2. Government Accession No.

3. Recipient's Catalog

No.

ESIGN OF SERT I1 SPACECRAFT STRUCTURES
7. Author(s)

8. Performing Organization Report No.

Lewis Research Center National Aeronautics and Space Administration

ntract or Grant No.

National Aeronautics and Space Administration Washington, D. C. 20546
5. Supplementary Notes

I

14. Sponsoring Agency Code

6. Abstract

The SERT I1 spacecraft structures are simple, rugged, low-cost structures that c changed to adapt to new components. They were designed, fabricated, and vibrati a very short time span with minimal stress analysis since weight was not a proble constructed from riveted aluminum and magnesium sheet and are cylindrical semi type structures. Simple, low-cost, easily designed and analyzed structures such structures may be used more often in the future when lower launch cost vehicles c use. The design constraints, design description, fabrication and handling, and shoe tion testing of the SERT I1 structures a r e the subject of this report.

Spacecraft; Structures; Spacecraft structure; Satellite design; Structural design; Structural vibration

Unclassified

- unlimited

Unclassified
t

Unclassified

For sale by the National Technical Information Service, Springfield, Virginia 22151

CEC

su
T I1 spacecraft structures are simple, rugged, low-cost st can b e easily changed to adapt to new components. They were designe ration tested over a very short time span with minimal stress analysis sine ” 0th are constructed from riveted aluminum and ma was not a problem. semimonocoque- type structures. Simple, low- cost, easfi res such as the SERT structures may be used more of future when lower launch cost vehicles comeinto full use. The design eo ion, fabrication and handling, and shock and vibration testing of tures are the subject of this repbrt.

ion is the second Space Electric Rocket Test. ital test which demonstrated the ability of ion thrus ective w a s to endurance test a mercury bo ration of the SERT I1 satellite is shown in figure tage with the spacecraft-spacecraft suppor end facing the earth and the Agena rocket - s o l a r a r r a y end away from t Gravity-gradient stabilization is achieved by locating all the heavy masses the satellite. The satellite was launched into a 1000-kilometer ( circular orbit. The orbit was calculated s o that the orbit plane of nodes wo at a rate approximately equal to the earth’s motion around the sun. Thus, t a r r a y s will face the sun for almost the entire mission. (The SE scribed in detail in ref. 1.)

_,--Cei~ter

of mass

Station 0.5334 m (21.51 in.) 0.5334 m (21.0 in.)
A A

Spacecraft

-

__
I
Earth

6.2 Bm (245.00 in.)

8

I. 575 cm in.)

+

5.1 4045 m (202.38 in.)

Ion thruster--”

\..--Thrust

vector CD-10991-32

Figure 1. - SERT I1 satellite.

eture w a s re

3

1.4859 m diam (58.5 in. 1
'+')

m

Contamination experiment , \

90"

,-Ion
I

thruster

,
\

(

-OD (-Z)

Space

(-Y)
Figure 2. - Top view of spacecraft.

CD-10992-32

(+y)900
I

//'

,Gas-supply lateralsupport s t r u t

/ ,-Gas supply

Gas-supply-side load-

/ '

//

rComponent support tray S u n side

0" (-Z)

270" (-Y) tigure
5.

C D -10993-32

- bpacecran rop way.

270" (-Y)

CD-10994-32

Figure 4. - Spacecraft bottom tray.

ures were no

(tZ) 180"-

-0" (-Z)

270" (-Y) Figure 5. - Spacecraft support unit top tray.

C 0-10995-32

1.4986 m diam (59.0 in.)
(y ,)

,,-Damping strut

90"

(tZ) 180"-

.O" ( -Z)

I

270" (-Y) Figure 6. - Spacecraft support unit bottom tray.

CD-10996-32

TABLE I.

-

STANDARD AGENA CLAMSHELL

SHROUD DYNAMIC ENVELOPE Vehicle station Dynamic envelope diameter
Z - Z axis

Remainder of circumference

m

in.

m

s
he spacecraft was desi tion of 7.5 g's, combined wi

m acceleration of 4.8 g's.

TABLE 11. Stem

- ASSUMED

SPACECRAFT DESIGN MASSES Location of center of m a s s Station
in

Design load lb
34.02 34.02 46.27 8.16 8.16 20.87 20.87 7.26 75 75 102 18 18 46 16

Thruster system 1 Thruster system 2 Backup attitude control system Power conditioner 1 Power conditioner 2 Tray

2 6

20 20

:enter
4 4

0
26 26 20

1 1 8 8

7 7 3 5

Structure

----Total design load

67.59 283. 5

149 525

s

res were

stiffeners as in

(a) Bottom view.

(b) Bay 8 side.
Figure 7.

- Spacecraft structure.

1

P

to the spacecraft in bays 2 and 6 (see figs. 2, 3, an ruster dynamic loa s to the Y-Y axis cross U) are mounted to the bay 4 thermal radiator plat
Exterior machined magnesium channel spacecraft lower ring (see figs. 3 and 10 ) tank and valve and regulator a s s e m y of the spacecraft. The two nozzle assemblies are rnou face at bays 4 and 8. The tank and the valve and re
,

Figure 10.

- Spacecraft and spacecraft support unit mounting.

rackets which attach to the cross beams of the spacecraft. T riey interference) antenna and contamination experiments are mo earn and outer ring on the face of the spacecraft. All other etronics boxes are mounted to the upper and lower bay 8 i n s t ~ ~ e n t

is mounted in bays 2, 4, 6, and 8 o r the the odd-numbered bays 1, 3, 5, and 7. d on figures 5 and 6. A l l electronic and electrical b Is) are mounte gururation of t for any instrument tray. The battery selecte s therefore located on the sun side of t orced, bay 8 back cross-beam wall. e lower bay 2 instrument t r a y re exceed the rather low tape recorder qualif e recorders, the lower e coupling w a s accomplished by tying t urmounted with a Lord anufacturing e o vibration enviro dy system has a lower cification requirements. ration environment qualification necessary to vibration isolat 's in order to meet by bolting the gyros to a box beam assembly and

__

-CMG

trunion

+

t

i

T

+

+

,r

Spacecraft supprt unit structural web

CD-10997-32

Figure 1 . -Control moment gyro (CMG) cross-beam assembly. 1

1

T A B L E III.

-

Q U A L I F I C A T I O N TESTS

(a) Sinusoidal sweep frequency qualification testa
Acceleration Sweep rate, octaves/min 2.0 2.0 1.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0

(b) Random noise vibration qualification test

b

Frequency range, Acceleration level, Spectral density,
HZ

g's r m s

g2/Hz

asweep time f o r 5 to 2000 HZ, -4.3 min. bAlong each of t h e X , Y, and Z axes; duration, 4.5 min/axes; overall level, 10.2 g's r m s .

CL

S

of spacecraft structural design is in reality the roblem of packaging riments s o that they will survive the launch vironment to f u n c t i o ~ m. This is the philosophy used in evolving the SE acecraft w a s designed within the weight, size, thermal, and economic ions set forth at the program outset. This can be done f o r any S/C st blem is considered as a system blem involving mechanical inring initial design craft experiments and systems. ication complexities versus the possible benefits of a minimum-weight e considered in view of the proposed launch vehic

a minimum-weig payload using the p s than the cost f o r orbiting the s a m e s
t u r e strong but s erials. A reasonable safety factor

CQ

al materials c rime launch vehicle, such as a rocke
permit another experiment to (3) If a more expensive rocket would be required w e r e the s p t ri mm ed (4) If a less costly vehicle could b e used if the structural wei acecraft is proposed, all systems should come under t tiny as proposed in the preceding paragraph. F o r instance, control, heat pipes should not be used if solid conduction can be found to at an acceptable wei increase. Electronics should b y heavy but s i m inexpensive to fabricate if the wei uble and triple redundancy should be practiced in critic problem. The purpose of these steps is not to produ spacecraft but to u s e weight margins s o as to increase spacecraft r en the S spacecraft was first proposed, many of these ideas ractice. This was desirable and possible because the launch vehi y on a payload-to-orbit basis but mainly as a ready package that coul perform the SE T I1 mission. The second s t a g e with its s o l a r a r r a y s at was to become a large p a r t of the orbiting vehicle. The SE launched successfully on February 2, 1970. Indications are that the launch environment undamaged. hus, the choiceof general s, and construction techniques was validated f o r the SERT I1 structures. esearch Center, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Cleveland, Ohio, March 5, 1971, 704- 13.

6. ; Gursk, Guy S. ; acecraft and Mission. NASA

sion Capabili nvironmental Test Specification f o r Spacecraft and Components ictated by Atlas-Agena, Thor-Agena, o r or-Agena Vehicles. Specification S- 320-A- 1, NASA God

. : Analysis and Design of

Flight Vehicle Structures. Tri-State

NASA-Langley, 1971

- 32

E-6 175

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