because of the current schedule of voting on the Hill, many of the elected officials were in the House or Senate chambers during our visit; therefore we met with staffers in their offices. A successful meeting with a staffer can be just as much or more beneficial for our cause. Since returning from Washington, I have received emails from staff members in two different Representative’s offices advising me that the Representative is going to co-sponsor HR 1178, a Bill that will ask the GAO to perform a formal study of how, on a national basis, CAP can assist the Department of Homeland Security. Since we are afforded the opportunity to visit Capital Hill only once a year, some of the most important legislative meetings can take place in your home district. Because of the geographic area covered by the House Districts in Tennessee, most Representatives maintain offices in the “major” cities in their District. A brief visit with a staff member in their office can go far in raising the visibility of your unit. I highly encourage Squadron Commanders to make these visits and maintain contact with local staff members on a regular basis. Invite members of the Congressional Squadron to visit your unit and participate in your activities. While observing CAP-USAF regulations, Congressional Squadron members can fly on our aircraft or ride in our vehicles. The same goes for our State Legislative Squadron members. The point is to reach out to the elected officials in your area. Making friends with them can be one of the most important relationships you form.###
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Squadron Leadership School / Unit Commanders course Knoxville, Tennessee - February 28 - March 1, 2009 Staff
Chap Ivan W McDaneld - TN128 Lt Col Wilma E Ward - TN001 Lt Col Randall L Stripling - TN001 Lt Col Dent W Young - TN001 Unit Commanders Course Maj Dale A Lahrs - TN001 Maj Darrell Sexton - TN128 Maj William A Renaud - TN128 Chap John F Gordy - TN001 1lt Kimberly A Bennett - TN001 1lt Harry M Barnes - TN001 C/Ssgt Elizabeth A Bennett TN148

Squadron Leadership School SM John A Boyer - TN087 2LT Charles D Bustetter - TN004 2LT Charles E Dempsey - TN192 2LT Richard I Dyer - TN192 Chaplain John F Gordy - TN001 2LT William D Gray - TN192 SM Clarence M Jeneau - TN170 Lt Col John C O’Donnell - TN128

Capt Adrian T Lemont - TN170 1LT Kimberly A Bennett - TN001 1LT Patrick A Deem - TN148 Maj Kermit E Duckett - TN001 1LT David W Ellis - TN176 1LT Charles D Hall - TN019 Capt Paul J Hodge - TN148 1LT Gary G Hutchison - TN019 Maj Susan J Hyder - TN173 Maj Stephen L Kintner - TN001 1LT Mark R Landrum - TN187 Lt Col Tracy D Scantland - SER001 Maj Joseph E Wilkins - FL376

2LT Samuel P Shaffer - TN001

Reminder from Lt Col Wilma Ward - When attending any CAP activity members should bring a completed form 60. http://members.gocivilairpatrol.com/forms_publications__regulations/forms_word.cfm This link will take you to the forms page in word format where you can download, complete, and print your form 60. Make sure that there is a current completed form 60 on file in your personnel records.

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Emergency Services Missions
Can $20 Improve Response Time? Capt Gary Pickens, TN119 In my opinion, YES! While some of my fellow CAP members may look at the title of this article with a bit of skepticism, I can honesty say, from personal experience, this small amount of money can make a difference in how fast you get “out the door” when you are called for a mission. Before I give you the justification for my belief, many of you may be thinking about the old saying - CAP stands for Come and Pay. CAP is a group of professional volunteers and we should expect to lay out some cash. I learned the truth about how fast or slow you can get out the door shortly after I became a member. The truth of the matter is that I should have known better and been better prepared. After more than 20 years in the Army and the National Guard, I should have been partially packed in the event I was called for a mission. That was not the case on a particular Sunday a couple of years ago. It was a weekend of watching football and on this particular Sunday the Titans were playing so the entire family had gathered to watch the game. I had not shaved since going to work on Friday so my appearance was a bit scruffy. As luck would have it, the phone rings and it is the Operations Officer and his first words were “Gary, we have a mission”. Reading this now, it kind of sounds like Apollo 13, “Houston, we have a problem.” Anyway, he asked that I meet him at the airport and had little other information for me. With no way of knowing how long we would be gone I begin to speculate on the possibilities. A few hours, a few days, no one knew. I hung up the phone, went to my closet and grabbed my flight bag, I will need that. There is my flight suit, I will need that. What if I am gone a couple of days, what else will I need? I need to shave and shower, I can’t suit up and go without being properly groomed. Boy, I’ve got to hurry, do I need to pack an extra flight suit? If this lasts a few days, that flight suit is going to get pretty funky so I’d better pack another along with extra of everything else. As I went to take a quick shower I realized that I didn’t have the toiletry articles needed to sustain myself for more than 24 hours. I quickly put a kit together from the contents of my bathroom cabinet and headed to the airfield. Can you imagine how much time was wasted scrambling around trying to find what I though I might need, pack it, shower, shave and get out the door? I’m guessing several minutes could have been saved if I had already been partially packed and ready. In-spite of the delay, we were wheels up about an hour after notification. That day I said never again will I be unprepared to respond. Twice a year I purchase travel size products for my trip kit. Since some of the items can get a bit old if not used, I replace them every six months and either use the opened items or if they are unopened, I take them to a homeless shelter. Either way, they serve their purpose. With a travel kit and extra uniform and undergarments already packed, you will be prepared to answer the call. My Kit Contents: Deodorant, Toothpaste, Shampoo, Mouthwash, Soap and Container, Razor Blades or disposables, Hair Spray (for the vain men and beautiful ladies), Toothbrush and Toothbrush cover. The cost on this is about $10. You may want to add other items increasing the cost a bit. Not a bad price to pay to make sure you are ready for any mission. As professional volunteers we pride ourselves on being able to respond to any situation quickly and perform our duties with skill and courage. A little planning now just might remove, or at least reduce, one more hurdle to our ability to respond to the call.###

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The Holidays Are Behind Us Time to Relax!
Have you looked at the wing calendar for the myriad of activities this spring and early summer - WOW! Annual validation of communication and supply inventories, the Southeast Liaison Region Survey Audit at the end of March, professional education courses, FEMA ICS courses, preparations for another great summer encampment at Ft Campbell, the AF SAR/DR Evaluation (rehearsal the first weekend in May, the actual the first weekend in June), the joint CAP/USAF Compliance Inspection the second week in June, the transition training for your 3d C-182T AFCS airplane, cadet competitions, and a lot of other “routine stuff” just to fill in the gaps. Really, there is something for everyone, and everyone CAN play a very important role. Really, it is a great time to be in TN CAP! For those of you who joined the Tennessee Wing of the CAP to provide a service to our nation, and to enjoy doing those great things, a myriad of opportunities to make such a contribution are right in front of you. Everyone, at every level, a member of the wing/ group staff, in a squadron leadership position or a new member trying to fit in - all have a chance to make a positive difference. Your partners in the AF are excited about being a part of these events and watching/helping you succeed. With such grand challenges to be won, certainly it will take a strong effort from everyone to be successful in the face of such a broad spectrum of high visibility events. I encourage each of you to look beyond the normal generous efforts you make, and look for ways to help one another and the wing succeed. Already I am in the process of building this year’s AF Evaluation of the wing’s ES capability and I assure you it will be a challenging scenario giving you the capability to demonstrate your talents. Now is the time to review your ES qualifications, advance those you can and review your training so you can make a good contribution to your wing’s efforts. This is not just the task for a few in east Tennessee, it is an evaluation of the wing as a whole. As for the survey audit, your wing commander and staff have been making arrangements to show
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improvement in the accountability of your resources. It is important you understand that the “Wing” results include reviews of your programs/resources at the squadron level as well as the wing managers it takes a full court press from the entire team to make this one turn out right. Then, the big event where the wing has an opportunity to excel every 4 years - the joint CAP/CAP-USAF Compliance Inspection, 13-15 June. Like the survey audit and the SAR/DR Eval, it will take the selfless efforts of many to prepare and complete the CI with the results we all want to see. Now is the time to find ways to make your contribution. Get the training you need, get into the books, roll up your sleeves for the task ahead of you. When the going gets tough, the TN CAP Wing gets going - now is the time to get going.### Your Friendly State Director - John Carnduff

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The Arrival of N453CA in Tennessee Wing

by: 1st Lt Kimberly Bennett, TN Wing PAO TN Wing received its first glass cockpit aircraft in 2007. A second in 2008 and on January 11, 2009 Maj Stephen Kintner and Maj Ian Jackson departed for Kansas to retrieve a third. During the trip they delivered one of our airplanes, N97018, to Dodge City Kansas to be modified and used in another CAP Wing as a Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) trainer and picked up the newest G1000 C182 for TN Wing. The first 2 1/2 days were spent at the Cessna factory completing transition training for the G1000. The next three days were spent in Cessna FAA Industry Training Scenario Authorized Instructor Training. During the training they flew approximately 20 hours. This extensive training was to prepare them for instructing our TN Wing pilots in transition training for the glass cockpit aircraft. After completing the training they returned on 18 January. Tennessee now has 3 glass cockpit 182’s, 3 round dial 182’s and 3 cessna 172’s. It is becoming more important to train our pilots on these new G1000’s because they make up 1/3 of our fleet. New Technology Advantages- This aircraft has a very powerful autopilot. “It is the first autopilot I’ve used that can fly better than I can.” Commented Maj Kintner. The flight instrumentation is impressive. There is a capability to collect weather information, both current and forecast. This aircraft could be flown into a disaster area where there is no power and could function as a weather station as long as there is fuel to run the engine. “This technology is a great advantage to CAP pilots. CAP allows me to have the opportunity to train on this type of advanced technology at a cost that can’t be beat.” These are also great aircraft to utilize for the Fly a Teacher program and Cadet Orientation Flights
March 2009

because it exposes them to the technology of the future. MTSU and other schools will be transitioning to this technology and our CAP cadets will have the advantage of being exposed to it early. Safety Advantages- This aircraft incorporates Traffic Information Service (TIS) which will display other aircraft on the screen. This allows another level of awareness of other aircraft in the area. There is also terrain awareness capability as terrain features are mapped on the display. This will be a huge help in mountain flying situations. The display will assist in maintaining compliance with CAP Reg 60-1 which requires 1000 feet above ground level to be maintained at all times. The display shows 200 feet and below as red and 1000 feet and below shows as yellow. There are also several engine system indicators as well as air bags in all seat belts. Mission Advantages - SAR Functions incorporating GPS will allow the pilot to set up a search pattern that the airplane will accomplish. The auto pilot will fly the search patterns giving the pilot and mission base confidence in the thoroughness of the task completed. This will help with pilot fatigue and task saturation is reduced. What may be biggest challenge in transitioning to the G1000? “It requires a new way of thinking and for pilots with many years of experience on the round dial, it can be a challenge to adapt to this new technology.” Says Maj Kintner. Want more information? Below is a link to some reasonably priced (as low as $3.99) simulator software for the G1000.### https://buy.garmin.com/shop/search.do? searchStr=G1000+simulator+software

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Safety

Maj Stephen Kintner, Wing Director of Safety
Do you ever wish you could speak your mind about a safety item? Now is your chance. I received a suggestion that an online forum would be a good tool to share safety information with each other in the Tennessee Wing. Well, that “suggestion” has been given “substance” and is now a reality. I would encourage every member to visit the Tennessee Wing website at www.tnwg.cap.gov and take advantage of the online discussion forum. There are separate forums for General Discussion, Ground Safety and Air Safety. To access the forum, you will need to create your own account with username and password. A visit to the “Safety Department” on the website will get you to the forum menu. As the wing Director or Safety, I will keep a close watch on the suggestions and discussion and comment as appropriate. And, of course, if an item needs immediate attention, contact me directly at safety@tnwg.cap.gov. My thanks to 1Lt David Sledge of TN-185 for this suggestion and to 1Lt Erika Mourar of TN-176 for the first “post” on the Ground Safety Forum. My thanks also goes to 1Lt Rob Borsari, the TN Wing IT guy, for creating the forum on the website and contributing the first “post” on the Air Safety Forum. I might also add that NHQ has also had a program for sharing your safety ideas. “CAPSafe” was developed just for this purpose. You can contribute easily to this program by visiting your eServices webpage and clicking on the “CAP Safety Suggestions” tab on the left side of the page. Let’s get the discussion going. Your suggestion could be the one item that will prevent a mishap or accident. Some CAP members hold the duty position of Safety Officer. In reality, every CAP member is a safety officer and we can each fulfill that responsibility by encouraging one another at every level of leadership to conduct ourselves in a safe manner. Mishaps decrease our effectiveness through the loss of resources due to injury or loss of equipment. Make it your mission to “speak up” for safety.###

SOLD
The old Wing Headquarters building on Sevier Avenue in Knoxville has officially been sold. The contract was signed on February 17 and we expect to close sometime in May. Wing staff have nearly completed emptying the building and hope to have the last items out in the next few weeks. TN Wing acquired the building in 1972 and it was utilized as the Wing Headquarters until October of 2006 when the offices relocated to McGhee Tyson Airport in Alcoa just a few miles away. The photographs are of a memorial marker in front of the building which was dedicated to Colonel William C Tallent, the building itself and the finance committee that was so pleased that this sale has taken place. Many of you may wonder what will become of the proceeds of the sale. The intention at this time is to hold the funds to help secure a more permanent TN Wing Headquarters location.

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The Black Knights (TN-008) Spend a Day in Huntsville
by: Cadet 1st Lt James Bailey If you are planning a visit to the Space and Rocket Center (SRC) in Huntsville Alabama, there are a few things that you need to know. First, it holds just about everything anyone would care to know about space. Second, this is actually where the campus of space camp is located. Third, the museum is a lot bigger than you expect with the two-level museum, the Rocket Park, and the entrance building. The museum has most of the equipment that the astronauts have used in their training and the actual missions. It also has a U.S. Army display with some high-tech gadgets and devices they use. The cafeteria, Imax theater, main gift shop and the climbing wall are also in the museum. The building also has numerous simulators and rides such as Space Shot and Gforce. There is no charge for any of these activities. Even though the SRC is huge, you always know where you are by using the Saturn 1 at the entrance and Saturn V at Rocket park as a point of reference. Sitting along with the Saturn V, are a few smaller rockets including the U.S. Army Redstone, the Mercury-Redstone, the Jupiter, and a few others. In the entrance to the museum, you’ll see a display of the future of space travel. As futuristic as it appears, these advances are not far from reality. Also in the entrance you’ll find a Saturn V broken down to show the different stages of it’s flight. A good thing to keep in mind if you go with CAP is to make sure you hold on to your hat. It’s a big place, with a lot of people. If it falls out of your hand or from your belt, a little kid will see it on the ground and grab it as a cool prize and you’ll never see that hat again. At least that’s what I think happened to mine.###

Members of the Black Knights Squadrons from Left to Right: 2nd Lt Jerry Brown, C/Amn Wesley Shupe (parent: Misty Shupe) C/1st Lt James Bailey, C/Amn James Eldreth, C/Ssgt Mark Shupe, Capt Bryan Jones, and Capt Gerald Bailey

March 2009

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Jeremy Sledge Appointment to West Point
Jeremy became a member of CAP in November 2006 after attending an Explorer group information session on the Civil Air Patrol with the St Edwards Squadron. This was a natural fit given his interest in a military career. Since joining the squadron, Jeremy says that National Honor Guard Academy in Maryland and Winter Encampment in Florida have been two of the highlights. The St Edwards Cadet Squadron is one of the largest squadrons in the Nashville area. Jeremy was able to share this experience with the other cadets in his squadron at a recent meeting. He signed the acceptance card with his squadron surrounding him. So what sparked his interest in the military? The simple answer is September 11, 2001. A day that changed many Americans was extremely personal to Jeremy. *My uncle is a Lt Col in the Air Force and worked in the Pentagon at the time. When we heard that the first tower was hit that day, my teacher immediately turned the television onto the news. About an hour later, we saw that the Pentagon had been hit. My first thought, and the only thing I thought about for the rest of the day, was “Is Uncle Reagan okay?” and I decided that I wasn’t going to just sit around and let another kid go through what I had gone through that day. It was after this that he began to consider a military career. “September 11 was a scary day for everyone, especially those who knew someone directly involved. That day I transformed from a fifth grader who happened to be an American and became an American who happened to be a fifth grader.” Jeremy set his sights on West Point while in the 7th Grade. After much investigation, he decided that it was more than just a college, it was an experience which he had been preparing for his whole life. So what is he most concerned about as he starts this new chapter in his life? The mental challenge of adjusting to military life and loosing some of the
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comforts of home. Top on the list for him are his ipod, cds, playstation, and his cell phone which will be taken on day one. “Even with all of this, you have to consider the benefits of attending West Point over the small discomforts. Ask me again in four if I think it was worth it.” For Jeremy, the requirements to be considered were straight forward except for the PT test. Preparing for the PT test had been the most challenging part of pursuing this dream. “There isn’t a minimum requirement, you simply have to give it your best and then wait to see if it was good enough.” Says Jeremy. He has been and continues to work with a trainer to make sure that he is physically prepared for West Point. How did CAP help to prepare him? Through the cadet program he was able to strengthen and demonstrate his leadership ability. It helped to solidify his decision to pursue a military path. It also helped him to be more confident, especially with interview and review board situations. “West point will offer me challenges that are beyond normal college classes, my living needs will be met and I will even get paid to go to school so that I can focus on studying and becoming the best that I can be.” Jeremy’s parents, David and Ryn Sledge, said that he appeared to have no signs of stress through the intense process. They are preparing themselves for the challenge of sending their only child away to school. “This is his dream and we understand and totally support him in this decision. I don’t think anyone could be more proud of a child than we are of Jeremy and the man that he has become.”### Congratulations C/1st Lt Jeremy Sledge on your appointment to The United States Military Academy at West Point.

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Training Opportunities - Event Information
Group 2 and 3 SAREX 28-29 March at Springfield TN. Types of training available: Air Operations (Mission Pilot, Mission Observer, Mission Scanner), Mission Base Staff, and flight line marshaller and flight line supervisor training. Website: www.intelliprof.com Mission Objectives: • Provide initial sortie opportunities to Mission Pilots, Observers and Scanners that need to renew their SQTR specialty. Second aircrew priority goes to mission participants that have one flight remaining on their SQTR. • Utilize short cycle scenarios to maximize the number of participants performing scenarios. Sorties should be no more than one hour from wheels up to wheels down. • Utilize scenarios that have expanding square, creeping line, parallel track and route searches, and ELT search. • Require aircrew renewal participants to take an online refresher course based on NESA materials. • Utilize a mission web site. • Use mission web site pre-registration to organize aircrews prior to the mission • Provide refresher training on air operation procedures on Friday night. • Provide Flight Line Marshaller and Flight Line Supervisor renewal and basic training

Contact Shaun vanBergen, 615-498-6309, s.s.v@charter.net; Steve Yeager, 615-775-6707, slyeag@gmail.com; or Hugh Cameron, 317-201-4769, hcameron@projecttools.com for more information.

Harry M. (Butch) Barnes, CISM Coordinator for Tennessee - All IC 's should make sure they read 60-5, specifically, 60-5 6.b. During each mission operational period, every 24 hours, a quick review of the need for CISM intervention should be made for all personnel participating in the mission. For all members who meet CISM qualifications be sure you are up to date on ICS 100-700. As many as 15 in TN Wing Have been dropped from the list by National HQ. Check your 101 card. Group 2 - Assistance Needed

by: C/1Lt. Joseph Murphy
On Saturday, April 25, 2009, the Cohutta 100 Mountain Bike Race will be held in the Cherokee National Forest. Last November, members of the Chattanooga Composite Squadron and other CAP members were able to work at a similar event, the US Adventure Race Association National Championship. Because of this, race directors saw first hand the benefits of having CAP members present, and have invited us to the event in April. In turn, the Chattanooga Composite Squadron is asking for assistance from all available CAP members, officers and cadets alike. The event will last from 0700 until 2000( Eastern Time) on April 25. Last November, at the Adventure Race, there were opportunities to use training in real-life situations. For instance, some cadets constructed a make-shift shelter during the heavy rainfall of that day. Others helped transport what seemed like a thousand canoes. By the end of the day, everyone was wet and tired, but no one was complaining. Rather, enjoyment and satisfaction were written on the faces of both the cadets and officers.
March 2009

Qualifications for this event are minimal. Basically, any CAP member can attend. All that is required is a complete BDU uniform plus two meals and plenty of water, plus an orange vest. Other qualifications, like First Aid or Radio Operator, are preferable, but not necessary for this event. In general, tasks will include manning a rest station and assisting the racers with anything they need. With over 500 racers expected, there is also a possibility that First Aid might be necessary. The main goal is simply to make the race run as smoothly as possible. Also, we hope to have an educational experience while working in the woods, and to apply our training in practical situations. Finally, we hope to once again enjoy ourselves, and to make the most of this

opportunity to serve our community. For more details, please contact 1Lt. Mark Landrum, Chattanooga Composite Squadron (423) 827-9095 mark.landrum@chattanoogacap.info Once again, please consider attending this event. You will not regret it. If you enjoy working in the woods, using radios, or just being with other CAP members, this event is for you. We hope to see you there.
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A PERSPECTIVE ON SQUADRON LEADERSHIP SCHOOL From “THE

HAPPY C.A.P. CHAPLAIN”

Ivan McDaneld, Captain, TN Group 1
Within two months after I started my career with Civil Air Patrol, I took part in my first Squadron Leadership School. Although I was just a novice’ Lt. Col Wilma Ward and Major Darrell Sexton invited me to lead the opening prayer both days. From the beginning I was both a student and a participant. It was an honor! I was very impressed with that school. I set a goal to advance along the road of Professional Development so that I could add other important skills and eventually take a greater role in SLS. I have now taught in SLS, CLC, and UCC. Last month I was allowed the privilege to be the Director of our SLS at McGhee-Tyson in Knoxville, TN. I had ten students, a perfect size for a good class (big enough to make things interesting but small enough for good networking and interaction). I was a “happy camper”, as they say. I have gone well beyond my original goal in many ways and what I really expected to accomplish, but now I’m even more excited. I believe in SLS and what it can do to “jump-start” a Civil Air Patrol Senior Member’s career. Let me tell you why from the HAPPY Chaplain’s point of view. • It’s FOUNDATIONAL – This is a vital organization and our Mission for America is more important than ever. We have established good working relationships with Homeland Security, FEMA, TEMA, and various EOC’s. SLS will serve to provide solid grounding that can solidify your personal preparation for greater service as you discover your own unique role in this structure. It’s FUNCTIONAL – In the three years since I took SLS as a novice, the program has gotten so much better. As an instructor, I can assure you that this latest curriculum really does what it is supposed to do, prepare you for leadership. And I’m not just talking about CAP. You will be a better person by using these principles at home, at work, in your community and faith group or whatever. As you become a well-rounded CAP member through SLS, CLC, etc. you will become a more fulfilled, healthier, and happier individual. Which brings me to my last point, which will not surprise my past students and all my friends and colleagues in CAP: It’s FUN – at least, it should be. (Learning regulations and structure and protocol is a big part of SLS. If it is a pleasure and not a chore to get started in Professional Development, everything else will fall into place.)

In my philosophy of chaplaincy, I believe that we are each a complex whole with many dimensions. My friends in Critical Incident Stress Management also make use of this holistic concept. CISM recognizes that we all share the dimensions of: Physical, Intellectual, Social, Emotional, as well as Spiritual. This philosophy is a part of my approach to Professional Development in Civil Air Patrol and Squadron Leadership School in particular. I believe a good chaplain will make the effort to train like the CAP members she/he will serve. Your Commander, your Squadron, and your fellow CAP officers need a Chaplain who understands, who is a leader in their own right, who sets a standard for others to follow. I’d always rather see a sermon than hear one and let’s face it, people are right when they tell us “what you do speaks so loudly, I can’t hear what you say!” Blessings! Captain Ivan McDaneld, the
HAPPY Captain

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CAP Awards and New Members
February 1 - March 15, 2009 Charles E “Chuck” Yeager Award (AEPSM) SM Matthew E Bailey TN004 Capt Gary D Pickens TN119 Chap Capt Ivan W McDaneld TN128 2Lt Nordehl Unbehaun TN087 1Lt Theresa A Hill TN114 C/Msgt Gabriel A Sanchez-Vinas TN004 Level 1 - (Membership Ribbon) SM Carter D Vath TN119 SM John W Younker TN014 SM Jackie L Younker TN014 SM Adam C Wilson TN148 SM Lisa M Huestis TN080 2Lt Charles D Stout TN005 SM John S Raehn TN119 SM Amy L Vath TN119 SM Jeffery Murphy TN192 SM Heath W Cherneski TN036 Level II - Benjamin O Davis, Jr Award (Leadership Ribbon) Capt Charles W Chance Level III - Grover Loening Award (Loening Ribbon) Maj Stephen L Kintner TN001 Maj Sam Senemounnarath TN162 Capt David A Stoner TN001 Level IV - Paul Garber Award (Garber Ribbon) Lt Col Gary T Ward TN185 Level V - Gill Robb Wilson Award (Wilson Ribbon) Lt Col Dent W Young TN001

New CAP Members
Kingsport Composite Squadron SM Patsy S Meridith Cadet Neil T Ledford Millington Composite Squadron SM Jim A Park Cadet John P Lindsey

Berry Field Composite Squadron Cadet Alvin D South Henry County Composite Squadron SM William L Bullington Knoxville Senior Squadron 1 SM John E Powell Jackson Madison County Senior Squadron SM Malcolm D Wilcox SM Robert W Wilson SM Jeffery Brewer SM Edward R Woerle SM Andrew W Wilson Cadet Alexander Wilson SM Gerald A Shelton SM Rodney D Wilson SM William C Lane Sumner County Cadet Squadron Cadet Jason D Etchebarren Oak Ridge Composite Squadron Cadet Jesse K Griffen Chattanooga Composite Squadron SM Dale E Grisso Hendersonville Cadet Squadron Cadet Matthew J Faulkner Cadet Hunter J E Riffe Tullahoma Composite Squadron Cadet Seth D Whitehead Cadet Luke V Whitehead Rhea County Composite Squadron Cadet Austin Scott Slone Cadet Nathan G Rothwell Cadet Jonathan Fry St Edwards Cadet Squadron Cadet Elvia B Watkins Cadet Anthony A Couch Cadet Salin T Dumasane Cadet Monroe Smith Cadet Lauryn N Green Cadet Jacob I Green Cadet Joselyn C Alvarez Williamson County Cadet Squadron Cadet Ian T Clara SM David D Armstrong SM Joseph J Clara Cadet Luke D Cecil Lewis County Cadet Squadron SM William S Harrell Marshall County Cadet Squadron Cadet Brandon J Stuckey

January 2009

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Calendar of Events January-September 2009
March 13-16 Combined Group 2 and 3 joint SAREX 13-15 Group 1 SAREX 21 Command Call Arnold AFB 20-22 Drill Team Practice at Tullahoma (subject to change) 27-30 Group 2 & 3 Joint SAREX 27-30 NPS SAREX April 4 FAA Wings Seminar (DKX) 17-19 SER Cadet Competition at Maxwell AFB in Montgomery, AL 22 Earth Day www.earthday.net 25 Tullahoma Open House 25 Chattanooga Adventure Race Event (100 mile Mtn. Bike Race) May 1 Space Day www.spaceday.org 2 Astronomy Day ay/astroday.html 1-4 SAR Evaluation (Practice) 15-18 Group 3 SAREX 15-18 Group 2 SAREX June 5-8 SAR Evaluation 12-15 Wing Compliance Inspection 26-29 Group 3 SAREX and Group 1 SAREX July 5 - 11 TN Wing Encampment at Ft. Campbell 6 - 24 A.E. Summer Workshop for Teachers 18-19 AFRCC Search Management Course (Army Reserve Center - Nashville) 24 - 27 Group 3 SAREX 24 - 27 Group 2 SAREX August 14 - 17 Wing-Wide Combined SAREX & Communications Exercise 29 - 30 SLS / UCC in Tullahoma September 2 - 8 Summer Board - San Antonio, TX 12 - 13 SCX Air Show 18 - 19 Millington Air Show

Tennessee Wing Civil Air Patrol
Official Auxiliary of the U.S. Air Force Wing Commander, Col Barry Melton Vice Commander, Lt Col Bill Lane Wing Administrator, Ms Beverly Huff PO Box 250 Alcoa, TN 37701 voice: (865) 342-4880 fax: (865) 342-4882

Public Affairs / Media Contact
1st Lt Kimberly Bennett (865) 382-5130 email: kbennett@tnwg.cap.gov or bennettcap@me.com Visit us on the Web: www.tnwg.cap.gov www.gocivilairpatrol.com

Citizens Serving Communities ... Above and Beyond

12

January 2009

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