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Republic of the Philippines

Department of Education
Bureau of Secondary Education
Curriculum Development Division
Pasig City

March 9, 2011
TABLE OF CONTENTS

ii Introduction

I. Conceptual Framework in English

II. Concept Matrix

III. Performance Matrix

IV. Program and General Standards

V. Three-Stage Curriculum Framework

Annexes

A. The Monitoring and Evaluation of the Implementation of the 2002 Secondary Education Curriculum: Findings and
Recommendations

B. Guide Questions for the Review of the Curriculum


INTRODUCTION

The Context

As a matter of practice, the curriculum in the Philippines is revised every ten years, but the rapid rate of change in education and the
fast obsolescence of knowledge necessitate a continual revisiting and updating of the curriculum to make it responsive to emerging
changes in the needs of the learner and the society. Thus, the refinement of the curriculum remains to be a work in progress.

Aside from the issue of relevance, the refinement of the secondary education curriculum was guided by the need, as articulated in the
Education for All Plan 2015, to streamline its content in order to improve student mastery and contribute to the attainment of
functional literacy. This became a primary consideration in the design of the curriculum and the formulation of standards and the
essential understandings from which the content of the curriculum was derived.

The results of national and international assessments were reviewed and analyzed for their implications for teaching and learning. The
findings were used to further tighten the standards and improve the delivery of the curriculum and the teaching-learning process. The
results of the evaluation of the implementation of the 2002 Basic Education Curriculum were likewise considered in the review of the
curriculum. The findings and recommendations (see Annex A) guided the training of teachers and the capacity-building of school
heads in managing the pilot test of the curriculum in 23 secondary schools nationwide.

The Process

The refinement of the curriculum followed the Understanding by Design (UbD) model developed by Jay McTighe and Grant Wiggins.
Essential
Questions
Content/ Essential
Objectives
Performance (knowledge/skills) Understandings
Standards

Results/Outcomes
Assessment
Products/ Criteria/
Performances Tools

Assessment

Resources/
Learning
Learning Plan Materials
Activities

The curriculum design has the following elements:

Stage 1
A. Results/Desired Outcomes, which define what students should be able to know and do at the end of the program, course, or unit
of study; generally expressed in terms of overall goals, and specifically defined in terms of content and performance standards

A.1. Content standards, which specify the essential knowledge (includes the most important and enduring ideas, issues,
principles and concepts from the disciplines), skills and habits of mind that should be taught and learned. They answer the
question, “What should students know and be able to do?”

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A.2. Performance standards, which express the degree or quality of proficiency that students are expected to demonstrate in
relation to the content standards. They answer the question, “How well must students do their work?” or “At what level of
performance would the student be appropriately qualified or certified?”

B. Essential Understandings, which are the big and enduring ideas at the heart of the discipline and which we want the children to
remember even long after they leave school
C. Essential Questions, which are open-ended, provocative questions that spark thinking and further inquiry into the essential
meanings and understandings
D. Curriculum Objectives, which are expressed in terms of knowledge and skills that teachers can use as guide in formulating their
own classroom objectives

Stage 2

A. Assessment, which defines acceptable evidence of student’s attainment of desired results; determines authentic performance
tasks that the student is expected to do to demonstrate the desired understandings; and defines the criteria against which the
student’s performances or products shall be judged.

B. Products and Performances, which are the evidence of students’ learning and a demonstration of their conceptual
understanding, and content and skill acquisition

Stage 3

A. Learning Plan, which details the instructional activities that students will go through to attain the standards
A.1. Instructional Activities, which are aligned with the standards and are designed to promote attainment of desired results.

Questions to guide the review of Stages 1 to 3 are provided in Annex B.

A series of consultations with critical stakeholders: students, teachers, school heads, parents, supervisors, industry, local government
officials, the religious, and experts from the academe, among others, were made to validate and further refine the formulation of
standards, the essential understandings, the essential questions, and the assessment criteria and the tools to measure students’ products

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and performances. Workshops were conducted to draft the curriculum documents, write the instructional plan and develop lesson
exemplars.

Teachers were trained and school heads from the 23 identified pilot schools underwent capacity-building to prepare them for the
management of the try-out of the curriculum. The schools were identified based on their location (i.e., Luzon, Visayas, Mindanao) and
the type of program (i.e., regular high school, specialist high school) they offer.

Meetings with school heads and classroom visits were made on a quarterly basis to monitor the try-out of the curriculum. Teachers’
feedback on the lesson guides became the basis for further refinement of the standards and the other elements of the curriculum.

Education supervisors were later trained on providing instructional support to teachers. A follow-through training was subsequently
conducted to further equip them with the tools of supervision given the requirements of the program.

Results

Initial feedback from the teachers has been useful in further improving the design of the curriculum. What has evolved from the try-
out is a core curriculum that builds on and retains the principles of the 2002 BEC (i.e., constructivism, integrative teaching) and
integrates the richness of the special curricular programs (Arts, Sports, Engineering and Science Education Program, Journalism,
Technical-Vocational Program, and Foreign Language). The latter shall be offered in schools as special interest areas which children
can pursue among many other career options in livelihood education. The curriculum has the following features:

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Features of the
Curriculum

• Lean- focuses on essential


understandings
• Sets high expectations SPA
(standards-based) – expressed in SPFL
terms of what students should Tech-Voc
know and the quality and SPS Core Curr.
proficiency of the skill that they
are expected to demonstrate as SPJ
evidence of learning S&T
• Rich and challenging- provides SPED
for a personalized approach to
developing the student’s multiple
intelligences
• Develops readiness and passion
for work and lifelong learning

What is being envisaged is that the core curriculum shall be implemented with special curricular programs: special program in the arts
(SPA), special program in sports (SPS), special program in journalism (SPJ), special program in foreign language, special
science/math (S&T), technical-vocational program (tech-voc) being offered on the side, to develop the students’ multiple intelligences.

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2010 Secondary Education Curriculum

Conceptual Framework in English

Functional Literacy for All

Communi- Literary
cative Competence/
Competence Appreciation

Valuing
CBI CALLA Context
PTCBL Text
Genre Based
Based Based

Theory of Learning
Constructivism
Theory of Language •Learning by doing (D) Theory of Language
•Linguistics •Reflective learning (P)
•Philosophy •Social learning Learning
•Psychology •Learning strategies • Process - Oriented
•Transformative Learning •Condition - Oriented
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CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK OF THE ENGLISH PROGRAM

The overall goal of the 2010 Secondary Education Curriculum is to develop a functionally literate Filipino who can effectively
function in various communication situations. A functionally literate individual demonstrates the following critical competencies: ability to
express clearly one’s ideas and feelings orally, in writing, and non-verbally; ability to learn on his own; ability to read, comprehend and
respond in turn to ideas presented; ability to write clearly ones ideas and feelings, and the ability to access, process, and utilize available
basic and multimedia information. These competencies comprise the expected outcomes of the 2010 Secondary English Curriculum.

As indicated in the schematic diagram, the two-fold goal of this Program is to develop the communicative and the literary
competence/appreciation of the Filipino youth. The purpose is to develop the four competencies: linguistic, sociolinguistic, discourse and
strategic with emphasis on cognitive academic language proficiency (CALP). On the other hand, literary competence is concerned with
general skills needed to meet the communicative and linguistic demands of the different types of literature. Values underscore the significant
insights and universal truths presented in the varied literary texts.

In addition to the macro-language skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing the model highlights the paramount importance of
viewing of multimedia and Internet sources of information as the means to develop creativity in transcoding concepts from one medium to
another. The said language skills do not occur as separate units but rather as integrated units.

In the 2010 Secondary English Curriculum (2010 SEC), other inputs have been considered in response to the paradigm shifts that
have taken place. These additional inputs mark the difference between the 2010 SEC and what preceded it. The model shows that as far as
communicative competence is concerned, the learning program in the curriculum focuses on content–based instruction (CBI) which
integrates the learning of language and the learning of some other content such as Science and Mathematics where English is used as the
medium of instruction. The model, likewise underscores the use of cognitive academic language learning approach (CALLA) which
takes into consideration the various contexts in which language is used in the classroom and other academic settings. In addition, the model
uses the problem-based, task-based, and competency-based learning (PTCBL) approaches in which students collaboratively solve
problems and reflect on their experiences. The teachers take on the role as facilitators of learning. The use of text analysis, text-based,
context–based and genre-based approaches to reading literature and literary appreciation ensures literary competence and appreciation.

The underlying theoretical bases of the 2010 SEC include the theory of language, theory of learning and theory of language
learning. The theories of language and language learning are in keeping with the current pedagogical practice highlighting constructivism.

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2010 Secondary Education Curriculum
English

CONCEPT MATRIX

Year Level FIRST YEAR SECOND YEAR THIRD YEAR FOURTH YEAR

Concept
Philippine Literature Afro-Asian Literature British-American and World Literature
(including Philippine Philippine Literature (including Philippine
Literature) Literature)
Quarter

1 Narrative Narrative Narrative Narrative

2 Drama Drama Drama Drama

3 Poetry Poetry Poetry Poetry

4 Essay Essay Essay Essay

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2010 Secondary Education Curriculum
English

PERFORMANCE MATRIX

Year Level
FIRST YEAR SECOND YEAR THIRD YEAR FOURTH YEAR
Quarter

1 Storytelling Interactive Short Story Writing One-Minute Film/ Movie


Storytelling/Reading Poster Presentation

2 Drama Presentation Playlet Presentation from Theatrical Presentation of Presentation of Modern


an Original Script an Existing Drama Adaptation of a Classic
Play

3 Choral Reading Writing a Haiku/Tanka Poetry Slam/Performance Writing Lyrics to a Given


Poetry Melody

4 Writing a Descriptive Essay Writing Writing a Persuasive Writing Critical Analysis of


Personal/Reflective Essay Essay a Film

4
Quarter 1

NARRATIVE
2010 Secondary Education Curriculum
English II

General Standard: The learner demonstrates literary and communicative competence through his/her understanding of the different genres of Afro-
Asian Literature and other text types for a deeper appreciation of Philippine culture and those of other countries.

Quarter 1: Narrative
Stage 1: Results/Outcomes Stage 2 : Assessment
Standard Essential Product/ At the level of
Content Performance Understanding Question Performance Understanding Performance

The learner The learner Afro-Asian narratives How do Afro-Asian An interactive story Explanation Performance
demonstrates participates and reveal a whole range of narratives reveal telling Explain the common assessment of an
understanding of the responds people’s beliefs, attitudes, people’s beliefs, features of narratives. interactive
artistic combination, creatively in an self concept philosophy in attitudes, self- INTERACTIVE  Accurate storytelling based
skillful variation and interactive story life and social concepts, philosophy STORYTELLING - a new  Coherent on the following
intermingling of the telling. ethics/standards. in life and social highly expressive art form of  Insightful criteria:
story’s basic ethics/standards? storytelling that integrates  Focus/content
ingredients which are interaction and narrative. It is Recognize the elements  Problem/
essential in illustrating participatory, for it involves in a text that prompt a Conflict
truth and in recreating the audience as active personal response.  Development of
participants immersed in the  Accurate
a fictional world in an People’s beliefs attitudes, How do people’s action
direct and friendly
interactive story philosophy in life and beliefs and attitudes  Coherent  Delivery
conversation. It’s non-
telling. social ethics/standards enhance universal  Predictive  Voice
conventional , non-linear
serve as means of values and assess which means that story
 Language
expanding experiences Asian identity? elements do not occur in Discuss how the theme of  Mechanics
and enhance universal fixed sequence ( start to a narrative is still  Gestures
values. finish) but can be divergent important to people of
or multidirectional although today.
it has a fixed outcome; what  Credible
matters here is the journey  Justified
not its conclusion.  Insightful

1
Stage 1: Results/Outcomes Stage 2 : Assessment
Standard Essential Product/ At the level of
Content Performance Understanding Question Performance Understanding Performance
Language Focus Interpretation
Construct meaning from
 Describing the inside range of
persons, places, textual/oral narratives.
objects and events  Illustrative
through the use of  Insightful
phrase modifiers  Meaningful
 Using simple past  Significant
tense and time
markers Make meaning of
narratives of different
cultures and eras including
Philippine culture.
 Illustrative
 Illuminating
 Meaningful
 Insightful

Read and listen critically or


interpretatively to a story.
 Insightful
 Meaningful
 Significant
Analyze the structure,
components/elements and
language of Afro-Asian
narratives.
 Credible
 Insightful
 Revealing

2
Stage 1: Results/Outcomes
Stage 2 : Assessment
Standard Essential Product/ At the level of
Content Performance Understanding Question Performance Understanding Performance
Application
Participate and respond
creatively in interactive story
telling.
 Efficient
 Fluent
 Effective

Retell a story from a different


point of view.
 Adaptive
 Fluent
 Effective

Use multimedia and technology


in the presentation.
 Adaptive
 Fluent
 Effective

Retell a story from different


points of view.
 Credible
 Insightful
 Plausible

3
Stage 1: Results/Outcomes Stage 2 : Assessment
Standard Essential Product/ At the level of
Content Performance Understanding Question Performance Understanding Performance
Empathy
Evaluate one’s and others’
narratives presentation
(written/oral) using a set of
rubrics.
 Insightful
 Perspective
 Receptive
 Open

Compare the customs,


traditions, beliefs and culture of
Afro-Asian people to one’s
culture, customs and traditions.
 Insightful
 Perspective
 Receptive
 Open

Self-knowledge
Conduct self-evaluation by
reviewing one’s work in narrative
mode.
 Meta cognitive
 Mature
 Reflective
 Self-adjusting

4
Quarter 1: NARRATIVE

Stage 1: Results/Outcomes Stage 2 : Assessment


Standard Essential Product/ At the level of
Content Performance Understanding Question Performance Understanding Performance
Topic 1 Explanation Performance
The learner The presentation of How does the An insightful Show how the assessment of a
The learner writes an believable characters interplay of personal features/elements of a personal narrative
demonstrates insightful and situations that the elements narrative story work together to based on the
understanding of the personal shape one’s life of short story help one understand and following criteria:
close relationships narrative. complimented by the create a appreciate the narrative.  Focus/ theme
among the elements of interplay of other story meaningful PERSONAL  Accurate  Characters
NARRATIVE - a
a short story that can features and elements whole? short narrative
 Coherent  Problem/ conflict
bring out its meaning. leads to the composition that  Insightful  Development of
understanding of a presents true-to-life Explain how the theme action
Language Focus: story. experiences of the of a narrative is still  Language
 Simple past tense author / narrator. It important to people of  Mechanics
is told in the first
 Time transition Personal narrative What is a person or “I “point of
today.
words reflects significant personal view.  Accurate
human experiences. narrative  Credible
without  Insightful
human Demonstrate imagination
experiences? of writing personal
narratives.
 Illuminating
 Insightful
 Predictive

5
Stage 1: Results/Outcomes Stage 2 : Assessment
Standard Essential Product/ At the level of
Content Performance Understanding Question Performance Understanding Performance
Interpretation
Discover Philippine and Afro-
Asian narratives as means of
expanding experiences and
outlook thus enhancing
worthwhile universal human
values.
 Illustrative
 Insightful
 Meaningful
 Significant
Make meaning of worthwhile
experiences underscored in Afro-
Asian and Phil. narratives.
 Illustrative
 Insightful
 Meaningful
 Significant
Make sense out of the language
features of a narrative.
 Illustrative
 Meaningful
 Significant
Application
Write a well-developed,
organized, coherent and
insightful personal narrative.
 Effective
 Realistic
 Meaningful

6
Stage 1: Results/Outcomes Stage 2 : Assessment
Standard Essential Product/ At the level of
Content Performance Understanding Question Performance Understanding Performance
Use appropriate language structure in
writing personal narratives.
 Efficient
 Effective
Write in expressive and imaginative
modes.
 Efficient
 Effective
 Diverse
Perspective
Discriminate between positive and
negative values used in narratives.
 Credible
 Insightful
 Plausible
Emphasize how narratives serve as
transmitter of culture and values.
 Credible
 Insightful
 Plausible
Infer how the universal themes in
narratives are still prevalent in Afro-
Asian Culture.
 Credible
 Insightful
 Plausible

7
Stage 1: Results/Outcomes Stage 2 : Assessment
Standard Essential Product/ At the level of
Perform
Content Performance Understanding Question Understanding Performance
ance
Empathy
Discover through narratives the links
between one’s life and the lives of
Afro-Asians.
 Insightful
 Perceptive
 Open
Be open to value and respect for
diversity which are evident in
narratives.
 Insightful
 Perceptive
 Open
 Receptive
Self-knowledge
Recognize the effect of a literary piece
on one’s values system.
 Self-aware
 Meta cognitive
 Reflective
Accept one’s strength and values as
underscored in a narrative.
 Self-aware
 Meta cognitive
 Reflective
Relate reading to one’s experience to
clarify meaning.
 Self-aware
 Meta cognitive
 Reflective

8
Stage 1: Results/Outcomes Stage 2 : Assessment
Standard Essential Product/ At the level of
Content Performance Understanding Question Performance Understanding Performance
Topic 2: Explanation
Show the importance of the Performance
The learner The learner Specific literary How do An insightful essence of literary devices assessment of an
demonstrates writes an devices underline, literary/narrative techniques and techniques in the insightful techniques
understanding of the insightful intensify, and devices essay which comprehension and essay based on the
effectiveness of techniques expand a story’s contribute to the focuses on creation of narratives. following criteria:
literary devices and essay which impact and overall theme of narrative styles  accurate  Focus/ content
styles used by the focuses on meaning. the story? and devices  credible  Organization
author in creating an narrative styles  insightful  Style
illusion of reality in and devices  Language
order to communicate TECHNIQUES Support interpretation with mechanics
meaning. ESSAY - an essay facts and specific examples.
that presents how  accurate
Language Focus: effective literary /
 credible
Clarifying and narrative devices and
techniques are as  coherent
describing persons, employed by the
ideas and situations author to Explain how meaning is
by using adjective communicate or to enhanced in a short story.
phrases convey the meaning
 accurate
of the literary piece.
 credible
 insightful

Explain the recurring themes


of narratives lead.
 accurate
 credible
 insightful

9
Stage 1: Results/Outcomes Stage 2 : Assessment
Standard Essential Product/ At the level of
Content Performance Understanding Question Performance Understanding Performance
Gather facts that support
illusion of reality or “fantastic”
reality.
 accurate
 credible
 coherent

Explain the appropriateness of


literary/ narrative devices/
technique used by the author
for specific purpose.
 credible
 justified
 insightful

Interpretation
Analyze the distinct qualities of
Afro-Asian narratives.
 illustrative
 insightful
 meaningful
Evaluate the effectiveness of
narrative/literary devices/
techniques used by the author.
 illustrative
 insightful
 meaningful

10
Stage 1: Results/Outcomes Stage 2 : Assessment
Standard Essential Product/ At the level of
Content Performance Understanding Question Performance Understanding Performance
Application
Recollect, talk and write
about the narrative/ literary
styles/techniques/ devices
used by the author.
 adaptive
 efficient
 effective
Write personal reflections
about narrative/literary
devices used by the author.
 adaptive
 effective
 efficient
Write creative, original and
analytical responses to a
narrative.
 realistic
 effective
Demonstrate a mature
command of the language.
 fluent
 effective
Use adjective phrases to
clarify intentions/
expressions.
 effective
 efficient
 fluent

11
Stage 1: Results/Outcomes Stage 2 : Assessment
Standard Essential Product/ At the level of
Content Performance Understanding Question Performance Understanding Performance
Perspective
Generate important questions
about the narrative
techniques/devices used.
 credible
 insightful
 plausible
Compare/contrast the
narrative/literary devices used
in the story read.
 credible
 insightful
 plausible

12
Stage 1: Results/Outcomes Stage 2 : Assessment
Standard Essential Product/ At the level of
Content Performance Understanding Question Performance Understanding Performance
Topic 3 Explanation Performance
Generate important assessment of an
The learner The learner Interactive How does An interactive questions about the story interactive
demonstrates takes part in an storytelling interactive storytelling and answer them storytelling based
understanding interactive story provides stimulus storytelling comprehensively. on the following
of how to telling. to stretch one’s recreate  accurate criteria:
convey and imagination, fosters meaning of an  credible  Focus/theme
recreate
creativity and experience?  insightful  Characters
enhances  Development of
meaning of a language/oral Explain the recurring action
story communication themes in narratives.  Problem/ conflict
communicated skills.  accurate  Voice
in various  credible  Delivery
ways also  insightful  Gestures/ body
from different movements
points of view. Show facts that support  Props
“illusion” of reality or  Language
“fantastic” reality in convention
narratives.
 accurate
 credible
 insightful

Demonstrate the steps in


interactive storytelling.
 accurate
 coherent
 systematic
 insightful

13
Stage 1: Results/Outcomes Stage 2 : Assessment
Standard Essential Product/ At the level of
Content Performance Understanding Question Performance Understanding Performance
Interpretation
Illustrate how the meaning of
an experience is highlighted in
interactive storytelling.
 illustrative
 insightful
 meaningful
 significant

Critique/evaluate the
effectiveness of an interactive
storytelling.
 insightful
 meaningful
 significant

Application
Take active/ meaningful
role/part in an interactive
storytelling.
 fluent
 efficient
 effective

Use storytelling to improve


English oral communication
skills.
 fluent
 efficient
 effective

14
Stage 1: Results/Outcomes Stage 2 : Assessment
Standard Essential Product/ At the level of
Content Performance Understanding Question Performance Understanding Performance
Integrate interaction and
narrative.
 adaptive
 effective
 innovative

Use graphic organizers/


informational ads to illustrate
ideas.
 adaptive
 diverse
 effective

Integrate multimedia and


technology in interactive story
telling.
 adaptive
 effective
 diverse

Give creative, original and


imaginative responses to
narratives presented.
 effective
 diverse
 innovative

15
Stage 1: Results/Outcomes Stage 2 : Assessment
Standard Essential Product/ At the level of
Content Performance Understanding Question Performance Understanding Performance
Refine presentation of significant
human experiences in an
interactive storytelling.
 efficient
 effective
 diverse
Exhibit language and oral
proficiency in sharing
experiences.
 effective
 efficient
 fluent
Retell a story from different
points of view.
 adaptive
 efficient
 effective
 fluent
Perspective
Compare traditions/ customs/
language and culture highlighted
in interactive storytelling.
 credible
 insightful
 revealing
Recognize the universality of
literary themes across cultures.

16
Stage 1: Results/Outcomes Stage 2 : Assessment
Standard Essential Product/ At the level of
Content Performance Understanding Question Performance Understanding Performance
 credible
 insightful
 plausible
Distinguish between fantasy and
realistic stories.
 insightful
 plausible
 revealing
Critique oral/ written presentation
using agreed upon criteria.
 insightful
 plausible
 revealing
Relate characters, events
situations to real life.
 insightful
 plausible
 revealing
Empathy
Be open to the links between
one’s life to the lives of others
through narratives.
 open
 perceptive
 receptive
Consider other styles of
presenting experiences in
interactive storytelling.

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Stage 1: Results/Outcomes Stage 2 : Assessment
Standard Essential Product/ At the level of
Content Performance Understanding Question Performance Understanding Performance
 open
 receptive
 insightful
Relate one’s experience to
others to find a common bond.
 open
 perceptive
 insightful
State the effect of a story
listened to/shared orally on one’s
value system.
 self-aware
 meta cognitive
 self-adjusting
Recognize one’s difficulties and
strengths in taking part in
interactive storytelling.
 meta cognitive
 self-aware
 self-adjusting
 reflective
Conduct self-evaluation by
reviewing one’s role/part in
interactive storytelling.
 meta cognitive
 self-adjusting

18
Stage 1: Results/Outcomes Stage 2 : Assessment
Standard Essential Product/ At the level of
Content Performance Understanding Question Performance Understanding Performance
Self-knowledge
State the effect of a story listened
to/shared orally on one’s value
system.
 self-aware
 meta cognitive
 self-adjusting

Recognize one’s difficulties and


strengths in taking part in
interactive storytelling.
 meta cognitive
 self-aware
 self-adjusting
 reflective

Conduct self-evaluation by
reviewing one’s role/part in
interactive storytelling.
 meta cognitive
 self-adjusting

As of March 9, 2011

19
Quarter 2

DRAMA
2010 Secondary Education Curriculum
English II

Quarter 2 – DRAMA
STAGE 1: RESULTS/OUTCOMES STAGE 2: ASSESSMENT
Standard Essential Product/ At the level of
Content Performance Understanding Question Performance Understanding Performance

The learner demonstrates The learner Drama depicts the How does drama A playlet Explanation Performance
understanding of how Afro-Asian takes active part culture, tradition, depict the culture, presentation Explain the common Performance
drama reflects the culture, tradition, in staging a values, beliefs, and tradition, beliefs, based on an features, elements, assessment of an
values, and beliefs, norms of playlet based on practices, norms of practices, and original script. conventions of Afro-Asian enthralling playlet
behavior and significant events an original script. behavior of Afro- norms of behavior drama. based on the following
through artistic interpretation and Asian countries by of Afro- Asian  Accurate criteria:
critical analysis of a playlet which artistic performances, countries? Explain  Justified
promotes the appreciation of the said moving dialogs, by way of giving  Credible  Voice
genre and satisfies the audience’s realistic setting, examples or Demonstrate a clear  Acting skills
craving for short dramatic authentic plot and situations. distinction among dominant  Stage presence
performances. clear interp etation. themes and story lines  Stage
contained in Afro Asian production
Language Focus: dramas.  Conventions
 Identifying and assessing  Illuminating  Mastery of lines
drama concepts by using  Credible  Technicalities
cause and effect connectors. Make a clear and  Proteomics
 Giving opinion on similarities interesting explanation
and differences in Afro-Asian about Afro- Asian people
dramas through the use of and their literary heritage.
single-word adverb.  Reflective
 Expressing specific ideas,  Accurate
feelings and thoughts in  Insightful
producing a dramatic Establish relationship
monologue using verbal between drama themes and
nouns. real life.
 Using infinitives as nouns or  Justified
adverbs in expressing  Comprehensive
specific values and  Insightful
experiences in preparation
for a playlet presentation.

1
Interpretation
Illustrate connections
among drama concepts that
draw meaningful
realizations between drama
text and reality.
 Meaningful
 Illustrative
 Significant
Make meaning of the drama
from various Afro-Asian
countries that
reflect multi-cultural
diversity and varied literary
styles.
 Meaningful
 Insightful
 Illuminating
 Authentic

Application
Perform a playlet in
conformity with drama
conventions.
Criteria
 Insightful
 Credible
 Revealing
Use creativity and ingenuity
in putting up the stage
design and ensure
functionality of equipment
needed in the playlet
production.
 Efficient
 Effective

2
Perspective
Analyze the structure,
elements, themes of Afro-
Asian drama.
 Credible
 Revealing
 Accurate
 insightful

Empathy
Assume role in a playlet
that links well or counter to
one’s character.
 Convincing
 Receptive

Self – Knowledge
Reflect on dominant themes
depicting way of life and
national aspirations
contained in Afro- Asian
drama.
 Self-aware
 Self-adjusting
 Mature
 Objective
Conduct self-evaluation by
reviewing how a playlet
depicts the culture, tradition,
norm of behavior, and way
of life of Afro-Asian people.
 Mature
 Reflective
 Objective
 Meta cognitive

3
2010 Secondary Education Curriculum
English II
QUARTER 2 - DRAMA
TOPIC 1: Elements, Features, and Themes of Afro-Asian Drama
STAGE 1: RESULTS/OUTCOMES STAGE 2: ASSESSMENT
Standard Essential Product/ At the level of
Content Performance Understanding Question Performance Understanding Performance

Topic 1 The learner The elements, How do the An impressive Explanation Performs an
The learner demonstrates interprets a play features, and elements, dramatic reading Identify the elements, impressive dramatic
understanding of the different through an themes of Afro- features, and of a play features, and themes of reading of a play
elements, features, and themes of impressive Asian drama themes of Afro- Afro-Asian drama. based on the
Afro-Asian dramas that provide dramatic reading. provide insights Asian drama  Accurate following criteria:
insights in producing a dramatic into the characters’ help in  Coherent  Audibility
reading of a play. lives and their understanding  Insightful  Tone of voice
relationship with and appreciating Analyze how the elements,  Phrasing
Language: the other this genre? features, and themes of  Stress
characters. Afro- Asian drama provide patterns
The learner demonstrates understanding of the genre.  Diction
understanding of the comparison  Credible  Pronunciation
and contrast connectors useful in  Accurate  Vocal variety
identifying and assessing the  Insightful  Pauses
elements, features, and themes of  illuminating
Afro-Asian drama.
Interpretation
Make sense of the dialogs
used in Afro-Asian drama.
 Persuasive
 Meaningful
 Significant
Illustrate authenticity of
context, and
characterization through
text revalidation.
 Illustrative
 Insightful

4
 Significant

Application
Use proper intonation in
expressing variety of
feelings and traits in a
drama.
 Accurate
 Credible
 Perceptive
Exhibit competencies in
using audible cues (pitch,
stress, diction, accent etc.)
in doing a dramatic reading.
 Accurate
 Insightful
 Justified

Perspective
Compare and contrast
features, and themes of
various Afro-Asian
dramas.
 Illustrative
 Illuminating
Infer character traits through
the structure of dialog and
mode of delivery.
 Credible
 Insightful
 Perceptive

Empathy
Relate drama themes in real
life experiences.

5
 Significant
 Meaningful
 Authentic
Consider various individual
strategies in internalizing a
role for a dramatic reading.
 Precise
 Meaningful
 Justified
Self-Knowledge
Reflect on the moods and
tones of characters.
 Revealing
 Insightful

6
2010 Secondary Education Curriculum
English II

QUARTER 2 – DRAMA
Topic 2: Concepts and Mechanics of Stage direction
STAGE 1: RESULTS/OUTCOMES STAGE 2: ASSESSMENT
Standard Essential Product/ At the level of
Content Performance Understanding Question Performance Understanding Performance

Topic 2 The learner Stage directions Why are stage A creative Explanation Performance assessment
The learner demonstrates produces a enhance directions stage plan/ Describe various of a creative stage design
understanding of the concepts and creative stage characterization, important in a design styles of designing based on the following
criteria:
mechanics of stage direction through plan/ design. setting, plot and play? a stage for Afro-
 Organizational
the strategies and competencies to moods in a play. Asian plays.
Planning
be employed in making a stage plan.  Accurate  Thematic
What is a play  Insightful accuracy
without stage  Creative  Color scheme
directions? Design a stage  Craftsmanship
within the context  Use of space
of culture and the  Collaboration and
Language prescribed setting. teamwork
The learner demonstrates  Credible
understanding of expressing  Justified
opinions on similarities and  Insightful
differences using single-word  Illuminating
adverbs that enhance
 Creative
characterization and setting of
moods.
Interpretation
Illustrate how stage
design helps
unravel
characterization,
setting, plot and
moods in a play.
 Significant
 Illuminating
 Insightful

7
Application
Create a stage
design by applying
the appropriate
technical and
aesthetic skills.
 Accurate
 Revealing
 Effective
Exhibit competency
in considering the
appropriate
materials and lights
in designing the
stage.
 Accurate
 Adaptive
 Significant

Perspective
Analyze a stage
design in terms of
aesthetic quality
and authenticity of
culture.
 Credible
 Accurate
 Insightful

Empathy
Consider various
ideas in putting up
a stage design of a
play.
 Perceptive

8
 Receptive
 Insightful
Self-knowledge
Recognize the
distinctive style and
authenticity of
context reflected in
the stage plan.
 Self-aware
 Meta
cognitive

As of March 9, 2011

9
2010 Secondary Education Curriculum
English II
QUARTER 2 - DRAMA
Topic 3: Dramatic Conventions and Role Internalization
STAGE 1: RESULTS/OUTCOMES STAGE 2: ASSESSMENT
Standard Essential Product/ At the level of
Content Performance Understanding Question Performance Understanding Performance

Topic 3 The learner Dramatic conventions What is the A sterling Explanation Performance
The learner demonstrates presents a such as masks, importance of dramatic Prove that dramatic assessment of a
understanding of the essential sterling indigenous music, dramatic monologue conventions and role dramatic monologue
dramatic conventions and role dramatic chants, and conventions internalization are requisites based on the
internalizations in presenting a monologue. internalization drills and role to a dramatic monologue following criteria:
dramatic monologue. contribute to a sterling internalization presentation.  Interpretation
performance of a in the  Accurate  Voice
dramatic monologue. presentation of  Credible Projection
a dramatic  Insightful  Facial
monologue? Describe how various Expressions
dramatic conventions such  Pronunciation
Language Focus: as masks, chants,  Proxemics
The learner demonstrates indigenous music, and  Stage
understanding of the use of authentic materials enliven deportment
verbal nouns in expressing the performance of a  Dramatic
specific ideas, feelings, and dramatic monologue. conventions
thoughts in performing a  Credible  Diction
dramatic monologue.  Illustrative
 Adaptive
Explain how
characterization, plot
structure, and lines are
enhanced by dramatic
conventions.
 Justified
 Credible
 Effective

10
Justify the appropriateness
of the author’s choice and
use of dramatic
conventions.
 Accurate
 Reliable
 Insightful
 illuminating

Interpretation
Evaluate concepts and
principles of different
dramatic conventions.
 Credible
 Coherent
 Effective
Document various
conventions applied in Afro-
Asian drama.
 Insightful
 Realistic
 Significant

Application
Produce insights from the
lines and roles of
characters.
 Reflective
 Justified
 Credible
Perform the roles to be
played after the
internalization drills.
 Credible
 Significant

11
 Moving
Exhibit own style in
delivering a dramatic
monologue.
 Convincing
 Insightful
 Adaptive
Perspective
Infer character traits based
on the dialogs/lines.
 Illuminating
 Reflective
 Credible
Empathy
Consider the dominant
feeling of a character
through a dramatic
monologue.
 Accurate
 Illustrative
 Convincing
Relate with the message of
the play by revisiting lines
and plot structure.
 Persuasive
 Moving
 Reflective
Self-Knowledge
Assess one’s performance
in a dramatic monologue.
 Self-adjusting
 Self aware

12
2010 Secondary Education Curriculum
English II
QUARTER 2 - DRAMA
TOPIC 4: THE AFRO-ASIAN PLAYLET
STAGE 1: RESULTS/OUTCOMES STAGE 2: ASSESSMENT
Standard Essential Product/ At the level of
Content Performance Understanding Question Performance Understanding Performance

Topic 4 The learners Drama reflects the How does Presentation Explanation Performance assessment
The learner demonstrates present an beliefs, values, drama reflect of an original Explain the significance of drama of an interesting playlet
understanding of drama original cultures, and events the beliefs, playlet. elements, features, and based on the following
that mirrors the values, playlet. in the lives of the values, and conventions in the light of a stage criteria:
beliefs, cultures and Afro-Asians through cultures of the performance.  Acting
events of the Afro-Asians stage performances Afro-Asians?  Accurate  Delivery of lines
through careful analysis and aesthetic skills.  Coherent  Interpretation
and artistic presentation Why should  insightful  Stage Deportment
of a playlet. drama be Recognize various play production  Conventions
staged? aspects that are needed in staging
a drama.
Language:  Accurate
The learner demonstrates  Coherent
understanding of the use  Predictive
of verbals in expressing Discuss how a playlet
specific values and presentation depicts the authentic
experiences in experiences of the Afro-Asians.
preparation for a playlet  Credible
presentation.
 Justified
 Insightful

Interpretation
Represent an enticing story line
through a playlet.
 Illustrative
 Insightful
 Meaningful

13
 Significant
Make meaning of a play
production based on the various
aspects to be considered.
 Illustrative
 Illuminating
 Meaningful
 Insightful
Watch and listen critically to a
playlet.
 Insightful
 Meaningful
 Significant

Application
Participate and assume role
responsibly in a playlet.
 Efficient
 Fluent
 Effective
Exhibit competencies in planning,
rehearsing, and presenting a
playlet.
 Adaptive
 Fluent
 Effective
Use multimedia and technology in
the playlet presentation.
 Adaptive
 Diverse
 Effective
Decide on matters like
technicalities and stage
performance to give life to the
playwright’s masterpiece.
 Credible

14
 Insightful
 Plausible
Perspective
Analyze the development of
events in a playlet.
 Credible
 Insightful
 Revealing
Criticize stage performance in the
light of the set criteria.
 Insightful
 Revealing
 Credible

Empathy
Relate with the characters’
sentiments as events gradually
unfold in the playlet presentation.
 Insightful
 Perceptive
 open
Compare the customs, traditions,
beliefs and culture of Afro-Asian
people based on the playlet
presentation.
 Insightful
 Receptive
 Perceptive
Self-knowledge
Conduct self-evaluation by
reviewing the playlet presented.
 Meta cognitive
 Mature
 Reflective
 Self-adjusting
As of March 9, 2011

15
Quarter 3

POETRY
2010 Secondary Education Curriculum
English II

Quarter 3: POETRY

Stage 1 : Results /Outcomes Stage 2 : Assessment


Standard Essential Product/ At the level of
Content Performance Understanding Question Performance Understanding Performance
Explanation
The learner demonstrates The learner The structure and Why do A creative Discuss the nature, Performance
understanding of how writes an content of Afro-Asian learners study and original special features and assessment of
haiku, tanka, hokku and original haiku. poetry reflect the people’s Afro-Asian haiku. elements of Haiku a haiku based
other Afro-Asian poetry identity that contribute poetry? /hokku/ tanka/ and on the following
present and promote much in promoting and other contemporary criteria:
the ideals, beliefs, culture and enriching their beliefs, HAIKU - Afro- Asian poetry. -Focus/
a simple typical Japanese
and experiences of the attitudes, tradition and
poem of unique 3 lines
 accurate Theme
people; thus enhance and culture; thus help in the seventeen syllables pattern.  insightful -Imagery
preserve worthwhile betterment of the society It has no rhyme, no meter  justified -Rhythm
universal values. and the world. and its purpose is to Express emotional -Language
. communicate the feeling of a -Visuals
reaction to what was
Idealism, beliefs, culture How do the single moment through using
Language Focus: presented in the
images / mental pictures. It
Using correct imperatives and experiences of the structure and sketches a quick picture of a poem.
gerunds and people enhance and content of Afro- scene from everyday life by  credible
infinitives in express preserve worthwhile Asian poetry using a “kigo” (seasonal  insightful
ing appreciation and universal values. reflect people’s word) that suggests / hints
identity? the feeling being conveyed. It  illuminating
understanding of Describe the
is noted for its brevity,
Afro-Asian poetry How do people’s beauty, and intensity of relationships
Commonalities and
ideals, beliefs and emotion being conveyed and among the elements
differences in ideals,
the use of nature to convey a
beliefs, culture and culture preserve of a haiku, tanka and
passing moment in life. Here,
experiences of the worthwhile noble subjects are treated
other Afro-Asian
people may exist universal values? indirectly with delicacy of poems.
among Afro-Asian touch and tenderness.  insightful
poems that may be of  illuminating
universal value.  justified

1
Explain how literary
techniques
help in bringing out
the beauty and
essence of the poem.
 insightful
 illuminating
 justified

Synthesize
production
elements that
contribute to
the development
and effectiveness
of writing a haiku.
 accurate
 insightful
 illuminating

Show appreciation of
the significant human
experiences
highlighted in haiku,
hokku,.tanka and
other.Afro-Asian
and Filipino poems.
 credible
 insightful
 illuminating

Interpretation
Analyze the distinct
qualities of a haiku,
hokku, and tanka
 insightful

2
 meaningful
 significant

Evaluate the
common features of
Afro-Asian and
Filipino poems.
 illustrative
 insightful
 meaningful
 significant

Evaluate how the


poets choose words
to create effective
expressions of their
thoughts, feelings
and observations in
life.
 illustrative
 insightful
 meaningful
 significant

Read, comprehend,
discuss and interpret
Afro-Asian poems
highlighting their
culture, beliefs and
societies.
 illustrative
 insightful
 meaningful
 significant

Make sense of a
haiku through using

3
appropriate media
and technological
aids.
 illustrative
 meaningful
 illuminating

Application
Write a haiku.
 adaptive
 effective
 efficient
 fluent

Use multimedia and


technology in the
presentation of a
Cultural Report.
 adaptive
 diverse
 effective
 efficient

Use appropriate
gerunds highlighting
feelings, thoughts,
actions.and
observations in life .
 adaptive
 effective
 efficient
 fluent

Refine presentation
of significant human
experiences in
poems.

4
 adaptive
 effective
 efficient
 diverse

Demonstrate a
mature command of
the language
with freshness of
expressions and
varied structures.
 effective
 efficient
 fluent

Use imperatives
effectively
in written and oral
communication.
 effective
 efficient
 fluent

Produce written and


oral works that to
demonstrate
comprehension
and appreciation
of Afro-Asian
poems.
 effective
 efficient
 diverse
 fluent

Use the language


effectively to convey

5
knowledge, meaning
and communication.
 adaptive
 effective
 efficient
 fluent
Collect , write and
talk about significant
experiences
communicated in an
Afro- Asian poem
through a Cultural
Report.
 adaptive
 effective
 efficient
 fluent
Stimulate oral
appreciation of a
haiku /hokko / tanka.
 effective
 efficient
 fluent
 realistic

Perspective
Compare Afro-Asian
language, oral
traditions and poems
that reflect their
customs, culture and
societies.
 credible
 insightful
 revealing

6
Understand how to
respond critically to
an Afro-Asian poem.
 critical in
analytical
sense
 insightful
 plausible

Analyze the
effectiveness of
complex elements of
an Afro- Asian poem.
 critical in
analytical
sense
 insightful
 plausible

Examine a haiku
from several critical
perspectives.
 critical in
analytical
sense
 insightful
 plausible

View concepts and


ideas presented in
an Afro-Asian
poem from different
perspectives.
 credible
 insightful
 plausible

7
 revealing
Compare and
contrast
different culture and
traditions as reflected
in Afro-Asian and
Filipino poems.
 credible
 insightful
 plausible
 revealing
Infer the emotional
appeal of the poem
read.
 Credible
 Insightful
 Plausible

Empathy
Evaluate own and
others’ style for
organizing, preparing
and presenting a
very unique haiku.
 insightful
 open
 perceptive
 receptive

Understand how and


why people react
differently to
poems based on
their background
knowledge,
purpose and point of
view.

8
 insightful
 open
 perceptive
 receptive

Connect information
and experiences in
text to life and life to
text experiences.
 open
 insightful
 perceptive
 receptive

Consider how others


use rhythm, rhyme
and language for
effect.
 open
 receptive
 tactful

Be open to the links


between one’s life
and that of others
throughout the world
as reflected in Afro-
Asian poems.
 open
 receptive
 perceptive

Show value and


respect for others
and diversity as
evident in Afro-Asian
and Filipino poetry.

9
 insightful
 open
 perceptive
Self-knowledge
Recognize one’s
knowledge, strengths
and values as
effect of one’s
understanding and
appreciation of a
haiku and other
contemporary
Afro-Asian poem
read.
 self- adjusting
 self-aware
 meta
cognitive
 reflective

State the effect of a


poem in one’s value
system.
 self-adjusting
 meta
cognitive
 mature
 wise
Use self- correction
strategies in writing a
haiku.
 self-adjusting
 meta
cognitive
 mature
 wise

10
Quarter 3: POETRY

Stage 1 : Results /Outcomes Stage 2 : Assessment


Standard Essential Product/ At the level of
Content Performance Understanding Question Performance Understanding Performance

Topic 1 Explanation
The learner demonstrates The learner presents The nature, How can A Cultural Discuss the nature, Performance
understanding of the a cultural report that special qualities Afro- Asian Report special features and assessment of
nature, features, and shows the differences features, and poetry be elements of A Cultural
elements of Afro-Asian between Afro-Asian elements of distinguished Afro-Asian poetry. Report based
poetry to distinguish poetry and that of Afro-Asian from the  accurate on the following
them from the poetry of other cultures. poetry work poetry of CULTURAL REPORT -
 insightful criteria:
an audio –visual report on
other cultures. together to set other
how people from different  justified  Focus/
it apart from the cultures? cultures can unite / share Highlight the factors that Content
poetry of other things in common as shaped Afro-Asian  Accuracy
cultures. highlighted or played up in poetry.  Organization
How different literary pieces.
 accurate  Visuals
or similar is - presents how Afro-Asian  insightful  Relevance
Afro-Asian poems highlight their customs,  illuminating  Delivery
Language Focus: poetry to tradition, beliefs, attitudes and
Express emotional  Appeal/
societies.
Using correct imperatives poetry of reaction to what was Impact
in giving emphasis to one’s other cultures? presented in the  Voice
feelings, actions, thoughts poem.
and observations  credible
 insightful
 illuminating
Describe the relationships
among the elements of a
poem.
 insightful
 illuminating
 justified

11
Explain how literary
techniques help in
bringing out the
beauty and essence
of the poem.
 insightful
 illuminating
 justified

Show how production


elements contribute
to the development and
effectiveness of Afro-
Asian poems as well as a
Cultural report.
 accurate
 insightful
 illuminating

Show appreciation of the


significant human
experiences highlighted
in Afro-Asian and Filipino
poems.
 credible
 insightful
 illuminating

Interpretation
Analyze the distinct
qualities of Afro-Asian
poetry.
 illustrative
 insightful
 meaningful
 significant

12
Evaluate the common
features of Afro-Asian
and Filipino poems.
 illustrative
 insightful
 meaningful
 significant

Evaluate how the poets


choose words to create
effective expressions of
their thoughts, feelings
and observations in life.
 illustrative
 insightful
 meaningful
 significant

Read, comprehend,
discuss and interpret
Afro-Asian poems
highlighting their culture,
beliefs and societies.
 illustrative
 insightful
 meaningful
 significant
Make sense of a Cultural
Report using appropriate
media and technological
aids.
 illustrative
 meaningful
 illuminating

13
Application
Present a Cultural Report
on what shaped a
specific Afro- Asian
poem.
 adaptive
 effective
 efficient
 fluent

Use multimedia and


technology in the
presentation of a
Cultural Report.
 adaptive
 diverse
 effective
 efficient

Use appropriate
imperatives in highlighting
feelings, thoughts,
actions and observations.
 adaptive
 effective
 efficient
 fluent

Refine presentation of
significant human
experiences in poems.
 adaptive
 effective
 efficient
 diverse

14
Demonstrate a mature
command of the
language
with freshness of
expressions
and varied structures.
 effective
 efficient
 fluent

Use imperatives
effectively in written and
oral communication.
 effective
 efficient
 fluent

Produce written and oral


work to demonstrate
comprehension
and appreciation of Afro-
Asian poems.
 effective
 efficient
 diverse
 fluent

Use the language


effectively to convey
knowledge, meaning
and communication.
 adaptive
 effective
 efficient
 fluent

15
Collect , write and talk
about significant
experiences
communicated in an Afro-
Asian poem through a
Cultural Report.
 adaptive
 effective
 efficient
 fluent
Stimulate oral production
in a Cultural Report of an
Afro- Asian poem.
 effective
 efficient
 fluent
 realistic
Perspective
Compare Afro-Asian
language, oral
traditions and poems that
reflect their customs,
culture and societies.
 credible
 insightful
 revealing
Understand how to
respond critically to an
Afro-Asian poem.
 critical in
analytical
sense
 insightful
 plausible
Analyze the effectiveness
of complex elements of
an Afro- Asian poem.

16
 critical in
analytical
sense
 insightful
 plausible

Examine a poem from


several critical
perspectives.
 critical in
analytical
sense
 insightful
 plausible

View concepts and ideas


presented in a poem
from different
perspectives.
 credible
 insightful
 plausible
 revealing

Compare and contrast


different culture and
traditions as reflected in
Afro-Asian and Filipino
poems as highlighted in
Cultural Reports.
 credible
 insightful
 plausible
 revealing

Infer the emotional

17
appeal of the poem read.
 Credible
 Insightful
 Plausible

Empathy
Evaluate own and others’
delivery of Cultural
Reports.
 insightful
 open
 perceptive
 receptive

Understand how and why


people react differently to
poems based on their
background knowledge,
purpose and point of
view.
 insightful
 open
 perceptive
 receptive

Connect information and


experiences in text to life
and life to text
experiences.
 open
 insightful
 perceptive
 receptive

Consider how others use


rhythm, rhyme and
language for effect.

18
 open
 receptive
 receptive
 tactful
Be open to the links
between one’s life and
that of others throughout
the world as reflected in
Afro-Asian poems.
 open
 receptive
 perceptive
Show value and respect
for others and diversity
as evident in Afro-Asian
and Filipino
poetry.
 insightful
 open
 perceptive

Self-knowledge
Recognize one’s
knowledge, strengths and
values as effect
of one’s understanding
and appreciation of Afro-
Asian poem read.
 self- adjusting
 self-aware
 meta cognitive
 reflective
State the effect of a poem
in one’s value system.
 self-adjusting
 meta cognitive
 mature

19
 wise
Use self- correction
strategies for writing and
speaking.
 self-adjusting
 meta cognitive
 mature
 wise

20
2010 Secondary Education Curriculum

English II

Quarter 3: POETRY

Stage 1 : Results /Outcomes Stage 2 : Assessment


Standard Essential Product/ At the level of
Content Performance Understanding Question Performance Understanding Performance

Topic 2 Explanation Performance


The learner demonstrates The learner Imagery, sounds, How are Choral Interpretation Explain the assessment of
understanding of how performs figurative meaningful (among others) appropriateness an Choral
imagery, figurative in a ( e.g. Choral, language, perceptions of an Afro-Asian of literary/ poetic Interpretation of
language, sound devices, sketches symbolism and being shaped poem devices used by the an Afro-Asian
symbolism and other poetic /drawing, dance, other poetic in Afro-Asian author. poem based on
devices shape the meaning dramatic, song) devices add up poetry?  accurate the following
of Afro-Asian poetry. Interpretation in shaping the CHORAL  insightful criteria:
of an Afro-Asian meaning of INTERPRETATION - a  justified -Voice
Language Focus poem. Afro-Asian group’s oral artistic / -Delivery
Using participles poetry as much stylistic interpretation of the Prove how one’s feeling -Interpretation
and participial as they literary text’s meaning. This -Mastery
requires orchestration of
about the poem are
phrases in connect ideas moves and gestures, influenced by by imagery, -Gestures
expressing to familiar, smoothness of delivery, rhythm, rhyme, figures of /Body
appreciation of the ordinary but quality of voice, speech, and other Movements
of poems significant appropriateness of facial literary/ poetic devices. -Props
expressions, masks,
explored experiences.
costumes and props.
 illuminating -Language
and in describing  insightful Conventions
ideas, thoughts,  justified
feelings and
observations. Show how different
poetic devices add
beauty and
meaning to poetry.
 credible
 insightful

21
 predictive

Describe the power of


sensory/figurative language
and participles in creating
meaning of a poem.
 accurate
 insightful
 justified

Synthesize figurative
language used.
 accurate
 credible
 illuminating

Interpretation
Interpret Afro-Asian
poems through using
illustrations.
 illustrative
 insightful
 meaningful

Illustrate how literary/


poetic devices help one
understand clearly the
meaning of the poem.
 insightful
 meaningful
 significant

Evaluate how the poet


uses literary/ poetic
devices.
 illustrative
 insightful

22
 meaningful

Make meaning of the


sensory images in the
poem read.
 illustrative
 insightful
 significant

Make sense of how the


poet uses vivid
descriptive words for
the readers to visualize
familiar images in a
new, original,
surprising and
unfamiliar ways.
 illustrative
 insightful
 meaningful

Evaluate how the poet


uses expressions
of his thoughts,
feelings and
observations in life.
 insightful
 meaningful
 significant

Critique the subtleties of


literary/poetic devices and
techniques in the
comprehension and
creation of poems.
 insightful
 meaningful

23
 illuminating

Application
Produce a well-prepared,
creative and imaginative
Choral Interpretation of an
Afro-Asian poem.
 Effective
 Efficient
 Fluent

Use the language


effectively to convey
knowledge, meaning
and communication.
 adaptive
 effective
 efficient
 fluent

Use participles and


participial phrases
to express one’s
feelings and thoughts in
writing a poem.
 Effective
 Efficient
 fluent

Perspective
Compare Afro-Asian
language, oral
traditions and poems that
reflect their customs,
culture and societies.
 credible
 insightful

24
 revealing
Understand how to
respond critically to an
Afro-Asian poem.
 critical in
analytical sense
 insightful
 plausible
Analyze the effectiveness of
complex elements of an
Afro-Asian poem.
 critical in
analytical sense
 insightful
 plausible

Examine a poem from


several critical perspectives.
 critical in
analytical sense
 insightful
 plausible

View concepts and ideas


presented in a poem from
different perspectives.
 credible
 insightful
 plausible
 revealing

Infer the emotional


appeal of the poem read.
 credible
 insightful
 plausible

25
Empathy
Understand how and why
people react differently to
poems based on their
background knowledge,
purpose and point
of view.
 insightful
 open
 perceptive
 receptive

Connect information and


experiences in text
to life and life to
text experiences.
 open
 insightful
 perceptive
 receptive

Consider how others use


rhythm, rhyme and
language for effect.
 open
 receptive
 receptive
 tactful

Be open to the links


between one’s life and
that of others throughout
the world as reflected in
Afro-Asian poems.
 open
 receptive

26
 perceptive

Show value and respect


for others and diversity
as evident in Afro-Asian
and Filipino poetry.
 insightful
 open
 perceptive
Self-knowledge
Recognize one’s
knowledge, strengths,
and values as
effect of one’s
understanding and
appreciation of Afro-Asian
poem read.
 self- adjusting
 self-aware
 meta cognitive
 reflective
State the effect of a
poem in one’s value
system.
 self-adjusting
 meta cognitive
 mature
 wise
Use self- correction
strategies
on presenting a creative
and imaginative Choral
Interpretation of
Afro-Asian poem.
 self-adjusting
 meta cognitive
 mature
 wise

27
Quarter 3: POETRY

Standard Essential Product/ At the level of


Content Performance Understanding Question Performance
Understanding Performance
Topic 3 Explanation
The learner demonstrates The learner The structure Why do A creative Discuss the nature, special Performance
understanding of how haiku, tanka, writes an original and content of learners and original features and elements of assessment of
hokku and other Afro -Asian poetry haiku. Afro-Asian study haiku haiku /hokku/ tanka/ and a haiku based
present and promote the ideals, poetry reflect Afro-Asian other Afro- Asian poetry. on the following
beliefs, culture and experiences the people’s poetry?  accurate criteria:
 insightful
of the people; thus identity that -Focus/
 justified
enhance and preserve worthwhile contribute much Theme
Express emotional reaction
universal values. in promoting HOKKU - an old form of
to what was presented in -Imagery
and enriching HAIKU with 3 lines -Rhythm
following 5-7-5 syllables
the poem.
Language Focus: their beliefs,  credible -Language
pattern.
Using correct gerunds in attitudes,  insightful -Visuals
expressing appreciation and tradition and  illuminating
understanding of Afro-Asian poetry. culture; thus Describe the relationships
help in the TANKA - a classic among the elements of a
Japanese verse form
betterment of haiku, tanka and other
expressing intense
the society Afro-Asian poems.
emotion in 5 lines
and the world. comprising 31 syllables  insightful
. following 5-7-5-7-  illuminating
7syllables pattern. It is a  justified
brief but beautiful poem Explain how literary
that describes strikingly techniques
beautiful scenery that help in bringing out the
appeal to the senses. beauty and essence of the
They originally developed
poem.
from songs.
 insightful
 illuminating
 justified

Synthesize production
elements that contribute to

28
the development and
effectiveness
of writing a haiku
 accurate
 insightful
 illuminating

Show appreciation of the


significant human
experiences highlighted in
haiku hokku, tanka and
other contemporary Afro-
Asian and Filipino poems.
 credible
 insightful
 illuminating

Interpretation
Analyze the distinct qualities
of a haiku hokku, and tanka
 insightful
 meaningful
 significant

Evaluate the common


features of Afro-Asian and
Filipino poems.
 illustrative
 insightful
 meaningful
 significant

Evaluate how the poets


choose words to create
effective expressions of
their thoughts, feelings and
observations in life.
 illustrative
 insightful
 meaningful

29
 significant

Read, comprehend, discuss


and interpret Afro-Asian
poems highlighting their
culture, beliefs and
societies.
 illustrative
 insightful
 meaningful
 significant

Make sense of a haiku


through using appropriate
media and technological
aids.
 illustrative
 meaningful
 illuminating

Application
Write a haiku.
 adaptive
 effective
 efficient
 fluent

Use appropriate gerunds


highlighting
feelings, thoughts,
actions
and observations in life .
 adaptive
 effective
 efficient
 fluent

Refine presentation of
significant human

30
experiences in poems.
 adaptive
 effective
 efficient
 diverse

Demonstrate a mature
command of the
language with freshness
of expressions and varied
structures.
 effective
 efficient
 fluent

Produce written and oral


works that demonstrate
comprehension and
appreciation of Afro-Asian
poems.
 effective
 efficient
 diverse
 fluent

Use the language


effectively to convey
knowledge, meaning
and communication.
 adaptive
 effective
 efficient
 fluent

Stimulate oral
appreciation
of a haiku /hokko / tanka

31
 effective
 efficient
 fluent
 realistic

Perspective
Compare Afro Asian
language, oral
traditions and poems that
reflect their customs, culture
and societies.
 credible
 insightful
 revealing

Understand how to respond


critically to an Afro-Asian
poem.
 critical in analytical
sense
 insightful
 plausible

Analyze the effectiveness of


complex elements of an
Afro- Asian poem.
 critical in analytical
sense
 insightful
 plausible

Examine a haiku from


several critical perspectives.
 critical in analytical
sense
 insightful
 plausible

View concepts and ideas


presented in an Afro-Asian

32
poem from different
perspectives.
 credible
 insightful
 plausible
 revealing

Compare and contrast


different culture and
traditions as reflected in
Afro-Asian and Filipino
poems
 credible
 insightful
 plausible
 revealing

nfer the emotional appeal of


the poem read.
 Credible
 Insightful
 Plausible

Empathy
Evaluate own and others’
style for organizing,
preparing and presenting a
very unique
haiku.
 insightful
 open
 perceptive
 receptive

Understand how and why


people react differently to
poems based on their
background knowledge,
purpose and point of view.
 insightful

33
 open
 perceptive
 receptive

Connect information and


experiences in text to life
and life to text experiences.
 open
 insightful
 perceptive
 receptive

Consider how others use


rhythm, rhyme and
language
for effect.
 open
 receptive
 receptive
 tactful

Be open to the links


between one’s life and that
of others throughout the
world as reflected in Afro-
Asian poems.
 open
 receptive
 perceptive

Show value and respect for


others and diversity as
evident in Afro-Asian and
Filipino poetry.
 insightful
 open
 perceptive

Self-knowledge
Recognize one’s

34
knowledge, strengths and
values as effect of one’s
understanding and
appreciation of a haiku and
other Afro-Asian poem read.
 self- adjusting
 self-aware
 meta cognitive
 reflective

State the effect of a poem in


one’s value system.
 self-adjusting
 meta cognitive
 mature
 wise

Use self- correction


strategies or writing a haiku.
 self-adjusting
 meta cognitive
 mature
 wise

35
Quarter 4

ESSAY
2010 Secondary Education Curriculum
English II

Quarter 4 - ESSAY
STAGE 1: Results/Outcomes STAGE2: Assessment
Standard Essential Product/ At the level of
Content Performance Understanding Question Performance Understanding Performance

The learner demonstrates The learner A powerful How does a A powerful Explanation Performance
understanding of how a produces a description plays a powerful descriptive Explain the basic features of a assessment of a
sterling description powerful significant role in description essay descriptive essay. powerful descriptive
necessitates the use of descriptive essay. composition writing enhance the  Accurate essay based on the
vibrant, colorful, sensory, by taking into writing of a DESCRIPTIVE
ESSAY -a special
 Justified following criteria:
figurative and picture consideration the composition? kind of essay that  Credible  Focus/idea
making words to portray use of clearer creates a vivid, Demonstrate a clear  Structure
colorful, moving and
specific and clear images words, more lively picture of a perception of writing a  Organization
of people, places, and convincing writing subject-in-focus descriptive essay.  Tone
objects or ideas; likewise, style, and by using (object, animal, plant,
place, person, figures
 Illuminating  Language
to create a strong mood in concepts which are of speech, symbolism  Credible  Mechanics
writing. easier to are used to bring  Authentic
understand. images into life.
Make a clear and interesting
Language: explanation on the elements of
The learner demonstrates Descriptive words What is a a descriptive essay.
understanding of and sensory composition  Reflective
participles, figurative images bring life to without
 Accurate
language, idioms and a given words?
 Insightful
correct positions of composition.
Demonstrate understanding of
adjectives to enhance What are
the steps in writing a
descriptive writing. words without
descriptive essay.
sensory
Forms: images?  Justified
*Correct positions of  Comprehensive
adjectives  Insightful
*participles (generic and
phrasal) Interpretation
*figurative language Make sense of the parts of a

1
2010 Secondary Education Curriculum
English II

Quarter 4 - ESSAY
descriptive essay.
Functions:  Meaningful
*Describing vividly items  Illustrative
like objects, ideas,  Significant
thoughts, feelings etc. Make meaning of the
*presenting clear organizational patterns that
descriptions enrich a descriptive essay.
*using sensory- based  Meaningful
picture forming words  Insightful
*using special expressions  Illuminating
to clarify and specify  Authentic
actions, intention and
ideas. Application
Exhibit knowledge in writing a
descriptive essay.
 Insightful
 Credible
 Revealing
 Persuasive
Use the correct forms,
functions and positions of
adjectives in writing a
descriptive essay.
 Efficient
 Effective
Integrate technology in the
presentation.

Perspective
Analyze the patterns of
organization and

2
2010 Secondary Education Curriculum
English II

Quarter 4 - ESSAY
appropriateness of words used
in a descriptive essay.
 Credible
 Revealing
 Accurate
 Insightful
Empathy
Consider others’ point of view
in writing a description.
 Convincing
 Receptive
 Challenging
 Insightful
Self – Knowledge
Reflect on the significance of
sensory words and figurative
language in writing a
descriptive essay
 Self-aware
 Self-adjusting
 Mature
 Objective
Conduct self-evaluation by
reviewing how a powerful
descriptive essay creates clear
images of the subject being
discussed.
 Mature
 Reflective
 Objective
 Meta cognitive

3
2010 Secondary Education Curriculum
English II

Quarter 4 - ESSAY
Topic 1: Description of an Object
STAGE 1: RESULTS/OUTCOMES STAGE 2: ASSESSMENT
Standard Essential Product/ At the level of
Content Performance Understanding Question Performance Understanding Performance

Topic 1 The learner Creating sensory How can a A clear description Explanation Performance
The learner writes a clear image that makes one description of an of an object Explain the basic principles assessment of a clear
demonstrates description of an not only see the object become of paragraph development. description of an
understanding of how a object. object but also smell, interesting?  Accurate object based on the
straight forward hear, taste and feel it  Coherent following criteria:
description consisting by using sensory and How can the use  Insightful  Focus/ideas
of sensory and specific specific words truly of descriptive Demonstrate knowledge of  Structure
words as well as clear makes a description words help in the different kinds of  Organization
descriptive details all of interesting. bringing to life a descriptive paragraph.  Style
which help in creating specific subject?  Accurate  Tone
a dominant impression The learner  Coherent  Language
about the nature of the demonstrates  Predictive  Mechanics
objects. understanding of how Discuss how the use of
a sterling description descriptive words can help in
Language Focus: necessitates the use bringing to life a specific
of vibrant, colorful, subject.
Correct positions/order sensory, figurative
of adjectives in a series  Credible
and picture making
 Justified
words to portray
 Insightful
specific and clear
images of people,
Interpretation
places, and objects or
Make sense of an object
ideas; likewise, to
through the use of vivid
create a strong mood
descriptive details.
in writing.
 Illustrative
 Insightful

4
2010 Secondary Education Curriculum
English II

Quarter 4 - ESSAY
 Meaningful
 Significant
Make meaning of a
descriptive paragraph
through the use of specific,
sensory words.
 Illustrative
 Illuminating
 Meaningful
 Insightful

Application
Produce an interesting
description of an object.
 Efficient
 Fluent
 Effective
Use clear sensory details
that create vivid images.
 Adaptive
 Fluent
 Effective
Exhibit competence in
following the order of
adjectives in a series.
 Illustrative
 Meaningful
 Significant

Perspective
Analyze the quality of the

5
2010 Secondary Education Curriculum
English II

Quarter 4 - ESSAY
object presented based on
the descriptive details.
 Credible
 Insightful
 Revealing
Compare and contrast
objects having their
descriptions as bases.
 Credible
 Insightful
 Revealing

Empathy
Consider others’
suggestions on the use of
descriptive words in a
paragraph.
 Perceptive
 Insightful
 Open
 Receptive
Imagine somebody else’s
description of an object
based on the use of clear
and exact words.
 Insightful
 Perceptive
 Open

Self-knowledge
Reflect on the accuracy of

6
2010 Secondary Education Curriculum
English II

Quarter 4 - ESSAY
descriptive details presented
in a composition.
 Meta cognitive
 Mature
 Reflective
 Self-adjusting
Conduct self-evaluation of
the content, style, and
language considered in the
description of an object.
 Mature
 Mata cognitive
 Self-adjusting

7
2010 Secondary Education Curriculum
English II

Quarter 4 - ESSAY
Topic 2: Description of a Place
STAGE 1: RESULTS/OUTCOMES STAGE 2: ASSESSMENT
Standard Essential Product/ At the level of
Content Performance Understanding Question Performance Understanding Performance

The learner demonstrates The learner writes A significant over- What constitutes An impressive Explanation Performance
understanding on writing and presents an all impression of an an impressive description of a Explain the conventions assessment on a
an impressive description impressive essay image description of a place in writing a description of description of place
of a place calls for describing a strengthened by place? Explain. a place. based on the
choosing the right words place. the communication  Accurate following criteria:
and using logical, well of the feeling or How does an over-  Coherent  Focus/ideas
organized picture which mood transported all impression of an  insightful  Structure
conveys the mood , or through a image allow one to Recognize the use of  Organization
visions, reinforcing a meaningful pattern visit an imaginary colorful and moving  Style
realistic experience allows one to visit fantastic place? descriptive words in  Language
an imaginary and describing a place.  Mechanics
fantastic place.  Accurate
Language Focus:  Coherent
*Use of Participles in  Predictive
describing place Discuss how word choice
and writing style help
enhance descriptive
details.
 Credible
 Justified
 Insightful

Interpretation
Construct a well written
discourse highlighting

8
2010 Secondary Education Curriculum
English II

Quarter 4 - ESSAY
description of a place.
 Illustrative
 Insightful
 Meaningful
 Significant
Make meaning of a
place’s description by
merit of descriptive
details and sensory
images.
 Illustrative
 Illuminating
 Meaningful
 Insightful
Application
Use participles correctly
in describing a place.
 Efficient
 Fluent
 Effective
Produce an impressive
description of a place
after taking into
consideration the validity
of facts and accuracy of
information.
 Credible
 Insightful
 Plausible
Perspective
Analyze the richness of

9
2010 Secondary Education Curriculum
English II

Quarter 4 - ESSAY
information contained in a
paragraph describing a
place.
 Credible
 Insightful
 Plausible
 Revealing
Empathy
Evaluate own and others’
descriptions of places
using a set of rubrics.
 Insightful
 Perceptive
 Open
 Receptive
Be open to feedback on
the quality of description
produced.
 Insightful
 Perceptive
 Open
Self-knowledge
Reflect on the quality of
the written description of
a place.
 Mature
 Reflective
 Meta cognitive
 Self-adjusting

10
2010 Secondary Education Curriculum
English II

Quarter 4 - ESSAY
Topic 3: A Character Portrait
STAGE 1: RESULTS/OUTCOMES STAGE 2: ASSESSMENT
Standard Essential Product/ At the level of
Content Performance Understanding Question Performance Understanding Performance

The learner demonstrates The learner Picturing out a character How is a A striking Explanation Performance
understanding of produces and as a ”unique” and distinct striking character Explain the requisites as well as assessment of a
bringing an imaginary presents a striking individual who is vibrant character portrait the standard in writing a character portrait
character come into life character portrait and alive on the page is portrait character portrait. based on the
vividly and realistically bolstered by descriptive written? following criteria:
means accentuating details, picture-making  Accurate
descriptive details of and sensory words. How do  Coherent  Focus/ideas
appearance, movement, descriptive  insightful  Structure
and personality of a details and Recognize the use of colorful  Organization
character in focus picture making and moving descriptive words  Style
through precise, vivid, and sensory in describing a literary or  Language
colorful, sensory, picture- words help the imaginary character.  Mechanics
making and figurative yet learner
specific language. present a  Accurate
striking  Coherent
Language Focus: character  Predictive
Adjective clauses portrait? Discuss how word choice and
writing style help enhance
descriptive details.
 Credible
 Justified
 Insightful

Interpretation
Construct a well written
discourse highlighting a

11
2010 Secondary Education Curriculum
English II

Quarter 4 - ESSAY
character’s description.
 Illustrative
 Insightful
 Meaningful
 Significant
Derive meaning of a character’s
description by merit of
descriptive details and sensory
images.
 Illustrative
 Illuminating
 Meaningful
 Insightful

Application
Use effective adjective clauses
in describing a character.

 Efficient
 Fluent
 Effective
Produce an impressive
character portrait by taking in
consideration the validity of
facts and accuracy of
information.
 Credible
 Insightful
 Plausible

12
2010 Secondary Education Curriculum
English II

Quarter 4 - ESSAY
Perspective
Analyze the richness of
information contained in a
paragraph describing a literary
or imaginary character.
 Credible
 Insightful
 Plausible
 Revealing
Empathy
Evaluate own and others’
character portraits using a set
of rubrics.
 Insightful
 Perceptive
 Open
 Receptive
Be open to feedback on the
quality of description produced.
 Insightful
 Perceptive
 Open
Self-knowledge
Reflect on the quality of the
character portrait produced.
 Mature
 Reflective
 Meta cognitive
 Self-adjusting

13
2010 Secondary Education Curriculum
English II

Quarter 4 - ESSAY
Topic 4: The Descriptive Essay
STAGE 1: RESULTS/OUTCOMES STAGE 2: ASSESSMENT
Standard Essential Product/ At the level of
Content Performance Understanding Question Performance Understanding Performance

The learner demonstrates The learner Creating specific images What embodies a A powerful Explanation Performance
understanding of descriptive writes a of a person, place or powerful descriptive Explain the requisites as well assessment of a
writing to show what and how powerful object with words that descriptive essay? essay as the standard in writing a powerful essay based
a person, a place, an object, descriptive appeal to the senses Explain. descriptive essay. on the following
or an idea looks like through essay. makes up an impressive DESCRIPTIVE  Accurate criteria:
ESSAY -a special
the use of picture making and descriptive essay. How do words kind of essay that  Coherent  Focus/ideas
sensory words. that appeal to the creates a vivid,  Insightful  Structure
colorful, moving and
senses make up lively picture of a Recognize the use of  Organization
Language Focus: an impressive subject-in-focus figurative language and  Style
Figurative language and descriptive essay? (object, animal, idioms in writing a  Tone
plant, place,
special expressions like idioms person), figures of descriptive essay.  Language
speech, symbolism  Accurate  Mechanics
are used to bring
images into life.  Coherent
 Predictive
Discuss how word choice
and writing style help
enhance descriptive details.
 Credible
 Justified
 Insightful

Interpretation
Construct a well written
descriptive essay.
 Illustrative
 Insightful

14
2010 Secondary Education Curriculum
English II

Quarter 4 - ESSAY
 Meaningful
 Significant
Derive meaning of a
composition by merit of
descriptive details and
sensory images.
 Illustrative
 Illuminating
 Meaningful
 Insightful
Application
Use correct figurative
language and idioms in a
descriptive essay.
 Efficient
 Fluent
 Effective
Produce an impressive
descriptive essay by taking
in consideration the validity
of facts and accuracy of
information.
 Credible
 Insightful
 Plausible
Perspective
Analyze the richness of
information contained in an
essay based on the richness
of details.
 Credible

15
2010 Secondary Education Curriculum
English II

Quarter 4 - ESSAY
 Insightful
 Plausible
 Revealing

Empathy
Evaluate own and others’
descriptive essays using a
set of rubrics.
 Insightful
 Perceptive
 Open
 Receptive
Be open to feedback on the
quality of description
produced.
 Insightful
 Perceptive
 Open

Self-knowledge
Reflect on the quality of the
descriptive essay.
 Mature
 Reflective
 Meta cognitive
 Self-adjusting
As of March 9, 2011

16
ANNEX A

The Monitoring and Evaluation of the Implementation of the 2002 Secondary Education Curriculum: Findings and
Recommendations

The Bureau of Secondary Education was tasked by the Department of Education to monitor and evaluate the implementation
of the new curriculum in secondary schools of the country.

Accordingly, the Bureau conducted case studies of twenty secondary schools, grouped as follows:

 General high schools funded fully by the national government


 Newly established high schools funded jointly by the national, provincial, and municipal government
 Science high schools
 Private high schools
 Technical-vocational high schools

The purpose of the multiple case studies is not to produce an objective body of knowledge that can be generalized to all
schools in the country, but to build collaboratively constructed descriptions and interpretations of practices, that enable supervisors,
school heads, department heads, supervisors and teachers, to formulate acceptable ways of implementing the BEC, and to solve
implementation problems that emerge.

The case studies recognize that the school is a learning community where people continuously plan, observe, review and
reflect on what they do in order to achieve shared goals and aspirations.

The first monitoring and evaluation of the BEC implementation was conducted in September 2002, the second in October 2003,
and the latest in September 2004.
The findings from the case studies were based primarily on qualitative data. To verify their reliability, the findings were
compared with those obtained from quantitative data. No marked difference in both findings was observed.

The following are the themes and patterns of school practices that emerged from the implementation of the BEC.

1. There are gross inconsistencies between means and ends.

School heads, department heads, and teachers fully agree with the BEC that the desired learner/graduate should be
functionally literate, a creative and critical thinker, an independent problem solver and a work-oriented lifelong learner
who is MakaDiyos, Makabayan, Makatao and Makakalikasan.

However, except in some Science high schools, there are gross inconsistencies between the kind of learner/graduate
that the schools desire to produce and the strategies they employ. For example, instruction is still predominantly
authoritative and textbook-based; learning is usually recipient and reproductive; supervision is commonly prescriptive and
directive; and assessment is focused more on judging rather than improving performance.

Moreover, while teachers believe in the importance of contextualizing or localizing the curriculum, yet many of them
derive lessons more from course syllabi, textbooks, and competency lists rather than from the learners’ felt needs. While
they believe in the full development of the learners’ potentials, yet lessons that they provide do not adequately address the
differing needs and capabilities of the students.

Recommendations:

In schools where the inconsistencies exist, the following actions may be taken:

The school head should organize a committee to identify and describe the curricular, instructional, supervisory,
assessment, and managerial practices that do not contribute to the development of the desired learner/graduate. Focus
group conversations may be conducted to clarify the school and non-school factors that reinforce the questionable practices
and to develop and implement action programs to remove the inconsistencies. There should be a school assurance team to
coordinate, monitor, and evaluate the implementation of the action program. The removal of the inconsistencies should be
among the primary goals of the school improvement plan and the focus of instructional supervision.
2. Teachers want to know more about integrated teaching.

Across all school types, teachers have a positive attitude toward the integrative, interactive, brain-based approaches
endorsed in the BEC. However, teachers do not feel confident to use the approaches because of their limited knowledge to
operationalize them in terms of lesson planning; instructional materials development; and subject matter organization,
presentation, and evaluation.

Some of the school heads and teachers who returned from the BEC training seriously conducted school-based training.
They reproduced and distributed BEC materials and coached teachers how to use them. Some, however, merely echoed
what they learned; thus there are still many teachers who do not have enough knowledge about the key concepts and
approaches in the BEC.

Teachers do not just need ready-made daily or weekly lesson plans. They want full understanding of integrated
teaching, i.e., its basic concepts, underlying assumptions, operational principles and approaches.

Recommendations:

School heads should capitalize and reinforce the positive attitude of the teachers toward the BEC, particularly its
instructional approaches. They should increase the teachers’ capability and confidence in using the approaches by
providing the competencies they need. A needs assessment managed by teachers themselves should be conducted to
identify gaps between actual and expected competencies.

A benchmarking study may be conducted to close the gap. The study can start with internal benchmarking of
successful practices by department or year level, and later expand to external benchmarking of successful practices of other
schools.

A handbook which explains the nature of integrated teaching, i.e., its underlying assumptions, principles, operational
definition of terms, practical methods and approaches and examples of long and short range plans, can help remove
discrepancies between process and output. Schools are also encouraged to prepare leaflets and flyers on the integrative
approaches.

3. Teachers have limited knowledge of constructivism as a learning theory.

“Learning as a construction process and the learner as a constructor of meaning” is among the basic concepts of the
BEC. The concept underlies the integrated approaches endorsed in the BEC. Although the concept was unfamiliar to many
teachers, yet its operationalization was observable in some classes in Mathematics, Science, and Araling Panlipunan where
problem-solving, inquiry or discovery approaches were being used.

Application of the concept, however, was very limited. School documents like the yearly reports, school development
and improvement plans, instructional and remedial programs, lesson plans, course syllabi, and teachers’ reports made little
mention of how the concept was being applied to the teaching-learning process.

Recommendations:

The school head should develop a consensual understanding of “constructivist learning” among his teachers. This can
be done through focus group conversations (FGC) by year level or by department. The conversations shall be facilitated
preferably, by the school head, with division supervisors or nearby university professors as resource persons and
consultants. The conversations should be backed up by extensive references on constructivist or integrative learning.

The FGC shall be followed through by activities on the practical application of the theory; i.e., lesson planning,
demonstrations, field tests of approaches, team teaching, etc.

The outputs of the FGC can be additional inputs into the school’s BEC Handbook. The Handbook should be revisited
regularly to keep it self-correcting and self-renewing.
4. Students are having difficulties using English as learning medium.

School heads and teachers recognize the difficulties that students face in learning English as a language and at the same
time using it as a medium of learning. As such they have resorted to various ways of increasing the English proficiency of
the students like holding essay contests, English campaigns, public speaking competitions and the like. The problem,
however, has remained unabated.

In English medium classes, both teachers and students usually shift to the local language to ensure that they understand
each other. The fall-back language is usually Taglish, which students in non-Tagalog provinces are ill at ease.

BEC advocates the development of creative, critical thinkers and problem solvers. Teachers find this difficult to
achieve in English medium classes where students have poor oral, aural, reading, and writing skills. In these classes,
teachers are prone to resort to simple recall, recognition and leading questions and to minimize questions that demand
complex reasoning, explanations, elaborations, analysis, synthesis and evaluation, which students find frustrating and even
exasperating.

Recommendations:

Schools should consider developing and testing the effectiveness of the following measures in increasing students’
English proficiency:
 Voluntary participation in English remedial sessions facilitated by volunteer students. Facilitators are selected
on the basis of their English proficiency and are given special training on how to facilitate group learning. A
system of incentives is provided to both walk-in students and volunteer facilitators.

 Proficient English students from higher levels, mentoring students from the lower levels. The participation in
the project of both mentors and learners is voluntary but the school provides an incentive system to support the
project.
 Holding regular English writing and impromptu speaking contests using criterion-referenced evaluation. To
encourage wide participation, multiple winners, not only the best, are proclaimed. At the end of the semester, the
classes with the biggest number of winners are given citations.

 Using the results of achievement tests for the previous years, the school conducts frequency and error
analysis of English competencies that students failed to master. Remedial measures are instituted and
continuously evaluated for their effectiveness in producing the desired change in achievement.

5. Several factors constrain teachers from playing their role as facilitators of the learning process.

Teachers are open to new opportunities and possibilities offered by the BEC to accelerate learning. They are fully
aware of the limitations of the traditional expository methods in facilitating the full development of the students’ potentials
and are willing to learn how to be more effective facilitators of the integrative learning process.

From the field data, however, emerged several factors that inhibit the teachers from playing the facilitator’s role
effectively: namely, students’ English deficiency that hinders critical discussion; overcrowded classes that restrict
interactive learning; insufficient supply of textbooks that predisposes teachers to lecture; prescriptive supervision that
constricts teacher creativity and initiative; and an examination system that encourages authoritative teaching. Confronted
with these constraints teachers tend to fall back on traditional expository modes like lecturing, question-and-answer,
dictation exercises, and practice tests.

Recommendations:

Use “best practices” approach by benchmarking classes, which, despite constraints of overcrowding, a foreign learning
medium, insufficient textbooks, and supervisory and assessment restrictions, still continue to be facilitative rather than
directive or prescriptive in teaching.
6. Promising alternative supervisory approaches are emerging.

Several promising supervisory approaches are emerging. One of these is collaborative supervision whereby groups of
two or more teachers help one another to improve their teaching practices as well as discover better ways of teaching.
They identify and address common instructional problems, share experiences and resources, and monitor and evaluate their
progress.

Another emerging approach is self-directed supervision, which is common among experienced and highly-motivated
teachers. In this practice each teacher assumes full responsibility for improving his instructional practices and promoting
his professional growth.

In both above-mentioned approaches the school head participates mainly as consultant, adviser, resource linker or
provider, reinforcer and facilitator. These supervisory approaches however, are not widespread.

Mentoring is also emerging as an alternative supervisory approach although it is still in a tentative and inchoate state.
There are schools, however, that are already talking about putting up a mentors’ pool for the professional and career
development of their teachers.

The most common supervisory practice is the conventional type whereby the supervisor observes a class as an expert or
authority and makes on-the-spot recommendations which the teacher is expected to implement. Teachers find the practice
threatening and disempowering. It stifles initiatives and creativity, lowers self-esteem, and encourages conformity but not
commitment. In many cases the school head delegates the supervisory function to department heads, who, teachers claim
tend to inspect and evaluate rather than improve performance.

A common but unpopular practice is the laissez faire type, whereby school heads, assuming that teachers know best
being major in their subjects, give teachers the freedom to select teaching methods. Many of these school heads do not
observe classes.
Recommendations:

With the continuing increase in supervisor-teacher ratio it would not be practical anymore to depend on the traditional
supervisory approach to improve teachers’ performance.

The school head should explore the following alternatives:

 Self-directed supervision for experienced, strongly motivated, and innovative teachers;


 Peer or collaborative supervision for teachers who can work in teams or quality circles;
 Mentoring of new teachers and coaching the mediocre and low performers. These necessitate putting up a pool of
trained volunteer mentors.

The school head should avoid copying these alternative modes, but rather benchmark them in order to adapt the
practices to the needs and conditions of his school. The institutionalization of the best supervisory practices should be an
important strategic goal in the School Development Plan.

Supervisors as instructional leaders should not only limit their functions to giving direct instructional assistance,
curriculum development, and staff development. Educational impact cannot be produced by teachers working individually
but by teachers working collaboratively toward shared goals. Therefore, teachers’ group development for collective action
should also be part of the supervisor’s responsibility.

So that teachers would not be slavishly dependent upon foreign ideas and methods, supervisors should help them
become knowledge workers by training them in classroom-based action research. This type of research is collaborative,
user-friendly, nonstatistical and naturalistic. Public school teachers are using many innovative teaching methods and
materials which do not become part of our educational heritage because they are not systematically developed and properly
documented. There is a need for supervisors to train teachers how to test their methods as they teach. This is classroom-
based action research, a practical technique for developing and confirming best practices.
7. Teachers need more knowledge and skills to operationalize Makabayan as a “Laboratory of Life”.

School heads and teachers find the “laboratory of life” concept of Makabayan novel and quite interesting and have
come up with some imaginative schemes to implement the concept. Among these are the 8-2 plan (8 weeks of the grading
period for teaching the four learning areas separately and 2 weeks for the integrated culminating activities), the planned or
deliberate integration (a weekly lesson plan carries two or three related objectives from the other learning areas) and
incidental integration (related content and skills from other disciplines are taken up as they crop up during the development
of the lesson).

Teachers, however, find the integration of the four Makabayan learning areas difficult to plan, implement, monitor and
evaluate for several reasons: (1) lack of a common vacant period for planning the integration, (2) limited knowledge of the
interdisciplinary, interactive methods, and (3) lack of readily available teacher-friendly expert assistance.

Moreover, the anxiety of not being able to cover the units expected for a grading period and the threat of division
achievement tests that are text-book based, predispose teachers to separate-subject teaching.

There are also teachers who are lukewarm toward integration because they believe that integrating other subjects would
reduce the time to teach the competencies prescribed for their own subject. Since their efficiency is assessed more by their
students’ performance in division tests than by how well they have integrated their subject with other subjects, their
tendency is to give less attention to integration.

Recommendations:

School heads should conduct consultative or brainstorming sessions with their staff to resolve problems and issues
related to the implementation of “Makabayan as laboratory of life.”

The four Makabayan learning areas have to be scheduled in such a way that the teachers will have time to meet and
plan integrated lessons.

Schools superintendents should also consider putting up pilot or experimental schools for the teaching of Makabayan to
lessen the trial-and-error practices which confuse teachers.
8. Teachers are divided on how to teach values.

Two patterns of thought emerged from the field data. One favors the integration of values education in all the subjects
and not teaching it as a separate subject. It recommends that the time allotted to values education in the present curriculum
should be used instead to increase the time allotment for TLE and AP.

The other pattern favors the teaching of values education as a separate subject for the reason that effective teaching of
values involves going through the valuing process of clarifying, analyzing and choosing in relation to decisions and actions,
which cannot be adequately enhanced in the integrated scheme. It is further argued that since values shape and guide
important decisions and actions, their development should not be left to chance. Hence, value education should remain a
separate subject.

Recommendations:

To help resolve the issue whether values education should remain as a separate subject or as an integral part of the
other subjects, two approaches are recommended.

 The values education teachers should approach the teaching of the subject as action researchers.

Working as a team, they identify a common teaching problem, plan and implement a solution, observe and reflect
on the feedback, and continue the process until they get the desired result. The action research process would shed
more light on the issue.

 Values education as a separate subject in the Basic Education Curriculum today should be viewed as a case study or
a focus of inquiry rather than a mandate. How do students personally perceive and feel about the methods,
materials, and the assessment and reporting systems that are being used?

The approach would make the classroom teachers active generators of experience-based knowledge and not mere
passive transmitters of knowledge from some remote experts.
9. Teachers teach to the test, students study to the test.

The use of traditional assessment tools like the multiple-response, simple recall, recognition and application tests is
predominant. Rubrics, portfolios, and other forms of authentic assessment are not widely used. Teachers are aware of the
limitations of traditional tests and the need for alternative forms to measure higher order thinking skills. However, they
tend to resort to the traditional forms for several compelling reasons:

 These are the types used in periodic and achievement examinations.


 They are easier to score. (Teachers teach as many as 300 to 400 students a day and scoring non-traditional
measures like rubrics could be an ordeal.)
 They are easier to prepare than the non-traditional forms like portfolios, rubrics, and other authentic measures.
 These are what everybody else is using.
 Teachers have inadequate knowledge of authentic learning and authentic assessment.

Documentary analysis showed that schools in general lack an institutionalized system of utilizing test results for
diagnostic and remedial purposes.

Teachers tend to teach to the test; students tend to study to the test. This culture is reinforced by supervisors who
specify units to be taught and tested for each grading period and use test results more for judging rather than improving
teacher and student performance.

Recommendations:

Schools should review their present assessment practices. The teacher appraisal system and the kinds of tests used in
the classroom as well as those, in the division and national examinations, should be evaluated against the goals and
objectives of the Basic Education Curriculum, among which is the development of critical thinkers and problem solvers.

Schools should also consider the use of alternative assessment tools and techniques that would provide opportunities
for students to experience learning as an enjoyable, delighting process of inquiry, discovery, construction and creation of
new knowledge, rather than as a tedious process of cramming to pass examinations.
While schools should double their efforts for students mastery of the basic competencies they should also never lose
sight of the fact that their ultimate goal should be the development of functionally literate citizens of a democratic
community.

10. Schools are moving toward shared governance.

Although most of the centralized organizational charts displayed in the principals’ office, are still the same charts
before R.A.9155, yet shared governance and participative leadership were clearly evident in many schools.

The involvement of ad hoc committees, task forces, study groups, action cells, and the conduct of consultative
meetings, and brainstorming sessions, to assist the school head make administrative or instructional decisions, were regular
patterns that cropped up in individual and group interviews.

Another promising pattern is rotational delegation of authority by the school head, among department heads and
subject leaders, as well.

Recommendations:

Schools should continue reinforcing their efforts toward the institutionalization of shared governance as envisioned in
R.A. 9155. To facilitate the process, they should make shared governance as one of the strategic goals in their educational
plans. The goals should be supported by a long-range program jointly designed, developed, implemented, monitored by
the school heads, department heads and teachers. The program components should include needs analysis, competency-
based training, benchmarking studies, design and development of appropriate organizational structure and staffing,
monitoring and evaluation and a reward system.

The traditional end-of-the-year assessment, characterized by achievement testing and one-shot school visits, should
be evaluated. The process which has been going on for decades, has not improved school performance and student
achievement. A better alternative should be considered.
ANNEX B

Guide Questions for the Review of the Curriculum

Stage 1

Content Standards
Do the content standards reflect the desired results: the most important and enduring ideas, issues, principles and concepts
from the disciplines; and skills and habits of mind that should be taught and learned?
Are the standards attainable, considering the capabilities of the target learners?

Performance Standards
Do the performance standards express the criteria against which students’ performances or products shall be assessed?
Do they answer the question, “How well must students do their work?”

Essential Understandings
Are they the big and enduring ideas drawn from the disciplines?
Do they reflect the major problems, issues and themes that are deemed most important for students to learn?

Essential Questions
Do they center around the major understanding, problem, issue or theme?
Do they unpack the essential understandings?
Are they relevant to students’ lives? To society?
Do they provide enough challenge or rigor?
Are they manageable: not too demanding of time or resources?
Are they suitable to the target students’ ages, interests, and abilities?
Stage 2

Assessment
Are they directly linked to standards through clearly stated criteria?
Do they provide for multiple sources of evidence to document student progress/attainment of standards?

Products and Performances


Do they provide enough evidence of learning or attainment of the standard(s)?
Do they accommodate a range of multiple intelligences and learning styles? Do they permit choices?
Do they demonstrate conceptual understanding, and content and skill acquisition?
Do they emerge naturally from the instructional activities?
Do they provide for individual or group work?

Stage 3

Instructional Activities

Do they address one or more specific standards?


Do they involve significant content and processes from the standards?
Do they lead to products and performances that can be used to assess student learning?
Do they promote active learning?
Do the introductory activities engage and motivate students?
Do the enabling activities ensure student progress toward the attainment of the standards? Are these sufficient?
Do the culminating activities encompass the identified standards? Do they require students to demonstrate their learning in
relation to the standards?