50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring
Donna Berry Charles Cadwell Joe Fehrmann

HRD Press, Inc. • Amherst • Massachusetts

Copyright © 1993, Donna Berry, Charles Cadwell, and Joe Fehrmann

The materials that appear in this book, other than those quoted from prior sources, may be reproduced for educational/training activities. There is no requirement to obtain special permission for such uses. We do, however, ask that the following statement appear on all reproductions: Reproduced from 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring by Donna Berry, Charles Cadwell, and Joe Fehrmann. Amherst, MA: HRD Press, 1993. This permission statement is limited to reproduction of materials for educational or training events. Systematic or large-scale reproduction or distribution, or inclusion of items in publications for sale, may be carried out only with prior written permission from the publisher.

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HRD Press, Inc. 22 Amherst Road Amherst, MA 01002 1-800-822-8201 (U.S. and Canada) 413-253-3488 413-253-3490 (fax) www.hrdpress.com

ISBN 0-87425-218-0

Production services by Jean Miller Cover design by Eileen Klockars Editorial services by Sally M. Farnham

Contents
Preface ........................................................................................ Introduction ................................................................................... Developing Coaching/Mentoring Skills .................................................... Index to Activities............................................................................ Time Checklist ................................................................................ Symbols ........................................................................................ The Activities 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 Rock, Paper, Scissors .............................................................. Strike Three, You’re Out .......................................................... Card Exchange ...................................................................... Who am I?............................................................................ Attitudes or Attributes? ........................................................... Picture That ......................................................................... How do you rate? ................................................................... Focus on Coaching Skills........................................................... String Toss ........................................................................... Let’s Have a BEER .................................................................. Wanna BET?.......................................................................... Making a Sandwich ................................................................. Chair Walking ....................................................................... Positive Feedback .................................................................. Goal Ladder ......................................................................... Construction......................................................................... Origami............................................................................... Card Houses ......................................................................... Idea Exchange....................................................................... Reel Movies .......................................................................... Coaches Bowl........................................................................ How am I doing? .................................................................... Trivia Quiz ........................................................................... Dueling Families .................................................................... Concentrate on. . . ................................................................ Coaching Challenge ................................................................ Opposite Poles ...................................................................... Nonverbal Behaviors ............................................................... Fishbowl.............................................................................. Recognition Brainstorm............................................................ Word Search ......................................................................... Finish the Sentence ................................................................ 17 25 31 35 39 47 49 53 57 59 65 67 71 75 77 85 89 93 97 99 103 107 117 119 125 131 139 141 151 153 157 163 v 1 5 9 13 15

50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring
33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 Theory X/Theory Y Assumptions ................................................. Letter to a Friend .................................................................. The Lovers ........................................................................... Say what you mean!................................................................ Three-Element Messages .......................................................... Proxemics............................................................................ What are you gonna do? ........................................................... Translation, Please................................................................. “Yeah, but. . .” .................................................................... Making Assignments ................................................................ Coaching Miscues ................................................................... Tic-Tac-Toe.......................................................................... Information Overload .............................................................. Listen up! ............................................................................ “Just Thought I’d Ask” ............................................................ “Say what?” ......................................................................... Tearing up Communication ....................................................... You want me to do what? ......................................................... 165 175 177 185 189 195 201 215 221 225 235 245 249 255 257 267 273 279 291

About the Authors ............................................................................

Preface Everyone wants to write a book. You can teach old dogs new tricks—and for that we’re grateful. If you have tricks you would like to share with these “old dogs. We think we’ve succeeded. Although we’re not that old (in our own minds at least). Coming up with 50 activities meant less than one activity for each year of experience. For us. In the meantime. So we each wrote one-third of a book. but not a whole book.” we’d be glad to hear from you. but very few people do. We appreciate the input we received from several members of the Sunflower Chapter of the American Society for Training and Development (ASTD) who attended our pre-publishing party and helped us fine tune many of these exercises (and eliminate some that didn’t quite hit the mark). We wanted to write a book too. They say two heads are better than one. among the three of us we have nearly 60 years of experience in education and training. The hard part was remembering back through all those years and then finding the best ones. we hope you’ll enjoy using these activities as much as we enjoyed putting them together. Donna Berry Charles Cadwell Joe Fehrmann ∼v∼ . three heads were just the number we needed.

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we might as well not bother conducting training in the first place. That’s why you’ll find that a majority of the activities in this book can easily be adapted to participant groups of 3 to 300. ∼1∼ . That was the signal that we needed to develop our own specialized activities that related directly to the performance that management expected when our participants returned to their jobs. the more they will learn. About Course Participants Experience tells us that the more involved participants are in the process. That belief has led us to strive for continuous improvement of our training activities so that the people who attend our sessions can apply what they learn on the job. That knowledge has helped us remember that no matter what size group you are working with. Don’t feel left out— that’s a good sign.Introduction About Us All three of us started out in an academic environment and later switched to the business world. Remember your job is to facilitate their learning. you can have active involvement of all participants if you break down larger groups into smaller subgroups. but will do fine in a smaller group. The activities in this book will encourage your participants to interact more with each other than with you. We subscribe to Robert F. Mager’s belief that training is only a means to an end—and that the end is performance. As trainers in the corporate world we also learned the difference between “active learning” and “having a good time” in class. not to be the allknowing trainer. We also know that participants often learn more from each other than they do from us. It was there that we began to learn how important active involvement was in adult education. We know that the simple act of asking questions and getting people involved in a discussion increases their retention. We soon realized what most trainers now take for granted— adults want to be actively involved in the learning process. Unless the people who attend training can perform their jobs in a way to help their organizations accomplish their goals and objectives. We also know that some people are hesitant to get involved in a large group activity. This revelation has led us to stop thinking of ourselves as trainers and to start thinking of ourselves as learning facilitators.

Effective facilitators are always looking for ways to help their participants learn as much as possible from their experiences in the classroom. this volume will enable you to provide your participants with a wide variety of interactive exercises that will enhance their on-the-job performance of coaching/ mentoring skills. as stated earlier.50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring About You Being a facilitator may sound like less work than being a trainer. each activity is organized in a user friendly format that. will guide you through the following process: • • • • • Establishing the objectives Conducting the activity Reviewing participant experience Discussing key learning points Considering application to job performance This process will ensure that learners do more than just participate in an activity. Anyone can be a trainer and conduct activities. when followed. They learn new ways of looking at things and are willing to admit they don’t have all the answers. The proper execution of the total learning experience will provide learners with proven methods of improving their job performance—which means successful facilitation for you. About This Volume Although the activities in this volume are commonly referred to as training activities. facilitators circulate through the groups to provide help and assistance to ensure that learning objectives are met. we understand that the real purpose of training is to improve performance. We chose this approach because. The best facilitators are true practitioners of excellent customer service and do whatever it takes to satisfy their customers’ (participants’) need to learn. but it’s really harder work. Improving performance means answering the often unspoken participant question. Whether you are an experienced veteran of the classroom or are new to the task. The activities in this book are designed to help your participants learn through active involvement. Improving performance requires being able to connect the classroom activity to the learner’s job. ∼2∼ . They learn what works and what doesn’t work and make necessary modifications for future participant groups. “What’s in it for me?” With this in mind. we consider them to be performance improvement exercises. The best facilitators are constantly learning right along with their participants. While activities are in progress. but improving performance is about facilitating learning.

They are not intended for distribution and are found in only some of the activities. at-a-glance guide to conducting the activity. physical activities. Timing will depend on group size and the depth to which you wish to pursue learning points. A short outline of the activity. Some take only a few minutes. The materials you’ll need to prepare to facilitate learning. while others will require more contemplation and analysis. Time. games. Description. About the Activities Each activity is presented in a uniform way. Skill areas. when given. Handouts. Observer sheets. Participants. Method and note. A summary of the skills that can be developed by using this particular exercise. These notes. Use the Index to Activities to identify the various coaching/mentoring skill areas covered in this volume. These are used in conjunction with some of the exercises and are also in a form that can be photocopied. • • • • ∼3∼ . and simulations. A step-by-step. Many different learning methods are employed. and suggested discussion points. In order to initiate the discussion. provide either further background information or precise details of materials required for the activity. background information. Objectives. They range from the simple and lighthearted to the complex and risky. They provide a means for communicating some of the key learning points or background information about the exercise. What the participants should be able to do after they experience the activity. These are designed to increase participant involvement. This is an estimate only. Guidance on size and type of group. role plays. Resources. we have often provided a list of suggested questions to ask. how to best use the activity. Provides guidance on timing. The facilitator is provided with the following: • • • • • • • • Activity number and title.Introduction This volume contains a wide variety of activities. while others take longer. This mix reflects our belief that different approaches are required to achieve different learning objectives. They are ready to be photocopied for use during the activity. Some will provide an obvious “ah-ha” to the learner. Trainer’s notes. You will find questionnaires. Again. these are ready to be photocopied. Exercises. Then select the appropriate activity to develop the skill and performance of your learners.

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V. and follow up. but does not necessarily involve a direct reporting relationship. Regardless of the term you prefer. improve their understanding of the work environment. Middle managers are expected to do more with less. One distinction that can be drawn is to think of coaching in terms of the boss-employee relationship. The two terms are often used interchangeably and indeed they have very similar meanings. generate alternatives and an action plan for dealing with identified problems. R. & Venkateswara. counseling. (1990). may be a peer or another person in the organization. monitor and review progress in achieving their goals. on the other hand. answer questions.1 1 Pareek. Performance coaching. The mentor has to rely on his/her ability to influence the other person without benefit of a supervisory relationship. the successful coach/mentor has to be able to help the people they are working with to • • • • • • • better appreciate their own strengths and weaknesses. The mentor’s role is to provide guidance. ∼5∼ . identify problems that may be adversely affecting progress. Organizations are changing.” Closely associated with coaching is the concept of mentoring. They are getting smaller and flatter.Developing Coaching/Mentoring Skills Importance of Coaching/Mentoring We have developed and assembled this collection of activities because we believe that the role of the coach/mentor is critical in today’s organizations. The 1990 Annual: Developing Human Resources (San Diego. and realize their full potential.. Coaching and Mentoring Roles We define coaching as “the process of developing employees by providing them with opportunities to develop their skills and experience while ensuring they receive continuous feedback. and help develop the individual’s skills and experience. One of the keys to the success of today’s supervisors will be their ability to lead and coach their people. CA: University Associates). encourage them to establish goals or targets for further performance improvement. A mentor.

Get agreement that a problem exists. 4. CA: University Associates). Kinlaw. Kinlaw suggests this is the process of developing in others such things as political savvy. Confronting and challenging. Tutoring. D. Success is measured by the degree to which a person helps others to obtain the knowledge and expertise needed in their work. Mentoring. These skills are needed to help the less-thansuccessful performers to become successful and to challenge the successful employees to become superior performers. Dennis C. This coaching model is explained in detail in Activity 39. (1991). Ed. Follow up.D. Give recognition when the problem is solved. and proactively managing their own careers. effective coaches use a fourstep process to solve performance problems: 1. Thus. Kinlaw.. Decide on a solution. 2. has suggested that successful coaches have to possess the following characteristics: • Contact and core communication skills.2 • • • • The confronting and challenging skills require the use of a coaching model to deal with performance problems. C. This consists of helping other people solve their own problems rather than providing solutions. 3. Coaching for commitment: managerial strategies for obtaining superior performance (San Diego. Coaching Model When the performance of their people does not meet expectations or developmental goals are missed because of performance deficiencies. What Are You Gonna Do? This activity also gives participants the opportunity to apply the coaching method in both a simulated and real work situation.50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring Coaching Characteristics Successful coaches/mentors have to possess a variety of skills in order to succeed in their roles with those assigned to them. Counseling. sensitivity to the organization’s culture. in his book Coaching for Commitment: Managerial Strategies for Obtaining Superior Performance. 2 . The role of coaching is largely undertaken in a variety of informal conversations. the coach must have regular and easy contact with those they are supposed to coach.

These and other skills areas are identified in the Index to Activities. This volume is designed to do just that. the coaches and mentors you work with will be able to develop the skills they need to be successful and to lead their organizations. and setting expectations.Developing Coaching/Mentoring Skills The 50 Activities Developing the skills and characteristics necessary to be effective and using the coaching model in a positive manner requires providing the would-be coach/mentor with a variety of learning experiences. collaboration. counseling. We are confident. goal setting. We have included activities that address such skills as building trust. listening. ∼7∼ . as you select and use the appropriate activities for your learning environments.

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Paper. Picture That 7. You're Out 3. Scissors 17 25 31 35 39 47 49 53 57 59 65 67 71 75 77 2. Card Exchange 4. Goal Ladder Recognition and Reward Course Closures . Attitudes or Attributes? 6. Positive Feedback 15. Let's Have a BEER 11. Wanna BET? 12. Strike Three. Focus on Coaching Skills 9. Chair Walking 14. How do you rate? 8. Rock. String Toss 10.Index to Activities Icebreakers Analyzing Performance Problems Assertiveness Building Trust Collaboration Communication Delegating Evaluation Goal Setting Listening Page Number Networking Nonverbal Communication Nurturing Orientation Questioning Role of Coach/Mentor Setting Expectations Training Counseling 1. Making a Sandwich 13. Who am I? Developing Coaching/Mentoring Skills ∼9∼ 5.

Coaches Bowl 22. Coaching Challenge 27. 26.Index to Activities Icebreakers Analyzing Performance Problems Assertiveness Building Trust Collaboration Communication Delegating Evaluation Goal Setting Listening Page Number Networking Nonverbal Communication Nurturing Orientation Questioning Role of Coach/Mentor Setting Expectations Training Counseling 16. Concentrate on. Trivia Quiz 24. Recognition Brainstorm Recognition and Reward . Fishbowl 30.. Opposite Poles 28. Reel Movies 21. How am I doing? 23. Idea Exchange 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring Course Closures ∼ 10 ∼ 20. Card Houses 19. Construction 85 89 93 97 99 103 107 117 119 125 131 137 139 149 151 17. Nonverbal Behaviors 29. Dueling Families 25.. Origami 18.

. Three-Element Messages 38. Proxemics 39. but. Translation. Tic-Tac-Toe 45.. "Yeah. Theory X/Theory Y Assumptions 34. Coaching Miscues 44. Please 41.Index to Activities Icebreakers Analyzing Performance Problems Assertiveness Building Trust Collaboration Communication Delegating Evaluation Goal Setting Listening Page Number Networking Nonverbal Communication Nurturing Orientation Questioning Role of Coach/Mentor Setting Expectations Training Counseling 31. Information Overload Recognition and Reward Course Closures . Word Search 155 161 163 173 175 183 187 193 199 213 219 223 233 243 247 32. Finish the Sentence 33. What are you gonna do? 40. Say what you mean! 37. The Lovers 36. Letter to a Friend Developing Coaching/Mentoring Skills ∼ 11 ∼ 35. Making Assignments 43." 42.

Tearing up Communication 271 265 255 253 Page Number Icebreakers Analyzing Performance Problems Assertiveness Building Trust Collaboration Communication Counseling Delegating Evaluation Goal Setting Listening Networking Nonverbal Communication Nurturing Orientation Questioning Recognition and Reward Role of Coach/Mentor Setting Expectations Training Course Closures Index to Activities . Listen up! 48. "Say what?" 47.50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring ∼ 12 ∼ 46. "Just Thought I'd Ask" 50. You want me to do what? 277 49.

and other variables that can occur during any course. The actual time will depend on size of group. length of time allowed for discussion. Paper. Scissors Who am I? Attitudes or Attributes? Focus on Coaching Skills Let’s Have a BEER Making a Sandwich Coaches Bowl How am I doing? Dueling Families Concentrate on. Theory X/Theory Y Assumptions ∼ 13 ∼ . .Time Checklist This checklist gives an approximate indication of the minimum time necessary to conduct each activity. You’re Out Card Exchange Picture That How do you rate? String Toss Wanna BET? Chair Walking Positive Feedback Construction Origami Card Houses Idea Exchange Reel Movies Trivia Quiz Coaching Challenge Opposite Poles Fishbowl Word Search Finish the Sentence Say what you mean! Three-Element Messages Proxemics Translation. . Please Listen up! “Say what?” Between one-half hour and one hour Rock. One-half hour or less Strike Three.

50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring Letter to a Friend The Lovers “Yeah. but…” Tic-Tac-Toe Information Overload “Just Thought I’d Ask” Tearing up Communications You want me to do what? More than one hour Goal Ladder Making Assignments Recognition Brainstorm What are you gonna do? Nonverbal Behaviors Coaching Miscues ∼ 14 ∼ .

Symbols The following symbols are used throughout this document: Handout Exercise Trainer’s Notes ∼ 15 ∼ .

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Scissors This activity illustrates the issues that arise when people are assigned to team situations and are encouraged to compete with and beat the competition. participants will be able to • • describe the value of collaboration rather than competition. Skill Areas • • Building trust Collaboration Participants Number: Type: 12 to 18 Any. and markers ∼ 17 ∼ . paper. Paper. but especially those for whom a working relationship built on trust is important Time 30 to 60 minutes. and explain the factors that affect building a trust relationship.1 for each participant Sufficient space for two teams to work without being overheard by each other and an open space for participants to meet Flipchart stand. Objectives By the end of this activity. including discussion Resources • • • One copy each of Handout 1.1 and Exercise 1.1 Description Rock.

5.” Refer participants to Exercise 1. a copy of Handout 1. Step 2: Distribute Handout 1. • • • • Divide participants into two teams. Have each team select a name for the team. Remaining participants. Rock (+) breaks Scissors (—) 2. ∼ 18 ∼ .Activity 1 Method Step 1: Introduce the activity. 2. Paper (+) covers Rock (—) Step 3: Explain exercise “rounds. and 3: Players start the game without consulting their respective team and without talking to each other.1.1 based on the scoring guidelines and these rules: 1. Rounds 4. 8. Notes: 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring Identify between 12 and 18 participants to take part in the activity. Paper. At no time during the exercise are participants to talk to members of the other team or to class members who are observing. Scissors (+) cuts Paper (—) 3. they will each use their hand to represent one of the following: Rock = closed fist Paper = open hand Scissors = V formed with index and middle fingers • Scorekeepers will record the results on Exercise 1. Notes: • • • Rounds 1. if any. proceed the way the team decides. Explain the purpose of the activity: to accumulate as high a score as possible for the team. and 6: Players consult with their team to decide how to play the game.1. players will face each other and maintain eye contact as they will each raise and lower one fist three times in a “table pounding” motion. Players must. Rounds 7. Scissors. They do not talk to each other. however. Have each team elect or appoint a scorekeeper. Notes: Give each participant. Have each team elect or appoint a player. are to record their observations for later discussion. Explain the rules: • • • The activity is based on the old game of Rock. When meeting. and 9: Players may talk with each other as well as with their team. On the count of 3. including the players.1.

and 9. • • • • During rounds 1. Step 5: Conduct the activity. During rounds 7. Allow discussion for 60 seconds for rounds 7. Have observers. 8. 2.50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring Activity 1 Step 4: Explain scoring. scores are face value. and 6. 5. Step 6: Review the activity by asking the participants to describe what happened. 5. and 3. Scores are totaled after round 9. The team with the highest score is the winner. Total the scores at the end of the activity and congratulate the “winners” and give condolences to the “losers. Notes: Lead a discussion on how this exercise revealed issues in collaboration and teamwork. verify scores. if any.” Option: You can influence the game’s outcome by • • instructing one of the teams to establish a “win-win” strategy. During rounds 4. Have scorekeepers record scores after each round. scores are doubled. scores are tripled. Notes: Scorekeepers will assign points based on scoring guidelines.” what could have been done to restore it? How were the teams like work groups or organizational units? What behavioral comparisons can be drawn? Did the players identify with their teams or with each other? ∼ 19 ∼ . Questions you might ask: • • • • • • • • • • • What was the objective of each team? In what ways did the teams collaborate? Did anything prevent collaboration? How could these obstacles have been overcome? Was there a clear “winner” or “loser”? Why or why not? Did one team have a higher score than the other? Does that create a “winner” or a “loser”? What was done to build trust between the players? What was done to build trust between the teams? If trust was “betrayed. and 6. and 9. 8. and/or instructing one of the teams to “double-cross” the other team. Notes: Allow discussion for 30 seconds per round for rounds 4.

” ∼ 20 ∼ . Collaboration can result in everyone being “winners. Collaboration between teams is sometimes difficult because of a natural competitive spirit. Trust between individuals on a team has to be established before trust between teams is possible. Notes: Allow 5 to 10 minutes. Focus on how learning can be applied on the job. The learning points should be those that emerged from Step 6. Some possibilities could be: • • • • Teams tend to be competitive.Activity 1 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring Step 7: Summarize the learning points on a flipchart.

they will raise and lower one of their fists three times in a “table pounding” motion. Amherst. Scissors This activity is based on the old game of Rock. and tripled during rounds 7—9. Paper. After the activity. Paper. 1993.Handout 1. MA: HRD Press. the facilitator will lead a discussion. In this game. trying to guess what their opponent will do. Maintaining eye contact. ∼ 21 ∼ . they will each use their hand to represent one of the following: Rock = closed fist Paper = open hand Scissors = V formed with index and middle fingers Scoring follows this guideline: Rock (+) breaks Scissors (—) Scissors (+) cuts Paper (—) Paper (+) covers Rock (—) The game will include nine rounds of play. Team members who have been selected as players will face each other in an area apart from their team. or scissors with their hands. Charles Cadwell. Scissors. Reproduced from 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring by Donna Berry. two players form symbols for rock. paper.1 Rock. On the count of 3. doubled during rounds 4—6. The goal is to accumulate the highest possible score for your team. and Joe Fehrmann. Scorekeepers will use the following scoring guidelines: scores are at face value during rounds 1—3.

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They are not allowed to talk to each other. Amherst. 1993. Round 7: Round 8: Round 9: Choice Choice Choice Player 1 Score Score Score Scoring Guidelines Player 1 Choice Scissors Scissors Scissors Rock Rock Paper Score +5 0 +10 0 0 +10 Player 2 Choice Scissors Rock Paper Rock Paper Paper Score +5 +10 0 0 +5 +10 Choice Choice Choice Player 2 Score Score Score Reproduced from 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring by Donna Berry. ∼ 23 ∼ . Rounds 1—3: Players play without consulting their teams. the scorekeepers will indicate each player’s choice and score for each round. Round 1: Round 2: Round 3: Choice Choice Choice Player 1 Score Score Score Choice Choice Choice Player 2 Score Score Score Rounds 4—6: Players may consult with their teams to decide how to play. Discussion time is limited to one minute per round. and Joe Fehrmann.Exercise 1. Charles Cadwell.1: Scoresheet Using the guidelines below. Scores are tripled. Round 4: Round 5: Round 6: Choice Choice Choice Player 1 Score Score Score Choice Choice Choice Player 2 Score Score Score Rounds 7—9: Players must now consult with each other.1 Exercise 1. MA: HRD Press. Discussion time is limited to 30 seconds per round. Scores are doubled.

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Objectives By the end of this activity.2 Description Strike Three. participants will be able to • • • • describe the need for complete. and open communication to meet competition. fearful. honest. or whiteboard for scorekeeping Prizes (optional) ∼ 25 ∼ .1 for the coaches One copy of Exercise 2.1 for each team Balloons in a variety of colors (enough for 12 balloons per participant) Straight pins (or any sharp object) A timer. flipchart. experience the frustration of the worker who is expected to perform to standards that are either unknown or vague. Skill Areas • • • • • • Analyzing performance problems Collaboration Communication/Nonverbal communication Goal setting Role of the coach Setting expectations Participants Number: Type: Any Any Time 20 to 40 minutes Resources • • • • • • Exercise 2. You’re Out This activity illustrates the necessity of complete communication between the coach and the team or individual. It also demonstrates how an ineffective coach can cause people to become frustrated. resentful. appreciate team effort. and describe the attributes of an effective coach. and generally nonproductive.

Notes: 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring In order to illustrate the effectiveness of teams to produce in a competitive environment. appoint that person as scorekeeper. If the participants ask what constitutes “acceptable. They will also receive the pin or some other sharp object. Some teams will become fearful of the “reprimand pop” and will stop producing. In each respect.” tell them that their coach will give them constant feedback concerning the acceptability of the balloon. Step 4: Brief the coaches. Ask each team to select a coach to lead the activity. Instruct the teams that they will be given five minutes to produce balloons. Give 12 balloons to each participant. Notes: Take the coaches out of the room and give them complete written instructions for what will be judged as an acceptable inflated balloon. Step 3: Brief the team. The only feedback they are allowed to give their team is approval or rejection of balloons. only acceptable balloons will count in their competitive standing. Step 5: Set the timer for five minutes and give the “Begin” signal. If you have an extra person.Activity 2 Method Step 1: Introduce the activity. Notes: The participants will want verbal feedback and will become increasingly frustrated as unacceptable balloons are popped. Rejection of inferior work will be indicated by the coach popping the balloon with the sharp object. Notes: Participants are to hold acceptable balloons high in the air until they are counted by the scorekeeper. Some teams will attempt to uncover the riddle of what made one balloon okay and caused another to be popped. Notes: Tell the teams that their coach will accept only those balloons that meet the criteria. Explain that each team will have a coach and that the team’s goal will be to produce more “acceptable” inflated balloons than the opposing team(s). Start timer. Remind them once again that they have five minutes to produce more acceptable balloons than the opposing team(s). Take the coaches back into the room. divide the participants into groups of five. ∼ 26 ∼ . Step 2: Explain Exercise 2. the lesson will be clear.1 to the coaches.

and resentful.50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring Activity 2 Step 6: Call “Time” and stop production. or confusion? Step 8: Review the activity. Give condolences to the loser(s). Notes: In response to the complaints about the lack of fairness. ∼ 27 ∼ . Lead the participants in understanding and discussing the attributes of the effective coach as a person who sets specific standards and makes sure that those standards are fully understood and accepted by the person or persons doing the work. Verbal feedback: Prepare to answer outcry. Step 9: Summarize the learning concepts on a flipchart. The concepts learned should be those that emerged from the discussion during Step 8. anxiety. Ineffective communication causes people to become frustrated. Ineffective communication results in lower productivity. Some possibilities could be: • • • • Effective communication should be specific. ask for feedback. Focus on how that understanding can be applied on the job. Employees want to know what is expected of them. Notes: Allow 5 to 10 minutes. Notes: Ask the participants to describe: • • • What just happened? What was learned? Why was this activity conducted? Lead a discussion about the necessity of complete and fully understood communication for team or individual production and morale. Notes: Congratulate the winning team. fearful. Step 7: Nonverbal feedback: Distribute prizes to the winners if you have chosen that option. Questions you might ask: • • • What problems did you have with production? What would have facilitated production? What caused frustration.

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one at a time. they will produce balloons for your approval. Production team members use only their left hands to give the balloons to you. You accept only a balloon that is different in color than the last one handed to you. Charles Cadwell. 2. You will take a balloon only from a team member different from the last person who handed you one. No production team member may submit two balloons in a row.1: The Coach’s Dilemma Instructions for the coach: As coach.1 Exercise 2. Reproduced from 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring by Donna Berry. The inflated balloons are handed to you. As a team. ∼ 29 ∼ . your team will depend on you for leadership in this competition. You will be guided by the following criteria for the acceptance or rejection of each balloon submitted. you must reject the balloon by immediately popping it. 4. 3. Accepted balloons are held in the air until the scorekeeper counts them and then they may be lowered. No talking or explanations of any kind are permitted.Exercise 2. Amherst. You may accept balloons only if all of the following standards are met: 1. by members of the team. MA: HRD Press. If balloons do not meet all of the above conditions. 1993. and Joe Fehrmann.

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and markers ∼ 31 ∼ . participants will be able to • • interact with other participants. The activity is flexible and can be used at the beginning.3 Description Card Exchange This activity encourages involvement and the interaction of all group members. and describe several roles of a coach/mentor. during. Skill Areas • • • • Icebreaker Networking Role of coach/mentor Course closure Participants Number: Type: Any Any Time 20 to 30 minutes Resources • • • • Business cards Index cards cut to the size of business cards Pen or pencil for each participant Flipchart stand. or at the end of a course. paper. Objectives By the end of this activity.

Step 4: Start the activity. The activity continues in this manner until everyone has collected a card from each group member or until you call “Time. Each participant will need the same number of cards as there are group members. Note: Depending on the size of the group.Activity 3 Method Step 1: Prepare the activity. Notes: Have participants walk around the room and meet with one another. Each participant should complete the same number of cards as there are group members. As they meet. Cut index cards to use as business cards for those participants who need them. Have them write their names and any other pertinent information on one side of the card. Notes: Distribute blank cards to those who do not have business cards. Step 2: Introduce the activity. Notes: 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring Before the session in which you use this activity. Step 3: Prepare the cards. Each participant is asked to select the role of a coach/mentor that they think is most important and write it on the back of their business cards/index cards. find out how many participants have business cards with them.” ∼ 32 ∼ . you may wish to divide into smaller groups. they exchange business cards and take 1 to 2 minutes to discuss the roles they have written on their cards. Notes: Explain that the goal is to learn as many different coaching roles as possible and to network with as many other participants as possible.

Conclude by relating the top choices to information you have (or will) be covering during the course. Determine the group’s top three choices and discuss why they selected them. Have them rank order their three choices. Notes: Have participants go through the cards they collected and select the three coaching roles that they think are most important. write their responses on a flipchart. discuss other choices that they considered to be less important. Step 6: Review the activity. Notes: If used as an icebreaker. ∼ 33 ∼ .50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring Activity 3 Step 5: Getting acquainted (optional). when participants meet they should introduce themselves and find out about one another. You should provide a list of things for them to find out about one another. As participants share their choices. If time permits.

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Skill Areas • • • • • Icebreaker Communication Listening Networking Questioning Participants Number: Type: Any Any Time 30 minutes Resources • • • Self-stick labels/name tags or paper signs and straight pins Paper and pen or pencil for each participant Prizes (optional) ∼ 35 ∼ .4 Description Who am I? This activity encourages physical interaction and encourages participants to get involved in the learning process. and name several other participants. Objectives By the end of this activity. participants will be able to • • ask questions to obtain information.

Names can be of those who are either living or dead. the better their chances of being successful. Find out who you are. or mixed. real or fictional. all of the same type. Notes: Review the objectives. Explain to participants that the greater number of people they interact with. Notes: 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring Prior to participants arriving.Activity 4 Method Step 1: Prepare the activity. Step 3: Put a name tag on the back of each participant to prevent the individual from seeing it. Notes: One way to do this is to give each participant a name tag and have the group stand in two circles—one within the other. Some examples: John Wayne Madonna George Bush Moses Tom Sawyer Jimmy Stewart Cher Bill Clinton Jesus Huck Finn Another option is to prepare name tags in pairs so that the activity has two steps: 1. Find the person who goes with you. 2. ∼ 36 ∼ . prepare name tags with names of famous people who would be known to participants. For example: Salt/Pepper Sugar/Cream George/Gracie Abbott/Costello Bush/Cheney Bill/Hillary Step 2: Introduce the activity. Participants put the name tag on the back of the person standing in front of or behind them.

after participants learn their secret identity.50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring Activity 4 Step 4: Start the activity. You could also give a prize to the person who asks the fewest questions before learning his/her identity. you could give a prize to the person who learns his/her identity first. Notes: If used as an icebreaker. Step 6: Award prizes (optional). Notes: To create a contest. have them meet with another person and learn about their real identities. In this case “Salt” and “Pepper” would interview each other. Step 7: Review the activity. Notes: Each participant is to ask someone else in the group a yes/no question about his/her identity. Examples include: • • • • Am I a living person? Am I male? Am I a thing? Could you taste me? The activity continues until each person in the group learns his/her identity. This works well if you use the “pairs” concept. Have participants keep track of how many questions they ask. Notes: Questions you might ask: • • • • • • How easy/difficult was it asking only yes/no questions? What other types of questions would have been helpful? What does this tell you about the types of questions you should ask to obtain information? How important was listening? Why did it take you so long to learn your identity? How can you apply what you’ve learned to a coaching situation? ∼ 37 ∼ . Step 5: Getting acquainted (optional).

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participants will be able to • • • list attitudes of successful coaches.2 for each participant Flipchart stand. and markers ∼ 39 ∼ .1 and 5. Participants also have the opportunity to evaluate their own attitudes and attributes. paper. Skill Areas • • • • Evaluation Orientation Role of coach Training Participants Number: Type: Any Any Time 1 hour Resources • • One copy each of Exercises 5. and evaluate their own attitudes and attributes. list attributes of successful coaches. Objectives By the end of this activity.5 Description Attitudes or Attributes? This activity encourages participants to explore the importance of attitudes and attributes of successful coaches.

Step 5: Discuss the importance of a coach’s attributes. Record pertinent comments on the flipchart. Notes: Review the directions with the group and allow 5 to 10 minutes to complete the questionnaire.” Discuss the differences between attitudes and attributes.1 to each participant. What attitudes does he/she have? Which attitudes do you think are most important? Why? What can you do if you have a “low” attitude score? How can you use the results of this questionnaire on the job? Step 4: Distribute one copy of Exercise 5. What attributes does he/she have? Which attributes do you think are most important? Why? ∼ 40 ∼ .2 to each participant. Record pertinent comments on the flipchart. Notes: 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring Ask participants to define the terms “attitude” and “attribute. Questions you might ask: • • • • • What role do you think attitudes play in a coach’s success? Think of someone you consider to be a successful coach. Notes: Ask participants to share the results of their worksheets. Step 3: Discuss the importance of a coach’s attitude. Discuss specific attributes and their importance.Activity 5 Method Step 1: Introduce the activity. Discuss specific attitudes and their importance. Notes: Review the directions with the group and allow 5 to 10 minutes to complete the worksheet. Notes: Ask participants to share the results of their questionnaires. Step 2: Distribute one copy of Exercise 5. Questions you might ask: • • • What role do you think attributes play in a coach’s success? Think of someone you consider to be a successful coach.

Ask participants to describe the relationship between attitudes and attributes as they relate to successful coaches. Notes: Go back to the definitions agreed to earlier. Have them write a brief statement of what they plan to do. Notes: Challenge participants to identify one or two attitudes and/or attributes that they want to improve. Step 7: Review the activity.50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring Activity 5 • • What can you do if you have a “low” attribute score? How can you use the results of this questionnaire on the job? Step 6: Discuss the relationship between attitudes and attributes. Ask participants which they think are most important—attitudes or attributes. ∼ 41 ∼ . Ask participants if they still think their original definitions are valid or if they need to be changed. The statement should be as specific as possible.

Exercise 5.1

Exercise 5.1: Coaching Attitudes
Listed below are several attitudes that can affect your success as a coach. Circle the number that you think best describes your personal attitudes as a coach. Rarely 1. I am genuinely interested in what my people do. 2. I support the decisions my people make. 3. I praise my people when they are successful. 4. I encourage my people to think for themselves. 5. I allow my people to participate in decisions. 6. I encourage my people to work together as a team. 7. I am able to remain objective when discussing problems. 8. I look for the “good” in what people do rather than the “bad.” 9. I display a positive attitude even when things are going wrong. 10. I enjoy seeing my people be successful. 11. I enjoy helping my people be successful even when they get more credit than I do. 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 Sometimes 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 Often 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7

Reproduced from 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring by Donna Berry, Charles Cadwell, and Joe Fehrmann. Amherst, MA: HRD Press, 1993.

∼ 43 ∼

Exercise 5.2

Exercise 5.2: Coaching Attributes
Coaches who are successful display some basic attributes in their relationships with their people. Effective coaches focus on four activities described below. Use this worksheet to evaluate what you are currently doing and any improvements you may want to make. 1. Orientation and Training I have an orientation plan that I use with new people. I have a training plan to teach new people their jobs. Whether a person is new to the organization or just new to the team, orientation is necessary to give the person the right start. Orientation occurs during the first few days or weeks on the job. Training, on the other hand, is an ongoing activity. Use the space below to list any action(s) you need to take with regard to orientation and training.

2. Development I have met with each of my people individually to discuss strengths, weaknesses, and opportunities for improvement. I have written development plans for each of my people that list specific activities and deadlines. Whether a person is new to the organization or just new to the team, orientation is necessary to give the person the right start. Orientation occurs during the first few days or weeks on the job. Training, on the other hand, is an ongoing activity. Use the space below to list any action(s) you need to take with regard to orientation and training.

(Continued)

∼ 45 ∼

Exercise 5.2 (concluded)
3. Support and Encouragement I provide regular feedback, positive and corrective, to my people about their performance. I provide resources, remove barriers, or work directly with my people to help them be successful. Effective leaders know that when their people are successful, they will be successful. Regular support and encouragement leads to enhanced confidence, new skills, and better overall performance. Use the space below to list any action(s) you need to take to provide support and encouragement to your people.

4. Performance Problems I accept responsibility for helping my people with performance problems. I use a systematic process to resolve performance problems. Effective coaches help their people understand and overcome problems that get in the way of their best performance. They develop skills in dealing with performance problems. Use the space below to list any action(s) you need to take to improve your ability to handle performance problems.

Reproduced from 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring by Donna Berry, Charles Cadwell, and Joe Fehrmann. Amherst, MA: HRD Press, 1993.

∼ 46 ∼

6 Description Picture That This activity works well as either an icebreaker exercise or a discussion starter. Skill Areas • • • Icebreaker Evaluation Setting expectations Participants Number: Type: Any Any Time 10 to 15 minutes Resources Tent cards and broad tip markers for each participant ∼ 47 ∼ . Objectives By the end of this activity. participants will be able to • • • express individual coaching skills. identify individual coaching skills needed. and name the other participants and the skill level of each. This exercise can also be used to determine the skill level of the participants.

This is also a good indicator of the current skill level so that training can be adapted to meet the needs of the audience. Step 3: Lead a discussion as a review of this activity.Activity 6 Method Step 1: Introduce the activity. Notes: Ask participants to share introductory information (if you are using this activity as an icebreaker) along with the skill they have depicted on the tent card. Step 2: Exchange information. Notes: 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring Explain that in addition to writing their name on the tent card. participants should draw a representative picture of a coaching skill they currently possess (or a coaching skill that they need and want to acquire as a result of this training). Ask that they use the broad tip markers and prepare to interpret their artwork. the skills can be compiled on a chart as the target for training. Notes: Questions you might ask: • What skills are essential to the effective coach? • Which skills named do you need to improve on? • What are your expectations for this training? • How could you use this activity with the people you coach? ∼ 48 ∼ . If this is the first opportunity to discuss coaching skills. This activity can be used to remind the trainer of the participant expectations.

Objectives By the end of this activity. Skill Areas • • • • Evaluation Goal setting Networking Course closure Participants Number: Type: Any Any Time 30 minutes Resources • • Tent cards for names Pen or pencil for each participant ∼ 49 ∼ . discuss their strengths and weaknesses with other participants.7 Description How do you rate? This activity can be used at any time during a session or as a course closure to identify your coaching/mentoring strengths and weaknesses. and set goals for improving their weaknesses. participants will be able to • • • identify their strengths and weaknesses as a coach.

Have participants form small groups in which people who have strengths meet with people who have the “matching” weaknesses. Step 3: Participants find a partner. Use this time to identify participants who have “matching” strengths and weaknesses. Notes: Have participants walk around the room until they find a participant(s) who identified as a strength something they consider to be a weakness. In rare instances. Step 5: Begin discussions. Have participants write their greatest weaknesses on the inside of their tent cards. Notes: Have participants write their greatest strength on the outside of their tent cards. Notes: Review the objectives. Step 4: Set up small groups. Notes: Allow groups 5 to 10 minutes to discuss strengths and weaknesses with each other. you might find two people who “match” exactly. In most cases.Activity 7 Method Step 1: Introduce the activity. Notes: Ask each participant to name one or two people who could be his/her partner. ∼ 50 ∼ . 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring Step 2: Participants identify their greatest strengths and weaknesses. Have them write down the name(s) of the person(s) whose strengths correspond with their weaknesses. you will have three or more people in the group.

Encourage participants to keep in touch with the people they identified who might be able to provide them with help for their “weaknesses” after the course is over. Have participants set goals to improve their weaknesses based on what they learned during the discussions.50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring Activity 7 Step 6: Review the activity. ∼ 51 ∼ . Point out the importance of networking with other people. Notes: Ask participants to comment on what they learned in their small group discussions.

8
Description

Focus on Coaching Skills

This activity allows participants to interact with one another and to discuss their strengths, weaknesses, and goals in a nonthreatening manner.

Objectives
By the end of this activity, participants will be able to
• • • •

describe their strengths and weaknesses; identify other group members who have similar strengths and weaknesses; discuss coaching skills with other group members; and set goals for improvement.

Skill Areas
• • • • •

Building trust Goal setting Networking Role of coach/mentor Setting expectations

Participants
Number: Type: Any Any

Time
1 hour

Resources
One copy of Exercise 8.1 for each participant

∼ 53 ∼

Activity 8 Method
Step 1: Introduce the activity. Notes: Review the objectives.

50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring

Explain that participants will be working in small groups. Step 2: Divide the group. Notes: Set up small groups of three to seven participants. Step 3: Distribute one copy of Exercise 8.1 to each participant. Notes: Review the exercise and answer any questions participants have. Step 4: Conduct the activity. Notes: Have participants fill in the top row of Exercise 8.1 with information about themselves. Have participants share with other people in their group what they have filled in on their exercise. Participants should fill in their exercises with information from other participants. As they fill in the information, they should discuss each person’s responses. Allow groups 30 minutes to discuss the questions and complete the exercise. Step 5: Review the activity. Notes: Reassemble the group. Discuss the exercise by reviewing the questions. Give participants the opportunity to find others in the larger group who share similar strengths and weaknesses. Discuss how knowledge of these strengths and weaknesses can be used during the training.

∼ 54 ∼

Exercise 8.1: Focus on Coaching Skills

Name

What I get paid for:

The best coach I ever had was… because…

My two best coaching skills are…

Hot buttons that keep me from being a successful coach:

Coaching skills I want to improve:

Reproduced from 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring by Donna Berry, Charles Cadwell, and Joe Fehrmann. Amherst, MA: HRD Press, 1993.

∼ 55 ∼

Exercise 8.1

and describe team cooperation.9 Description String Toss This activity can be used to brainstorm coaching skills or as a technique for review. Skill Areas • • • Evaluation Networking Course closure Participants Number: Type: 6 to 10 Any Time 10 to 15 minutes Resources A ball of yarn or string ∼ 57 ∼ . Objectives By the end of this activity. participants will be able to • • list coaching skills.

what comes to mind? What happens when one person drops the string that they hold? (Instruct someone to do just that. When skills have been exhausted. If this activity has been an evaluation tool. you will be able to determine course content recall by the responses. he/she must recall or think of an essential coaching skill.) Another? And another? Step 5: Review the activity. Step 2: Explain the activity. Notes: 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring Ask the participants to stand and form a circle as a group. draw the participants’ attention to the web of string that has formed. Step 3: Conduct the activity. Listen for someone to call out “teamwork” or “team leadership” or some skill that indicates the teaming concept. the participants have woven a team representation. ∼ 58 ∼ . Notes: While reviewing or brainstorming coaching skills.Activity 9 Method Step 1: Introduce the activity. Notes: Give the ball to one of the participants and make sure he/she holds the end of the string while tossing the ball and calling out a skill. depending upon how you use this exercise. Notes: This activity calls for spontaneous response prompted by catching the ball of string. Explain that they will take turns calling out a coaching skill while holding the end of the string and tossing the ball to someone in the circle. Step 4: Lead a discussion. connecting each person with the others. Before one can toss it to another. You can choose to draw that application or not. Notes: Questions you might ask: • • When you observe the web that has resulted.

and markers Exercise 10.1 (optional) ∼ 59 ∼ . and enhance the four-step process with additional coaching activities. using the four-step process. Objectives By the end of this activity.10 Description Let’s Have a BEER This activity provides a four-step model for criticizing and correcting behavior and performance problems as well as an exercise to practice using the model. participants will be able to • • • describe the four-step model. Skill Areas • • • • Analyzing performance problems Assertiveness Evaluation Setting expectations Participants Number: Type: Any Any Time 30 to 40 minutes Resources • • Flipchart stand. paper. correct behavior in a nonthreatening manner.

Notes: Ask the participants to list all the effective things that the supervisor did. Allow 2 to 3 minutes.” Step 2: Discuss the role play. Direct the volunteer “supervisor” to face “X” and confront him/her. Describe the “situation” by addressing the volunteer you select to play the role of a supervisor (be sure this person can role play in front of a group): You supervise a work team here at (organization). and does acceptable work.Activity 10 Method Step 1: Introduce the activity. It’s gotten to the point that you need to confront “X” about this problem. One of your best workers is “X” (the other volunteer). This morning. Notes: Explain that you will now present a model for confronting an employee whose behavior or performance is unsatisfactory. Write on the flipchart: B E E R ∼ 60 ∼ . The list will probably include: • • • • Used polite tone Expressed appreciation for “X’s” past work Got to the point Made clear what needs to be done Step 3: Describe the model. “X” is always on time. Notes: 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring Ask for two volunteers for a role play. one of the other members of your team took you aside and voiced a complaint—“X” has a bad habit of picking his/her nose. asking the group to show special appreciation for the effort given by the “supervisor. then thank both volunteers. doesn’t complain. though. often in front of customers.

Each “supervisor” will need two to four minutes. how it hurts productivity. Have participants pair up. etc. Notes: Refer once more to the BEER model. Expectation—What you expect the employee to do or not do to change Result—What will happen if the employee changes (positive tone) or the consequences of this behavior continuing (negative tone) Step 4: Practice the model. You may also have class members volunteer additional elements that can be added to the model to make it more supportive (such as asking the subordinate for his/her ideas to correct the problem).50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring Activity 10 Explain the acronym: B E E R Behavior—What the employee is doing or not doing that is unacceptable Effect—Why the behavior is unacceptable. ∼ 61 ∼ . Have each pair practice the BEER model by confronting each other using their own examples. Step 5: Summarize the activity. Option: You may choose to use Exercise 10. bothers others. Notes: Instruct the class to recall a current or recent example of unacceptable behavior or performance.1 for practice.

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MA: HRD Press. Ray and Marsha are obviously attracted to each other. sure enough. Tom is a good worker. In fact. but he has one nagging problem: he can’t seem to get back to work on time after lunch. At the end of the day.1 Exercise 10. It’s almost 5:00 now. After lunch. 1993. In fact. and. His voice carries. or drops something. he swears loudly. She sometimes even calls them stupid if they ask her a question. Bobbie can’t seem to remember to clean up after herself. You just heard the sound of a file hitting the floor. You’ve just overheard her berating a new employee. Amherst. 3. Jack started cussing. 5. 2. 4. and Joe Fehrmann. they are together right now. 15 minutes overdue.1: Let’s Have a BEER 1. enough so that they frequently spend time together that should be spent working. food wrappers litter her area.Exercise 10. and other employees have occasionally complained about his bad language. it’s not uncommon for the mess to remain on the floor. Whenever Jack makes a mistake. he just strolled back in. ∼ 63 ∼ . Reproduced from 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring by Donna Berry. and she’s once again showing no signs of cleaning up. Susan has a bad habit of speaking sharply to coworkers. Charles Cadwell. has a problem.

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as well as an opportunity to practice the model. paper.11 Description Wanna BET? This activity provides a three-step process for praising employees. participants will be able to • • describe the three-step model. Objectives By the end of this activity. Skill Areas • • • Recognition and reward Nurturing Evaluation Participants Number: Type: Any Any Time 10 to 15 minutes Resources Flipchart stand. and markers ∼ 65 ∼ . and praise another person using the three-step process.

Note: This exercise is also effective when paired with Activity 10: Let’s Have a BEER. how it contributes Thank you—A tangible expression Step 2: Practice the model. Notes: 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring A useful opening is to ask the class.Activity 11 Method Step 1: Describe the model. Notes: Instruct the class to recall a recent example of good performance. Have participants pair up. “How many of you have been praised too much lately?” Explain that you will present a model for praising good performance. Each “supervisor” will need one to three minutes. Have each pair practice the BET model by praising each other using their own examples. Write on the flipchart: B E T Explain the acronym: B E T Behavior—What the employee is doing that is valuable Effect—Why the performance is important. ∼ 66 ∼ .

Skill Areas • • Delegating assignments Training Participants Number: Type: 10 to 50 Any Time 30 to 45 minutes Resources • • One copy of Exercise 12. knives. etc. Objectives By the end of this activity. participants will be able to • • describe an assignment or task using the Step/Key Idea outline. peanut butter. towels. ∼ 67 ∼ .1 for each participant Sandwich-making supplies: bread. spoons. apron.12 Description Making a Sandwich This activity provides participants with a simple training model and employs a humorous approach to avoiding assumptions. paper plates. and explain the danger of making assumptions regarding others’ knowledge. jelly.

Steps of a task are just that—the actions necessary to complete a task. shortcuts. (Be sure to select examples that will illustrate the need to be clear. Notes: Instruct participants to explain the making of a peanut butter and jelly sandwich using the outline. selecting one or two of the participants’ work to demonstrate.).Activity 12 Method Step 1: Distribute Exercise 12.” serve it to the participant. Spend only two or three minutes doing this. spread jelly on the crust edge. and make the sandwich as though you’ve never seen one in your life (put the peanut butter and jelly on opposite sides of the bread. etc. use the wrong end of the knife. Follow the steps literally. safety tips. circulate through the room. etc. grab the jellied bread with your hand. Explain the Steps and Key Ideas of the exercise. frying an egg. keep steps in sequence. Notes: Illustrate the use of the Step/Key Ideas outline with an example (such as starting a car. When you’ve completed the “sandwich. display the sandwich-making supplies. optional steps—any information that helps the learner. and so forth.). Notes: 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring Introduce the purpose of this exercise: to describe an assignment or a task in a step-by-step sequence. Have participants list steps and offer their ideas for the Key Ideas column.1. Notes: Questions you might ask: • • What does this demonstration show us about assumptions? Has anyone ever been surprised by someone not understanding you? ∼ 68 ∼ .) As participants continue to write. Key Ideas include the “why” of a step (important for adults!). As participants are writing. Step 2: Provide an example. Step 3: Lead participants in the exercise. Secure the example(s) you will use and begin making the sandwich according to the instructions the participant wrote. shaving. Allow about seven to eight minutes. Step 4: Review the activity. avoid assumptions.

Exercise 12. Charles Cadwell.1: Step-by-Step Objective or Task: Steps Key Ideas Reproduced from 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring by Donna Berry. and Joe Fehrmann. MA: HRD Press.1 Exercise 12. Amherst. ∼ 69 ∼ . 1993.

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participants will be able to • • describe the feeling of trust. Skill Areas • • • Building trust Networking Nonverbal communication Participants Number: Type: Five to six per team Any Time 20 to 30 minutes Resources • • Five to six sturdy.13 Description Chair Walking This activity demonstrates the necessity of trust in the coach/employee relationship. Objectives By the end of this activity. The trainer can also use this exercise to illustrate the advantage of networking. straight back chairs One blindfold per team (optional) ∼ 71 ∼ . and translate the need for trust to the coach/employee relationship.

Notes: Attempt to determine why one team appeared to accomplish the task with greater ease and confidence than another. Notes: After dividing the larger group into small teams of five to six.Activity 13 Method Step 1: Introduce the activity. Explain that this is not a competition. Notes: 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring Explain that this activity illustrates the need to have a trusting relationship in the workplace. Notes: Questions you might ask: • • How did you feel as you walked blindfolded or with your eyes closed? Would you have felt more or less confident without the help of your team members? ∼ 72 ∼ . it is an opportunity to experience vulnerability and trust. Team members will want to stand alongside the chairs to give physical aid and reassurance to the “trusting” (blindfolded) walker.) Each person on the team will walk. and the impact of nonverbal communication. allow the person to walk without the blindfold and with eyes open. Through this activity. eyes closed or blindfolded. If someone has vertigo. on top of the chair seats with the guidance of team members. the advantage of networking. ask each team to position straight back chairs in a line so that the sides are touching (as closely as possible) and all chair fronts are facing in the same direction. The best choice of chairs are those with flat bottoms—padded or not—with straight. Step 4: Lead a discussion. Give each team time enough to complete the exercise. you can demonstrate the need for trust in the coach/ employee relationship. (Chairs with rollers on the legs will not work. with each person on the team taking a turn at walking the length of the chairs. Step 2: Explain the activity. Step 3: Observe the teams and the hesitancy or confidence exhibited. sturdy legs and straight backs.

or coworker for guidance and direction? Have you ever worked in a situation where there was no trust? How did that affect productivity or quality? Step 5: Review the activity. 2.50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring Activity 13 • • • Have you ever lacked confidence with a task in the workplace and depended on the support of a coach. Notes: Questions you might ask: • • • Why did we do this exercise? What did we learn? How does this illustrate coaching responsibility? Step 6: Summarize the activity. Results of a trusting relationship in the workplace. Notes: Ask the participants to list the following: 1. ∼ 73 ∼ . mentor. Reasons trust is essential to coach/employee relationships.

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positive feedback to fellow participants. Skill Areas • • • • • • Communication Counseling Evaluation Listening Nurturing Course closure Participants Number: Type: Any Any Time 10 to 20 minutes Resources None ∼ 75 ∼ .14 Description Positive Feedback This activity is useful as a summary for all or a portion of a session dealing with interpersonal skills such as counseling or listening. and increase their comfort in giving positive feedback to another. Objectives By the end of this activity. It also serves as a trust builder for participants. participants will be able to • • provide specific.

Notes: 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring Have participants pair up. Each participant is to take two to three minutes to write down one or two skills or characteristics his or her partner has shown during the session that is a strength in coaching. Notes: Questions you might ask: • • • • Were you comfortable giving feedback? Why or why not? What made giving feedback easier? How did it feel to receive feedback? What topics of our program were mentioned? . Step 3: Review the activity.Activity 14 Method Step 1: Introduce the activity. Notes: Allow four to five minutes for partners to exchange their comments. Step 2: Conduct the activity.

1 for each participant Flipchart stand. Skill Areas • • • Goal setting Setting expectations Training Participants Number: Type: Any Any Time 45 to 90 minutes Resources • • One copy of Exercise 15. The coach can use this exercise to better understand what will motivate the employee as he or she trains in a new skill. and focus effort on areas for specific professional development. paper. Objectives By the end of this activity. create a set of goals for work based on the same method. It can be used to demonstrate the need for goals and expectations in the workplace. participants will be able to • • • define goals for seven separate areas of life. although the exercise will concentrate on the entirety of the individual’s life. and markers ∼ 77 ∼ .15 Description Goal Ladder This activity gives each participant an opportunity to set goals.

clubs. assure the participants that • • • there will be sufficient time allowed to complete the exercise. Notes: Area 1—Vocation Explain that this area focuses on job. buying a car. loans. taking vacations. educating someone. etc. Notes: Distribute Exercise 15. or credit belong here: establishing savings or retirement. and annual goals. paying off loans or credit cards. planning a family reunion. paying for college. Area 4—Financial Explain that any plans involving money. and to have fun with this exercise. Encourage them to dream. establishing credit. to envision. having children. It is also a method that has been used effectively for long-range planning. friends. semi-annual. What do you do for fun? This would include hobbies. retiring.1 to each participant. sports. Notes: 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring Explain that this activity is an opportunity to think about goals—both longand short-term—for several separate areas of each participant’s life.Activity 15 Method Step 1: Introduce the activity. Step 2: Explain the activity. Step 3: Define the Goal Areas. buying homes. After defining each area. desired profession— what you do or plan to do to earn a living. current profession. Area 2—Avocation This is the recreational or leisure part of life. they will not be required to share the goals with anyone. Area 3—Family Explain that these are plans regarding marriage. ∼ 78 ∼ . and even though some areas are foreign (in that they have never given thought or planning to that aspect of their life). or entertainment. etc. civic involvement. they should attempt to set a goal for each division. The exercise will illustrate a technique that can be used repeatedly to update and track both personal and professional goals. The process is easily adapted to the workplace for setting and tracking quarterly. purchasing insurance.

etc. This would be the goal that falls somewhere between tomorrow and the intermediate point. Next week. this would be 3 months. Area 6—Mental Ask about plans to “exercise” the mind. visiting local cultural spots. not failure. For the degree program. this would be a 2-year goal.50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring Activity 15 Area 5—Physical Ask about plans to improve or change physical condition: starting exercise or diet program. Plan for success. Completion of a degree program may require a long-term goal of 6 years. for the weight loss. This could possibly be a place described as “half-way there. taking a class. Remind participants to keep their goals realistic. What goals could they establish for themselves that would bring them to a level of greater development. Both of these are long-term goals and require the support of the following goal increments. tournament. learning more about anything that will improve a person mentally. for the 20 pounds. Goals that involve the body belong here. What we are attempting to do is establish a tracking system so that our goals can be attainable and measurable. This would be a measurable point between now and the short term. Short term. learning a new language.” ∼ 79 ∼ . Tomorrow. Step 4: Define the rungs of the Goal Ladder. earning a degree. giving up a habit. Losing 20 pounds may only need 6 months. Ask participants to plan the first thing they must do to start on the road toward accomplishment. Next month. this would be 4 years from now. establishing a nutritional eating plan. Area 7—Spiritual Explain that humans are spiritual and ask each to consider what it is that gives their life purpose and what offers meaning to their existence.” For the 8-year goal. league play. This is self-explanatory: a tracking point for the very near future.). training for developing physical endurance (a road race. Notes: Explain the rungs on the ladder as follows: Long term. Depending on the goal area. Explain that you want goals that will stretch the mental capacity—reading. this would be a goal that comes at the 6-week point. This is material for tomorrow’s “to do list. Intermediate. long-term goals will vary from 6 months to 10 years.

you might suggest that they first complete each area through the short term. all the others seem to suffer or take a back seat until those areas demand priority. Then for the three goals that seem most urgent to the individual. and avocation are tied together. This is strictly voluntary. they should plan activity completely through the tomorrow rung. Step 6: Lead a discussion about the activity. Additional questions you might ask: • • • • • What have you learned about yourself? How might you use this in the workplace? How would this facilitate your workplace production? In what ways would this discipline help you manage your time and projects at work? In what ways could this activity enhance communication at work? At home? Step 7: Review the activity. These are the people who live in a reactive kind of existence and the proactive exercise of goal setting is strange and somehow threatening to them. Notes: Ask the participants: • In what ways could you use this technique on the job to enhance production and quality of production? ∼ 80 ∼ . family. Experts tell us that we can only give concentrated effort to three of the areas at a time. but many times people are anxious to disclose what they learned about themselves. For example. Notes: 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring Allow participants at least 30 minutes to work through the exercise. financial. especially the way in which several areas are connected. In the interest of time. Questions you might ask: • • • How did this exercise feel? Was anyone uncomfortable? Why? Many people feel discomfort because they are not accustomed to planning. the person who is planning to retire and travel in 5 years finds that the goals of vocation. and it is impossible to work on one without impacting the others.Activity 15 Step 5: Conduct the activity. Notes: Ask someone to share the goal ladder in his/her chosen area.

It is important that participants see the application of this tool to the professional part of their life. Step 8: Summarize the activity.50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring Activity 15 Breaking into small groups and assigning a participant to record observations will often create a need to work more diligently on this part of the task. ∼ 81 ∼ . Notes: List the application ideas on a flipchart or a whiteboard as they are contributed.

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Amherst. MA: HRD Press. Charles Cadwell. and Joe Fehrmann.1 Tomorrow Tomorrow Tomorrow Tomorrow . ∼ 83 ∼ Next Month Next Month Next Month Next Week Next Week Next Week Tomorrow Tomorrow Tomorrow Next Month Next Month Next Month Next Month Next Week Next Week Next Week Next Week Exercise 15.Exercise 15. 1993.1: Goal Ladder Worksheet Avocation Long Term Long Term Long Term Long Term Long Term Family Financial Physical Mental Spiritual Long Term Vocation Long Term Intermediate Intermediate Intermediate Intermediate Intermediate Intermediate Intermediate Short Term Short Term Short Term Short Term Short Term Short Term Short Term Reproduced from 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring by Donna Berry.

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and describe the advantages of collaboration for team production. This exercise can also be used to demonstrate the benefit of collaboration for team building. Objectives By the end of this activity. Skill Areas • • • • Analyzing performance problems Collaboration Communication Role of coach/mentor Participants Number: Type: Five to six per group Any Time 20 to 30 minutes Resources • • • • A basic set of Tinkertoys (sticks and wheels) or building block set for each group of five to six participants A picture of an object for each group to build A timer Prizes (optional) ∼ 85 ∼ .16 Description Construction This activity illustrates the contribution of communication to productivity. participants will be able to • • define the importance of communication for performance.

They can give verbal instructions to the team. in the seven-minute time limit. Award prizes. Simply inform the participants that they will divide into teams of five to six members and be given a construction project to complete within the sevenminute time limit. This is completely optional. Check to see which team is the closest to completion and has built the project nearest to the specifications detailed in the picture.” You may also choose to award prizes to the winners. First. They may share the name of the object only. the purpose is not affected. but they are not allowed to touch the building pieces or show the picture to the team.) Step 4: Conduct the activity.Activity 16 Method Step 1: Introduce the activity. Give each coach a black-and-white picture of an object that can be built from this particular set of building blocks or Tinkertoys. according to specification. Notes: Take the coaches out of the room. Notes: Questions you might ask: • • Team: How did you feel during construction? Was there any frustration? Coach: What would have made your leadership tasks easier? ∼ 86 ∼ . if appropriate. Notes: Explain that their task is to construct the project. Notes: Set the timer and have teams begin the construction. Instruct them to lead their team in completing the task⎯building the object to the specification shown in the picture in the seven-minute time limit. Step 5: Lead a discussion about the activity. (You may want to inject the competitive component at this point. Either way. Teams enjoy the pressure of working to “beat an opponent. they are to select a team coach. Step 2: Brief the coaches and distribute materials. Step 3: Brief the teams. When time has elapsed. Notes: 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring This activity is more effective if the purpose is not disclosed at the outset. call “Time” to halt the construction.

The first team to finish wins. could an individual—the coach.50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring Activity 16 • • • What one thing handicapped production more than any other? What were the advantages of constructing this project with a team? (Each person could/did take responsibility for a different portion of the building. Dismantle the project and let the teams rebuild with the picture in full sight of everyone. communication must be open and complete. you might consider constructing the project again under slightly different circumstances: 1. Note: Variation Notes: At this point. This exercise illustrated that with communication limited (full information was known only to the coach). the team felt frustration when trying to achieve a quality performance within time constraints. for example—have constructed the project quicker and better alone? Step 6: Apply the activity to the workplace. free-standing object in four minutes. Establish a competition among the teams. Dismantle the project and give instructions that the construction goal will be to build the tallest. 4.) With the handicapped conditions under which you worked. Change coaches and let the team use the picture and complete the first project as soon as possible. 2. Notes: Ask some or all of these questions: • • • • Why did we do this exercise? What did we learn about teams? What is the advantage of working with teams? What one component is absolutely essential for team production and morale? (Communication) ∼ 87 ∼ . Notes: Explain that for a team to produce to specified standards and with high morale. Give out new project plans (a different picture) and let the teams build using the picture as a guide and in competition with one another. Step 7: Review the activity. 3.

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participants will be able to • • define the importance of communication for performance. Objectives By the end of this activity. Use this activity to demonstrate the importance of communication to production and collaboration.17 Description Origami This activity is a variation of the previous Construction exercise but is better suited to larger groups (for which the cost of Tinkertoys or building block sets would be prohibitive). and describe the advantage of collaboration for team production. Skill Areas • • • Analyzing performance problems Collaboration Role of coach/mentor Participants Number: Type: Five to six per group Any Time 20 to 30 minutes Resources • • A 6 x 6 square piece of lightweight paper for each participant A simple origami (paper-folding) project picture with instructions for each coach (Origami kits can be purchased in toyshops or bookstores and come complete with diagrams and instructions.) ∼ 89 ∼ .

(You may want to inject the competitive component at this point. and give each of them a piece of folding paper and the picture of the object (which is the instruction information) that their team is to fold. Notes: Explain that their task is to construct the project. and this practice time gives them a chance to figure out how they will verbally communicate the instructions to the team. Check to see which team is the closest to completion and has folded their papers correctly. in the seven-minute time limit. ∼ 90 ∼ . if appropriate.Activity 17 Method Step 1: Introduce the activity. or demonstrate the folding. This is completely optional.” You may also choose to aware prizes to the winners. Step 2: Brief the coaches and distribute materials. Notes: Set the timer and have teams begin the construction. Instruct them to lead their team in completing the task⎯folding the object to the specification shown in the picture in the seven-minute time limit. call “Time” to halt the construction. Step 3: Brief the teams. according to specification. the purpose is not affected. Simply inform the participants that they will divide into teams of five to six members and be given a construction project to complete within the sevenminute time limit. Most people are not generally familiar with the art of paper folding. Give them time to fold the object once or twice. Award prizes. Teams enjoy the pressure of working to “beat an opponent. show the team the picture. Notes: Take the coaches out of the room. Either way. They may share the name of the object only. they are to select a team coach. First.) Step 4: Conduct the activity. Notes: 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring This activity is more effective if the purpose is not disclosed at the outset. but they are not allowed to touch anyone’s paper. They can give verbal instructions to the team. When time has elapsed.

Notes: Explain that for a team to produce to specified standards and with high morale.50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring Activity 17 Step 5: Lead a discussion about the activity. This exercise illustrated that with communication limited (full information was known only by the coach). why? Coach: What would have made your leadership tasks easier? What one thing handicapped production more than any other? What were the advantages of constructing this project with the other members of the team around you? Would this task have been more difficult if you had been required to construct it on your own? Step 6: Apply the activity to the workplace. Step 7: Review the activity. the team felt frustration when trying to achieve a quality performance within time constraints. communication must be open and complete. Notes: Questions you might ask: • • • • • Team: How did you feel during construction? Was there frustration? If so. Notes: Ask some or all of these questions: • • • • Why did we do this exercise? What did we learn about teams? What is the advantage of working with teams? What one component is absolutely essential for team production and morale? (Communication) ∼ 91 ∼ .

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18 Description Card Houses This activity illustrates the morale and general effectiveness of a team when managed with a directive style in comparison to a team-building attitude displayed by a coach. participants will be able to • • define the importance of communication for performance. Objectives By the end of this activity. and describe the advantages of collaboration for team production. Skill Areas • • • Analyzing performance problems Collaboration Role of coach/mentor Participants Number: Type: Five to six per group Any Time 20 to 30 minutes Resources • • • A package of 3 x 5 index cards for each group Paper clips and masking or cellulose tape Instructions for coaches ∼ 93 ∼ .

a box of paper clips. Notes: Set the timer and have teams begin the construction.Activity 18 Method Step 1: Introduce the activity. Tell them they will give verbal instructions only. Notes: 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring This activity is more effective if the purpose is not disclosed at the outset. (You may want to inject the competitive component at this point.) Step 4: Conduct the activity. according to specification. Check to see which team is the closest to completion and has built the project nearest to the specifications detailed in the picture. Instruct that they are to lead their team to the successful production of a card house in the time limit allowed. in the five-minute time limit. Step 3: Brief the teams. First. ∼ 94 ∼ . and a 12-inch piece of tape. The house is to be constructed from their own imagination. Simply inform the participants that they will divide into teams of five to six members and be given a construction project to complete within a fiveminute time limit. they are to select a team coach. if appropriate. This is completely optional. Either way. Give them a package of 3 x 5 index cards. Teams enjoy the pressure of working to “beat an opponent. they will not be allowed to touch the building materials or show the sketch to the team. They should be given a few minutes to make sketches so that you can evaluate the finished product against the design sketch. the purpose is not affected. Notes: Take the coaches out of the room. Step 2: Brief the coaches and distribute materials. Notes: Explain that their task is to construct the project. Award prizes. call “Time” to halt the construction.” You may also choose to award prizes to the winners. When time has elapsed.

This variation is more effective when used with an observer who records the group dynamics and reports those during the discussion. Note: Variation Notes: At this point. ∼ 95 ∼ . The first construction exercise was conducted under a highly directive coaching style. In contrast to the original directive coaching style. Using the handsoff approach. 2. communication must be open and complete. a two-story colonial.) With the handicapped conditions under which you worked. the team will operate on its own. This time use the team approach to leadership and allow the team to design and construct their own creation. Notes: Explain that for a team to produce to specified standards and with high morale. for example—have constructed the project quicker and better alone? Step 6: Apply the activity to the workplace. Notes: Questions you might ask: • • • • • Team: How did you feel during construction? Was there any frustration? Coach: What would have made your leadership tasks easier? What one thing handicapped production more than any other? What were the advantages of constructing this project with a team? (Each person could/did take responsibility for a different portion of the building. For example: 1. the team felt frustration when trying to achieve a quality performance within time constraints. could an individual—the coach. give the coaches instructions to adopt a completely laissez-faire attitude. From that point.50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring Activity 18 Step 5: Lead a discussion about the activity. Lead a discussion about the differences in attitude when everyone had a part in planning the actual construction and reward of fulfillment. This exercise illustrated that with communication limited (full information was known only by the coach). a rambling bungalow with twocar garage). the coach gives the team only a general description of the house (for example. you might consider constructing the project again under slightly different circumstances.

Activity 18 Step 7: Review the activity. Notes: Ask some or all of these questions: • • • • 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring Why did we do this exercise? What did we learn about teams? What is the advantage of working with teams? What one component is absolutely essential for team production and morale? (Communication) ∼ 96 ∼ .

communicating. participants will be able to • • list 5 to 10 successful strategies for goal setting. Skill Areas • • • • • Icebreaker Goal setting Training Delegating Course closure (Note: This activity is also appropriate for other topics.19 Description Idea Exchange This activity provides participants a way to initially explore a topic by listing their own successful experiences with it. and markers ∼ 97 ∼ .) Participants Number: Type: 12 to 30 Any Time 10 to 20 minutes Resources • • 3 x 5 index cards Flipchart stand. and describe personal goal-setting strategies. Objectives By the end of this activity. paper. etc. such as counseling.

Redistribute them to the group. one per participant. Allow five minutes. Instruct the groups to select the two best strategies they have. ∼ 98 ∼ . Notes: Divide the class into groups of five to seven. Collect the cards and shuffle them (or mix them in a hat). one per participant. Step 2: Facilitate group reports. Instruct participants to write down their most successful strategy for goal setting.Activity 19 Method Step 1: Begin the activity. Notes: 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring Distribute index cards. Have each group volunteer one idea at a time as you list them on the flipchart.

Iowa. participants will be able to • • • recognize some effective coaching behavior.20 Description Reel Movies This activity uses clips of real Hollywood movies on DVD (as opposed to training DVDs) to illustrate effective and ineffective coaching techniques. contrast effective behavior with ineffective behavior. Skill Areas • • Role of coach/mentor Training Participants Number: Type: Any Any Time 10 to 15 minutes per clip Resources • • DVD player and monitor A movie DVD with appropriate credit and acknowledgment cued to the clip *Adapted from an idea originally used by Sylvia Roba. and forecast the production for various coaching behaviors. St. This is an enjoyable and effective exercise that energizes participants. Luke’s Hospital.* Objectives By the end of this activity. Davenport. ∼ 99 ∼ .

there are several examples of ineffective leadership in the movies Joe Versus the Volcano and Shock to the System. For example. This is a highly effective training technique when used properly.Activity 20 Method Step 1: Prepare the activity. Anyone who goes to the movies or rents DVDs has made coaching application for themselves when watching various scenes. It is helpful if you are familiar with the movies and if you watch them for illustrations of the skills that you want to teach. Notes: 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring To conduct this activity. If the group is large. you must select a portion of a movie that depicts the skill. “Set up” the clip by explaining something about the story line. and what is happening. so it is necessary to acknowledge and credit the movie DVD and cue it (run it to the place of the clip) prior to use in training. There may be a fee. the characters. ∼ 100 ∼ . When you use this glitzy illustration technique. or lack of skill. You may choose a clip that displays an effective behavior or an example of ineffective skill. you will need a larger screen or multiple monitors with a single hook-up. Adjust the volume so that everyone can hear. it can have high impact. Notes: Make sure the monitor is large enough for everyone to see. Step 3: Show the clip. that you are attempting to illustrate to the coaches. It is in violation of copyright laws to copy any portion of a movie. Explain only those elements that participants can actually apply to the training. Notes: Explain that you will show a clip from a real movie that illustrates an aspect of a coaching behavior. the American Society of Training and Development supplies a Copyright Information Kit by request. Step 2: Introduce the activity. If you are in question about copyright restrictions.

but it is another highly effective way to present the material. I find that participants remember the concept better as a result of this tool.50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring Activity 20 Step 4: Lead a discussion about the clip and the skill that was illustrated. and it has always been met with resounding positive response. Notes: Questions you might ask: • • • Why did we view this movie clip? What application can we make from the contrast (or similarity)? What have we learned with this illustration? Author’s note: I have used this technique for years. It does take some effort and there is a cost investment. Notes: Questions you might ask: • • • • • How does this clip support or refute the principles or techniques we have been exploring? Have you ever experienced someone who operated in this fashion? What was your response to that person’s method? What was the general morale? What do you believe to be the morale or attitude of those in this movie? Step 5: Review the activity. ∼ 101 ∼ .

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participants will be able to • • evaluate their knowledge of key learning points. paper. Objectives By the end of this activity. and evaluate the knowledge of other participants. Skill Areas • • Role of coach/mentor Course closure Participants Number: Type: Any Any Time 1 hour Resources • • • • • 20 3 x 5 index cards Pen or pencil for each participant Flipchart stand. This activity can also be used to review individual sessions within a longer course.21 Description Coaches Bowl This activity provides a fun and interesting way to review course material. and markers Noise makers (optional) Prizes (optional) ∼ 103 ∼ .

Seat the players at separate tables facing you. Notes: Randomly select 15 of the cards for the game. Give each team 10 index cards. Then go on to the next question. Notes: 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring Explain what material will be covered during the activity. The question should be written on one side of the card and the answer on the other. Allow 15 minutes for each team to write 10 questions and answers based on the material to be covered. It’s okay if teams get the questions they wrote since the objective is to review material. Note: Use an uneven number of cards to prevent ties. If no one responds within 15 seconds. Divide the chart into two columns and write the team names at the top of each column. Step 3: Set up the game area.”) Step 4: Conduct the activity. (This is where noise makers can be used. Notes: Divide the group into two teams. Determine how players will signal when they want to answer a question. Read the questions. Explain how the game will be played (refer to Step 4). Keep 5 in reserve as substitutes in case some questions don’t work as planned.Activity 21 Method Step 1: Introduce the activity. Step 2: Prepare materials. prepare a flipchart to use for keeping score. or you could have one team shout “Green” and the other team shout “Red. While teams are writing their questions. read the answer and discuss it. ∼ 104 ∼ . Notes: Select one to four participants from each team to represent their respective teams. not just to “win” the game. Shuffle the 15 cards and draw them one at a time. You will act as the moderator for the game. Players signal when they want to try to answer a question.

Option: You may want to deduct 5 points if teams signal to answer before you finish reading the question and they answer it incorrectly. award them 10 points instead of the team that originally answered the question. If the question is answered incorrectly. Give the other team a chance to answer the question. Record scores on the flipchart. ∼ 105 ∼ . Reinforce the importance of participants’ applying the knowledge on the job to be effective coaches for their people. The game is over after 15 questions have been asked. Option: Players on the other team can challenge the “correct” answer. Option: Award prizes. If their challenge is a better answer. Notes: Summarize objectives and how they were met.50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring Activity 21 If the question is answered correctly. Step 5: Review the activity. award 10 points. do not deduct points. You will be the judge in these situations.

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22 Description How am I doing? This activity provides participants with the opportunity to evaluate the quantity and quality of feedback they provide as coaches. Skill Areas • • • • Counseling Listening Recognition and reward Setting expectations Participants Number: Type: Any Any Time 30 to 45 minutes Resources • • One copy each of Exercises 22. Objectives By the end of this activity. participants will be able to • • • evaluate the feedback they provide others.1 through 22. They will also be able to survey their employees to determine their perceptions about the quantity and quality of the feedback they receive. and use a feedback tool to survey their employees. describe the importance of providing regular feedback.3 for each participant Paper and pencil or pen for each participant ∼ 107 ∼ .

” Ask participants: “What do you think he means by that?” Ask participants to think about the best coaches they have had. Notes: Explain that effective coaches provide regular performance feedback to the people with whom they work. “Feedback is the breakfast of champions. It has been estimated that people do things right 80 percent of the time. Ask: “Did they provide a lot of feedback? What kind of feedback?” Most supervisors think they do a good job of providing feedback to their employees. The feedback may be either positive or corrective. ∼ 108 ∼ . it has been estimated that 80 percent of the performance problems that occur on the job could be solved if supervisors gave better feedback more often. In fact.Activity 22 Method 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring Step 1: Introduce the activity and prepare the participants for the questionnaire. Step 3: Discuss the activity. many employees don’t have the same perceptions as their supervisors about the quantity and quality of feedback they receive. Step 2: Distribute Exercise 22.1. Questions you might ask: • • • • What were your highest/lowest scores? Why are these the highest/lowest? What benefit would there be to your employees if you raised your lower scores? How do you think your employees would respond to similar questions about your feedback style? Explain that when employees are asked about their supervisor’s feedback. Yet they rarely get 80/20 feedback (80 percent positive/20 percent corrective). Notes: Read instructions together and have participants complete the exercise. Notes: Ask participants about their scores. Most people want and need regular feedback about their performance. Author Ken Blanchard says.

People will work hard and long and go to extraordinary lengths if they know what they do is appreciated and recognized.50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring Activity 22 One employee survey found that poor use of corrective feedback was listed among the top five causes of conflict at work. your time and effort should be focused on being positive. Notes: Explain how this tool gives supervisors a chance to see if their perceptions match their employees’ perceptions. If performance is still unacceptable. Recommend that supervisors distribute the surveys to employees at a group meeting and explain the reason for doing the survey. The goal for giving corrective feedback is to eliminate the behavior that caused the problem. These people said they would be less likely to cooperate or collaborate with their critics in the future. it’s important that you follow up. Explain that the survey should be anonymous in order to obtain honest feedback. When the performance improves or meets established standards. Notes: Key points you should make: • Positive feedback (recognition) strengthens performance. provide positive feedback. Despite your best efforts. there will be times when your people don’t meet performance standards. Recommend that employees mail the surveys back to the supervisors. Step 4: Discuss giving positive feedback. ∼ 109 ∼ . Notes: Key points you should make: • As a coach. These supervisors don’t realize that most people are motivated by the desire to succeed and achieve results—as long as someone recognizes their efforts. Some supervisors think that as long as they don’t tell someone there is a problem. After giving corrective feedback. • • Step 6: Distribute Exercise 22. repeat the corrective feedback. the person will assume everything is okay.2 and explain its use. • Step 5: Discuss giving corrective feedback. Poorly handled criticism was noted as a significant source of friction.

Encourage participants to have a group follow-up meeting with their employees and discuss what they learned from the employees’ surveys and what. Notes: Conclude by answering questions and briefly reviewing the importance of providing feedback. Notes: Explain how to use this sheet to compare their perceptions with those of their employees. Step 8: Review the activity. ∼ 110 ∼ . you might assign them to tally their employee surveys and bring the results to class for discussion. Participants should be cautioned against trying to determine who completed the individual surveys.Activity 22 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring Step 7: Distribute Exercise 22. they plan to do differently. Explain the importance of looking for trends in responses.3 and explain its use. If you will be meeting with participants again in a few days or weeks. if anything.

6. 5. 1993. Offer support to employees. Amherst. 8. 12. 7. Provide specific feedback. Try to find the good in things rather than the bad. charts.. 2. not the person. Rarely 1. and Joe Fehrmann. Pass on positive feedback received from others. 3. MA: HRD Press. Listen to employees. to provide feedback. Provide positive feedback.Exercise 22. Charles Cadwell. 11. I think that I.1 Exercise 22. Give corrective feedback.1: Rate Your Use of Feedback Read each statement below and circle the number that you think best describes the feedback you give to your employees. 9. Provide sincere feedback. Use graphs. ∼ 111 ∼ . Praise more than criticize. 4. Criticize behavior. etc. Total Score: 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 Sometimes 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 Often 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 Reproduced from 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring by Donna Berry. Provide help to improve. . . 10. Focus on what’s right. 13.

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2. 13. Provides specific feedback. 12. 4. to provide feedback. Passes on positive feedback received from others. Listens to employees. . I think that my boss. . 11.Exercise 22. Offers support to employees.2: Rate Your Boss’s Use of Feedback Read each statement below and circle the number that you think best describes the feedback your boss gives to you. Charles Cadwell. and Joe Fehrmann. 6. MA: HRD Press. Uses graphs.2 Exercise 22. Gives corrective feedback. ∼ 113 ∼ . Rarely 1. 5. 1993. 8. Total Score: 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 Sometimes 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 Often 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 Reproduced from 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring by Donna Berry. Tries to find the good in things rather than the bad. Praises more than criticizes. Provides positive feedback. 9. charts. Provides help to improve. Focuses on what’s right. 3. Amherst. Criticizes behavior. 10. etc. not the person. Provides sincere feedback.. 7.

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Provides positive feedback 2. Uses graphs.Exercise 22.. Criticizes behavior.5 or more can indicate areas where improvement may be needed. Differences of 2. E2. etc. Provides specific feedback 3. Praises more than criticizes E1 E2 E3 E4 E5 Avg.) for each item and compare it with your average score.3: Feedback Perception Comparison For each statement below. etc. Tries to find the good in things rather than the bad 8.) that you gave yourself for each item. Gives corrective feedback 5. Provides help to improve 7.3 Exercise 22. Passes on positive feedback received from others 13. MA: HRD Press. Reproduced from 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring by Donna Berry. to provide feedback 11. Use additional sheets if needed. etc. not the person 6. Listens to employees 10. indicate the score (1. Offers support to employees 12. Mine 1. and Joe Fehrmann. Provides sincere feedback 4. Focuses on what’s right 9. ∼ 115 ∼ . Charles Cadwell. Use the spaces to the right to indicate your employees’ scores for the same items. charts. Then determine the average score of the employee responses (columns E1. 3. 1993. Amherst.

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Skill Areas • • Role of coach/mentor Course closure Participants Number: Type: 12 to 30 Any Time 10 to 15 minutes Resources 10 to 20 bells. buzzers. other signaling devices ∼ 117 ∼ . participants will be able to list and discuss key learning points covered in a program. Objective By the end of this activity.23 Description Trivia Quiz This activity is a tool for summarizing the important points covered in a coaching program.

”) Ask the trivia questions. open posture. Illinois. The first team to ring the buzzer or bell may answer. they score one point. A typical list for part of a unit on communication skills might include: • • • • • • Who was Fred Astaire’s dancing sister? (Adele Astaire) What do you call a question that forces someone to answer in a predetermined manner? (a leading question) What president caught pneumonia at his inauguration and served only one month? (William Henry Harrison) What is the listening technique that has listeners repeat in their own words what they heard another person say? (paraphrasing) Name three of the states that border on Missouri. the next team to ring the buzzer may answer. (You may also wish to assign a panel of “judges. What is it? (Pennsylvania) Which is a stronger communication channel. Ohio) Name two positive and two negative listening behaviors.” ∼ 118 ∼ . eye contact. The team with the most points “wins.) If they are wrong. (Kansas. Notes: Divide the class into teams of four to seven participants. loaded questions. prepare a list of quiz questions that include both program topics and trivia. (You may assign a higher point value for tougher questions. Negative: interrupting. Notes: 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring Before class begins. These questions will serve as a review of a half-day or oneday body of information. etc. Arkansas.) There is only one state that starts with the letter P.Activity 23 Method Step 1: Prepare the activity. verbal or nonverbal? (nonverbal) • • Step 2: Conduct the activity. (Positive: reflective listening. etc. If they are right. sarcasm.

and collaborate to effectively produce team effort. Skill Areas • • • Assertiveness Evaluation Course closure Participants Number: Type: Two teams of four to six each Any Time 1 hour Resources • • • • • • One copy of Exercise 24.24 Description Dueling Families This activity works well to evaluate learning and/or to illustrate the effectiveness of appropriate coaching skills. Objectives By the end of this activity.1 for each of the team coaches Prepared questions for material covered to this point in training Instructions for the teams and the coaches A timer A scoreboard (flipchart or whiteboard) and markers Prizes (optional) ∼ 119 ∼ . participants will be able to • • • recite learning to this point. interpret the nonverbal communication of coach and team members.

they will receive 50 points. they will receive 25 points and the other team will have a chance to complete the answer. Notes: 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring In advance. Step 1: Introduce the activity. If the opposing team can complete the answers. Each team member will have an opportunity to contribute a part of the answer in the order in which they stand.Activity 24 Method Pre-course work. Notes: Explain that the group will divide into two teams of four to six participants per team. It will be necessary to display the answers as they are called out correctly by the team members so provision should be made for adequate display. especially if the question is difficult and you think your team knows only part of the answer—a part they may be able to contribute later when the other team is stymied. Taking turns. Probably the best method of display is either a flannel board (which you can make or purchase) or stick-on Velcro™ mounted to a large board with corresponding Velcro™ on the back of each answer. you will need to prepare questions that have multi-part answers. unafraid of conflict. if not. Sometimes it is advantageous to pass. good listener. six. ∼ 120 ∼ . there is enough tray space below chalkboards or whiteboards to hold the answers. open. they receive nothing but have the opportunity to play or pass the question to the other team. flexible. For each complete answer (all parts correctly identified). You will need to prepare either four. In some situations. Each team will need to pick a coach. the team will be awarded 50 points. Print out the answers to each question separately on paper or poster board. If only part of the question is answered correctly. Even numbers of questions ensure that both teams have equal opportunity to play and to score even though the rules or play will allow each team to play or pass when they receive that option. self-confident. An example of such a question would be: Q: What are six characteristics of an effective team member? A: Honest. Take these questions and answers from the material that has been covered in the training to this point. etc. or eight questions with multi-part answers. Explain that the teams will compete against one another in a friendly version of the TV game show Family Feud. the teams will be asked questions with multi-part answers. tolerant.

it does not score but has the opportunity to play or pass the next question. Prizes can be awarded if that option has been chosen. If the team has still not arrived at all of the correct answers. or eight questions). Example: If the answer has 6 parts. If the original team correctly answers all parts and scores the 50 points. each team chooses a representative and the first to answer the tiebreaker question correctly wins the game for his/her team. they express the team’s wish to play or pass to the other. 8. 2. if the answer has five parts. With the teams lined up on opposite sides. it gets 50 points. Step 3: Conduct the activity. If the team answers correctly. The opposing team gets one chance for each missing part. Allow 5 to 10 minutes for review of the rules and material prior to play. 7. it receives 25 points for the answers given correctly. 4. and the turn passes to the other team. Give the coaches a copy of the exercise and ask that they discuss the rules with their teams. Allow the team who won the coin toss to confer and choose to play or pass. 6. Notes: 1. Notes: Explain to coaches that they speak for their team on matters of general interest. they will lead as the team decides who will be the spokesperson. the team gets eight chances. If the team cannot fill in the missing parts with correct answers.50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring Activity 24 Step 2: Brief the coaches and distribute Exercise 24. six. Play continues until even rounds have been played (four. For example. 9. 5. 3. the opposing team gets the option to play or pass. In tiebreaker or grand prize categories. If the score is tied. flip a coin to determine who will have the first option to answer.1. Display or ask the question. No materials will be used for reference during play. The first team attempting to answer the question gets 50 percent more opportunities to answer than there are parts to the answer. the team gets nine chances. after conferring with the team. ∼ 121 ∼ .

Notes: Ask some or all of these questions: • • 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring • What did we just do? What was the purpose of this exercise? (Most of the time the participants are amazed that they just reviewed most of the material covered and had fun doing it. or a form of this technique.) How could you use this technique.Activity 24 Step 4: Review the activity. for those whom you coach? ∼ 122 ∼ .

∼ 123 ∼ . that person will not be able to confer with the others about the answer. each team will confer and appoint a team representative to play in a tiebreaker. 6. The purpose of the exercise is to score more points for your team than the other one scores. Play continues until all rounds have been completed. it receives nothing but the option to play or pass to the next question. The team that plays will give answers in the order that they stand in line. If the team cannot answer all parts correctly. and Joe Fehrmann. If all parts are answered correctly. only encouragement. As a team.1: Dueling Families Instructions for the coach: As coach. For example. 1993.” Once chosen to speak for the team. The individual will receive no help. Charles Cadwell. Consider how that might influence scoring. Reproduced from 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring by Donna Berry. If the opposing team gets all the remaining portions correct. 2. if there are four answers. No reference materials will be allowed. 4.” you will strategize playing or passing options in an attempt to answer more questions correctly when it is your turn to play. In case of a tie. the team will receive 25 points. the team receives 50 points. There will be 50 percent more opportunity to respond to the question correctly than there are answers. The team that won the toss will have the option (after considering the question) to play and attempt to answer or to pass and give the question to the other team. The first person to answer the tiebreaker question correctly wins the game for his/her “dueling family. Each person will take turns giving an answer. When it is time to play: 1. 5. Amherst. If the opposing team cannot. 3. A question will be asked or displayed.Exercise 24. You will be given time to meet with your team to review the rules for play and the materials over which play will be based. 7. MA: HRD Press. or one of the “dueling families. Your team will line up opposite the other. it receives 50 points. from the other “family” members. the other team gets the chance to try. For even a portion of correct answers. the team would have six chances to get them right. the team will depend on your leadership for direction but not for the answers. The way in which you line up could be critical.1 Exercise 24.

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Objectives By the end of this activity. . Skill Areas • • • Orientation Training Course closure Participants Number: Type: Any Any Time 30 to 45 minutes Resources • • • Play card(s). for use by the entire group divided into two teams. and review personal knowledge level and recall ability. or enough for groups of three (see “Method”) Flipchart stand and paper or whiteboard and marker to be used for keeping score for a large group Trainer’s Notes ∼ 125 ∼ . This activity can be used as an introduction to training or as a review technique. It can be used in triads or with the larger group divided into teams working in competition. either one large.25 Description Concentrate on. . participants will be able to • • recognize certain aspects of any topic.

When a person or team remembers correctly and uncovers a pair. Playing pieces such as checkers. Step 2: Introduce the activity. you can use Velcro™ on paper or poster board. Step 4: Begin play if two large teams are playing. Number the outside so that players call them as they attempt to match pairs. or a large play card can be prepared on a flipchart page or poster board for larger groups. When all the pairs have been matched. it is the opponent’s turn. Explain that the exercise will work similar to the TV game show Concentration. Ask the participant keeping score and observing the play to cover the words so that the other two can’t see. For the larger version. Explain that actually everyone wins.Activity 25 Method Step 1: Prepare the activity (see Trainer’s Notes). When preparing the play card. When that occurs. Notes: Ask the group of three to decide which two participants will play and who will keep score. Allow play to continue until all groups are finished. they score a point and get to play again. Everyone will have either been introduced to the new material or will have reviewed the material just covered. or bottle caps can be used for the smaller version. Cards can be small (8½ x 11) for using with groups of three. the person or team with the highest score wins. Step 3: Distribute materials if the group is playing in teams of three. remember to devise some method by which the words can be covered until correctly identified in matching pairs. The object is to uncover matching pairs. Introduce the material to be covered. Play starts with the team rep who wins the coin toss. Magnetic strips can be used on a metal whiteboard. Notes: Ask each team to appoint a representative who will play for the team. ∼ 126 ∼ . That person continues to play until unable to make a match. Notes: Explain that this activity will be used to either: • • • Review the material just covered. buttons. Notes: 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring You will need to prepare play card(s) based on the topic.

the team verbally encourage their representative with enthusiasm. Notes: If you are using this as an introduction.” Step 5: Lead a discussion. You can ask them to introduce themselves by identifying which of the roles. Notes: Questions you might ask: • • • • Which of these are easiest for you? Which are more difficult? Which are least often evident in your workplace? What benefit would result if all aspects were routinely apparent? ∼ 127 ∼ . begin at this point to train the participants. Play until all matches are made.50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring Activity 25 Suggest that. Step 6: Review the activity. If this is a review technique. while not calling out the matches. skills. or concepts they need the most. you will want to congratulate the participants on how well they did. You will have the beginnings of a class needs assessment. Tally the scores to determine the “winner.

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Trainer’s Notes Trainer’s Notes: Sample Game Coaching Roles Negotiator Counselor Mentor Negotiator Director Teacher Counselor Sponsor Mentor Leader Listener Advocate Leader Director Trainer Sponsor Advocate Listener Trainer Teacher Reproduced from 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring by Donna Berry. MA: HRD Press. ∼ 129 ∼ . 1993. Amherst. and Joe Fehrmann. Charles Cadwell.

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Objectives By the end of this activity.1 for each participant Pen or pencil for each participant Prizes for winners (optional) ∼ 131 ∼ . and describe the importance of various coaching roles Skill Areas • • Role of coach/mentor Course closure Participants Number: Type: Any Any Time 30 minutes Resources • • • • Trainer’s Notes One copy of Exercise 26. at your option. participants will be able to • • define key terms related to the role of the coach/mentor. also be used to create fun competition among participants. It can.26 Description Coaching Challenge This activity can be used to review key concepts presented during the training.

” The first person/team to get five in a row vertically. Notes: 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring Decide if the game will be played by individuals or teams. ∼ 132 ∼ .Activity 26 Method Step 1: Prepare the activity. If they have marked the correct term. Random assignment of terms is best so that cards are different. The person/team is asked to read the terms that are marked. Decide if you want to provide “prizes” to the winners. Step 2: Introduce the activity.1. Notes: Review the objectives. they will then explain why that role is important for a coach. horizontally. provided they can explain the importance of the roles they have marked. If the explanation is satisfactory. Notes: Read definitions one at a time. another person/team can win the “X” by giving the correct explanation. or diagonally wins. Play until there is a winner. Step 5: Conduct the activity. Notes: Have participants fill out their game cards. Participants must be able to both identify the term and explain its importance. they keep the “X. Notes: You will provide only the definitions of coaching/mentoring terms. Participants will find the correct answer and mark it with an “X. Step 4: Explain the rules. Award prizes to winners (optional). Step 3: Distribute Exercise 26.” If the explanation is not satisfactory.

50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring Activity 26 Continue playing until there are winners in all directions (horizontally. Notes: Summarize objectives and discuss any questions participants have. Continue from where you left off with the previous winner. Step 6: Review the activity. Do not start a new game each time. and diagonally). ∼ 133 ∼ . Go for “blackout” if time permits. vertically.

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Number the definitions as you use them so that you can repeat the order when checking winners’ results. it’s what really matters. it has to be earned. performance is likely to be similar. The act of exchanging information. Feedback Mentor Orientation Goal Communication Appraisal Listening Trust Training Teamwork Networking Performance Recognition Delegating Counseling Expectations Information given to employees to let them know how they are doing on a daily basis. The act of giving an employee the authority and responsibility to complete a task. An object or end that one strives to attain. it works best if it’s two way. The act of letting employees know that their good work is appreciated. Amherst. The practice of using other people as resources in gathering information. Use the definitions in any order. 1993. A person who provides guidance and feedback to another person on a regular basis. The process of getting a new person started. it should be realistic and attainable. MA: HRD Press. and Joe Fehrmann. The active participation of all members toward the same goal. whatever they are. The performance that is expected. An activity reserved for serious performance problems. A formal method of providing feedback. The act of executing. not demanded. ∼ 135 ∼ . Reproduced from 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring by Donna Berry. The process of helping an employee learn a new skill. Charles Cadwell. Confidence in another person’s honesty. A skill that allows coaches to find out what their people are thinking.Trainer’s Notes Trainer’s Notes: Coaching Definitions Use the following definitions or modify the list as necessary to fit with your course materials.

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You choose the square where you want to write the term. Listening Performance Teamwork Feedback Appraisal Expectations Counseling Communication Delegating Recognition Networking Orientation Trust Training Goal Mentor Reproduced from 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring by Donna Berry. MA: HRD Press. When you are finished.1: Coaching Challenge Instructions: Write the terms below in the squares in the matrix. one term per square. Amherst.Exercise 26. and Joe Fehrmann. Charles Cadwell.1 Exercise 26. 1993. ∼ 137 ∼ . you will have created your own individual “Coaching Challenge” game card.

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participants will be able to • • list and discuss key benefits in delegating. and develop ways to overcome the disadvantages of delegating. and markers 3 x 5 index cards ∼ 139 ∼ . paper.27 Description Opposite Poles This activity enables participants to identify key benefits and problems associated with delegating. Skill Areas • • • Icebreaker Delegation Setting expectations Participants Number: Type: 12 to 40 Supervisors or managers Time 30 minutes Resources • • Flipchart stand. Objectives By the end of this activity. It is also useful for an initial small group activity.

Step 3: Facilitate discussion. Each is to be written on a 3 x 5 index card. List these on the flipchart. instruct the groups to exchange the problems they listed with those of another group. Note: This activity is useful for introducing many topics. Notes: Groups are to volunteer the benefits they listed. Give them 10 minutes to brainstorm ways of overcoming or minimizing the problems. criticizing. Notes: 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring Divide the class into groups of five to seven participants each.Activity 27 Method Step 1: Introduce the activity. etc. one at a time. ∼ 140 ∼ . Instruct the groups to develop a list of the most significant benefits of delegating and the two biggest problems associated with delegating. Notes: At the end of 10 minutes. Write each on the flipchart. When all the benefits have been listed. along with the “problem” they attacked. Step 2: Conduct the activity. have each group volunteer the two or three solutions they like the most. especially those that may be perceived as having disadvantages such as counseling.

4 for each participant Flipchart stand. Objectives By the end of this activity. Skill Areas • • • Communication Listening Nonverbal communication Participants Number: Type: 16 to 30 Any Time 60 to 90 minutes Resources • • One copy each of Exercises 28. and identify listening behaviors in others. participants will be able to • • recognize when they are engaging in effective or ineffective listening behaviors.28 Description Nonverbal Behaviors This is a “fish bowl” exercise to provide participants with practice in identifying positive and negative communication behaviors.1 through 28. paper. and markers ∼ 141 ∼ .

how? Which of these behaviors do we find ourselves performing? ∼ 142 ∼ .1 and 28. Write their remarks on a flipchart marked “Positive Behaviors” and “Negative Behaviors.” and the second group will be observers. Step 2: Conduct the activity. Separate the class into two groups. Notes: Ask observers to share their notes (one observation at a time. so that all are able to contribute). per observer. The first group will be the “committee.2 to alternating committee members (designate them as As and Bs) and Exercises 28. Notes: 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring Tell participants that the purpose of this exercise is to see communication in action. one of 6 to 12 participants. Notes: Give the committee 30 to 40 minutes to discuss the issue of whom to hire for the position of executive director. and the other of all the remaining participants. Step 3: Discuss the communication process.4 to alternating observers (also designated as As and Bs).” Questions you might ask: • • • • Did any of these behaviors go unnoticed by the committee members? Did any of these behaviors create feelings among the committee members (either positive or negative)? Did committee members try to overcome the effects of the negative behaviors? If so. Distribute copies of Exercises 28.Activity 28 Method Step 1: Introduce the activity.3 and 28.

000 per year. Age 42. Degree: MBA. Has been a volunteer on a number of fundraising efforts.Exercise 28. Was most recently director of a Red Cross chapter with 21 employees.000. Has chaired another chapter Fund Allocation Committee for three years. Age 37. Would place emphasis on children’s issues. All are from outside your area: Fred Baxter Age 59. is a fairly large one. Your chapter. Was most recently owner of his own computer software company (which he sold at a fair profit). married. Advocates more careful scrutiny and auditing of agencies. Has chaired several successful United Way campaigns. The position pays $50. especially those helping unemployed and hopeless. Degree: BS. no children. serving seven counties with a total population of 450. Your chapter supports over 30 agencies. divorced with custody of one child. married with four grown children. Mid-America has a staff of 30 full-time employees and 5 part-time employees. Age 45. Has led successful special event fundraisers. Would encourage support of more agencies while expecting established agencies to gradually develop more of their own funding sources. the United Way of Mid-America.1: Discussion Instructions—Committee Member A You are a member of the search committee to hire a new executive director for the local chapter of the United Way.1 Exercise 28. Psychology. Would heighten fundraising efforts and emphasize counseling for families. Would set a goal of increasing local support to 125 percent of present level and use the additional funds to finance new agencies. including very active Red Cross and Salvation Army chapters. Was most recently director of Development for a state university with 20. Was most recently vice president of Sales for a manufacturer of light aircraft.000 students. Degree: MS. You have narrowed your list to four candidates and must select one during today’s meeting. Wilma Johnson Larry Reynolds David Espinoza (Continued) ∼ 143 ∼ . Education. married with two children.

MA: HRD Press. do your best to practice positive communication behaviors.” involved posture Encouraging others to contribute Maintaining eye contact Making your comments clearly and concisely Listening without interrupting Clarifying others’ comments Helping to resolve conflicts Reproduced from 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring by Donna Berry.1 (concluded) Throughout your discussion. 1993. such as: • • • • • • • Exhibiting an “inviting. ∼ 144 ∼ .Exercise 28. Charles Cadwell. Amherst. and Joe Fehrmann.

2 Exercise 28. especially those helping unemployed and hopeless. Has led successful special event fundraisers. The position pays $50. Advocates more careful scrutiny and auditing of agencies. Degree: BS. married. Would encourage support of more agencies while expecting established agencies to gradually develop more of their own funding sources.000.Exercise 28. married with two children. Age 42. Has chaired another chapter Fund Allocation Committee for three years. Wilma Johnson Larry Reynolds David Espinoza (Continued) ∼ 145 ∼ . is a fairly large one. the United Way of Mid-America. Would set a goal of increasing local support to 125 percent of present level and use the additional funds to finance new agencies. Would place emphasis on children’s issues. married with four grown children. Was most recently director of a Red Cross chapter with 21 employees. serving seven counties with a total population of 450. Would heighten fundraising efforts and emphasize counseling for families. All are from outside your area: Fred Baxter Age 59. You have narrowed your list to four candidates and must select one during today’s meeting.000 students. Has been a volunteer on a number of fundraising efforts. Was most recently owner of his own computer software company (which he sold at a fair profit).2: Discussion Instructions—Committee Member B You are a member of the search committee to hire a new executive director for the local chapter of the United Way. Your chapter. Was most recently vice president of Sales for a manufacturer of light aircraft. no children. Degree: MBA. Mid-America has a staff of 30 full-time employees and 5 part-time employees. Age 37. Age 45. Was most recently director of Development for a state university with 20. divorced with custody of one child. Your chapter supports over 30 agencies.000 per year. Psychology. Degree: MS. Education. including very active Red Cross and Salvation Army chapters. Has chaired several successful United Way campaigns.

2 (concluded) Throughout your discussion. 1993. cleaning nails.Exercise 28. such as: • • • • • • • • Exhibiting a closed or uninterested posture Interrupting others Looking away. ∼ 146 ∼ . so you don’t have to display all of these negative behaviors yourself. display negative communication behaviors. etc. MA: HRD Press. Using sarcasm Asking “quiz questions” Judging others’ ideas Wandering off-track Creating conflict or arguments It is important that you be realistic in your behaviors. and Joe Fehrmann. Amherst. Several of your committee members will receive these same instructions. Charles Cadwell. Reproduced from 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring by Donna Berry.

Exercise 28. 1993. . . MA: HRD Press.clarified Susan’s comment by saying. Record your observations by using specific behavioral terms such as “. . Charles Cadwell.3: Discussion Instructions—Observer A As you observe the committee.” or “. ∼ 147 ∼ . Amherst.” Name Behavior Reproduced from 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring by Donna Berry. . . watch for positive communication behaviors. .asked John if he had any ideas on how to. . . . and Joe Fehrmann.3 Exercise 28.

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. and looked at his feet.4: Discussion Instructions—Observer B As you observe the committee. .interrupted Susan by saying he never heard of. Charles Cadwell. Record your observations by using specific behavioral terms such as “. . . 1993. ∼ 149 ∼ . . folded his arms. MA: HRD Press.Exercise 28.” or “.4 Exercise 28.leaned back. Amherst. watch for negative communication behaviors. . and Joe Fehrmann. .” Name Behavior Reproduced from 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring by Donna Berry. . .

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paper.29 Description Fishbowl This activity can either be used as a discussion starter at the beginning of a session or to close the session. Its purpose is to identify and discuss key coaching concepts. and describe expectations for the training session. and markers ∼ 151 ∼ . Skill Areas • • Icebreaker Course closure Participants Number: Type: Any Any Time 30 minutes Resources • • • Fishbowl or similar container One 3 x 5 index card per participant (two if using as icebreaker) Flipchart stand. or describe how the course met expectations. participants will be able to • • • identify key coaching concepts. Objectives By the end of this activity.

Continue until all cards have been drawn from the fishbowl. Notes: Read what is on the card and ask for the participant who wrote the card to identify himself/herself. .Activity 29 Method Step 1: Introduce the activity. give participants a second card. Write the comment from the card on the flipchart. Notes: Review the objectives. Have the participants explain their responses to the group. Notes: If using the activity as an icebreaker. have the participants introduce themselves to the group. Have them write their names on the second card. ∼ 152 ∼ . List the information you want them to tell the group on a second flipchart so that the introductions will be consistent. Step 5: Review the activity. comment on the coaching roles and explain which ones will be covered during the course. Step 3: Collect the cards and place them in the fishbowl.” If using as an icebreaker. Step 2: Give each participant one index card. . Notes: 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring Have participants write on the 3 x 5 index card the way they would finish the following sentence: “One of the most important roles of a coach is to. If using the activity as an icebreaker: After you draw the “name” cards. If using this as a course closure. Step 4: Draw the cards from the fishbowl one at a time. compare comments to course expectations that were discussed at the beginning of the session.

and develop a plan for implementing recognition methods. paper. and markers ∼ 153 ∼ .30 Description Recognition Brainstorm This activity encourages participants to think beyond monetary rewards and brainstorm other ways of recognizing positive performance. Objectives By the end of this activity. participants will be able to • • • identify (by 4 times the number of participants) methods to recognize performance. Skill Areas • • • • • Evaluation Goal setting Nurturing Recognition and reward Setting expectations Participants Number: Type: 10 to 15 Any Time 60 to 90 minutes Resources • • • • Four prepared flipcharts Ten (10) self-stick notes approximately 2 square for each participant Pen or pencil for each participant Flipchart stand. benefit from the experience of other participants.

Step 4: Have participants identify types of recognition.Activity 30 Method Step 1: Prepare the activity. they should say what it is and briefly explain it if necessary. As participants are putting their notes on the chart. Notes: Instruct participants to write on their self-stick notes at least one type of recognition that could be provided for each of the four categories shown on the flipcharts. often have just as much (sometimes more) value to employees than monetary rewards. Step 5: Brainstorming Round 1. Discuss the importance of providing recognition to employees when they meet established goals or expectations. such as pins or badges and prizes. Notes: 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring Prepare four flipchart pages with the following headings: • • • • Free $10 or less $11—$25 Over $25 Step 2: Introduce the activity. Explain that other types of recognition. Show participants the headings on the four flipcharts and tell them they will be identifying nonmonetary methods of employee recognition. Notes: Start with any one of the four categories. ∼ 154 ∼ . Step 3: Distribute 10 self-stick notes to each participant. Discuss how many organizations use monetary incentive systems that reward employees in actual cash. Have each participant go to the flipchart one at a time and put his/her note on the flipchart. Notes: Review the objectives.

• Step 8: Have groups present reports. For example. Notes: Follow the same procedure as for Round 1 and complete the process for each of the other three categories. Participants can use their extra notes if they want to place more than one note on the chart. They may add or subtract from the initial list. Reinforce the importance of recognition and using the various strategies identified by the group. Prepare a brief report on their list and strategies to present to the entire group. Come up with a strategy for implementing each item. Do not discuss the list at this time. Notes: Divide participants into four groups. 3. When there are no more ideas. Step 9: Review the activity. Continue until every participant has placed at least one note on the chart. if there is one. Assign each group one of the four categories. then that person’s name could be published in the company newsletter or announced over the public address system. Step 7: Discuss and evaluate the four lists. conclude Round 1. Notes: Summarize objectives and how they were met. Step 6: Brainstorming Rounds 2. if a person is to be recognized. and 4.50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring Activity 30 Follow brainstorming rules and do not permit other participants to discuss the idea at this time. Notes: Have each small group present the results of their discussion to the entire group. ∼ 155 ∼ . Each group should: • • Evaluate each of the items on their list and develop their own “final” list.

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participants will be able to • • identify key terms related to coaching skills.1 for each participant Trainer’s Notes Pen or pencil for each participant ∼ 157 ∼ . Objectives By the end of this activity.31 Description Word Search This is an end-of-course activity designed to allow participants to review key points of a coaching seminar in a fun and relaxing way. and describe the coaching skills they learned during the seminar. Skill Area Course closure Participants Number: Type: Any Any Time 30 minutes Resources • • • One copy of Exercise 31.

∼ 158 ∼ .1.Activity 31 Method Step 1: Introduce the activity. You may want to have other participants tell what they learned as well as the person who found the word. Then have the participant briefly explain what he/she learned about that topic during the seminar. Cover as many words as you wish or as time permits. Step 3: Conduct session review. Use this time to reinforce key points. Notes: Review the objectives. Have one participant who found the word tell where he/she found it. Allow 5 to 10 minutes. Step 2: Distribute Exercise 31. Notes: 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring Read the instructions and have participants complete the activity. Notes: Name one of the words on the list and ask who found it.

MA: HRD Press.1 Exercise 31. Charles Cadwell. Some letters are used in more than one word. backward.Exercise 31. ∼ 159 ∼ . Words can be found by reading frontward. up. and diagonally. and Joe Fehrmann.1: Word Search Hidden below are the following coaching terms: feedback mentor orientation goal sponsorship communication performance expectations collaboration recognition body language assertiveness coaching training teamwork counseling networking appraisal delegate listening evaluation trust Circle each word when you find it. down. Amherst. K R A B O A F E L L T T A B A G O S E C O L L A B O R A T I O N O T A P O D E E X P E C T A T I O N S T L M Y T E A M W O R K H L O E M P A M L A F P E R T E C X I N E O E S U A S O P N A A A O O S N C R R T N N S F R E C O G N I T I O N F I I G E E A T C R R O O E T U E O E C U R E I O I I E R B N R N T R F A A T D S L W E A L O I A S W M O T G I B A A R N T A A N I E O A R I E V A L U A T I O N G N L R N C O O E C I P C A R G S A I I K C A N I N K E O K T E U W O N N I E T A G E L E D I I R A S E G G N R I L E S I S I D O L D E T O E G T O R O S T S P O N S O R S H I P Reproduced from 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring by Donna Berry. 1993. across.

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across. Some letters are used in more than one word. and Joe Fehrmann. 1993. Words can be found by reading frontward. Amherst. backward. up. MA: HRD Press. and diagonally. ∼ 161 ∼ .1 Hidden below are the following coaching terms: feedback mentor orientation goal sponsorship communication performance expectations collaboration recognition body language assertiveness coaching training teamwork counseling networking appraisal delegate listening evaluation trust Circle each word when you find it. Charles Cadwell. K R A B O A F E L L T T A B A G O S E C O L L A B O R A T I O N O T A P O D E E X P E C T A T I O N S T L M Y T E A M W O R K H L O E M P A M L A F P E R T E C X I N E O E S U A S O P N A A A O O S N C R R T N N S F R E C O G N I T I O N F I I G E E A T C R R O O E T U E O E C U R E I O I I E R B N R N T R F A A T D S L W E A L O I A S W M O T G I B A A R N T A A N I E O A R I E V A L U A T I O N G N L R N A O O E C I P C A R G S A I I K C C N I N K E O K T E U W O N N I E T A G E L E D I I R A S E G G N R I L E S I S I D O L D E T O E G T O R O S T S P O N S O R S H I P Reproduced from 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring by Donna Berry.Trainer’s Notes Trainer’s Notes: Answer Key to Exercise 31. down.

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Objective By the end of this activity. and markers 3 x 5 index cards Masking tape ∼ 163 ∼ .32 Description Finish the Sentence This is a very short. paper. very flexible activity to begin an exploration of coaching by having participants discuss their own feelings or experiences with coaching. Skill Areas • • Icebreaker Role of coach/mentor Participants Number: Type: 9 to 24 Any Time 15 to 30 minutes Resources • • • Flipchart stand. It is especially appropriate as an introductory exercise. participants will be able to express their own assumptions or beliefs on coaching.

If used as an icebreaker. . . Explain that they are to find other participants with the same sentence. Participants tape their answers where the rest of the class can see them. Step 3: Discuss the group’s responses. A mentor is one who. prepare index cards by printing an incomplete sentence on each card. Begin the class by instructing participants to finish their sentence in three to five ways. Distribute one card to each participant as they enter the room. . The role of a coach in an organization is to. Instruct the rest of the team to explain why they responded as they did. Prepare four to six index cards with each sentence. Notes: Cards may be distributed at any time. . ∼ 164 ∼ . Relate group responses to learning points that will be covered later in the training. . . . Suggested sentences: • • • • • • A good coach always. Step 2: Conduct the activity. . . Notes: One or two spokespersons from each team reads the whole sentence to the rest of the class. A football coach and a business coach are alike because.Activity 32 Method Step 1: Prepare the activity. A football coach and a business coach are not alike because. Some coaches are ineffective because they. . Notes: 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring Before class begins. . but this activity is most effective as a discussion starter at the beginning of the class. they are to introduce themselves to each other and form groups (of four to six members). . They should write their answers on a sheet of flipchart paper.

Objectives By the end of this activity.1 through 33. and practice behaviors appropriate for an X or Y situation.3 for each participant Flipchart stand. paper. It illustrates the effect that having assumptions about human behavior will have on coaching styles. participants will be able to • • identify their own X and Y assumptions. but experience as supervisor is helpful Time 30 to 60 minutes Resources • • One copy each of Exercises 33. and markers ∼ 165 ∼ .33 Description Theory X/Theory Y Assumptions This is a paper-and-pencil activity with follow-up discussion. Skill Areas • • Building trust Role of coach/mentor Participants Number: Type: Any Any.

Explain that the terms blue and green will be used because biases exist regarding behaviors corresponding to X and Y. which he labeled “X” and “Y. ∼ 166 ∼ .” Write “Most people don’t want to work” in the X column. Blue behaviors tend to focus on directing and controlling. Notes: Explain that this exercise will examine some of the assumptions we hold about people. On another sheet of flipchart paper. Have the class volunteer assumptions that they think would be included in X. green behaviors tend to focus on coaching and communicating.Activity 33 Method Step 1: Prepare the activity. Label one column “X” and the other column “Y. Allow about 4 minutes for completion. Have the class volunteer other assumptions. Write “Most people seek responsibility” in the Y column.1. Notes: 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring Prepare for this exercise by becoming familiar with Douglas MacGregor’s Theory X and Theory Y. and how these assumptions affect the way we coach. Step 2: Distribute Exercise 33. have the class volunteer a few behaviors that might result from each set of assumptions. Step 3: Discuss X and Y assumptions.” Explain MacGregor’s approach in simple terms: that he believed leaders hold two basic sets of assumptions about people. This study of management assumptions about people is a standard part of motivation theory and will be easy for you to find. Notes: Begin a discussion of Theory X and Theory Y by drawing a vertical line to create two columns on the flipchart. Write X behaviors with a blue marker and Y behaviors with a green marker.

Summarize this activity by asking the class “What coaching conclusions can we draw from our responses?” Record their answers on the flipchart. Notes: Explain why. Notes: Have groups select a spokesperson to report their responses to the rest of the class. depending on how mature subordinates are (that is.50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring Activity 33 Step 4: Distribute Exercise 33. Step 6: Conclude the activity.2. more or less blue or green behavior might be appropriate. Questions you might ask: • • • Do you think your score really reflects assumptions you hold about others? Why or why not? What has caused your behavior to be more blue/green? What do you think it might mean if you’re toward the middle of the scale? Step 5: Distribute Exercise 33. ∼ 167 ∼ . Instruct half of the groups to complete the questions in the “Blue” column and the other half of the groups to complete the questions in the “Green” column. how well they work together and how well they do their work).3. Notes: Have participants score their responses and mark their score on the X—Y scale. Divide the class into groups of five to seven participants each.

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B. ∼ 169 ∼ .Exercise 33. Employees need to be pushed to respond to unusual requests. Employees tend to get involved in inappropriate activity at work. K. R. Charles Cadwell. I think that… 1. M. 7. Reproduced from 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring by Donna Berry. 3. Employees are able to plan their own work. D. Employees’ decisions need to be “checked” for quality. and Joe Fehrmann. Employees should be told how to do a job. Employees would rather stay home. H. Employees are not interested in the objectives of the organization. J. Employees tend to let conflict get in the way of working together. O. Employees want to understand the “why” of a request. Employees want to come to work. 2. Employees would rather be told what to do. Employees focus their attention on getting an appropriate amount of work accomplished. 5. P. Use only whole numbers. Employees want to achieve the objectives of the organization. 9. I like Fords. Employees work well together. My hobby is skydiving. Generally. or 0 3 I like to fish. Employees take the initiative in anticipating unusual needs. 6. Employees need to be shown each step of a task. Employees exercise good judgment. I. N. 4. E. 1993. A. Amherst. Q. L. F. C.1 Exercise 33. G. For example: 2 1 I like Chevies. MA: HRD Press. Employees are creative in devising better ways of accomplishing a task.1 Coach’s Assumptions Divide three points between each pair of statements. 8.

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2: Scoring Add the points you gave to these items: B D E G J L M O R ________ ________ ________ ________ ________ ________ ________ ________ ________ ________ Add the points you gave to these items: A ________ C ________ F ________ H ________ I ________ K ________ N ________ P ________ Q ________ Total: ________ Total: Mark this total on the X score. X 27 25 23 21 19 17 15 13 11 9 7 5 3 1 Y 1 3 5 7 9 11 13 15 17 19 21 23 25 27 Reproduced from 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring by Donna Berry.Exercise 33. and Joe Fehrmann. Charles Cadwell. 1993. MA: HRD Press.2 Exercise 33. ∼ 171 ∼ . Amherst. Mark this total on the Y scale.

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What are some examples of effective “green” behavior? Example: • Giving work instructions and following up to be sure they are followed Asking employees for their ideas on solving a problem 2. and Joe Fehrmann.Exercise 33. Amherst. What are some examples of effective “blue” behavior? Example: • Green 1. 1993. ∼ 173 ∼ .3 Exercise 33. How might “green” and “blue” behaviors be combined? Reproduced from 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring by Donna Berry. MA: HRD Press.3: Company Behaviors Blue 1. What are some examples of ineffective “green” behaviors? Example: • Shouting at employees Not responding to a rule infraction 3. What are some examples of ineffective “blue” behaviors? Example: • 2. Charles Cadwell. How might “green” and “blue” behaviors be combined? 3.

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Objectives By the end of this activity. Skill Areas • • • • • Analyzing performance problems Counseling Evaluation Role of coach/mentor Setting expectations Participants Number: Type: 9 to 27 Any Time 30 to 45 minutes Resources • • Flipchart stand. paper. participants will be able to • • express their opinion of performance in concrete. tangible terms. and use both written and verbal communication to describe performance.34 Description Letter to a Friend This activity uses both written and verbal communication to enhance participants’ abilities to discuss performance and expectations in concrete. and markers Writing paper for participants ∼ 175 ∼ . behavioral terms.

g. Instruct participants to think of two people. Step 3: Lead the discussion. If they are not supervisors. they should think of current or former coworkers who would be best and worst as performers. Questions you might ask: • • • • • What was circled in your own letter? How could you have expressed things more clearly? Are any patterns present in our letters (e. Notes: 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring Explain that one of the most difficult aspects of coaching is identifying or defining behavior. that may be interpreted in more than one way. After the letters are written.Activity 34 Method Step 1: Explain the activity. they should think of their best performer and their worst performer. in evaluating performance. This skill is needed in setting performance expectations.. frequent use of words such as “attitude”)? Was it difficult to explain the employee’s performance in behavioral terms? Why or why not? Why is this skill important in the coaching process? ∼ 176 ∼ . If participants are supervisors. Notes: Tell participants that they are going to write a letter to a friend who is a supervisor and to whom each of these two people has applied for a job. have the participants pair up. and in analyzing performance problems. The letter is to give as accurate a description as possible. and read them. or that do not describe behavior. Partners are to discuss the letters until every reader understands fully what the writer meant to say. Notes: Readers are to circle all statements that do not appear clear. exchange their letters. Step 2: Conduct the activity.

Objectives By the end of this activity. and understand the effect of differing values on a mentoring relationship.2 for the other half of the participants ∼ 177 ∼ . participants will be able to • • appreciate the significance of different value systems. and markers Copies of Exercise 35.35 Description The Lovers This activity illustrates the part values and ethical decisions can play in the coaching or mentoring process. copies of Exercise 35. but a mixture of men and women provides the richest discussion Time 30 to 40 minutes Resources • • Flipchart stand. paper. Skill Areas • • Building trust Collaboration Participants Number: Type: Any Any.1 for one-half of the participants.

draw the following charts on the flipchart: Jennifer David Preston John Thomas Jennifer David Mary John Donna Allow room for at least seven responses on each chart. especially when faced with difficult choices.” and complete the exercise after the story. ∼ 178 ∼ . “Does anyone have something different from this one?” Your goal is to get as wide a range of responses as possible. Notes: After participants have finished their individual work.1 and half receive Exercise 35. “The Lovers. Instruct participants to silently read the hypothetical story. Step 2: Distribute the exercises to the class.Activity 35 Method Step 1: Prepare the class for the activity. after having two participants read the stories aloud. Notes: Half of the participants receive Exercise 35.2. Notes: 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring Explain that the activity will give us a quick look at how some of our own values may be different from others’. ask for one more by saying. Step 3: Discuss responses. Ask participants to volunteer their responses to the exercise on ranking the behavior of the characters. Do this with both stories. After each.

focus discussion on why these characters were judged differently. Now focus attention on the two stories. with groups reporting their responses to the rest of the participants. Lead a discussion on how this story reveals issues of values in the coaching or mentoring process. Step 4: Conclude group discussion. ask for reasons why. Get participants to ask each other for reasons.50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring Activity 35 Prompt debate of the rankings by asking those who rate one character differently from others to explain their decisions. Notes: This step may also be done in small groups. If rankings for Jennifer and Preston are different from those for David and Mary. Questions you might ask: • • • • How do values affect the mentoring relationship? What positive results may be obtained by pairing mentors and protégés who have different backgrounds? What dangers are there in pairing mentors and protégés who have different backgrounds? What are some ways a mentor can deal with values that don’t fit the organization’s culture? ∼ 179 ∼ . If they are similar.

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1 Exercise 35. Along the way. Our story ends with Jennifer laughing as she watches the enraged Thomas horsewhip David. David went to the front of the train to help with the lead wagon while Jennifer took charge of the children at the rear. Jennifer told her sad tale. Preston. the wagon train finally began its ascent of Breakneck Pass. Preston brought her across. In fact. Through mile after mile of hard travel. and could force Preston to help. they worked together by day and shared their dreams by night. To her dismay. Unexpected rains. sought David out. Jennifer could think of no other solution. Distraught. however. but not wagons. but on the condition that they spend the evening together having dinner before they left. One of the travelers. In mid-September. Only a few of the lead wagons reached the crest. Each day. As the snow deepened. Jennifer and David were separated by dozens of feet of snow. Preston agreed. named Thomas. true to his word. he didn’t care what Preston did. At dusk. and agreed to Preston’s terms. and the pass would be closed to wagon trains until spring.1: The Lovers During the days of the settlement of the Old West. they fell in love and decided to marry and settle down together when they reached their destination. Jennifer knew that the wagons on the western slope must soon descend or risk being trapped hundreds of feet above help. John told her that Preston was hired to scout westward. and on the next morning. He was Preston’s boss. and other delays slowed their progress until they were in danger of not being able to cross Breakneck Pass. Jennifer went to John. Jennifer explained her situation and pleaded for his help to take her across to join David. the lead wagons finally reached the pass. he said. (Continued) ∼ 181 ∼ . and since they were descending to the east because of the snow. when they could see the campfires of the lead wagons below them.Exercise 35. One or two hard snows. the heavy clouds unleashed a blinding snowstorm that quickly halted the train. a young woman named Jennifer and a young man named David joined a wagon train heading for California. their wagon train fell farther and farther behind its schedule. Preston said he knew of a second pass that could be traveled by a single file of pack animals. swollen rivers. When Jennifer told David what she had done. heard her crying and sought to comfort her. After days of back-breaking work. he left her. the remainder turned to work their way back down the trail. Thomas. he pushed her away in disgust. They had dinner together. she reasoned. for help. She stood at the edge of the encampment and sobbed. the wagon master. Suddenly. Jennifer was heartbroken. below the worst of the blizzard. one less person was exactly what their ruined crossing needed. telling her he wanted nothing to do with an improper woman. She went to the train’s scout. not only shocked by David’s behavior but also attracted to Jennifer.

∼ 182 ∼ .1 (concluded) Directions: Rank the characters of this story from 1 to 5. Jennifer David Preston John Thomas ________ ________ ________ ________ ________ Reproduced from 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring by Donna Berry. Amherst. MA: HRD Press. with 1 being the character whose behavior is most offensive. and Joe Fehrmann. 1993. Charles Cadwell.Exercise 35. and 5 the character whose behavior is least offensive.

one less person was exactly what their ruined crossing needed. David explained his situation and pleaded for her help to take him across to join Jennifer. the heavy clouds unleashed a blinding snowstorm that quickly halted the train. and the pass would be closed to wagon trains until spring. swollen rivers. Suddenly. the wagon train finally began its ascent of Breakneck Pass. they worked together by day and shared their dreams by night. David went to the front of the train to help with the lead wagon while Jennifer took charge of the children at the rear. the lead wagons finally reached the pass. however. not only shocked by Jennifer’s behavior but also attracted to David. Our story ends with David laughing as he watches the furious Donna attack Jennifer. Mary said she knew of a second pass that could be traveled by a single file of pack animals. Donna. (Continued) ∼ 183 ∼ . and could influence the scout’s wife. but on the condition that they spend the evening together having dinner before they left. He stood at the edge of the encampment and sobbed. they fell in love and decided to marry and settle down together when they reached their destination. she left. David went to John. He went to Mary. the wagon master. Mary brought him across. and on the next morning. One or two hard snows. Through mile after mile of hard travel. the remainder turned to work their way back down the trail.2: The Lovers During the days of the settlement of the Old West. he said. she pushed him away in disgust. David could think of no other solution. Distraught. David was heartbroken. Unexpected rains. when they could see the campfires of the lead wagons below them. sought Jennifer out. true to her word. Each day. Mary agreed. When David told Jennifer what he had done. and since they were descending to the east because of the snow.2 Exercise 35. They had dinner together. Along the way. To his dismay. their wagon train fell farther and farther behind its schedule. the wife of the wagon train’s scout (who was across the pass with the lead wagons). At dusk. and agreed to Mary’s terms. telling him she wanted nothing to do with a spineless creature who could do something so improper. After days of back-breaking work. a young woman named Jennifer and a young man named David joined a wagon train heading for California. and other delays slowed their progress until they were in danger of not being able to cross Breakneck Pass. David told his sad tale. below the worst of the blizzard. David knew that the wagons on the western slope must soon descend or risk being trapped hundreds of feet above help. but not wagons. named Donna. One of the other women. Only a few of the lead wagons reached the crest. John told him that Mary and her husband were hired to scout westward. he reasoned. he didn’t care what Mary did. As the snow deepened. In fact. In mid-September. heard him crying and sought to comfort him. He was the scout’s boss. Jennifer and David were separated by dozens of feet of snow.Exercise 35.

∼ 184 ∼ . Jennifer David Mary John Donna ________ ________ ________ ________ ________ Reproduced from 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring by Donna Berry.Exercise 35. and Joe Fehrmann. and 5 the character whose behavior is least offensive. Charles Cadwell. Amherst.2 (concluded) Directions: Rank the characters of this story from 1 to 5. 1993. with 1 being the character whose behavior is most offensive. MA: HRD Press.

In groups of two or three.1 for each participant ∼ 185 ∼ . Objectives By the end of this activity. and describe the different feelings attached to the same words spoken in different ways. practice speaking so that tone and inflection complement and support the words. the participants take turns reading the phrases with a change in emphasis and tone of voice in an attempt to understand the power of nonverbal communication. Skill Areas • • • Building trust Nonverbal communication Role of coach/mentor Participants Number: Type: Any Any Time 15 to 30 minutes Resources One copy of Exercise 36. participants will be able to • • • recognize the change in meaning when the tone and inflection of voice is different.36 Description Say what you mean! This activity gives the participants an opportunity to hear simple coaching phrases spoken with a change in inflection.

Instruct them to follow the instructions given in the exercise. Notes: Explain that well-intentioned phrases can be misinterpreted when inflection is improper. Help those who are having difficulty.1 to practice changing inflection.Activity 36 Method 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring Step 1: Introduce the activity and distribute Exercise 36. Step 5: Review the activity. Step 4: Observe the activity. Notes: Listen as they practice. Notes: Questions you might ask: • • • How did meaning. Practice in advance to feel comfortable. Step 2: Observe the activity.1. You might want to demonstrate the example. Notes: Walk among the groups to hear the changes in inflection. Notes: Direct participants to use the phrases again. and tone change? How would tone and inflection affect the employee’s response to the coach? What have we learned with this activity? ∼ 186 ∼ . The participants will use Exercise 36. Draw their attention to instructions 3 and 4. inflection. this time using a tone of voice that depicts a mood. Step 3: Continue the activity.

” a) b) c) d) “Please. Use these phrases or create new ones: a) b) c) d) “You did that well this time.” “Please. Use a tone of voice that reflects: • • • • • Anger Interest Pleasure Apathy Distraction Reproduced from 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring by Donna Berry.” “Have you read the procedures for this process?” “Is this the result you intended?” “What do you think?” 4. Try the phrases again. try that again. MA: HRD Press. Note and discuss how the meaning is changed each time inflection is changed. Charles Cadwell. try that again.” “Please. try that again. 3. 1993.” 2. In groups of two or three. ∼ 187 ∼ . For example: “Please. take turns speaking the following simple coaching phrases with inflection or emphasis on a different word in the phrase each time.1: Simple Coaching Phrases Instructions: 1.Exercise 36. Amherst. try that again. try that again.1 Exercise 36.” “Please. and Joe Fehrmann.

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participants will be able to • • • recognize incongruency in messages. and body language. and ask for clarification when receiving a message that is delivered with contradicting parts. This should be the opportunity to point out that incongruent messages result in distrust. Any Time 15 to 30 minutes ∼ 189 ∼ .37 Description Three-Element Messages This activity provides participants with an opportunity to practice and observe congruency (consistency) and incongruency (inconsistency) in coaching messages. If the group is very large. tone of voice. Objectives By the end of this activity. communicate so that there is congruency with words. Skill Areas • • • • • Building trust Communication Counseling Nonverbal communication Role of coach/mentor Participants Number: Type: Any. however. congruent messages enable the coach to counsel effectively. this exercise would work better in teams of 6 to 10.

” and “Body Language.” “Tone of Voice. each person will take a “message” from the container and say it using the paper drawn from the “tone” container and combine the verbal with the nonverbal instruction from the “body language” container.” write statements on separate pieces of paper and place them in the appropriate containers. To illustrate the principle. Ask the participants to make note of change in meaning.) Step 2: Introduce the activity. Notes: For each of three separate containers labeled “Messages.Activity 37 Resources • 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring Three containers (or if the large group is divided into smaller teams. (See Trainer’s Notes on page 191 for suggestions. Variation: Ask several different people to speak the same message but each drawing different tone and body language instructions. three containers for each team) labeled as follows: − − − “Messages” “Tone” “Body Language” • Slips of paper that describe: − − − Coaching messages for Container #1 Tone of voice instructions for Container #2 Body language instructions for Container #3 • Trainer’s Notes Method Step 1: Prepare the activity. Notes: Explain that coaching phrases can lose intended meaning when tone of voice and body language contradict the words spoken. ∼ 190 ∼ . Step 3: Conduct the activity. Notes: Observe and assist as participants attempt to combine three elements.

Notes: Questions you might ask: • • What changes in behavior could be facilitated or hindered by incongruent messages? How have you experienced incongruent messages in the workplace? Step 5: Review the activity. the receiver is always more likely to believe the tone of voice and the body language. Notes: Make the point clear that when message parts contradict (or when the message is incongruent). ∼ 191 ∼ .50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring Activity 37 Step 4: Lead the discussion. Notes: Questions you might ask: • • • Why did we do this activity? What have we learned? Which is more powerful—what we say or how we say it? Step 6: Summarize and conclude the activity.

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MA: HRD Press.” “Does this work meet the standard you have set for yourself?” “What can I do to help you?” Tone of Voice Abrupt Indifferent Body Language No eye contact. look down Turn and walk away as you speak Sit. lean toward the person.” Genuinely pleased Reproduced from 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring by Donna Berry.” “Tell me what you think about this situation.” “We are glad to have you on our team.Trainer’s Notes Trainer’s Notes: Message Component Suggestions Messages “How’s it going today?” “You seem to be doing a great job. Charles Cadwell. 1993. Amherst. lean back. ∼ 193 ∼ . and put your hands behind your head Look around as you say the message Empathetic Distracted Angry Puzzled Hold the person’s arm and look them straight in the eye as you repeat the message Cross your arms on your chest as you deliver the message “Feel free to come to me whenever you have a question or problem. and Joe Fehrmann. and look into his/her eyes Sit.

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38 Description Proxemics* This activity uses physical space to illustrate how nonverbal behaviors can affect communication.” is the study of how people use space. ∼ 195 ∼ . Skill Areas • • Counseling Nonverbal communication Participants Number: Type: 9 to 94 Any Time 10 to 15 minutes Resources • • Exercise 38. from the Greek word meaning “to approach. participants will be able to use space effectively in one-on-one communication settings.1 and Exercise 38. and markers *Proxemics. Objective By the end of this activity. paper.2 for alternating participants Flipchart stand.

A and B. Notes: Lead a discussion of how the use of space can affect the quality of communication. Step 2: Begin the activity. etc.1 to group A and Exercise 38. Notes: Begin the activity by saying “Begin your conversations. Form pairs with one member from each group (group A member chooses a group B partner).2 to group B. Tell participants they are not to share exercises with members of the other group. Questions you might ask: • • • • What did you notice about your conversation partner? Was anyone uncomfortable? How did your discomfort affect your conversation? What can you do when someone uses space differently than you do? Variation: Group B participants can display nonattentive or disinterested behaviors such as little or no eye contact. have participants return to their regular places.Activity 38 Method Step 1: Prepare the activity. Step 3: Review the activity. ∼ 196 ∼ . At the end of that time. 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring Distribute Exercise 38. Notes: Divide participants into two groups.” Allow approximately five minutes for pairs to converse. leaning away.

MA: HRD Press.1: Group A Participants You are to initiate a conversation with your partner (a member of group B). • • • • A local political issue Your (or your partner’s) favorite hobby A work-related topic The best performance evaluation format Your partner and you will converse for about five minutes. 1993. Begin when the trainer says. “Begin your conversations. Charles Cadwell. ∼ 197 ∼ . and Joe Fehrmann. Select one of the following topics.1 Exercise 38. Amherst.Exercise 38.” Reproduced from 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring by Donna Berry. or choose one of your own.

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gradually do two or more of the following: • • • Touch your partner with your hand Move to within 12 to 16 inches of his or her face Shift in your chair until your knee touches your partner’s knee Be sure to make your actions natural and gradual.Exercise 38. 1993. Charles Cadwell. Take an active part in the conversation. If your partner pulls away or moves. and Joe Fehrmann. Amherst. but as you converse. MA: HRD Press. Your partner will select the conversation topic and will initiate the discussion. simply continue your gradual “encroachment.2 Exercise 38.” Reproduced from 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring by Donna Berry. ∼ 199 ∼ .2: Group B Participants You are to participate in a conversation with your partner (a member of group A).

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39
Description

What are you gonna do?

This activity presents a coaching method to use with an employee to resolve a performance problem and get commitment for improvement. Participants will be given the opportunity to practice the coaching method and get feedback on their success.

Objectives
By the end of this activity, participants will be able to
• • •

describe the four-step coaching method; apply the four-step coaching method during a role play; and develop a plan for using the coaching method on the job.

Skill Areas
• • • • • •

Analyzing performance problems Collaboration Counseling Listening Questioning Setting expectations

Participants
Number: Type: Any Any

Time
60 to 90 minutes

Resources

One copy of Handout 39.1 for each participant, one copy each of Exercises 39.1, 39.2, and 39.4 for each group, and three copies of Exercise 39.3 for each group Pen or pencil for each participant

∼ 201 ∼

Activity 39 Method
Step 1: Introduce the topic and the activity. Notes: Review the objectives. Use the following (or a similar) introduction:

50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring

When the performance of their people does not meet expectations or developmental goals are missed because of performance deficiencies, effective coaches know it is their responsibility to help their people handle their problems. Examples of performance problems that might occur are
• • • •

a a a a

person’s performance, which has been good, begins to slip; person is having trouble meeting commitments; person obviously needs help in resolving a problem; or person comes to you and asks for assistance.

Step 2: Distribute Handout 39.1. Notes: Review the coaching model with participants. Discuss each of the four steps in detail. To focus the discussion, have one of the participants describe a performance problem he or she is currently having with an employee. Use that problem as an example and work through it using the coaching model. Step 3: Set up the role play and distribute Exercises 39.1, 39.2, and 39.3. Notes: Divide participants into groups of three. Assign one person in each group to one of the following roles:
• • •

Coach Employee Observer

Review instructions on each of the exercises. Conduct Role Play Situation 1. As participants do the role play, circulate among the groups to ensure they are staying on track. Also use this time to answer questions and provide assistance. After 10 minutes, stop the role play and have the observers provide feedback to the coaches.

∼ 202 ∼

50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring

Activity 39

Step 4: Discuss the first role play. Notes: Questions you might ask:
• • • • • • • •

How successful was the coach in getting agreement that there was a problem? How did he or she go about getting this agreement? Was the employee involved in deciding on a solution? Did the employee and the coach generate several alternatives? Were clear expectations established between the coach and the employee? Does the coach have a follow-up plan? What type of recognition will be given if the problem is solved? What should the coach do if the problem is not solved?

Step 5: Conduct the second role play. Notes: Have participants switch roles and do Role Play Situation 2. After they are finished, discuss the role play using the questions in Step 4. Step 6: Conduct the third role play. Notes: Have participants switch roles again and do Role Play Situation 3. At this point, every participant should have been assigned all three roles. After they are finished, discuss the role play using the questions in Step 4. Step 7: Distribute Exercise 39.4 and discuss. Notes: Have participants complete the worksheet for a current performance problem they want to resolve. Step 8: Review the activity. Notes: Reassemble the entire group and conduct a wrap-up discussion. Questions you might ask:
• • • •

How effective do you think this process will be on the job? Why? What would you do differently? What did you learn during the role play that will help you? What obstacles, if any, do you face in using this process?

∼ 203 ∼

Handout 39.1

Handout 39.1: Coaching Model
When the performance of their people does not meet expectations or developmental goals are missed because of performance deficiencies, effective coaches use a fourstep process to solve performance problems. 1. Get Agreement that a Problem Exists
• • •

Ask questions to see if the person is aware of the problem Ensure that the person understands the consequences of the problem Get agreement from the person that a problem exists

2. Decide on a Solution
• • • • • •

Ask questions to involve the person with the problem Generate as many alternatives to the problem as possible Help the person think through the problem Let the person think through the problem Agree on the solution(s) that will be implemented Agree on a timetable for implementing the solution(s)

3. Follow Up
• • •

Check to see whether the solution is implemented Determine whether the solution is implemented on schedule Determine whether the solution is working

4. Give Recognition When the Problem Is Solved
• • •

Give specific feedback Be sincere when you give feedback Remember that recognition strengthens performance

Reproduced from 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring by Donna Berry, Charles Cadwell, and Joe Fehrmann. Amherst, MA: HRD Press, 1993.

∼ 205 ∼

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All your employees submitted travel and expense budgets for the year and agreed to live within them. you’ll have the same problem again next week. Everything was fine the first two weeks. Charles Cadwell.1: Role Play—Coach Situation 1 Three weeks ago Joan (John) transferred to your work group. You know that if priorities aren’t set today. Amherst.Exercise 39. Situation 3 This year was going to be different. and Joe Fehrmann. MA: HRD Press. Friday. The first week you were able to cover for Richard (Ruth) because your boss was out of town the day the report was due. You have to submit a budget exception report to your boss in two days. Reproduced from 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring by Donna Berry. he/she was a half-hour late Monday. Situation 2 Your boss called you “on the carpet” today for not getting the productivity report in on time.1 Exercise 39. and again today. but this week. Wednesday. His/her previous supervisor warned you to expect that he/she would be late frequently. The result is that your department’s travel and expense costs are over budget for the first quarter. This is the second time in the past two weeks this has happened. ∼ 207 ∼ . You want to take action now before the problem gets out of hand so you’ve asked Joan (John) to meet with you. and Barbara (Bob) is 25 percent over budget. You’ve scheduled a meeting with Barbara (Bob) to discuss his/her budget so that you can get things under control by the end of the second quarter. You’re now three months into the year. 1993. The reason you were late was because your employee Richard (Ruth) was late getting the information to you. You’ve scheduled a meeting with Richard (Ruth) to discuss the problem.

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Situation 2 The “weekly productivity report”—what an ironic name! It’s been late the last two weeks because the people in Group 18. have been late. If you cut down on your travel. Amherst.2 Exercise 39. you’ll be traveling just as much next quarter. Your boss has asked to meet with you to discuss your budget. Now he/she has asked to meet with you about the report.” You’re not sure what the topic is. You’ve had several projects that required your follow up. Besides. but if not. Charles Cadwell. who are supposed to provide you with their information. If he/she has any good ideas. You don’t see much changing over the second quarter. MA: HRD Press. but you assume it’s the fact that you were late three days this week. Situation 3 What a first quarter! You’ve been busier than ever. ∼ 209 ∼ . and you agreed to make sure the kids get to school Monday. Your spouse just took a new job. and Friday. 1993. You would have liked to have stayed within your new budget. but it just wasn’t possible. Your spouse will be responsible on Tuesday and Thursday. You’ve asked them to get the information to you. well. You heard your boss really caught it from his/her boss today for being late with the report. you’re open. but you don’t have any authority over Group 18.2: Role Play—Employee Situation 1 Your boss asked to meet with you to discuss a “problem. Reproduced from 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring by Donna Berry. and the travel schedule has been hectic. you stayed 45 minutes after everyone else on Monday and Wednesday. You sure wish there was something you could do. You didn’t think about telling your boss because you were only 20 minutes late and you see other people routinely coming in 15 minutes late. but they were even later this week than last week.Exercise 39. there’s a chance the projects won’t be successful. Wednesday. and Joe Fehrmann.

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how? No How involved was the employee? How involved was the coach? Did they agree on a specific timetable to solve the problem? (Continued) ∼ 211 ∼ .Exercise 39. your responsibility is to observe the coach and determine how well he/she handles the situation. Use the checklist below to make notes so that you can provide feedback to the group after the role play.3 Exercise 39. how? No If not. 1. why not? 2. Did the coach get agreement that a problem exists? Yes If so.3: Role Play—Observer During the role play. Did the coach and the employee decide on a solution? Yes If so.

Was a follow-up plan discussed? Yes No Do you think the coach will follow up? Why or why not? 4. ∼ 212 ∼ .Exercise 39. 1993.3 (concluded) 3. and Joe Fehrmann. What type of recognition would be appropriate for this situation? Reproduced from 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring by Donna Berry. Charles Cadwell. Amherst. MA: HRD Press.

Step 1: Get agreement that a problem exists What questions will you ask? What did you agree to as the problem? Step 2: Decide on a solution What are the alternatives? What solution(s) did you agree to implement? By when? Step 3: Follow up When will you follow up? How will you know the solution is working? (Continued) ∼ 213 ∼ . Refer to it during the discussion to help keep yourself on track.Exercise 39.4: Coaching Worksheet Use this worksheet to think about a current performance problem you have with one of your people and to develop a plan for resolving the problem. Employee: Date of planned discussion: Describe the problem that you think exists.4 Exercise 39.

and Joe Fehrmann. Charles Cadwell. 1993. MA: HRD Press.4 (concluded) Step 4: Give recognition when the problem is solved What type of recognition will you give? What will you do to help keep the problem from happening again? Reproduced from 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring by Donna Berry. ∼ 214 ∼ . Amherst.Exercise 39.

participants will be able to understand the importance of using clear language and words appropriate for the listener. Objective By the end of this activity. Please This activity reminds participants of the need to express themselves in ways that their listeners can understand.1 for each participant Trainer’s Notes ∼ 215 ∼ .40 Description Translation. Skill Areas • • • Icebreaker Counseling Delegating Participants Number: Type: Any Any Time 10 to 15 minutes Resources • • One copy of Exercise 40.

or any other effort involving communication.1 to each participant. read correct “translations” from the Trainer’s Notes. Notes: Emphasis should be on the importance of clear communication in delegating. Notes: Allow 3 to 4 minutes for completion of the exercise. Recognize participant(s) with the most correct responses. Questions you might ask: • • What dangers are there in using our own professional “languages”? Who has had the experience of now understanding another’s language? How did it feel? ∼ 216 ∼ . counseling. When time is up. the “language” to be spoken is one that the other person will understand.Activity 40 Method 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring Step 1: Distribute Exercise 40. Step 2: Discuss the activity.

Exercise 40.1

Exercise 40.1: “Translation, Please”
“Translate” as many of the following expressions as you can in the time allowed. All are common sayings. 1. Precipitation entails negation of economy.

2. It is deviation from the routine that gives zest to the cycle of existence.

3. Persons abiding in domiciles of silica combined with metallic oxides are advised not to hurl small geological missiles.

4. Each mass of water vapor suspended in the atmosphere has an exterior decoration of polished metallic hue.

5. Avian creates of kindred mind associate gregariously.

Reproduced from 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring by Donna Berry, Charles Cadwell, and Joe Fehrmann. Amherst, MA: HRD Press, 1993.

∼ 217 ∼

Trainer’s Notes

Trainer’s Notes: Answers to “Translation, Please”
1. Haste makes waste. 2. Variety is the spice of life. 3. People who live in glass houses shouldn’t throw stones. 4. Every cloud has a silver lining. 5. Birds of a feather flock together.

Reproduced from 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring by Donna Berry, Charles Cadwell, and Joe Fehrmann. Amherst, MA: HRD Press, 1993.

∼ 219 ∼

41
Description

“Yeah, but. . .”

This role-play activity demonstrates three frequent errors in listening and provides practice for developing empathic listening skills.

Objectives
By the end of this activity, participants will be able to
• •

demonstrate their empathic listening to a conversation partner; and avoid common, ineffective listening behaviors.

Skill Areas
• • • •

Counseling Listening Nonverbal communication Questioning

Participants
Number: Type: 12 to 14 Any

Time
20 to 40 minutes

Resources
• •

Flipchart stand, paper, and markers 3 x 5 index cards (one per participant)

∼ 221 ∼

until one or more of the listening errors (some examples are listed in Step 3) have appeared. talking loudly. Step 2: Ask for volunteers for demonstration. “I understand your position. Chevies Japanese vs.” (often disguised as. Notes: After thanking volunteers. because we learn early in our lives to try to “win” discussions. baseball Add other issues as you wish. the Republican party Football vs. Allow several minutes for their discussion.) • • • “Yeah. Notes: Ask for two participants whose answers disagree to volunteer to discuss one of the issues. Instruct one to begin with a statement of feeling or opinion and the other to respond naturally. 3. American cars The Democratic party vs. . first ask the volunteers and then other participants for examples of these behaviors shown in class.Activity 41 Method Step 1: Introduce the activity. Chocolate ice cream vs.”) Quiz questions (leading and loaded questions. 2. Because of this. etc. but. Empathic listening. participants are to indicate which item in each pair they prefer. Next to each item. . on the other hand. vanilla ice cream Fords vs. nonverbal dismissing of the other. trusting climate in which a freer discussion may take place. . interrupting. our listening responses tend to fall into three categories. Once this is done. or “logic trap” questions) Aggression (sarcasm. establishes a supportive. 5. 4.) All of these responses tend to set up a “win-lose” climate. ask participants to reveal their responses by raising their hands as you read each item. Notes: 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring Instruct participants to each write on a 3 x 5 index card the issues you recite: 1. explain that our discussions with others frequently include poor listening habits. however. . Repeat with another pair of volunteers. ∼ 222 ∼ . Step 3: Discuss common listening errors. The two should have a discussion of the issue. (As you list each item.

List responses on the flipchart. Questions you might ask: • • • • Who had difficulty resisting the urge to “Yea. Notes: Ask for two more volunteers to discuss an issue.50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring Activity 41 Step 4: Discuss empathic listening behaviors. Notes: Ask partners to share their reactions to the exercise. Have participants pair up (it is helpful for partners to disagree on their discussion issues. . but it is not vital). The list should include: • • • • • • Nodding Paraphrasing Maintaining eye contact Offering “mirror” responses Making encouraging comments Leaning forward Step 5: Practice active listening. Step 6: Review the activity. but. Have each pair practice empathic listening. Notes: Ask the participants for examples of empathic (or “active”) listening behaviors. Have the volunteers and the class list the empathic listening behaviors each volunteer practices.” or otherwise “win”? What listening responses were most comfortable? Uncomfortable? What happened to your conversation when you showed you were listening? How can these behaviors contribute to understanding each other? ∼ 223 ∼ . .

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participants will be able to • • identify ineffective delegating behaviors. paper.1 through 42. Skill Areas • • • • Building trust Delegating Nonverbal communication Setting expectations Participants Number: Type: 12 to 14 Any Time 60 to 90 minutes Resources • • One copy each of Exercises 42.42 Description Making Assignments This role-play activity allows participants to identify common errors in delegating. and markers ∼ 225 ∼ . Objectives By the end of this activity.3 for each participant Flipchart stand. and identify and practice effective delegating behaviors.

Notes: These will. Have participants form into groups of three. be the opposite of items on the effective list. playing one of the roles. Allow 5 minutes for participants to complete item #1 of Exercise 42. such as: − − − − Eye contact Open posture Supportive tone Understandable pace Step 3: Lead a discussion of ineffective delegating behaviors. quality requirements. The list should include: • • • • • • • Explanation of the assignment Checking for the subordinate’s understanding Encouragement or emphasis on the value of the assignment Opportunity for the subordinate to ask questions Opportunity for the subordinate to suggest approaches Explanation of follow-up method. Each should record their reactions. A second member plays the role of subordinate. They are to make the assignment. and the third member observes. Notes: Discuss and list them on the flipchart. Step 4: Conduct the role play.Activity 42 Method Step 1: Prepare the activity. and standards Effective nonverbal behaviors. Allow time as follows: • • • Role play: 5 minutes Subordinate reactions: 3 to 5 minutes Observer reactions: 3 to 5 minutes ∼ 226 ∼ . Notes: Distribute one copy of each exercise to each participant. Step 2: Lead a discussion of effective delegating behaviors.1. Repeat until all have been the supervisor at least once.1. Notes: 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring Explain that the class is about to demonstrate effective and ineffective delegating behaviors. for the most part. Members are to each select one role from the list in item #2 of Exercise 42.

Summarize by referring to the list of effective behaviors developed earlier. Record points on the flipchart.50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring Activity 42 Step 5: Review the activity. Notes: Ask participants for their observations and reactions. ∼ 227 ∼ .

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Description of the assignment: B.): (Continued) ∼ 229 ∼ . other resources.1 Exercise 42. Complete the following outline: A. follow-up. Standards for completion: 1) Quality 2) Time 3) Cost 4) Other Other information. etc. as appropriate (priority.Exercise 42.1: Assignments 1. Think of a task you assign to one or more of your subordinates that requires an explanation because it is not routine.

you don’t even need to discuss the assignment. This subordinate is capable. this subordinate is not very capable and will probably mess it up. MA: HRD Press. and Joe Fehrmann. and you don’t want to discuss any more than necessary. Amherst. and you want to be sure he/she succeeds in this assignment. 1993. already late and impatient to get to a meeting. This assignment is critical. Charles Cadwell.1 (concluded) 2.Exercise 42. ∼ 230 ∼ . You have a lot of faith in this subordinate. in fact. You are in a hurry. Unfortunately. Be sure it is understood and the subordinate feels confident. Reproduced from 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring by Donna Berry. D. C. Roles: A. B.

What tone did your supervisor use? 2. Amherst. Did you understand the assignment? 4. How was this tone communicated? • • Verbally: Nonverbally: 3. How do you feel about this assignment? Reproduced from 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring by Donna Berry.Exercise 42. Charles Cadwell. 1993. and Joe Fehrmann. MA: HRD Press.2 Exercise 42.2: Subordinate Reactions 1. ∼ 231 ∼ .

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Amherst. What message did the supervisor send? • • Verbally: Nonverbally: 4.3 Exercise 42. ∼ 233 ∼ . What tone did the supervisor use? 2. What ineffective delegating behaviors were shown? Reproduced from 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring by Donna Berry. Did the supervisor check for understanding? How? 3. MA: HRD Press.3: Observer Notes 1. Charles Cadwell. 1993. What effective delegating behaviors were shown? 5. and Joe Fehrmann.Exercise 42.

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Skill Areas • • • • • Analyzing performance problems Counseling Listening Nurturing Setting expectations Participants Number: Type: Any Any Time 1 to 2 hours Resources • • One copy of Handout 43. identify miscues in specific coaching situations. and develop a plan for preventing coaching errors.1 and one copy each of Exercises 43.1 and 43.43 Description Coaching Miscues This activity allows participants to evaluate their coaching skills and learn ways to overcome common coaching errors. participants will be able to • • • describe the difference between ineffective and effective listening behaviors. Objectives By the end of this activity.2 for each participant Pen or pencil for each participant ∼ 235 ∼ .

Often these errors seem minor and are unintentional. A better approach would be for the coach to gather more information and involve the employee in offering a solution. Still. our job is to help them make fewer mistakes so that their performance improves.1 and conduct the activity. Notes: Have participants write their answers on the exercise. Use the following (or a similar) introduction: 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring People make mistakes. The manager accepts it without question and offers an “ideal” solution.Activity 43 Method Step 1: Introduce the topic and the activity. Ask participants for specific examples of coaches who have listening skills like those described. Unfortunately. Situation 2: • • ∼ 236 ∼ . Ask if these coaches were effective or ineffective.” Step 3: Distribute Exercise 43. Then discuss each situation after they finish. Step 2: Distribute Handout 43.1. You might want to spend some time discussing the concept of “active listening. As coaches. A more effective coach would try to find out more about the situation by asking the employee to analyze the conditions causing the errors. The coach is trying to guess the problems and is implying that the employee is careless. we sometimes make things worse instead of better because we make errors when we coach. Notes: Review the characteristics described on the handout and compare and contrast the paired descriptions. Notes: Review the objectives. Situation 1: • • Employee seems to be blaming someone else. Emphasize the importance of listening when involved in a coaching situation. they can cause problems in our relationship with our employees. This activity looks at some of those errors and how to prevent them.

50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring Activity 43 Step 4: Distribute Exercise 43. The coach has not been practicing good follow up. Circulate among the groups and answer any questions during the activity. Notes: Situation 3: • • The error is in implying lack of judgment rather than describing the behavior. Also he/she seems to be impatient and making value judgments. and 5. discuss the scenario with the entire group. Asking a few questions would get the dialogue started. A better response would be to use active listening and be sure you understand the employee’s point of view.2 and have participants work through the situations in small groups. After each situation. The coach should try to find out why the employee is late and determine if the problem can be solved. The coach would be better advised to find out why the employee feels this case is different. Notes: Divide participants into groups of three: • • • Coach Employee Observer Review the instructions on the exercise and ensure that participants understand what to do. Use the notes given in Step 5 as a guide. The employee is likely to be defensive. 4. Situation 4: • • Situation 5: • • ∼ 237 ∼ . Step 5: Discuss situations 3. The coach has been allowing the behavior to go on too long without taking action.

if any. Questions you might ask: • • • • • • • • • • • How effective do you think these coaches would be on the job? What did you learn from the exercises? How will this help you on the job? What benefits do you see in using these coaching techniques? What obstacles. will keep you from using what you’ve learned? Avoid judgment Maintain objectivity Be sincere Strive to help Get employee commitment Listening is critical Summary points to make about effective coaching: ∼ 238 ∼ .Activity 43 Step 6: Review the activity. Notes: 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring Reassemble the entire group and conduct a wrap-up discussion.

Amherst. Charles Cadwell. MA: HRD Press. but does not play “20 questions” Paraphrasing Fails to check whether message was received accurately Paraphrases and restates what he/she thought the other person said Advice Narrows the choices by suggesting the best solution early in the discussion Asks for suggestions from the other person as well as providing own alternatives Reproduced from 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring by Donna Berry.1: Characteristics of Ineffective/Effective Listeners Ineffective Nonverbal Behavior Looks bored. seems uninterested or judgmental.1 Handout 43. makes suggestions first Accepts ideas and feelings and probes for more information before making recommendations Empathy Fails to see or hear the other person’s point of view Tries to put himself/herself in the other person’s shoes Probing Fails to probe or follow up for additional information Probes in a helpful way. ∼ 239 ∼ . 1993.Handout 43. avoids eye contact Maintains positive posture and avoids distracting behavior Effective Focus of Attention Shifts focus to self and talks about own accomplishments Keeps focus of comments on the other person Acceptance Doesn’t accept other person’s ideas or feelings. and Joe Fehrmann.

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” Coach: “Do you proofread the articles before you send the newsletter to the printer?” Employee: “Every time.Exercise 43. Charles Cadwell. I know mistakes are costly. and Joe Fehrmann.” Coach: “Why don’t you sit down and discuss it with her. Situation 1 Employee: “She gets on my nerves. The coach makes one or more miscues.1 Exercise 43.1: Coaching Miscues—Part 1 Read the situations below.” Coaching miscue: Suggested improvement: Situation 2 Employee: “Yeah. I’m sure you two can solve this like adults so that we can get some work done around here. Amherst. Identify the miscues and then make your own suggestions for improvement. 1993. ∼ 241 ∼ . MA: HRD Press.” Coach: “Are you sure you understand your new computer?” Coaching miscue: Suggested improvement: Reproduced from 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring by Donna Berry.

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” Coach: “This is a holiday that comes every year at this time.2 Exercise 43.2: Coaching Miscues—Part 2 Each person in the group should take one of three roles: coach. We can’t get caught up because someone always wants something different this week than last week or last year. The observer should also ask the coach and employee for their own suggestions after they complete the exercise.” Coach: “This is the third time you’ve been late this month!” Employee: “I didn’t know we had to punch a management time clock. or observer. The observer should identify the miscues and then make suggestions for improvement. Have them continue the discussion to a conclusion after the script ends. Situation 3 Employee: “Things are really hectic this time of year.” Coach: “Don’t you realize how much it disrupts my meetings to have you always coming in late?” Coaching miscue: Suggested improvement: (Continued) ∼ 243 ∼ . You need to improve your planning and use the system I showed you. employee. Have the coach and employee read the situation below.Exercise 43.” Coaching miscue: Suggested improvement: Situation 4 Employee: “Good morning.

2 (concluded) Situation 5 Coach: “Didn’t we have this discussion once before?” Employee: “Yeah. Charles Cadwell. Amherst. MA: HRD Press. I don’t like having to stop what I’m doing to take care of something you should have handled. and Joe Fehrmann. ∼ 244 ∼ .Exercise 43. I’m surprised you didn’t remember. but that was different.” Coach: “Well.” Coaching miscue: Suggested improvement: Reproduced from 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring by Donna Berry. 1993.

participants will be able to evaluate • • their knowledge of key learning points. Objectives By the end of this activity. and markers for tic-tac-toe diagram Prizes (optional) ∼ 245 ∼ . paper. The activity can be conducted at any time during the course or as a course closure. and the knowledge of other participants. divided into teams of five to seven members if there is a large group Any Time 1 hour Resources • • • • 10 3 x 5 index cards per team Pen or pencil for each participant Flipchart stand. Skill Areas • • Role of coach/mentor Course closure Participants Number: Type: Any.44 Description Tic-Tac-Toe This activity uses a familiar childhood game to review course material.

Allow 15 minutes for each team to write 10 questions based on their assigned material. You will need an even number of teams. If you have a large group. ∼ 246 ∼ . Assign specific course content areas to each team so that they will not have duplicate questions. Allow no more than 30 seconds for teams to provide an answer. Step 3: Set up the area. You will need one diagram for every two teams.Activity 44 Method Step 1: Introduce the activity. Team members may confer to come up with their answer. You should act as moderator for the game. Have teams number the question side of each card. Step 4: Conduct the activity. it is recommended that you divide into several teams of five to seven members per team. Notes: 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring Explain that you are going to conduct a game of tic-tac-toe and you’ll explain the special rules in just a few minutes. If you will have more than one game. Each question should be written on one side of the card and the answer on the other. prepare as many tic-tac-toe diagrams as you will need. The opposing team asks the question on the card with the selected number. Notes: Select one to four participants from each team as players to represent their respective teams. While teams are writing their questions. Step 2: Prepare materials. The first team selects a number from 1 to 10 and indicates on which space on the diagram they want to place their mark. Seat the players facing the tic-tac-toe diagram. Notes: Divide the group into two teams designated X and O. Give each team 10 3 x 5 index cards. assign one participant per game to assist as moderators. Notes: Use a coin toss to determine which team will go first.

Option: Award prizes. the team with the most marks is the winner.50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring Activity 44 If they answer correctly. If no team has a tic-tac-toe after all 20 questions are used. the space is left blank. Alternate between teams in this manner until one team gets a tic-tac-toe. ∼ 247 ∼ . Step 5: Review the activity. If they answer incorrectly. Reinforce the importance of applying on-the-job skills they learned during the class. place the team’s mark (X or O) in the designated space. Notes: Summarize the objectives and how they were met.

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Objectives By the end of this activity. It also provides an opportunity to explore what can happen when work assignments are delegated to employees. describe what can happen when making work assignments. Skill Areas • • • • Icebreaker Delegating Listening Orientation Participants Number: Type: Any Any Time 30 to 45 minutes Resources • • Trainer’s Notes Pen or pencil and paper for each participant ∼ 249 ∼ . and develop a plan for helping their employees listen.45 Description Information Overload This activity is designed to help participants be more aware of their listening habits. participants will be able to • • • describe their listening strengths and weaknesses.

Notes: Explain that you want to make sure the new person understands the job assignment. Step 2: Read the assignment from the Trainer’s Notes to the participants. Try to be conversational. as if you were giving a real work assignment. Notes: Compare scores the second time with those on the first try. Notes: Questions you might ask: • • • • • • How accurately does your score reflect your listening ability? Why did you score high/low? How do you think a new employee would react to such an assignment? What questions do you think a new employee would ask? Do different people listen in different ways? How? What is your motivation for listening to someone? Step 5: Repeat the exercise (optional).Activity 45 Method Step 1: Introduce the activity. Step 3: Administer the test. ∼ 250 ∼ . Discuss why scores were better or worse. Discuss the importance of asking questions when you don’t understand. Step 4: Discuss the results. Notes: 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring Tell participants that they will experience what it is like to be a new employee being given a very specific work assignment. Notes: Read the information at a normal rate of speed.

50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring Activity 45 Step 6: Review the activity. ∼ 251 ∼ . Notes: Discuss the role of listening as it applies to being a successful coach/mentor. Ask them how they can improve these situations in the future. If using as an icebreaker. discuss the importance of listening during the course. Ask participants to think of situations where their inability to listen has caused problems.

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On Fridays you have to get to the mail room yourself to pick up the mail. She probably already told you that filing and distributing the mail will be your most important duties. They may be. I hope the boss filled you in on your breaks. it’s a good idea to ask for project status reports the day before they are due so that you can start typing. and again around 2:00 p. You’ve got to take the mail that has been left on the desk to Charles Hall for pickup. a lot of it will be personal stuff. She won’t give you much. but I can tell you from my own experience that answering the phone will take most of your time. The boss had to go to a very important meeting. It’s next to Hunter’s office. we’ll try to get you out of here by 12:15 so that you can be back by 1:00 when the afternoon action gets started.) The Situation This is your first day on the job. You’ll need them—10 minutes in the morning. so she asked me to help get you started. go ahead and stop by Preston’s office and drop his off. Lunch time depends on whose day it is to answer the phones. As far as the filing goes. The Orientation It’s good to have you with us. If you spend too much time on his stuff. By the way. I’m a coworker the supervisor assigned to you to help with orientation. He just transferred up there a month ago. once at 10:00 a. We usually try to go between 11:30 and 1:00 in 15-minute intervals. If you really have some rush stuff. She’s a real stickler. 45 minutes at noon. take it to the mail room on the third floor. you’ll go around 9:55 to beat the rush. It comes in twice a day. He’s on the northeast corner of the lower level next to the computer lab. but it’s not so bad. but don’t permit any questions. I’m not sure she trusts anyone to do a job right. Sometimes you can sort the mail while you’re walking back here. The mail situation sounds tricky. They’ll give it to you in bundles. you can go anytime. Poulson is especially bad about expecting to get his handwritten notes typed up 30 minutes before the report is due. You’ll probably get a lot of mail that belongs to Preston in the marketing department. and another 10 in the afternoon. It takes that long to figure out his hieroglyphics. Unfortunately. (Continued) ∼ 253 ∼ . They have so much they just can’t get it delivered. Comes in early and checks the files to see if they’re right. northeast corner. even if they don’t understand.m. Since you’re new. (New employees generally are reluctant to ask questions. If you get it done. Be as conversational as possible. Then there’s Mason. but you’d better get it right.Trainer’s Notes Trainer’s Notes: Assignment Read the following information to participants at a normal rate of speed. In the afternoon. you’ll never get your work done. you’ll get the most from Goodwin. If you’re smart. and we still get his mail.m.

If you forget. she gets very testy. 8. False Goodwin gives personal stuff to file. Right now I’ve got to get over to the Legal department and pick up some stuff for Mason. False The mail room is located on the lower level. False Most of your time will be spent answering the phone. ∼ 254 ∼ . and Joe Fehrmann. 10. True You should be back from lunch by 12:30. 11. MA: HRD Press. True Reproduced from 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring by Donna Berry. Amherst. False Charles Hall recently transferred to marketing. 1. 9. just ask. Charles Cadwell. If you have any questions. False You are to call Jeno every morning at 8:45. True Your main jobs according to the boss are filing and answering the phone. 6. morning and afternoon. 7. True Mason is likely to check the accuracy of your filing. 12. False Breaks are 10 minutes. You have to pick up the mail yourself on Thursday. 4. False Preston likes to give you handwritten copies to type. 5. 1993. 3. Listening Test Answer true or false. 2. True Lunch is 45 minutes. See you later.Trainer’s Notes (concluded) One more thing: you are supposed to call Gina at 8:15 every morning and make sure she’s up and getting ready for work.

participants will be able to • • • identify bad listening habits in others.46 Description Listen up! This activity asks the participants to examine bad listening habits by asking them to list things that people do when they are supposed to be listening. identify bad listening habits of self. and markers ∼ 255 ∼ . Objectives By the end of this activity. and describe the effects of poor listening behavior. paper. Skill Areas • • • Listening Nonverbal communication Role of coach/mentor Participants Number: Type: Any Any Time 10 to 30 minutes Resources Flipchart stand.

Give an example. Some of the behaviors that will be listed include reading. eating. doodling. Notes: 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring Explain that the participants will make a list of bad listening habits—things that people do while assuring the talker that they are listening. Notes: Participants will more than likely agree that the behaviors they contributed to the list annoy them. avoiding eye contact. and ask for more ideas. talking to someone else. Step 3: Review the activity. How will knowing that information help you with your coaching effectiveness? How will knowing what causes such behavior help you with your skill development? ∼ 256 ∼ . personally.) What might cause you to act in these ways. Notes: It is important for the participants to understand that the behaviors they have listed are unacceptable for an effective coach to exhibit. ask some or all of the following questions: • • You have identified some of your own bad listening habits.Activity 46 Method Step 1: Introduce the activity. watching TV. have been known to display. To better apply the concept. you might ask: • • • • Which of these are most annoying or could even be considered rude? Why? What does that action signal? Which of these are you guilty of displaying on occasion? (Ask the participants to list three of the behaviors that they. walking away. To fully cover the negative reaction to these types of behaviors. Step 2: Discuss the behaviors. etc. Coaches are expected to be skilled listeners and to work to eliminate any ineffective behaviors. writing it on the flipchart page. grooming. drinking.

paper. and markers ∼ 257 ∼ .1 and 47. and practice effective assertive communication for optimum coaching skill.47 Description “Just Thought I’d Ask” This activity allows participants to practice assertive communication skills by learning to recognize and eliminate aggressive. passive. Skill Areas • • • Assertiveness Building trust Listening Participants Number: Type: Any. participants will be able to • • recognize aggressive.2 for each participant Trainer’s Notes Flipchart stand. divided into groups of two or three Any Time 30 to 60 minutes Resources • • • One copy of Exercises 47. Objectives By the end of this activity. and assertive styles of communication. emotion-laden messages and passive styles of relating.

desires. but the assertive person communicates self-respect as well as respect for others. aggressive. underhanded method that a person uses to gain his or her own way while appearing outwardly compliant. negotiating. The passive person becomes a victim. The demanding tone indicates a feeling of superiority. and not accepting guilt or responsibility for the actions or feelings of anyone else. Notes: The obvious difference in aggressive and assertive communication is the language. Other peoples’ rights are never sacrificed. Aggressive communication is plagued with accusing “you” messages. Step 2: Distribute Exercise 47. Notes: Call the participants’ attention to the definitions for passive. has the predictable outcome of win-win. direct.1. Notes: 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring Explain that communication is generally divided into three categories: passive. and rights before anyone else’s. and assertive. aggressive. ∼ 258 ∼ . the passive-aggressive style is a deceitful. honest or dishonest method. integrating. referring to your Trainer’s Notes if necessary.Activity 47 Method Step 1: Introduce the activity. In contrast. while assertive styles use nonjudgmental “I” messages. through either a direct or an indirect. while the third. Passive communication is an indirect form of communication that indicates an inferior position. assertive communication. Assertive behavior creates a win-win situation by listening. While simple aggressive behaviors bully the other person. Assertive communication is active. Step 3: Explain the activity. It communicates thoughts and feelings clearly and takes responsibility for personal emotions and beliefs. The first two result in win-lose relationships. A person using this type of communication always attempts to get his or her way. People presenting a passive demeanor allow the other’s wants and desires to be more important and have more priority than their own. wants. Some aggressive behavior is passive-aggressive in nature. and assertive communication. and honest. aggressive people put their own needs. both verbal and nonverbal.

Step 5: Review and summarize the activity. Ask the participants to divide into groups of two or three. 2. Allow 10 to 15 minutes for the role play. review the activity. Notes: 1.2 using the corresponding nonverbal behaviors identified in Exercise 47. Record suggestions on a flipchart using the guide offered in Exercise 47.1. Step 4: Distribute Exercise 47.1. Ask for feedback. Ask that they take notes in order to have a complete picture of the behavior. 3. 2.50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring Activity 47 1. ask that they rotate the communicator role so that everyone has a chance to act and to react. If you are using groups of three. When everyone has finished.2. Allow them 5 to 10 minutes to write their ideas in the box at the bottom of Exercise 47.1. Fill in where the groups come up short on ideas. Ask participants to role play the “you” and “I” statements printed in Exercise 47. Ask each group to brainstorm body language behaviors for each of the three types of communication. Notes: Questions you might ask: • • • • • • • Why did we do this activity? Which type of communication is more likely to result in cooperation? In resentment? In frustration? In trust? Which style is more fitting for the coaching form of leadership? Which type or style would you prefer in those that you coach? What did the role play reveal to you? What did you learn about yourself? How will you be able to use this information with your coaching responsibilities? ∼ 259 ∼ .

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People presenting a passive demeanor allow the other’s wants and desires to be more important and have more priority than their own. Other peoples’ rights are never sacrificed. Amherst. direct. The passive person becomes a victim. While simple aggressive behaviors bully the other person. underhanded method that a person uses to gain his or her own way while appearing outwardly compliant. Assertive communication is active. but the assertive person communicates selfrespect as well as respect for others. A person using this type of communication always attempts to get his or her way.Exercise 47. Charles Cadwell. MA: HRD Press. aggressive people put their own needs. wants. through either a direct or an indirect. honest or dishonest method. desires. In contrast.1 Exercise 47. and rights before anyone else’s. List nonverbal behaviors of each style: Aggressive Passive Assertive Reproduced from 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring by Donna Berry. and not accepting guilt or responsibility for the actions or feelings of anyone else. negotiating. Some aggressive behavior is passive-aggressive in nature. the passive-aggressive style is a deceitful. It communicates thoughts and feelings clearly and takes responsibility for personal emotions and beliefs. Assertive behavior creates a win-win situation by listening. and honest. ∼ 261 ∼ . The demanding tone indicates a feeling of superiority. 1993. integrating. and Joe Fehrmann.1: Styles of Communication Passive communication is an indirect form of communication that indicates an inferior position.

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“I’m concerned when I see behavior that is inappropriate. An “I” statement places no blame but is representative of a person who is willing to take responsibility for himself and his feelings. ∼ 263 ∼ . Aggressive communication is plagued with accusing “you” messages. while assertive styles use nonjudgmental “I” messages. MA: HRD Press. 1993.” “I’m not sure I made myself clear about what was acceptable. Practice the following “You” and “I” statements using the appropriate body language cues from your work in Exercise 47.2: Role Play—“You” and “I” An obvious difference in aggressive and assertive communication is the language—both verbal and nonverbal.” “You make me so mad.1.” “You are the rudest person I have ever met.” “I am angry about what you just said.” “You goofed again. “You” messages create a climate of defensiveness in the listener. Amherst.Exercise 47. Charles Cadwell. and Joe Fehrmann.” “I feel very frustrated with these errors.” Reproduced from 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring by Donna Berry.2 Exercise 47.” “You hurt my feelings.

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∼ 265 ∼ . looks sad Nods head in agreement Speaks softly Whines. mumbles Acts afraid Fiddles with objects Assertive Appears at ease and comfortable Shoulders and back are straight Leans forward. MA: HRD Press. body straight with other person Makes eye contact but looks away every now and then Frowns Rolls eyes Points finger Uses pen or pencil to direct people Yells or screams Speaks loudly and/or rapidly Critical tone Tone is clear. and Joe Fehrmann. 1993.Trainer’s Notes Trainer’s Notes: Nonverbal Behaviors of Each Style Aggressive Stares Looks at clock or watch Paces Appears stiff Lowers eyebrows Passive Hand at or over mouth Shoulders slumped Leans on things Eyes look down Does not make eye contact Pouts. Amherst. speaks with proper volume and rate Gives appropriate emphasis Facial expression shows interest Hands express emphasis Hands are open Reproduced from 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring by Donna Berry. Charles Cadwell.

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48 Description “Say what?” This activity is designed to illustrate the importance of and need for attentive listening skills in the coach. and list reasons why coaches must be able to listen effectively and remember accurately. Skill Area Listening Participants Number: Type: Any Any Time 10 to 15 minutes Resources • • A copy of Exercise 48. Objectives By the end of this activity. By asking the participant to hear and remember information. participants will be able to • • describe the frustration of receiving detailed information and not knowing what to remember and what to ignore.1 for each participant Trainer’s Notes ∼ 267 ∼ . the difficult job of determining what is important will become apparent.

score the results. Step 2: Using the Trainer’s Notes. Divide total by number of participants to find the class average.1. to the listen and remember test. Step 5: Review the activity. Step 3: Repeat the items and then give answers.Activity 48 Method 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring Step 1: Explain the activity and distribute Exercise 48. Notes: Tell participants that they will use this sheet to record their answers. read the test “Say what?” Notes: Read test items 1 through 6 in a normal tone and at a normal rate of speed. This is a listening test. Notes: Allow participants to self-score tests as you read 1 through 6 again and give the answers. Notes: Collect scores of each participant and total them. without talking to anyone. Notes: Questions you might ask: • • • • • • What did you feel during this exercise? What did this activity tell you about your listening skills? When might a similar situation occur in the workplace? How important is listening and remembering to the coach? What makes it difficult to listen and remember? How can we work to overcome those barriers? ∼ 268 ∼ . Step 4: As an optional step. Do not repeat.

Charles Cadwell.Exercise 48. a. __________ 2.1: “Say what?”—Answer Sheet 1. __________ How did I do? My score was __________ Compared to the class average of __________ Reproduced from 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring by Donna Berry. ________ 6. and Joe Fehrmann. __________ 4.1 Exercise 48. 1993. ________ b. __________ 5. MA: HRD Press. __________ 3. ∼ 269 ∼ . Amherst.

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triangle. square. 22. Wichita. In the series of words to. To take advantage of this money-back offer. How much money do you send? $1. Inc. white. green.Trainer’s Notes Trainer’s Notes: “Say. To get to 729 Market Avenue. In the series of numbers 5. postmarked before December 31. and Joe Fehrmann. turn right for three blocks. the fourth word was? from 3. Charles Cadwell.25 for handling to our home office. for. red. 492. you need to travel three blocks south. In the series of shapes circle. Amherst. MA: HRD Press. your receipt. what?”— Listen and Remember Test 1. at. then turn left for one block. 15. which color followed red? green 5. 3915 E. 29th Street. which shape preceded rectangle? circle Reproduced from 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring by Donna Berry. 1993. from. In the series of colors yellow. rectangle. the third number was? 22 2. a) What are the total number of blocks you must travel to 729 Market Avenue? seven b) What direction would you be going when you get to 729 Market Avenue? South 6. ∼ 271 ∼ .. blue. me. and $1. send the UPC bar code. KS 67202. Acme Products. oval.25 4. 39.

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and use complete communication to reduce frustration. Skill Areas • • • • Building trust Listening Nonverbal communication Training Participants Number: Type: Any Any Time 30 to 45 minutes Resources Four pieces of paper (all the same size) for each participant and for you *Contributed by Kate Martin. participants will be able to • • • • describe the benefit of combining verbal and nonverbal communication in sending a message.* Objectives By the end of this activity. use feedback to improve the communication process. identify blocks that interfere with the communication process. It also provides practical experience for giving effective instruction to coaches responsible for training their employees.49 Description Tearing up Communication This activity illustrates the problems associated with incomplete communication and how the communication process can be improved for more productive coaching. Kate Martin & Associates ∼ 273 ∼ . including assumptions and perceptions.

Notes: Hold one piece of paper in front of you and in clear view of all senders. the goal is for the receiver’s paper to match the senders. Senders and receivers must be standing back-to-back at all times.” Partners should stand back-to-back with senders facing you. however. Fold the paper at least three times and tear it at least twice. Notes: Tell partners that the goal of the activity is to produce two identical papers after folding and tearing the paper. ∼ 274 ∼ . Step 3: Demonstrate a folding and tearing pattern to senders. Step 2: Explain the activity. Receivers may not talk or provide any form of nonverbal communication to the senders. They will fold and tear their papers as you provide direction.Activity 49 Method 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring Step 1: Introduce the activity and organize the group. Notes: Divide the group into groups of two. Ask each pair to identify a “sender” and a “receiver. pausing after each fold or tear to allow senders to complete the process. If you have an odd number. ask one person to be an observer. Senders will then describe to their receivers how to fold and tear the paper to produce an identical paper. Do not give any verbal clues that receivers can hear. Senders should stand in a straight line or some other configuration so that no receivers can see any of the senders. Explain the procedures and the rules: • • • • Senders will learn how to fold and tear their papers by observing you. Inform senders that it is not critical that their papers match yours exactly.

Step 5: Review Stage 1. Notes: Questions you might ask: • • • • • How many matched? How many did not? What made this difficult? What would have made it easier? What blocks in the communication process can you identify? (Common problems identified are noise. Along with any observers. After all partners have completed the instruction process. Senders and receivers stay in the same role. ∼ 275 ∼ .50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring Activity 49 Step 4: Conduct the activity (Stage 1). you should watch partners to note any particularly effective communication practices as well as points at which receivers begin to fold or tear the wrong way.) Step 6: Repeat the activity (Stage 2). Notes: Give participants another sheet of paper. Notes: Conduct a similar discussion. This time senders and receivers may talk to each other. Notes: Tell senders to begin giving instructions. have them compare papers. Step 7: Review Stage 2. this time noting the impact of verbal feedback on the process. and assumptions. All other instructions remain the same. lack of verbal feedback.

Step 12: Review the entire activity. If discussing training skills. nonverbal. They also actively seek feedback to confirm understanding. including verbal. note the importance of having the employee demonstrate the task to confirm understanding. instruct participants to work in the same teams and to talk and face each other. Step 10: Repeat the activity (Stage 4—option). Discuss the impact of incomplete communication in the work environment as it pertains to coaching and training activities. This time senders and receivers may talk to each other. Senders and receivers stay in the same role. Notes: Reassemble participants into one group. but in such a way that the receiver cannot see the sender. Step 9: Review Stage 3. Notes: Conduct a similar discussion noting the impact of both verbal and visual confirmation by both partners. Notes: In this stage. Notes: Conduct a similar discussion this time noting the impact of verbal interaction and visual confirmation by the sender. the sender can watch over the receiver’s shoulder and give instructions. and visual cues. Notes: 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring Give participants another sheet of paper. Step 11: Review Stage 4. Note: Sometimes you will find partners having trouble because of mirroring when the right hand is opposite the left hand.Activity 49 Step 8: Repeat the activity (Stage 3—option). Point out that effective coaches use as many modes of communication as possible. ∼ 276 ∼ .

50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring Activity 49 Questions you might ask: • • • • What did you learn about the impact of nonverbal communication? What role do visual clues play in communication? What’s the relationship between what we say and what we do? How can you apply what you’ve learned on the job? ∼ 277 ∼ .

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1 through 50. participants will be able to • • • describe their preferred conflict resolution style. and develop a plan for resolving current conflicts. use a four-step process for resolving conflicts.50 Description You want me to do what? This activity gives participants the opportunity to develop the skills necessary to resolve conflicts that prevent coaches and organizations from achieving their goals. Objectives By the end of this activity.3 for each participant One copy of Handout 50. Skill Areas • • • • • Collaboration Consulting Listening Role of coach/mentor Setting expectations Participants Number: Type: Any Any Time 1 hour Resources • • • One copy each of Exercises 50.1 for each participant Pen or pencil for each participant ∼ 279 ∼ .

Step 3: Distribute Exercise 50. they acknowledge it and begin to take steps to resolve it. Review the problem-solving model with participants. Have participants determine which style they are most likely to use based on the questionnaire they completed. Notes: Explain that there are five basic approaches to resolving conflict.1 and review.2 and review. Step 4: Distribute Handout 50. Discuss each of the four steps. Instead. This questionnaire will help participants identify the style that they are most likely to use. Notes: 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring Review the objectives. When a conflict occurs.Activity 50 Method Step 1: Introduce the topic and the activity. Notes: Review the five basic approaches to conflict resolution. Notes: Point out the value of using the problem-solving approach. Effective coaches know that resolving conflicts can lead to achieving better results and having a more effective organization. Use a conflict example supplied by one of the participants as a point of reference when discussing the steps and their applications. Allow 5 minutes to complete. Effective coaches do not ignore conflict. Ask participants for specific examples of coaches they have worked with who used each of the styles. they accept the fact that conflicts will occur from time to time. ∼ 280 ∼ . Ask if they agree or disagree with the results of the questionnaire and why. Use the following (or a similar) introduction. Step 2: Distribute Exercise 50. Ask if these coaches were effective or ineffective.1 and review.

Notes: Have participants complete the worksheet for a current conflict they want to resolve. Continue until all participants have experienced each of the three roles. Option: You can provide prepared role plays. Step 8: Distribute Exercise 50. Notes: Questions you might ask: • • • • • • Was the problem solved to the satisfaction of both parties? What were the biggest obstacles in solving the problem? What made the process go smoother? What other conflict resolution styles did you see emerge? Do you think the problem has been solved long term? Why or why not? What suggestions do you have for improving the process? Step 7: Conduct second and third role plays (option).50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring Activity 50 Step 5: Conduct problem-solving role play. Assign each person one of the following roles: • • • Coach Employee Observer Have participants use their own “real world” examples as the basis for the role plays. Notes: Divide participants into groups of three. The observer should watch for the application of the four-step process. ∼ 281 ∼ . Step 6: Discuss the first role play. Have “coaches” explain a situation they need to resolve to the “employee” so that he/she can assume a realistic role. Notes: Have participants switch roles and complete another role play.3 and discuss.

Notes: Questions you might ask: • • • • • • • • 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring What are the five conflict resolution styles? Which one is preferable and why? Why is it important to acknowledge the conflict? Why is it important to discuss the conflict? What techniques can be used to agree on a solution? How can you monitor results? What did you learn that you can apply on the job? What obstacles. if any.Activity 50 Step 9: Review the activity. do you face using this process? ∼ 282 ∼ .

Handout 50. Amherst. and Joe Fehrmann. Agree on a Solution • • • Discuss alternatives Decide on mutually acceptable solution Decide how to implement the solution 4. Charles Cadwell. MA: HRD Press. ∼ 283 ∼ . The four-step process below can help you reduce conflict and solve problems. Acknowledge the Conflict • • • • Schedule a meeting Determine own conflict resolution style Determine other person’s style Decide to discuss the conflict 2. Monitor Results • • • Decide how you will verify that solution is implemented Ensure that conflict is resolved to everyone’s satisfaction Determine if anything else needs to be done Reproduced from 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring by Donna Berry. 1993.1 Handout 50.1: Problem-Solving Approach The ability to use a prescribed method of resolving conflict that focuses on solving problems is important for effective coaches. Discuss the Conflict • • • • Decide what questions to ask Be prepared to listen Do you know what your point of view is? Do you understand the other person’s point of view? 3. 1.

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Not do anything that might damage relationships.Exercise 50.1: Resolving Conflict There are five generally accepted styles of resolving conflict. 3. Prove that my position is the best. Amherst. These styles are reflected in the statements that follow. 7. Ignore conflict because it will solve itself with time. Be cooperative. Reproduced from 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring by Donna Berry. 9. . . even at the expense of personal goals. Openly discuss mutually beneficial solutions. 2. Be agreeable and nonassertive. Believe that I must win at any cost. 8. Believe there is more than one good way to do anything. 1. 1993. Try to maintain good relationships. MA: HRD Press. 4 Always 3 Usually 2 Sometimes 1 Never When there are conflicts. Think about conflicts you have had in the past as you rate the statements using the following scale. Be assertive and cooperative. ∼ 285 ∼ . 10. 4.1 Exercise 50. 5. I tend to. Charles Cadwell. 6. and Joe Fehrmann.

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1993. high respect for mutual support. MA: HRD Press. Amherst. Style Avoidance 1. attempts to solve might damage relationships Agreeable and nonassertive. ___________ Total _________ Behavior Nonconfronting. cooperative even at the expense of personal goals Not worth risking damage to relationships or creating disharmony Confrontational and assertive. The numbers in the first column refer to the numbered statements on the questionnaire in Exercise 50.2 Exercise 50. ignores or passes over issues. ___________ Total _________ Problem Solving 3. ___________ Total _________ Accommodating 2. must prove superiority and be correct Important that all parties achieve basic goals and maintain good relationships No one person or idea is perfect. ___________ 6.Exercise 50. ___________ 9. you must give to get Needs of both parties are legitimate and important. a mutually beneficial solution can be found with major concessions Reproduced from 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring by Donna Berry. ∼ 287 ∼ . Add your points for the statements to determine which style(s) you tend to use.1. assertive and cooperative When all parties will openly discuss issues. and Joe Fehrmann. denies issues are a problem Justification Difference too minor to worry about. ___________ Total _________ Win/Lose 3. there is more than one good way to do anything. ___________ Total _________ Compromising 4. Charles Cadwell. ___________ 7.2: Conflict Resolution Styles The five basic conflict resolution styles are described below. must win at any cost Survival of the fittest. ___________ 8. ___________ 6.

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need to be made in either style? Are both parties willing to discuss the conflict? 2.Exercise 50. What conflict resolution style do you want to use? What conflict resolution style is the other person using? What changes. 1. Discuss the Conflict What questions do you want to ask? Are you prepared to practice active listening? What is your point of view regarding the conflict? (Continued) ∼ 289 ∼ .3: Problem-Solving Worksheet Use the worksheet to plan how you will work through a current on-the-job conflict.3 Exercise 50. Acknowledge the Conflict Schedule a meeting. if any.

MA: HRD Press.3 (concluded) 3. and Joe Fehrmann. Agree on a Solution What are the alternatives? What is the mutually acceptable solution? How will the solution be implemented? 4.Exercise 50. Monitor Results How will you make sure the solution is acceptable? Has the conflict been resolved to both parties’ satisfaction? What else needs to be done at this time? Reproduced from 50 Activities for Coaching/Mentoring by Donna Berry. Amherst. Charles Cadwell. ∼ 290 ∼ . 1993.

She has operated her own consulting firm.About the Authors Donna M. Donna’s work with business and industry includes such clients as Pizza Hut. Training Choices. She holds an MS in Adult Education from Kansas State University. the Coleman Company. reside in Wichita. Fehrmann holds an ME in Educational Administration from Wichita State University. Prior to that.. Inc. Steve. ∼ 291 ∼ . technical. and businesses. Inc. Fehrmann has been involved with policy development. sales. In addition to his training and development work. local colleges. Donna was instrumental in chapter revitalization. communication. As president of the Sunflower Chapter of the American Society for Training and Development (ASTD). Prior to his current position. He oversees the training for 7.. Koch Industries. He has almost 20 years of training experience. and Director of Training for Popingo Video. since 1986. the State of Kansas. Charles Cadwell is president of Training Systems+ in Mulvane. specializing in management development.. Prior to starting his own consulting firm. He is a frequent speaker on management topics for professional groups.. Cadwell is currently past president of both the Sunflower Chapter of the American Society for Training and Development and the United Methodist Men in Mulvane. PepsiCo Food Service International. and computer skills. and salary administration. security management. She and her husband. RentA-Center. Kansas). Inc. and customer service skills. He is active in the United Way and the American Red Cross and serves on the board of directors of the Sunflower Chapter of the American Society for Training and Development.000 employees in craft. She was recently awarded the coveted ASTD Region VI Significant Contributor honor. he was director of training for Kansas Gas and Electric Company. Donna was employed in business and academics. He currently serves as first vice president of Mulvane’s Lions Club. Berry is a trainer. Kansas. management. area chambers of commerce. Inc. and AT&T. which specializes in training system design and development. Joe Fehrmann is manager of Management Development and Training for Beech Aircraft Corporation (Wichita. and Burger King Corporation. His client list has included national and international companies such as Pizza Hut. he held positions as Director of Field Training for Pizza Hut.

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