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vol.18 issue 25 | may 4-10, 2011
weekender
BUT THEN
AGAIN: Rising
got wedding
fever p. 42
STAGE: ‘The Wedding
Singer’ comes to life
p. 32
First Friday grand
reopening for New
Visions
p. 40
AND THEY’RE OFF!
Kentucky Derby celebration gallops into Pocono Downs
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staff
Letter from the editor
social
Contributors
Ralphie Aversa, Caeriel Crestin, Pete Croatto, Dale Culp, Jim Gavenus, Christine Freeberg, Michael Irwin,
Amy Longsdorf, Jayne Moore, Mystery Mouth, Ryan O’Malley, Jason Riedmiller, Jim Rising, Lisa Schaeffer,
Ignatious Schiavo, Alan Sculley, Chuck Shepherd, Mike Sullivan, Bill Thomas, Noelle Vetrosky
Interns
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Address 90 E. Market St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18703
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astout@theweekender.com
here back in 2006. Franco
was a kind and great person
who I always loved having
conversations with whenever I
ran into him, and for a long time
now, the Sideshow Gathering
has been one of my favorite
yearly events.
On behalf of all of us here at
the Weekender, we express our
deepest sympathies to Kim and
everyone who will surely miss
Franco as much as we will. God
bless, friend.
Nikki M. Mascali
Weekender Editor
Contact us
letters@theweekender.com
This week, I’m pleased to
announce a new addition to
the Weekender family: Staff
Writer Stephanie DeBalko.
If the name seems familiar
to you, it should because
Stephanie has been one
of our “Novel Approach”
book reviewers since 2009.
Going back even further,
however, Stephanie was an
editorial intern here in 2007
while she was attending
Wilkes University for
communications studies.
I was the Weekender’s
staff writer at that time and
always remembered Stephanie’s
drive, creativity and humor, so
I’m very pleased to have her on
board as part of our editorial
staff. I hope you’ll join me in
welcoming her to the paper and
look as forward as I do to having
her write for us.
On an unhappy note, I was
deeply saddened to hear about
the passing of Franco Kossa, co-
owner of Marc’s Tattooing and
Body Piercing and the organizer
of the Sideshow Gathering
component to the annual Inkin’
the Valley tattoo convention.
The Weekender has worked
for many years alongside Franco
and his wife, Kim, both of whom
I met personally when I started
RockandRollGuru
Online comment
of the week.
According
to #RockandRollPhilosophy,
genius has limits, while
stupidity does not.
The Weekender has 7,718
Facebook fans. Find us now at
Facebook.com/theweekender
“Pony Tale.”
“Photo Finish.” “Pringle.”
“McGarrett.” “Mr. Mojo Risin.’”
“Snoopy or Prickly Pete.”
“The Boss, in honor of George
Steinbrenner, who loved horse
racing.”
“The Knight Who Says Icky-Icky-
Icky-Ptang-Zoop-Boing.”
IF YOU
HAD
A HORSE,
WHAT
WOULD IT
BE
NAMED?
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inside
web
35 ET TU, JUDAS?
A gritty portrayal of “The Last Days of Judas Iscariot.”
43 STYLE FILES
Meeting some new feathered friends.
MAY4-10, 2011
52
THE GAMER: A campy, bizarre way to
raise awareness for immigration reform.
18
ALBUM REVIEWS: Urge Overkill’s first album since 1995, plus new releases from Beastie Boys and k.d. lang.
The dirty side of All Time Low. www.theweekender.com/bonus/exclusive
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news of the weird
By Chuck Shepherd
Weekender Wire Services
HUNGRY FOR JUSTICE?
Equal justice under the law
might just depend simply on
whether a judge’s stomach is
growling when he pronounces
sentence, according to a study of
1,000 parole decisions during 50
courtroom days observed by
students from Columbia Uni-
versity and Israel’s Ben Gurion
University for an April journal
article. The students found that,
day after day, judges were in-
creasingly stingy with parole as a
morning or afternoon session
wore on, but that dramatic spikes
in generosity took effect immedi-
ately following lunch or a snack
break. The lead researcher, Co-
lumbia professor Jonathan Levav,
expressed satisfaction with the
scholarship but disappointment
“as a citizen” with the findings.
NOTE: From time to time,
News of the Weird reminds
readers that bizarre human
adventures repeat themselves
again and again. Here are some
choice selections of previous
themes recently recurring:
-- “Man’s best friend” some-
times isn’t, as when a playful dog
hops onto a gun on the ground,
causing it to fire a round. John
Daniels, 28, took a bullet in the
knee from his dog, for example,
in Raleigh, N.C., in January.
Dogs betray in other ways, too.
Motorist Joel Dobrin, 32, was
pulled over in a traffic stop in
February in Moro, Ore., and
rushed to hide his alleged drug
stash, which was in a sock. How-
ever, his dog intercepted the sock
for an impromptu game of dog-
tug-of-war in the car. Dobrin won
but lost his grip, and the sock
flew out the driver’s window,
right in front of the officer. Do-
brin was cited, and later indicted,
for drug possession.
-- At least three jihadist groups
in recent years have published
full-color Arabic magazines
lauding the Islamist struggle,
with articles and essays to recruit
fighters and offer personal advice
for women on the importance of
raising proper families and cater-
ing to mujahedeens’ needs. The
latest, Al-Shamikha (“The Ma-
jestic Woman”), which surfaced
in March, featured interviews
with martyrs’ wives and advised
women to stay indoors, both for
modesty and a “clear complex-
ion” (advice that earned the
magazine its nickname “Jihad
Cosmo”).
-- Prevailing medical authority
20 years ago warned that few
humans could survive blood-
alcohol readings above .40 (per-
cent), but in recent years, drivers
have rather easily survived higher
numbers (curiously, many from
Wisconsin, such as the man in
February in Madison, Wis., with
a .559). (In 2007, an Oregon
driver was found unconscious,
but survived, with a .72 reading.)
The plethora of high numbers
might indicate mistaken medical
teaching or nonstandard machine
measurements — or an evolu-
tionary hardiness in American
drinkers.
-- Young girls “grow up” pre-
maturely, often aided by hungry
retailers such as the U.S.’s Aber-
crombie & Fitch and the British
clothiers Primark and Matalan,
each of which this spring began
offering lines of padded bras for
girls as young as 7 (8 at Aber-
crombie & Fitch for the “Ashley
Push-Up Triangle”), with Mata-
lan offering one in size “28aa.”
Child advocates were predictably
disgusted, with one Los Angeles
psychologist opining that permis-
sive mothers were trying to com-
pensate through their daughters
for their own lack of sexual ap-
peal.
-- Chutzpah! Thieves usually
pick out easy jobs, but occasion-
ally they go bold — for example,
breaking into the prison at New
Plymouth, New Zealand’s North
Island, in March (carrying off a
large TV set) or breaking into a
police station in Uddingston,
Scotland, in April (carrying off
uniforms and radios).
-- Carelessness sometimes
begets tragedy, as when motorists
survive terrible accidents but
then, while awaiting help, they
are hit and killed by emergency
vehicles. In December, near
Ocala, Fla., a 39-year-old driver
survived a rollover but was acci-
dentally run over and killed by a
responding Marion County sher-
iff’s deputy, and in April in Bald-
win Park, Calif., an arriving
ambulance fatally struck a 22-
year-old accident victim who
was, until that moment, not seri-
ously hurt.
UPDATES
-- In 2007, Australian Wayne
Scullino, then 30, quit his job in
Sydney and somehow convinced
his wife they should sell their
house and move to Wisconsin for
the sole purpose of rooting for
the Green Bay Packers, about
which he had enjoyed an in-
explicable fascination since age
15. Said Scullino, “At some
point, you’ve got to ... start living
the life you want to.” After one
season, the Scullinos returned
home, but in February 2011, he
was of course back in the U.S.,
on hand in Dallas for the Pack-
ers’ victory in Super Bowl XLV.
Scullino says his Australian
friends are still bewildered. “I try
to talk to them about it,” he said,
“but they just don’t get it.”
-- In January 2010, shortly
after News of the Weird’s report,
the U.K. government admitted
that the British-made “magic
wand” bomb-detector its own
Department of Trade and Indus-
try was promoting for export to
police in Mexico and the Philip-
pines was useless (no better than
a Ouija board). Earlier, several
British firms had sold thousands
to Iraqi police at dollar equiv-
alents of $16,000 to $60,000
(from a manufacturing cost of
about $20 each). Furthermore,
according to City of London
police, “hundreds” of Iraqis had
died in Baghdad after suicide
bombers were mistakenly al-
lowed into secure areas after
being “cleared” by the wands. In
January 2011, BBC News report-
ed that a new British company,
Unival, featuring a respected
retired Army colonel as spokes-
man, had resumed selling the
wands, to Bulgarian police.
-- Sigurdur Hjartarson’s life’s
work is his Phallological Mu-
seum in the fishing town of Hu-
savik, Iceland. As the world’s
only all-penis attraction, it draws
tourists by the thousands, eager
to see the 276-specimen collec-
tion of desiccated or stuffed
organs from a wide range of
animals. However, only in April
(15 years after it opened) did the
museum acquire a human penis,
donated by the late Pall Arason,
an acquaintance who, said Hjar-
tarson, “liked to be in the lime-
light ... to be provocative.” To an
Associated Press reporter in-
quiring of the “size” of Arason’s
donation, Hjartarson said only,
“You will just have to come and
see it.” W
Are you ready for News of the
Weird Pro Edition? Every
Monday at
NewsoftheWeird.blogspot.com
and WeirdUniverse.net. Other
handy addresses:
WeirdNews@earthlink.net,
NewsoftheWeird.com and P.O.
Box 18737, Tampa FL 33679.
COVER STORY
36-37
LISTINGS
THIS JUST IN...10
LIVE ENTERTAINMENT…22
CONCERTS…20-21
THEATER…34
AGENDA…35, 38-39, 42
SPEAK & SEE…45
MUSIC
MUSIC ON THE MENU… 16
ALBUM REVIEWS…18
CHARTS…18
STAGE & SCREEN
MOVIE REVIEW…27
RALPHIE REPORT…30
STARSTRUCK…30
THE WEDDING SINGER...32
NOVEL APPROACH…34
THE LAST DAYS OF JUDAS ISCARIOT...35
NEW VISIONS GRAND REOPENING...40
FOOD & FASHION
NEWS OF THE WEIRD…7
BUT THEN AGAIN…42
STYLE FILES…43
BULLY WALK...46
TELL US…46
THE GAMER...52
MISC.
SIGN LANGUAGE…48
MOTORHEAD…49
SORRY MOM & DAD...49
SCOOTER GIRL...51
SHOW US SOME SKIN…62
WEEKENDER MAN…69
WEEKENDER MODEL…70
ON THE COVER
DESIGN BY…STEVE HUSTED
PHOTO BY...STEVE HUSTED
VOLUME 18 • ISSUE 25
index
May 4-10, 2011
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1280 Highway 315 • Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702
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APPEARING
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this just in
By Weekender Staff
weekender@theweekender.com
CELEBRATING THE LACKAWANNA RIVER
The Lackawanna River Corridor Association (LRCA) will host RiverFest 2011 Saturday,
May 7 at the Olive Street Bridge in Scranton. The event features the 39th annual Canoe-
A-Thon, a competitive, timed, 12-mile downriver white water canoe and kayak race, a non-
competitive fun paddle run, the Duck-A-Thon and more.
Registration for the Canoe-A-Thon opens at 8 a.m., launching begins at 10 a.m. at David
Maslyar Park on Laurel Street in Archbald and at Robert Mellow Park in Peckville-
Blakely. Pre-registration is required for participants renting canoes or kayaks; registration
forms are available at www.lrca.org until Wednesday, May 4. Participants using their own
boats can pre-register or register at their launch site May 7. Late registrants will have an
extra fee.
The main paddling activities take place between 10 a.m. at the Mid Valley sites and the
finish line area in Scranton between 11 a.m.-1 p.m.
Entertainment at the Showmobile on Olive Street begins at noon, featuring High Falls,
Fred and Carol, Velvet Soul and Dave Kuffa. There will also be a live animal presenta-
tion by Second Chance Wildlife Center at 2:30 p.m.
Call 347.6311 to volunteer or visit website for more info.
A NIGHT AT THE TRACK
The 25th Annual Wilkes-Barre Family YMCA’s Night at the Races will be held Mon-
day, May 9 Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs (1280 Route 315, Plains Twp.). Doors open at
6 p.m., post time is 7 p.m.
A $15 general admission ticket provides entry into the patio, buffet, soda, beer and own-
ership of a horse. A $20 ticket offers the same, but guarantees a reserved seat in Pacer’s
Clubhouse. All proceeds benefit the children’s programs at the YMCA.
Tickets are available by calling the 570.823.2191 ext. 127.
WATER EVERYWHERE
Geologist Brian Oram, laboratory director of the Environmental Quality Center at
Wilkes University, was featured in an article entitled “Water World” in the May issue of
SELF magazine, which discussed the safety of tap water.
PANACEA SPLITS
Local rock band Panacea called it quits last week, announcing on its website that “It is
with a heavy heart and much sadness to announce today that the members of Pan.a.ce.a
have disbanded. This was not by any stretch an easy decision for anyone. But it was felt
that it was just time. It’s been a great ride, but all good things must come to an end.”
The band was made up of singer/songwriter Tim Farley, drummer Kevin Harry, bassist
Matt Jaffin and guitarist Paul Young.
ROAD TO MUSIC
The recently created NEPA-based music website Highway 81 Revisited, launched by for-
mer Weekender editor Mike Lello, will host a launch party Saturday, May 14 AT 8 p.m. at
The Bog (341 Adams Ave., Scranton) featuring performances by These United States, Pap-
py and Mike Quinn.
There is a $5 cover charge, and attendees will have a chance to win tickets to the Drive-
By Truckers concert at the F.M. Kirby Center (71 Public Square, Wilkes-Barre) and up-
coming shows presented by Get Cryptic as well as Prairie Queen Records CDs.
For more info on Highway 81 Revisited, contact mike@highway81revisited.com or call
570.817.0339.
AMBER ALERT
Count Me In for Women’s Economic Independence, the leading national not-for-profit
women entrepreneur advocates recently named Holly Chmil of Scranton-based Amberjew-
elry.com as one of 62 Pitch Winners selected in its latest Make Mine a Million $ Busi-
ness event last month in Denver.
Chmil received a $1,000 prize for her winning business pitch in a national competition
vying for a spot in a renowned business growth program to help catapult her business reve-
nue to $1 million. Described as a cross between “The Apprentice” and “American Idol,”
the pitch competition invites women business owners to deliver a two minute “elevator
pitch” to a panel of small business experts and judges.
Amberjewelry.com, which sells certified authentic Baltic amber and sterling silver jewelry
from Poland, was founded by Scranton native Andzia Chmil in 1995. The store is located
at 1808 N. Main Ave., Scranton. Hours are Monday-Friday from 10 a.m.-6 and Saturday
from 11 a.m.-3. For more info visit the website or call 570.346.4568. W
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WITH ALAN K. STOUT
FACEBOOK.COM/
MUSICONTHEMENU
Music on the menu
By Alan K. Stout
Weekender Music Columnist
$
204, 544.
That’s howmuch money
“Concert For Karen/Concert
For ACause” raised during its
12-year run from1999-2011. And
what struck me the most last week
at the event’s grand finale, “Con-
cert For ACause 9: The Final
Show,” was howmany people
were saying “thank you” to one
another. I knowthat I myself said
it quite a bit. I thanked the bands
that played the show, the folks
from97.9Xand 97 BHT, the crew
fromRock Street Music, the
people fromThe Woodlands, the
volunteers fromBig Brothers/Big
Sisters, my friends fromthe
Weekender, and of course, all of
the people that came out and
helped us raise $12,614 for the Big
Brothers/Big Sisters Anti-Bully-
ing Program.
CFC9 was, in many ways, one
big “thank you,” which is exactly
one of the things I’d hoped it
would be. Presenting one last
show, rather than just packing it in
before saying goodbye, was our
way of thanking you for 12 years
of incredible support. And as I
arrived at The Woodlands around
2 p.m. last Wednesday —four
hours before we opened the doors
to CFC9 —I realized I’ll prob-
ably never again be a part of any-
thing quite like it. Our radio spon-
sors were already there, broad-
casting live. The crewfromRock
Street was already there, setting
up the stages and musical equip-
ment. And The Woodlands?
Handling business, as usual. It all
reminded me of that old line from
President Ronald Reagan, “You’d
be amazed what can be accom-
plished when nobody cares who
gets the credit.”
That, to me, was “Concert For
Karen/Concert For ACause.”
It was “our” event, and that
includes you, the people that came
to it year after year. It was a tre-
mendous teameffort, and maybe
that’s why so many people were
saying “thank you” to one another
last Wednesday.
I’ve been writing this annual
CFK/CFCwrap-up column for 12
years now. Often, I’d try to name
every single person that helped
out in any way. This year, I even
thought about not only doing that,
but also some of the folks that
have helped us out dating back to
1999. But you knowwhat might
happen —so many years, so many
great people —I might forget
some folks. Thus, I’mgoing to try
and keep it basic, yet also compre-
hensive.
Big thanks also to all 71bands
that played the event over the past
12 years, including the more than
30 acts that rocked the house last
Wednesday. Music was the key to
CFC. And we always had great
music.
Thanks also everyone at The
Weekender and The Times Lead-
er, both past and present, that
supported CFC. I was always very
proud of the way our company
supported the event and this year
was no exception.
Big thanks to everyone at 97.9X
and 97BHT, both past and present.
Since1999, radio was a huge part
of CFC’s success and we worked
with some fine people at those
two radio stations over the years.
Huge thanks Rock Street Mu-
sic. I said it every year and I’ll say
it again: no sound, no lights, no
show. Thank you.
Thanks to the entire staff of The
Woodlands, who for the past 10
years, literally let us take over the
place for one day each year. And
thanks to the former staffs of
Jitterbugs and the Voodoo
Lounge, our CFKhome from
1999-2001. And thanks to L.T.
Verrastro/Coors Light. They
joined us in 2005 for CFC3, and
for six years, they were a wonder-
ful sponsor.
Thanks to everyone at The
United Way of Wyoming Valley
for their tremendous support, and
to the Gallery of Sound. We sold
well over a thousand CFCrecords
at Gallery of Sound since 2002,
and do you knowwho much mon-
ey the stores kept as a distribution
fee? None. Every dime came right
back to the cause. Thank you.
Thanks to Fleet Decal &Graph-
ics, Bewick &Jones Printing and
WBRE-TV, WNEP-TVand FOX
56. And thanks to Saturation
Acres Recording Studio for its
help on the CFCalbums.
Thanks to all of the other local
radio stations that also helped us
spread the word about CFC, in-
cluding Magic 93, WILK, The
Mountain, KRZ-FM, WRKC-FM
and WSFX-FM. Thanks Elton
John and the Mohegan Sun Arena,
and to Northway Ventures and
Lamar Advertising for the bill-
boards. Thanks to the great team
of volunteers fromBig Brothers/
Big Sisters that worked long shifts
at the T-shirt and CDstand and to
all of the great photographers that
took CFCpictures over the years.
And very special thanks to Lyn
Carey. The death of her sister,
Karen Greenberg Revit, inspired
the first “Concert For Karen”
event 12 years ago, and Karen’s
spirit stayed with us each year, as
did Lyn. Her parents, Barry and
Irma Fischer, who have also since
passed away, were also very sup-
portive of the event, and we felt
still their spirit with us as well,
especially this year as we doubled
Barry’s goal of reaching
$100,000.
$204, 544. That’s a lot of money
raised for great causes. And so
fromme —and for all of us —we
say, thank you.
Andthankyou, most of all, to
Karen. W
204,544 reasons
to say ` thank you'
CFC said goodbye last week.
EX OTIC
LIN G ERIE
M R.
FA SH ION S
GIFT CERTIFICATES AVAILABLE
1255 Sans Souci Highway
Wilkes-Barre, PA
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Mountaingrown
Music
Weekender/Mountaingrown
Original Music Series
SUPPORTING LOCAL MUSIC
... LIKE NEVER BEFORE
5/11/11
at the Woodlands
no cover
Performance by:
Miz
Live radio broadcast from 10-11 p.m.
on 102.3-FM, The Mountain
Hosted by Alan K. Stout
weekender
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charts
Urge Overkill might be best known for
its cover of Neil Diamond’s “Girl, You’ll
Be a Woman Soon” — famously used
in “Pulp Fiction” — but truth be told, it
deserves to be known just as much for
being a great, gritty Chicago rock ’n’ roll
band.
Featuring original singers/guitarists
Eddie “King” Roeser and Nash Kato
with drummer Bonn Quast and bassist
Good things often come in small
packages, and that is undeniably the case
with “Sing it Loud,” the most recent
offering from k.d. lang and the Siss
Boom Bang; it’s lang’s first record in 20
years created entirely with a band of her
own. With many expectations to meet,
she and her band rise to the challenge
beautifully.
The sweet little guitar licks and all-
too familiar melancholy lyrics on “I
Confess” set the mood of the album,
While the Beastie Boys
haven’t always been media
darlings, whenever they release
an album, it tends to get a lot
of attention — both good and
bad. Their latest album “Hot
Sauce Committee Part 2” is no
different, no doubt partially due
to the off-stage issues that the
band has had to deal with. The
lengthy four-year gap between
releases isn’t the longest one in
the Beastie’s career, but this one
became more significant after the
band didn’t release an album and
went on hiatus after announcing
that Adam “MCA” Yauch was
undergoing treatment for throat
cancer. Fast forward two years,
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Beastie Boys
“Hot Sauce Committee Part 2”
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Urge Overkill
“Rock & Roll Submarine”
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k.d. lang
and the Siss Boom Bang
“Sing it Loud”
Hadji Hodgkiss, UO will drop “Rock &
Roll Submarine,” its first album since
1995, May 10.
Lead track “Mason/Dixon” starts with
brief wind sounds and beeps before fuzzy
guitar kicks in. The title track follows
with great, chugging guitar and Roeser
wondering, “Do I have to spell it out
again/ This time with attitude?”
The angsty “Effigy,” with its Neil
Young “Rockin’ in the Free World”-
inspired guitar, is the first of several
standouts. “I don’t want an apology,
I want an effigy,” Roeser declares on
the track. Other highlights include the
noisy “Little Vice” with its great guitars
and almost sinister vocals; the trippy
distorted sounds of “Thought Balloon,”
which sounds straight from the ’90s (in
a good way) and “Quiet Person.” The
latter is light and airy, despite Roesner
sadly questioning, “I was always a quiet
person/ What kind of person could walk
all over me?” and “Am I happy? Or
just lucky today?” Kato’s strong vocals
kick in about halfway through to add
a completely different layer, and it’s
fantastic.
“Rock & Roll Submarine” is a great
record, proving that it’s a damn shame
Urge Overkill’s been MIAfor the past
16 years. Hopefully, the submarine will
bring the group above water — for good.
-- Nikki M. Mascali
Weekender Editor
which is one of haunting, elegantly
structured songs. lang is known for her
occasional transitions to and from genres,
having started out more in the realm of
old-school country music, and “Sing it
Loud” seems to be a celebration of that
bucolic edge (especially on “Inglewood”
and “Sorrow Nevermore”), but with
an ethereal weightlessness that is only
pulled off by the perfect combination
of velvety vocals and strong drum
backbeats.
The song “Sugar Buzz,” with its guitar
riff opening, is a melodic pick-me-up
after the lull of dramatic incantation
that opens the album. Its lyrics are pure
and simple, making a break from the
more intensely worded romanticism
lang establishes with “ASleep with No
Dreaming” and “The Water’s Edge.”
After the high of “Sugar Buzz,” “Sing
it Loud” delves into another plush
flow with the title track, and a cover of
Talking Heads’ “Heaven” rounds out the
compilation with impressive edge.
What lang and her band lack in
quantity, they make up for with quality.
Her signature crooning is marked by a
seemingly impossible blending of raw
words with smooth vocals. Her band
provides the perfect accompaniment on
each and every song, and the only thing
left to be desired would be more.
-- Stephanie DeBalko
Weekender Staff Writer
Yauch is doing well, and the
group decided to dust off most of
the songs, add a few new ones,
and put them together as “Hot
Sauce Committee Part 2.”
The album opens with “Make
Some Noise,” which may be
intended as a call-to-arms type
of song, but doesn’t have quite
the energy that one might expect.
However, while some might
see that lack of energy as an
indication that the band has run
out of gas, the reality is that the
Beastie Boys haven’t grown old,
they’ve just grown up. Tracks
such as “OK” and “Too Many
Rappers” would be right at home
on any of the Beasties’ previous
albums, and they even show a bit
of fire on tracks like “Lee Majors
Come Again” and “Here’s A
Little Something For Ya.”
It’s been a long time since
the Beasties’ songs have been
focused solely around a party-
all-night mentality, and while the
departure from that means that
there is not another anthem on
this album a la “Fight for Your
Right” or “Hey Ladies,” the
resulting freedom also allows the
band to experiment a bit and to
create some music that is a little
more interesting.
-- Mike Irwin
Weekender Correspondent
Urge Overkill
re-emerges
Pitch-perfect
elegance
Less-partying Beasties
8. Tinie Tempah/Eric Turner:
“Written in the Stars”
7. Jennifer Lopez/Pitbull: “On
The Floor”
6. Bruno Mars: “The Lazy
Song”
5. Ke$ha: “Blow”
4. Rihanna: “S&M”
3. Katy Perry/Kanye West:
“E.T.”
2. Black Eyed Peas: “Just
Can’t Get Enough”
1. Britney Spears: “Till The
World Ends”
1. Foo Fighters: “Rope”
2. Seether: “Country Song”
3. Rise Against: “Help Is On The
Way”
4. Mumford & Sons: “The Cave”
5. Cage The Elephant: “Shake Me
Down”
6. The Black Keys: “Howlin’ For
You”
7. Incubus: “Adolescents”
8. Linkin Park: “Waiting For The
End”
9. Papa Roach: “Burn”
10. Stone Sour: “Say You’ll Haunt
Me”
ALBUM REVIEWS
Top 8 at 8 with Ralphie Aversa Billboard Top Rock Songs
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concerts
BREWS BROTHERS WEST
75 Main St., Luzerne
570.283.1300
Tickets at Ticketfly.com, venue or
Pittston location at 1705 River St.
52nd Street (Billy Joel tribute): May
23, $7, 21+
Rusted Root: May 18, doors 6 p.m.,
$24 advance, $28 day of, all-ages
Adler’s Appetite: May 22, doors 6
p.m., $15 advance, $20 day of, 21+
CAESARS POCONO
RESORTS
1.877.800.5380
www.CPResorts.com
Stayin’ Alive (Bee Gees tribute): May
13-14
The Village People: May 15
Byrd Pressley’s Comedy Series: May
27-29
Boogie Wonder Band: June 10-11
Bill Cosby: June 26
Howie Mandel: July 24
Bill Engvall: Aug. 14
The Four Tops: Aug. 26
Brian Regan: Sept. 25
The Temptations: Nov. 13
ELEANOR RIGBY’S
603 Route 6, Jermyn
www.myspace.com/eleanorrigbys
Gallagher: May 7, 8 p.m.
Hit the Lights / YMAEWK: May 8, 6
p.m.
Kill The Coward: May 14, 6 p.m.
Attila: May 20, 5:30 p.m.
Lorna Shore: May 22, 6 p.m.
The Queers: May 25, 6:30 p.m.
Swingin’ Utters: June 16, 6:30 p.m.
In Alcatraz 1962: June 17, 6 p.m.
Curse of Sorrow: June 18, 7 p.m.
EMBASSY VINYL
352 Adams Ave., Scranton
Jonah Matranga: May 7, 7 p.m., cost
TBA, all ages
Dead Rider / Mascara: May 13, 7 p.m.,
$6, all ages
The Beets / Eww Yaboo: May 17, 7
p.m., cost TBA, all ages
The Body / Nimbus Terrifix / Esopha-
gus: May 20, 8 p.m., $8, all ages
Tape Deck Mountain / Grooms: June
21, 7 p.m., cost TBA, all ages
F.M. KIRBY CENTER
71 Public Square, Wilkes-Barre
Phone: 570.826.1100
NEPA Philharmonic Season Finale:
May 6, 8 p.m.
Stephen Lynch: May 7, 8 p.m.,
$24.50-$35
Sully Erna: May 14, 8 p.m., $24.50-$35
“The Big Adventures of Stuart Lit-
tle:” May 19, 10 a.m.
The Science of Magic: May 20, 10 a.m.
Laurie Berkner Band: May 21, 2 p.m.,
$27-$37
Daniel O’Donnell: May 31-June 1, 7
p.m., $57-$87
Drive-By Truckers: June 21, 8 p.m.,
$28
THE HIVE
1307 Park Ave., Williamsport,
Phone: www.thehivepa.com
Shai Hulud / Endwell / Lions Lions /
Skylines End / The One We Lost /
Empyreal: May 5, 6 p.m., $10 advance
$13 day of
KIWANIS WYOMING
COUNTY FAIR
Rt. 6, Meshoppen
Phone: 570.836.9992
www.wyomingcountyfair.com
Sept. 1-6
Wild World of Animals show: daily,
times vary
Gallagher: Sept. 2, 8 p.m.
Katie Armiger / amRadio: Sept. 3, 7
p.m.
The Roots and Boots Tour ft. Aaron
Tippin, Sammy Kershaw, Joe Diffie,
more: Sept. 4, 7 p.m.
MAUCH CHUNK OPERA
HOUSE
14 W. Broadway, Jim Thorpe,
570.325.0249, www.jtams.net
Artimus Pyle Band: May 7, 8:30 p.m.,
$26
Yarn: May 14, 8:30 p.m., $20
Todd Snider: May 21, 8:30 p.m., $25
Carbon Leaf: May 27, 8:30 p.m., $23
Michelle Shocked: May 28, 8:30 p.m.,
$28
Jay Smar & KG: June 4, 8:30 p.m., $15
Dave Wilcox: June 10, 8:30 p.m., $26
The Felice Brothers: June 17, 8:30
p.m., $25
Louisiana Hoodoo Krewe: June 25,
8:30 p.m., $20
Bennie And The Jets: July 2, 8:30
p.m., $23
The Janks: July 16, 8:30 p.m., $18
Paul Thorne: July 23, 8:30 p.m., $23
Jimmy Webb: July 30, 8:30 p.m., $26
The Greencards: Aug. 26, 8:30 p.m.,
$22
US Rails: Sept. 2, 8:30 p.m., $18
Jonathan Edwards Band: Sept. 3,
8:30 p.m., $23
Real Diamond (Neil Diamond Trib-
ute): Sept. 10, 8:30 p.m., $23
Simon & Garfunkel Tribute: Sept. 17,
8:30 p.m., $25
Joy Kills Sorrow: Sept. 24, 8:30 p.m.,
$18
Cabinet: Sept. 30, 8:30 p.m., $18
Blues Caravan: Oct. 1, 8:30 p.m., $25
Battlefield Band: Oct. 15, 8:30 p.m.,
$25
MISERICORDIA
UNIVERSITY
301 Lake St., Dallas
570.674.6719
www.misericordia.edu/theartsand-
more
Jazz in July: “Old Time is Still a-
Flying, The New Torch Bearers of
Classic Jazz” ft. Dan Levinson and
his New Millennium All Stars: July 18,
8 p.m. $8 lawn, $15 amphitheater,
$120 tables for six (on sale 5/3 by
calling 570.674.6719)
Under the Stars Summer Arts Festiv-
al ft. Mary Wilson, an original found-
ing member of The Supremes: July
23, 8 p.m., $20 lawn, $30 amphithe-
ater, $270 tables for six. (on sale 5/3
by calling 570.674.6719)
MOHEGAN SUN ARENA
255 Highland Park Blvd., Wilkes-Barre
Twp.
Barney Live in Concert Birthday
Bash: May 10-11, TIMES VARY, $15-$55
Michael Buble: June 8, 8 p.m., $61.20-
$103.65
American Idol Live: Aug. 21, 7 p.m.,
$55.85-$77.45
PENN’S PEAK
325 Maury Road, Jim Thorpe
866.605.7325 or visit pennspeak-
.com.
Gary Allan: May 6, 8 p.m., $49.25-
$54.25
Whitesnake: May 15, 8 p.m., $38.75
The Wailers: May 19, 8 p.m., $28
Easton Corbin: June 2, 8 p.m., $28
Chris Isaak: June 12, 8 p.m., $51.25-
$57.25
Robin Trower: June 18, 8 p.m., $35.75
Uriah Heep: June 24, 8 p.m., $30
Raymond the Amish Comic: July 9, 8
p.m., $22.25
Herman’s Hermits: July 22, 8 p.m.,
$35.75-$40.75
Stryper: July 29, 8 p.m.
Ted Nugent: Aug. 14, 8 p.m.
Don Williams: Aug. 25, 8 p.m., $35.75-
$40.75
Styx: Aug. 26, 8 p.m., $53.25-$59.25
The Outlaws: Aug. 27, 8 p.m., $35.75
Yardbirds: Sept. 8, 8 p.m., $30
.38 Special: Sept. 16, 8 p.m.
Gordon Lightfoot: Oct. 2, 8 p.m.,
$51.25-$54.25
Loretta Lynn: Oct. 14, 8 p.m., $47-$58
PENNSYLVANIA BLUES
FESTIVAL
Blue Mountain Ski Area, Palmerton
610.826.7700
www.skibluemt.com
July 30-31, on-site camping, all are
welcome, Visit website for info
RIVER STREET JAZZ CAFE
665 N. River St., Plains
Phone: 570.822.2992
Mystery Fyre: May 5
Mother Nature’s Son: May 6
Mike Dougherty Band / Suze: May 7
Clarence Spady Band: May 13
Mahavishnu Project: May 14
Free Music Orchestra “FMO” / Rouge
Chimp: May 20
George Wesley Band: May 27
Strawberry Jam: May 28
Marco Benevento / Exter vs Kimock:
June 23
SCRANTON CULTURAL
CENTER
420 N. Washington Ave., Scranton
Phone: 888.669.8966
“The View” with a Scranton Attitude
Let’s Hear it from the Boys: May 6, 6
p.m., $6
Duck for President, Fancy Nancy &
Other Stories: May 7, 10 a.m. Wiggles
& Giggles, 11 a.m., show. $7
NEPA Philharmonic Masterworks IV:
Inspiration: May 7, 8 p.m., $32-$65
Dancing with NEPA Stars: July 8,
5:30 p.m., $19
Dancing with NEPA Stars: July 29,
5:30 p.m., $19
Dancing with NEPA Stars: Aug. 19,
5:30 p.m., $19
Alice Cooper: Aug. 23, 8 p.m., $47.30-
$68.55
Celtic Thunder: Oct. 2, 7:30 p.m.,
$57.10-$83.30
SHERMAN THEATER
524 Main St., Stroudsburg
Phone: 570.420.2808, www.sherman-
theater.com
Southside Johnny & The Asbury
Jukes: May 7, 8 p.m., $28-$38
Blackmore’s Night: May 14, 8 p.m.,
$36
Dark Star Orchestra: May 17, 8 p.m.,
$27 advance, $29 day of
Tower of Power: May 19, 8 p.m.,
$35-$45
The Last Ten Seconds of Life: May
20, 6 p.m., $10
Kenny Vance & The Planotones: May
21, 8 p.m., $35-$45
The Click Five: May 27, 6 p.m., $10
Electric Hot Tuna: June 2, 8 p.m., $35
Dancestand USA ft. The Main Street
Cruisers: June 4, 7:30 p.m., $20-$55
Blue’s Clues Live: Blue’s Birthday
Party: June 18-19, TIMES VARY, $13-$17
New Riders of the Purple Sage: June
24, 8 p.m., $22
The John Butler Trio: Aug. 6, 8 p.m.,
$28
Belladonna: Aug. 13, 8 p.m., $15
Gregg Allman: Sept. 6, 8 p.m., $35-
$45
The Tartan Terrors: Oct. 1, 8 p.m., $30
1964: The Tribute: Oct. 22, 8 p.m.,
$32-$42
SPYGLASS RIDGE WINERY
105 Carroll Road, Sunbury
570.286.9911
www.spyglassridgewinery.com
6th Annual Blues Fest: May 21, 11
a.m.-8 p.m. ft. Big Bill Morganfield,
son of Muddy Waters
Blue Oyster Cult / Foghat: July 9, 8
p.m.
8th Annual Celtic Festival: Aug. 20, 11
a.m.-8 p.m. ft. Seven Nations &
Rathkeltair
Styx: Aug. 27, 8 p.m.
TOYOTA PAVILION AT
MONTAGE MOUNTAIN
1000 Montage Mountain Road, Scran-
ton
Sugarland / Sara Bareilles: June 18,
7:30 p.m., $36.50-$71
Def Leppard / Heart / Evan Watson:
June 29, 7:30 p.m., $39-$122.15
Vans Warped Tour: July 14, 11 a.m.,
$43.50
Brad Paisley: July 22, 4 p.m., $34-
$73.90
Motley Crue / Poison / New York
Dolls: July 31, 7 p.m., $40-$116.15
PHILADELPHIA
ELECTRIC FACTORY
3421 Willow St., Philadelphia
Phone: 215.LOVE.222
Stone Sour: May 4, 8 p.m.
Thenewdeal: May 5, 8:30 p.m.
Dark Star Orchestra (Grateful Dead
Tribute): May 6, 8:30 p.m.
Cage the Elephant: May 7, 8:30 p.m.
Deftones / Dillinger Escape Plan: May
10, 8 p.m.
Adele / The Civil Wars: May 13, 8:30
p.m.
Arctic Monkeys: May 18, 8 p.m.
The Cars: May 22, 8 p.m.
Raphael Saadiq: May 26, 8:30 p.m.
THE FILLMORE AT THE
TLA
334 South St., Philadelphia
Phone: 215.922.1011
Jon Anderson: May 4, 8 p.m.
Foals / Freelance Whales / The
Naked and Famous: May 5, 9 p.m.
Amon Amarth: May 6, 9 p.m.
Donald Glover / Childish Gambino:
May 11, 8 p.m.
Aaron Karo: May 12, 8 p.m.
Reverend Horton Heat / The Rever-
end Peyton’s Big Damn Band: May 13,
9 p.m.
Manchester Orchestra: May 14, 8 p.m.
Blue October / The Soldier Thread:
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$5.99
22 oz. Gonda Guzzler
All Day & Night
$2.25
Daily Feature 1-9 pm
$3 Capt & Coke
Happy Hour 9-11
$2.75 Mixers
& Shots
OPEN 1 PM
THURSDAY
Meatball
Parmigiana
Sub
w/16 oz. Drink
$5.99
22 oz. Gonda Guzzler
All Day & Night
$2.25
CINCO DE
MAYO
$2.75 CORONA
OR SOL
ALL DAY!
FRIDAY
22 oz. Gonda Guzzler
All Day & Night
$2.25
Daily Feature 1-9 pm
$2 Coors Light Pints
Happy Hour 9-11
$1.75 Pints
$5.50 Pitcher
SATURDAY
OPEN
FOR
LUNCH
AT
11 AM
22 oz. Gonda
Guzzler
All Day & Night
$2.25
Happy Hour
9-11
$1.75 Pints &
$5.50 Pitchers
EBAR
OPEN 1 PM
SUNDAY
OPEN
FOR
LUNCH
AT
11 AM
22 oz. Gonda Guzzler
All Day & Night
$2.25
Happy Hour
9-11
$1.75 Pints &
$5.50 Pitchers
EBAR
OPEN 1 PM
MONDAY
OPEN 1 PM
22 oz. Gonda Guzzler
All Day & Night
$2.25
Daily Feature 1-9 pm
$2 Miller Lite Bottles
Happy Hour 9-11
$1.75 Bottles
$2.50 Some Imports
TUESDAY
OPEN
FOR
LUNCH
AT
11 AM
OPEN 1 PM
22 oz. Gonda Guzzler
All Day & Night
$2.25
Daily Feature 1-9 pm
$2 Coors Light Pints
Happy Hour 9-11
$1.75 Bottles
$5.50 Pitchers
EBAR
LUNCH EBAR
TRAY OF JUMBO
PIZZA $9.99
2 JUMBO CUTS
$3.99
CINCO DE
MAYO EVE!
LUNCH
OPEN 1 PM
EBAR
EBAR
OPEN 1 P.M.
2 JUMBO CUTS
$3.99
LARGE PITA
FLATBREAD PIZZA
$7.99
Battered
Haddock or
Tuna Wheat
Wrap or Sub
w/16 oz. Drink
$5.99
LUNCH
39¢
LEGENDARY WINGS
ALL DAY, ALL NITE
EAT-IN OR TAKE OUT
LUNCH
Ham & Cheese
Sub or Wrap
w/16 oz. Drink
$5.99
OPEN 1 PM
EBAR
2 CHILI DOGS
$2.99
LARGE
PITA FLATBREAD
PIZZA
$7.99
LUNCH
Turkey Sub
or Wrap
w/16 oz. Drink
$5.99
45 LEGENDARY
WINGS FOR
$24.99
LARGE PITA
FLATBREAD PIZZA
$7.99
45 LEGENDARY
WINGS FOR
$24.99
LARGE PITA
FLATBREAD PIZZA
$7.99
39¢
LEGENDARY WINGS
ALL DAY, ALL NITE
EAT-IN OR TAKE OUT
May 15, 8 p.m.
Lykke Li / Grimes: May 16, 8 p.m.
Brett Dennen: May 17, 8 p.m.
Blackfield: May 19, 8 p.m.
Neon Trees: May 22, 8 p.m.
The Main / Augustana: May 26, 6:30
p.m.
KESWICK THEATER
Easton Road-Keswick Ave, Glenside,
Pa.
Phone: 215.572.7650
Vicki Lawrence & Mama: a Two
Woman Show, May 5, 8 p.m.
Bruce Cockburn: May 6, 8 p.m.
Love Songs, Doo Wop & Rock ’n’ Roll:
May 7, 8 p.m.
Mint Condition: May 8, 7:30 p.m.
Tommy Emmanuel & The Australian
All Stars Band: May 11, 8 p.m.
Weird Al Yankovic: May 20, 8 p.m.
Eddie Griffin: May 28, 8 p.m.
MANN MUSIC CENTER
52nd and Parkside, Philadelphia
Phone: 215.893.1999
Willie Nelson: May 27, 3:30 p.m.
TOWER THEATER
69th and Ludlow Sts. Upper Darby
Phone: 610.352.2887
Stone Temple Pilots / Rose Hill
Drive: May 5, 8 p.m.
My Chemical Romance / Thursday /
The Architects: May 6, 8 p.m.
Warren Haynes: May 14, 9 p.m.
Elvis Costello / The Imposters: May
19, 8 p.m.
Chelsea Handler: May 20, 8 p.m.
Fleet Foxes: May 21, 9 p.m.
TROCADERO
10th & Arch St, Philadelphia
Phone: 215.336.2000
Protest the Hero: May 4, 7 p.m.
Family Force 5: May 5, 6 p.m.
Tempertrend: May 6, 6:30 p.m.
The Airborne Toxic Event: May 7 & 9,
7 p.m.
Sleigh Bells / CSS (Cansei De Ser
Sexy): May 8, 7 p.m.
The Twilight Singers: May 10, 7 p.m.
Echo & the Bunnymen: May 12, 7 p.m.
Doug Stanhope: May 13, 8 p.m.
House Party Flashback: May 14, 8
p.m.
Pauly Shore: May 19, 8 p.m.
Dredg: May 20, 7 p.m.
Face to Face: May 21, 7 p.m.
Two Star Cub: May 22, 6 p.m.
Sixkill: May 27, 6:30 p.m.
Matt & Kim: May 31, 7 p.m.
SUSQUEHANNA BANK
CENTER
1 Harbour Blvd., Camden, NJ.
Phone: 609.365.1300
Bruno Mars & Janelle Monae: May 8,
7 p.m.
Sugarland: May 14, 7:30 p.m.
Daughtry / Lifehouse / Colbie Caillat:
May 15, 6 p.m.
3 Doors Down: May 22, 1 p.m.
ELSEWHERE IN PA
CROCODILE ROCK
520 Hamilton St, Allentown
Phone: 610.434.460
All Time Low: May 4, 6 p.m.
The AP Tour ft. Black Veil Brides /
Destroy Rebuild / Until God Shows:
May 5, 5 p.m.
Gallagher: May 8, 7 p.m.
Reverend Horton Heat: May 11, 8 p.m.
Sebastian Bach: May 12, 7 p.m.
Bowling for Soup: May 14, 7 p.m.
(HED)P.E. / Mushroomhead: May 18
6:30 p.m.
Crossfade: May 26, 7 p.m.
POST GAZETTE PAVILION
AT STAR LAKE
Route 18 and 22, Pittsburgh
Phone: 724.947.740
Stone Sour / Seether: May 6, 3 p.m.
Sugarland: May 15, 7:30 p.m.
WHITAKER CENTER
222 Market St., Harrisburg
Phone: 717.214.ARTS
The Machine (Pink Floyd Tribute):
May 13, 8 p.m.
Get the Led Out (Led Zeppelin Trib-
ute): May 14, 8 p.m.
NEW YORK / NEW JERSEY

BEACON THEATER
2124 Broadway, New York, NY.
Phone: 212.496.7070
Gladys Knight: May 5, 8 p.m.
Royal Comedy Tour: May 7, 7 p.m.
Paul Simon: May 10-11, 8 p.m.
Warren Haynes Band: May 12, 8 p.m.
Adele: May 19, 8 p.m.
Chelsea Handler: May 21, Times Vary
Elvis Costello / The Imposters: May
22-23, 8 p.m.
Wavy Gravy: May 27, 7:30 p.m.
BETHEL WOODS CENTER
Bethel NY
www.bethelwoodscenter.org
Roger McGuinn: May 6, 8 p.m.
Eileen Ivers: May 14, 8 p.m.
Phish: May 27-29, 7:30 p.m.
BROOME COUNTY ARENA
1 Stuart Street, Binghamton, NY
Phone: 670.778.6626
Trans-Siberian Orchestra: May 20, 8
p.m.
HAMMERSTEIN
BALLROOM
311 W. 34th St, New York, NY.
Phone: 212.279.7740
Kylie Minogue: May 4, 8 p.m.
Jeremih / New Boyz / Mike Posner /
Flo Rida / Jay Sean: May 20, 8 p.m.
Joaquin Sabina: May 25, 8 p.m.
THE FILLMORE AT IRVING
PLAZA
17 Irving Place, New York, N.Y.
Phone: 212.777.6800
Combichrist: May 4, 7 p.m.
Calle 13, May 6, 7 p.m.
Cavalera Conspiracy: May 10, 7 p.m.
Blue October: May 12, 7 p.m. & 10:30
p.m.
Echo and the Bunnymen: May 13-14, 8
p.m.
Whitesnake: May 18, 7 p.m.
The 11th Annual Joey Ramone’s
Birthday Bash: May 19, 7 p.m.
Blackfield: May 20, 7:30 p.m.
Apocalyptica: May 21, 8 p.m.
The Maine / Augustana: May 24-25, 6
p.m.
Brendan Perry / Robin Guthrie: May
31, 7:30 p.m.
IZOD CENTER
50 State Rt. 120
East Rutherford, N.J.
Rammstein: May 5, 8 p.m.
ROSELAND BALLROOM
239 52nd Street, New York, NY.
Phone: 212.777.6800
Bruno Mars & Janelle Monae: May 4,
7:30 p.m.
The Cars: May 25, 8 p.m.
BOARDWALK HALL
Atlantic City, NJ
Phone: 609.348.7803
Usher / AKON: May 6, 8 p.m.
Charlie Wilson: May 7, 7:30 p.m.
BORGATA HOTEL AND
CASINO
Atlantic City, NJ
Phone:1.866.MYBORGATA
Stevie Nicks: May 6, 8 p.m.
Jason Bonham’s Led-Zepplin Experi-
ence: May 6, 9 p.m.
Steve Angello: May 7, 10 p.m.
Crosby & Nash: May 13, 9 p.m.
Larry King: May 14, 9 p.m.
Mike Marino: May 20, 9 p.m.
James Taylor: May 21, 8 p.m.
Live From Daryl’s House: May 27, 9
p.m.
Weezer: May 27, 9 p.m.
Paul Simon: May 28, 8 p.m.
John Pinette: May 28-29, 9 p.m.
Steve Aoki: May 29, 10 p.m. W
compiled by Marie Burrell,
Weekender Intern
To send a concert listing, e-mail
weekender@theweekender.com
PHOTO COURTESY GALLAGHERSMASH.COM
If you’re a watermelon,
it’s a bad time to be in Pennsylvania.
Prop-comedy icon Gallagher is coming to Eleanor Rigby’s
(603 Scranton Carbondale Highway, Jermyn) on Saturday,
May 7 and Crocodile Rock in Allentown on Sunday, May 8.
Gallagher has been splattering watermelons, cottage
cheese and every other grocery item you can think of all
over the country for decades, closing his standup comedy
shows with his most famous bit, a consumerist culture-
smashing sketch called “The Sledge-O-Matic.” Those who
attend the shows in Jermyn and Allentown might want to
bring raincoats or a change of clothes.
Tickets for the May 7 show at Eleanor Rigby’s are $25-$30.
For info, call 570.730.3798. or visit myspace.com/Eleanor-
Rigbys. Tickets for the May 8 show at Crocodile Rock are
$20. Call 610.434.4600 or visit crocodilerockcafe.com.
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Wednesday:
Bar on Oak: Line Dancing
Bart and Urby’s: Bonejak
Hardware Bar, Wilkes-Barre: $100 Wii Bowling contest
Hops & Barleys: Karaoke w/ DJ Bounce
Jim McCarthy’s: Karaoke
Ole Tyme Charley’s: Bevan & Kevin
River Street Jazz Caféé: Open Mic
Slate Bar & Lounge: Traveling Wilkes-Barreans
Woodlands: M-80
Thursday:
Arena Bar & Grill: Cinco De Mayo Party w/ Stereo Parade
Bar on Oak: Merlin’s Dream
Bart & Urby’s: Brave Heart Cancer Fundraiser 5-7 p.m., DJ Ramses and
Walt Luke @ 7 p.m. Cinco De Mayo Party
Breakers, Mohegan Sun: Battle of the Bands
Brews Brothers, Luzerne: Cinco De Mayo Party w/ Eric Rudy
Chacko’s: Kartune
Colosseum: Cinco de Mayo Party- DJ Woogie
Cooper’s Cabana: Cinco de Mayo—Fake Uncle Jack
Hardware Bar, Scranton: Pink Slip on stage, DJ Shock D in Eclipse
Nightclub, Bull Riding contest
Hardware Bar, Wilkes-Barre: Miss Chili Pepper Contest, Chili Pepper
Eating Contest, Lucky You on stage
Huns’ West Side Caféé: DJ Bounce
Knuckleheads: FREE Jukebox
Ole Tyme Charley’s: Karaoke
River Grille: Cinco De Mayo Party w/ DJ Ooh Wee
River Street Ale House: Open Mic w/ Paul Martin
River Street Jazz Caféé: Mystery Fyre
Rox 52: Beer Pong
Slate Bar & Lounge: Lee & John – formerly of Strawberry Jam
Tommyboys Bar & Grill: DJ Cosmo
Woodlands: DJ Kev (Club HD)
Friday:
Bar on Oak: Picture Perfect
Bart & Urby’s: Downtime Jazz Trio @ 6:30 p.m., DJ @ 10 p.m.
Bentley’s: Robb Brown & Hammer 6-9 p.m.
Breakers, Mohegan Sun: New Divine
Brews Brothers, Pittston: Country Night w/ DJ Crockett
Chacko’s: Kartune
Colosseum: Frat House Friday! Video DJ Super J- hosted by Woogie
Cooper’s Cabana: C-N-R
First Friday Downtown Scranton: American Cancer Society Benefit w/ Mr.
Echo
Grotto, Harveys Lake: The Sperazza Band
Grotto, Outside Wyoming Valley Mall: Dymond Cutter
Hardware Bar, Scranton: Johnny Unit
Hardware Bar, Wilkes-Barre: Green Eggs
Hops & Barley’s: Cinco De Mayo Party w/ DJ Eddie J
Jim McCarthy’s: DJ Justin
La Tolteca: Eric & the Dreamers
Liam’s: Mame
Ole Tyme Charley’s: Headlock main bar, DJ EFX all request party in the
Lava Lounge
River Street Jazz Caféé: Mother Natures Sons
Rox 52: Free Jukebox
Senunas’: DJ Notorious PAT
Slate Bar & Lounge: 3
rd
Degree
Stan’s Caféé: DJ Alero
Tommyboy’s Bar & Grill: Gone Crazy Duo 5:30-7:30 then Ronnie
Williams
Woodlands: (Evolution) DJ Kev, Smooth Like Clyde
Saturday:
Bar on Oak: Who Knows
Bart & Urby’s: DJ Ashley Freckletone
Bentley’s: Iron Cowboy
Breakers, Mohegan Sun: M80
Brews Brothers, Luzerne: Bad Hair Day
Brews Brothers, Pittston: The Escape Artist
Colosseum: King B - hosted by DJ Woogie
Cooper’s Cabana: Joker Band
Ernie G’s Pub & Eatery: Lee Strumski & John Shemo formerly of
Strawberry Jam
Hardware Bar, Scranton: UUU
Hardware Bar, Wilkes-Barre: 40 Lb. Head
Jim McCarthy’s: Oldies Karaoke
Liam’s: The Way, 3 to Breathe, Temptation Denied
Lucky’s Sporthouse: Kentucky Derby – watch it here
Main St. Jukebox, Stroudsburg: Kingdead
Ole Tyme Charley’s: Karaoke and DJ EFX
River Street Jazz Caféé: Suze & Mike Daugherty Band
Rox 52: Free Jukebox
Senunas’: Tightly Wound
Slate Bar & Lounge: Mr. Echo
Stan’s Caféé: Shitz N Gigglez
Tommyboys Bar & Grill: Aaron Bruch
Woodlands: (Evolution) DJ DJ Kev, Generation Next
Sunday:
Arena Bar & Grill: Mike Antosh and McNothing
Banko’s: Mr. Echo
Breakers, Mohegan Sun: Kartune
Brews Brothers, Luzerne: Stoney Creek
Cooper’s Cabana: The Wannabees Party Band
La Tolteca: Souled Out
Tommyboys Bar & Grill: NASCAR
Woodlands: The Tones w/ DJ Godfather
Monday:
Jim McCarthy’s: Unplugged Monday - Open Mic
River Street Ale House: Mr. Echo w/ Jump & Drev
Tuesday:
Bar on Oak: Comedy Night
Dugan’s Pub: Kevin Sult benefit
Grotto, Harveys Lake: Cover 2 6:30
Hops: Aaron Bruch
Huns’ West Side Caféé: AJ Jump and Mike Miz
Knuckleheads: Free Pool All Day
Ole Tyme Charley’s: Karaoke and Beer Pong, DJ EFX in the Lava Lounge
Rox 52: Free Pool
Tommyboys Bar & Grill: Open Mic Night
The Woodlands: Corporate Karaoke
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12 Market St. Nanticoke • 570-735-2023
OPEN 11 A.M. Tues.-Sat., NOON Sundays
New Happy Hour! Mon-Thurs 9-11 pm
PARKING AVAILABLE IN THE REAR
COME IN & CHECK OUT OUR
DIFFERENT DAILY SPECIALS
FREE
WI
FI
OPEN MIC NIGHT
SATURDAY SUNDAY MONDAY
$1.50 COORS
LIGHTS ALL DAY
NASCAR!
WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY
40¢ WINGS with
$1.50 LAGER 16 OZ. MUGS
YUENGS & WINGS
DJ COSMO
$1.50 BUD
16 OZ. MUGS
PASTA NIGHT!
CLAM NIGHT!
HAPPY HOUR 5:30-7:30
TUESDAY
$1.50 MILLER LITE
16 OZ. MUGS
GONE CRAZY DUO
RONNIE WILLIAMS
THEN LATER ...
AARON
BRUCH
BUILD YOUR
OWN
BURGER
NITE!
$2 PINNACLE
VODKA MIXERS
2
6
8
2
6
3 21A Gateway Shopping Center, Edwardsville
570-714-8888
BAR HOURS:
SUN.-WED. 11 AM-MIDNIGHT
THURSDAY-SATURDAY
11AM-2AM
HAPPY HOUR
EVERY DAY 5-7 P.M.
1/2 PRICE COCKTAILS
$1.25 ALL DRAFTS
$1 OFF ALL HOUSE WINE
ACCEPTING MOTHERS DAY
RESERVATIONS
FIRST 100 RESERVATIONS W/5 PEOPLE
OR MORE, MOTHER EATS FREE
2
8
5
8
2
8
Place Pete’s
Daily Specials
Experience
Our Healthy
Lebanese Cuisine
35 E. South St. • Wilkes-Barre
(570) 820-7172 • Open Mon.-Fri. 7 am - 7 pm
FRIDAY FRIDAY
American
Cancer
Society
Benefit
First Friday
Downtown
Scranton
7-10
SATURDAY SATURDAY
PRIVATE PARTY AT
TOMMY BOY’S
NANTICOKE 5-8
&
Slate
Hanover Twp.
10-1:30
SUNDAY SUNDAY
Bankos
West Nanticoke
6-9
Facebook.com/MrEchoBand
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at the Corner of E.Northampton & Hillside St. in Wilkes-Barre
570.829.9779
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9PM
-1AM
M
ILLER
LITE
PINTS
$1.50
• 7PM
-9PM
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9PM
-1AM
COORS
LIGHT
PINTS
$1.50
• 7PM
-9PM
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M
OTHER’S
DAY!
FREE
ROSE
TO
EVERY
M
OTHER
W
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DINNER!
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CO
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G
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6LB. RIB
EYE
STEAK
SANDW
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PLATTER
EAT
IT
ALL
IN
ONE
HOUR
AND
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FREE!
EVERY CHALLENGER GETS A FREE T-SHIRT TO PROVE IT!
KITCH
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5-8
EV
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D
AY!
40¢
W
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CLAM
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CONCERT STYLE
STAGE AND LIGHTS!
SMOKING PERMITTED!
HHDaily
5-7
HHSat.
8-10
OAK ST., PITTSTONTWP.
654-1112
Tues.
COMEDY
NIGHT
EVERY TUESDAY
8-11
Thurs.
MERLIN’S
DREAM
8 PM
Wed.
LINE
DANCING 7-11
CONCERT STYLE
STAGE & LIGHTS
Fri.
PICTURE
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9-1
HH 5-7: $1.50
DOM. PINTS,
$2 DOM.
BOTTLES, $2.50
MIXERS, $3
WINES
FREE SNACKS
Sat.
WHO
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9-1
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WED. & MON.
$2.50 JUMBO 25 OZ. MUGS 10-12
THURS. & TUES.
$2 CORONAS 10-12
$2 MARGARITAS ‘TIL 12
FRI., SAT. & SUN.
$1 VODKA MIXERS 9-11
MON. & TUES.
$2.50 BUD LIGHT 25 OZ. MUGS 10-12
FREE
PIZZA
FROM
PIZZA
BELLA
MON. &
TUES.
THE WAY, 3 TO BREATHE & TEMPTATION DENIED
SATURDAY
to advertise...
to advertise...
to advertise...
to advertise...
call matt 829.7204
2
7
3
8
1
3
to advertise...
to advertise...
to advertise...
to advertise...
call john 831.7398
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LACKAWANNA COUNTY
ABBEY GALES – SCRANTON
AGAVE CANTINA & TEQUILA BAR –
CLARKS SUMMIT
ANDY GAVIN’S – SCRANTON
APPLEBEE’S – DICKSON CITY
BACKYARD ALE HOUSE – SCRANTON
COOPER’S – SCRANTON
FRESNO’S – DICKSON CITY
GRAVITY INN – WAYMART
HEART LAKE LODGE – MONTDALE
JULIA’S – OLD FORGE
KILDARE’S – SCRANTON
LA TONALTECA – DICKSON CITY
LUIGI’S – OLYPHANT
MENDICINO’S – MOSCOW
MERT’S – SCRANTON
MORGANZ – SCRANTON
PAPPY’S – SPRINGBROOK
QUAKER STEAK & LUBE – DICKSON CITY
SMILER’S – DICKSON CITY
V-SPOT - SCRANTON
LUZERNE COUNTY
15
TH
ST. BEER WAREHOUSE – HAZLETON
4
TH
STREET PUB – W. HAZLETON
APPLEBEE’S – HAZELTON
ARENA BAR & GRILL – WILKES-BARRE
BAR LOUIE – MOHEGAN CASINO
BEER BELLIES – HANOVER TWP.
BO BROTHERS – WYOMING
BOTTLE NECKS – W. HAZLETON
BRASS BUCKLE – CONYNGHAM
BREWS BROTHERS WEST – LUZERNE
BREWS BROTHERS – PITTSTON
BRICKHOUSE – DUPONT
BROTHER’S SHIM – BEAR CREEK
CHILI’S – WILKES-BARRE
COOPERS – PITTSTON
DAMON’S – HAZELTON
ERNIE G’S PUB & EATERY – AVOCA
GONDA’S – WILKES-BARRE
HARDWARE BAR – WILKES-BARRE
HOLLYWOOD DINER – HAZELTON
HOPS & BARLEY’S – LUZERNE
JUAN PEDRO’S – HAZELTON
KELSEY’S – ASHLEY
LA TOLTECA – WILKES-BARRE
LUCKY’S – WILKES-BARRE
MADISON’S VODKA BAR & STEAKHOUSE –
NANTICOKE
METRO – DALLAS
OLE TYME CHARLEY’S – PLAINS
RIVER GRILLE – PLAINS
RIVER ST. ALE HOUSE – PITTSTON
RODANO’S – WILKES-BARRE
SENUNAS’ – WILKES-BARRE
SLATE BAR – WILKES-BARRE
SLIDERZ – EXETER
TAVERN ON A HILL – WILKES-BARRE
THE WOODLANDS – WILKES-BARRE
TIPSY TURTLE, OWEN ST. –
SWOYERSVILLE
TIPSY TURTLE, MARKET ST – PLAINS
TOWN TAVERN – DURYEA
WAYNE COUNTY
BACKDRAFTS – LAKE ARIEL
BEACH LAKE INN – BEACH LAKE
BENNOCO’S – HAMLIN
WHITE OWL – BEACH LAKE
L.T. VERRASTRO, INC.
IMPORTING BEER DISTRIBUTOR
1-800-341-1200 • WWW.LTVERRASTRO.COM
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N
ormally, my column is
a bit more “consumer”
oriented. But given the
latest news, I think a segue into
something a bit more pertinent to
current events is warranted.
By now, you’ve heard the
big news: Osama bin Laden is
dead. If this is news to you, you
should pick up The Times Leader
because you’ve missed a bit of
extremely important news.
Americans were out in the
streets late Sunday night into
early Monday morning chanting
“U.S.A., U.S.A.” repeatedly and
waving American fags all around.
And there’s nothing wrong with
that — we have neutralized a
dangerous, implacable enemy,
someone responsible for the
deaths of thousands of Americans
and countless others in countries
around the globe.
But we need to be asking
ourselves some hard questions,
like why, with all of the data and
technology at our fngertips, did
it take 10 years to fnd bin Laden?
What happens now? In the eyes of
al-Qaida, we’ve created a martyr
— and there’s a valid concern that
this will provoke another attack.
America has some extremely
impressive military technology
at its disposal. Predator drones.
Satellites literally encompass
the globe, providing real-time
surveillance. If you’ve seen
Google Maps, you know you can
see your car in your driveway,
and in some cases, you can see
people as well. And that’s just the
civilian-level snapshots.
The full capabilities of a
military surveillance satellite
are, of course, classifed. But I
wouldn’t be surprised if they
could read off a Post-it Note
you held in your hand. We have
instantaneous information
transfer to any point on the
globe, and we had all of these
capabilities 10 years ago as well,
and we still couldn’t fnd him.
Why? Because, for all of our
vaunted technology, and all of
the advanced capabilities we have,
bin Laden, and terrorists like him,
know how to leave a very small
footprint. A satellite can’t see you
if you don’t go outside. You can’t
be tracked to a given location if
you aren’t seen entering it.
I would argue that the military
needs to focus more on micro-
scale surveillance instead of a
Predator-drone sized vehicle,
something the size of a bird, or
maybe even smaller still.
And a company in California
has done just that.
AeroVironment, a company
that produces unmanned drones
for the military, has developed
a robotic fying machine that
is camoufaged to look like a
hummingbird. Currently, it’s
a rather loud hummingbird,
with twitchy, uncoordinated
movements.
But devices on this scale, with
some development, might one day
pass unnoticed among crowds,
and even enter buildings.
Granted, it can’t carry the
payload of a Predator drone, but
I don’t think anyone will ever
mistake a Predator Recon
Drone for a bird.
Given that
today’s warfare
is trending
toward urban
environments
and
guerrilla-
style combat,
these tiny
devices might
one day make the
difference between a
10-year manhunt and
tech talk
By Nick Delorenzo
Special to the Weekender
Bird of prey
a 24-hour search.
Nick DeLorenzo is director of
Interactive and New Media for
The Times Leader. Write him at
ndelorenzo@timesleader.com.
The hummingbird drone developed by AeroVironment.
PHOTO COURTESY OF AEROVIRONMENT
2
8
3
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0
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3 ON 3
BASKETBALL
TOURNAMENT
For more information on The Guardian Angel Project, visit
bradfordcountyguardianangelproject.com
Prizes will be awarded to the first and second place winners including
gift certificates to various restaurants, various gym memberships, movie
passes to the R/C Movies 14 in Wilkes-Barre, as well as a special prize
that will be announced prior to the start of the tournament.
SUNDAY MAY 29TH, 2011
THE WILKES UCOMM CENTER
169 South Main St.
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702
10:00 am TO 6:00 pm…or until a team is
CROWNED KING OF THE COURT!
Come join the Bradford County
Probation Department as they
host the first annual Kings of the
Court 3 on 3 basketball
tournament! All proceeds will
benefit “The Guardian Angel
Project” to ensure it stays
implemented for years to come.
Contact Justin Popovich at jpop8742@gmail.com or 570-637-0034 to
reserve your spot in this 30-team, round ball ruckus. Entry fee is $40.00/
Team with a 4-Man Roster
N
ormally, my column is
a bit more “consumer”
oriented. But given the
latest news, I think a segue into
something a bit more pertinent to
current events is warranted.
By now, you’ve heard the
big news: Osama bin Laden is
dead. If this is news to you, you
should pick up The Times Leader
because you’ve missed a bit of
extremely important news.
Americans were out in the
streets late Sunday night into
early Monday morning chanting
“U.S.A., U.S.A.” repeatedly and
waving American fags all around.
And there’s nothing wrong with
that — we have neutralized a
dangerous, implacable enemy,
someone responsible for the
deaths of thousands of Americans
and countless others in countries
around the globe.
But we need to be asking
ourselves some hard questions,
like why, with all of the data and
technology at our fngertips, did
it take 10 years to fnd bin Laden?
What happens now? In the eyes of
al-Qaida, we’ve created a martyr
— and there’s a valid concern that
this will provoke another attack.
America has some extremely
impressive military technology
at its disposal. Predator drones.
Satellites literally encompass
the globe, providing real-time
surveillance. If you’ve seen
Google Maps, you know you can
see your car in your driveway,
and in some cases, you can see
people as well. And that’s just the
civilian-level snapshots.
The full capabilities of a
military surveillance satellite
are, of course, classifed. But I
wouldn’t be surprised if they
could read off a Post-it Note
you held in your hand. We have
instantaneous information
transfer to any point on the
globe, and we had all of these
capabilities 10 years ago as well,
and we still couldn’t fnd him.
Why? Because, for all of our
vaunted technology, and all of
the advanced capabilities we have,
bin Laden, and terrorists like him,
know how to leave a very small
footprint. A satellite can’t see you
if you don’t go outside. You can’t
be tracked to a given location if
you aren’t seen entering it.
I would argue that the military
needs to focus more on micro-
scale surveillance instead of a
Predator-drone sized vehicle,
something the size of a bird, or
maybe even smaller still.
And a company in California
has done just that.
AeroVironment, a company
that produces unmanned drones
for the military, has developed
a robotic fying machine that
is camoufaged to look like a
hummingbird. Currently, it’s
a rather loud hummingbird,
with twitchy, uncoordinated
movements.
But devices on this scale, with
some development, might one day
pass unnoticed among crowds,
and even enter buildings.
Granted, it can’t carry the
payload of a Predator drone, but
I don’t think anyone will ever
mistake a Predator Recon
Drone for a bird.
Given that
today’s warfare
is trending
toward urban
environments
and
guerrilla-
style combat,
these tiny
devices might
one day make the
difference between a
10-year manhunt and
tech talk
By Nick Delorenzo
Special to the Weekender
Bird of prey
a 24-hour search.
Nick DeLorenzo is director of
Interactive and New Media for
The Times Leader. Write him at
ndelorenzo@timesleader.com.
The hummingbird drone developed by AeroVironment.
PHOTO COURTESY OF AEROVIRONMENT
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movie review
reel attractions
By Ignatious Schiavo
Weekender Correspondent
C
ombine two of
Hollywood’s top action
stars, an established
high-octane film franchise and a
veritable cornucopia of Brazil’s
finest buttocks and one would
expect their staggering ticket
price to serve as the key to an
equally staggering theatrical
ride. Unfortunately, as common
knowledge dictates, things don’t
always work out as planned.
Vin Diesel and Paul Walker
return to their “Fast/Furious”
franchise with the fifth
installment, “Fast Five.” After
flirting with serious dramatic
roles early in his career, “Multi-
Facial” and “Saving Private
Ryan,” Diesel has settled in to
the big-budget action genre. As
his string of successes would
attest, this seems to suit him
just fine. For the series’ fifth
installment, Diesel is once again
paired with Walker, Jordana
Brewster, Tyrese Gibson and
Gal Gadot. Thus proving that
the first criteria in becoming a
car racer/professional thief is to
be frighteningly attractive.
Incarcerated again, Dom
Toretto (Diesel) is sprung by his
associates during a daring raid
that involves causing a prison
bus to roll over approximately
17 times. Amazingly, not only
does Toretto escape uninjured,
so do the other 20 occupants.
While this is a movie, it is this
blatant disregard for the laws of
physics that tend to detract from
the final product. By trying to
keep the all important PG-13
tag, filmmakers are forced to
avoid such horrible realities as
foul language, sex and violent
death.
Following the escape, Toretto,
O’Conner (Walker) and Mia
(Brewster) meet up in Rio de
Janeiro. After a botched job
makes them the most wanted
humans alive, they call in the
rest of their old team to pull
of one last heist: Stealing the
local drug lord Reyes’ (Joaquim
de Almeida) $100 million in
cash. Of course, the attention
also attracts the DEA’s top
fugitive retrieval team and their
Terminator-like commander
Hobbs (Dwayne Johnson).
“Fast Five” does not attempt
to break any new ground.
The story is a played-out
combination of the ride into
the sunset after one last job and
let’s-get-the-band-back-together
themes. It references the
Not so ‘Fast’ fifth film
Great Odin’s raven!
Opening this week:
“Thor,” “Jumping the Broom,”
“Something Borrowed”
Opening next week:
“Bridesmaids,” “Priest”
“Thor” “Bridesmaids”
Upcoming attractions
W W
Looks like Apatow might be jumping
the shark on this one …
Vin Diesel, left, comes face to face with Dwayne Johnson in ‘Fast Five.’
previous films briefly and falls
back into the franchises’ comfort
zone: Car racing. The franchise
would have us believe that there
is an underground car-racing
scene readily available no matter
where you are. They promise a
world teeming with laboratory
constructed engines powering
the most exotic-looking wheels
surrounded by badass gangsters
and their multitude of scantily
clad concubines all consorting to
a thumping hip-hop soundtrack.
While this may be the case in a
handful of locales, safe money
would probably find the race
from “Grease” to be more the
norm for the vast majority of
thrill seekers.
Whatever one’s personal
tastes, there is no denying the
appeal of the franchise based on
the success it has seen at the box
office. It continues to provide
cutting-edge action sequences
and great international locales.
However, the combination of
video game-inspired racing and
hip-hop videos has really run its
course. The story is tired. The
dialogue is laden with inside
jokes and is amateurish at best.
It is saved solely by Johnson’s
channeling of his professional-
wrestling melodramatics as he
still owns it and can really bring
a smile to one’s face with his
over-the-top machismo.
At the finish line, one receives
a healthy dollop of thrill-ride
intensity wrapped in bikini-clad
packaging. Sadly, even the most
ardent Red Bull junkie can’t
get past the fact that it’s a ride
they’ve taken before.
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WIN
WIN
T
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C
K
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T
S
T
I
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K
E
T
S
To win a pair of tickets to see
KISS at Mt. Laurel, send us your
best KISS look-a-like photos
with your face painted to
weekender@theweekender.com.
Subject line Kiss ticket contest.
Please include your full name
and phone number.
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Had an encounter with someone famous? If so, the Weekender wants
your pictures for our Starstruck.
It doesn’t matter if it happened five months ago or five years ago. Send
us your photo, your name, hometown, the celebrity you met, and when
and where you met them, and we’ll run one photo here each week. E-mail
high resolution JPEGs to weekender@theweekender.com, or send your
photos to Starstruck, c/o The Weekender, 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA,
18703.
starstruck
Lorenzo Medico and Derek Zambino of NEPA
with Mickey Rourke at Set Nightclub in Miami
in the summer of 2008.
ralphie report
the
By Ralphie Aversa
Special to the Weekender
K
elly Cutrone found out
that she was pregnant
on Sept. 10, 2001. The
next day, the most horrif ic
attack against civilians on
American soil took place. On
May 9, 2002, Cutrone gave
birth to her daughter. On Sun-
day, Ava celebrated her ninth
birthday, the day that Presi-
dent Barack Obama an-
nounced that Osama bin La-
den, the man who orchestrat-
ed 9/11, was killed by U.S.
troops.
Of course, Cutrone found
out the news Sunday night in
dramatic fashion: She was in a
New York cab, driving with a
Muslim driver through Man-
hattan with her daughter,
when the news was announced
over the radio.
“(The driver) starts crying,
and we start cheering,” Cu-
trone said on “The Ralphie
Radio Show.” “Martin
(Bell), Ava’s godfather, was
f ilming the whole thing. It
was so bizarre just to have
that split-screen kind of real-
ity for everyone, but at the
same time, you know we all
had to be sensitive about each
other’s feelings because, I
mean, we were in a cab to-
gether going 60 blocks.”
It’s stories similar to that
one which give Cutrone’s new
book, “Normal Gets You
Nowhere,” an appropriate
title. The publicist’s life has
strayed about as far from
“normal” as one can, and she
documents a lot of it while
throwing in various anecdotes
about everything from having
sex with married men to end-
ing traditional, commercial-
ized holidays. Continuing
from her f irst book, “If You
Have to Cry, Go Outside:
And Other Things Your
Mother Never Told You,”
Cutrone offers a perspective
in to her company, People’s
Revolution, the fashion PR
f irm she created. On the
theme of normal, Cutrone
writes that she’s dreaded ev-
ery normal person who has
walked through the doors at
her f irm. But, she didn’t dread
MTV star Whitney Port.
“Whitney’s not so normal!”
Cutrone insisted. “She’s fun-
ny, she’s quirky. She has a
subversive side to her that you
wouldn’t (expect). How can
you be on ‘The City’ and
‘The Hills’ and design a
clothing line and be normal?”
USHER DENIES
RUMORED RIHANNA
ROMANCE
In a radio interview to pro-
mote his show at the Dunkin’
Donuts Center in Providence,
R.I., on May 4, Usher all but
avoided directly answering a
question by 92 PRO-FM’s
Jessica Schiano on whether
he and Rihanna were in-
volved romantically.
“I’m not on the phone to
dispel anything,” responded
the singer when Schiano
asked him if he was hanging
out with someone whose name
“rhymed with Rihanna.” “You
know, artists, we have friends
… people def initely see
something that might not
always be what you think it
is.”
Rumors began swirling that
the r&b superstars were an
item after the two were alleg-
edly spotted together at the
Coachella festival in Cali-
fornia. A couple of days later,
the two were allegedly spotted
in New York on a date.
Usher’s “OMG Tour” ends
June 1 in Los Angeles. Rihan-
na kicks off her summer-long
trek with supporting act Cee
Lo Green on June 4 in Balti-
more. W
Listen to The Ralphie
Radio Show weekdays from 7
p.m.-midnight on 97 BHT.
The cover of Kelly
Cutrone’s new book,
‘Normal Gets You
Nowhere.’
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stage
T
he ’60s gave us hippies.
The ’70s gave us “Wel-
come Back, Kotter.” And
the ’80s, with shoulder pads,
high-tops and Arsenio Hall,
gave us a source of endless
hilarity that stemmed from the
“anything goes” attitude we
now associate with the era.
Love them or hate them, the
1980s were a decade of stylistic
decadence and contextual hu-
mor, and it is partially because
of that legacy that the 1998
film, “The Wedding Singer,”
was such a box-office hit. This
month, The Music Box Reper-
tory Company invites everyone
to snap on their slap bracelets
and slip into their Members
Only jackets for the live musi-
cal comedy based on the film,
also titled “The Wedding Sing-
er.”
The Tony Award-winning
musical, with a book written by
Chad Begeulin and Tim Herli-
hy, music by Matthew Sklar and
lyrics by Begeulin, originally
made its debut on Broadway in
2006, and the upcoming adap-
tation is the first time it will hit
stages locally.
“It just recently became
available, and since the movie
was a huge hit, I thought it
would be great,” said Dana
Feigenblatt, the director and
box office manager of The
Music Box. “It’s a bubbly, fun
musical.”
Although the stage produc-
tion differs in some ways from
its film counterpart, the basic
story remains the same. Big-
hearted wedding singer, Robbie
Hart, portrayed by John Owen
Kennedy, is dumped at the altar
by rocker-chick Linda (Wendy
Popeck), and later finds himself
falling for girl-next-door Julia
Sullivan, a lovable waitress who
will be embodied by Amanda
Reese. The hitch? Julia is en-
gaged to “Miami Vice” wan-
nabe, Glenn (Ryan Engel).
The story plays out with
comedic genius and no lack of
’80s indulgence, with a cast of
loyal, plucky characters, in-
cluding Julia’s party girl cousin,
Holly (Feigenblatt), Robbie’s
raucous grandma Rosie (Jessica
Werbin) and his eccentric band-
mates, Sammy (Dana Bower II)
and George (Mark Petrole).
Feigenblatt revealed that
although the flick was a hit, she
regards the musical’s exaggerat-
ed nod to the decade that made
John Hughes a household name
as much more entertaining.
“I find the musical to be
much funnier than the movie,
and the songs are so clever,”
she said. “It is so typical ’80s
and makes every ’80s refer-
ence. The story is really cute,
and the whole romance aspect
translates well to the stage
version.”
She added that the upcoming
show does follow in the foot-
steps of its Broadway prede-
cessor, but guests can expect a
little local style to be in the mix
as well.
“We always present our own
adaptation, based on the space
that we have, and we kind of
put our own spin on it and put
our own flavor into it.”
The approaching perform-
ance is also part of a celebra-
tion for the venue’s 30th anni-
versary. Debbie Zehner, presi-
dent of the board of directors,
has been involved for the past
29 of those 30 years, and noted
that while patrons will always
love the classics, like “Hello,
Dolly” and “Fiddler on the
Roof,” it’s shows like “The
Wedding Singer” that help draw
an even more diverse crowd.
“People are always looking
for something new to see, and
shows like “The Wedding Sing-
er’ encourage a younger audi-
ence to be a part of live thea-
ter,” Zehner said.
The past 30 years, which will
be highlighted in an upcoming
revue show, have seen many
creative minds grace the stage
of The Music Box. For Zehner,
providing an outlet for that
local talent is the most fulfill-
ing aspect of hosting perform-
ances, and it’s what makes a
show like “The Wedding Sing-
er” a worthwhile venture.
“I’ve seen young people grow
up at the theater and become
involved in the arts,” she said.
“And I’ve watched what the live
theater does to give these kids
confidence to get up and do
whatever their future might be.
We’ve always tried to educate
as well as perform.” W
“The Wedding Singer,” May
6-8, 12-15, 19-22, The Music
Box (196 Hughes St., Swoyers-
ville). Info: 570.283.2185.
Kneeling, Wendy Popeck and Dana Feigenblatt and
standing, Dane Bower II, Amanda Reese, John Owen
Kennedy and Mark Petrole in a scene from ‘The Wedding
Singer.’
A cute and
clever flashback
By Stephanie DeBalko
Weekender Staff Writer
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LAST REAL RECORD STORES!
Mon-Fri 10-7, Sat 10-9, Sun 11-5
facebook.com/mainstjukebox
twitter.com/mainstjukebox
Saturday, May 7th
6 to 9pm
FOCUS
The Art of Sherley Escribano
w/ Musical Guest: Kingdead
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Mexican Restaurant
Authentic Mexican Food
200 Mundy Street 200 Mundy Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA 19702 Wilkes-Barre, PA 19702
570.825.5001 FAX 570.825.5001 FAX
570.825.5011 570.825.5011
COME CELEBRATE
COME CELEBRATE
WITH US!
WITH US!
WEDNESDAY, MAY 4 — 1 DAY TO CINCO DE MAYO
WEDNESDAY, MAY 4 — 1 DAY TO CINCO DE MAYO
THURSDAY, MAY 5
THE BIG DAY!
MUSIC BY DJ DIVA
THE CORONA GIRLS &
THE DOS EQUIS GIRLS FROM 6-8 P.M.
MARGARITA SPECIALS!
ALL MEXICAN BEER ON SPECIAL!
FRIDAY, MAY 6 — THE DAY AFTER!
FRIDAY, MAY 6 — THE DAY AFTER!
HAPPY HOUR 7-9
HAPPY HOUR 7-9
CORONA $2.55 • MARGARITAS $4.50
CORONA $2.55 • MARGARITAS $4.50
LIVE BAND! ERIC & THE DREAMERS 8 PM
LIVE BAND! ERIC & THE DREAMERS 8 PM
SUNDAY MAY 8, MOTHERS DAY — MARGARITA SPECIALS ALL DAY!
SUNDAY MAY 8, MOTHERS DAY — MARGARITA SPECIALS ALL DAY!
COFFEE MUG GIVEAWAYS FOR ALL MOTHERS
COFFEE MUG GIVEAWAYS FOR ALL MOTHERS
SOULED OUT starts 8PM. HAPPY HOUR 7-9 12 OZ. DRAFTS $1
SOULED OUT starts 8PM. HAPPY HOUR 7-9 12 OZ. DRAFTS $1
ENJOY OUR HAPPY HOUR 5-7
ENJOY OUR HAPPY HOUR 5-7
12 OZ. DOS EQUIS, DOS EQUIS LAGER DRAFTS $1
12 OZ. DOS EQUIS, DOS EQUIS LAGER DRAFTS $1
REGULAR MARGARITAS $4.50
REGULAR MARGARITAS $4.50
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theater listings
ACTORS CIRCLE AT
PROVIDENCE PLAYHOUSE
(1256 Providence Rd, Scranton, reser-
vations: 570.342.9707, www.actorscir-
cle.org)
• “Heaven Can Wait:” May 13-15,
20-22. Fri./Sat., 8 p.m., Sun, 2 p.m.
The unlikely story of a boxer taken
to heaven before his time who
comes back as a murdered banker.
$12 GA, $10 seniors, $8 students.
Preview May 12, $8 GA/seniors, $6
students.
ARTS YOUNIVERSE
(47 N. Franklin St., Wilkes-Barre,
570.970.2787, www.artsyouni-
verse.com)
•“The Last Days of Judas Iscariot:”
May 5, 6, 7, 8 p.m., call for reserva-
tions.
BLOOMSBURG THEATER
ENSEMBLE
(Alvina Krause Theatre, 226 Center
St., Bloomsburg, 570.784.8181,
800.282.0283, www.bte.org)
• “Ghost-Writer:” through May 15,
Thurs.-Sat., 7:30 p.m., Sun., 3 p .m.
$24 adults, $19 seniors 60+, $11 chil-
dren/students, $5 for BU students
with ID.
CORNER BISTRO DINNER
THEATRE
(76-78 S. Main St. Carbondale,
570.282.7499)
• “Do Not Disturb:” May 6-7, doors
6:30 p.m., followed by buffet and
show. $23 dinner/show.
DIETRICH THEATRE
(60 E. Tioga Street, Tunkhannock,
570.996.1500, www.dietrichthea-
ter.com)
• “Peter and the Wolf Live on
Stage:” May 6, 1:30 p.m., May 7, 11 a.m.,
free.
• Radio Players Performance: May
17, 7 p.m., free.
ELECTRIC THEATRE
COMPANY
(326 Spruce St., 2nd Floor, Scranton,
www.electrictheatre.org, 570.558.1515)
• “At Wit’s End:” May 4-8, Pay-What-
You-Can Wed., 7 p.m., Cheaper-Than-
A-Movie Thurs., 7 p.m., $8, Fri./Sat., 8
p.m., Sun., 3 p.m., $24 GA, $16 seniors,
$8 students.
• Mo Gaffney & Kathy Nijamy’s
“Parallel Lives:” May 12-23, a tribute
to the common struggles of men,
women, and children muddling
though modern life. Wed./Thurs., 7
p.m., Fri./Sat., 8 p.m., Sun., 3 p.m.
Wed. Pay-What-You-Can, Thurs., $7,
all other shows $20 GA, $15 seniors,
$7 students. Free opening night
party May 14, 10 p.m. with refresh-
ments, buffet and season announce-
ment, free with ticket stub.
• All New York cast stage reading of
Neil Simon’s “I Ought to be in Pic-
tures:” May 15, 3 p.m. Free.
HANOVER DRAMA CLUB
(1600 Sans Souci Parkway, Hanover
Twp., 570.470.3425)
• “Cinderella:” May 13, 7 p.m.
KING’S COLLEGE
THEATRE:
(Admin. Bldg., 133 N. River St., Wilkes-
Barre, 570.208.5825)
• Renaissance Faire: May 5, 10 a.m.-2
p.m. at Monarch Court. Proceeds help
fund theater students’ annual trip to
Stratford Shakespeare Theatre
Festival in Stratford, Ontario, Canada.
THE LAKESIDE PLAYERS
(Lakeville Community Hall, Route
590, Lakeville, across from Caesars
Cove Haven, 570.226.6207, www.lake-
sideplayers.net)
• Tony Schwartz and Marylou Am-
brose’s “Double Occupancy:” May
7-8, Sat., 7:30 p.m., Sun., 3 p.m. $12.
LITTLE THEATRE OF
WILKES-BARRE
(537 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre:
570.823.1875, www.ltwb.org)
• “A Midsummer Night’s Dream:”
May 14-15, 20-22.
MUSIC BOX PLAYERS
(196 Hughes St., Swoyersville:
570.283.2195 or 800.698.PLAY or
www.musicbox.org)
• “The Wedding Singer:” May 6-8,
12-15, 19-22. Thurs.-Sat., 8 p.m., Sun., 3
p.m. Buffet 90 min. before curtain,
dinner & show and show only tickets
available.
THE NORTH RIVER
THEATRICAL SOCIETY
(570.814.0813, fmbprod@aol.com)
• “The Last Days of Judas Iscariot:”
May 5-7, 8 p.m., Arts YOUniverse (47
N. Franklin St., Wilkes-Barre). General
seating, e-mail or call for reserva-
tions.
THE PHOENIX
PERFORMING ARTS
CENTER
(409-411 Main St., Duryea,
570.457.3589, www.phoenixpac.vp-
web.com, phoenixpac08@aol.com)
• Peter Pan The Musical: May 6, 7, 13,
14, 7 p.m., May 8 & 15, 2 p.m., $12/
adult, $8/students, $5/kids 5 and
under, limited seating, reservations
recommended.
SCRANTON CULTURAL
CENTER
(420 N.
WASHINGTON AVE.,
SCRANTON)
• “May I Have the Pleasure of This
Dance?” May 6, 6 p.m., presented by
Pa. Humanities Council, Humanities
on the Road, features Jeff Savage
and Nancy Walker of Mercersburg
Performers. Free, must RSPV by Apri
27 to Stefanie Bush at 570.346.7369,
ext. 122 or stefanie@scrantoncultural-
center.org.
❏ Broadway Theatre League of NEPA
presents:
• Mammoth Follies puppet show:
May 13, 10 a.m., $7
SHAWNEE PLAYHOUSE
(570.421.5093, www.theshawneeplay-
house.com)
• Conor McPherson’s “The Seafar-
er:” May 6-15.
THREE WITCHES
PRODUCTIONS
(threewitches2010@aol.com)
• “An Evening of Shakespeare,” a
compilation of Shakespeare’s most
memorable monologues and scenes:
May 20-21, 8 p.m. at AFA Gallery (514
Lackawanna Ave., Scranton). $7 GA,
$5 students/seniors/children. E-mail
for info. W
novel approach

Open City” by Teju Cole is
a thoughtful and mesmeriz-
ing coming-of-age story
about a young man divided. In
his debut novel, Cole shares
with his readers the story of
Julius, who is in his early 30s
when the novel begins.
Readers quickly come to find
that Julius is a Nigerian im-
migrant born in Lagos and
raised in the surroundings of
his Nigerian father. However,
through his identity, Julius be-
gins to tackle questions regard-
ing his maternal ancestry.
The novel takes place in the
late present, but is disrupted by
Julius’ past events of faraway
life in Africa. The locations
vary widely, but much of the
backdrop change is due to the
journey Julius must fulfill — to
seek out his maternal grand-
mother, the only root left of his
German ancestry.
Julius leaves Lagos to travel
to New York City where his
narrative begins to intersect
with the circle of people around
him. While Julius is occupied
with his psychiatry fellowship
by day, he spends most of his
remaining time declining sleep
and all the while, doting on the
adversity present in the world.
“Not long before this aimless
wandering began, I had fallen
into the habit of watching bird
migrations from my apartment
… Each time I caught sight of
the geese swooping in forma-
tion of the sky, I wondered how
our life below might look from
their perspective.”
The character development is
one of the prime aspects of the
book. Characters serve as a
way to test Julius throughout
the novel, in some cases, re-
garding his identity and purpose
in life. Much of the novel is
about the rejection of compla-
cency. But, in being aware of
his identity, Julius comes across
as isolated from others around
him.
There are many reasons why
this novel is near perfect. The
way in which the imagery is
written is best described as a
melding of works from Albert
Camus and Elizabeth Hardwick.
The product of which becomes
compounded into abrupt, raw,
and beautiful language.
Though the book may seem
meditative and somewhat long-
winded at times, there are many
events that shatter the readers’
perception of Julius, enough to
make one question just how
reliable a narrator he is in the
novel. Yet, Julius’ detachment
of many events throughout the
novel seems to reveal a coping
mechanism and ultimately pro-
pel the final weave at the end
of the novel.
Cole is one of the most
thoughtful and provocative new
writers to come along in recent
years. Of course, the only nega-
tive aspect of such a successful
book is the significance of the
follow-up. A great novel such
as “Open City” will dictate
Cole’s next project; however,
based on his first attempt, read-
ers can only anticipate contin-
ued growth.
“Open City”
by Teju Cole
W W W W W
Near-
perfect
debut
By Kacy Muir
Weekender Correspondent
The character
development is one
of the prime
aspects of the
book.
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stage
W
hether it is because of
the recently celebrated
Easter holiday or from
Lady Gaga’s new single, the
name Judas has surely been
getting a lot of attention lately.
Putting the name in the spotlight
in our area this week is the North
River Theatrical Society as it
prepares to present “The Last
Days of Judas Iscariot” opening
Thursday, May 5 at Arts YOUni-
verse.
Premiering in NEPA for the
first time, the production takes
the audience into a courtroom in
Purgatory, where the ultimate
fate of Judas is to be decided.
With quirky and unique charac-
ters including Mary Magdalene,
Sigmund Freud and Satan as
testifying witnesses and court
officials who have been waiting
decades to find out if they are
going to heaven or hell, the play
is a dark comedy, not to be con-
fused with a biblical story.
“The most interesting part of
the play is the strong situations
and language,” says director Paul
Winarski. “It’s a very gritty and
real portrayal. There’s a lot of
humor and thought-provoking
scenes.”
When deciding on a spring
production, Winarski wanted
something different, something
that hadn’t been done before so
people would have no precon-
ceived notions going into the
theater. Written by modern
American playwright Stephen
Adly Guirgis, the show brings a
new type of production to the
area.
“I read and loved the script,”
Winarski shares. “I did a little
research and was very fascinated
how (Guirgis) approached the
story. It’s a New-York style of
play, and the characters are rec-
ognizable today. He took a very
New-York look at how the sub-
ject matter is portrayed; there’s
lots of street talk. Pontius Pilate
sounds more like a mob boss
than a Roman governmental
figure.”
In fact, the production debuted
in New York City under the
direction of actor Philip Seymour
Hoffman in 2005 and was very
well-received by theatergoers.
Guirgis premiered a brand new,
explicitly-titled play last month
in the Big Apple starring Chris
Rock, so it felt right for the
North River Theatrical Society to
bring his previous success to the
area around the same time.
“It’s refreshing to see someone
do something different,” Winar-
ski explains. “I always try to do
something different from my last
show, and this play is very excit-
ing — it had an excellent New
York response. People are really
starting to notice the playwright
and recognize him. Hopefully
more productions like this will
come to the area.”
The cast of 17 actors and ac-
tresses — many of which are
well-known in the theater com-
munity — have worked tirelessly
to perfect their interpretations of
the characters in the play and
hope that people can recognize
themselves in many of them.
“I have to say that in my ca-
reer, this is one of the finest casts
I’ve ever worked with,” Winarski
says. “They have developed the
characters with their own sensi-
bility, their own understanding.
The kinetic energy they bring to
the roles, especially when they
hit on something and do it so
well, is exciting to watch.”
Even though the production is
not meant to be an actual biblical
account by any means and is
filled with humorous dialect,
audience members should still
walk away with a lesson learned.
“People who come to see the
show will learn something on
how to survive in today’s world
as told through the story of Ju-
das.” W
Not a Sunday-school
story of Judas
By Noelle Vetrosky
Weekender Correspondent
Alex DeVirgilis and Jarid Jopling as Satan and Judas in
’The Last Days of Judas Iscariot.’
“The Last Days of Judas Isca-
riot,” Fri.-Sat., May 5-7, 8
p.m., Arts YOUniverse, (47 N.
Franklin St., Wilkes-Barre. $15
via 570.814.0813 or
fmbprod@aol.com
agenda
BENEFITS / CHARITY
EVENTS
2nd Annual Multicultural
Dinner May 20, 6-8 p.m., Hanover
Area Jr./Sr. High School (1600 Sans
Souci Pky., Hanover Twp.). $6.50, $3
children 8-under. Features ethnic
dance teams and Shawn’s “Your
Individual Style” fashion show, whose
proceeds benefit the Peace & Justice
Center of Wilkes-Barre.
4th Annual Chocolate &
Wine Festival May 21, 3-7 p.m., $17
advance, $20 at door, 11 wineries,
vendors, local businesses, music.
Proceeds benefit Endless Mountains
Health Systems and Susquehanna
County Library building funds.
14th Annual Rainbow Walk
May 7, Kirby Park, registration 9 a.m.,
walk begins 10 a.m., benefits Candy’s
Place. Call 570.714.8800 for info.
Alex’s Lemonade Stand June
11, 10 a.m.-1 p.m., Frontier Communi-
cations, Back Mt. Little League Field,
Church St, Dallas, raffles, character
appearances, food. For info, visit
http://www.alexslemonade.org/
mypage/71247.
American Lung Association
• Oxygen Project: 15-week program
starting May 20, ages 18-34, meet
once a week, raise $250 by conclu-
sion, all proceeds benefit ALA to
break 25 area participants free from
smoking addiction. Call 570.823.2212
for info.
• Fight for Air Walk: June 4, King’s
College Betzler Field, family-friendly
event with a dry-walk route and
wet-and-wild alternative water sprin-
kler route available. Call or register
online.
Association for the Blind
• Celebrity Guest Bartending fun-
draiser: May 5, 6-10 p.m., Mr. Tony’s
(N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre). Music by
Millennium, Vince Brust Studios’
Cinco De Mayo Dancers from 8-10
p.m. Call Ed Troy for info,
570.823.7626.
Bradford County Probation
Department
•Kings of the Court 3 on 3 basket-
ball tournament, May 28, Wilkes
University UCOMM Center. $40 per
team with a four-man roster and
double elimination play. Proceeds
benefit The Guardian Angel Project.
Call 570.637.0034 for info.
Candy’s Place (570.714.8800)
• Show Your Passion Through Your
Fashion 2: July 24, 11 a.m.-2:30 p.m., at
The Woodlands, Plains Twp. Call for
more info.
Fight for Air Walk June 4, 10
a.m., King’s College Betzler Field,
ages 8+, walk the dry or water-
sprinkler route. Features compli-
mentary lunch post walk at Mohegan
Sun. Call 570.823.2212 or visit
www.lunginfo.org/wbwalk for info.
Many Faces of Breast Can-
cer, May 5, registration 6 p.m., event
6:30-8:30 p.m., The Woodlands (1073
Highway 315, Plains Twp.). Admission,
light refreshments and parking free
for this national program that edu-
cates and celebrates breast cancer
survivors. Hosted by Geisinger Health
System in partnership with American
Cancer Society, sponsored by Astra-
Zeneca. Call 877.291.0358 or e-mail
ManyFacesWilkes-Barre@zenogroupe-
vents.comto register.
Memorial Pet Walk, May 14,
noon, McDade Park, $10 to walk with
pet, $25 for t-shirt. Features food,
raffles, flea market, dogs for adop-
tion. Proceeds benefit Tracey’s Hope
Hospice Care Program and Rescue
for Domestic Animals, Inc. Call
570.457.1625 for info.
Two Steppin’ Towards a Cure
May 12, 7 p.m., Scranton Harware Bar
(519 Linden St., Scranton) $8, music
by Country Kickers and Farmer’s
Daughter. Benefits NEPA Susan G.
Komen. Call 570.969.6072 for info.
Voluntary Action Center of
NEPA (538 Spruce St., Scranton,
570.347.5616)
• 5th Annual Run for the Roses at
the Kentucky Derby: May 7, 3 p.m.,
Waverly Country Club (903 S. Abing-
ton Road, Clarks Summit). $65 per
person, call for info.
Walk 2 Miles In My Shoes for
R.S.D. June 12, registration noon-1
p.m., walks 1 p.m., McDade Park,
Scranton. $50 walkers with sponsors,
$10 without sponsors. Call
50.876.4034 for info.
Walk to Cure Juvenile Dia-
SEE AGENDA, PAGE 38
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By Marie Burrell
Weekender Intern
Going all out
Mohegan mirrors Kentucky Derby activities
with camaraderie, harness racing and more
T
he engine revs, and the starter car
slowly begins to circle the dirt
track, the portable gate attached to
it spreading wide like wings. It gradually
picks up speed, the horses and their drivers
coming out from the sidelines, trotting in
time as they line up side by side, following
their temporary “Pied Piper.” Suddenly the
car snaps forward. The gate closes as the car
speeds off toward the sidelines.
And they’re off!
Celebrating its 46th racing season,
Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs will be
featuring a celebration of the Kentucky
Derby this Saturday, May 7 beginning at 3
p.m., with an early post time of 5 p.m. for
the racing. Throughout the day there will be
various events taking place, such as a hat
contest, live harness racing and a broadcast
of part of the Kentucky Derby at Churchill
Downs in Louisville, Ky., as well as food
provided by Johnny Rockets.
Kelly Connors, racing public relations
manager at Pocono Downs, said that the
Kentucky Derby is a lot of fun for anyone,
and that Pocono Downs is a great spot for
those who want to celebrate it.
“There is so much excitement around the
Derby — from people who are interested
in thoroughbreds or standard breeds, or just
having a good time,” she said. “If you can’t
make it to Churchill Downs, why not come to
Pocono Downs?”
One of the big favorites of the celebration
is the Run for the Roses Hat Revue. Connors
said that they expect a big crowd for the
contest, more than 50 women participating,
and that it will be interesting to see what kind
of hats will be worn this year.
“Some of them are really over the top, and
some are understated,” she said. “It’s just
a classic-Derby staple. Fashion comes and
goes, but the Derby hat is always around.”
Jennifer Starr, racing marketing manager
at Pocono Downs, is also excited about the
hat contest.
“You’d be surprised what people do for
their hats,” she said. “You will see gorgeous
and glamorous hats. You’ll see funky hats.
You’ll see hats with toys on them. People
go all different directions. It’s always been a
tradition to wear a hat to the Derby, it’s just
fun.”
But what would Derby day be without
some races?
As always, Pocono Downs will have live
harness racing throughout the night. Starr
said that the racing is very enjoyable, even
for younger crowds, despite many feelings
that the sport is more of something for an
older audience.
“In the past, people had looked at it as
a sport for a night out for maybe an older
couple to go out to,” she said. “But it’s really
not. It’s a lot of fun to come out. Younger
people are actually looking at it now over
the past few years. And it is a great night to
go out — it’s not very expensive, it’s very
exciting to watch.”
Starr said that it is als
sport where people, eve
each other, will strike u
about the races, cheer f
congratulate those who
Horses and drivers take to the track last week at Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs.
“A lot
people
know t
much
racing
it’s a lo
fun.”
Driver Matt
PHOTOS BY STEVE HUSTED
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so a very bonding
en if they don’t know
up conversations
for other horses and
o had winning picks.
Connors also agreed, saying that a lot of
great people come out to the races, even if
they aren’t very familiar with the sport.
“There is a lot of camaraderie,” Connors
said. “It kind of gives people a reason to
bond and cheer. Even if you don’t know a
lot about it, the people who do are always
willing to share information — talk to you,
tell you how to do things, how they do their
picks.”
But the camaraderie doesn’t just stay in
the stands. The drivers, even though they are
competing against one another, often form
bonds of their own. Andrew McCarthy, one
of the drivers who will be racing the night of
the Derby, said that the friendship is one of
his favorite parts.
“We all love winning races and
whatever,” he said. “There are a lot of really
good people, and you make a lot of nice
friends — lifetime friends.”
McCarthy, originally fromAustralia, said
he has been racing here in the states for four
years now. Also in his fourth year is Matt
Kakaley, who said he hopes that a lot of
people come out for the races.
“Hopefully everybody will come out and
watch,” Kakaley said. “Alot of people don’t
know too much about it, but it’s a lot of
fun.”
And the fun continues with the live
broadcast of the Kentucky Derby itself.
Begun in 1875, the Derby is celebrating its
137th race this year. It is one of the oldest
Thoroughbred horse races in the US, the
Phoenix Stakes being the oldest. The race
has been very popular over the years and
has various traditions such as drinking mint
juleps, an iced drink made with bourbon,
mint and sugar syrup, as well as women
wearing their extravagant hats.
While the Kentucky Derby will be
running for most of the day, Starr said the
live broadcast will be airing at the 6:24
p.m. post time for the million-dollar race
and continue for the post-race coverage.
Afterward, the live racing at Pocono Downs
will continue for the rest of the evening.
Starr said that it really is worth coming
down for the entire celebration.
“I’d love for everyone to come out and
experience harness racing here at Pocono
Downs because it is a lot of fun,” she said.
“Bring a group of friends, sit out on the
patio at night, and watch some harness
racing. It’s a big day, a really big day.” W
137th Kentucky Derby, Sat. May 7, 3 p.m.
Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs
(1280 Route 315, Plains Twp.).
Info: 570.831.2100, poconodowns.com
of
e don’t
too
about
g, but
ot of
Kakaley
W
hile horse racing has been fairly
popular throughout the country for
years, popularity for racing here
in NEPAhas gone up and down, according
to Jennifer Starr, racing marketing manager
at Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs. She said
that the Downs, which was the first race track
in the area, is currently seeing a resurgence in
popularity.
“When we broke ground 46 years ago,
it was the place to go,” she said. “We had
thousands and thousands of people here.
Over the years, it’s developed. We’ve
revamped it, added on to it and everything
like that.”
With the addition of the casino in 2006,
which features 2,500 slots, electronic
blackjack, roulette and poker, the Downs
has also done other renovations such as a
$6.5 million paddock and a new patio area,
Starr said. She also said it is trying to have
new events to draw in younger crowds, such
as the new Friday Night Party at the Track,
beginning on June 3, which will involve
racing and free music.
“What people like to do in the summertime
is they like to go and they like to sit outside
and have a drink or two on the patio,” Starr
said. “And that’s what we’re going to try to
win over the people that want to go and sit
outside. Not only will we offer them great
music, we’ll offer them great drink specials
and live racing.”
Starr said that once people see the races
and how fun a night at the Downs can be,
they tend to return.
“They just keep coming back because it’s
so much history and so much to watch.”
M.B.
Mohegan stays on track
Top, a horse gets his shoes on in preparation to run the track.
Above, the carts that the drivers use in races.
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betes May 14, register 9:30 a.m., 10
a.m., Endless Mountains Riding Trail,
start at Pump ’n’ Pantry (Route 706,
Montrose). 3.5-mile walk to benefit
Juvenile Diabetes Research Founda-
tion. Visit walktocurejuvenilediabete-
s.org or self-sponsor day of walk.
Wine Tasting Spring Fun-
draiser May 20, 6-10 p.m., Maiolate-
si Wine Cellars (210 Green Grove
Road, Scott Twp.) Features basket
raffles, dinner by Cangiano’s, more.
Wyoming Valley Children’s
Association (570.288.4350)
• 2nd Annual Swing “fore” the Kids
Nine and Dine Golf Event: May 20, 3
p.m. shotgun start, 6 p.m. cocktail
hour, 7 p.m. dinner, Mountain Laurel
Golf Club, White Haven. $125/person,
$500 foursome. Visit www.wvca-
kids.org/events for info.
EVENTS
6th Annual Mothers Day
Intertribal Powwow May 7, 10
a.m.-10 p.m., May 8, 10 a.m.-dusk,
Noxen Fire Co. Grounds (Stull Road,
Noxen). Features, emcee Richard
Gray Owl Green, host drum Mother
Earth Drum, with Thunder Over
Mountains, Yellow Thunder and
Turtle Creek, storyteller Grace Dove,
more. Free, dogs welcome, but must
be leashed. Bring own lawn chair.
Volunteers needed, contact Natalie,
570.947.2097, Wisteria18704@ya-
hoo.com for info.
50th Anniversary Cele-
bration of the Annual Sum-
mer Festival May 19, 6-9:30 p.m.,
Radisson Lackawanna Station Hotel,
Scranton. $35, features cash bar,
music, brief program and docu-
mentary film detailing history of
festival.
Asbury United Methodist
Church (720 Delaware St., Scran-
ton, 570.343.1035)
• Hoagie Sale: every third Thurs. $4,
includes chips. Call to place orders,
pick up in church kitchen 11 a.m.-2
p.m.
Cameo House Bus Tours
(Anne Postupack, 570.655.3420,
anne.cameo@verizon.net, checks to
933 Wyoming Ave., W. Pittston, Pa.
18643)
• 39th Annual Kips Bay Decorator
Showhouse & More: May 14, depart
Wegmans, Wilkes-Barre, 7:30 a.m.
(park in row 13); Viewmont Mall,
Dickson City, 8 a.m. (Sears parking
lot near Mexican restaurant); leaves
New York City 7:30 p.m. Features
tour of a townhouse, catered lunch
in Central Park’s Strawberry Fields
and the Pompeii exhibit. Dinner is
your treat in the Times Square/
Theater District area. $145/person,
includes breakfast treat, goodie bag,
water, admissions, tip and more. Call,
e-mail to reserve.
Chicory House and Folklore
Society (www.folkloresociety.org,
570.333.4007) events:
• Contra Dance: May 7, 7:30 p.m.,
Church of Christ Uniting (Sprague
Ave., Kingston). $9 adults, $25 fam-
ilies. No partner or previous experi-
ence necessary.
Chinchilla Hose Company
(Shady Lane Rd., 570.586.5726,
www.chcfire.net)
• Annual Pizza Sale: every Fri.
through Lent. Red, white and white
broccoli square pizza available.
Proceeds benefit the firehouse. Call
to order or walk-in.
ConynghamUnited Metho-
dist Church (Main Street, Conyng-
ham, 570.788.1390)
• Rummage sale, May 17, 9 a.m.-2
p.m., 6 p.m.-8 p.m. Bag Day, May 18, 9
a.m.-11 a.m. Donations can be made
May 15, noon-2 p.m., May 16, 9 a.m.-
noon.
Dietrich Theater (60 E. Tioga
Street, Tunkhannock, 570.996.1500,
www.dietrichtheater.com) calendar
of events:
❏ Kids Classes:
• Quilting for Kids: Wed. through
July 20, 3:30-5 p.m., ages 6+, $6/
class; children learn early American
quilting techniques.
• Mixed Media for Kids: Preschool
Art: Thurs., 11-11:45 a.m. Series 2: May
5, 12, 19, 26. Mommy & Me, Fri., 11-11:45
a.m. Series 2: May 6, 13, 20, 27. Ages
6-12, Fri., 4-5:30 p.m. Series 2: May 6,
13, 20, 27. $35/series. Explore arts
through variety of media to create
pottery, sculpture, drawings, paint-
ings and collages.
❏ Intergenerational Classes:
• Open Studio: Painting, Drawing &
Pottery: May 10, 17, 24, 7-8:30 p.m.,
13+, $50/four classes, $15/class. Call
to register.
• Quilting: Wed. through July 20,
6-7:30 p.m., 13+. $6/class. Learn early
American quilting techniques to
make double pinwheel quilt. All
materials provided, call to register.
❏ Adult Classes:
• Decorative Painting: May 11, 18, 25,
June 15, 22, 29, noon-3 p.m., 16+,
$20/class + cost of painting surface.
Pre-registration required, call to sign
up.
• Photography for Beginners: May 9,
16, June 13, 20, 7-9 p.m., June 11, 1-3
p.m., 16+, $75.
• Spanish for Beginners: Wed.,
through June 8, 7-8 p.m., $50. Learn
basic Spanish phrases/vocabulary.
Call to register.
• Learn Tunisian Crochet: May 5, 19,
7 p.m., 16+, $35, all materials provid-
ed. Call to register.
• Basketry-Black Ash Wearable
Pouch: May 7, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., 16+, $60,
all materials provided. Call to regis-
ter.
• Jewelry Making-Intro to Art clay
Silver: May 9, 6-9 p.m., 16+, $65, all
materials/tools supplied. Call to
register.
• Sign Language for Beginners:
Thurs., May 12, 26, 6:30-7:30 p.m., 16+.
$60.
• Sign Language Level 1: Thurs., May
12, 26, 7:30-8:30 p.m., $50.
Greek Food Festival May 11-14, 11
a.m.-8 p.m., Annunciation Greek
Orthodox Church (32 East Ross St.,
Wilkes-Barre). Eat-in/take-out, free
local delivery within two miles of
church for orders $30+. Call
570.823.4805 for info.
Hanover Twp. Memorial Day
parade May 30, 10 a.m., begins at
Holy Cross Church, Buttonwood,
down Main road to the Hanover
Green Cemetery, where memorial
service held. Guest speaker Louis E.
Sewell, a Vietnam Era veteran and
member of Hanover Area Fire De-
partment.
Highway 81 Revisited
Launch Party May 14, 8 p.m., The
Bog (341 Adams Ave., Scranton): $5,
features music by These United
States, Pappy and Mike Quinn, plus
chance to win tickets to Drive-By
Truckers, Get Cryptic show, more.
Call Mike 570.817.0339 for info.
JimThorpe events:
❏ Jim Thorpe Art Weekend, May
14-15:
• Sat.: 1-7 p.m., free self-guided open
studio and gallery tour in historic
district; 1 p.m., Amazing Tales, stories
of the history of art in Jim Thorpe at
Harry Packer Mansion; 2 p.m., pho-
tographic tour of historic district;
2-4:30 p.m., Shannon Marsyada Trio
in Josiah White Park; 3 p.m., ceme-
tery art tour; 4 p.m., wine tasting at
Albright Mansion; 5 p.m., poetry
reading at Gilded Cupid; 6:30 p.m.,
dinner in an art gallery at Moya; 8
p.m., Yarn performing at Mauch
Chunk Opera House.
• Sun.: 1 p.m., stained-glass demo at
Hill Home Forge glass studio; 2 p.m.,
photographic tour of historic district
of Jim Thorpe; 3 p.m., open house at
selected beds & breakfasts.
Lackawanna College events:
❏ Environmental Institute events:
(Rt. 435, Covington Twp.,
570.842.1506, www.lackawanna.edu)
• Feather Art: through June 2, free
with local artist Allen Crothamel.
• Natural Wonders: every other
Thurs. through June 2, 1-2:30 p.m.,
ages 3-5, cost $40/6-class series.
Pre-registration required.
• Geothermal Energy 101: May 10,
6:30-8 p.m., $4, pre-registration
required,
• “Good Food” film: May 11, 6:30 p.m.,
free, pre-registration required. Pop-
corn/light refreshments provided.
• Art in Nature: Weaving with Recy-
cled Materials: May 14, 9 a.m.-noon,
$15, all materials provided, pre-
payment required, seating limited.
Luzerne County Community
College (1333 S. Prospect St., Nanti-
coke)
•13th Annual Flea Market and Col-
lectible Show: May 7, 8 a.m.-2 p.m. in
ECC and ATC parking lot. Features
70+ vendors, 50/50 raffles, theme
basket auction, more, plus an iPad 2
raffle, tickets $2 each, $5 for 3. To
volunteer or to vend, call 740.0735
or e-mail alumni@luzerne.edu,
spaces start at $20.
Misericordia University
events (www.misericordia.edu,
570.674.6372, box office 674.6719):
• Nursing students diaper collection:
through May 6 to benefit Angelic
Diaper Ministries, Inc. of Dallas. Drop
off in the Dept. of Nursing offices, 2
nd floor, College of Health Sciences
bldg. or Banks Student Life Center
lobby. For info, call 674.6474 or visit
www.misericordia.edu/nursing.
• Cinderella Ice Cream Party Fun-
draiser: May 7, 1-3 p.m., $5/child,
features picture with Cinderella,
Sleeping Beauty, etc. Proceeds bene-
fit students attending Dublin Pilgrim-
age for Young Mercy Leaders Confer-
ence. Call 610.509.6204 for info.
Nicholson Fire Company (PO
Box 425, Nicholson, 570.687.1203)
• “Vineyards by the Viaduct:” May
14, 11 a.m.-5 p.m., pre-sale tickets $15,
all proceeds benefit NFD. Features
arts, crafts and other vendors.
The Osterhout Free Library
events (71 S. Franklin St., Wilkes-
Barre, www.osterhout.info,
570.823.0156, ext. 217)
• Board Game Night: Mon., 6:30-8
p.m.
• Open Computer Lab: Mon./Wed.,
5-8 p.m.; Sat., 1-4 p.m.
• Knitting group: May 14, 10:30 a.m.-
noon. Open to all ages, new knitters
welcome.
• ESL class: May 5, 12, 19, 10-11:30 a.m.
Visit website for more info.
Scranton Cultural Center
(420 N. Washington Ave., Scranton)
• How to Build a Storm: The Weather
Show: May 9-11, 10 a.m., 4th floor. $7.
St. Luke’s United Church of
Christ (N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre,
570.762.8265)
• Flea Market/Rummage Sale: May 7,
9, 10, 9 a.m.-6 p.m.
St. Maria Goretti Parish
Center (Laflin Rd., Laflin,
www.stmariagoretti-laflin.org,
570.655.8956) events:
• Flea Market and Book Sale: May 14,
8 a.m.-3 p.m., May 15, 9 a.m.-noon,
free admission, handicapped acces-
sible, free parking. Everything half-
price Sun.
St. Michael’s Church (corner of
Church/Winter Sts., Old Forge,
570.457.2875)
• Halupki sale: May 21, $1, orders by
May 17, pick up May 21, 11 a.m.-2 p.m.
Call for info.
St. Michael’s Ukrainian Or-
thodox Church (540 N. Main
Ave., Scranton, 570.343.7165)
• Pierogi Sale every Friday, 11 a.m.-5
p.m.
Waverly Community House
(1115 N. Abington Rd., Waverly,
570.586.8191, www.waverlycomm.org)
events:
• Chalk Walk: May 14, 10 a.m.-noon,
donation $10/block, chalk included,
plus lemonade stand, face painting.
Proceeds benefit playground project.
West Wyoming Hose Co. (926
Shoemaker Ave.)
• First annual unbaked pizza sale:
Fri. during Lent, 4-7 p.m. $10 each,
call 570.301.8329 or 693.1811 to order.
Wyoming Valley Montessori
School (851 W. Market St., Kingston)
• “Family Fun Day:” May 14, noon-5
p.m. Features carnival games, food,
pony rides, obstacle course, more,
plus Bonner Chevrolet test drives, for
every drive, Bonner will donate $20
to the school.
LEARNING
ArtWorks Gallery & Studio
(502 Lackawanna Ave., Scranton.
570.207.1815):Art Exhibit “Diverse City:
Many Faces of Scranton”: Opening
reception, May 6, 6-9 p.m., awards
ceremony 7 p.m., exhibit will run
through May 27. Free and open to
public. (artworksnepa.com,
570.207.1815)
Aikido of Scranton, Inc. (1627
N. Main Ave., Scranton, 570.963.0500)
• Self-Defense Class taught by
Aikido Master Ven Sensei, every Mon.
& Wed., 7-9 p.m. $10.
• Traditional Weapons Class, every
Thurs., 7-9 p.m. $10.
Beauty Lies Within School of
Pole Dance (32 Forrest St., Wilkes-
Barre, 570.793.5757, sl.beautylies-
within@gmail.com). Hours by ap-
pointment, free sample appointment
offered. Call or e-mail for details.
Carbondale Chiropractic
SEE AGENDA, PAGE 39
AGENDA, FROM PAGE 35
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Center (267 Brooklyn St.,
570.282.1240, www.carbondalechi-
ropractic.com).
• Run with Doc: Sun. 9-10 a.m. at
Lake Scranton. Jog around Lake
Scranton with Dr. Andrew Rivera.
Visit Website for info.
Core Chiropractic Center (180
United Penn Plaza, Kingston,
570.718.1672)
• The Empowered Heart Essential
Action Process: May 5, 6:30 p.m.-8:30
p.m., $35. Pre-registration required,
call.
Dance Contours (201 Bear Creek
Blvd., Wilkes-Barre, 570.208.0152,
www.dancecontours.com)
• Adult classes in ballet, tap, lyrical,
CardioSalsa, ballroom dance.
• Children/teen classes in ballet,
tap, CheerDance, HipTech Jazz, a
funky form of dance developed by
Jennifer Magnotta, blending basic
Jazz Technique with the styles of
street dance and hip hop.
• Zumba classes for adults: Tues., 6
p.m., Sat., 10 a.m. First class free.
• Adult ballet: Sat. morn.
Danko’s Core Wrestling
Strength Training Camp
(DankosAllAmericanFitness.com)
• Four sessions/week, features two
clinics, two core strength. 4 ses-
sions/week. Increase power, speed
and agility. Group discounts, coach-
es, teams, clubs, free stuff. Visit
website or call Larry Danko at
570.825.5989 for info.
Drawing & Painting Classes
with Georgiana Cray Bart, Wilkes-
Barre. Beginner to advanced, all
media, all subjects
Includes pencil, charcoal, oil, acrylic,
pastel, colored pencil and more.
570.947.8387, gcraybart@aol.com,
www.gcraybart-artworks.com
• Adult, ages 13+, Mon., noon-4 p.m.,
Tues., 6-9 p.m.
• Children, ages 8-10: Tues., 5-6 p.m.,
ages 11-12, Mon., 4:30-5:30 p.m.
• Portfolio instruction for the col-
lege bound
• Private instruction available.
Everhart Museum(1901 Mulber-
ry St., Scranton, 570.346.7186,
www.everhart-museum.org)
• “Everybody’s Art” New Series of
Adult Art Classes: $25/workshop for
members, $30 non-members. Pre-
registration required.
The Exercise Lady, Doreen
Rakowski (Theeexercisela-
dy0@aol.com, 570.287.9801)
• Yoga, Pilates and Thai Chi Classes
Extreme M.M.A.(2424 Old Ber-
wick Rd., Bloomsburg. 570.854.2580)
• MMA Class: Mon., Wed., 6-7 p.m.
First visit free. Learn wrestling fun-
damentals and basic Brazilian Ju-
Jitsu No Gi techniques. Call for info.
• Boxing/Kickboxing Fitness Class:
Mon., Wed., 7-8 p.m. First visit free.
Non-combative class.
• Personal Training: Call 317.7250 for
info.
Fazio’s Hapkido Do Jang (61
Main St., Luzerne, 570.239.1191)
Now accepting new students. Chil-
dren (age 7-12) Mon./Wed., 5:30-6:30
p.m. Teen/adult Mon./Wed., 6:45-8:15
p.m.; Tues.-Thurs., 6:30-8 p.m. Private
lesson also available.
Learn Hapkido, the Korean martial
art that uses natural movements
unlocking hidden powers of strength
and confidence. Self defense applica-
tions included in every class. Cost
$50 monthly, no contract.

Harris Conservatory for the
Arts (545 Charles St. Luzerne,
570.287.7977 or 718.0673)
• Instrumental Music Instruction:
Call for info.
• Private Ballroom Lessons: Call for
info.
• Private Vocal Instruction: Tues.
evenings. Call for info.
• Dragons’ Tale Karate: Mon., 5:30-7
p.m.; Wed., 6-7:30 p.m. Ages 5+. Call
for info.
• Tumbling: Fri., 5:30-6:30 p.m. Ages
5+. $30/month.
Dimensions In Dance les-
sons at Phoenix Theater Adult
classes: Mon., 6-8 p.m., includes
jazzercise and ballet boot camp.
Thurs., 6-8 p.m., includes jazzercise
and tap. Kid classes: Wed., 5:30-8:30
p.m., includes tap, ballet/hip hop, and
hip hop/jazz. Thurs., 8-9 p.m., in-
cludes Fosse jazz. $10. Call Lee to
register 991.1817.
Northeast Photography Club
(www.northeastphotographyclub.org)
meets the first Wed. of each month
at 7 p.m., in the boardroom of Prime
Med (old Wes Freedman Building) off
Morgan Hwy., (first parking lot on the
left, just below Allied Complex).
Meetings cover wide variety of topics
and features monthly contest, guest
speakers. Membership open to any-
one interested in photography.
Academy of Northern Mar-
tial Arts (79 N. Main St., Pittston)
Traditional Kung Fu & San Shou. For
Health and Defense. Adult & Chil-
dren’s Classes held Mon.-Thurs., Sat.
First class is Free. Walk-Ins welcome
or call 371.9919 or 817.2161 for more
information.
Olympic Style Fencing classes
will be given at The Fencing Ex-
change located above AFA Gallery,
514 Lackawanna Ave., Scranton,
Monday-Thursday. Foil, saber, and
epee taught. For more info, call
570.969.1224.
Shaolin White Crane Fist
(Wyoming)
Teaching the traditional Chinese
martial arts of Shaolin White Crane
Fist, Wing Chun Gong Fu, Yang Style
Taijiquan, Qigong-Energy work,
Shauijiao-Chinese Wrestling, more.
$35/week, first week free. Three
levels of training for ages 15+. Con-
tact Master Mike DiMeglio
570.371.8898.
STAR Gallery, inside the
Mall at Steamtown
• Baby Footsteps In The Sand: Tues.,
6-7 p.m., ages 5+. $15/class, some
supplies included
• Sat. Art & Craft Classes: 1-2 p.m.,
$15/child.
• First Steps of a Budding Artist:
Sat., 1:30-3:30 p.m., $25/class, some
supplies included.
• Passport to Adventure: bring
photo of choice and learn to turn it
into art, $20 pastel classes, #25
acrylic. Contact 347.5146 for info.
• Cruise To The Tropics: bring pho-
to/clipping of choice form your last
cruise and make souvenir. $20 pastel
class, $25 acrylic. Contact 347.5146
for info.
Wyoming Valley Art League
• Painting with Irina Krawitz: $15/
hour, $120/4-weeks. Call 570.793.3992
for info.
MIND AND BODY
Absolute Pilates with Leslie
(263 Carbondale Rd., Clarks Summit,
www.pilateswithleslie.com)
• Classes Schedule: Mon., Wed., Fri.,
9-10 a.m. Private training on the
Cadillac, Reformer and Wunda Chair,
along with Pilates mat classes, stabil-
ity ball core classes and more. Check
Website for updates.
Arts YOUniverse (47 N. Franklin
St., Wilkes-Barre, 570.970.2787,
www.artsyouniverse.com)
• Pilates And More: 8-week sessions,
Mon. & Thurs., 5:30 p.m., Tues. &
Thurs., 12 p.m. Learn Pilates and
strengthen abdominals, reduce
tension, and improve posture. Begin-
ner to advanced, first session free.
Call 814.3051 for info
• Life Empowerment Class: Tues.,
6-7 p.m. $10.
❏ Studio J, 2nd floor
• Meditation in the tradition of
Gurdjieff and Ospensky: Sun., 12-1 p.m.,
$5
• Children’s Meditation: Thurs., 6-7
p.m. Ages 9-14, $5
• Tarot Card Readings, by appoint-
ment. $20 first half hour, $10 addi-
tional half hours.
ArtWorks Studio (503 Lacka-
wanna Ave., Scranton, 570.207.1815,
www.artsworksnepa.com)
• Art Exhibit “Diverse City: Many
Faces of Scranton:” Opening recep-
tion, May 6, 6-9 p.m., awards ceremo-
ny 7 p.m., exhibit will run through
May 27. Free and open to public.
Balance Ultimate Fitness
(Belladaro Prof Bldg, 570.862.2840)
• Early Morning Fitness Bootcamp:
Tues./Thurs., 6:30 a.m.-7:30 a.m., Sat,
9:30 a.m.-10:30 a.m., $15 or 12 classes
for $150.
Be In the Pink (313 S. Main St.,
Old Forge, 570.451.3990)
Now Forming Yoga/Tai Chi Class:
Call/visit store to register.
Bellas Yoga Studio (650 Boule-
vard Ave., Dickson City,
570.307.5000, www.bellasyoga.com,
info@bellasyoga.com)
All workshops $15, pre-registration
suggested.
• Sunday Morning Class: 10-11:15 a.m.
Features Alternating Vinyasa style
yoga with yoga fusion.
Club Fit (1 West Broad St., Hazle-
ton, 570.497.4700, www.clubfithazle-
ton.com)
• Boxing classes with Rich Pastorel-
la (pastorella.net26.net). Mon., 7-8
p.m. $40 per month.
Egyptian Belly Dance Class-
es with Dianna Shahein. Call
570.343.2033 for various times/
locations. Private/group classes
available.
Exhale Yoga Studio (900 Rutter
Ave., 2nd floor, Forty Fort, behind
Beer Deli in the “big brick building,”
570.301.3225)
• Free style Vinyasa: Tues., 10
a.m.-11:15 a.m., Thurs., 2-3:15 p.m., Fri.,
6-7:15 p.m. All levels, breathing,
aromatherapy and guided med-
itations. $10 per class.
Goddess Creations Shop &
Gallery (214 Depot St., Clarks Sum-
mit, 570.575.8649, info@goddess-
creations.net)
• Tarot Card Readings by Rev. Whit-
ney Mulqueen by appointment. Call
to book.
• Tarot Readings: Thurs., 6-9:30 p.m.
at Montrose Inn, Restaurant & Tavern
(26 S. Main St., Montrose). $25 for
15-20 min.
• Monthly astrology workshop with
Holly Avila: first Sun., $45. Call to
reserve space.
Goshin Jitsu Martial Arts
Classes Every month at Golight-
ley’s Martial Arts (Mark Plaza Shop-
ping Center, Rt. 11, Edwardsville).
Classes focus on cardio, stretching,
defense, stamina and more. Self
defense, cardio and karate aerobics
also available. $75/month. Call
570.814.3293 for info.
Haifa Belly Dance (Haifabelly-
dance.com, 570.836.7399)
• Mon., 5:15 p.m., Serenity Wellness &
Dance Center (135 Main St., Luzerne)
• Wed., 6 p.m., Holistic Health Center
(Route 6, Tunkhannock)
Healthy Living Expo: May 4, 10
a.m.-6 p.m., Columbia Mall (225 Co-
lumbia Mall Drive, Bloomsburg), free
screenings, seminars, entertainment,
hearing aid drawing, win cash and
prizes. Food by Bloomsburg Fire
Department. Call 570.387.2099 for
info.
Hoop Fitness Classes (whirli-
gighoopers.com)
• Beginner/Intermediate: Mon., 7:30
p.m., Harris Conservatory (545 Char-
les St., Luzerne). $5. Call 718.0673 to
reserve spot.
• Beginner/Intermediate: Thurs.,
5:30 p.m., Studio 32 (32 Forrest St.,
Wilkes-Barre) $5.
Jeet Kune Do Fighting Con-
cepts Teaches theories of move-
ment in Martial Arts. $100/month. Call
instructor Mike DiMeglio for info,
570.371.8898.
Kwon Kodo Lessons: Learn the
self-defense system that combines
different Korean Martial Arts such as
Hapkido, Taekwondo & Kuk Sool.
Lessons held at the Hapkido Taek-
wondo Institute (150 Welles St., Forty
Fort). Cost is $40 per month. For
more info, call 570.287.4290 or visit
www.htkdi.com.
Lackawanna County Medical
Society (321 Spruce St., Scranton,
570.344.3616)
• 7th Annual Health Fair, June 11, 9
a.m.-noon, Nay Aug Park, over 70
vendors, free health screening,
children’s fingerprinting.
Leverage Performance
Training Studio (900 Rutter Ave.,
Forty Fort, 570.388.2386, www.lever-
agetrainingstudio.com )
• Primal Scream Classes, a Tabata
Circuit Training Class: Tues./Thurs., 7
p.m., free if member, $5 with mem-
ber, $10 non-member
• Primal Scream Express: Tues./
Thurs., 8 p.m., free if member, $5
with member, $10 non-member
MaximumHealth and Fit-
ness (310 Market St., Kingston,
570.283.2804)
• Ab Lab with Amy: Sat., 8:30 a.m.;
Mon., 7:30 p.m. Call for info.
Meditation/Yoga classes at
Spectrum Health & Racquet Club (151
SEE AGENDA, PAGE 42
AGENDA, FROM PAGE 38
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T
he Big Apple, the city
where you can order Chi-
nese food at three in the
morning, is one of the most
popular cities to move to. Scran-
ton is making a move to show it
can be electrifying. First Friday
Scranton is an event that supports
artists and invites the community
to come together and enjoy dif-
ferent aspects of art. Businesses
and galleries highlight paintings,
photography, music and perform-
ance art, having something new
every time. New Visions Studio,
a new gallery, will be joining
Scranton to showcase its artists
and show what it has to offer.
Originally based in Taylor, gal-
lery owners Adam Weitzenkorn
and Melanie Boisseau wanted to
start fresh.
“The building was bad and
leaky,” says Weitzenkorn of its
previous location. “We did not
have the best exposure for the
gallery, and it worked at the time.
We were doing welding, and we
were not able to continue with
that because of the space. The
lease was up, we found a good
space in Scranton, and we want-
ed to be a part of First Fridays.
We had a following and people
were wondering where we were
when we first moved.”
With the remodeling of its new
studio and becoming a part of
Scranton, New Visions Studio
will be holding a grand opening
on Friday, May 6 featuring artist
Jessica Diehl and her exhibit
“Petals of Passion.” Diehl’s ex-
hibit shows her new-found pas-
sion for photography in flowers.
Most of the photos were taken at
Longwood Gardens in Kennett
Square, Pa.
“It consists of a lot of nice
floral-type pictures, which will
be nice for Mothers Day,” says
Weitzenkorn.
To have your artwork be a
main focus in a new gallery is an
outstanding accomplishment,
especially for a new artist. Weit-
zenkorn and Boisseau are open
to all artists and believe that
everybody has an artist hiding
inside of them somewhere.
“We accept art from anybody,”
Weitzenkorn says. “We have
group showings in June that
people can submit artwork. We
work closely with the art com-
munity, and we give people a
chance who normally would not.”
Four different galleries will be
participating in First Friday,
showcasing different artists, but
New Visions Studio is different
from other galleries. It offers
classes for kids and adults and
will be opening a store front; it
also sells film.
“We are the only gallery in
around downtown that has work-
ing black-and-white dark rooms
for photography,” says Weit-
zenkorn. “We are going to be the
only place that can buy film, and
we offer classes, a variety of
things from sculpture, creating
tapestry to all kinds of stuff for
adults and kids.
With their new location, Weit-
zenkorn and Boisseau hope to
make a change and bring life,
creativity and people to the city
that continues to grow.
“We are just hoping to make it
work,” Weitzenkorn says. “We
just want downtown to look
better and have open-minded
people. We want to influence this
area. The theater district is get-
ting better and is including more
events for people to participate.
We are just trying to make it
work and help people create what
they want to create and be their
outlet for creativity and fun.”
New Visions’goal in the future
is to continue to grow and make
an impact on Scranton. Not only
does it want to improve the
Scranton city life and art world,
but it wants to open people’s eyes
to new and better things.
“We are looking to grow,”
Weitzenkorn says. “As long as
everything works out and ex-
pands. We now have welding and
sculpture classes, and hopefully
we will take more, plus we have
individual possible artist studios.
We want to grow as much as we
can and not be obverse to any
ideas. We hope to hold music
events for local bands and stand-
up comedy.” W
Grand opening of New Visions
Studio Gallery, May 6, 6 p.m.,
201 Vine St., Scranton,
610.636.9684, www.newvi-
sionsstudio.com
A work from Jessica Diehl’s ‘Petals of Passion’ exhibit.
New site for
New Visions
By Christine Moua
Weekender Intern
355 MARKET STREET KINGSTON (Next To Rita’s Italian Ice)
570-763-0044
Ivan and Cheri Davidowitz, Certified Pedorthists
ARCH COMFORT
Where fashionmeets comfort
With every pair you purchase, TOMS will
give a pair of new shoes to a child in need.
Now Available At
T H E V ID E O G A M E ST O R E
BUY-S E L L -T RAD E
VIDEO GA M ES,
SYSTEM S & LP RECO RDS
PS1 & 2,XBox,N intendo,Sega,A tari,Coleco,Vectrex,
Gam eboy,Genesis,Etc.A lso Buying DVDs,VHS & CDs
M o n day - Satu rday
12 P M - 6 P M
28 S.M ain St.,W B • 822-9929
N ext to G allery o f So u n d
1150 S.M ain A v e.
Scran to n • 941-9908
...casual dining with a difference!
Mother’s Day Menu
Gateway Shopping Center, Edwardsville
(570) 714-7777 WWW.COSTELLOS.INFO
Chicken Carbonara $13.95
Chicken Francaise $14.95
Crab Cakes $14.95
Seafood Stuffed Sole $15.95
Crab Encrusted Haddock $16.95
Prime Rib $18.95
Lobster Tail Dinner $28.95
Filet Mignon $29.95
...c
Now Taking Mother’s Day Reservations!
W
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Where family and friends enjoy
Mexican Cuisine at its best.
COFFEE MUG GIVEAWAYS for Moms!
Margarita Specials All Day!
HAPPY HOUR 7-9 P.M. 12 oz. Drafts.
Live entertainment by SOULED OUT at 8 P.M.
outdoor patio
now open
Now Serving an expanded menu
with new dishes and margaritas
Mon.-Thurs.
11am-10pm
Fri.-Sat.
11am-11pm
Sun.
12pm-9:30pm
200 Mundy Street
Wilkes-Barre
825-5001
Celebrate Mother’s Day and
every special occasion with us.
1901 Highway 315
Pittston, PA
654-7771
Where Quality and Service Will Long Be Remembered!
$6.00 Thursdays Every Week
starting at 10:00 PM
Cinco De Mayo on the Deck with
Joey James Band 10-2
Coronita Buckets, Margaritas & Giveaways
$6.00 Bar food Good Fellos style serving until 1:30 AM
Casino employees show your ID and first
drink is on Good Fellos!!!
Enjoy Good Fellos Happy Hour from 10 PM - Midnight
with a variety of Martinis, Wines and Mixed Drinks
All for $6.00
Come enjoy Scranton’s best all you can eat steak house.
At Ipanema Grille we specialize in Brazilian cuisine offering a variety of entree items as
well as the all you can eat meat option known as the Rodizio
A meat lover’s dream!
Rodizio is a style of serving favorful cuts of fre roasted meats tableside. Our trained waiters
will bring you the meats, one at a time, on large sword-like skewers. The amount he/she carves
depends on you. Remember that we offer fourteen meats including beef, lamb, pork, chicken
and turkey. Therefore pacing yourself, if you intend to try all meats, is recommended.
Our Specials
Come celebrate your birthday with us and
enjoy one of our homemade desserts for free.*
Ten Stamps Deal!
After you pay your bill you will be
given an Ipanema Stamp Card. For every
Rodizio your table had you will receive
one stamp. Accumulate ten stamps and
receive One Rodizio Free*
Our Meats:
1. Bacon Wrapped Turkey
2. Chicken Legs
3. Pork Sausage
4. Pork Ribs
5. Boneless Pork Ribs
6. Pork Tender Loin
7. Lamb with Rosemary
8. Top Round Steak
9. Peppered Roasted Beef
10. Rib Eye Steak
11. Sirloin Steak
12. Sirloin with Garlic
13. Flank Steak with
Parmesan Cheese
14. Beef Shish Ka Bob
15. Chicken Hearts
...and a Grilled Pineapple
with Cinnamon included as
dessert.
-To complement the Rodizio we offer a cold salad bar with a variety of fresh
vegetables, as well as our hot buffet including both traditional Brazilian and American
side-dishes and more.
Other menu items, aside from our house specialty
Rodizio, include mouth-watering appetizers, a wide
variety of entrees and lastly home made desserts.
• Seafood Paella • Seafood Shish Ka Bob
• Broiled Salmon • Stuffed Flounder
• Ipanema Shrimp • Grilled Cod Fish
• Fettuccini Rose • Penne a la Vodka
• Linguini Jumbo Shrimp Scampi • Penne Ipanema
• Steak Ipanema (NewYork Strip)
• Ipanema Grilled Chicken Breast
• Churrasco Mixto (Mixed Grill)
• Feijoada (Brazil’s National Dish)
Best Sangria
in Scranton
*Not valid in combination with any other offer. Not valid
during holidays. Offer only valid if used Tuesday, Wednes-
day, Thursday or Sunday.
Ipanema Grille
1911 N. Main Ave
Scranton PA, 18508
Phone: 570-558-0742
Fax: 570-558-0743
Also on the Web:
www.ipanemagrille.com
&
Join us on Facebook
Ipanema Grille @ Scranton PA
Hours:
Tuesday 5:00pm to 9:00pm
Wednesday 5:00pm to 9:00pm
Thursday 5:00pm to 9:00pm
Friday 5:00pm to 10:00pm
Saturday 5:00pm to 10:00pm
Sunday 5:00pm to 9:00pm
Reservations Recommended...
Ipanema
Grille
Taking
Mother’s Day
Reservations
Open at
Noon
We Need
Your Help!
Anonymous Tip Line
1-888-796-5519
Luzerne County Sheriff’s Office
W
theweekender.com
Check us out online: www.theweekender.com
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Terrace Dr., Eynon). Meditation: Fri.,
7-8 p.m. Yoga: Sat., 9:45-10:45 a.m. $5
each class, bring mat. Call
570.383.3223 for info.
Motivations Fitness Center
(112 Prospect St., Dunmore.
570.341.7665)
• Sandstorm Fitness with Rachel
“Kali” Dare: Learn various techniques
and shed pounds. Call for info.
NutriFitness Boot Camp (311
Market St., Kingston, 570.288.2409)
• Free week of Boot Camp for new
members: Mon.-Fri., 8:30 a.m., 5:30
p.m.
• Zumba: Tues. 6 p.m.; Thurs., 7 p.m.;
Sat., 9 a.m. $5.
• Tang Soo Do Karate Classes: Mon.,
Wed., 6:45 p.m.; Sat., 10 a.m. Call to
register.
Odyssey Fitness (401 Coal St.,
Wilkes-Barre, 570.829.2661, odyssey-
fitnesscenter.com)
• Yoga Classes: Sun., 12:30 p.m.;
Mon., 7:15 a.m.; Tues., 7 a.m., 5 p.m.;
Wed., 8 a.m., 6:30 p.m.; Thurs., 6:30
p.m.; Sat., 10:30 a.m. All levels wel-
come.
• ZumbAtomic: Lil Starz, ages 4-7:
5:30 p.m.; Big Starz, ages 8-12: 6:15
p.m.
Pocono Yoga & Meditation
Classes (570.472.3272, www.Poco-
noYoga.com) Classes with Suzi,
certified yoga instructor
• Gentle Yoga: Thurs., 6:30 p.m., East
Mountain Apartments. Free to resi-
dents.
• Private Yoga Instruction: Only by
appointment. $35 per hour. Call to
schedule.
• Private Meditation Instruction:
Only by appointment. $35 per hour.
Call to schedule.
Reiki Classes (570.387.6157,
reikictr@localnet.com) Sessions with
Sue Yarnes:
• Beginner to Advanced Reiki at our
locations or your home. Private
sessions for stress relief, pain man-
agement, enhanced healing and
well-being and affordable classes
with each level completed in after-
noon or two evenings. Hospital
endorsed, training for professional
Usui Reiki teacher certification
available. Call or e-mail for info.
Spine & SportCare (Old Forge,
570.451.1122)
• Pilates Mat Classes: Mon. 9:30
a.m.; Wed. noon; Thurs. 5:30 p.m.;
Yoga Flow: Tues. 5:30 p.m. $10/class,
$45/5 classes.
• Small Group Personal Training: Get
professional instruction without high
cost of one-on-one personal trainer.
Receive personalized program that
changes with every session, similar
to P90X crossfit style. All levels, call
for details.
Thetravelingyogi@ya-
hoo.comIndividual attention for
physical/spiritual advancement. All
levels welcome. Call 570.709.2406 for
info. Classes held at The Studio at 32
(32 Forrest St., Wilkes-Barre) Sat.,
10:30 a.m.-noon.
Wilkes-Barre YMCA events
(570.823.2191)
• 25th Annual Wilkes-Barre Family
YMCA’s Night: May 9, doors 6 p.m.,
post time 7 p.m., Mohegan Sun at
Pocono Downs (1280 Route 315, Plains
Twp.). $15 GA, includes entry onto
patio, buffet, soda, beer, ownership
of a horse, $20 guarantees reserved
seat in Pacers Clubhouse. Proceeds
benefit children’s programs at YMCA.
The Yoga Studio (210 Wyoming
Ave., Wyoming, 570.301.7544)
• Yoga: Mon., 9:30 a.m., 6:30 p.m.;
Wed., 10:30 a.m.; Thurs., 9:30 a.m.,
6:30 p.m.; Sat., 10:30 a.m.
• Zumba: Tues., 5:30 p.m.; Wed. 9
a.m., 7 p.m.; Fri., 5:30 p.m.
Zumba Fitness Classes
• Mon./Wed., 5:15 p.m.; Sat., 11 a.m., at
TLC Fitness Center (bottom of Mor-
gan Hwy., Scranton). $5/class. Call
570.558.7293 for info.
• Adult classes held at Fitwize 4
Kids Tues./Thurs., 7:15, Sun., 11 a.m. on
Keyser Ave. across from Keyser Oak
Shopping Center Call 348.9383 for
info.
OUTSIDE
Delaware Highlands Conser-
vancy 3rd Annual Golf Tour-
nament: May 16, breakfast and
registration 8:30 a.m., 10 a.m. shot-
gun start, wine and cheese reception
and awards ceremony 3 p.m., $110/
golfer, $50/person reception only.
Call 570.226.3164 for more info.
Frances SlocumState Park
(565 Mt. Olivet Road, Wyoming,
570.696.9105)
• Family Fishing Program: May 14, 9
a.m.-noon, equipment and bait pro-
vided, no license required, not for
experienced anglers, space limited
and registration required, ending
May12.
Greater Scranton YMCA (706
N. Blakely St., Dunmore) hikes:
Call 570.343.5144 for info or visit
hikingjane.com. Meet 9:15 a.m. in
parking lot.
• Susquehanna Riverlands: May 26,
9 a.m., 3 miles easy along Lake
Tookawhile and Susquehanna River.
Tour nuclear energy plant, $5 mem-
bers, $8 non-members.
• Jacobsburg Evnrionmental Center:
May 12, 9 a.m., walk 2 miles easy
along creek, tour Martin Guitar
Factory. $5 members, $8 non-mem-
bers.
Lacawac Sanctuary (94 Sanc-
tuary Rd., Lake Ariel, 570.689.9494,
director@lacawac.org)
• Lacawac’s Music in the Forest
Series: May 7, 7 p.m., family friendly,
features Young Geezers.
Lackawanna River Corridor
Assoc. (570.347.6311, www.lrca.org)
• 24th Annual Riverfest: May 7, 10
a.m.-5 p.m., canoe/kayak race, duck
race, live bands, food, and exhibits.
Nay Aug Park events (340 N.
Washington Ave. Scranton)
•14th Annual Walk for Mental Health
Awareness: May 7, 10:30 a.m., activ-
ities include information fair, art
show, the walk, light lunch. Call
570.342.1047 for info.
Wildflower Walk at Lake
Scranton May 14, 10 a.m. Join
naturalist Jane Frye for easy 2-mile
walk to identify spring wildflowers.
Bottled water supplied. Meet at the
Pa. American Water Co. parking lot
on Route 307. Info: 570.343.5144
SOCIAL GROUPS
Executive Women’s Golf
Association (www.nepaew-
ga.com)
• Golf every Thurs., 18 or nine holes
at 3:30 or 5:30 p.m. Free Tee-Time
Books to new members, which offer
various discounts to courses in Pa.,
N.Y. and N.J. Dues $155/year. Visit
website for more info.
Holistic Moms Network (wyo-
mingvalleypa.holisticmoms.org, 1560
Wyoming Avenue, Forty Fort,
570.466.1347)
• Reduce/Reuse/Recycle: May 5,
5:30-7:30 p.m., Wyoming Seminary
Lower School Library (1560 Wyoming
Ave., Forty Fort). Info on ways to
recycle and reduce common house-
hold waste, plus fun ways to reuse
things from around the house. Free.
Scranton Tomorrow (scranton-
tomorrow.com, The Tripp House, 1011
N. Main Ave., Scranton)
• Gold Recycling Fundraiser: May 11,
4-8 p.m. at The Colonnade (401 Jef-
ferson Ave., Scranton). $10 donation,
features live jazz, hors d’oeuvres,
drink. Bring unwanted gold, sterling
silver and old coines to be sold for
cash, portion of proceeds benefits
Scranton Tomorrow. W
- compiled by Christine Moua,
Weekender Intern
Send your listings to
weekender@theweekender.com,
90 E. Market St., Wilkes-Barre,
PA18703 or fax to 570.831.7375
AGENDA, FROM PAGE 39
but then again ...
By Jim Rising
Weekender Correspondent
I
was up at 5 a.m. Friday
watching the Royal Wedding.
I really couldn’t avoid it. It
was on five of the six TVs in front
of the treadmill I was on at the
gym that is part of my daily rou-
tine. The sixth had ESPN on. No
wedding there, no doubt because
the only scoring will be later on.
Rim shot puh-lease. Not funny?
So sorry.
The images I saw as I sweated
were mostly of the key players
being transported to the church.
In my twisted mind, it reminded
me for some reason of the slow-
motion Bronco chase featuring
O.J. Simpson on the L.A. freeway.
Not sure why, but there you go.
After my workout I turned on
the plasma at home and parked
myself on the couch. I admit, it
was irresistible. I mean it was
getting such attention it must be
important, right? I was drawn to it
like a fat man to a buffet.
Of course, being a red-blooded
American male, I can’t admit
that. The long-suffering wife
observed that I was glued to the
coverage. I demurred, assured her
if I was, it was only to get a co-
lumn out of it, and I would sooner
be having a root canal. She
sniffed and made other signs of
dismissal. I think she may have
seen through me.
No one does pomp and circum-
stance like our British cousins.
Although I have to say that I felt a
little concerned that no less than a
dozen HD channels were carry-
ing what was essentially an event
that could have only one possible
outcome, it was still something to
see. And it was nice to see wall-
to-wall coverage of something
that didn’t end at a cemetery or
was a natural disaster.
Royalty is kind of a mystery to
Americans. Tough to imagine
what that must be like, to live in a
place where the leaders wear
crowns and are considered to be
divine. But the spectacle and
beauty of the ceremony moved
even my flint-hard heart. From
the stately procession of fancy
cars ferrying the princes and the
bride-to-be (Rolls Royce must
have paid for product placement)
to the breathtaking majesty of
Westminster Abbey, it was eye
candy.
The logistics of such an under-
taking are mind numbing. Imag-
ine the armies of technicians it
must have taken. One stat I heard
was $11 million spent on security
alone.
The images were breathtaking,
but as a former radio guy, I
thought that the audio was thrill-
ing. I was spellbound at the beau-
ty of the choir, and the organ was
earth shaking. I would really like
to hear “In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida”
on that sucker. The total effect
was rather like watching a cross
between an MGM musical and an
over-the-top Disney movie. It was
almost too perfect. The audio was
only slightly marred by the hor-
rendous background noise and
hiss when they opened the micro-
phones for the ABC commenta-
tors. Probably only a radio guy
would notice.
Some random thoughts: I lost
count at 25 as the number of
times Barbara Walters said “fah-
wytale whedding.” Princess Bea-
trice of York’s hat looked like it
could double as a pink microwave
transmitter tower. She could put
an eye out with that thing. What
do you do with a hat like that after
the ceremony? The Archbishop
of Canterbury should consider an
eyebrow trim. It looked like two
badgers were parked on his fore-
head. Prince William (“How do
you know he’s a Prince?” “He
hasn’t got shit all over him.”
Sorry Monty Python lovers.) had
a little trouble putting the ring on
Kate’s finger. This was noticed
and commented on extensively.
It was hard to watch and not to
think of the missing guest. As
steeped in controversy as Princess
Diana was and as tragic as her
end was, a Mom ought to be on
hand to see her son get hitched. W
Reach Jimat
contact@jamesrising.com. Even
more rants are on his blog,
updated every day at
jamesrising.com
Crashing the
Royal Wedding
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Style files
By Rachel A. Pugh
Weekender General Manager
Sapphire Salon in Pittston is ruffling
some feathers. Alot of feathers. Only this
type of ruffling has customers coming
back for more. And more. And more.
Because with the recent feather craze
adorned by actresses and rock stars alike,
fashionistas all over the area are nearly
tripping over one another to get inside
Sapphire Salon and come out looking
like a celeb.
Hair extensions have been popular
for some time, and long wavy locks have
been making their way on girls’ heads
to add length and, oftentimes, volume.
But accessorizing hair doesn’t stop with
simple hair extensions.
Feather hair extensions are easy
to apply and offer a fun new look to
hairstyles. Sapphire Salon is all too
familiar with its popularity — it’s done
more than 600 individual pieces since it
got the feathers in store — on April 18.
Selling out of them at both the Pittston
and Shoppes at Montage locations,
owner Angie Morgan recently took a trip
into New York City to purchase more as
the distributors in California cannot keep
up with the demand and get them to her
salon quickly enough.
“Dressing up the hair with accessories
is fun and creative,” she expresses.
Starting as what seemed to be an
unusual fad among celebrities in the
social circuit, more and more mainstream
pop icons started sporting the look.
Ke$ha, Miley Cyrus and even Aerosmith
frontman Stephen Tyler have all been
spotted recently adorning feather
Sapphire Salon fluffs its feathers
extensions.
Available in all sizes for all different
tastes, most of Sapphire’s feathers are
rooster feathers (no animals harmed)
although some of the smaller dyed
ones are synthetic. Depending upon the
material, the extensions can be flat ironed
and reused. Some of the extensions have
a silicone bead at the top of the extension
so as to not damage the hair and can
be left in the hair for about a month.
Other extensions simply clip in the hair
near the root and can be taken out and
reapplied as often as desired.
Sapphire has applied feather
extensions to all age groups and both
sexes with most of the males being local
musicians. With the entire process taking
no longer than 10 minutes, customers can
be in and out, ready for their night out
with their new “dreads.”
In addition to the feathers, Bling
Strings and rhinestones are also being
used to accessorize the hair, both of
which Sapphire Salon carries. Recently,
the salon has seen a lot of brides asking
to be accessorized with feathers and
beads, creating a fun, trendy look to the
hairstyle for the special day. Adding
even more fun to the mix,
Sapphire will also soon be
offering feather eyelashes
which come in all different
shapes and sizes for a more
subtle look or a more
extreme fantasy appeal.
Prices for the hair
extensions vary
y
with their new “dread
In addition to the f
Strings and rhinestone
used to accessorize th
which Sapphire Salon
the salon has seen a lo
to be accessorized wit
beads, creating a fun,
hairstyle for the speci
even more fun to the m
Sapphire will also soo
offering feather eyelas
which come in all diff
shapes and sizes for a or a
subtle look or a mo ore
extreme fantasy app pea
Prices for the ha air
extensions vary extensions vary
depending upon the type of feather.
Smaller synthetic feathers are $5, while
more dramatic peacock feathers can cost
around $25. Most feathers however range
around $11.
Get in on the fun. Try on a feather
extension for size, and live it up with a
fun and festive look. W
Call 570.602.7700 for an appointment
at Sapphire’s Pittston location
(247-249 S. Main St.) or 414.7700 for
Montage (2211 Shoppes Blvd., Moosic.
From left: Sapphire Salon stylist Genesis Tabone has helped make feathers fly in NEPA, Georgia Bone displays a natural look,
Renee Miller wears feather extensions on both sides and Chrissy Mendel goes dramatic.
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Changing Futures. Changing Lives.
®
E X C E L L E N C E I N E D U C A T I O N S I N C E 1 8 9 7
— C A R E E R E D U C A T I O N —
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McCANN ISREADYTO
CHANGEYOURFUTURE!
STOP BY OUR CAMPUS FOR AN INFORMATION SESSION AND TOUR.
Day and evening classes. Career placement assistance for graduates.
Financial aid is available for those who qualify.
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www.McCann.edu | 2227 SCRANTON CARBONDALE HWY., SCRANTON, PA 18508 | p : 888-226-0386
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speak and see
POETIC
Albright Memorial Library
(500 Vine St., Scranton,
570.348.3000)
• Truth in Evidence: The Para-
normal: May 12, 6:30 p.m. Call to
RSVP.
Anthology Books (515 Center
St., Scranton, above Outrageous,
570.341.1443, scrantholo-
gy@gmail.com) All events free,
unless otherwise noted.
❏ Book Groups
• Scranton Interplanetary Literary
Agency, a classic science fiction
discussion group: 2nd Tues, 6:30
p.m.
❏ Writing Groups
• Open writers group: Sat., noon led
by KK Gordon and Leslee Clapp.
Bring piece of original writing to
discuss and critique.
Arts YOUniverse (47 N. Fran-
klin St., Wilkes-Barre, 570.970.2787,
www.artsyouniverse.com)
• Cynthia W. Post, author of the
“Carrie Flower” series: May 21, 11 a.m.
Free, donations welcome. Call
905.7308 for info.
Barnes & Noble Booksellers
(Arena Hub Plaza, Wilkes-Barre,
570.829.4210)
❏ Signings:
• Ellyn Ramich, author of “411:” June
11, 2-6 p.m.
Barnes & Noble Wilkes-
King’s Booksellers (7 S. Main
St., Wilkes-Barre, 570.208.4700)
❏ Monthly Book Clubs, all 6:30-7:30
p.m.
• Teens: third Mon. 6:30-7:30 p.m.
Ages 14-18.
• New Age: last Thurs., 6:30-7:30
p.m.
• “The Slug Club,” an all-ages club
about Harry Potter: first Wed., 6:30-
7:30 p.m., led by Charles Moore.
Costumes encouraged, not required.
❏ Children’s Events:
• Young Readers Monthly Activity
Night: first Thurs., 6:30-7:30 p.m.
Ages 8-12.
• American Girl Doll Give-A-Way:
first Thurs., 6:30-7:30 p.m.
• Weekly Sat. morning story time, 11
a.m.-noon.
Dietrich Theater (60 E. Tioga
St., Tunkhannock: 570.996.1500)
• Writers Group Thursdays, 7-8:30
p.m. The group celebrates all differ-
ent types of writing styles and
formats. Join anytime. Admission
free. Call to register.
Keystone College, La Plume
• The Gathering: July 14-17, explore
creativity through literature, arts
and sciences through lectures,
panels, hands-on workshops, more.
Call 570.945.8512 for info.
Osterhout Library (71 S. Fran-
klin St., Wilkes-Barre, 570.823.0156,
ext. 217)
• Ian Fleming’s “Casino Royale”
book discussion: May 5, 6:30 p.m.
• Socrates Café discussion group:
May 12, 6:30-8 p.m.
• Franklin St. Sleuths book dis-
cussion: May 19, 6:30 p.m., features
“The Sweetness at the Bottom of
the Pie” by Alan Bradley.
Scranton Cultural Center
(420 N. Washington Ave., Scranton)
• Story Pirates arts and creative
writing program for youths: May 17,
10 a.m., $7
West Pittston Library (200
Exeter Ave., www.wplibrary.org,
570.654.9847)
• Book Club: First Tues., 6:45 p.m.
Free. Features an informal dis-
cussion of member-selected books.
• Weekly story time for
children: Fri., 1 p.m. Free.
• Book/Bake Sale: June 24-25,
books start at $.25. Baked goods
raffle starts June 25, 2:30 p.m.
VISUAL
AFA Gallery (514 Lackawanna
Ave., Scranton: 570.969.1040 or
Artistsforart.com)
Gallery hours Thurs.-Sat., 12-5 p.m.
• Life Drawing sessions: every
Tues., 7-9 p.m. Call Phil for info,
561.7817.
• Drawing Socials: Sun., 6-9 p.m. $5
GA, $2 student.
• “Expressions and Constructions:”
May 5-28, featuring works by Ellen
Jamiolkowski and John Mulvaney.
Opening reception May 6, 6-9 p.m.
ArtWorks Gallery (502 Lacka-
wanna Ave., Scranton. 570.207.1815)
• “Diverse City: Celebrating the
many faces of” call for artists, May
6-26. Show theme: diversity. Juror
will weigh appropriateness/original-
ity of response when he makes
awards.
Camerawork Gallery (Down-
stairs in the Marquis Gallery, Laun-
dry Building, 515 Center St., Scran-
ton, 570.510.5028. www.camerawork-
gallery.org, rross233@aol.com)
Gallery hours Mon.-Fri., 10 a.m.-6
p.m.; Sat., 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
• “Flower Sounds,” photographs by
Phil Dente: May 6-31. Opening recep-
tion May 6, 6-8:30 p.m.
Connell Space (129 N. Washing-
ton Ave., Scranton)
• Independent Artist Collective
Group Exhibition: through May.
Features works by John Bromberg,
Kayla Cady, Dennis Corrigan, Kim
Glogowski, Jason Healey, Ryan Hnat,
John Kolbek, Oliver Pettinato,
Sage, Amy Lynn Rickert,
Sarah Schimeneck, Skip
Sensbach, Brie
Taylor, Ryan
Ward, Evan
West and
Kevin Vol-
grin. Opening
reception May 6,
6-9 p.m. For info, visit
iacollective.blogspot.com.
Everhart Museum (1901 Mulber-
ry St., Scranton, PA, 570.346.7186,
www.everhart-museum.org)
Admission $5 adults; $3 students/
seniors; $2 children 6-12; Everhart
Museum members free.
• “With bullets singing all around
me:” Regional Stories of the Cival
War: through July 17.
• “Medics In Action: Caring For the
Wounded:” through July 17.
Gallery at the Pocono Com-
munity Theater (88 S. Courtland
St., East Stroudsburg, 570.421.3456.
poconocommunitytheater.org)
• “The Flower Show:” through June
26. Artist reception May 7, 1-3 p.m.
Hope Horn Gallery (Hyland
Hall, University of Scranton,
570.941.4214)
• “25th Annual Student Exhibition:”
Through May13. Free during gallery
hours.
The Main Street Gallery (27
N. Main St., Carbondale)
• “Essentials: A Group Exhibition:”
Opening reception May 13, 6-9 p.m.
Marquis Art & Frame (122 S.
Main St., Wilkes-Barre, 570.823.0518)
Gallery hours Mon.-Sat., 10 a.m.-5
p.m.
• “Collected & New Works” by
Barbro Jernberg and Kelly Olszyk:
through May 7.
Misericordia University (301
Lake St., Dallas, 570.674.6286)
• Verve Vertu Art Exhibit: May 5,
5-8 p.m., Speech-Language and
Hearing Center, College of Health
Sciences building, 2nd floor. free
and open to public, reservations are
required.
New Visions Studio & Gal-
lery (201 Vine St., Scranton,
www.newvisionstudio.com,
978.501.7812)
Gallery hours: Tues.-Sun., noon-6
p.m. and by appointment.
• Grand re-opening May 6, 6-9 p.m.,
First Friday debut with Jessica
Diehl’s photography exhibit, “Petals
of Passion.”
• Family Ties -a juried group exhib-
it. Accepting submissions from all
media artists, nation-wide. Central
theme will be family, and the role of
a father in the eyes of the artist.
Cash prize, deadline is May 8th at
midnight.
Pauly Friedman Art Gallery
(Misericordia University,
570.674.6250, misericordia.edu/art)
Gallery hours: Mon.-Thurs. 10 a.m.-8
p.m., Fri., 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat./Sun., 1-5
p.m.
• “The Mary Wilson Supremes
Collection:” July 23-Oct. 17, featuring
the gowns of Mary Wilson, a found-
ing member of The Supremes, in
conjunction with Wilson’s Under the
Stars Summer Arts Festival perform-
ance July 23. Open reception July
22, 5-8 p.m., features Q&A with
Wilson. $40 limited tickets available,
$360 “Supreme Experience’’ includes
opening reception for six, festival-
table seating for six at concert. Call
674.6719 for tickets.
Schulman Gallery (2nd floor of
LCCC Campus Center, 1333 S. Pros-
pect St., Nanticoke, www.lu-
zerne.edu/schulmangallery,
570.740.0727)
Gallery hours: Wed.-Sat., 5-8 p.m.
• Annual Student Show: May 6-July
1. Exhibit of graphics, paintings,
photography, computer graphics and
portfolios by students of LCCC art
dept. Opening reception May 6, 6-8
p.m.
• Pink Ribbon Exhibit: July 8-Aug 6.
Artwork by area artists with dona-
tion to Breast Cancer Awareness.
• Tattoo Art: Aug. 12-Sept. 10. Art-
work by area artist in style of tattoo
art.
• Photography Exhibit: Sept. 16-Oct.
15. Featuring photos by students,
faculty and invited photographers.
• Old Masters: Oct. 21-Nov. 26.
Artwork by students exhibiting
techniques of Old Master
• Annual Faculty/Alumni Exhibit:
Dec. 2-Jan. 7.

STAR Gallery at the Mall at
Steamtown (570.969.2537/
343.3048)
❏ Children and adult art classes
• Ceramic sculpture and the Chil-
dren’s Art Corner: Call Tom Gates,
877.3261
• Drawing and painting classes: Call
Karen Mahalik 383.1220
• Private Photoshop classes: Call
Gerry Stankiewicz, 709.9203
Wayne County Art Exhibit
May 9-13, 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m., lobby of
the Wayne County Court House. Call
the Wayne County Area Agency on
Aging at 570.253.4262 for info.
Widmann Gallery (Located in
King’s College’s Sheehy-Farmer
Campus Center between North
Franklin and North Main Streets,
Wilkes-Barre, 208.5900, ext. 5328)
Gallery hours: Mon. through Fri. 9
a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Free and open to
the public.
• 23rd Annual King’s Student Exhib-
it: through May 4. Features works by
Mass Communication Dept. and
classes in sculpture and drawing.
• “Finding Home:” May 16-June 24.
Features photography by local artist
Shane Montross. Artist discussion
May 20, 6-8 p.m. Free and open to
the public.
The Wyoming Valley Art
League (47 N. Franklin St., Wilkes-
Barre, www.wval.org, 570.288.1020)
• Art League Dinner: May 6.
• David Green Sculptor, Stone or
Clay: May 13-14.
• 3rd Friday exhibit/reception: May
20.
• Fine Arts Fiesta: May 19-22. W
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W
e’ve all seen the “clas-
sic” bullies in movies —
they knock books out of
other students’ hands, shove the
geeks into lockers, play devious
pranks on teachers and always
wind up in detention. They chase
underclassmen after school,
knock them around a bit, then
call it a day. The bullied would
walk home, often bruised phys-
ically, always bruised emotional-
ly. The bullied would walk away,
their head hung low.
But they do not walk alone.
Having started a walk of his
own this past Sunday, May 1,
Scranton resident George Ewing
is traveling one step at a time to
Greensboro, N.C. for the first
annual No More Bullies Walk.
The approximately 600-mile
walk, which began with a rally at
Courthouse Square in Scranton,
will close with another rally in
Greensboro on Tuesday, May 31.
Ewing said the event, which
was created to raise awareness
about bullying, was originally
supposed to be just a rally in
Scranton, but evolved into a walk
after he heard the story of Bran-
don Bitner, a 14-year-old boy
from Mount Pleasant Mills, Pa.
who, after walking from his
home in the middle of the night,
took his own life last year after
having been bullied.
“I knew that I had to do some
type of walk,” Ewing said prior
to the start of his journey. “We
had to walk, not only in Bran-
don’s memory, but walk for all
the other Brandons that are out
there in the world right now.”
Ewing said that it is important
to make people aware of the
effects of bullying, especially as
more and more youths are turn-
ing to suicide, now being termed
“bullycide” in these cases. He
said that he was a victim of bul-
lying in high school because of
his weight and good grades, and
eventually dropped out because
of it.
“I was lucky,” he said. “I was
lifted up by friends and family.
There were times that I thought
about taking my life because of
this. I was one of those bully-
cides that could have happened.
That’s why this is important to
me.”
Ewing went on to earn a mas-
ter’s degree in conflict resolution,
and is currently working on his
Ph.D. in conflict analysis and
resolution. He is also a member
of Win-Win Resolutions, a non-
profit organization that works
with youths and their families in
order to prevent and deal with
situations such as bullying
through the use of conflict reso-
lution workshops.
Debra Vigliano, executive
director of Win-Win Resolutions,
said that Ewing’s walk is a great
complement to the programs the
group normally runs, and that it
has gotten a very positive re-
sponse from the community who
want to become part of the solu-
tion.
“We could walk around the
world 10 times, and we’d still
have bullies in our world,” she
said. “As we talk to people, their
own issues and experiences with
bullying come to the surface, and
they’re committed, and they want
to get involved.”
Bullying continues to evolve,
spreading into the world of social
media sites such as Facebook and
Twitter.
“When you got off the school
bus back in my day,” she said,
“whatever you were dealing with
at school, if there was a bully in
the classroom, you left him be-
hind, and you were safe. There’s
no safety zones anywhere any-
more because it’s 24/7.”
Those fighting it have also
turned to the social media sites to
strengthen their cause. Through-
out the walk, updates will be
made on Facebook and Twitter of
Ewing’s progress, as well as
provide information as to how
others can contribute to the
cause, which hopes to raise
$300,000 to help fund the imple-
mentation of programs in schools
against bullying and other issues.
Monica Thomas, founder of
PASS (Parents Advocating for
Safe Schools), has also joined
with the group to help advocate
against bullying in schools. She
said it is important to inform
people that this problem exists
and that there are other solutions
than suicide available to youths
dealing with bullying.
“There’s hope, you can come
out of this,” she said. “You can
survive this. Don’t take a perma-
nent solution to a short-term
problem.” W
A 600-mile walk
to end bullying
By Marie Burrell
Weekender Intern
No More Bullies Walk, May 1-31.
Info: winwinresolutions.org,
parentsadvocatingforsafes-
chools.webs.com
GEORGE EWING
“I was one of those bullycides that could have
happened. That’s why this is important to me.”
No More Bullies Walker George Ewing
Denise
Gans-
Torruellas
Vanilla cherry
Justin
Borsdam
Mint chocolate chip
Kait
Bobs
Chocolate chip
cookie dough
Kevin
Fei
Vanilla with hot
chocolate
by Ashley Gries, Weekender Intern
tell us ...
Aliah
Roseman
Rocky Road
Chad
Nordahl
Twist on a cone with
twinkle coat
What’s your favorite ice
cream flavor?
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CINCO DE MAYO
AT HOPS
THURSDAY, 5/5 WITH
DJ EDDIE J
$1.50 TACOS ALL DAY
$2.50 CORONAS
DOS EQUIS DRAFT SPECIAL
Prizes & Giveaways
2
5
4
4
9
7
Wings&WineFest
UpstatePA
Saturday, May 14th 11am–5pm
Whipple Performing Arts Studio
Village Shopping Center Route 29 South Tunkhannock, PA
COME FOR THE WINGS!
COME FOR THEWINE!
STAY FOR A FULL DAY OF FUN!
NEPA
Wine Country
An NEPA Wine Country Event
Info: www.NEPAwinecountry.com or 570.836.5253
Starlite Playhouse Wing Cook-off
Several Pennsylvania Wineries
GETYOURTICKETSINADVANCE&SAVE!
First 1,000 guests receive commemorative wine glass.
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Mackrell’s
Barbershop
329 North Washington Ave.
Scranton, PA 18503
(570) 341-3235
BARBER HOURS
Tuesday - Friday 9-5
Saturday 8-2
Monday & Sunday Closed
After 5 by appointment
We Need
Your Help!
Anonymous Tip Line
1-888-796-5519
Luzerne County Sheriff’s Office
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TAURUS (APRIL 20-MAY 20)
Criticism is one thing. Full-on abuse is
quite another. While I hope you’re mature
and open-minded enough to receive the
former and allow it to influence your
behavior (if not right in the moment, then
at least after a bit of reflection). I also
hope you’re willing to stick up for yourself
if this crosses the line into outright judg-
ment and cruelty. This may not always be
clear-cut, so those you consider your
friends and allies should help you deter-
mine just where that line is, and help you
fight the good fight if and when it’s vio-
lated.
GEMINI (MAY 21-JUNE 20)
Don’t overthink things. Sometimes you
remind me of an old-school Western med-
ical doctor, addressing each symptom of a
problem as it arises (and the symptoms
resulting from the “solutions” you’ve
implemented), instead of trying to simply
discover the root of the problem and nip
that cleanly in the bud. The problem(s)
before you, while currently occupying an
inordinate amount of mental real estate,
have one simple, quick solution, which
will become obvious to you if you can
take about ten steps back to have a gander
at the much bigger picture. The real ques-
tion is: Can you do that? If not, what’s
stopping you?
CANCER (JUNE 21-JULY 22)
It’s kind of you to be respectful of some-
one else’s emotional state (not inviting
his/her recent ex to a party, for example).
However, eventually your relationships
must be on your own terms. There’s a
statute of limitations regarding how long
you’re required to bend to others’ emo-
tional needs. At some point, they need to
get over themselves instead of keeping
their friends hostage to their drama. You’re
incredibly sensitive and patient — and
even you know this is true. Unfortunately,
this week you may have to drive the point
home.
LEO (JULY 23-AUG. 22)
People are allowed to change their
minds — they have to be, since they’ll do
it whether they’re allowed to or not. It
would be nice if they could have figured
things out before they’d gone so far (leav-
ing someone at the altar is the extreme
case of such a scenario), but sometimes
they’re simply unable to wrap their heads
around a situation until it’s truly upon
them. This can be confounding to Leos,
who rarely have such difficulty and are
generally forthright about their state of
mind. You can’t impart this decisiveness
on others, so unfortunately you have to
deal with their freaky, changeable minds.
In the end, don’t waste energy wishing you
could change them — it’s too late for that,
even if you could. What happens or has
happened is completely out of your hands;
the only thing you can control is how you
react to it.
VIRGO (AUG. 23-SEPT. 22)
Every relationship is different, and you
shouldn’t compare. My boyfriend and I
once ran into an old ex of his, who
thoughtlessly commented, “Does he wake
you up all night to fool around, too?” (He
didn’t.) Naturally, that was a bit of a down-
er, but at the end of the day comparing and
contrasting relationships is a losing propo-
sition, so don’t do it. And if you can’t help
it, at least cut yourself some slack and
conclude that what you have is better:
“No, he doesn’t wake me up — I guess I
just wore him right out!”
LIBRA (SEPT. 23-OCT. 22)
Stuff is just stuff. While I’m sure you
realize that rationally, coming to terms
with it emotionally is sometimes more
challenging, particularly when the material
objects in question were gifts or inher-
itances or otherwise infused with senti-
mental nostalgia. While their worth to you
defies monetary assessment, try to recog-
nize that 99 percent of that value lies
inside your head and can’t be taken away,
even if the object is lost, stolen, or de-
stroyed. Sure the item is gone or ruined,
but its real value is still intact, inside your
head. Try to keep that in mind before you
fly off the handle.
SCORPIO (OCT. 23-NOV. 21)
Everyone makes mistakes. Some of
them are even ridiculously stupid, embar-
rassing ones. Yes, you should have known
better, but the sooner you ’fess up to the
mess, the sooner you can rectify the sit-
uation and move past it. Trying to cover it
up or shift blame are the actions of a child;
getting caught doing that — which would
surely happen — would be even more
humiliating, and cause more problems
than just owning the slip-up right from the
beginning. Step up, admit you screwed up,
and maturely begin the process of figuring
out how to best move on from here.
SAGITTARIUS (NOV. 22-DEC. 21)
You can’t control how people react to
situations. Even though you tend to ap-
proach life with a direct, honest, mostly
positive approach, you’ve probably notice
that some people are determined to see the
worst in others, convinced the world is
“out to get them,” positive that anything
that can go wrong, will, or all of the
above. While it’s admirable that you try to
help such cynical souls, sometimes it’s
best to recognize that their habits are so
ingrained that any conflicting perspectives
you try to point out to them will be count-
ed as unusual exceptions to the rule, and
not the way things are.
CAPRICORN (DEC. 22-JAN. 19)
When a problem is entirely in your
head, it can still sometimes be very diffi-
cult to distinguish from real difficulties
imposed on you from the outside world; it
seems just as tangible, daunting, and mi-
sery-inducing. And sometimes your lack
of leverage can make it even harder to deal
with successfully. This is when you ask for
help, something most Capricorns despise
doing. Barking orders or making unrea-
sonable demands won’t work out too well,
so resist the urge to save face by trying
those tactics. Instead, humbly and honestly
ask for the help you’ll need, you’ll almost
certainly get it.
AQUARIUS (JAN. 20-FEB. 18)
In this case, the best place to live might
lie outside of your comfort zone. In other
words, you’re house hunting in completely
the wrong neighborhood! Exceptions to
rules are frequently fantastic because
they’re just that — exceptional. By not
considering them, you’re severely limiting
your options, and perhaps depriving your-
self (and others) of tremendous happiness.
It’s time to broaden your horizons, think
outside the box and contemplate scenarios
you haven’t dared to imagine before. Most
of those might be ridiculous pipe dreams,
but one is likely to work out beautifully,
and you’ll never know which until you
give them a go.
PISCES (FEB. 19-MARCH 20)
Staying neutral isn’t always an option.
Sometimes you quite simply have to pick
sides. Failing to do so will have you lump-
ed in on one side or the other, by default,
whether you like it or not. As annoying as
the whole conflict is for you, at some
point, preferably early on, you need to
realize it’s not going to go away and you
will not be allowed to remain aloof from
it. Therefore you need to dive right in,
draw a line about acceptable behavior, and
then stick to it — even if it means remov-
ing you and yours from the situation alto-
gether if and when that line gets crossed.
ARIES (MARCH 21-APRIL 19)
Here’s your mantra for this week:
“Whatever works.” You can get complete-
ly caught up with how things should func-
tion and what might be expected of you in
various scenarios. But sometimes those
ideas are simply unrealistic, woefully
incomplete or not taking into account the
details of your specific situation. Natural-
ly, you can stubbornly cling to those con-
cepts and watch things crash and burn, but
wouldn’t it be better to, for the sake of the
worthy goals you have in mind, be willing
to at least try stuff that could help, whether
or not it “should” be necessary? Failing to
do so would be at best narrow-minded,
and at worst cruelly, needlessly masochis-
tic. W
To contact Caeriel send mail to
sign.language.astrology@gmail.com.
By Caeriel Crestin
Weekender Correspondent
LANCE BASS
May 4 1979
ADELE
May 5 1988
GABOUREY SIDIBE
May 6 1983
TIMRUSSERT
May 7 1950
ENRIQUE IGLESIAS
May 8 1975
AUDRINA PATRIDGE
(pictured)
May 9 1985
KENAN THOMPSON
May 10 1978
sign language
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sorry mom&dad
By Justin Brown
Weekender Correspondent
T
o my knowledge, I’m the
only person banned from
being on the set of the
television clip show “The Soup.”
It’s all because the executive
producer, K.P. Anderson, thought
it was unprofessional of me to
ask if I could be shot by Joel
McHale with a toy gun. What
was I thinking?
It all started when I was enter-
tainment news anchor for my
college’s television news show.
Each week I delivered the latest
update on what was going on in
pop culture, with a comically
satirical twist. “This is far too
inappropriate,” the faculty ad-
visor in charge of the station
would routinely scream. “You
can’t say that shit!”
I’d often be surprised during
our live broadcasts when some of
my lewd jokes would be omitted
from the teleprompter without
being told. I started adding jokes
so preposterous that I knew
they’d be deleted from the
prompter by the station manager,
allowing the jokes I really wanted
used to appear less indecent and
remain in place.
During that time I would reli-
giously watch McHale for in-
spiration, which is why I applied
to intern at E! I wanted the op-
portunity to grow by working
with the team that produced “The
Soup.” Instead selected to intern
for “True Hollywood Story,” I
was given the opportunity to sit
in on a taping of the show that
once inspired me to combine pop
culture with comedy. Me, a hand-
ful of personally invited guests,
McHale and a little bit of ob-
scene behavior made for an eve-
ning I would never forget — for
reasons other than the fact that I
got my picture taken with my
idol.
“I’m jealous of the intern who
got shot by Joel in a skit,” I
shared with my friend who at-
tended the taping with me. “I
wonder if they’d let me get shot
in a skit?” They say curiosity
killed the cat? Well, curiosity
killed my dreams of getting shot
by McHale with a toy gun, be-
cause the next day I decided to
e-mail the executive producer of
the show and ask.
Incredibly naïve, I thought my
approach should show how funny
I could be. So, I told a bogus
story about how I relocated to
Los Angeles so I could be closer
to Britney Spears, hoping to meet
and party with her because she
made bipolar disorder look like
fun! In retrospect, not funny or
wise! I continued by stating that I
wanted to be shot by McHale in a
skit and topped it off with clip art
of a news reporter in front of a
burning building under the cap-
tion “This Just In!” Let’s just say,
it didn’t go over very well. He
reported me to the head of E!’s
human resources!
“I know this can be a very
exciting place to be,” announced
the head of HR over the phone.
“But you can’t be contacting
these people. They asked me to
tell you that they no longer want
you to attend their show.”
Initially crestfallen, I have
grown to own the fact that I am
the only person banned from
“The Soup!” Though I wasn’t
right, getting banned was a little
extreme! Anderson must have
been stressed out that day. Some
people take an anxiety pill to
calm down when they’re stressed.
As someone who is against tak-
ing any prescription medication,
unless it’s somebody else’s pre-
scription and chased with a Four
Loko, I recommend masturbation
as a resourceful method of reduc-
ing tension. Perhaps if Anderson
rubbed one out in the shower that
morning, he wouldn’t have went
all Demi Lovato on me. Like the
age old question of how many
licks it takes to get to the center
of a Tootsie Roll pop, perhaps
we’ll never know … W
Follow Justin on Twitter
@sorrymomanddad or
check out Facebook.com/
sorrymomanddad
Banned soup
Justin with Joel McHale
of ’The Soup.’
motorhead
Ride of
the Week
“This car was a stock 1997 Mustang when I bought it
back in 2004,” said Roman, who has since converted the
engine to a Cobra Teksid 4.6-liter, 4-valve dual overhead
cam V-8.
The Mustang also has all the supporting modifications
involved with fuel delivery, air induction and the clutch. It
was dyno tuned using SCT software by Dave Guy of SGS
Performance in Dillsburg, Pa. The car is painted two-tone
in Grabber Blue and Bright White and rides on 17-inch
Cobra-R wheels on Toyo TQ drag radial tires. W
By Michael Golubiewski
Special to the Weekender
1997
FORD MUSTANG GT
Owner:
Keith Roman of Hanover Twp.
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scooter girl
By Jayne Moore
Weekender Correspondent
I
n the next few weeks, you’ll
be reading a lot about May
being Motorcycle Safety
Awareness Month. One group
felt that the best way to start
this month off was by having a
motorcycle run and a pancake
breakfast to improve awareness.
Luzerne County ABATE
Chapter President Dave Corby
said that what they are working
on right now to help motorists
to pay attention to motorcyclists
is the “Look Twice Save a Life
Motorcycles are Everywhere”
yard signs. You will see many
of these signs popping up as
we move into riding season.
Despite the weather that we’ve
been having up until now, it’s
not been great riding weather.
As the weather improves the
number of motorcyclists will
increase. Now is really the time
to really start being on the
lookout as you drive.
When I asked him what
makes him most proud of his
work with ABATE, Corby said,
“Teaching my children to get
involved and standing up for
what you think is right or a
worthy cause. With being in-
volved with ABATE, my two
children have learned it takes a
lot of hard work and determi-
nation to accomplish/organize
successful events.”
So what is ABATE? It stands
for Alliance of Bikers Aimed
Toward Education, its mission
statement reads, “An Alliance
of Bikers dedicated to the pro-
tection of the individual rights
of motorcyclists through politi-
cal change, charitable works
and public education.” You can
see from some of the issues
mentioned before that they do
indeed take their work serious-
ly.
One issue that I can really
get behind is the issue of dis-
tracted drivers. We have all
heard stories of people having
accidents because of distracted
driving. Texting, being on the
phone and even reading the
newspaper while driving can
lead to serious accidents. One
of the most common reasons
for motorists having accidents
with motorcycles is “I didn’t
see them.”
The yard signs and other
work that ABATE participates
in tries to educate bikers and
motorists alike to the dangers
of not being totally focused on
their driving. Bikes are way too
easy to miss if you’ve only got
75 percent of your attention on
the road.
What is important about May
as Motorcycle Safety Awareness
Month?
“May being declared Motor-
cycle Awareness Month is a
simple reminder that we are out
there, and we have the same
rights on the road as any other
vehicle,” Corby stated.
Biker’s rights are protected.
On its website, abatepa.org, you
can see that emphasized. One
of the issues at stake here is
the helmet law. Currently, in
Pennsylvania, riders are not
required by law to wear a hel-
met as in some neighboring
states like New York and Vir-
ginia. ABATE states, “It was
never about the helmet, it was
about the choice.” While I
personally believe that everyone
should wear a helmet, Corby
argued that it is about having
the choice to wear or not wear
a helmet.
After the pancake breakfast,
those riders that chose to were
treated to a wonderful ride to
meet up with the ABATE of
Pa. Pike County Chapter for its
annual chicken barbecue. Corby
said that anyone can contact
them either on the website
mentioned above or via their
Facebook page. No matter
where you live, there is a local
chapter of ABATE near
enough.
Some other tips to think
about as more bikers take to
the roads: Obey all road signs
— even the yield signs, stay
off the dang phone, and my
favorite: Stay on your side of
the yellow lines. The lines are
there to separate the road into
two driving lanes; one for you,
and one for oncoming vehicles.
One other point is that this
riding season will see many
more sponsored runs going on.
Be patient, and pay attention to
the traffic control people as
they are out there to make
everyone safe.
So as we move into the rid-
ing season of 2011, let’s make
it a safe year for all people
who share the road. So read
the signs, and practice looking
twice — it may save a life.
Motorcycles are indeed every-
where! W
May is Motorcycle Safety Awareness Month.
The month
of motorcycles
One of the most
common reasons
for motorists hav-
ing accidents with
motorcycles is “I
didn’t see them.”
2
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Enter your pet for Weekender’s
PET OF THE WEEK
by sending photo, pet’s name, breed
if applicable, owner’s name and
hometown to:
weekender@theweekender.com
subject line: Pet of the Week
Owner:
Nicole Roberts, Wilkes-Barre
ROCCO
Yorkshire Terrier
The Gamer
By Dale Culp
Weekender Correspondent
I
t’s very rare that we see satire
used to tackle social and
political issues in video
games. This is most likely due to
the fact that video games are still
a young medium, although, I
suspect it has more to do with
the idea that it’s very difficult to
build a game around a social
issue. How do you make it
“fun,” for example, to address
the issue of ending world hun-
ger, helping underprivileged kids
go to college or legalizing same-
sex marriage? How do you make
it appeal to an audience that
might not even care?
For Owlchemy Labs, the an-
swer was a physics-based, 2-D
racing game for the iPhone with
a theme built around the issue of
United States immigration law
reform. They called their game
“Smuggle Truck.”
The story is that “Smuggle
Truck” was born out of the frus-
tration experienced by friends of
Owlchemy Labs who wanted to
immigrate into the U.S. After 12
months of struggling to get in,
what started as a joke — that it
would be easier to smuggle
themselves into the country than
to follow official channels —
quickly grew into a viable game
concept.
In two days, it went from
prototype to working iPhone
game. As levels were built and
graphics were polished, the
largest hurdle would be getting
the game past Apple’s app re-
view board and into the iTunes
App Store.
The premise of “Smuggle
Truck” is to drive a pickup truck
full of illegal immigrants across
the border in the shortest amount
of time while losing as few peo-
ple as possible. It’s a difficult
challenge, requiring a delicate
touch to make sure you don’t
send all of your passengers fly-
ing off the flatbed. Unfortunately
for Owlchemy Labs, as fun as
the core concept might be, that
didn’t make up for the theme
and subject matter of the game.
The app review board rejected it.
Was it the idea of smuggling
illegal immigrants across the
border that the app review board
at Apple, Inc. didn’t agree with?
Or was it seeing the cute, car-
toonish people, including babies,
being accidentally flung off the
back of a truck that they didn’t
like? No one really knows, but it
required some kind of change if
Owlchemy Labs were ever to
hope their game would see the
light of day.
In a show of quick, clever
thinking, the name of the game
was changed to “Snuggle Truck”
and the idea shifted away from
illegal immigrants to cute, fuzzy
animals trying to escape extinc-
tion by sneaking into a zoo. It’s a
far cry from the original idea,
but at least Owlchemy Labs
were able to get their game on
the app store and start making
money from their work.
Meanwhile, for those who
wish to experience “Smuggle
Truck” in its original form, the
PC and Mac version are avail-
able from Owlchemy Labs’
website for $4.99. As an added
bonus, the PC/Mac version also
contains “Snuggle Truck,” allow-
ing you to play both versions.
There’s also an upcoming expan-
sion pack that will add more
levels to the game for free.
“Smuggle/Snuggle Truck”
may end up being a campy,
bizarre way of raising awareness
for immigration law reform, but
it’s also quite brave. The game
has received a lot of negative
press for its subject matter, but
the developers insist that they
were very wary of stereotypes
and took precautions against
offending anyone. Even so, ille-
gal immigration is a hotbed issue
with a lot of folks.
I hope, as video games ma-
ture, and as we learn to embrace
video games as art, that games
like “Smuggle Truck” will be-
come less rare. However, let’s
not forget why we play games in
the first place — to escape from
reality and have a little fun. That
said, I don’t think I’ve ever
played a socially conscious satire
on United States immigration
law reform that was quite this
fun.
For more information on
“Smuggle Truck,” visit smuggle-
truck.com. W
Game spoofs
hot-point issue
Above and below, the different versions of Owlchemy
Labs’ new game.
W
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NUMBER
ONE
AUDITED
NEWSPAPER
IN LUZERNE COUNTY
– AUDIT BUREAU OF CIRCULATIONS (ABC)
Cooks Pharmacy
Cross Valley Federal
Credit Union
Humphrey’s Bootery & Bags
Orloski’s Car Wash & Lube
National Paint & Supply Co.
Ochman’s Coins & Jewelry
Schiel’s Family Markets
Philly Subs & Pizzeria
The Computer Shop
Robert’s Automotive
Cartridge World
Bingo’s Hoagies
Borino Tire & Auto
Center
W
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457 Wanted to Buy
Auto
468 Auto Parts
457 Wanted to Buy
Auto
468 Auto Parts
$$$ HIGHEST PRICE PAID $$$
FOR JUNK
VEHICLES
PICKED UP
570-876-1010
570-346-7673
BUYING JUNK VEHICLES
$300 and Up
$125 extra if driven,
pulled or pushed in.
NOBODY Pays More
570-760-2035
Monday thru Saturday 6 am-9 pm
Sunday 8 am - 68 pm
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
100
ANNOUNCEMENTS
110 Lost
ALL JUNK CARS
WANTED!!
CALL ANYTIME
FREE REMOVAL
CA$H PAID
ON THE SPOT
570.301.3602
ALL
JUNK
CAR &
TRUCKS
WANTED
Highest Prices
Paid!!!
FREE
REMOVAL
Call V&G
Anytime
288-8995
LOST BEAGLE: 7
months old, 11 1/2 “
high, black back
with white belly and
legs. Last seen in
Falls, Coolbaugh
Mountain Road on
Wednesday 4/27.
REWARD. Call
570-388-2775 or
570-388-3239
LOST BLACK CAT.
1 yr old, a few white
hairs under chin.
Near Carverton
Road and 8th St.
REWARD!! Please
call 570-696-1309
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
LOST RING
Anniversary
Diamond Band in
vicinity of Wood-
land’s on 4/29.
Please call
570-814-0004.
120 Found
Bracelet. Found in
Mohegan Sun Arena
Parking Lot on April
26. Call to identify.
570-824-2510
FOUND - Keys for
SUBARU on RIver
St. 570-417-3689
FOUND, Brown and
white Beagle in St.
Mary’s cemetery in
Hanover Township
on Easter. Please
call Nick to identify.
(570) 407-0833
150 Special Notices
ADOPT
We can give your
infant love and
security, you can
help make us a
family. Expenses
paid. Please call
Denise & Howard
1-877-676-1660.
ADOPT: Adoring
Mom, Dad, Big
Brother would like
to share a lifetime
of hugs & kisses
in our loving home
with a newborn.
Please Call
Lynda & Dennis
888-688-1422
Expenses Paid
ADOPTION
A loving married
teacher couple
with so much to
offer would love
to adopt your
newborn. We
can provide a
lifetime of happi-
ness, security
& educational
opportunities.
Expenses paid.
Nancy/Kevin
1-866-254-3529
www.nancykevin
2adopt.com
P PA AYING $500 YING $500
MINIMUM
DRIVEN IN
Full size 4 wheel
drive trucks
ALSO PAYING TOP $$$
for heavy equip-
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dump trucks,
bull dozers
HAPPY TRAILS
TRUCK SALES
570-760-2035
542-2277
6am to 8pm
Wyoming County
Chorale presents:
“OLD TIME
AMERI-
CANA”
Saturday
May 7, 7:30PM
in Tunkhannock
Middle School.
Special guests
“The Coal
Town Rounders”
and featuring songs
from “O Brother
Where Art Thou”
plus many other
bluegrass, folk and
gospel numbers.
Tickets $8
(12 and under free)
available at door or
www.wyoming
countychorale.org
310 Attorney
Services
Free Bankruptcy
Consultation
Payment plans.
Carol Baltimore
570-822-1959
310 Attorney
Services
BANKRUPTCY
FREE CONSULT
Guaranteed
Low Fees
Payment Plan!
Colleen Metroka
570-592-4796
Attorney
Keith Hunter
Bankruptcies
MAHLER, LOHIN
& ASSOCIATES
(570) 718-1118
MARGIOTTI
LAW OFFICES
BANKRUPTCY
Free Consult
Payment Plans
(570) 970-9977
Wilkes-Barre
(570) 223-2536
Stroudsburg
SOCIAL SECURITY
DISABILITY
Free Consultation.
Contact Atty. Sherry
Dalessandro
570-823-9006
380 Travel
BROADWAY SHOWS
That Championship
Season 5/21-NEW!;
Jersey Boys 7/20 &
9/10; Sister Act
7/23—NEW!; Lion
King 8/6; Phantom
of the Opera 8/6;
Wicked 10/19
1-800-432-8069
YANKEES TRIP
TO CINCINNATI
June 20, 21 and 22
(Monday, Tuesday,
Wednesday)
Catch the Yankees
take on the Reds at
The Great American
Ballpark in Cincin-
nati, Ohio
Trip Includes:
*Round trip bus
transportation
*Beer, soda & food
on the bus
*Great box level
seats to two games
(Mon & Tues night)
*Hotel accommoda-
tions at the Millenni-
um Hotel. Just three
blocks from stadium
and walking dis-
tance from Cincin-
nati Zoo and other
downtown attrac-
tions
Price: $350
Call 570-287-9701
for more info.
406 ATVs/Dune
Buggies
QUARTER MIDGET
RACE CAR
76 inch Bull Rider,
Honda 120 motor,
Kirkey seat,
new brake system,
A-Main feature wins
Asphalt/Dirt,
Many Extras,
Value $6,000,
Sell for $2,999
Call (570) 954-2749
409 Autos under
$5000
CADILLAC `94
DEVILLE SEDAN
94,000 miles,
automatic, front
wheel drive, 4
door, air condi-
tioning, air bags,
all power, cruise
control, leather
interior, $3,300.
570-394-9004
412 Autos for Sale
ACURA `08 RDX
Good Condition.
53,000 miles.
AWD, Full Power,
AM/FM, CD
Changer, Blue
Tooth, XM Radio,
Leather Interior
& Sunroof
$20,000
(570) 814-8398
Call after 9:30 a.m.
Audi `02 A4
1.8 Turbo, AWD,
Automatic, white
with beige leather
interior. 84,000
Miles. Very Good
Condition. $8,900
(570) 696-9809
(570) 690-4262
BMW `07 328xi
Black with black
interior. Heated
seats. Back up &
navigation sys-
tems. New tires &
brakes. Sunroof.
Garage kept. Many
extras! 46,000
Miles.
Asking $19,500.
570-825-8888 or
626-297-0155
Call Anytime!
BMW `07 328xi
Black with black
interior. Heated
seats. Back up &
navigation sys-
tems. New tires &
brakes. Sunroof.
Garage kept. Many
extras! 46,000
Miles.
Asking $19,500.
570-825-8888 or
626-297-0155
Call Anytime!
FORD `07 MUSTANG
63,000 highway
miles, silver, runs
great, $11,500.
negotiable.
570-479-2482
412 Autos for Sale
BMW `93 325 IC
Convertible,
Metallic Green
Exterior & Tan
Interior, 5 Speed
Transmission,
Heated Seats. 2nd
Owner, 66k Miles.
Excellent Condition,
Garage Kept,
Excellent Gas
Mileage. Carfax
available. Price
reduced $7,995
or trade for SUV or
other. Beautiful /
Fun Car.
570-388-6669
Selling your
Camper?
Place an ad and
find a new owner.
570-829-7130
CADILLAC ‘06 STS
AWD, 6 cylinder, Sil-
ver, 52,600 miles,
sunroof, heated
seats, Bose sound
system, 6 CD
changer, satellite
radio, Onstar, park-
ing assist, remote
keyless entry, elec-
tronic keyless igni-
tion, & more!
$17,600
570-881-2775
CHEVROLET `88
MONTE CARLO SS
V8, automatic,
51,267 miles,
MUST SELL
$9,200 OBO
(570) 760-0511
CHEVROLET ‘06
CORVETTE
CONVERTIBLE
Silver beauty, 1
Owner, Museum
quality. 4,900
miles, 6 speed. All
possible options
including Naviga-
tion, Power top.
New, paid $62,000
Must sell $45,900
570-299-9370
CHRYSLER ‘06
300C HEMI
Light green, 18,000
miles, loaded,
leather, wood trim,
$24,000.
570-222-4960
leave message
CHRYSLER `02
PT CRUISER
Inferno Red, flame
design. Chrome
wheels. 47,000
miles, one owner.
Looks and runs
great. New inspec-
tion. $5,800
Call (570) 472-1854
CHRYSLER `07 300
55,600 miles, auto-
matic, 4 door, anti-
lock brakes, air con-
ditioning, air bags,
all power, AM/FM
radio, CD player,
new new brakes.
$10,900.
570-760-6983
FORD `04 MUSTANG
Mach I, 40th
ANNIVERSARY EDITION
V8, Auto, 1,200
miles, all options,
show room condi-
tion. Call for info.
Asking $24,995
Serious inquiries
only. 570-636-3151
412 Autos for Sale
FORD `07 MUSTANG
63,000 highway
miles, silver, runs
great, $11,500.
negotiable.
570-479-2482
FORD `07
MUSTANG GT
Premium package,
silver, black leather
interior, 5 speed
manual. 20,000
miles. $18,900
(570) 868-3832
FORD ‘02 MUSTANG
GT CONVERTIBLE
Red with black top.
6,500 miles. One
Owner. Excellent
Condition. $18,500
570-760-5833
VITO’S
&
GINO’S
Wanted:
Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Highest
Prices
Paid!!
FREE PICKUP
288-8995
HYUNDAI `04
TIBURON GT
Blue, 5 speed
manual, CD, Air,
factory alarm,
power windows &
locks. 38K.
$7,500 negotiable.
Call 570-540-6236
LEXUS `95 ES 300
Beautiful, mint
condition. Grey with
leather interior. 2
owners.New brakes
rotors & shocks.
Ice cold AC. Fully
loaded. 112K.
Asking $4,900
(347) 452-3650
Mountain Top
WANTED!
ALL
JUNK
CARS!
CA$H
PAID
570-301-3602
MERCEDES BENZ
`74 450 SE
SOLID CAR!
Interior perfect,
exterior very good.
Runs great! New
tires, 68K original
miles.
$5,500 FIRM.
570-905-7389
Ask for Lee
412 Autos for Sale
MAZDA `04 RX-8
Hunter Green,
80,000 miles.
New brakes &
rotors. New
alignment. Two
new rear tires.
No accidents.
PRICE REDUCED
$8,000 or best
offer. For more
information, call
(570) 332-4213
MERCEDES-BENZ
`01 C-240
Loaded, automatic,
AC, heated leather
seats, 4 door.
$4,700
Call 570-388-6535
MERCEDES-BENZ
`05 240C
4Matic, V6 - Gray,
77K highway miles,
Excellent condition,
dealer serviced. Sun
roof, heated seats.
$15,500. Call
570-288-3916
MERCEDES-BENZ
`95 SL 500
Convertible, with
removable hard
top, dark Blue,
camel interior,
Summer Driving
Only, Garage Kept.
Very Good
Condition, No
Accidents. Classy
Car. Price
Reduced!
$13,995
or trade for
SUV or other.
570-388-6669
PONTIAC ‘69 FIREBIRD
400 CONVERTIBLE
Blue/white top &
white interior.
Recent document-
ed frame-off
restoration. Over
$31,000 invested.
will sell $21,500.
570-335-3127
412 Autos for Sale
Rare, Exclusive
Opportunity To
Own...
‘26 FORD
MODEL T
Panel Delivery
100 point
Concours quality
restoration. Red
with black fend-
ers. Never Driven.
0 miles on
restoration.
RARE!
$40,000
$38,000
$36,500
2002 BMW 745i
The Flagship of
the Fleet
New - $87,000
Midnight Emerald
with beige leather
interior. 61K miles.
Mint condition.
Loaded. Garage
Kept. Navigation
Stunning,
Must Sell!
$20,000
$18,600
1993 CADILLAC
ALANTE
2 Door
Convertible
Exquisite Candy
Apple Red black
soft top. 13,000
original miles. All
available options,
including gold
alloy wheels.
Garage Kept. 1
owner. Final
Model Year.
Gorgeous
Automobile!
$31,000
$29,900
$27,900
From an Exotic,
Private Collection
Call 570-650-0278
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
W
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412 Autos for Sale
PONTIAC `06
SOLSTICE
Only 16,000 miles!
Garage kept, 2.4
liter, manual 5
speed transmission,
black, a/c, cd play-
er, leather interior.
Real Nice. Fun Ride.
Asking $16,500
(570) 301-3433
PORSCHE `02
BOXSTER S
Great convertible,
black top, 6 speed
manual transmis-
sion, carbon fiber
dash, leather interi-
or, front & rear
trunk, fast & agile.
$18,000 or best
offer. Call
570-262-2478
SUBARU `02
IMPREZA WRX
Low mileage,
57,000 miles, 5
speed, all-wheel
drive, 4 door, anti-
lock brakes, air
conditioning, air
bags, power locks,
power windows,
power mirrors,
cruise control,
AM/FM radio, CD
changer, rear
defroster, new Blitz
Stainless Exhaust,
AEM Cold Air
Intake, TURBOXS
Blowoff Valve &
Boost Control.
$10,500.
(201) 704-8640
Call before
7:30 pm
TOYOTA `06
AVALON
New tires, new
brakes, Inspected
March 4, AC,
AVPS, Fully
loaded, 18,000
mile bumper to
bumper warranty.
90,000 miles.
$12,900.
(570) 881-3712
TOYOTA `93 MR2
T-top, 5 speed.
AM/FM/CD, AC,
power antenna.
New tires. No rust.
Great condition.
$5,000
(570) 708-0269
after 6:00PM
415 Autos-Antique
& Classic
CADILLAC `80
COUPE DEVILLE
Excellent condition,
$3,000 located in
Hazleton.
570-454-1945 or
561-573-4114
CHEVROLET `68 C10
New 350 motor and
new transmission.
REDUCED TO
$5,000 FIRM
(570) 906-1771
415 Autos-Antique
& Classic
CHEVROLET `72
CHEVELLE
Two door hard top.
307 Motor. Needs
work. Comes with
additional 400 small
block & many parts.
$5,000. Serious
inquires only.
(570) 836-2574
CHEVROLET `76
PICKUP
Very Good
Condition!
Low miles!
$7500. FIRM
570-905-7389
Ask for Lee
CORVETTES
WANTED
1953-1972
Any Condition!
Courteous, Fast
Professional Buyer.
Licensed & Bonded
corvettebuyer.com
1-800-850-3656
FORD `52
COUNTRY SEDAN
CUSTOM LINE
STATION WAGON
V8, automatic,
8 passenger,
3rd seat, good
condition, 2nd
owner. $9,500.
570-579-3517
FORD `66
Mustang Coupe.
Pearl white, pony
interior. Pristine
condition. 26K
miles. $17,000 or
best offer.
(570) 817-6768
LINCOLN `88
TOWN CAR
61,000 original
miles, garage kept,
triple black, leather
interior, carriage
roof, factory wire
wheels, loaded,
excellent condition.
$5,500. Call
Mike 570-237-7660
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
MAZDA `88 RX-7
CONVERTIBLE
1 owner, garage
kept, 65k original
miles, black with
grey leather interior,
all original & never
seen snow. $8,900.
Call 570-237-5119
MERCEDES-BENZ
`73 450SL
Convertible with
removable hard top,
power windows, AM
/FM radio with cas-
sette player, CD
player, automatic, 4
new tires. Cham-
pagne exterior; Ital-
ian red leather inte-
rior inside. Garage
kept, excellent con-
dition. $31,000. Call
825-6272
415 Autos-Antique
& Classic
OLDSMOBILE `68
DELMONT
DRASTICALLY
REDUCED!!
This model only
produced in 1967
& 1968. All
original 45,000
miles, Color
Burgundy, cloth
& vinyl interior,
350 rocket
engine, 2nd
owner. Fender
skirts, always
garaged. Trophy
winner at shows.
Serious inquiries
only, $7,500.
570-690-0727
421 Boats &
Marinas
CUSTOM
CREST 15’
Fiberglass
boat with
trailer. Out-
board propul-
sion. Includes:
2 motors
Erinmade,
“Lark II series”
PRICE
REDUCED!
$2,400
NEGOTI ABLE
570-417-3940
427 Commercial
Trucks &
Equipment
CHEVY ‘08 3500
HD DUMP TRUCK
2WD, automatic.
Only 12,000 miles.
Vehicle in like
new condition.
$21,900.
570-288-4322
FORD ‘99 E350
BUCKET VAN
Triton V8. 2 speed
boom; 92,000miles;
$9999 or best price.
Great condition. Call
570-675-3384 or
570574-7002
439 Motorcycles
HARLEY DAVIDSON
` 06 SOFTTAIL
NIGHTTRAIN
Dark gray metallic,
new rr tire &
brakes, many
extras. $10,900
(570) 592-4982
HARLEY DAVIDSON
‘10 SPORTSTER 1200
A MUST SEE!
Custom Paint.
Only driven under
10 miles!! Asking
$8,900 or best
offer. For info,
call 570-864-2543
or 215-379-1375
439 Motorcycles
HARLEY DAVIDSON
‘03 DYNA WIDE GLIDE
Golden Anniversary.
Silver/Black. New
Tires. Extras. Excel-
lent Condition.
19,000 miles
$12,000 negotiable
570-639-2539
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
SUZUKI `07 C50T
CRUISER
EXCELLENT
CONDITION
Windshield, Bags,
Floorboards,V&H
Pipes, White
walls,Garage Kept.
6K Miles $5,200
(570) 430-0357
SUZUKI ‘04
GSXR 1000CC
Less than 1,000
miles. Team colors
with matching hel-
met & jacket. Fend-
er eliminator kit.
Scorpion exhaust.
$6,000.
Call Dave after 5
pm 570-825-0394
SUZUKI ‘77
GS 750
Needs work.
$1,500
or best offer
570-822-2508
YAMAHA `04 V-STAR
1100 Custom. 5800
miles, light bar,
cobra exhaust,
windshield, many
extras, must sell.
$4,900. Call
570-301-3433
YAMAHA `97 VIRAGO
750cc. 8,000 miles,
saddlebags, wind-
shield, back rest,
Black & Pearl,
Excellent Condition.
Must See. Asking
$2,499. Call after 4.
570-823-9376
YAMAHA ‘07
650 V-STAR
Custom Midnight
Edition. Matted
black finish. Mint
condition. New
tires, inspected,
fully serviced &
ready to ride.
Windshield & sissy
bar. Low miles &
garage kept.
$3,950 or best
offer. Call
570-762-5158
YAMAHA` 08 R1
BEAUTIFUL BIKE
Perfect condition.
3700 miles, new
rear tire, undertail
kit, cover. Price
negotiable $7,800
570-852-9072
442 RVs & Campers
FLAGSTAFF `08
CLASSIC
Super Lite Fifth
Wheel. LCD/DVD
flat screen TV, fire-
place, heated mat-
tress, ceiling fan,
Hide-a-Bed sofa,
outside speakers &
grill, 2 sliders,
aluminum wheels,
water purifier,
awning, microwave
oven, tinted safety
glass windows,
raised panel fridge
& many acces-
sories & options.
Excellent condition,
$22,500.
570-868-6986
SUNLINE `06 SOLARIS
Travel Trailer. 29’,
mint condition, 1
slide out a/c-heat.
Stove, microwave,
fridge, shower
inside & out. Many
more extras.
Reduced. $13,500.
Call 570-842-6735
Wanna make a
speedy sale? Place
your ad today 570-
829-7130.
SUNLITE CAMPER
22 ft. 3 rear bunks,
center bathroom,
kitchen, sofa bed.
Air, Fully self con-
tained. Sleeps 6.
New tires, fridge
awning. $4500.
215-322-9845
TRAVEL TRAILER 33 ft
Rear queen master
bedroom, Walk
thru bathroom.
Center kitchen +
dinette bed. Front
extra large living
room + sofa bed.
Big View windows.
Air, awning, sleeps
6, very clean, will
deliver. Located in
Benton, Pa. $4,900.
215-694-7497
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
BUICK `05
RENDEZVOUS CX
AWD, Fully
loaded, 1 owner,
18,000 miles. 6
cylinder. New
inspection, tires
& brakes. Like
new, inside & out.
$16,900. Call
(570) 540-0975
CHEVR0LET`02
EXPRESS
CONVERSION
VAN
Loaded. Low
miles. Excellent
condition.
$18,900
570-674-3901
CHEVROLET `05
TRAILBLAZER LT
Black/Grey. 18,000
miles. Well
equipped. Includes
On-Star, tow pack-
age, roof rack,
running boards,
remote starter,
extended warranty.
$16,000
(570) 825-7251
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
CHEVROLET `06
SILVERADO 1500
4X4 pickup, extend-
ed cab, 6 1/2 ft.
box, automatic.
Pewter. 48,000
miles. Excellent
condition. $15,000
Negotiable
(570) 954-7461
CHEVROLET `09
EQUINOX LS
Low mileage, 15000
miles, automatic,
all-wheel drive, 4
door, anti-lock
brakes, air condi-
tioning, air bags,
power locks, power
windows, power
mirrors, cruise con-
trol, AM/FM radio,
cassette player, CD
player, keyless
entry, rear de-
froster, rear wind-
shield wiper, tinted
windows. $17,500.
(570) 954-9333
Call after 9:00 a.m.
CHEVROLET `10
SILVERADO 1500
Extended Cab V71
Package 4x4. Bed-
liner. V-8. Red.
Remote start. 6,300
miles $27,000
negotiable
(570) 639-2539
CHEVY `05 EQUINOX
LT (premium pack-
age), 3.4L, 47,000
miles. All wheel
drive, power moon-
roof, windows, locks
& seats. Leather
interior, 6 cd chang-
er, rear folding
seats, keyless entry,
onstar, roof rack,
running boards,
garage kept.
$14,750.
570-362-1910
CHEVY `94 GLADIATOR
Custom Van. 67K
miles. Interior has
oak wood trim, car-
peting, storage
areas, TV, rear seat
convertible to dou-
ble bed, curtains.
Seats 7. Power win-
dows & seats. Cus-
tom lighting on ceil-
ing. New exhaust
system. New rear
tires. Recently
inspected. Excellent
condition. $4,800.
Call 570-655-0530
CHEVY `94 GLADIATOR
Custom Van. 67K
miles. Interior has
oak wood trim, car-
peting, storage
areas, TV, rear seat
convertible to dou-
ble bed, curtains.
Seats 7. Power win-
dows & seats. Cus-
tom lighting on ceil-
ing. New exhaust
system. New rear
tires. Recently
inspected. Excellent
condition. $4,800.
Call 570-655-0530
DODGE `94 DAKOTA
with cap. 1 owner,
garage kept, very
good condition.
Many extras includ-
ing lift & back seat.
29 MPG gas.
$4,000
or best offer
(570) 868-0944
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
DODGE `10
GRAND CARAVAN
Only 17k miles.
Fully loaded.
Excellent condi-
tion. Factory &
extended war-
ranty. $17,995
(570) 690-2806
DODGE `97 RAM
1500 LARAMIE MARK 3
82,000 miles, auto-
matic, chrome step
up and mirrors &
leather interior.
Good Condition.
Drums Area.
$4,500
401-524-9763
FORD `99 E250
Wheelchair Van
78,250 miles. Fully
serviced, new bat-
tery, tires & rods.
Seats 6 or 3 wheel-
chairs. Braun Millen-
nium lift with
remote. Walk up
door. Front & rear
A/C. Power locks &
windows. Excellent
condition. $9,500.
570-237-6375
GMC `99
SUBURBAN
Champagne
exterior,
leather interior,
power windows
& locks, 4 wheel
drive. $4,850.
Call for
condition and
known issues.
570-362-4080
HONDA `03
ODYSSEY
High mileage,
140000 miles,
automatic, front
wheel drive, 4
door, anti-lock
brakes, air condi-
tioning, air bags,
power locks,
power windows,
power mirrors,
AM/FM radio, CD
player, rear
defroster, rear
windshield wiper,
$5,990
(570) 606-4198
INTERNATIONAL ‘95
DUMP TRUCK
Refurbished, rebuilt
engine, transmis-
sion replaced.
Rear-end removed
and relubed. Brand
new 10’ dump. PA
state inspected.
$12,900/best offer.
570-594-1496
KIA `02 SEDONA
EX, Van, Sunroof.
61,000 miles.
Loaded. Good
condition.
$5000 or best offer.
570-606-7654
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
HONDA `10
ODYSSEY
Special Edition.
Maroon, Fully
loaded. Leather
seats. TV/DVD,
navigation, sun roof
plus many other
extras. 3rd seat .
Only 1,900 Miles.
Brand New.
Asking $37,000
(570) 328-0850
JEEP `00
WRANGLER
TJ, Black with grey
interior. 4 cylinder,
5-speed manual
transmission. CD
player, hardtop, full
doors, sound bar.
4” Skyjacker
Suspension lift with
steering stabilizer.
Like new BF
Goodrich 35’s with
Full size spare. Only
85,000 miles.
$6,999
(570) 301-7221
JEEP `02 GRAND
CHEROKEE LAREDO
Triple black, eco-
nomical 6 cylinder.
4x4 select drive.
CD, remote door
opener, power win-
dows & locks,
cruise, tilt wheel.
108k highway miles.
Garage kept. Super
clean inside and out.
No rust. Sale price
$6,895. Scranton.
570-466-2771
Looking for Work?
Tell Employers with
a Classified Ad.
570-829-7130
JEEP `07
WRANGLER X
4x4, stick shift, soft
top. Red exterior,
well maintained,
garage kept. 11,500
miles, one owner.
AC, CD player,
cruise control.
Tow package with
cargo carrier.
Excellent condition.
$18,700
Call 570-822-9680
MERCEDES-BENZ
`99 ML 320
Sunroof, new tires,
115,930 miles
MUST SELL
$7,200 OBO
(570)760-0511
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412 Autos for Sale
542 Logistics/
Transportation
412 Autos for Sale
542 Logistics/
Transportation
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
D on’t w a it for g a sp r ice s
to re a ch $5.00 / g a llon
G e t you r V E SP A now a nd SAV E $$$ a t
TE A M E F F O RT CY CL E
12 80 Sa nsSouciPk w y
H a noverTw p,Pa .1870 6
570 -82 5-4581 w w w .tea m effortcycle.com
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DRIVERS -
CLASS A CDL
Looking for a company
you can retire with?
Looking for more
home/family time?
We offer top pay
and benefits
Weekly home time
and much more
For more details, please call
800-628-7807
and ask for recruiting
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DRIVERS
484-768-1453
Independent contractor
opportunities for
owners/operators with 2002
or newer cargo vans and some
smaller vehicles for distribution
and courier service.
Must have cell phone and GPS.
www.aexdrivers.net
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
MITSUBISHI `95
MONTERO SR 4WD
177,102 miles, auto-
matic, four wheel
drive, 4 door, anti-
lock brakes, air con-
ditioning, air bags,
power locks, power
windows, power
mirrors, power
seats, cruise con-
trol, AM/FM radio,
cassette player, CD
changer, leather
interior, sun roof,
rear defroster, rear
windshield wiper,
new Passed inspec-
tion, new battery.
$2,500
(570) 868-1100
Call after 2:00 p.m.
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
SUZUKI `07 XL-7
56,000 miles,
automatic,
all-wheel drive,
4 door, air condi-
tioning, all power,
CD player, leather
interior, tinted
windows, custom
wheels, $13,000
Call 570-829-8753
Before 5:00 p.m.
TRACTOR
TRAILERS
FREIGHTLINER
’97 MIDROOF
475 CAT & 10
speed transmission.
$12,000
FREIGHTLINER
’99 CONDO
430 Detroit, Super
10 transmission.
Asking $15,000.
‘ 88 FRUEHAUF 45’
with sides. All
aluminum, spread
axle. $6,500.
2 storage trailers.
570-814-4790
TRUCKS FOR SALE
Ford, GMC,
International-Prices
starting at $2,295.
Box Truck, Cab &
Chassis available.
Call U-haul
570-822-5536
460
AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
468 Auto Parts
BEST PRICES
IN THE AREA
CA$H ON THE $POT,
Free Anytime
Pickup
570-301-3602
570-301-3602
CALL US!
TO JUNK
YOUR CAR
472 Auto Services
$ WANTED JUNK $
VEHICLES
LISPI TOWING
We pick up 822-0995
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
506 Administrative/
Clerical
ANSWERING SERVICE
Seeks one part time
position. Evenings
and weekends.
570-208-7705
OFFICE MANAGER/
RECEPTIONIST
For Professional
Engineering Firm.
Communication and
computer skills and
ability to multi task
a must. Please
send resume to
rszat@arriseng.com
506 Administrative/
Clerical
SECRETARIAL
POSITION
Professional firm
seeks reliable part
to full-time secre-
tary with good peo-
ple and organization
skills. Must be pro-
ficient with
Microsoft Word,
Excel and Power-
Point. Photoshop
knowledge a plus.
Starting $10-$12/
hour based on
experience. Full
healthcare benefits
& paid vacation.
Please fax resume
to Nina Ciarla at
570-207-9305 or
email to: nciarla@
facilitydesignltd.com
509 Building/
Construction/
Skilled Trades
CARPENTER
Experienced.
Full time position.
Please forward
resume to:
employment@
ruckno.com or send
to: PO Box 1227
Kingston, Pa 18704
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
CARPENTERS
LABORERS & ROOFERS
Experienced.
Local work. Must
have valid driver’s
license. Apply at
197 Courtdale Ave.
Courtdale, PA 18704
509 Building/
Construction/
Skilled Trades
LABORER
With Heavy Equip-
ment Operator
experience needed
for company spe-
cializing in mobile
crushing operation.
Management expe-
rience a plus. This is
a year round opera-
tion. These posi-
tions involve travel
at a minimum Mon-
day through Friday.
Employer pays hotel
costs & mileage
reimbursement.
3 years experience
needed with operat-
ing any of the fol-
lowing:
• Front End Loader
• Bulldozer
• Grinder Operator
• Hydraulic
Excavator
Employer has
complete health-
care package.
Submit resume to
bgapstone@
yahoo.com
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
515 Creative/Design
LICENSED STYLISTS &
NAIL TECHNICIANS
Needed for new
salon. Experienced.
Spanish-speaking a
plus.
Call 570-606-1701
or 570-328-0948
518 Customer
Support/Client Care
LUBRICATION
DISTRIBUTOR
HAS OPENING FOR
CUSTOMER SERVICE
PERSONNEL
Craft Oil Corpora-
tion is looking for a
p r o f e s s i o n a l
with excellent cus-
tomer service skills.
This is a telephone
intensive position
and requires
strong oral commu-
nication and com-
puter skills.
Applicants must be
dependable, highly
motivated and good
at multi-tasking.
Minimum 3 years
experience in cus-
tomer service.
We offer a competi-
tive starting rate
and full benefit
package including
comprehensive
health benefits and
401k.
Send resume to:
Craft Oil
Corporation
Attn: Human
Resource Dept.
P.O. Box 5066
Avoca, PA 18641
Or Email:
jmcginty@
craftoilcorp.com
No Phone Calls
Please. EOE
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
527 Food Services/
Hospitality
VALLEY COUNTRY
CLUB
in West Hazleton
is seeking
experienced:
SOUS CHEF
Call 570-788-1112
ext. 118 to set up
an interview.
527 Food Services/
Hospitality
Harveys Lake
BAR SERVERS
AND COOKS
Experience
preferred but not
necessary.
Servers must be
18 or older.
Apply in person.
NO PHONE CALLS
Find Your Ideal
Employee! Place an
ad and end the
search!
570-829-7130
ask for an employ-
ment specialist
533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
HEAVY EQUIPMENT
MECHANIC
Local Heavy Equip-
ment Distributorship
is currently accept-
ing applications for
a shop mechanic in
its Service Depart-
ment. Candidates
must have 3-5
years experience
and must have own
tools. Excellent
wage/benefits
package. Qualified
candidates please
call 570-824-9891.
KALINOSKY
LANDSCAPING INC.
Is seeking experi-
enced persons for
Landscape & Main-
tenance positions.
Driver’s License
a must. Please call
570-696-4606
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SHERLOCK HOMES
C21SHERLOCKHOMES.COM
Two offices to serve you better.
Clarks Summit
570-586-1000
1-866-586-2121
Tunkhannock
570-836-3457
1-800-999-4214
HUD HOMES AVAILABLE • FIND AN OPEN HOUSE GO TO NORTHEASTPAHOMES.COM
FREE PRE-APPROVAL CALL CENTURY 21 MORTGAGE 1-888-460-7398
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FACTORYVILLE - Wonderful country
French two story on 10 acres in private
setting. Zodiac quartz counter tops,
tile and wood floors, master bath suite
on first floor, fireplace, landscaped with
stonewalls & 30 ft. waterfall which cas-
cades into a fish pond. Spacious deck,
enclosed porch and stone patio.
$495,000 (MLS#11-1426)
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TUNKHANNOCK - Spacious townhome
with view of the mountains. Buyer can
choose finish if purchased prior to
completion.
$210,000 (MLS#11-108)
TUNKHANNOCK - Building in excel-
lent condition. Open floor plan.
Ideal for many uses. Refurbished
apartment in last two years, 1,853 sq.
ft., tastefully decorated.
$930,000 (MLS#11-1301)
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FALLS - Extensive renovations, new
electrical, plumbing, bathrooms,
floors. It’s a must see property.
Convenient Boro location, walk to el-
ementary school, all services nearby.
Quiet Street.
$139,900 (MLS#11-1632)
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TUNKHANNOCK - Fully rented 6 unit
apartment building in convenient
location. Excellent opportunity for a
positive cash flow.
$325,000 (MLS#10-5490)
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TUNKHANNOCK - Extraordinary ranch
home in private country setting. Open
floor plan. Beautiful views of the End-
less Mountains. Fenced yard, 23x13
enclosed porch, 16x6 front porch, large
private deck, 32x45 room currently used
as a library could be family room or
in-law apartment. A Must See!
$279,500 (MLS#10-2645)
TUNKHANNOCK Excellent property
for warehouse or commercial. Cen-
trally located in Tunkhannock, high
visability, high traffic, loading docks
& auto lifts.
$1,375,000 (MLS#11-932)
TUNKHANNOCK - Ideal for light
manufacturing/warehousing. Con-
venient location to Rt. 6 and Rt. 29.
1.58 acres. 22 foot ceiling heights in
2003 addition of 7,200 sq. ft. building.
$895,000 (MLS#11-1302)
TUNKHANNOCK - Very roomy bi-level
situated on open and level 2.9 acre
lot. Large living room and family
room. 3 bedrooms and 2 ½ baths.
Nice deck overlooking back yard.
$179,900 (MLS#11-1000)
TUNKHANNOCK - Spacious
townhome with view of the moun-
tains. buyer can choose finish if
purchased prior to completion.
$225,000 (MLS#11-159)
MEHOOPANY - New construction. 3
bedroom, 2 bath ranch home in
country development. Full Basement,
2 car built-in garage.
$169,000 (MLS#11-1380)
NOXEN - Comfy, cozy cape cod – ready
to move into – 4 bedrooms, heated
sunroom, heated 2 car garage, stone
patio for BBQS, front porch for rockers,
comes with all appliances and washer
& dryer. Monroe Twp. – Tunkhannock
Schools – Come to the country!
$142,000 (MLS#11-583)
PLYMOUTH - Well maintained, 4
bedroom, comfortable home in
Plymouth Boro. Quiet neighborhood,
large porch, close to schools and
shopping. $36,500 (MLS#11-1350
TUNKHANNOCK - Large home on
private dead end street in Tunkhan-
nock Borough. Double lot with
big yard. Newer kitchen, baths,
roof, paint, electric and oil hot air
furnace. 18x20 detached garage.
$167,000 (MLS#11-1649)
TUNKHANNOCK - Traditional 2 story
on private lot with views. Gas fire-
place in living room and studio, oak
kitchen with breakfast bar, 3 bed-
rooms, 2 ½ baths. nicely landscaped,
tiered deck, oversized 2 car garage.
$219,000 (MLS#11-1469).
REDUCED!
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LAKE ARIEL: The Hideout! Ranch
home with finished lower level. Newer
carpeting and freshly painted in
great shape. Wrap around deck and
other amenities. Bank Foreclosure,
being sold in“As Is” condition.
$114,380 (MLS #11-1757)
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WEST SCRANTON: Bi Level with New
Kitchen on corner lot with oversized
deck. Full finished lower level & 4th
bedroom. Corner gas fireplace.
$169,000 (MLS #11-1314)
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GREEN RIDGE: Location, Location,
Location! Across from Marywood Uni-
versity this 4 Bedroom, 2 Bath has Old
World Charm. Many updates, finished
attic, formal dining room, fireplace &
fenced yard. $240,000 (MLS #10-6155)
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LAKE WINOLA: Beautiful 3 Bed-
room/1.5 bath condo w/ many
updates: granite countertops, tile
flooring, stainless, heating & AC. This
is maintenance free living at its best.
Overlooking the Lake!
$141,900 (MLS #11-1256)
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CLARKS SUMMIT: Lovely Townhome
in great condition. Gas fireplace,
oak kitchen and Neutral Colors...
$199,000 (MLS #10-6029)
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THE HIDEOUT: Great Buy in this 3
bedroom raised ranch with ready to be
finished basement and 1 car garage.
Bank Foreclosure, Being Sold In“As Is’”
Condition. $69,900 (MLS #11-700)
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GREENRIDGE: Great Location! Dou-
ble with 3 and 4 bedrooms, off street
parking and separate utilities. Newer
furnaces and water heater. Fully
Occupied near Marywood University.
$199,000 (MLS #11-422)
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DUNMORE: Joy of Ownership! This
darling 3 BR, 1.5 bath home in the
Bunker Hill Section is a perfect way
to own you own home. Spacious
yard, updated heating system and a
newer roof are just a few of its many
features! $64,500 (MLS #10-2307)
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ABINGTON HEIGHTS SCHOOLS: Well
maintained bi-level, original owner,
central A/C, 3 Bedroom, 2 bath w/
fully finished LL. Fire/police security
system, 2 car built in garage-some
appliances included.
$174,900 (MLS #11-287)
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WEST SCRANTON: Three bedroom,
two bath two story home on a large
lot. Bank Foreclosure, being sold in
“As Is” Condition.
$49,900 (MLS #11-759)
REDUCED!
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NORTH SCRANTON - Duplex &
Single house on one lot with off
street parking. Great for owner oc-
cupant to help pay mortgage. This
3 unit if fully occupied.
$119,900 10-105 C
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WEST SCRANTON - This 3/3 side by side
in the St. Ann Section is in excellent cond.
Offers separate utilities, off street parking,
1 car garage & fenced yard. Perfect for
the owner occupant looking for help
w/ mortgage or an investors dream.
$94,900 10-1708 C
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NORTH SCRANTON - 8 Room, 2 bath
home with rear deck & off street
parking.
$66,000 10-5955
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SCRANTON - Great Investment Op-
portunity! Side by side double. Fully
rented, tenants want to stay! One
year lease just renewed. Huge back-
yard and off street parking.
$55,000 10-444 C
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WAVERLY - 12.19 acres of land off the Waverly exit of I-81.
Water and septic available, three phase electric and
natural gas run along the property.There’s a 50x100
parcel that has been compacted for a building with
underground drainage. High exposure area, property
fronts on three roads. $950,000 08-5540
CLARKS SUMMIT - 11.89 Acres that is completely wooded
& mostly flat. 510 Ft of Road Frontage. Perced and ready
to build on. Great view of Bald Mount. Map available.
$160,000 10-3594
CLARKS SUMMIT - 7.35 Acres of gorgeous land. Abington
Schools. Needs well & septic, land has previous perced.
$155,000 11-769
NEW LISTING
LAKE ARIEL: 7.73 Partially wooded acres with pond.
Western Wayne School District.
$69,900 (MLS #11-1394)
NORTH POCONO SCHOOL DISTRICT - 5 Acre wooded
parcel in Lake Kahagon. Current Perc Test. Acres of
hunting land.
$69,000 10-2294
EYNON - Commercial lot, lightly wooded, high traffic loca-
tion with public utilities.
$39,900 10-5063
WEST SCRANTON - Large residential building lot .72 Acre
(140 x 225). Bring your best offer!
$34,500 11-839
EAST MOUNTAIN: Build your dream home on this quarter
acre lot. Quiet setting in a great neighborhood with paid
sewer hook-up. Beautiful views from a country setting
within city limits.
$32,500 (MLS #10-318)
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548 Medical/Health 548 Medical/Health
Children's Behavioral Health Services, Inc.
is currently looking for:
BEHAVIORAL SPECIALIST
CONSULTANTS
Must have a a Master’s Degree in a Clinical field.
Full-Time Therapeutic
Staff Support Workers
Bachelor’s Degree/Associate Degree in Human
Services. Provide 1:1 interventions & support to
children. Full-time TSS are guaranteed a
minimum of 35 hours per week.
Full-time benefits include:
competitive pay, health insurance,
paid holidays and vacation days.
EOE
If you are outcome oriented and a team player
seeking a challenging opportunity, please send,
fax or e-mail your resume & letter of interest to:
Children’s Behavioral Health Services
Attn: Susan Hurd
104 Woodward Hill Rd., Edwardsville, PA 18704
Email: shurd@cbhsinc.com or fax to 714-7231
542 Logistics/
Transportation
542 Logistics/
Transportation
542 Logistics/
Transportation
North Star Foodservice of PA,
a stable and successful food
distribution organization,
is recruiting for
N th St F d i N th St F d i
Foodservice Delivery Drivers
Candidates will have a valid Class A CDL, 1 year truck driving experience
and clean driving record or 6 months of food and beverage delivery
experience. Candidates must provide a verifiable and consistent work
history, exemplary driving record, and submit to a background screen.
This position involves delivering to multi-unit franchises throughout the
Mid-Atlantic states. North Star Foodservice offers an excellent
compensation and benefits package including 401(k) with company match.
Interested candidates should apply online at
www.usfoodservice.com
under the careers/available opportunities tab, requisition 10002945.
You may also apply in person at
NORTH STAR FOODSERVICE of PA
13 Rutledge Drive, Pittston, PA
EEO/AA/M/F/D/V
$1,500 SIGN-ON BONUS!
®
Find out more or apply to become a valued
Teammate by contacting: John Hart, McClane
People Department by phone: (570) 330-8400,
or email: jfhart@mcclaneco.com
McLane, a $28 billion supply chain services leader,
is looking for qualifed Class A Drivers to become part
of our valued team. McLane’s uniformed drivers are
well recognized and trusted throughout the U.S. for
their knowledge, accuracy, and professionalism.
GET ON THE ROAD
TO SUCCESS!
Do you have what it takes to help drive our team?
• Earn more money with more at-home time
• “We’re here to stay” -as a McLane teammate, you’ll be working in a
stable, secure environment
• Multi-stop deliveries primarily located in Pennsylvania and New Jersey
• Great pay and benefts - $55,000 to $60,000 in the frst year; medical,
dental, vision, life and 401(k)
Class A Drivers
• HS diploma or GED
• Two years driving experience
• Clean driving record and great customer service skills
Requirements:
EOE, M/F/D/V
542 Logistics/
Transportation
542 Logistics/
Transportation
542 Logistics/
Transportation
554 Production/
Operations
554 Production/
Operations
CDL CLASS A
DRIVERS
TIRED OF LONGTRIPS...AWAY FROM HOME AT NIGHT
REINHART FOODSERVICE, LLC
HAS THE CAREER FOR YOU!
$1000.00 SIGN ON BONUS
CDL Class A drivers transport products from our Pittston domicile to
customer locations, conduct pre/post trip inspections, unload cased
products from trailer to desired customer location, and other duties as
assigned. Drivers must be willing to operate a Tracscan unit and be able
to lift and/or move up to 50 pounds frequently and lift and/or move up
to 100 pounds occasionally. Excellent customer service and interperson-
al skills are required.
Drug Free, EEO/AAP/M/F/H/V/D. Reasonable accommodations may
be made to enable individuals with disabilities to perform the essential
function of a position.
Reinhart offers an attractive compensation program, a comprehensive
benefits package including health insurance, eye and dental insurance,
and 401(k), and the opportunity to work in a well-established and
growth-oriented company.
For confidential consideration, apply at www.RFShires.com or
1-877-573-7447. Applications being accepted until May 30, 2011
or until maximum number of applications received.
Machine Operators
Freedom Corrugated is looking for hardwork-
ing, energetic, and reliable people with manu-
facturing experience. If you have what it takes
to perform quality work in a fast-paced envi-
ronment, and want to join an industry leading
company, this just may be the job for you! The
company offers a competitive wage/benefits
package including medical, dental, prescrip-
tion, 401(k), life insurance, profit and gain
sharing.
Qualified applicants may apply in person at the
Luzerne County Careerlink – Hazleton Center
75 North Laurel Center
Hazleton, PA 18201
Applications will only be accepted at the
Careerlink office.
573 Warehouse
ASSISTANT
WAREHOUSE
SUPERVISOR
Plant seeking can-
didate with strong
leadership, organi-
zation and com-
munication skills.
Will work hands-
on to direct and
manage staff for
busy high volume
Logistics depart-
ment. Must have
previous supervi-
sory experience in
a warehouse facil-
ity including all
function of ship-
ping/receiving/
inventory, union
and ISO experi-
ence a plus. Com-
puter literate, abil-
ity to multi-task,
meet deadlines,
attention to detail
a must. Schedule
will be every other
weekend commit-
ment. Full time
with competitive
wage and bene-
fits. Qualified can-
didates please for-
ward resume
WITH SALARY
REQUIREMENTS a
must to:
AEP Industries,
Inc.
Attn: Human
Resources
20 Elmwood Ave.
Mountaintop, PA
18707
Fax 570-474-9257
email:
Lynottm@
aepinc.com
We are a drug-
free workplace
EOE
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
600
FINANCIAL
610 Business
Opportunities
CREATIVE & EXCITING
Paint your own
pottery studio
franchise. Low start
up & local training.
POKE-A-NOSE
POTTERY
Inspiration is Within
Call Jason
570-730-7855 or
email: pnpfranchise
@yahoo.com
FLORAL SHOP
The only shop
in the area!
1,300 sq/ft retail
& 1,300 sq/ft
storage
$63,000
Includes
established sales,
all equipment,
showcases,
inventory &
memberships to
FTD, Tele-Floral &
1-800-FLOWERS.
Willing to train
buyer. Owner
retiring after 25
years in business.
Room for
potential growth.
CALL 570-542-4520
Pictures available.
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INCLASSIFIED!
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A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
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You’re in bussiness
with classified!
JAN-PRO
COMMERCIAL
CLEANING
OF NEPA
Be Your Own
Boss Work Full or
Part time
Accounts available
NOW throughout
Wilkes Barre,
Scranton,
and Hazleton.
We guarantee
$5,000 to
$200,000
in annual billing.
Small investment
We’re ready -
Are you?
For more info
Call 570-824-5774
Janproofnepa.com
630 Money To Loan
“We can erase
your bad credit -
100% GUARAN-
TEED.” Attorneys
for the Federal
Trade Commission
say they’ve never
seen a legitimate
credit repair opera-
tion. No one can
legally remove
accurate and timely
information from
your credit report.
It’s a process that
starts with you and
involves time and a
conscious effort to
pay your debts.
Learn about manag-
ing credit and debt
at ftc. gov/credit. A
message from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
Line up a place to live
in classified!
700
MERCHANDISE
702 Air
Conditioners
AIR CONDITIONER
$40
570-740-1246
AIR CONDITIONER
portable, 10,000
BTU, G.E., excellent
condition. Asking
$150. 829-6417
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INCLASSIFIED!
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in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
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Name:
Edward
Rought
Town:
Wilkes-Barre
Vote for your favorite tattoo at
weekender@theweekender.com.
Please include ‘tattoo contest’ in
subject line of email. Only one vote per
e-mail address will be counted.
The winner will receive a $75 gift
certificate to Marc’s Tattoos.
vote
1
2
3
4
CAROUSEL CLUB
AN UPSCALE GENTLEMAN’S CLUB
OURS IS FREE — NO COVER CHARGE!!
OURS IS FREE — NO COVER CHARGE!! OURS IS FREE — NO COVER CHARGE!!
AN UPSCALE ALL NUDE CLUB
AN UPSCALE ALL NUDE CLUB AN UPSCALE ALL NUDE CLUB
A BYOB CLUB OR
FULL LIQUOR BAR
Rt. 11
West Nanticoke
735-9885
1/2 Mile Past the West
Nanticoke Bridge
WHY PAY $10 — $15 — $20???
WHY PAY $10 — $15 — $20??? WHY PAY $10 — $15 — $20???
• FULL LIQUOR BAR • FREE BACHELOR PARTIES
• FULL LIQUOR BAR • FREE BACHELOR PARTIES • FULL LIQUOR BAR • FREE BACHELOR PARTIES
• ATM MACHINE • POOL TABLE • VIP ROOMS
• ATM MACHINE • POOL TABLE • VIP ROOMS • ATM MACHINE • POOL TABLE • VIP ROOMS
• CHAMPAGNE ROOMS • SNACK BAR • SMOKING PERMITTED
• CHAMPAGNE ROOMS • SNACK BAR • SMOKING PERMITTED • CHAMPAGNE ROOMS • SNACK BAR • SMOKING PERMITTED
• WE’VE GOT THE ACTION — WE’VE GOT THE GIRLS!!
• WE’VE GOT THE ACTION — WE’VE GOT THE GIRLS!! • WE’VE GOT THE ACTION — WE’VE GOT THE GIRLS!!
OPEN 7 DAYS 5 P.M.-2 A.M. • ALSO SUNDAYS
OPEN 7 DAYS 5 P.M.-2 A.M. • ALSO SUNDAYS OPEN 7 DAYS 5 P.M.-2 A.M. • ALSO SUNDAYS
TOTALLY NUDE DANCERS
HIRING DANCERS— NO EXP. — CALL 735-9885 AFTER 5 P.M.
HIRING DANCERS— NO EXP. — CALL 735-9885 AFTER 5 P.M. HIRING DANCERS— NO EXP. — CALL 735-9885 AFTER 5 P.M.
$2
DRAFTS
ALL NITE
$1-2-3
DRINKS
5-7 PM
W
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702 Air
Conditioners
GENE’S
RECONDITIONED
APPLIANCES
60 Day Warranty
Monday-Friday
8:00PM-5:00PM
Saturday
8:00AM-11:00AM
Gateway
Shopping Center
Kingston, PA
(570) 819-1966
MICROWAVE: GE, all
options, with
turntable, excellent
condition. $40.
REFRIGERATOR,
small college size,
good condition $40/
570-675-4383
Wanna make a
speedy sale? Place
your ad today 570-
829-7130.
716 Building
Materials
WINDOWS Re-
placement new 1-
16”x27.5” & 1-
18”x27” white vinyl
double hung insulat-
ed glass 1/2 screen
$65. each. (2)
16”x16” concrete
chimney caps $10.
each.
800
PETS & ANIMALS
815 Dogs
AKC ALASKAN
MALAMUTE PUPPIES!
Very beautiful,
excellent blood-
lines. Family raised.
1st shots, wormed.
$625 each.
Call 570-374-2190
or 570-259-8503
AKC DOBERMAN
PUPPIES
Black/Rust, 5
males, Parents OFA
certified. VWD
cleared, thyroid
done, Ready 5/28.
$600. Approved
homes only. For info
(570) 974-1047
AKC GREAT
PYRENEES PUPS
Both parents calm,
well mannered &
loving. Raised with
children. 1st shots,
wormed, heath
guarantee. $500.
(570) 937-4154
815 Dogs
COCKER SPANIEL
PUPPY FOR SALE
3 months old, with
papers. All shots &
records. Crate
trained. Comes with
crate & all supplies.
$600 or best offer.
(570) 212-2335
DOBERMAN PUPPIES
AKC Puppies.
Black & rust. Veteri-
narian checked.
Tails, due claws &
shots done.
Ready May 10.
570-739-4674
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
ENGLISH SETTER
PUPPIES
Registered. Vet
checked, $350
Ready to go.
570-443-9189
GERMAN SHEPHERD
PUPPIES, AKC
Shepherds By Fanti
25 Yrs. Experience
Family Raised
Black/Tan,
Black/Red. M/F
Hasenborn-Arminus
570-825-5597
570-239-5498
GOLDEN RETRIEVER
& LAB PUPPIES
Yellow $350. Black
$250. Wormed.
570-836-1090
ITALIAN CANE CORSO
Mastiff Puppies
Registered and
ready to go! Parents
on premises. Blue &
blue fawn.
Vet Checked
570-617-4880
POMERANIAN PUPPIES
Parents on premises
Shots Current. $500.
570-401-1838
POMERANIANS
AKC, 10-15 weeks,
All Shots &
wormed. Vet
checked. $350
570-864-2643
SHIH TZU PUPPY
AKC registered
White in color, 5
months old, all
shots,$550, moving
must sell. 954-4656
815 Dogs
S ST T. B . BERNARD ERNARD P PUP UP
ACA. 1 Female.
Wormed & shots
$500
570-274-5099
835 Pets-
Miscellaneous
CHAMELEON cage
(new) with all
accessories. $45.
Call 570-631-6635
9am-5:30pm or
570-283-5958 After
5:30.
SNAKE red tail BOA,
with cage $250.
Python with cage
$275. 570-704-8134
845 Pet Supplies
PET CARRIER, Pet-
mate Pet Taxi
Deluxe, small size,
18” L x 10” H x 10”
W, heavy duty plas-
tic shell with latches
to lift off top, side
ventilation, metal
pinch latch door for
easy opening,
excellent $10. 570-
709-3146 in Laflin.
900
REAL ESTATE
FOR SALE
906 Homes for Sale
Having trouble
paying your mort-
gage? Falling
behind on your
payments? You
may get mail from
people who promise
to forestall your
foreclosure for a fee
in advance. Report
them to the Federal
Trade Commission,
the nation’s con-
sumer protection
agency. Call 1-877-
FTC-HELP or click
on ftc.gov. A mes-
sage from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
FORTY FORT
65 West
Pettebone St.
Beautiful remod-
eled home in nice
neighborhood. 4
bed, 3 bath, new
carpeting new
kitchen, stainless
appliances.
A must see.
PRICE REDUCED
$169,500
Leave Message
570-881-8493
906 Homes for Sale
PARDEESVILLE
738 PARDEESVILLE RD
CORNER LOT
Single family built
in 2005. 2.5 baths,
two story with
attached garage.
Oil furnace with
central air. 90 x
140 corner lot.
Kitchen with cen-
ter cooking island,
dining room,
raised ceiling with
glass door entry &
hardwood floor.
Carpeting thru out
home. Tiled
kitchen and bath.
Kitchen appli-
ances included.
NICELY PRICED
$219,900
(570) 233-1993
To place your
ad call...829-7130
WEST WYOMING
438 Tripp St
SUNDAY
1:00PM-3:00PM
Completely remod-
eled home with
everything new.
New kitchen, baths,
bedrooms, tile
floors, hardwoods,
granite countertops,
all new stainless
steel appliances,
refrigerator, stove,
microwave, dish-
washer, free stand-
ing shower, tub for
two, huge deck,
large yard, excellent
neighborhood
$154,900 (835.00 /
30years/ 5%)
570-654-1490
WEST WYOMING
TOY TOWN SECTION
148 Stites Street
CHARMING
BUNGALOW
$74,500
650 sq. ft.
On corner lot with
2 car garage.
2 bedrooms, 1 bath,
walk up attic & full
heated basement,
hardwood floors
with three season
room. Freshly paint-
ed & move in condi-
tion. 570-446-3254
906 Homes for Sale
WILKES-BARRE
Affordable
Newly built 3
bedroom home.
20-year
no-interest
mortgage.
Must meet
Wyoming Valley
Habitat for
Humanity
eligibility
requirements.
Inquire at
570-820-8002
GET THE WORD OUT
with a Classified Ad.
570-829-7130
909 Income &
Commercial
Properties
PITTSTON
5 UNIT MULTI FAMILY
2 Buildings.
4 Car garage.
Prime location with
over 6,000 sf.
3 New furnaces in
last 2 years.
New roof in ‘08.
Separate utilities.
Close to churches,
parks & town.
Fully rented -
gross income
over $25,000!!
$169,000 OBO
570-563-1261
915 Manufactured
Homes
ASHLEY PARK
Laurel Run & San
Souci Parks, Like
new, several to
choose from,
Financing&Warranty,
facebook.com/
MobileOne.Sales
Call (570)250-2890
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
AVOCA
3 rooms, wall to wall
carpeting, appli-
ances, coin-op laun-
dry, off street park-
ing, security. No
pets. $410/month
(570) 655-1606
BEAR CREEK
New furnished 3
room apartment
Includes water, sep-
tic & most of the
heat. No smoking &
no pets. $750/
month. + security,
references. Could
be unfurnished. Call
(570) 954-1200
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
DALLAS
2 apartments
Modern 1st floor 2
bedroom apartment
& large 2nd floor 3
bedroom apart-
ment. Washer &
dryer. Gas heat. Off
street parking. No
pets. $600 - $690.
Call Joe
570-881-2517
DUPONT
Totally renovated
6 room apartment.
Partially furnished,
brand new fridge/
electric range, elec-
tric washer & dryer.
Brand new custom
draperies, Roman
shades, carpeting /
flooring & energy
efficient furnace &
windows. 2 bed-
room + large attic
loft bedroom with
spacious walk-in
closet, full tiled bath
on 1st floor, Easy
access to I-81,
airport & casino, off
street parking. No
smoking, No pets.
$750 + utilities &
security.
570-762-8265
PERFECTLY
CHARMING
FORTY FORT -
SECOND FLOOR,
Immaculate 4
rooms with appli-
ances, laundry,
porch, parking.
Management pro-
vided, 2 YEAR
SAME RENT $465 +
UTILITIES, NO
PETS/SMOKING/
EMPLOYMENT
APPLICATION
REQUIRED.
AMERICA REALTY
570-288-1422
AMERICA
REALTY
QUALITY COLONIAL
FORTY FORT -
FIRST FLOOR
DUPLEX. UNIQUE
$595 + UTILITIES.
Cook’s kitchen with
built-ins, formal din-
ing room, front/rear
enclosed porches,
custom window
coverings. TWO
YEAR SAME RENT,
NO PETS/SMOK-
ING/EMPLOYMENT
APPLICATION
Managed
AMERICA REALTY
570-288-1422
KINGSTON
2 bedroom, second
floor, off street
parking, stove &
refrigerator.
No Pets.
$520./month
Includes water
(570) 779-1684
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
HUGHESTOWN
4 Room/2 bedroom,
wall to wall carpet,
appliances, wash-
er/dryer hookup, off
street parking,
security, no pets.
$470.570-655-1606
KINGST KINGSTON ON
A A GREA GREAT T PLACE!!! PLACE!!!
LIKE NEW!! LIKE NEW!!
2 bedroom
apartment in
great neighbor-
hood. 2nd floor.
Includes new
kitchen (with new
stove, dishwash-
er & microwave)
& bath w/washer
dryer hookup.
Hardwood
throughout with
ceramic tile in
kitchen and bath.
$695/mo + utili-
ties and security.
No Pets, refer-
ences required.
Call Scott
(570) 823-2431
Ext. 137
KINGSTON
E. WALNUT ST.
Light, bright, 1st
floor, 2 bedrooms,
elevator, carpet-
ed, Security
system. Garage.
Extra storage &
cable TV included.
Laundry facilities.
Heat & hot water
furnished. Fine
neighborhood.
Convenient to bus
& stores. No
pets. References.
Security. Lease.
No smokers
please. $840.
570-287-0900
LARKSVILLE
Very clean, 1st floor
3 Bedroom with
modern bath and
kitchen. New floor-
ing, large closets.
Off Street Parking,
fenced yard. Water
& garbage included.
Tenant pays electric
& gas service.
$575/month. No
pets. One year
lease.
570-760-5573
MOUNTAIN TOP
WOODBRYN
1 & 2 Bedroom,
available
immediately, No
pets. Rents based
on income start
at $395 & $430.
Handicap Accessi-
ble. Equal Housing
Opportunity.
Call 570-474-5010
TTY711
This institution is an
equal opportunity
provider and
employer.
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
NANTICOKE
1st floor, 1 bedroom.
Heat, water,
garbage & sewage
included. Off street
parking. All appli-
ances included.
$530 + security.
Call 570-406-5221
NANTICOKE
353 East Ridge St
1 person apartment.
1st floor. Heat,
water, sewage &
garbage included.
All appliances &
parking. $540/
month. Call
570-301-3170
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
NANTICOKE
Modern 3 room,
wall to wall carpet,
washer/dryer
hookup, fridge &
range. Water
sewer, garbage&
off street parking
included. $430/mo.
No pets. Call
570-735-3479
PLYMOUTH
2 bedroom apt.
Heat, water, stove
& fridge included.
Near bus stop.
$500/mo.
No smoking or
pets. Security &
references
required. Call
(570) 592-2902
WILKES-BARRE
Handicap equipped.
Large 2 bedroom.
Includes electric lift,
oversized doors,
large sit in shower.
Appliances. Heat,
hot water & much
more. Available
immediately. Refer-
ences requested.
Call (570) 417-3299
WILKES-BARRE
Mayflower
Crossing
Apartments
570.822.3968
- Light & bright
open floor plans
- All major
appliances included
- Pets welcome*
- Close to everything
- 24 hour emergency
maintenance
- Short term
leases available
Call TODAY For
AVAILABILITY!!
www.mayflower
crossing.com
Certain Restrictions
Apply*
P
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N E W G IR L S A V A IL A B L E ! N E W G IR L S A V A IL A B L E ! N E W G IR L S A V A IL A B L E !
In Ca ll/ Ou t Ca ll — P rov idin g M a ssa ge, E scort In Ca ll/ Ou t Ca ll — P rov idin g M a ssa ge, E scort
P riv a te D a n ces & Ba chelor P a rties • F L A T R A TE S P riv a te D a n ces & Ba chelor P a rties • F L A T R A TE S
S exy
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570-991-8444 570-991-8444
N OW H IR IN G ! N OW H IR IN G !
FLATRATES AVA ILA B LE! FLATRATES AVA ILA B LE!
2 H O U R S P E C IA L ! 2 H O U R S P E C IA L ! 2 H O U R S P E C IA L !
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675-1245
HE AL T H &
RE L AX AT IO N S PA
T HIS W E E K S S PE C IAL S !
$10 O F F
AN Y M AS S AGE 9 AM - 5 PM
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W IT H C O UPO N
E X P. 5- 11- 11
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14 75 W.MainSt.,Plym outh
P AR K ING IN B ACK &
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D AILY SP E CIAL
1 H our, $40
Tue s 11a m -3p m
30 m in . $2 0
Th ur s 6p m -10p m
30 m in . $2 0
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30 m in . $2 0
NE E D E X TR A CASH !
F L E X IB L E H OUR S!SE R IOUS
INQUIR IE S ONLY!
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539 SPA
539 R e a r Scott Str e e t, W ilk e s-B a r r e
570.82 9.3914 • H our s: 10 a m – 1 a m • Op e n 7 D a ys A W e e k
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L a rge P a rkin g A rea • Open D a ily 9a m -M idn ight
570.852.3429
S w eetCa ndy
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57 0- 7 9 3- 5145
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S UBS C RIBE O N W E BS IT E & GE T GRE AT DE AL S !
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570-815-3398
h ttp ://scr a n ton .m ye scor tp a g e .com
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A L a d y In
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570-970-3971
FOUR FOR ONE! AND
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SHAVE-SHOWER
SHAMPOO-MASSAGE
$40(tax & gratuity not included)
Welcome
7 New
Masseuses!
Welcome
7 New
Masseuses!
G
rand Opening
South Rt. 309
Hazleton
(entrance on
2nd floor)
FREE
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570-861-9027
Spa 21
570-654-5550 570-654-5550
THE THE
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EMPORIUM EMPORIUM
HOURS: HOURS:
MON. THRU SAT. 11 TO 9 MON. THRU SAT. 11 TO 9
SUN. 12 TO 9 SUN. 12 TO 9
I hated weddings as a kid. The old people
would always go up to me and say, ‘You’re
next’. So I started doing the same thing to
them at funerals.
2
7
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1
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Magical Asian Massage
570-540-5333
177 South Market Street, Nanticoke
OPEN:
8:30 A.M.-1 A.M.
Featuring Table Shampoo
$10 OFF 1 HOUR MASSAGE
with this ad. exp. 3/15/11 5/15/2011
to advertise...
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call matt 829.7204
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to advertise...
to advertise...
call john 831.7398
BEAUTIFUL YOUNG
ASIAN GIRLS
Professional
Massage
Open 7 days
9:30 am-11 pm
Fashion Mall
Rt. 6
2
8
2
3
6
8
570-341-5852
SWEET TREATS
In call/out call
Escorts-Massage
Dancers-Fetishes
M4M
570-766-1751
NEPA’S TOP RATED GIRLS!
Now hiring high class men
and women!
New girls and
bi-sexual men available
W
theweekender.com
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941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
IN THE HEART OF WILKES-BARRE
Immediate Occupancy!!
MARTIN D. POPKY APARTMENTS
61 E. Northampton St.
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18701
• Affordable Senior Apartments
• Income Eligibility Required
• Utilities Included! • Low cable rates;
• New appliances; laundry on site;
• Activities!
• Curb side Public Transportation
Please call 570-825-8594
TDD/TTY 800-654-5984
944 Commercial
Properties
944 Commercial
Properties
962 Rooms 962 Rooms
PROVINCIAL TOWER - S. MAIN
Great Commercial Store Front,
& Inside Suites Available
Steps from New Intermodal Hub
& Public Parking
FREE RENT - Call For Details Today!
570-829-1573
Starting at $650
utilities included
WILKES-BARRE
Rooms starting at
Daily $39.99 + tax
Weekly $169.99 + tax
Microwave
Refrigerator
WiFi
HBO
(570) 823-8027
www.casinocountrysideinn.com
info@casinocountrysideinn.com
Bear Creek Township
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971 Vacation &
Resort Properties
971 Vacation &
Resort Properties
BLACK LAKE, NY
NEED A VACATION?
Come relax and enjoy
great fishing & tranquility
at it’s finest.
Housekeeping cottages
on the water with all the
amenities of home.
(315) 375-8962
www.blacklake4fish.com
daveroll@blacklakemarine.com
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
WILKES-BARRE
264 Academy St
2 bedrooms, newly
renovated building.
Washer & dryer.
$600/per month
includes heat, hot
water and parking.
646-712-1286
570-328-9896
570-855-4744
Wilkes-Barre SOUTH
Charming 2 bed-
room, 2nd floor,
duplex, 1 1/2 baths,
laundry room, wall
to wall, stove &
refrigerator. Heat &
Water included.
$575
Call 570-824-4904
WILKES-BARRE SOUTH
SECURE BUILDINGS
1 & 2 bedroom
apartments.
Laundry facility. Off
street parking avail-
able. Starting at
$440. 570-332-5723
944 Commercial
Properties
COMMERCIAL BUILDING
12,000 + square
foot. Forty Fort
60 Dilley Street
Rent with Option
To Buy or For Sale.
Zoned commercial
& Industrial. Ware-
house, offices, 4
bath rooms, huge
storage area.
Available June 1st.
570-881-4993
To place your
ad Call Toll Free
1-800-427-8649
DURYEA
Up to 7,500 SF
Warehouse.
Includes offices and
baths. 20’ ceilings.
3 overhead doors
with loading dock.
Much paved off
street parking.
Reduced to
$800-$2,100/mo.
Call 570-885-5919
COMMERCIAL SPACE
KINGSTON FOR RENT
620 Market St.
Newly Renovated
Prime Space.
1,250 sq. ft.,
Near Kingston
Corners. Great
location for retail or
business office.
Easy Access and
parking. Call Cliff
570-760-3427
OFFICE SPACE
Wyoming 900 Sf.
Utilities included.
Approx 21.5’x40’
$900/month
570-430-4396
944 Commercial
Properties
OFFICE SPACE
239 SCHUYLER AVE,
KINGSTON
2,050 sf office
space. 2nd floor.
Modern, four sep-
arate offices,
large reception
area, break room,
conference room,
private bathroom.
$795 month
+ utilities
Call 706-5628
PLAINS TWP
7 PETHICK DRIVE
OFF RTE. 315
1200 & 700 SF
Office Available.
Reasonable.
570-760-1513
315 PLAZA
1750 & 3200 SF
Retail / Office
Space Available
570-829-1206
947 Garages
GARAGE SPACE
2,500 sf. Zoned
Commercially in
Kingston. Two
over head garage
& entrance
doors. Private
bath. Located on
private road.
Gas Heat.
$875/month +
utilities, security
& references.
570-706-5628
950 Half Doubles
KINGSTON
NEWLY RENOVATED
1st floor. 3 bed-
rooms, 1.5 baths,
new carpet, wash-
er/dryer hook-up,
dishwasher. $650 +
utilities. Call
570-814-3838
KINGSTON
Newly renovated. 2
bedroom. Base-
ment, attic, yard.
$500 + utilities,
security & lease.
Call 570-287-5491
LARKSVILLE
3 bedroom, 1 bath
half double, Freshly
cleaned & painted.
Tenant pays all utili-
ties including sewer.
$550 plus security.
Call (570) 332-5723
950 Half Doubles
KINGSTON
Park Place
Beautiful, 3 bed-
room, 3 floors,
garage, hardwood
floors, full basement
Back yard. $950 +
utilities & security.
Call (570) 762-2878
NANTICOKE
55 Loomis St
3 bedroom, wall
to wall carpet,
full basement &
attic, stove,
fridge & water
included. No
pets. $630
plus security
570-814-1356
PITTSTON 1/2 DOUBLE
2 bedrooms, sun-
room, new bath,
washer/dryer
hookup. No pets.
$580 + utilities &
security, sewer &
garbage included.
Call (570) 655-5156
PITTSTON
3 bedroom, 1 1/2
baths. Wall to wall
carpet, washer
dryer hookup, dish-
washer & stove
included. Off street
parking. $550 +
heat, utilities &
security. Call
570-655-0218
PLYMOUTH
Large 1/2 double, off
street parking &
yard. 2 bedrooms, 1
1/2 baths, $575 +
security. Utilities by
tenant. Call
570-690-6289
WILKES-BARRE/SOUTH
Sunny 3 bedroom,
1/2 double, painted,
w/w carpet, yard,
washer/dryer hook-
up, basement,
stove, refrigerator.
No Pets. Non
Smokers. Credit
check/references.
$525/month + 1 1/2
months security
(201) 232-8328
950 Half Doubles
WEST PITTSTON
197 Fifth Street
2.5 bedroom, 1 bath
fenced yard, gas
heat. Sewer &
garbage included.
No pets, no smok-
ing. $600 + security
Call (570) 655-5549
953Houses for Rent
BACK MOUNTAIN
2 bedroom, 2 bath
home in beautiful
rural setting next to
Friedman Farms.
$1,100 monthly. Call
570-822-2992
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
3 bedroom single
family. 1 1/2 baths.
Driveway, yard, nice
area. $800 + utilities
Call 570-332-5723
HUNLOCK CREEK
Retreat. 3 bed-
room home. 2
baths. Hardwood
floors. 1 car
attached garage. 3
car detached
garage. Pool, hot
tup & appliances
included. $950 +
utilities. Available
Immediately. Call
386-873-1879
LUZERNE
2nd floor, 2 bed-
rooms, living room,
eat-in kitchen, wall
to wall, washer &
dryer. $485 heat
included. Security &
references required
Call 570-288-8012
NANTICOKE
3 bedrooms, 1 1/2
bath single. 1st floor
laundry. Many
extras. All new,
inside and out. Rent
to own. Owner
financing available.
570-817-0601
Leave message
with phone number
WILKES-BARRE
Whole house for
rent. $1300/per
month, utilities
included, Call
845-224-9151
953Houses for Rent
KINGSTON
46 Zerby Ave
Sunday 1pm-3pm
Lease with option
to buy, completely
remodeled, mint,
turn key condition,
3 bedrooms, 1.5
baths, large
closets, with
hardwoods, carpet
& tile floors, new
kitchen and baths,
gas heat, shed,
large yard.
$134,000, seller
will pay closing
costs, $5000 down
and monthly
payments are
$995/month.
WALSH
REAL ESTATE
570-654-1490
MOUNTAINTOP
MIDDLEBURG
3 bedrooms, 1.5
baths, small modu-
lar. Washer/dryer
hookups. Full base-
ment, 1 car garage,
paved driveway, big
yard, shed. Crest-
wood School Dis-
trict. $600 month
plus 1st month, last
month & security.
Includes water &
sewer.
570-474-0388
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
NANTICOKE
Desirable
Lexington Village
Nanticoke, PA
Many ranch style
homes. 2 bedrooms
2 Free Months With
A 2 Year Lease
$795 + electric
SQUARE FOOT RE
MANAGEMENT
866-873-0478
953Houses for Rent
NANTICOKE/WEST
Single family, 2 bed-
room home. 1.5
baths, modern
kitchen with appli-
ances, yard, partial-
ly fenced in. Off
street parking. Next
to park & bus stop.
Includes sewer &
garbage.
$600.00 + utilities
No pets. Security &
references required
Call 570-735-8544
SHAVERTOWN
IMMACULATE
2 bedroom Cape
Cod with eat-in
kitchen, hardwood
floors, gas heat,
detached garage.
$950 month + utili-
ties & security
deposit.
570-675-3178
WILKES-BARRE
Parsons
143 Stucker Ave.
3 Bedroom 1-1/2
Bath. 1,900 square
foot Modern Home
in Great Neighbor-
hood. Includes all
Appliances. Large
fenced in yard with
deck & shed. Off
Street Parking. No
smokers / pets.
$875 / month + utili-
ties. Security, Cred-
it Check & Refer-
ences Required.
570-332-6003
971 Vacation &
Resort Properties
SPRUCE CREEK, PA
30 minutes from
PSU. 300 ft. + of
exclusive fishing,
hunting, 8+ acres,
log cabin, oil heat,
out buildings, pond.
$775,000.
By appointment.
Call (717) 919-9222
WILDWOOD CREST
Ocean front, on the
Beach. 1 bedroom
Condo, pool.
5/6-6/23 $1,250/
week. 06/24 - 9/9
$1,550/week
Call 570-693-3525
1000
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
1093 Excavating
All Types Of
Excavating,
Demolition &
Concrete Work
Large & Small Jobs
FREE ESTIMATES
(570) 760-1497
1135 Hauling &
Trucking
A.S.A.P Hauling
Estate Cleanouts,
Attics, Cellars,
Garages, Fire &
Flood Damage.
Free Estimates,
Same Day
Service!
570-822-4582
1204 Painting &
Wallpaper
A & N PAINTING
Airplane Quality at
Submarine Prices!
Interior/Exterior,
pressure washing,
decks & siding.
Commercial/Resi-
dential. Over 17
years experience!
Free estimates.
Licensed & Insured
570-820-7832
M. PARALI S PAI NTI NG
Int/ Ext. painting,
Power washing.
Professional work
at affordable rates.
Free estimates.
570-288-0733
1204 Painting &
Wallpaper
A.B.C. Professional
Painting
36 Yrs Experience
We Specialize In
New Construction
Residential
Repaints
Comm./Industrial
All Insurance
Claims
Apartments
Interior/Exterior
Spray,Brush, Rolls
WallpaperRemoval
Cabinet Refinish-
ing
Drywall/Finishing
Power Washing
Deck Specialist
Handy Man
FREE ESTIMATES
Larry Neer
570-606-9638
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
1213 Paving &
Excavating
EDWARD’S ALL COUNTY
PAVING & SEAL COATING
3 Generations of
experience.
Celebrating 76
years of Pride &
Tradition!
CALL NOW & Get
The 1st Seal Coat-
ing FREE with
signed contract.
Licensed and
Insured.
Free estimates.
570-474-6329
Lic.# PA021520
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533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
TRUCK MECHANIC
Opening for Experi-
enced full time Truck
Mechanic. Must
Have Own Tools/PA
Class 8 Inspection
License a Plus. We
Offer Top Wages &
Benefits Package.
Call For Interview
and Ask for Jon:
Falzone Towing
Service, Inc.
271 N. Sherman St.
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18702
570-823-2100
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
538 Janitorial/
Cleaning
JANITORIAL/
MAINTENANCE
Full Time.
Apartment building
in Pittston. Position
requires basic
plumbing, electrical,
carpentry & apart-
ment prep skills,
janitorial & ground
maintenance. 24
hour emergency
response.
QUALIFIED
PERSONS PLEASE
CALL 570-602-1684
For Application
or fax resume to
570- 602-1685
542 Logistics/
Transportation
DRIVERS
Local Trucking
Company looking
for OTR/REGIONAL
Tractor Trailer Driver
3 years minimum
experience with
clean MVR. Full time
and part time need-
ed. Medical benefits
after 90 days.
Please call
570-270-5145 or
mail resume to:
J & S Ralston
Trucking, Inc.
8 E. Ann Street
Plains, Pa 18705
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
ROLLBACK DRIVERS
Opening for
Rollback Drivers.
First & Second Shifts
Must Have Good
Driving Record. We
Offer Top Wages &
Benefits Package.
Apply in Person
Falzone’s Towing
Service, Inc.
271 N. Sherman St.,
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18702
570-823-2100
545 Marketing/
Product
PART-TIME MARKETING
In search of a
dynamic person
with great commu-
nication skills and
ability to multi-task.
The successful can-
didate will be punc-
tual, organized, reli-
able, creative, con-
scientious, and per-
sonable. Must have
prior marketing
experience. Must
be a self-starter
with reliable trans-
portation. Computer
skills a must. Will-
ingness to work
Saturdays a must.
Positive attitude and
high energy a must.
Fax resume to
570-822-3446. No
phone calls please.
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
548 Medical/Health
CAREGIVER
Part Time in-home
care for female
adult in Dallas. Must
reside nearby.
Bathing required.
Call 570-675-2539.
548 Medical/Health
DIETARY AIDES
Healthcare Services
Group at Highland
Manor Nursing and
Rehabilitation Center
is currently accept-
ing applications for
part time Dietary
Aides. Also hiring Full
& Part time House-
keeping & Laundry
Aides. Apply in per-
son Monday - Friday
between the hours
of 9am-4pm at:
750 Schooley Ave.
Exeter, PA 18643
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
RN/LPNs
Needed
Maxim Health-
care is looking for
a RN/LPN in the
Greater Wilkes-
Barre area with at
least 1 year of
experience and a
valid CPR card.
Preferred experi-
ence is with adults
and quadriplegics.
- Excellent Pay
- Weekly
Paychecks
- Direct Deposit
- Convenient
Online Training
- Benefits
Contact
Dave or Eric @
570-822-6900
548 Medical/Health
RNS, LPNS, CNAS
Full Time, Part Time,
and Per Diem.
All shifts available.
SOCIAL WORKER
Part Time
UNIT MANAGER
FULL TIME RN
LTC Experience
Preferred.
Apply in person to:
Mountain Top
Senior Care and
Rehabilitation
Center
185 S. Mountain Blvd
Mountain Top, PA.
18707
(570) 474-6377
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
551 Other
LAWN CARE
Looking for some-
one to cut my lawn
in the Back Moun-
tain area every
other week. $20
week. If interested
call 570-239-5226
554 Production/
Operations
DESIGN/PREPRESS
PERSON
Area commercial
printer seeks design/
prepress person for
full-time position.
Should possess
strong design capa-
bility with experi-
ence in MAC, PC &
DTP applications &
an understanding of
prepress, the print-
ing process, and all
aspects of bindery
operation. Must
have a minimum of
2 years education in
graphic design &
advertising, and a
minimum of 5 years
practical experience
in graphic design,
print and bindery
production. Knowl-
edge of the Apogee
workflow a plus.
Must have the ability
to move freely
throughout the
building to gather
information, materi-
als & authorizations.
Competitive salary
and full benefits.
Send resume only
to: Independent
Graphics
P.O. BOX 703,
Pittston, PA 18640
Phone calls will
not be accepted.
Find Your Ideal
Employee! Place an
ad and end the
search!
570-829-7130
ask for an employ-
ment specialist
566 Sales/Retail/
Business
Development
INDEPENDENT
INSURANCE AGENCY
Local Insurance
Agency is looking to
hire a Commercial
Lines Customer
Service Agent to
handle existing book
of business. At
least (3) to 5 years
experience is pre-
ferred, position
available in our
Wilkes-Barre office.
Salary commensu-
rate with experi-
ence, Benefit Pack-
age includes, Health
Benefits, Life Insur-
ance, 20 day PTO
Time & 401k plan.
Please forward
resume to:
Eastern
Insurance Group
Attn: Renee Valenti,
613 Baltimore Drive,
Wilkes-Barre, Pa.
18702.
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
SALES
Can you sell ADS?
For Commission
ONLY? Get a
performance
DRAW, and PAID
Training!!!
Email your great
resume: careers@
adsonaglass.com
Line up a place to live
in classified!
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
Job Seekers are
looking here!
Where's your ad?
570-829-7130 and
ask for an employ-
ment specialist
Line up a place to live
in classified!
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
Over
47,000
people cite the
The Times
Leader as their
primary source
for shopping
information.
*2008 Pulse Research
What Do
You Have
To Sell
Today?
Call 829-7130
to place your ad.
ONLYONE LEADER. ONL NL NNLLL NNNNNLYONE NNNNNNNNNNNNNN LEA LLLE LE LE LE EE LLLLE EEEE DER DD .
timesleader.com
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HAIR STUDIO weekender
thevaultstore.com
AGE: 19 • HOMETOWN: South Abington
STATUS: Happily taken
OCCUPATION: Tour guide
FAVORITEWEEKENDER FEATURE:
Club ads
WHAT WASTHE LAST SONGYOU DOWNLOADED?
“Moment 4 Life Freestyle” by Meek Mill
WHAT IS SOMETHING MOST PEOPLE DON’T
KNOWABOUTYOU?
I was born in Germany
WHAT IS ONETHINGYOU ALWAYS KEEP INYOUR FRIDGE?
Hot Pockets
FOR MORE PHOTOS OF MICHAEL
VISIT US ATTHEWEEKENDER.COM
Photos by Amanda Dittmar
MICHAEL A.
RUFUS II
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CASEY
SAMSEL
AGE: 21 • HOMETOWN: Bloomsburg
STATUS: In a relationship
OCCUPATION: Student
FAVORITEWEEKENDER FEATURE:
Model of the Week
WHAT WASTHE LAST SONGYOU DOWNLOADED?
“Coffee Pot (It’s Time for the Percolator)” by Cajmere
WHAT IS ONETALENTYOUWISHEDYOU POSSESSED?
To drive a monster truck
SHOPPING IN MILAN OR SKIING INTHE ALPS?
Snowboarding in the Alps!
FOR MORE PHOTOS OF CASEY
VISIT US ATTHEWEEKENDER.COM
Photos by Amanda Dittmar
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weekender
thevaultstore.com
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the fnal show.
CFC9
“Concert For A Cause 9: The Final Show” raised
$12,614
FOR THE BIG BROTHERS/BIG SISTERS
ANTI-BULLYING PROGRAM.
This annual event was co-founded by The Times Leader
and The Weekender in 1999.
The 12-year total of
“Concert For Karen/Concert For A Cause” is
$204,544
All monies raised from 1999-2011 were presented
to various local charities
THANK YOU FOR THE SUPPORT
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L.T. VERRASTRO, INC. • IMPORTING BEER DISTRIBUTOR • 1-800-341-1200 • WWW.LTVERRASTRO.COM
LOOK TO PAGE 24 FOR A FULL CINCO DE MAYO PARTY LISTING NEAR YOU!

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