MAY 2011 VOL. 32 • NO. 4 • $4.

00
“ V O I C E O F T H E C O N S T R U C T I O N I N D U S T R Y ”
ALSO: WORKING SMART – REDUCING OPERATING AND MAINTENANCE COSTS FOR SCHOOL BUILDINGS
SILVER-LEVEL CERTIFICATION IS ANTICIPATED
UNDER USGBC’S LEED RATING SYSTEM
®
GREENLEAF
TRUST BUILDING
CAM MAGAZI NE MAY 2011 2 Visit us online at www.cammagazineonline.com
IN THIS ISSUE:
12 Member Feature
Allen Brothers, Inc. and LUMA Resources, LLC
Honored at State of the Union Address
ROOFING
16 Top of the Class
Public Safety and Operations Building Gets a Roof
18 Clearing New Hurdles at
Rooftop Level
Chem Link Introduces New Class of Single Ply
EPDM Adhesive
EDUCATIONAL FACILITY CONSTRUCTION
22 WORKING SMART
Reducing Operating and Maintenance Costs for School Buildings
26 Creative Design Solutions for
Medical Learning Environments
SHW Group Leeds the Way
28 A Marathon Year for Detroit
School Construction
Walbridge Joint Venture and Design/Build
Teams Convert Bond Dollars Into Buildings
31 A Passion for Learning
Fanning Howey Tracks Design Trends
in Learning Space
34 Greenprint for the Future
Sustainable Schools on a Budget
CONSTRUCTION HIGHLIGHT
36 A Watched Site
Silver-Level Certification is Anticipated
for Greenleaf Trust Building
ABOUT THE COVER:
THE GREENLEAF TRUST BUILDING, IN DOWNTOWN BIRMINGHAM, WAS PHOTOGRAPHED BY JEFF GARLAND OF JEFF
GARLAND ARCHITECTURAL PHOTOGRAPHY.
8 Industry News
11 Safety Tool Kit
40 Product Showcase
43 People in Construction
44 Construction Calendar
45 Buyers Guide Updates
46 CAM Welcomes New Members
46 Advertisers Index
DEPARTMENTS
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Call (800) 954-0423 for more information
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CAM MAGAZI NE MAY 2011 6 Visit us online at www.cammagazineonline.com
888 West Big Beaver Road, Suite 1200, Troy, Michigan 48084
www.oaklandcompanies.net
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Ph (248) 647-2500 • Fax (248) 647-4689
INSURANCE BONDING
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T. F. Beck Co.
Rochester Hills MI
248.852.9255
J. D. Candler
Roofing Co., Inc.
Livonia MI
313.899.2100
Christen/Detroit
Detroit MI
313.837.1420
Detroit Cornice & Slate Co.
Ferndale MI
248.398.7690
LaDuke Roofing &
Sheet Metal
Oak Park MI
248.414.6600
Lutz Roofing Co., Inc.
Shelby Twp. MI
586.739.1148
M.W. Morss Roofing, Inc.
Romulus MI
734.942.0840
Newton Crane Roofing, Inc.
Pontiac MI
248.332.3021
North Roofing Co.
Auburn Hills MI
248.373.1500
Dave Pomaville & Sons, Inc.
Warren MI
586.755.6030
Royal Roofing Co.
Orion MI
248.276.ROOF (7663)
Schena Roofing &
Sheet Metal Co., Inc.
Chesterfield MI
586.949.4777
Schreiber Corporation
Wixom MI
248.926.1500
SOUTHEASTERN MI CHI GAN ROOFI NG CONTRACTORS ASSOCI ATI ON MEMBERS
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Roofing problems can lead to costly problems in
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7 CAM MAGAZI NE MAY 2011 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
PUBLISHER Kevin N. Koehler
EDITOR Amanda M. Tackett
ASSOCIATE EDITORS Mary E. Kremposky
David R. Miller
PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Matthew J. Austermann
GRAPHIC DESIGN Marci L. Christian
DIRECTOR OF MARKETING Gregg A. Montowski
ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Cathy A. Jones
DIRECTORS
OFFICERS
Chairman James C. Capo, AIA,
DeMattia Group
Vice Chairman Stephen J. Auger, AIA,
Stephen Auger + Associates Architects
Vice Chairman Jacqueline LaDuke Walters,
LaDuke Roofing & Sheet Metal
Treasurer Frank G. Nehr, Jr.,
Davis Iron Works
President Kevin N. Koehler
DIRECTORS Gregory Andrzejewski,
PPG Industries
M. James Brennan,
Broadcast Design & Construction, Inc.
Kevin French,
Poncraft Door Company
Todd W. Hill,
Ventcon, Inc.
Mary K. Marble,
Marble Mechanical, LLC
Donald J. Purdie, Jr.,
Detroit Elevator Company
Eric C. Steck,
Amalio Corporation
Kurt F. Von Koss,
Beaver Tile & Stone
Michigan Society of
Association Executives
2002, 2004, 2005 & 2007
Diamond Award
2003, 2006, 2010 Honorable Mention
Gallery of Fine Printing
2002 Bronze Award
MARCOM International
Creative Awards
2005 Gold Award
The Communicator
International
Print Media Competition
Overall Association Magazine
Magazine Writing
CAM Magazine (ISSN08837880) is published monthly by the Construction Association of Michigan, 43636 Woodward
Ave., P.O. Box 3204, Bloomfield Hills, MI 48302-3204 (248) 972-1000. $24.00 of annual membership dues is allocated to
a subscription to CAM Magazine. Additional subscriptions $40.00 annually. Periodical postage paid at Bloomfield Hills, MI
and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER, SEND ADDRESS CHANGES TO: CAM MAGAZINE, 43636 WOODWARD AVE.,
BLOOMFIELD HILLS, MI 48302-3204.
For editorial comment or more information: magazine@cam-online.com.
For reprints or to sell CAM Magazine: 248-972-1000.
Copyright © 2008 Construction Association of Michigan. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or part without
permission is prohibited. CAM Magazine is a registered trademark of the Construction Association of Michigan.
2006
GRAPHIC DESIGN USA
AMERICAN INHOUSE
DESIGN AWARD
CAM MAGAZI NE MAY 2011 8 Visit us online at www.cammagazineonline.com
United Union of
Roofers,
Waterproofers
& Allied Workers
Local 149
Industrial • Commercial • Institutional
Roofers & Waterproofers of Local 149 have the skill,
knowledge, and training to be productive and qualified for all
roofing and waterproofing systems.
Serving these areas of Michigan
Detroit/Metro
Office (313) 961-6093
Fax (313) 961-7009
Mid-Michigan
Office (810) 687-1368
Fax (810) 687-2647
Northern Mich./U.P.
Traverse City
Office/Fax (989) 786-4209
Port Huron
Office (313) 961-6093
Fax (313) 961-7009
Local 149 Apprentice School
Office (248) 543-3847
Fax (248) 543-3871
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9 CAM MAGAZI NE MAY 2011 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
Michigan’s Top Engineering and Surveying
Projects Honored at Annual Excellence
Awards Ceremony
The American Council of Engineering Companies of Michigan
(ACEC/M) recently honored 13 firms for engineering and surveying
excellence during the association’s annual awards ceremony. In late
February, engineering professionals and guests gathered at the
MotorCity Casino SoundBoard Theatre in Detroit to recognize
outstanding Michigan engineering and surveying projects from the
past year. Since 1965, firms have competed to receive ACEC/M’s top
honor – the prestigious Eminent Conceptor Award.
This year’s engineering Eminent Conceptor winner was HNTB,
Detroit for the I-75 Ambassador Bridge Gateway Project in Detroit.
The project provided a complete transformation of the busiest
international border crossing in North America allowing direct
connections between the freeway system and the Ambassador
Bridge. The main contract, Contract 4, was the largest single contract
in MDOT history at nearly $170 million. The project was completed
five months ahead of schedule and created approximately 3,500
jobs.
Six firms were honored with the Honorable Conceptor Award, the
second-highest award of achievement: Fleis & VandenBrink, Grand
Rapids for the Northport Waste Water Collection & Treatment
Facility, Northport; Mead & Hunt, Lansing for the Sand Creek
Relocation project, Benton Harbor; Spicer Group, Saginaw for the
Karn/Weadock Coal Dock Replacement project, Essexville; Alfred
Benesch, Lansing for I-196 Reconstruction/Baldwin Street
Interchange Improvements, Georgetown; Fishbeck, Thompson, Carr
& Huber, Farmington Hills for the 9 Mile over I-75 Emergency Bridge
Replacement, Hazel Park; and a surveying award to Spicer Group for
the Henry Ford Hospital Site Information System, West Bloomfield.
Engineering Merit Awards were presented to: Johnson &
Anderson, Waterford, for the Water System Control Optimization
project, Charter Township of West Bloomfield; NTH Consultants,
Northville & AEW for the North Gratiot Interceptor-Phase 1,
Chesterfield and Harrison Townships; Abonmarche, Benton Harbor
for the Silver Beach Center, St. Joseph; URS Corporation, Southfield
for the new I-96 Interchange at Wixom Road, Wixom; and C2AE,
Lansing for the new Francis Motz County Park, St. Johns.
The Judges’ Choice Award for Board Design was given to Mead &
Hunt for the project board designed to “tell the story” of the Sand
Creek Relocation project in Benton Harbor. This year’s ACEC Vernon
B. Spalding Leadership Award was presented to William Winiarski,
PE, PS, retired CEO of ROWE Professional Services, in honor of his
outstanding leadership roles in ACEC and community organizations.
The Felix A. Anderson Image Award was presented to James Page,
PE, retired Detroit office corporate director of Harley Ellis Devereaux,
for contributions designed to enhance the image of the engineering
profession.
The 2011 Engineering & Surveying Excellence Program offers the
opportunity to showcase the year’s best engineering and surveying
achievements to an audience of peers, clients and decision makers
at all levels. Eminent and Honorable Conceptor award winners are
eligible to compete at the National ACEC competition in
Washington, D.C.
For more information on the projects and award winners, please
contact ACEC/M at (517) 332-2066 or visit the ACEC/M website at
www.acecmi.org.
Washtenaw County’s 14A District Court
Achieves LEED Silver Certification
The Washtenaw County 14A District Court recently received
LEED® NC 2.2 Silver certification. The design and construction team
worked closely with Washtenaw County officials on positively
impacting the community by incorporating “green” features into the
new addition. The team includes TowerPinkster, an architecture and
engineering firm with offices in Grand Rapids and Kalamazoo; HOK,
design consultants with 25 offices worldwide; Clark Construction, a
construction management firm headquartered in Lansing with
offices in Southfield; Beckett & Raeder, Inc. landscape architecture
and civil engineering firm with offices in Ann Arbor, Petoskey and
Traverse City; and Robert Darvas Associates, structural engineering
firm in Ann Arbor.
The project earned LEED points in five categories: water
efficiency, energy and atmosphere, materials and resources, indoor
environmental quality, and innovation and design process.
Some of the project’s sustainable features include: a high-
performance building envelope; a white, solar reflective roof;
controlled daylighting in each courtroom and regularly occupied
spaces; low-emitting materials for a healthy interior environment;
de-centralized heating plants; and the use of local materials and
equipment.
I N D U S T R Y N E W S
CAM MAGAZI NE MAY 2011 10 Visit us online at www.cammagazineonline.com
In addition, 94 percent of the total wood-
based building materials was harvested
from Forest Stewardship Council (FSC)
certified forests; 77 percent of on-site
generated construction waste was diverted
from landfills; 24 percent of the total
building materials content, by value, was
manufactured using recycled materials; and
low flow fixtures were used, contributing
water savings of 58 percent.
By using less energy and water, the
building saves money in operating costs and
has a positive impact on the environment. In
fact, it is predicted that the innovative
design will result in 27 percent in energy
savings. This translates into 447 tons of
greenhouse gas emissions prevented from
entering the atmosphere each year.
Opened in July 2010, the new courthouse
is comprised of three courtrooms, judges’
chambers, jury assembly and a court clerk
area. The facility also houses secure holding
areas for each courtroom with a direct
connection to the jail. For greater security,
the new 14A District Court features a single
point of entry to the courthouse, sheriff’s
administration, and the jail.
DTE Energy Foundation and
City Connect Detroit Partner
to Provide 333 Summer Jobs
to Youth in Detroit and
Surrounding Suburbs
DTE Energy Foundation generously
donated a $500,000 grant to fund and
support 333 summer jobs for youth in
metropolitan Detroit through the Grow
Detroit Young Talent program operated by
City Connect. Recently announced at City
Connect’s second annual Youth
Employment Summit, DTE Energy
Foundation’s grant is the largest private
donation in City Connect’s 1.2 million- to 1.5
million- fundraising campaign.
The summit was entitled “Homegrown
Talent: Envisioning Detroit’s Future Workforce
– Are You Ready?” The event highlighted the
collaborative efforts of DTE Energy
Foundation and City Connect Detroit to
identify hundreds of summer jobs for young
people ages 14 to 24. “Summer employment
is one of the best ways to help young people
prepare for their future and to start them on
the road to success,” said Fred Shell, president
of the DTE Energy Foundation and vice
president of DTE Energy. “It introduces them
to the demands, expectations and rewards of
the workplace, including being responsible,
being a good team member and being proud
of a job well done.”
Last year, City Connect Detroit launched
the community campaign, “Grow Detroit’s
Young Talent Program,” with support from
The Skillman Foundation.
The campaign raised more than $1 million
to provide work experiences for 600 teens
and young adults. “DTE Energy Foundation’s
generous gift will allow us to make a
tremendous step forward in transforming
our community by increasing job opportu-
nities for young people,” said Dr. Geneva J.
Williams, City Connect Detroit’s founding
president and strategic executive
consultant. “The creation of sustainable,
high-quality jobs not only has a huge impact
on our youth, but also provides a great value
to employers. The summit will address
strategies and tactics to accelerate youth
employment.”
U.S. Senator Debbie Stabenow (D–MI)
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11 CAM MAGAZI NE MAY 2011 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
delivered the keynote address, “Growing Young Talent for the World
of Work.” Other dignitaries included Keith Cockrell, Michigan
president and regional executive for Bank of America; represen-
tatives of Mayor Dave Bing’s office; Steve Kurmas, Detroit Edision
president; and Larry Steward, DTE vice president of Human
Resources.
This year’s summer jobs program is designed to help hundreds of
young people learn what it takes to be a good employee and to
develop critical work skills that will be invaluable as they move into
the workforce. “Support for summer employment programs like this
is a critical element in a young person’s future success,” Shell said. “It
speaks to the need to develop Michigan’s future workforce now, as
well as promote the importance of cultivating homegrown talent at
an early age.”
The summer jobs program begins in July and runs for six weeks.
For more information on how to participate or to provide additional
job opportunities call (313) 879-1476 or please visit the website at:
www.growdetroitsyoungtalent.org.
I N D U S T R Y N E W S
Oakland Metal
Sales, Inc.
Distributor of:
COPPER
• Cold Rolled Copper Sheet and Coil in 12oz-.125
• Revere Evergreen Pre-Patinated 16 & 20oz
• Freedom Gray Z-T Alloy Coated Copper, 16 & 20oz
• Copper Bar
ALUMINUM
• Mill Finish .025-.125
• Anodized Aluminum .032-.125
• Kynar 500 Painted Sheets .032-.063
STAINLESS STEEL
• 10 ga-28ga Sheets 2B & #4 Finishes
KYNAR 500/HYLAR 5000
PRE-PAINTED STEEL SHEETS
• Roofing and Wall Systems in Many Profiles from
Different Manuafacturers
GALVANIZED, GALVALUME,
BONDERIZED STEEL SHEETS
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LEAD SHEETS
GUTTER SYSTEMS
• Copper: American & European Styles
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CUSTOM FABRICATED BREAK METAL
ANDEK ROOFING & WALL COATINGS
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• Snow Guards • Solder-Flux-Irons
• Copper Roofing Nails • Copper & Stainless
Steel Nails-Driven & Collated
Contact Us Today for All
Your Metal Needs!!
www.OaklandMetalSales.com
Phone (248) 377-8847
Fax (248) 377-4196
info@oaklandmetalsales.com
FAMILY OWNED & OPERATED SINCE 1984
Oakland Metal
Sales, Inc.
Distributor of:
COPPER
• Cold Rolled Copper Sheet and Coil in 12oz-.125
• Revere Evergreen Pre-Patinated 16 & 20oz
• Freedom Gray Z-T Alloy Coated Copper, 16 & 20oz
• Copper Bar
ALUMINUM
• Mill Finish .025-.125
• Anodized Aluminum .032-.125
• Kynar 500 Painted Sheets .032-.063
STAINLESS STEEL
• 10 ga-28ga Sheets 2B & #4 Finishes
KYNAR 500/HYLAR 5000
PRE-PAINTED STEEL SHEETS
• Roofing and Wall Systems in Many Profiles from
Different Manufacturers
GALVANIZED, GALVALUME,
BONDERIZED STEEL SHEETS
RHEINZINK SHEET & COIL
LEAD SHEETS
GUTTER SYSTEMS
• Copper: American & European Styles
• Rheinzink
• Pre-Finished Steel & Aluminum
CUSTOM FABRICATED BRAKE METAL
ANDEK ROOFING & WALL COATINGS
ADDITIONAL STOCK ITEMS
• Snow Guards • Solder-Flux-Irons
• Copper Roofing Nails • Copper & Stainless
Steel Nails-Driven & Collated

Contact Us Today for All
Your Metal Needs!!
www.OaklandMetalSales.com
Phone (248) 377-8847
Fax (248) 377-4196
info@oaklandmetalsales.com
FAMILY OWNED & OPERATED SINCE 1984
CAM Magazine is a monthly publication covering construction
news throughout the state of Michigan, highlighting interesting con-
struction projects, personnel news and industry happenings. In-
depth feature articles focus on a variety of industry trade segments
and on key management and economic issues, keeping pace with
the Michigan construction scene. Since 1985, CAM Magazine has
been known as the “Voice of the Construction Industry”. Now, in
addition to being printed and mailed to over 3,600 industry profes-
sionals each month, thousands more are able to access the entire
magazine online, complete with link-thrus to participating advertis-
ers' company websites. This has dramatically increased the circula-
tion and exposure of our award-winning magazine and our advertis-
ers – we are now worldwide!
Call or e-mail to find out how CAM Magazine can help put your
company in front of an unlimited number of construction
professionals each month.
“The Voice of the Construction Industry”
For Advertising Information Call
248.972.1115
Or email at jones@cam-online.com
CAM Magazine is a publication of the
Construction Association of Michigan.
43636 Woodward Ave. • Bloomfield Hills, MI 48302-3204
www.cam-online.com
T
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CAM MAGAZI NE MAY 2011 12 Visit us online at www.cammagazineonline.com
workers. The numbers look good but it still
represents 12 lost workday cases and 23 additional
recordable cases. Companies who submitted their
information ranged from small construction managers to larger, full self-
perform contractors. I think this shows that safety can be an integral
part of your operation regardless of your size or trade.
It is important to note though that these numbers reflect what
happened in 2010; not what you’re going to do about safety in 2011. It’s
important to keep looking forward and strive to work pro-actively
toward safe worksites. The main goal being that every worker goes
home at the end of the day in the same physical condition as they were
when they started work in the morning. When safety is a core value with
an equal place with productivity and quality, you can’t lose – literally.
I hope all CAM members have a prosperous and SAFE 2011
construction season.
Remember: CAMSAFETY is offering free, on-site and hands-on safety
training under our grant from MIOSHA. To find out more about this
opportunity or if you have any question or comments contact me at
248-972-1141 or at forgue@cam-online.com.
The 2010 CAM Safety
Achievement Awards
By Joe Forgue
CAMSAFETY
had 40
submissions
for the 2010 CAM Safety Achievement Awards. In
early April we announced the winners of the Gold,
Silver and Bronze Awards (CHART BELOW).
The average EMR was .81, LWD rate .48,
Recordable rate 1.4. These submissions
represent 5,010,173 work hours and 2,547
Joseph M. Forgue
Director of Education
& Safety Services
SAFETY TOOL KIT
Gold
0 – 99,999
Walsh Construction
Company
100,000 – 199,999
Turner Construction
Company
Above 200,000
George W. Auch
Company
Silver
Universal Glass
& Metal
Eagle
Excavation, Inc.
DeCal, Inc.
Bronze W-3 Construction Ventcon, Inc. Roncelli, Inc.
Lowest EMR Commercial Contracting Corporation
Big Discounts for CAM Members!
Commercial Lines
Business Insurance
Personal Lines
Auto & Homeowners Insurance
O General Liability
O Property Insurance
O Contractors Equip.
O Commercial Auto
O Package Policies
O Employment Liability
O Business Umbrella
O Builders Risk
O Installation Floater
O Multi-Policy Discounts
A Voluntary Employee Benefit for yourself and employees from
Michigan’s most respected Insurer of contractors
and their valued employees
Automobile
Boats
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Personal Umbrella
Homeowners
Condos
Vacation Homes
Renters Insurance
Take advantage of CAM’sendorsed program for both
Commercial Lines and Personal Lines Insurance.
13 CAM MAGAZI NE MAY 2011 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
T
he story of Allen Brothers, Inc. (ABI) is part of the American story
in the opening chapters of the 21st Century. Seasoned roofers
from this Rochester Hills company helped reroof the Pentagon
after the terrorist attacks of 9/11. Later, the second seismic event to
shake the nation – the Great Recession – put a sizeable dent in their
roofing business. But defeat is not part of the vocabulary of this
tenacious roofing company or of this country. Allen Brothers and
countless other firms have jumpstarted their own businesses - and
the great American enterprise as a whole - by redirecting existing
abilities into the ongoing societal shift toward sustainability.
For Allen Brothers, Inc., the next chapter in its business saga was
the creation of LUMA Resources, LLC, a company dedicated to the
manufacture of a solar rooftop system named as the 2008 Best New
Product of the Year at the 2008 International Roofing Expo. This
quintessential American success story was told to the nation and to
the world by none other than President Barack Obama at the State
of the Union Address on Jan. 25, 2011. Both Robert and Gary Allen
proudly sat in the First Lady’s box as the first roofers in history to be
honored at this national address. Their firm was mentioned three
times throughout the speech and used as a prime example of the
M E M B E R F E A T U R E
Winning the Future
MICHIGAN ROOFING COMPANY HONORED
AT STATE OF THE UNION ADDRESS
By Mary E. Kremposky, Associate Editor
Photos courtesy of LUMA Resources
CAM MAGAZI NE MAY 2011 14 Visit us online at www.cammagazineonline.com
pioneering spirit needed to retool America’s
economy and energy infrastructure.
Robert Allen, president and co-owner of
ABI, hopes the telling of his company’s story
on this grand stage will inspire those
dispirited by the economic gloom of recent
years. After the 2011 State of the Union
address, the Allen’s received a flurry of calls
from family, friends and well-wishers
throughout the industry. “I started to hear a
common refrain from people,” Robert Allen
said. “The response of a North Carolina
roofer at the recent International Roofing
Show in Las Vegas was typical. He basically
said, ‘It’s great for you, but I could never do
that.’” But Allen believes, yes, you can.
For Allen, their firm’s success is easily
duplicated by simply plugging existing
abilities into new opportunities. Indeed,
other companies, faced with shrinking
revenues, have already carved out a niche in
this growing “green” economy, including a
Michigan general contractor that now
installs geothermal systems and a Michigan
residential builder currently installing
LUMA’s solar shingles.
“What they are doing is not anything less
than what we have done,” said Allen. “They
are ‘stewarding’ their businesses and
employing people by keeping in step with
what is going on in the world. Alternative or
renewable energy – solar, wind, hydro,
geothermal and biomass - is the next
industrial revolution. Renewable energy is
the engine of job creation, and also where
the next round of wealth will be found.”
BUILDING ON THE BASICS
Because constructing the world is just
what contractors do, Allen believes
everyone in the industry can rebuild their
business based on a tradition of hard work
and hard-won capabilities. LUMA Resources
itself rests on a “foundation” already “cast in
place” by over 61 years of hard work. Said
Allen, years of following the firm’s unofficial
mantra of “shut up, figure it out, get it done,
and get it done now” meant the company
was fully prepared to take advantage of new
opportunities.
He communicated his basic message in a
talk given at a recent LUMA product instal-
lation seminar, an event originally slated for
20 that turned into a hands-on training
workshop attended by 35 people from three
different states and Canada. “I challenged
these guys to stop worrying about
re-inventing themselves, but to take the
talents and the abilities that they already
have and re-direct them in a new way,” said
Allen. “Be a good steward of the talents that
you already possess.”
Even LUMA’s recently UL listed solar
rooftop kit is a synthesis of existing systems.
“There is really nothing that new about our
product other than the way it is attached to
a building,” said Allen. “We took technology
that has been around in the roofing industry
for 100 plus years and in the solar arena for
around 50 years, and reapplied it in a
different way.”
It all began with a query from a solar
manufacturer to solve a problem. Gary
Allen, vice-president and co-owner of Allen
Brothers, solved the problem and patented
the solution, resulting in the launch of LUMA
Resources. Recent projects include instal-
lation of LUMA’s solar rooftop system on a
Michigan home in St. Clair, a coastal home in
Santa Cruse, CA, and on the City of Rochester
Hills’ new fire station – the first fire station in
the country to go solar. Federal tax credits
and DTE’s Solar Currents program sweeten
the deal for building owners interested in
going solar.
THE AUDACITY OF HOPE
The story of how the Allen brothers
actually became part of the State of the
Union address can be summarized by a well-
known presidential phrase: the Audacity of
Hope. After a White House staffer contacted,
interviewed and ultimately extended the
president’s invitation to the State of the
Union address, the staffer asked if Allen was
shocked. Robert Allen replied, “No, I have
been telling everybody for a year that we are
going to be invited to sit in the First Lady’s
box at the State of the Union address.”
Allen thinks this statement may be
recorded in the minutes of a staff meeting
held long before the call from the White
House propelled the company into the
national spotlight. “At a staff meeting I said,
‘This story is so good the president is going
to talk about our company at the State of the
Union address,’” recalled Allen.
The particulars of the company’s path to
the White House can be traced by following
a long string of government acronyms,
arranged like stepping-stones beginning
with the American Recovery and
Reinvestment Act (ARRA) and leading to
state and national departments under the
Michigan Department of Labor, Energy and
Economic Growth (MDLEG), the National
Science Foundation (NSF) and the U.S.
Department of Energy (DOE).
Launching the process, then-Gov. Jennifer
Granholm was the first governor to fly to
Washington, D.C. and secure ARRA grants in
the Clean Energy Advanced Manufacturing
With the help of the Recovery Act, the Allen brothers were able to retool half of their
manufacturing facility in order to manufacture solar shingles and launch a whole new
business called LUMA Resources.
15 CAM MAGAZI NE MAY 2011 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
category. Overseen by NSF and distributed through MDLEG, the clean
energy grants were awarded to five Michigan firms even before
Granholm’s return flight touched down in the Great Lakes State.
“Because of Granholm’s hard work, Michigan was the first state in
the nation to tap the ARRA funds for Clean Energy Advanced
Manufacturing,” said Allen. “Of the five Michigan recipients, four
were in the wind sector, making LUMA Resources the first solar
manufacturer in the nation to tap ARRA funds for Clean Energy
Advanced Manufacturing.”
The $500,000 ARRA grant was vital, for the Allen brothers had
leveraged everything they had to launch LUMA Resources. When
banks declined to lend, the ARRA grant supplied the financing
necessary to give wings to the fledging company.
The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) then interviewed Allen for
an article to be placed on the DOE website. Allen believes the DOE
article was one of the pivotal factors in bringing LUMA Resources to
the attention of the White House. Another factor was a call Allen
made to a NSF staffer turned acquaintance. Allen specifically asked,
“What does it take to get into the First Lady’s box and have the
president mention you at the State of the Union address?” Ask and
ye shall receive. The NSF acquaintance wrote a letter to the powers
that be, but never received a reply. However, 8 months later all these
threads came together – the ARRA grant, the DOE article and the
NSF letter - and that’s how Robert and Gary Allen came to be part of
the presidential motorcade speeding down Pennsylvania Avenue on
the way to the Capitol that chilly January evening.
M E M B E R F E A T U R E
The LUMA roofing shingle is a Building Integrated Photovoltaic
(BIPV) system, according to LUMA’s website. LUMA’s system is
the roof, as well as the solar generator. This aesthetically pleasing,
UL-listed solar roofing shingle can be integrated with any type
of roofing shingle.
Shedding Light on LUMA Resources Solar Rooftop System
LUMA Resources LLC’s website explains the basic LUMA solar rooftop system: “LUMA is a solar shingle designed for steep-sloped roofing
applications. The polycrystalline, photovoltaic tempered glass module is adhered to a custom-formed metal shingle. A premium plastic edge
protector surrounds the glass to provide added durability. The junction box located on the back is positioned in the center of the shingle,
allowing equal length wires to run in either direction. Composing the roof itself, the solar shingles come with their own custom flashing that
surrounds the system. The flashing transitions the solar shingles into virtually all other roofing products.”
The recently UL-listed solar rooftop system is deemed a true industry breakthrough, because it solves the conundrum of what is referred to
as the half-life roof, meaning what do you do when the existing roof still has years of usable life left but will not outlast the newly installed solar
shingle system? According to the LUMA website, “When a LUMA solar roofing system is installed it does not matter whether the surrounding
roof system is old or new. The LUMA system will flash to any roof in its existing condition. A new roof can be installed around the LUMA system
at a future date without ever having to touch the solar roof section, because the LUMA system is the roof and the solar energy collector.”
CAM MAGAZI NE MAY 2011 16 Visit us online at www.cammagazineonline.com
Perhaps, the real ingredient behind this
White House saga is simply having the
chutzpah to ask and the capacity to believe
in what may seem like an impossible dream.
The same audacity launched and is
continuing to fuel the growth of LUMA
Resources.
THE ALLEN BROTHERS GO TO THE WHITE
HOUSE
For the Allen brothers, the Washington
whirlwind began with a day in the media
spotlight and an evening reception with First
Lady Michelle Obama. “We had several
conversations,” said Allen. “She is very
congenial and graceful. She just flows.”
During the actual State of the Union
address, “I had no idea that we were going to
be mentioned so many times in the speech,”
said Allen. He also had no idea that his
company was going to be heralded as a
prime example of innovation in clean energy
technology and as part of what Obama called
“our generation’s Sputnik moment.”
After the address, the Allen brothers had
their moment in the sun with the President of
the United States. A brief conversation and a
photo opportunity with First Lady Michelle
and President Barack Obama was the
culmination of the Allen’s day in Washington,
D.C. Always willing to take a risk and take
advantage of opportunities, Robert Allen
even slipped the president his business card.
“He is a nice guy, and he is very witty,” said
Allen. Obama thanked Allen, tucked the card
into his jacket pocket and said, “Now you can
tell the world that you carded the president.”
Back to work in Rochester Hills, Allen
discovered he had 15,000 “friends” on
Facebook. Needless to say, orders for LUMA
Resources’ solar rooftop system have been
flying off the shelf and are now helping to
generate revenue and jobs, beginning with
the 12 jobs originally created at LUMA
Resources, itself. “Steve Templeton, a
residential builder, has called people off of
unemployment to install our solar rooftop
system,” said Allen. “We are shipping our
product all over the country, producing many
new jobs. Think about the ripple effect of just
one innovation helped by the Recovery Act.”
Since that grand day in Washington, D.C.,
the Allens have been featured in publications
ranging from the Detroit News and Crain’s
Detroit Business to the Wall Street Journal.
They have appeared on PBS’ Nightly Business
Report and may soon be featured on CNN.
Watch for a documentary this June by Fox
news anchor reporter Bret Barr. The hour-
long documentary will focus on the future of
“green” technology and “green” jobs. LUMA’s
solar roofing shingle and GM’s electric car, the
Volt, will be the primary focus of the
documentary. Speaking engagements in the
near future include being the keynote
speaker for an energy conference sponsored
by the State of Alaska. Joe the Plumber was
part of the national experience during the
last election. Who knows, perhaps Robert the
Roofer will be the next contractor in the
electoral spotlight?
It’s all heady stuff, but the Allens – whose
business it is to capture the light - wants to
use their moment in the sun to inspire
others to believe in the power of possibility.
With hard work and a touch of audacity, the
sun can shine on re-invigorated businesses
and gainfully employed communities
throughout Michigan.
17 CAM MAGAZI NE MAY 2011 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
N
o matter what skill is being taught
in a classroom setting, a few
people will always understand
complex concepts before the
entire group does. As these gifted few figure
things out, their questions and comments
often help others form their own
understanding. Eventually, everyone gets it.
Though it is not a classroom facility, the
recently constructed Office of Public Safety
Headquarters and Operations Building for
Detroit Public Schools served as an example
where the group working at the highest
level quickly set the pace for everyone else.
Few construction trades work above
rooftops, so CASS Sheet Metal, Detroit, led
the way. Once they provided for a dry
worksite underneath their work, interior
trades raced to finish the 23,000-square-foot
facility on an extremely accelerated
schedule. Other key members of the project
team included architect Landmark Design
Group, Grand Rapids, general contractor
O’Brian Edwards Construction Company,
Inc., Detroit and bond program manager
Walbridge Joint Venture for Detroit Public
Schools, Detroit.
KEEPING ON SCHEDULE
The Public Safety and Operations Building
near I-75 and Caniff Road allows for remote
observation of almost any hallway at all
Detroit Public Schools and will serve as home
base for the district’s security operations. The
single story structure is covered by 34,000
square feet of pitched standing seam metal
roof supplied by Texas-based Berridge
Manufacturing Company. The building was
competitively bid in the first set of bid packs
for a large bond issue partially funded by
federal stimulus grants. Early phases of the
project were complicated by site issues, plus
the usual difficulties associated with being
the first of many projects out of the starting
gate. CASS Sheet Metal employed a variety of
techniques to accelerate their own work,
thereby enabling other trades to compensate
for lost time by beginning work inside the
building.
“We had up to eight foremen on site with
this project because of the schedule,” said
Glenn Parvin, president of CASS Sheet Metal.
“We worked some nines [nine-hour days] and
most Saturdays to advance the schedule. We
were literally right behind the carpenters. We
were installing roof before the trusses for the
rest of the building were even finished.”
Up to 15 CASS Sheet Metal workers were on
site at times. Increasing the number of roofers
on the site had the potential to drastically
reduce the duration of the job, but
maintaining peak production was a unique
challenge.
“We had to change some of the standard
practices that keep us productive,” said Greg
Gietek, senior project manager for CASS Sheet
Metal. “There was some metal flashing work
that we would typically do before installing
the next panel. In this case, with so many
people working, we installed the panels and
then fell back to take care of the detail work.”
According to Geitek, the process of altering
the installation sequence complicated the
process resulting in an increase of overall
man-hours, but the net effect of having more
workers employed at the site more than
compensated for this, resulting in a shorter
duration. CASS Sheet Metal also shaved time
off the schedule by pressuring the metal
panel supplier to expedite delivery. Geitek
estimates that Berridge trimmed two to three
weeks off from their typical lead time, thereby
providing extra installation time that was
sorely needed. In fact, the project that would
have potentially taken 10-12 weeks was
substantially complete in only five. CASS
Sheet Metal also proposed a simple idea to
let interior work start even before the roof
was complete.
“We knew what the schedule was when we
bid the project, so we encouraged each
general contractor bidding the job to require
Grace Ice & Water Shield® as an
underlayment, which worked as a temporary
roof” said Gietek. “We were able to cover the
whole thing in a week and the interior of the
building was 95 percent dry so the interior
trades could start working right away.”
A demanding schedule was only one
difficulty associated with this roofing project.
A host of other issues added to the overall
complexity of the job.
PROJECT SPECIFICS
CASS Sheet Metal installed 34,000 square
feet of metal roofing atop the Public Safety
and Operations Building, with 2,100 square
feet of soffit and over 5,000 lineal feet of
custom flashing and trim. The largest panels
measure 65 feet from eave to ridge, which is
much larger than what is typically used, but
they offered the dual benefits of expediting
the project while eliminating horizontal
seams that could fail over time, resulting in
water intrusion. Transporting panels this
large from the shop to the site would have
been problematic, so all were fabricated on-
R O O F I N G
BY DAVID R. MILLER, ASSOCIATE EDITOR
PHOTOS COURTESY OF CASS SHEET METAL
This single-story structure is covered by 34,000 square feet
of pitched standing seam metal roof. The roof was
substantially complete in only five weeks.
TOP OF THE CLASS
CAM MAGAZI NE MAY 2011 18 Visit us online at www.cammagazineonline.com
August
G Construction Law
G Interiors / Finishes
September
G Insurance / Bonding
G Renovation / Restoration
C O M I N G U P I N
“Voice of the Construction Industry”
site. A 4,000-pound pan-forming machine
was elevated to rooftop level on a forklift to
provide easy access, but manipulating the
finished panels on top of the roof was no
easy feat.
“You’re trying to handle the panels on a
sloped roof instead of on flat ground,” said
Gietek. “If you fabricate smaller panels in the
shop, you can skid them and hoist the whole
skid up to the roof. You are also fabricating
from a flat surface.”
The roof covering the Public Safety and
Operations Building was pitched 4:12, but
some sections were 8:12, or even 12:12. Even
though a large number of workers were
needed to meet the schedule, not every
roofer is cut out to work in this demanding
environment.
“We had to find people who knew how to
work on a roof and who could handle a
panel,” said Gietek. “You might be able to put
someone new on a roof and they might be
able to work safely, but when you are working
with a 65-foot panel, everybody needs to
understand what everyone else is doing. It
isn’t just about keeping an individual safe any
more. Everyone needs to work in the same
direction, and if someone decides not to, he is
affecting someone else on the roof.”
Schools are the cornerstones of any
community and the bond issue that fueled
this project will ultimately fund a number of
new and renovated facilities for Detroit Public
Schools. Improvements to school facilities
often have impacts that extend far beyond
the property line. As a certified Detroit-Based
Business headquartered just a few blocks
from the Public Safety and Operations
Building site, CASS Sheet Metal has a vested
interest in this process.
“Schools have a tendency to attract
revitalization,” said Parvin. “A new or
revamped school will hopefully revitalize
the area around it.”
If the new Public Safety and Operations
Building is any indication, then brighter
times lie ahead for the surrounding
neighborhoods.
The installation sequence was altered to
maximize production with large crews.
Up to 15 CASS Sheet Metal workers were
on this site at times.
challenge?
We thrive on it!
challenge?
We thrive on it!
SPECIALIZING IN THE CONSULTING, DESIGN AND
INSTALLATION OF ARCHITECTURAL SHEET METAL WORK
SPECIALIZING IN THE CONSULTING, DESIGN AND
INSTALLATION OF ARCHITECTURAL SHEET METAL WORK
CASS SHEET METAL
(313) 571- C.A.S.S.
5641 CONNER • DETROIT, MI 48213
18 CAM MAGAZI NE MAY 2011
R O O F I N G
Clearing New
Hurdles at
Rooftop
Level
“Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
L
ike most other contractors, roofers are often being asked to do
more with less, even in a challenging economy. Facility owners
want greater reliability delivered in less time with less expense,
all while minimizing disruptions to their daily activities and
working towards sustainability goals. Every new expectation raises
the bar, so contractors must elevate their performance to clear each
new hurdle. Fortunately, Chem Link has introduced an entirely new
class of Single Ply EPDM Adhesive that can put a little extra spring in
the steps of roofing contractors.
UNDERSTANDING THE PRODUCT
Roofers traditionally had three adhesive options for single ply
roofing: solvent-based, water-based and peel and stick. All have their
own strengths and weaknesses.
Solvent-based products are the most popular option and they
usually provide good adhesion, but this advantage must be weighed
against environmental and safety concerns associated with solvents.
Water-based adhesives are generally thought of as a greener option
than solvents, but many users also feel that they are not as strong as
solvent-based products. Perception is a difficult thing to prove, so
roofers who are interested in this option should look for results from
adhesion tests, preferably confirmed by an independent laboratory.
The solvent-based products that they are most familiar with typically
By David R. Miller, Associate Editor
Photos courtesy of Chem Link
CAM MAGAZI NE MAY 2011 19 Visit us online at www.cammagazineonline.com
withstand two to three pounds of force per
square inch in these tests, so products that
test lower than this should be scrutinized.
Peel and stick is a third option that provides
good adhesion without the concerns
associated with solvents, but it is generally
thought of as cost-prohibitive and it requires
a very clean surface to work properly. Prices
are easy enough to check, so contractors can
also evaluate this option for themselves. If
they find that the price is right, then peel and
stick might be a good option for them.
Chem Link’s Single Ply EPDM Adhesive, a
new fourth option for roofers, is different
because it utilizes a chemical reaction that
takes place when the product is exposed to
moisture.
“It doesn’t just stick because it is sticky,”
explained Jon Ballema, research and
development lab manager for Chem Link. “It
sticks because there is a chemical reaction
that bonds it to the surface.”
Solvent- and water-based products are
typically applied both to the rooftop and to
the material that is being put down. Installers
then wait for the water or solvent to enter a
vapor state so it can be carried away by the
air, thereby leaving a sticky surface behind.
No waiting period is necessary with Chem
Link Single Ply EPDM Adhesive, as the
material is ready to begin bonding as soon as
it is exposed to moisture. Unlike sticky
adhesives that instantly form a hard bond,
Chem Link Single Ply EPDM Adhesive allows
for roofing materials to be shifted slightly to
correct wrinkles or other imperfections while
the chemical bond forms. Of course, this also
means that the material can be moved
unintentionally by strong winds or by other
contractors working nearby, so installers must
be keenly aware of the time that it will take
the adhesive to cure. This can take 20-30
minutes, or even longer in cold temperatures,
so Chem Link recommends against using the
product if the temperature is below 40° F.
When temperatures are above 40° F, the
product is remarkably easy to use.
USING THE PRODUCT
Solvent-based adhesives are widely used
by roofing contractors because they are
affordable and they offer a reliable bond, but
they also present some challenges in the
field. Shipping can be problematic because
solvents are flammable and contractors need
to work carefully to prevent static electricity
sparks. Though fires are rare, they can be
catastrophic. Solvent fumes can also be
drawn into occupied spaces through air
intakes, possibly necessitating the evacuation
‡ ‡
800-664-3697

www.nadc1.com
Serving Michigan Since 1984




















































20 CAM MAGAZI NE MAY 2011 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
R O O F I N G
Roof assemblies are tested on wind uplift tables like this one.
In all tests conducted at Chem Link, and at independent
laboratories, the Chem Link EPDM Single Ply EPDM
Adhesive has never been the point of failure.
A roof assembly at the point of failure is seen here. Roofing material can be put down as soon as
this adhesive is in place.
work with them on the job.”
Chem Link also posts instructional videos
online and operates a contractor hot line to
provide additional support after the training
is over. In addition to training contractors
how to use the product properly, Chem Link
also went to extraordinary lengths to ensure
that the Single Ply EPDM Adhesive would
perform as needed. Chem Link tested over
200 formulas over several years before
making this product commercially available,
according to Ballema.
Still, industry veterans might be skeptical.
Kelley pointed out that Chem Link’s new
Single Ply EPDM Adhesive produces peel
values that are 250 percent stronger than the
industry standard for solvent-based contact
adhesives. He has one simple request for
contractors who may be reluctant to try
something new.
“Just go out and try it before you say, ‘That’ll
never work,’” he said.
of the building. Although solvent-based
products can currently be used under the
USGBC’s LEED rating system, Dennis Kelley,
national brand manager for Chem Link,
believes that this might not always be the
case. Future legislation could also potentially
impose more restrictions on the use of
solvents.
“Legislation is generally moving forward in
this area and Chem Link products are far
ahead of that curve,” said Ballema.
In spite of these drawbacks, solvent-based
products have served the industry well for
many years. Most contractors are
understandably reluctant to stake their hard-
earned reputations on a product they have
never tried before. Even if they work as
advertised, new products entail learning new
techniques.
“Every time you change something that
crews are used to doing, you create the risk of
making mistakes,” said Ballema.
After applying water or solvent-based
products, contractors must wait until the
adhesive is dry enough to stick properly. The
potential for misjudging this is eliminated
with Chem Link’s product, as roofing material
can be put down as soon as the adhesive is in
place. Still, there is a wrong way to do
anything, so Chem Link works hard to prevent
contractors from having bad experiences.
“We offer a lot of training,” said Kelley. “If
they let us come out, we’ll pick up rollers and
work right with them. We’ll get their crews
properly trained in their shops and then we’ll
CAM MAGAZI NE MAY 2011 21 Visit us online at www.cammagazineonline.com
Single Ply, BUR, Slate, Shingles, Green and Vegetative Roof Systems,
Architectural Metals, Air Barriers, Roof Audits, Complete Roof Service
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www.ceigroupllc.com
Services provided in the United States
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22 CAM MAGAZI NE MAY 2011 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
E D U C A T I O N A L
F A C I L I T Y
C O N S T R U C T I O N
of keeping their host of little red schoolhouses
open and operational. Bond issues and sinking
funds are part of capital costs with bonds
funding sizeable construction projects and
annual sinking funds feeding cash into smaller
additions, upgrades, and other facility
improvements. But these two pools of money
cannot be used for basic maintenance, utility
bills, teacher salaries and other operating
expenditures. “Schools can’t pay utility bills
with sinking fund or bond dollars, but if you
can improve the facility with those funds, the
school can still cut operational costs, and
perhaps use that money to keep a teacher on
staff,” said Jeffrey D. Hamilton, PE, vice
president/project director of the George W.
Auch Company, Pontiac, a firm delivering
construction services to 17 different school
districts in southeastern Michigan.
Value analysis and facility assessment are
the “power tools” in the Auch Company’s “tool-
box” that aid districts in extracting the best
value from every available dollar. As part of an
owner-architect-contractor team, Auch prefers
to engage in a project in the very early
planning stages, developing a keen
understanding of a district’s goals. Auch then
works with the design professionals to develop
cost options for the owner’s consideration and
to continually look for opportunities to add
value to the district’s projects. “We take it
beyond what used to be called value
engineering, which became a bit of a
misnomer for cutting scope,” said Vince
DeLeonardis, LEED AP, president and CEO of
the George W. Auch Company. “What we focus
on is the value to the owner, and examining
life-cycle costs.”
TRIMMING MAINTENANCE COSTS
Managing life-cycle costs is the life blood of
a viable operating and maintenance budget.
These strategies are particularly important in
the face of current operating and maintenance
budgets. “While maintenance expenditures
per-square-foot of instructional space have
increased only 11 percent or so over a decade
(because of rising costs in general),
maintenance expenditures as a percentage of
total expenditures have decreased almost nine
percent over the last 10 years,” said Scott E.
Little, associate executive director of Michigan
School Business Officials (MSBO), Lansing.
With a smaller piece of the fiscal pie reserved
for operations and maintenance, school
districts need buildings designed for easy and
economical care. “Consideration of the life-
cycle costs of maintaining a building is
becoming a huge issue for districts going
forward,” said Little. Something as basic as
selecting flooring material without annual re-
finishing requirements saves a tremendous
maintenance costs, energy bills and other
operating expenditures.
“The first and foremost issue on the minds of
our education clients is operational costs,” said
Theo Pappas, AIA, REFP, NCARB, LEED AP,
executive director, principal of the Michigan
office of Fanning Howey Associates, Novi. “They
are asking, ‘How can we save money, how can
we save on maintenance, and how can we save
energy?’ The design of facilities has to first
answer the basic question of operational
costs.”
As a brief primer in school finance, districts
incur capital and operating costs in the course
O
ver the years, slate blackboards have
given way to interactive smart boards,
but one thing remains the same: the
need for funds to pay for technology, buildings,
and teachers. In short, the “hunger for
knowledge” must be fed by sufficient dollars.
Today, Michigan schools and others across the
nation are confronted by financial woes played
out in controversial budget proposals and
divided political factions. For its part, savvy
companies within Michigan’s design and
construction industry can soften these
budgetary blows to a degree by delivering
facilities capable of reducing a district’s
By Mary E. Kremposky, Associate Editor
At Phelps Architecture, Construction and Engineering High School, future industry professionals
experience firsthand the ability of daylighting and other strategies to save energy and boost
academic performance.
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Working
Smart
Reducing Operating and Maintenance
Costs for School Buildings
school buildings. “We are upgrading the pools
of three high schools in Livonia with energy
recovery units,” said Hamilton. The units
recover waste heat and recycle it back into
the natatorium.
Replacing chlorinated chemicals with an
ultraviolet light filtration system saves money,
energy and boosts air quality. Repeated
chemical usage is costly and is hard on pool
pumps and people. “If we use fewer
chemicals in the pool water, the pumps will
last longer with less corrosive product in the
system,” said Hamilton. Chlorination also
demands more frequent air changes in the
space, meaning more energy is consumed to
condition the outside air delivered to the
space.
Because of heat recovery units, ultraviolet
filtration and lighting upgrades, “If you
walked into one of these facilities, the
difference between before and after is
amazing,” said Hamilton. “The humidity is
comfortable, you can breathe more easily, and
it saves a ton of money in operational costs.”
The Auch Company has already installed
ultraviolet light filtration systems in six school
natatoriums, including three in Livonia. “We
suggest this cost-saving option in all
natatorium upgrades,” said Hamilton.
The Auch Company has even bigger fish to
fry in reducing operating costs in school
gymnasiums. “Gyms incur significant costs in
utility expenses due to their constant use
throughout the day and evening, with some
schools spending more than half-a-million
dollars for utilities a year,” said Hamilton.
Installing energy-efficient air handling units
and T5 fluorescent fixtures is producing
significant drops in energy usage. “We are
also saving costs in two South Redford middle
school gyms by installing some controls and
T5s – the most energy-efficient lamp now
available for this application,” said
Munchiando. Additionally, in pools, gyms, and
large auditoriums, the use of CO2 monitors
accurately gauges the level of carbon dioxide
in the space, effectively blocking any
unnecessary and costly air changes.
Lighting, mechanical and building
enclosure systems all work together to
achieve cost savings and energy efficiency.
“We are constantly educating ourselves about
different systems and materials to stay on the
leading edge, said Hamilton. At Walsh
College’s Jeffery W. Barry Center, Auch
installed a light shedding system. “It is a
system that reads the light level in a room and
as the day gets brighter the lights
automatically come down,” said Munchiando.
At Wing Lake Development Center, Auch
installed a cutting-edge, energy-efficient heat
pump system.
CAM MAGAZI NE MAY 2011 23 Visit us online at www.cammagazineonline.com
Auch’s work on the building envelope
ranges from the cutting edge to the basic.
The company has begun using more
polyurethane insulation foam as part of high-
performance wall construction. “We are still
going into school buildings today that have
single-pane windows,” said Hamilton. “Those
are one of the first items that we change out
to boost a building’s insulation value.”
For the building envelope, the Auch
Company also keeps pace with developments
in building enclosures by having on board
staff trained in masonry inspections and by
active involvement with the Building
Enclosure Council (BEC). In fact, Auch’s own
Steven Robbins, senior project manager, is
currently serving as BEC president.
THE ENERGY REPORT CARD
Rochester Community Schools is on the
leading edge of energy tracking, posting its
information on the District website and
reporting an enviable amount in savings.
“Rochester Community Schools began an
earnest energy conservation program in the
early 1990s when the District realized that
energy was a significant portion of its budget
and that these costs were controllable,” said
John Stoner, Rochester Community School’s
director of operations and transportation.
“Through the years the efforts have resulted
in savings of many millions, which enabled
the District to redirect funds to the
classrooms. Just last year, energy costs were
reduced by 15 percent and usage by 7
percent. In dollars, this equaled savings of in
excess of $400,000.”
This energy-savvy district uses seven main
strategies to achieve these stellar results.
According to Stoner, the District’s strategies
include: “Committing to energy conservation
and asking for the support of the board, staff
and community; collecting and analyzing
data from every building (you can’t know
where you are going without knowing where
you are); prioritizing projects and practices
with the highest payback and the least effort;
aggressively purchasing supplies on the open
market as a commodity (this only works due
to deregulation); selecting team partners,
such as CMs, architects and service providers,
that have a commitment to helping the
district reduce energy costs; using cost and
usage data to provide accountability; and
celebrating successes yearly.”
Munchiando also commends the energy
initiatives of West Bloomfield schools. “West
Bloomfield tracks energy and sets goals for
themselves every year to see how they can
bring their energy costs down,” he said. “They
are seeing more savings every year as they
incorporate items such as lighting, heating and
amount of labor. Creating any building is a
balancing act of function, aesthetics and cost,
but insisting on best quality/best price
mechanical equipment will greatly reduce
maintenance and energy costs over the long
haul, he adds.
As another maintenance strategy, districts
have been releasing more contracts for
synthetic turf athletic fields, said Hamilton.
These resilient fields of faux green require
minimal maintenance and can accommodate
more users in a single day. With synthetic turf,
the band can practice on the field at 4 pm, the
junior varsity can play a game at 6 pm, and a
local club can play soccer later. “The school
district can probably even generate some
funds from renting the field out to various
groups,” said James W. Munchiando, George W.
Auch vice president/project director. With less
state funds available, some school districts
have even passed a recreational millage to
specifically offset athletic department costs,
such as busing players to a game, added
Hamilton.
BIG SAVINGS IN BIG-BOX SPACES
Smart school districts understand the
impact of energy-efficient building
improvements on operational costs. “These
improvements often pay for themselves in
five or ten years, and are all part of an overall
strategy of working smart,” said Pappas.
“These are not lost dollars. They are
recovered dollars, because every dollar spent
could possibly recover five dollars over the
life of the building.”
For energy-efficient schools, Fanning
Howey offers a “Shades of Green” program.
“Although we often encourage our clients to
utilize LEED® Sustainable Design Practices,
and we have many LEED-Accredited
Professionals on staff, many of our clients only
want to implement selected measures of
“green” building practices that apply to their
specific needs,” said Pappas. “Our ‘Shades of
Green’ program makes that possible.”
A program called “Technical Energy
Analysis (TEA) is offered through the state of
Michigan to schools, colleges/universities,
public housing authorities and local
government buildings to improve energy
efficiency and reduce costs,” according to a
Consumers Energy website. Consumers
Energy delivers the assessment as a
consultant prequalified through the state of
Michigan. “TEA visits school districts, assesses
energy usage, and provides a list of energy-
saving approaches along with an estimated
payback period,” said Munchiando.
For its part, the Auch Company is actively
engaged in boosting the efficiency of pools,
gymnasiums and other big-box spaces in
24 CAM MAGAZI NE MAY 2011 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
percent. Population loss and shifting
demographics – Livingston, Clinton, Ottawa,
Isabella and Grand Traverse counties actually
posted fairly sizeable population gains – have
led to enrollment declines in many districts.
“We continue to see funding being reduced to
districts and that is based not only on the
amount of money allocated per pupil, but also
on declining enrollment in many districts,” said
Little.
Such factors have triggered a cascade of
building consolidations, especially in smaller
school districts. This has given rise to efforts to
merge middle schools and high schools or
consolidate elementary schools into a single
facility. Districts are also actively looking at
selling their closed buildings for alternative
uses, both private or public, to eliminate long-
term ownership costs.
Consolidation often leads to renovations,
additions, and sometimes replacement of
older facilities with contemporary, more
energy-efficient schoolhouses. In the
Avondale school district, for example, a fairly
sizeable school building for fifth and sixth
graders was taken out of circulation. While the
fifth-grade class was absorbed into existing
elementary schools, the remaining middle
school did not have the capacity to house the
sixth-grade class, triggering the passage of a
bond issue and the construction of a three-
CONSOLIDATION OF SERVICES AND
SCHOOLS
Of course, consolidation is a more
controversial way of trimming a district’s
operational costs. Some districts have already
consolidated services. “All the school districts
in Livingston County use buses managed
strictly through the county,” said Hamilton.
Added Pappas, “Districts are looking at
everything from consolidation of
procurement to privatization of
transportation, maintenance and food
services.”
Declining property values in a rough
housing market and population loss are part of
the broader economic forces shaping
Michigan’s education and municipal sectors.
“Because the basis of our client’s ability to levy
bonds to finance public projects is based on
property values, the recent magnitude of
declining property values is having a chilling
effect on many public projects– libraries,
courthouses and other municipal work - that
doesn’t have federal or state funding of other
kinds,” said Pappas.
According to the 2010 US Census Bureau
report (2010.census.gov.), Michigan was the
only state in the country to lose population
over the last decade. Michigan posted a
population loss of 0.6 percent against an
overall national population increase of 9.7
cooling controls and management systems.”
The Auch Company tracks its own progress
in meeting the owner’s goals, both in energy
reduction and for all its “school assignments.”
“We want to make sure we are meeting the
owner’s goals,” said Munchiando. “We analyze
if we have met the owner’s energy goal, not
just by buying different units and installing
newer systems, but did we get to the goal of
producing a building that actually uses less
energy.”
Fanning Howey performs all of its own
metrics, resulting in square footage analysis
and the compilation of cost, performance and
energy consumption data into its own
database. “It allows us to measure our own
progress and compare,” said Pappas.
Little believes in the benefits of third-party
commissioning as an energy-saving tool. He
also encourages the design and construction
industry to train the owner in the operation
and maintenance of sophisticated equipment
and building management systems. “If the
head custodian doesn’t have a clue about
how to run that sophisticated building
management system, what happens is they
turn what should have been a very energy-
efficient tool into an energy-inefficient tool,”
he commented. “Don’t just turn over the key,
but really commit to making sure the district
understands how to maintain a building
properly.”
E D U C A T I O N A L
F A C I L I T Y
C O N S T R U C T I O N
Q
ualified school bonds passed in the last few years offer a glimpse into
the school marketplace. The Michigan Treasury Department’s
website maintains a list of every failed and passed bond issue
proposed from 1996 to the present. The general number and largest
bonds passed over the last two years are listed below:
2009: 50 proposed bond issues, 35 passed, 15 failed
2010: 50 proposed bond issues: 33 passed, 17 failed
Top four districts by bond amount:
• Macomb County, Chippewa Valley Schools, Wakely, $89,765,000
• Clinton County, St. Johns Public Schools, Kingscott, $64, 325,000
• Ottawa County, Holland City School District, GMB, $60, 865,000
• Livingston County, Pinckney Community Schools, Wold, $59, 465,000
2011: 32 proposed as of 5/03/2011
Feb. 22, 2011 Election: 9 passed, 7 failed
Upcoming May 3, 2011 election date: 16 proposed bond issues
• Largest Passed Feb. 22 election: Kent County, Comstock Park Public
Schools, GMB, $21, 530,000 million
• Largest Proposed in May election: Berrien County, Lakeshore District,
Tower Pinkster, $103,560,000
• Largest Passed Feb. 22 election in Southeast Michigan:
Macomb County, Fraser Public Schools, Wakely, $19,900,000
• Largest Proposed in May election in Southeast Michigan and vicinity:
Saint Clair County, Port Huron Area School District, TMP, $22, 780,000
million
Additions, renovations, educational technology and athletic fields appear
to dominate the bond proposals. “I definitely see technology as a percentage
of budget increasing over time,” said Vince DeLeonardis, LEED AP, president
and CEO, George W. Auch Company, Pontiac. With the passage of a 2010 bond
issue, Auch will be helping Pinckney to become the next district to go
completely wireless. The Auch Company is currently performing technology
upgrades, HVAC upgrades and roofing projects for 30 schools in the Warren
Consolidated School District.
Buoyed by a large donor base, higher education is a more vibrant market
than K12, although uncertainty with state funding may be leading to some
hesitation in initiating even university projects. “Dollar-wise, I think K12 is less
than what it was, because most of the projects are smaller renovations and
additions,” said James W. Munchiando, Auch vice president/project director.
“The smaller colleges and universities are having a tougher time, because they
rely on state funding and tuition.”
For easy access to the entire list of state qualified bonds please google
Michigan Treasury Department School Bond Election Search or try
treassecure.state.mi.us/apps/findschoolbondelectinfo.asp
ThE School MArKETplAcE
CAM MAGAZI NE MAY 2011 25 Visit us online at www.cammagazineonline.com
100 Years of Building Trust
Oakland Community College Southeld Addition
classroom addition, said Hamilton.
The consolidation of school districts and/or
services may be in the cards. “We have already
seen districts combining services with others
to save overhead costs,” said Munchiando.
“Consolidation is one of the things we think is
going to happen more in the future. I would
say in the next five years you are going to see a
big difference.” Echoing this prediction, Little
comments, “I think many districts have to come
to grips with rightsizing their amount of
square footage.”
DOING YOUR HOMEWORK
Clearly, school districts across Michigan are
learning difficult lessons in financial
management. In this school of hard knocks, a
construction manager can bring valuable
budget strategies to the table. For its part, the
Auch Company “does its homework” and
“arrives early to class” with a facility
assessment prepared in the early planning
stages and as part of a broad team. “We feel
we bring the greatest value to projects joined
in the very early phases,” said DeLeonardis.
“The facility assessment is essentially a master
list used to identify and prioritize the work.”
By ranking work items, the prioritized
master plan allows work to be spread over a
number of years. “The districts typically
divide the identified needs into multi-year
increments, normally three to five years,” said
Munchiando. “This allows the administration
to present the required infrastructure
improvements to the community in a clear
and concise manner for voter consideration.”
“The facility assessment can be used to help
the district decide whether the program
should be structured as a bond, sinking fund
or both,” said Hamilton. “Our key to success in
the bond arena is the accuracy of the data. We
think our ability to conduct the facility
assessment and apply accurate dollars and
budgets to them is really what helps the
community understand the needs of the
district, and the fact that it is not just some big,
open checkbook.”
Once passed, the bond issue cannot be
altered, making accurate information and
group buy-in pivotal to project success. User
groups from the community take part in
discussing the district’s facility needs prior to
the bond vote. “In this way, you get
information from more users, and you start to
get some buy-in from the community about
what is on the master list,” said Munchiando.
Called CMA or construction manager as an
agent, the majority of work in Michigan is
delivered under this method that essentially
makes a construction manager an employee
of the owner. “We take our responsibility as
the owner’s advocate very seriously,” said
DeLeonardis. “For us, we believe acting as the
owner’s agent is the most efficient method of
delivery.”
Well-schooled in the educational sector,
the George W. Auch Company has been
managing school construction dollars for
almost a century, having built its first school
for St. Thomas Lutheran Church in Detroit
shortly after 1912. Fanning Howey is
celebrating its 50th anniversary this year and
its 20th anniversary of being of service to
Michigan schools. While the writing on the
wall – or in this case on the smart board –
does not bring the best of news, these two
firms and other companies in the design and
construction industry are bringing their own
particular expertise to the table in solving a
portion of the financial woes besetting
Michigan schools.
26 CAM MAGAZI NE MAY 2011 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
features of a hospital, the infrastructure for
the technology and the space to allow for
observation.”
ACCOUNTING FOR EQUIPMENT
In addition to planning for the
requirements of simulation technology,
expensive medical equipment and flexibility
needs require careful programming to ensure
that the resulting space is both efficient and
useful. This planning must occur early in the
design phase and be based on an
understanding of the medical equipment
required for instruction, the school’s
scheduling needs and the building’s space
limitations.
At Jackson Community College in Jackson,
SHW Group incorporated “tweener rooms”
between each classroom, which function as
both a storage room and a breakout space for
students. All medical equipment is on wheels
to allow for easy transport, and overhead
power is installed to aid mobility. The
strategically located storage rooms and
mobile equipment enable instructors to
quickly store and easily access necessary
the technological support systems necessary
for simulation is an additional consideration
during the programming and design phases.
For example, during full simulation
training, a room can be set up to resemble an
emergency room, with a simulator
mannequin available for students to use for
training and testing purposes. Data from the
students’ procedures is recorded and
broadcast to an observation space with
recording equipment and two-way
communication systems.
“These spaces have a very specific program
and purpose that require the incorporation of
advanced technology,” said Tod R. Stevens,
AIA, LEED AP+, NCARB, partner at SHW Group,
one of the nation’s largest educational
architecture and engineering firms. “Quite a
number of different stakeholder groups are
involved daily in operating the equipment,
leading instruction and learning from the
equipment. As a designer, you must
understand each group’s role and how the
space can accommodate everyone’s needs.
To implement this design successfully,
architects must design these spaces with the
B
uilding medical learning environments
at institutions of higher learning
demands that an architect have a deep
understanding both of the building type and
of its use as a learning tool. With instruction
and programming driving the design,
appropriate choices must be made during
programming to ensure the space is
functional, cost effective and supports
curriculum, testing and the necessary
technology.
PLANNING FOR TECHNOLOGY
Simulation training is an important tool
that medical educators use to train today’s
students for tomorrow’s medical practice and
procedures. The incorporation of simulation
technology and training devices within a
medical learning environment helps
educators train medical students in highly
technical procedures using advanced
technology. Additionally, practicing surgeons,
nurses and support staff use the simulation
environment to be trained on new
equipment and new procedures, which saves
valuable operating room time. Incorporating
E D U C A T I O N A L
F A C I L I T Y
C O N S T R U C T I O N
One large observation room in Wayne State
University’s Medical Education Commons
services multiple simulation rooms.
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multipurpose observation space saves on
square footage.
“We felt it was important to build a facility
which provides our students with ample
access to modern learning tools, however as a
result of our location in downtown Detroit,
space is a real commodity,” said Ron Spalding,
WSU chief administrative officer of academic
and student programs. “Incorporating a single
observation room enabled us to save on
square footage without compromising on
quality. This allowed us to include additional
building features for our students. We feel
that the resulting facility is an atmosphere
most conducive to success.”
The resulting observation space serves a
clinical skills center with four simulation labs.
Additional spaces include student services,
classrooms, collaborative study areas and a
desk for the public and students. A flex
classroom frames the new front door of the
School of Medicine. This highly collaborative
learning environment is planned around a
large flexible open space with small breakout
pods along the perimeter.
It is important to design spaces that
support the technology and teaching
methods that promote learning for our future
medical professionals. By understanding the
basic requirements of a medical learning
environment and tailoring these
requirements to each college or university’s
unique needs, architects can implement
creative design solutions to create facilities
that enable healthcare students to graduate
workforce ready.
space.
“It is always important that our students
are provided with an environment most
conducive to learning,” said Jim Lantz, MCC
vice president of administrative services. “In
the case of nursing students, this
environment must allow for the unique
instruction/implementation teaching format.
Merging the nursing classrooms and nursing
labs into one, integrated space allows
students to execute newly taught skills
following professor lessons, thus providing a
facility that meets the learning needs of the
students and the teaching needs of the
professors.”
EVALUATING THROUGH OBSERVATION
In medical learning environments,
observation is an important tool for both
students and professors. Observation rooms
allow students to observe peers and be
evaluated by professors. Regardless of how
observation is implemented, the key is to
seamlessly incorporate the observation room
in such a way that the students feel the
simulation is realistic. This is often
accomplished via a connected room with
one-way glass and video observation.
However, these spaces can require an ample
amount of space, which may be limited on
some campuses.
At Wayne State University (WSU) in Detroit,
SHW Group efficiently incorporated the
necessary observation space by designing
the facility to include one large observation
room for multiple simulation rooms. This
equipment. This layout also improves
classroom utilization by allowing the college
to schedule different course classes back-to-
back in the same classroom.
SHW Group also included breakout spaces
throughout the building to promote learning
outside of the traditional classroom. Students
use the spaces for studying and informal
group sessions; teachers utilize the areas for
small group testing and one-on-one
teacher/student learning and observation.
SHW Group took a different approach for
the design of a nursing lab at Henry Ford
Community College in Dearborn. Because of
the existing building footprint, it was
important to find program efficiencies. SHW
Group worked with Henry Ford
representatives to discuss storage and prep
room needs. After reviewing the nursing
program’s schedule, SHW Group determined
that an 800-square-foot prep room would
allow the College to serve the program with
one fewer lab and facilitate a five-minute
setup and turnaround for the labs and
classrooms. Another space saver included
designing the space with one control room
and one-way observation glass for all three
simulation labs, which includes both adult
and infant mannequins. Additionally, all the
labs include cameras for recording and
playback in the classrooms.
DESIGNING FOR TEACHING METHODS
To address space limitations in medical
learning environments and accommodate
ever-evolving teaching styles, architects can
design nursing labs with combined
instruction and practice space. A
multipurpose room, which can operate as flex
space, allows for simultaneous lecture-style
instruction and hands-on practice. This
teaching style increases students’ retention
rates and has proven to be a successful
training method. Nursing programs in
particular lend themselves to this integrated
design, as much of a nurse’s education
requires hands-on practice. Often programs
vary in degree offerings, and each degree
requires different training and courses,
creating the need for a variety of classrooms.
At Montcalm Community College (MCC) in
Sidney, SHW designed the classrooms with
beds and simulator stations along the
perimeter of the room, surrounding a
centralized lecture area. This layout allows
nursing students to break out into small
groups to work at stations and reassemble for
professor instruction. Nursing students can
immediately apply what they have learned
through the lecture without leaving the
SHW Group has designed an efficient, state-of-the-art learning
environment for Henry Ford Community College’s School of Nursing.
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28 CAM MAGAZI NE MAY 2011 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
one of the one nation’s
largest minority-owned
educational program
management and
construction management
firms; and Fanning Howey
Associates, Inc., the third
largest educational planning
and architectural firm in the
country. With a Michigan
office in Novi, Fanning Howey
has partnered with Mark
English Design LLC, a
minority-owned architectural
design firm headquartered in
Detroit.
“Fanning Howey was very
instrumental in early bridge
document design,” said
Carter. “Brailsford and
Dunlavy helped DPS design
and implement the selection
and bid process. Walbridge
has extensive implementation experience and construction
capability.” Beyond a job well done, “the Walbridge Joint Venture has
been an absolute pleasure to work with,” Carter added. “The
diversity among the companies and individuals assigned is
remarkable.”
Another cornerstone of this successful program is community
support, ranging from trade unions to school principals. “The trade
unions have been a very supportive partner in this program,” said
Carter. As of March 2011, “the current number of employees working
on the program, including trade and non-trade, is approximately
850,” but the number will increase as construction intensifies. “The
majority of the design/build teams and subcontractors are Detroit
businesses,” he added.
DPS members and WJV actively engaged the entire community.
“School principals and staff were engaged during early design
phases,” said Carter. “Community meetings were held before the
bridge documents for each school were designed. …Once compiled,
I
t’s been a marathon year for
the Detroit Public Schools
(DPS) Construction Bond
Program and the Walbridge
Joint Venture ( WJV), program
managers for the $500.5 million
program committed to delivering
18 Detroit School projects in three
years. The DPS executive team and
WJV swiftly issued bridge
documents and design/build
contracts in 2010. “The entire bond
program has been awarded with
the last school – a new Finney
Crockett High School – in October
2010,” said Mark Carter, executive
director of the DPS Construction
Bond Program. As of March 2011,
“there is approximately 400 million
in construction under contract.”
The Walbridge Joint Venture and
the design/build teams are
efficiently converting bond dollars
into buildings of steel, brick and glass. “The average cost savings was
12 percent under the budgeted amount,” said Carter. “The
design/build concept was a major contributing factor. This concept
allowed the design/builder flexibility and best cost values for the
district. The contracts for each individual school are for a guaranteed
maximum price.”
Carter also attributes the program’s success to the experience and
diversity of the design/build selection committee of WJV and DPS
members. “Many issues were prevented because of the preplanning
and proactive management of this professional and experienced
team assembled by Mr. Robert Bobb, DPS emergency financial
manager,” said Carter.
The Walbridge Joint Venture draws on the expertise of Walbridge,
a 93-year-old construction firm headquartered in Detroit, and its
partner E.L. Bailey & Company, a minority-owned school
construction and construction management company with offices
in Detroit and Southfield; Brailsford and Dunlavey, Washington, D.C.,
E D U C A T I O N A L
F A C I L I T Y
C O N S T R U C T I O N
for Detroit School
Construction
By Mary E. KrEMposKy, associatE Editor
photos courtEsy of dEtroit puBlic schools
Robert C. Bobb (center), DPS emergency financial manager, attended the
new Martin Luther King Jr. Senior High School Community Construction
Preview. Jenkins Granger LLC is the design builder constructing the new
$46.4 million dollar facility.
CAM MAGAZI NE MAY 2011 29 Visit us online at www.cammagazineonline.com
Fanning Howey’s bridge documents were
very thorough and comprehensive. As soon
as letters of intent were sent by DPS, the
design/build team could begin the design
process.”
The design/build approach expedited the
schedule, as well. “The builder and architect
are on the same team, which accelerates
design as well as a fast turnaround time for
Requests for Information (RFIs),” said Carter.
“The design builder has a bridge document
requirement for the school project. The
architect, community, design builder, and
the DPS executive team also meet regularly
to resolve any issues that may arise.”
The community is beginning to see results
of this construction whirlwind. In late
February 2011, over 60 students, parents,
faculty and members of the community
toured the emerging Martin Luther King Jr.
Senior High School now under construction
by Jenkins Granger LLC. Designed by TMP
Architecture, this $46.4 million dollar school
will focus on a Science, Technology,
Engineering and Mathematics (STEM)
curriculum. “The community reaction to the
school has been very positive,” said Carter.
“Martin Luther King Jr. Senior High School
has a unique design with a very creative use
of materials. In addition, the school will be a
LEED Gold facility when completed in the
fall of 2011.”
Jenkins Granger LLC led the community preview of the Martin Luther
King Jr. Senior High School in late February 2011. Over 60 people
toured the emerging facility designed by TMP Architecture.
More than 1,000 square feet of 4x8-foot vision glass panels have been
installed in the commons area of the new Martin Luther King Jr. Senior
High School slated to open fall 2011, according to DPS.
A long roster of schools, both new and
newly renovated, will open their doors in fall
2011, including two new pre-K-8 facilities,
one for Clark Park and the other for
Gompers; major renovations at Denby,
Henry Ford, and Western International High
Schools; and a major renovation at the pre-
K-8 Duke Ellington at Beckham School.
Two new high schools are expected to
open their doors in 2012. The first is Finney
Crockett, a new $46.3 million high school
under design builder Tooles Clark and
designed by Albert Kahn Associates, Inc.
Mumford High School is a new $50.3 million
school under design builder White/Turner
and designed by Hamilton Anderson
Associates.
The 18 school projects managed under
the bond program will be the core of the
DPS community of revitalized schools.
“Because of demographics and current and
projected school enrollment, one of the
objectives of this program is to build or
renovate 21st Century schools, merging
school closures into combined buildings,”
said Carter. “The consolidation will not only
deliver high technology to the students, but
also a cost savings to the District. The new
buildings are energy-efficient, and operating
costs, compared to some of the old schools,
will be substantially less.” For more
information, please visit
dpsschoolconstruction.org.
30 CAM MAGAZI NE MAY 2011 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
Robert Bobb addresses the crowd assembled
at the Mumford High School groundbreaking.
As design builder, White/Turner is constructing
the new $50.3 million high school designed by
Hamilton Anderson Associates. Construction
began fall 2010; completion is slated for 2012.
CAM MAGAZI NE MAY 2011 31 Visit us online at www.cammagazineonline.com
changing the learning
environment dramatically.
“We don’t even use the
word classroom anymore,”
said Theo Pappas, AIA, REFP,
NCARB, LEED AP, executive
director, principal, of the
Michigan office of Fanning
Howey in Novi. “We call
them learning spaces,
because classroom is a
much more restrictive
expression of what a school
environment really is in the
21st Century.”
The conventional
school is a series of double-
loaded corridors with
classrooms lined in rows as
straight as the traditional
seats within. “The project-
based learning environment
has to have flexibility,” said
Pappas. “The furniture is
modular and moveable,
allowing students to break up into small or larger groups and to
parse the learning space up into various multi-tasking
environments. Sometimes even more than one instructor is in the
room.”
Traditional corridors have given way to large interaction zones in
newer facilities. “Some corridors have expanded into alcoves,
creating extended learning areas for teachers and students a place
to interact,” said Pappas.
I
n 1961, Ron Fanning and
Clair Howey opened an
architectural practice in
the small, Midwestern
city of Celina, Ohio. As the
national firm of Fanning
Howey Associates, Inc.
celebrates its 50th
anniversary and its
Michigan office in Novi
reaches its own 20-year
milestone, the partnership’s
goal of creating exceptional
places to learn has clearly
been achieved with over
2,100 projects and more
than 200 design awards to
its credit nationally.
Fifty years later, Fanning
Howey is still on the leading
edge of design, thanks to its
focus on creating learning
spaces based on current
research of student and
teacher performance. With
research supporting the ability of a teaching method called project-
based learning to boost academic achievement, Fanning Howey and
architectural firms across the country are designing a growing
number of schools without conventional classrooms and traditional
corridors.
In this model, students interact in small groups or work as an
entire class on projects designed to teach a concept through hands-
on application or real-life examples. This teaching methodology is
E D U C A T I O N A L
F A C I L I T Y
C O N S T R U C T I O N
Fanning Howey Associates, Inc. earned a 2009 Impact on Learning Award from
School Planning & Management for its work on the Zionsville High School
Multi-Disciplinary Instructional Center. This 12,164-square-foot facility is a
prime example of the open, flexible learning environments of contemporary
schools following the project-based learning educational model.
Fanning Howey Tracks Design Trends in Learning Spaces
By Mary E. Kremposky Photos Courtesy of
Associate Editor Fanning Howey Associates, Inc.
A Passion
for Learning
A sense of open space and
clear sightlines are part of this
education model, along with a
concept called ”spatial agility.”
While flexibility re-arranges the
learning space, agility
completely changes the purpose
of the space. “An agile space
might change its use from year
to year or every five years,” said
Pappas. “Past institutions had
spaces that were empty two or
three hours a day, but these
spaces still had to be heated or
cooled. With spatial agility, we
can be maximally efficient in
how we utilize the school
building, so underutilization is
minimized or eliminated.”
Project-based learning is now
appearing in growing numbers
and to varying degrees in
schools across the county. “Our prime examples of schools using
project-based learning have come from California with such
facilities as High Tech High in Chula Vista and San Diego, and like the
32 CAM MAGAZI NE MAY 2011 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
recently opened Center for
Advanced Professional Studies
(CAPS) program at Blue Valley
Schools in Kansas,” said Pappas.
“I think probably the majority of
schools are trying this approach
to some degree, but a much
smaller percentage employs it as
a mainstay of their curriculum.”
Fanning Howey’s Michigan
office designed its first project-
based learning space in 2004 for
the award-winning Romeo
Engineering and Technology
Center. Currently, Fanning
Howey is designing the Center
for Innovative Schools (CIS), a
20,000-square-foot addition to
Milan High School that will be
completely project-based. Clark
Construction, Lansing, is
expected to begin construction
in late 2011 or early 2012.
The addition will include a senior transition studio to help
students prepare for higher education or the work force, an
E D U C A T I O N A L
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Open spaces and flexible seating arrangements accommodate both
large and small groups of students in Zionsville High School Multi-
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CAM MAGAZI NE MAY 2011 33 Visit us online at www.cammagazineonline.com
psychologist or a historian with a
metallurgist.”
Fanning Howey practices what it preaches
as a full service firm providing planning,
architectural, engineering, interior design
and educational technology services. Over
the last 20 years, the Michigan office has
serviced 140 clients and designed over 500
projects covering 21.2 million square feet of
space.
With a sincere passion for education,
Fanning Howey works closely with
administrators, teachers, parents, and
students, even observing the teacher in
action to more accurately tailor the design
to the curriculum. “Fanning Howey is
devoted to students and learning spaces,”
said Pappas. “We feel very proud that we
have positively influenced the lives of
millions of children around the country for
all these years by always putting students
and teaching first. As well as designing
pleasing spaces, we make sure that the school
functions and supports education.”
exploration lab using an interdisciplinary
approach to teach sciences ranging from
botany to physics, and a design lab for
architectural, graphic and computer game
design, and an innovation zone for students
to gather and work in small groups. The
addition may also include two Steelcase
Learn Labs™, a new product in sync with the
flexible, agile spaces of project-based
learning.
Fanning Howey is working with Granger
Construction Company, Lansing, on an $80
million renovation and expansion of
Belleville High School slated for completion
in 2012. “Belleville is employing project-
based learning in about half-dozen to a
dozen learning spaces,” said Pappas. “I have
heard that Bloomfield Hills Schools are
considering using project-based learning
throughout a proposed new high school.”
According to Wikipedia, Bloomfield schools
voted to merge Andover and Lahser high
schools, but the first proposed bond to build
a new replacement high school failed to
pass in November 2010.
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In other trends, Pappas believes the
continuing revolution in technology from
PCs to laptops, ipads, and other plug-and-
play technologies, plus the Internet Culture
with its online courses and social media, will
continue “to liberate the classroom” and aid
schools in becoming more integrated into
the community. “In Europe, some new high
schools have spaces that are actually
integrated throughout their towns and
communities,” he said. “They still have a
central high school facility with communal
spaces, but other learning spaces are located
in commercial and retail districts to
encourage applied learning principals.
Instead of studying in a business class,
students actually observe a business in
action.”
All of these approaches will prepare
students to thrive in workplaces increasingly
operating as multi-disciplinary teams. “This
integration of talents is already happening
at some companies,” said Pappas. “You
might have a scientist working with a
business person, a designer working with a
34 CAM MAGAZI NE MAY 2011 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
occupancy. Low flow plumbing fixtures save
on water consumption, which reduces
operational costs for schools and aids the
natural environment.
• Natural vs. Artificial Lighting
For a project such as a window replacement,
controlling sun exposure using low-e glass or
shading devices on the south, west and east
sides of a building will maintain thermal
comfort for occupants. Low-e glass and
shades will result in electrical energy cost
savings, avoiding unnecessary artificial
lighting use.
• Operation, Maintenance and Indoor
Air Quality
Administrators for educational facilities
should strive to create indoor air quality
conducive to learning. Implementation of a
green cleaning program involves selection of
products without toxins. This strategy will
boost air quality and demonstrate the
district’s or college’s commitment to the
health of the students and faculty.
• Recycling During Construction
A plan to recycle building materials is
essential for both large and small projects.
Instead of sending material to landfills, these
recycled materials can be reused to
manufacture additional products. Working
closely with a contractor in creating a plan of
action prior to construction helps facilitate
the effort.
• Green Building Materials
Whether it’s flooring replacement or a small
classroom addition, a design with recycled
materials in mind reduces the amount of
harvested and extracted natural materials.
Most materials today are manufactured using
some amount of recycled content. A few
popular green material choices include
linoleum, cork, bamboo flooring, and structural
steel. Selections for these sustainable
materials should always be based on traffic
patterns, durability and use of the space.
These concepts represent a starting point
in planning for a “green” e d u c a t i o n a l
facility. Additional measures can be taken to
reduce a facility’s environmental impact and
to reduce energy costs, but even a small
number of sustainable design features – all
without extensive costs – can enhance a
building. Whether building a new facility or
remodeling an existing school, these
seemingly small “fixes” can greatly impact
both students and the environment.
demonstrating to students, staff, faculty and
community that a facility is serving its
sustainability mission.
• Sensors and Fixtures
A renovation design that utilizes occupancy
sensors and low flow plumbing fixtures is a
relatively simple solution to high energy
costs. Occupancy sensors are a minimal first-
cost increase that decreases energy demand
by lighting a space only during actual
W
ith budgets shrinking and state
educational funding cuts the
norm, many Michigan K-12
districts, as well as colleges and
universities, find it difficult to imagine an
affordable “green” transformation of their
educational facilities. The notion of up-front
costs can be daunting to school
administrators. Below are a few “green” tips
that can actually assist with budget issues,
while maintaining classroom excellence and
E D U C A T I O N A L
F A C I L I T Y
C O N S T R U C T I O N
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G R E E N P R I N T
F O R T H E F U T U R E
Sustainable Schools
on a Budget
By Julie Blue, AIA, LEED AP, TMP Architecture, Inc.
36 CAM MAGAZI NE MAY 2011 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
C O N S T R U C T I O N H I G H L I G H T
CAM MAGAZI NE MAY 2011 37 Visit us online at www.cammagazineonline.com
A
watched pot never boils, but can
a watched site ever bloom? For
years, all eyes in Birmingham
were focused on a small piece of
land at the intersection of
Woodward Avenue and Maple Road. Many
Birmingham visitors make their first
impressions from this gateway into the city’s
popular downtown. A former gas station
resting on a designated Brownfield was an
image few city boosters were comfortable
with, so they kept a close eye on the site –
until the seeds of development finally
sprouted into the landmark building that
graces the land today.
Catalyst Development Co., LLC worked
with construction manager CSM Group and
architect and interior designer Eckert
Wordell, Architecture, Engineering, Interior
Design, all of Kalamazoo, to revitalize the
blighted corner with a new five-story, mixed-
use structure. Named for Greenleaf Trust,
which occupies a significant portion of the
building, the structure also houses an Italian
restaurant and luxury residential units along
with additional Class A office space. True to
the Greenleaf name and the reputation of
the project team, as well as to the gardener-
like attention that nurtured growth on the
site, the structure was built with sustain-
ability in mind. Silver-Level Certification is
anticipated under USGBC’s LEED rating
system and the building received an
honorable mention in CAM Magazine’s
Green Project of the Year Awards.
MAKING THE GARDEN GROW
The Greenleaf Trust site measures about
14,000 square feet, but busy nearby
roadways and an existing restaurant
effectively limited development options.
Minor soil contamination could also be
attributed to the existing gas station’s
underground fuel storage tanks. In spite of
these shortcomings, the site’s positive
features were much too significant to be
overlooked.
“The most important feature was the
exposure that the site offered,” said Rick
Wordell, senior principal in charge of design
for Eckert Wordell. “It is a high visibility
corner that really is the gateway into the
downtown area of Birmingham. It was the
perfect site for our client, mostly because of
the exposure.”
Making the site work required the
combined talents of Eckert Wordell and CSM
Group. After some contaminated soil was
removed, a membrane was installed to
separate the building from what remained.
This required careful coordination and the
foundations were poured in small sections
so that individual pieces of the membrane
could be joined together to form an uninter-
rupted barrier. Recessed items such as
plumbing, utilities and grease traps for the
restaurant required advanced planning
because they all had to sit atop the
membrane.
Once workers emerged from the 20-foot
excavation pit, they had to contend with the
close confines presented by roads on three
sides and the existing restaurant on the
fourth. The outer wall of the Greenleaf Trust
Building sits a scant four inches away from
Peabody’s Restaurant, yet the new building
towers over the existing structure.
Scaffolding was actually placed above the
existing restaurant, with permission from
the owner, to set stone on the new building’s
higher floors. Vertical access challenges
were met with a variety of innovative
solutions from the project team.
“The tower crane foundation was designed
integral with the building foundation,”
explained Todd McDonald, president of CSM
Group. “It penetrated a roof area over the
underground parking/mechanical space, so
we could pull it out as close to the end of the
project as possible.”
This tower crane was removed in January
2010, but the final phases of the project
were supported with a portable tower crane
that featured a very small footprint. This
crane was erected along Woodward and was
used to hoist materials up to the roof during
the project’s final months. In addition to
accommodating cranes on the small site, the
project team conserved space by having
contractors park offsite while creating a
temporary lot to serve the parking needs of
the existing restaurant. In spite of the site’s
size, the finished Greenleaf Trust Building
now offers classic visual appeal and a wealth
of functional spaces.
ENJOYING THE FRUITS OF THEIR LABOR
As the Greenleaf Trust project progressed,
the team enjoyed a steady stream of
hospitality and good will from the
businesses, civic leaders and people of
Birmingham. Although they always wanted
to be good neighbors, the warm welcome
that they received further cemented their
desire to make themselves a positive
addition to the community. One of the
surest ways to make a good first impression
was to fit in with the unique architecture of
the city, as defined by historic downtown
buildings and the nearby Cranbrook
Educational Community.
The building’s classic, contemporary styling
pays respectful homage to Birmingham’s
architectural heritage, while the Mankato
Greenleaf Trust occupies a significant portion of the building, which also houses an Italian
restaurant and luxury residential units, along with additional Class A office space.
38 CAM MAGAZI NE MAY 2011 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
stone used on the exterior helped to meet
sustainability goals by being sourced within
500 miles of the site. Mankato stone and
other design elements from the exterior are
carried into the building’s interior to create a
seamless, yet elegant, look. No detail was too
small for consideration, as even exterior glass
and custom interior lighting fixtures were
selected to complement the Greenleaf Trust
logo.
“This project afforded a great opportunity
to combine the site constraints, the program
requirements, the wonderful architectural
history of the vicinity, and the owner’s true
desire to meet the LEED criteria on a
Brownfield, while also building a structure
that would stand the test of time and act as
a catalyst for future development standards
within the Birmingham area,” said Jeff
Eckert, senior principal for Eckert Wordell.
“This building makes a profound statement
towards those ends.”
In addition to making a positive impact
today, the Greenleaf Trust Building was also
designed to conserve resources for
tomorrow. Brownfield redevelopment is an
inherently green process and this particular
site also offers pedestrian access to
downtown buildings and mass transit
options. Locally available materials with
high levels of recycled content were used
whenever feasible. Construction waste was
also given careful consideration, but
recycling required a little extra thought at
the Greenleaf Trust site.
“Normally, you have four or five
dumpsters for cardboard, wood, metal and
other materials,” said McDonald. “We had to
use smaller containers and arrange for more
frequent pickup to manage disposal here
because of the site constraints.”
The project team did a fair amount of
finessing to fit the Greenleaf Trust Building
onto its site, but it looks like it belongs there
now. Much like a tree growing in a forest, the
building became a natural part of the
landscape that is in harmony with its
surroundings. Thanks to the skills and vision
of the entire project team, Birmingham’s
watched site has finally bloomed.
THE FOLLOWING SUBCONTRACTORS
AND PROFESSIONAL CONSULTANTS
CONTRIBUTED THEIR SKILLS TO THE
PROJECT:
• Carpet and Specialty Flooring – SCI
Floorcovering, Southfield (Core and Shell,
Greenleaf Trust Interior and Zazios
Restaurant)
• Civil Engineer – Nowak & Fraus, Pontiac
• Commissioning Agent – L.L. Catey
Engineering Services, LLC, Royal Oak
• Concrete Flatwork, Structural and Floor
Slabs – Ideal Contractors, Detroit (Core
and Shell)
• Concrete Forming and Accessories –
Albanelli Cement Contractors, Livonia
(Core and Shell)
• Conveying Equipment – Connelly Crane
Rental Corporation, Detroit
(Core and Shell)
• Drywall, Acoustical Ceilings and General
Trades – Jasman Construction,
Whitmore Lake (Core and Shell, Greenleaf
Trust Interior and Zazios Restaurant)
• Earth Moving – Site Development, Inc.,
Madison Heights (Core and Shell)
• Electrical and Fire Alarm – Edgewood
Electric, Madison Heights (Core and Shell,
Greenleaf Trust Interior and Zazios
Restaurant)
• Elevators – Thyssen Krupp Elevator
Company, Livonia (Core and Shell)
• Fire Alarm – Riverside Integrated
Systems, Grand Rapids (Core and Shell)
• Fire Protection – Advanced Fire
Protection, Lansing (Core and Shell,
Greenleaf Trust Interior and Zazios
Restaurant)
C O N S T R U C T I O N H I G H L I G H T
Mankato stone and other design elements
from the exterior are carried into the
building’s interior to create a seamless, yet
elegant, look.
CAM MAGAZI NE MAY 2011 39 Visit us online at www.cammagazineonline.com
• Fire Protection – Westland Fire
Protection, Livonia (Core and Shell,
Greenleaf Trust Interior and Zazios
Restaurant)
• Fire and Smoke Protection – William E
Harnish Accoustical, Inc., Redford (Core
and Shell)
• Food Service Equipment – Great Lakes
Hotel Supply, Detroit (Zazios Restaurant)
• General Trades – City Renovation & Trim,
Inc., Auburn Hills (Core and Shell)
• Glazing – Madison Heights Glass,
Ferndale (Core and Shell, Greenleaf Trust
Interior and Zazios Restaurant)
• Hard Tile Flooring – F.D. Beradino Tile,
Eastpointe (Core and Shell and Greenleaf
Trust Interior)
• Hard Tile Flooring – Wolverine Stone
Company, Warren (Zazios Restaurant)
• Landscaping – Donato Landscape,
Shelby Township (Core and Shell)
• Mechanical – Pro Services, Portage (Core
and Shell, Greenleaf Trust Interior and
Zazios Restaurant)
• Mechanical and Electrical Engineer –
Ketchmark & Associates, Burr Ridge, IL
• Painting – Somerset Painting and
Commercial Services, Washington (Core
and Shell, Greenleaf Trust Interior and
Zazios Restaurant)
• Siding (Metal Panels) – Architectural
Metals, Inc., Portland (Core and Shell)
• Roofing – Stephenson & Sons Roofing,
Flint (Core and Shell)
• Security Consultant – Security Design &
Consulting, Inc., Flushing
• Site Remediation – Bierlein Companies,
Inc., Midland (Core and Shell)
• Security Cameras – SecurAlarm Systems,
Grand Rapids (Core and Shell, Greenleaf
Trust Interior and Zazios Restaurant)
• Specialty Doors and Frames – Overhead
Door of Jackson, Jackson
(Core and Shell)
• Sound Consultants – Kolano & Saha
Engineers, Waterford
• Special Foundations, Load Bearing
Elements and Auger Cast Piles –
Schnabel Foundation Company, Cary IL
(Core and Shell)
• Structural Engineer – JDH Engineering,
Inc., Grandville
• Structural Steel and Metal Fabrication –
Kirby Steel, Burton (Core and Shell)
• Structured Cabling – TeL Systems, Ann
Arbor (Zazios Restaurant)
• Testing Consultant – Soils & Materials
Engineers, Inc. (SME), Plymouth
• Traffic Coatings – D.C. Byers, Grand
Rapids (Core and Shell)
• Traffic Consultants – Birchler Arroyo
Associates, Inc., Lathrup Village
• Traffic Signaling Consultant – Mansell
Associates, Inc., Farmington
• Traffic Signals – Rauhorn Electric,
Macomb (Core and Shell)
• Unit Masonry – Leidal & Hart, Livonia
(Core and Shell and Zazios Restaurant)
Subcontractors and professional consultants
listed in the Construction Highlight are
identified by the general contractor,
architect or owner.



NOW INCLUDES
Construction
Pre-View Projects!!






40 CAM MAGAZI NE MAY 2011 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
Therma-Tru® Introduces New Products
Builders and remodelers looking to enhance their marketplace
presence and gain business in 2011 can stop at the front door. That’s
where the innovative advantages start for building industry profes-
sionals using the newest Therma-Tru products.
The newest products from Therma-Tru are intended to meet
builder demands and the current tastes of homeowners, including
more choices in premium doors and better entryway functionality.
Add the benefits of significantly easier maintenance and the
improved energy efficiency of fiberglass over wood, and Therma-Tru
is continuing to provide builders with a product offering that has
made it their most preferred brand of entry doors for 10 years
running.
Therma-Tru showcased its full portfolio of fiberglass entryway
solutions at the show plus premiered new products that include:
the new Classic-Craft® Canvas Collection™, fiberglass doors feature
a smooth, paintable surface designed with the performance and
elegance of the Classic-Craft line; the enhanced Fiber-Classic® Oak
Collection™, which now includes more aesthetically pleasing, high-
definition embossments to be paired with a wider variety of
decorative glass options; the New Avonlea™ Glass Design, which
expands Therma-Tru’s decorative glass portfolio with its new clear
baroque glass design with black nickel caming, designed to
complement Modern, New American and Colonial homes; and New
Vented Sidelites, which allow homeowners to let fresh air and light
into their homes without compromising style or energy efficiency.
For more information about Therma-Tru Doors, visit
www.thermatru.comor call (800) 537-8827.
Insect Shield® Repellent Work Wear Program
Enhances Corporate Occupational Safety and
Health Measures
Insect Shield repellent work wear offers vital protection against a
variety of insects that can cause dangerous diseases such as malaria,
dengue fever or Lyme disease.
The Insect Shield program is being offered to oil and gas, mining
and forestry companies and their subcontractors in locations where
insect-borne disease is endemic. Every day, thousands of these
company’s employees are exposed to insects that can carry malaria,
dengue fever, trypanosomiasis, filariasis, leishmaniasis, and other
dangerous diseases. Insect Shield’s long-lasting clothing
treatment—proven to last through 70 washings—is an excellent
solution for employees living in harm’s
way.
The Insect Shield Workplace
Safety & Health online store
makes protective
clothing and gear items
available to workers in at-risk
locations across the globe. The
Insect Shield assortment
consists of work wear, profes-
sional apparel and
accessories—including
clothing that also offers sun
protection, flame resistance
and high visibility—as well as
additional protective items
such as mosquito nets for use
at home. A Youth section was
recently added to go a step
further and help protect the
families of employees who
have been relocated to disease-
risk parts of the world.
Patent-pending Insect Shield technology provides long-lasting,
effective, invisible, and odorless protection against insects. Insect
Shield apparel products repel ticks, ants, flies, chiggers, and midges
(no-see-ums) through 70 launderings.
For more information, visit http://www.insectshield.com/work,
http://www.facebook.com/insectshieldor
http://www.twitter.com/insect_shield.
P R O D U C T S H O W C A S E
LED Fluorescent Tube
Replacement Lamps
Available From NxGen
Technologies
NxGen Technologies, Inc. has
announced the availability of its second
generation LED fluorescent tube
replacement lamps. The lamps are UL
listed and are available in 2-, 3-, 4-, and 5-
foot lengths.
Requiring no ballast to work, the LED
fluorescent tube replacement lamps are
virtually maintenance-free for their
lifetime – which is estimated at more
than 40,000 hours. The daylight white
color lamps operate at a color
temperature of 6,500oK, the neutral
white at 4,100oK and the warm white at 3,000oK. And, because they
are LED-based, they do not have the flicker or warm up time
associated with fluorescent tubes.
Further information on the LED Fluorescent Tube Replacement
lamps produced by NxGen Technologies can be obtained by calling
215-493-2673 or writing to NxGen Technologies, Inc., 1790
Yardley-Langhorne Rd., Suite 206, Yardley, PA 19067. Information
about the lamp is also available on the worldwide Web at:
www.nxgentechnologies.com.
Metabo's New Filet Weld Grinder Well Suited
for Finishing Various Metals
Metabo Corporation now offers the KNSE 12-150 Fillet Weld
Grinder, which is well suited for finishing various metals including
stainless steel. The new extended nose grinder is used for finishing
and polishing hard to access fillet welds typically found on handrails
or inside welds on enclosed areas.
The KNSE12-150 features an extremely flat design that enhances
the tool's overall operation and maneuverability. Weighing just 6.6
lbs and equipped with Metabo's Marathon motor, this new tool is
designed with double gear reduction for extreme power delivery.
Standard features include a winding protection grid, auto-stop
carbon brushes and thumbwheel for speed preselect. The Vario
Tacho Constamatic (VTC) full-wave electronic speed control feature
keeps the tool's speed nearly constant under any load.
Safety features of the KNSE12-150 include an electronic soft-start,
a toolless adjustment for the grinder's protective cover, overload
protection and a power interruption protection.
The KNSE12-150 can take a weld from raw to mirror finish using
the available accessories.
For more information, please visit
http://www.metabo.com/Product-catalogue-handheld-
powertools.24048+M517c96221c6.0.html or contact Terry
Tuerk, Metabo Corporation, 1231 Wilson Drive, West
Chester, PA, 19380; phone: 800-638-2264; fax:
800-638-2261; e-mail:
ttuerk@metabousa.com; or visit
www.metabousa.com.
CAM MAGAZI NE MAY 2011 41 Visit us online at www.cammagazineonline.com
SnowEx Introduces New Economical Salt Box
SnowEx introduces the SB-1000 salt box, an economical version of
its popular storage systems. The SB-1000 features a highly durable
design but is inexpensive, making it well suited for entry-level
needs.
Constructed from water-
resistant, noncorrosive
polyethylene, the
SB-1000 has a
storage capacity of
10 cubic feet and is
designed to protect
a wide variety of
materials from
weather elements.
Although the most
common use is for
storing salt, sand and
other spreading
materials for ice
management, the salt box
can also be used for holding fertilizer, tools and anything else that
requires a weather-protected enclosure.
In addition to the SB-1000, SnowEx offers a full line of salt boxes
with varying capacities and more convenience features, such as
lockable lids and fork pockets.
For more information, contact TrynEx International, 23455
Regency Park Drive, Warren, MI 48089; call 800-725-8377 or 586-756-
6555; fax 586-755-0338; e-mail
info@trynexfactory.com; or visit
www.trynexfactory.com.
Hilti's Newest Heavy
Hitter
Designed for heavy breaking
applications and demolition work at
floor level, Hilti unveils its newest
electro pneumatic tool, the new TE 3000-
AVR Breaker. The Hilti TE 3000-AVR Breaker
boasts the power of an air tool, at the same
weight level, without the need for an air
compressor to deliver explosive breaking
power and exceptional mobility.
Weighing 65 pounds, the TE 3000-AVR
delivers 50 foot-pounds of impact energy to
break up to six tons of material per hour, at rate
comparable with a 60- to 65-pound air tool. This
tool offers contractors easy, flexible operation
from anywhere on the jobsite. Because it does
not require an air compressor, the TE 3000-AVR
allows contractors to have their tool set up and
working before the compressor is even towed to the location and
hooked up. For maximum versatility, the TE 3000-AVR accepts
standard 1-1/8" chisels, same as air-powered tools.
Hilti has developed a range of sub-chassis active vibration
reduction (AVR) solutions to benefit power tool operators, solutions
matched to the needs of specific applications. The TE 3000-AVR
incorporates Hilti’s AVR system to dramatically cut the vibration
passed along to the operator during operation, reducing fatigue and
allowing them to work longer.
42 CAM MAGAZI NE MAY 2011 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
Hilti redefines durability with the TE 3000-
AVR. An active cooling system reduces wear
and tear on the motor, electronics and
hammering mechanism. Plus, the TE 3000-
AVR features a brushless SR motor that
eliminates the need to replace carbon
brushes — allowing longer intervals
between service and twice the expected
motor life.
The Hilti TE 3000-AVR provides long-term
service under the most rugged conditions.
Hilti backs that promise up with its Lifetime
Service agreement, a service plan that
includes two years of no-cost coverage, on
the TE 3000-AVR.
For more information on the Hilti TE 3000-
AVR Breaker, please contact Hilti Customer
Service. From the U.S., call Hilti, Inc. at 1-800-
879-8000, or visit www.us.hilti.com; from
Canada, call Hilti (Canada) Corporation at
1-800-461-3028, or visit www.hilti.ca.
DaVinci Roofscapes®
Introduces New Roofing Colors
DAVINCI ROOFSCAPES HAS INTRODUCED
NEW ROOFING COLORS AND BLENDS.
Eight new colors and eight additional
new color blends were introduced for the
durable DaVinci polymer slate and shake
roofing tiles. With the addition of these
colors, the company now offers a total of 49
colors and 28 standard color
blends.
New DaVinci
polymer slate colors
include Medium
Terracotta, Dark
Terracotta, Light Clay and
Dark Clay. They join the
existing slate colors of:
Light Gray; Medium Gray;
Dark Gray; Light Green;
Medium Green; Dark Green;
Light Brown; Medium Brown;
Medium Tan; Dark Tan; Light
Purple; Dark Purple; Green
Stone; Dark Stone; Slate Gray;
Slate Black; Light Violet; Dark Violet; and Dark
Amber.
New colors in the shake line introduced at
the show include Light Chesapeake, Medium
Light Chesapeake, Medium Chesapeake and
Dark Chesapeake. There are 22 other
available shake colors from DaVinci
including: Light Autumn; Medium Light
Autumn; Medium Autumn; Dark Autumn;
Light New Cedar; Medium Light New Cedar;
Medium New Cedar; Medium Dark New
Cedar; Dark New Cedar; Light Mountain;
Medium Mountain; Dark Mountain; Light
Tahoe; Medium Tahoe; Medium Dark Tahoe;
Dark Tahoe; Light Weathered Gray; Medium
Light Weathered Gray; Medium Weathered
Gray; Medium Dark Weathered Gray; and
Dark Weathered Gray.
DaVinci launched eight new color blends
as a result of research and homeowner
requests over the years. Together with the
company’s previous 20 color blend options,
DaVinci now offers a total of 28 color blends
in their standard offerings. The new blends
include: Milano – Light Gray, Medium Gray,
Dark Gray and Dark Purple colors in the
single-width Valoré Slate and Bellaforté
product lines; Cambridge – Light Brown,
Medium Brown, Dark Stone and Dark Tan
colors in the single-width Valoré Slate and
Bellaforté product lines; Sedona – Medium
Terracotta, Dark Terracotta, Light Clay and
Dark Clay in the single-width Valoré Slate
and Bellaforté product lines; Sabino – Dark
Mountain and Medium Autumn in the
single-width Valore Slate product line and
Dark Mountain and Medium Autumn in the
Bellaforté product line; Sonora – Medium
Terracotta, Dark Terracotta, Light Clay and
Dark Clay in the multi-width Slate product
line; Canyon – Dark Mountain, Medium
Autumn and Dark Autumn in the multi-
width Slate product line; Harbor Gray – Light
Chesapeake, Medium Light Chesapeake,
Medium Chesapeake and Dark
Chesapeake in the single-
width Valoré Shake product
line; Chesapeake – Light
Chesapeake, Medium Light
Chesapeake, Medium
Chesapeake and Dark
Chesapeake in the multi-
width Shake and Fancy
Shake product lines.
A newly-
enhanced Color
Designer tool on the
DaVinci website offers
a fast, easy way for people
to view the standard color blends or
create their own custom color blends using
up to five of DaVinci’s 49 standard colors.
The easy-to-navigate DaVinci website also
includes technical specifications and
downloadable materials for single- and
multi-width Slate and Shake tiles, an
architectural toolbox and a section on
sustainability and the environment. Visitors
find it simple to locate roofing tile options
on the site and learn about the advantages
of selecting the synthetic roofing that are
backed by a 50-year warranty and are 100
percent recyclable.
For additional information call 1-800-328-
4624 or visit www.davinciroofscapes.com.
P R O D U C T S H O W C A S E


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Rolland L. Stapleton, CPC, CPE
• Certified Professional
Constructor (10 + yrs)
• Certified Professional
Estimator (30 + yrs)
• Arbitrator
(AAA 20 + yrs)
• Adjunct University Professor Constrution
(20 + yrs)
• Recognized at trial courts and arbitration
as Expert Witness
• Construction Claims Management, Claims
Development, Claim Defense
• Estimating
• Scheduling
• Constructability reviews and analysis
• Cost outcome projections planned vs
actual analysis
Phone: 313.320.2663
Website: rlsa.net
E-mail: rstapleton@rlsa.net
CAM MAGAZI NE MAY 2011 43 Visit us online at www.cammagazineonline.com
Duro-Last Roofing, Inc.,
headquartered in Saginaw,
recently announced that
National Sales Manager
John Deal was recognized
by the Restaurant Facility
Management Association
(RFMA) at their national
conference, being named
the “Vendor of the Year” for
2010. Duro-Last also
recently announced the
hiring of Thomas L. Saeli as
the company’s chief
executive officer. In addition
to Duro-Last, Saeli will
oversee the operations of
sister companies
Plastatech® Engineering
Ltd., Oscoda Plastics®, Inc.,
TIP-TOP® Screw
Manufacturing, Inc., Energy
Solutions Insulation®, Inc.,
and JRB Personnel, LLC.
Also, Duro-Last has
announced the hiring of Brian Brigmann as
director of purchasing. Brigmann will be
responsible for the supply agreements and
activities associated with the procurement
of materials for manufacturing operations at
Duro-Last and its sister companies.
Fishbeck, Thompson, Carr & Huber, Inc.
(FTC&H) Engineers ● Scientists ● Architects
● Constructors, is pleased to announce the
promotion of Kamran Qadeer, PE to
associate. Qadeer, a senior project manager,
works out of FTC&H’s Farmington Hills office
and is a registered profes-
sional engineer in Michigan.
He is the past president of
the American Society of
Civil Engineers (ASCE)
Michigan Section and is
currently chair of the
History and Heritage
Committee of ASCE
Southeastern Branch. He is an active
member of American Council of Engineering
Companies (ACEC) and Southern Oakland
County Municipal Engineers (SOCME).
Plumbing Professors, Canton Township,
is pleased to announce that Mike
Demarest, service technician, has been
awarded his Master Plumber License by the
State of Michigan.
Kevin Akey, of AZD Architect, Bloomfield
Hills, and Bernie Ronnish of Ronnish
Construction, Troy, have won the “2011
Outstanding New
Construction Award” for
their Lofts on 9 Mile project.
The award was presented
by Main Street Oakland
County in recognition of the
team’s contributions to
improving the downtowns
of local communities.
Hubbell, Roth & Clark, Inc. (HRC), a
consulting engineering and architectural
services firm with offices throughout
Michigan, recently announced that Jane
Graham, AIA, has been promoted to
associate. Graham functions as HRC’s
Industrial Facilities Design Department
Head and provides project management
and architectural design services, practicing
sustainable design principles, for HRC’s
Architectural and Industrial Facilities Design
Departments.
C2AE, a full-service architectural,
engineering, and planning design firm
based in Lansing, recently announced the
election of its Board of Directors. The 2011
elected officers are as follows: William
Kimble, PE – Chairman and president of the
Board; Lawrence Fox, PE – vice president of
the Board; Paul Rozeboom, PE, LEED® AP –
Board treasurer; and Kevin Feuka, PE –
Board secretary. The remaining Directors
elected to the Board include the following
principal shareholders: Mathew Jarvi, PE;
Dennis Bekken, AIA, LEED® AP; and Dennis
Jensen, AIA. In addition to re-electing its
Board of Directors, C2AE is pleased to
announce several new associates and senior
associates who are shareholders of the firm.
New senior associates include: Adam
Falkowski; John Harvey; Roger Marks; and
Rusti Owens. New associates include: Norm
Farhat; Amanda Poynter; Eric Rantanen;
and Ernie West.
Lawrence R. Chute, PE, SE has joined Soil
and Materials Engineers, Inc. (SME) as a
senior project manager in the firm’s
Plymouth office. With 33
years of engineering
experience, Chute
specializes in helping
owners and
design/construction teams
with structural issues, and
building enclosure analysis
and design.
The architectural firm of Hobbs+Black is
happy to announce a reorganized
management team in its Lansing office.
Robert Daverman has joined as a vice
president and project manager. He is a
registered architect with over 30 years
experience in Michigan and is a LEED
Accredited Professional. Nick Scarpone,
vice president, will continue in his project
manager capacity and will also assume the
role of office production coordinator. He will
be responsible for the technical production
of all projects within mid-Michigan. Marty
Ruiter, senior associate, will continue in his
project manager capacity, while also being
responsible for mid-Michigan Business
Development. Dennis Bartz, senior
associate, will continue as the firm’s director
of engineering. In addition to acting as a
project manager, Dennis will be responsible
for coordinating concept and development
of structural, mechanical, and electrical
systems for all Hobbs + Black projects. The
architectural firm is headquartered in Ann
Arbor, with full-service regional offices in
Lansing and Phoenix, AZ.
C O R P O R A T E N E W S
Clark Construction Company has been
named general contractor for the major
renovation of two student housing units at
Michigan State University (MSU).
Construction work at MSU’s Bailey and
Rather Halls is expected to begin in May
2011. The $24.9 million renovation at Bailey
and Rather Halls will transform 200,000-
square-feet of student housing units in the
Brody complex. Renovations are expected
to be completed June 2012.
Synergy Group, Inc., Troy, has completed
a design-build project for an international
business center expansion to the
Automation Alley building ahead of
schedule, it was announced recently.
Automation Alley is a technology business
association comprised of more than 1,000
member companies, housed in a 12,000-
square-foot building in Troy. Synergy was
selected to build the office building
expansion on a design-build basis.
Construction took place during the winter
months to make the center open and ready
for business in March. The expanded center
was officially opened at an April 28
ceremony at Automation Alley.
P E O P L E I N C O N S T R U C T I O N
Deal
Saeli
Qadeer
Chute
Ronnish
Brigmann
CAM has announced its 2011 Golf Outing
schedule:
• June 14 – Devil's Ridge Golf Club
in Oxford
• July 19 – Dunham Hills Golf Club
in Hartland
• August 23 – Fieldstone Golf Club
in Auburn Hills
• September 12 – Paint Creek Country
Club in Lake Orion
Contact Diana Brown at CAM for more infor-
mation or to register (248) 972-1000.
May 19 – CAM Connect at Willys Overland
Lofts
CAM will present their second CAM
Connect of 2011 at the Willys Overland Lofts
in Detroit, from 4:00 - 8:00 pm. Professionals
will be on hand to discuss project financing,
architectural design, and give tours. There
will also be plenty of time to network with
others in the construction industry, so bring
your business cards and get ready to con-
nect! This CAM Connect event is FREE to all
CAM Members. To RSVP, contact Mary
Carabott at CAM (248) 972-1000.
May 24 – CAM Sporting Clays Shootout
This event will take place at the Detroit
Gun Club in Walled Lake. Lunch and a deli-
cious steak dinner will also be served.
Deadline for registration is May 16. All
shooters must bring their own shotguns;
only 12 or 20 gauge may be used.
For more information, or to register, call
Gregg Montowski at 248-972-1000.
June 6-9 – Hexagon 2011
The Leica Geosystems’ High Definition
Surveying (HDS™) Worldwide User
Conference and Airborne Sensor (ABS) User
Conference will expand to offer sessions,
hands-on training and new business oppor-
tunities under the Hexagon 2011 umbrella.
Hexagon 2011 will be held at the Orlando
World Center Marriot Resort in Orlando, FL.
For more information about
Leica Geosystems at Hexagon 2011,
please visit website
www.hexagonconference.com.
Jun. 13-15 – NeoCon®
The National Exhibition of Contract
Furnishings, at The Merchandise Mart in
Chicago, IL, will feature the latest design
trends, products, and concepts in office,
healthcare, hospitality, residential, institu-
tional and government interior environ-
ments. A comprehensive conference sched-
ule will offer more than 140 CEU-accredited
seminars, industry association forums, and
keynote speakers.
For more information, visit
www.neocon.com, or call 800-677-6278
(MART) in the United States, or 312-527-
7600 outside the United States.
Jun. 16-19 – CEO Forum – The American
Society of Concrete Contractors (ASCC) will
hold its annual CEO Forum at the Pinehurst
Resort in Pinehurst, NC. The CEO Forum is a
leadership and executive conference for
concrete professionals. Participants include
CEOs, presidents, owners, CFOs, vice presi-
dents and other top managers of concrete
contracting firms.
For more information, or to register, visit
www.ascconline.org, or call the ASCC office
at 866-788-2722.
June 29, 2011 – Mid-Year Economic
Forecast and State of the Industry
Breakfast
Presented by CAM in partnership with the
BIA (Building Industry Association). This
breakfast will take place at the Best Western
Sterling Inn in Sterling Heights. Learn what
Michigan can and must do to bring about
positive changes to make us a leader once
again. Featured speakers include Paul Traub,
business economist with the Federal
Reserve Bank of Chicago (Detroit branch),
and John Rakolta, Jr., chairman and CEO of
Walbridge. VIP reception prior to the break-
fast meeting. Limited tabletop display space
and sponsorship opportunities are also
available.
For more information or reservations, visit
www.cam-online.com or contact Kevin
Koehler at CAM (248) 972-1000.
44 CAM MAGAZI NE MAY 2011 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
C O R P O R A T E N E W S – C O N S T R U C T I O N C A L E N D A R
CONSTRUCTION
CALENDAR
M
a
y
Please submit all calendar items no less than six weeks prior to the event to: Calendar Editor,
CAM Magazine, P.O. Box 3204, Bloomfield Hills, MI 48302-3204.
Lansing-based C2AE, the engineering and
architectural firm responsible for the design
of the new Motz County Park in St. Johns, is
pleased to announce the project has
received four awards since its grand
opening last summer. A former gravel pit,
Motz County Park is Clinton County’s first
park. The 42-acre property was transformed
into a user-friendly outdoor recreational
area that incorporates Universal Access (UA)
features throughout. Serving all visitors
equally regardless of age or ability, the park
offers an enhanced level of convenience and
function beyond that of a traditional park.
JC Beal Construction Inc., a general
contracting firm with offices in Detroit and
Ann Arbor, has recently signed a contract
with LM - Atlanta Airport Inc. for the
renovation of a former 499-room Ramada
Inn located near Atlanta, GA into the newly
branded 333-room Holiday Inn & Suites
Atlanta Airport North Hotel. Designed by
Kraemer Design Group of Detroit, the
project comprehensively modernizes the
268,000-square-foot building’s
infrastructure and creates a Holiday Inn-
level suite product not currently available in
the area. Completion is scheduled for fall
2011.
Canton-based Plumbing Professors, a
full service plumbing, sewer repair and pipe
lining company, has been awarded the
"2010 Job of the Year" by NuFlow for their
epoxy pipe lining work for the State of Ohio.
Saginaw-based Duro-Last® Roofing, Inc.
was recently recognized at the Restaurant
Facility Management Association’s (RFMA)
National Conference in Long Beach, CA, by
Darden Restaurants as “Vendor of the Year”
for 2010. Over 8 million square feet of Duro-
Last roofing membrane have been installed
on 1,138 Darden restaurants since 1987.
Hilti has announced that eight of its
products have received the prestigious
GOOD DESIGN™ Award presented by the
Chicago Athenaeum Museum of
Architecture and Design, together with The
European Centre for Architecture Art Design
and Urban Studies. The eight Hilti products
receiving the award are: the PRE 3 Rotating
Laser; DSH 700 & 900 Gas Saws; TE 1000-AVR
and TE 1500-AVR Breakers; WSR 18-A
Cordless Reciprocating Saw; SF 18-A
Cordless Drill Driver; and the SFH 18-A
Cordless Hammer Drill Driver. Hilti’s
Michigan locations include Livonia and
Grand Rapids.
CAM MAGAZI NE MAY 2011 45 Visit us online at www.cammagazineonline.com
A
s you all are probably aware, the 2011 Construction Buyers Guide is out on the street. In an effort to keep our
information as accurate as possible, we’re including here all the changes and corrections we have received for
members’ company listings as of April 5. Changes from the book are in bold.
To see continual, up-to-date, complete company listings, check out the Buyers Guide Online at www.cam-online.com, updated monthly.
Check back to this section every month in CAM Magazine to get heads-up information and news involving the Construction Buyers Guide.
Questions? Contact Mary Carabott at 248-972-1000 for answers and to find out how to add to your online listings.
To obtain additional copies of the Guide, stop by the CAM office and pick them up at no additional charge, or send $6 per book for shipping to
have the books sent to your company via UPS. Please call ahead of time for authorization if you want a substantial number of copies.
Invoices for the 2011 Buyers Guide listings have been generated and mailed. If you have questions regarding your invoice, call the CAM office.
B U Y E R S G U I D E U P D A T E S
Air Design, Inc.
22517 Telegraph Rd.
Southfield, MI 48033
Phone: 248-447-0400
Fax: 248-447-0404
Akey Josephson, LLC
2555 Crumb Rd.
Commerce, MI 48390
Phone: 248-926-2900
Fax: 248-926-2902
B.J. Construction Services, Inc.
42219 Irwin
Harrison Twp., MI 48045
Phone: 586-783-4559
Fax: 586-786-6288
Carlo Construction, Inc.
14899 33 Mile Rd.
Romeo, MI 48065
Phone: 586-752-9771
Fax: 586-752-9772
J.T. Crawford, Inc.
121 Wendover Ct.
Commerce Twp., Mi 48390
Phone: 248-960-7530
Fax: 248-960-7630
Robert J. Davis
8869 Meskill Rd.
Columbus, MI 48063
Phone: 313-884-6347
A.R. Decker & Associates, Inc.
1878 Star Batt Rd.
Rochester Hills, MI 48309
Phone: 248-243-3940
Fax: 248-243-3944
Eagen Drywall, Inc.
P.O. Box 117
Marysville, MI 48040
Phone: 810-364-7660
Fax: 810-364-3810
R.P. Fitzpatrick Co., Inc.
14098 Cranbrook
Riverview, MI 48193
Phone: 734-283-5987
Christopher Kulin Building Co.
7649 Mary Lou Ct.
Shelby Twp., MI 48317
Phone: 810-499-9245
Fax: 586-580-2040
LPL Financial
28411 Northwestern Hwy., Suite
1200
Southfield, MI 48034
Phone: 248-353-6570
Fax: 248-352-3612
David Milling Architects
2106 Overlook Ct.
Ann Arbor, MI 48103
Phone: 734-913-1010
Fax: 734-913-6054
Mosser Construction, Inc.
(Replaces Toledo location only)
1613 Henthrone Dr.
Maumee, OH 43537
Phone: 419-861-5100
Fax: 419-861-5110
OYK Engineering & Construction
1349 Rochester Rd.,Ste.210
Rochester Hills,MI 48307
Phone: 248-656-7695
Fax: 248-656-7694
Patriot Pumps
1200 Victory Dr.
Howell, MI 48843
Phone: 517-552-5650
Fax: 517-552-5996
RBE, Inc.
4822 Joslyn Rd.
Orion, MI 48359
Phone: 248-874-2006
Fax: 248-874-1966
RCI Roofing & Sheet Metal, Inc.
735 N. Second St
Brighton, MI 48116
Phone: 810-220-2300
Fax: 810-220-4829
Ronnisch
Construction Group
320 Martin, Suite 30
Birmingham, MI 48009
Phone: 248-549-1800
Fax: 248-723-8080
Scott Williams Trucking
& Excavating, Inc.
(Formerly Tyger Excavating, Inc.)
58751 North Ave.
Ray Twp., MI 48096
Phone: 586-749-9470
Fax: 586-749-7246
The Sheer Shop
7393 23 Mile Rd.
Shelby Twp., MI 48316
Phone: 586-731-4499
Fax: 586-731-7301
Sidock Group, Inc.
(Replaces Novi location only)
45650 Grand River Ave., Floor 1,
Novi, MI 48374
Phone: 248-349-4500
Fax: 248-349-1429
Transwestern
(Formerly Transwestern
Commercial Services)
32255 Northwestern Hwy.
Farmington Hills, MI 48334
Phone: 248-932-2840
Fax: 248-932-1108
Tyger Excavating, Inc.
21 Kercheval Ave.,Ste.285
Grosse Pointe,MI 48236
Phone: 586-270-6672
Fax: 586-270-6673
BUYERS GUIDE
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46 CAM MAGAZI NE MAY 2011 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
W E L C O M E N E W M E M B E R S A D V E R T I S E R S I N D E X
Ace Cutting Equipment ................................................21
Aluminum Supply Company
/Marshall Sales ............................................................6
Aoun & Company ............................................................32
Auch, George W. Co. ........................................................25
CAM / BIA Mid-Year Economic Conference ..........35
CAM ECPN..........................................................................39
C.A.S.S. ................................................................................17
CEI Roofing ........................................................................21
C.F.C.U. ................................................................................BC
Connelly Crane Rental Corp.........................................38
Curran Crane Co., J.J. ......................................................33
Detroit Terrazzo Contractors Association ..............32
Doeren Mayhew ..............................................................46
Engineered Buildings, Inc. ..............................................7
Fanning Howey ................................................................33
Fishbeck, Thompson, Carr & Huber, Inc. ..................21
G2 Consulting Group ....................................................34
Hartland Insurance Group, Inc. ..................................11
Interface Financial Group ............................................42
Lawrence Technological University ..........................29
Michigan Construction Marketplace......................IBC
Next Generation Services Group ..............................30
North American Dismantling Corp. ..........................19
Oakland Companies..........................................................5
Oakland Metal Sales, Inc. ..............................................10
Plante & Moran, PLLC ....................................................15
Plumbing Professors ........................................................7
R.S. Dale Co. ......................................................................IFC
Roland L. Stapleton ........................................................42
Ronald B. Rich......................................................................9
Roofers Local 149 ..............................................................7
Roofing Technology Associates, LTD........................19
SMRCA....................................................................................5
Scaffolding, Inc. ..................................................................7
Valenti Trobec Chandler Inc./
Griffin Smalley & Wilkerson ....................................3
&
W E L C O M E N E W M E M B E R S
AIR TEMP SOLUTIONS, GREGORY
ALPINE ENGINEERING, INC., NOVI
BRENNAN JEWELRY, INC., ALLEN PARK
HART & ASSOCIATES CONSTRUCTION, LLC
DETROIT
INDUSTRIAL PIPING & MAINTENANCE CO.
STURGIS
METRO CONSULTING ASSOCIATES, PLLC
BELLEVILLE
MICHAEL ANDREWS CONCRETE, LLC
TECUMSEH
ORION STONE WHOLESALE, ORION
PARK DEVELOPERS, BROOKLYN
PRANAM GLOBAL TECH, INC., DETROIT
PRUDENTIAL PROTECTIVE SERVICES
SOUTHFIELD
R L SHERIDAN, LLC, GARDEN CITY
RAYMOND DESTEIGER, INC., STERLING HTS
THE THINK SHOP ARCHITECTS, BRIGHTON
TITTLE BROTHERS CONSTRUCTION, LLC
LINCOLN PARK
WESCO DISTRIBUTION, STERLING HTS.
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Equal Housing Lender NCUA
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to serve the members of the construction trades
and their families, we have been providing
unmatched personal service ever since.
Join us and experience banking made better,
service the way it used to be.
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