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Lutheran Church—Missouri Synod. Please
pray for them as they begin their ministries.
PRAY FOR OUR GRADUATES
lcms.org/witness
Blessings
Gifts
Challenges
InterpretInG the Contemporary world
may 2011

®
from a lutheran ChrIstIan perspeCtIve
A Special LCMS Report
[
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Make one small change.
See a major impact.
Improve your financial life
Whether you choose to start simple or take a
big first step, you’ll see the benefits really
add up. Thrivent Financial for Lutherans has
been empowering our members to build
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Share your idea and
we’ll make a donation
Complete an online form committing
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201100299
A
t my request, The Lutheran Witness staf has
put together this issue to inform the good folks
of Synod about the fnancial realities that we
face. The funding of this multi-billion-dollar institu-
tion called The Lutheran Church—Missouri Synod is
complex, to say the least. It took me a good fve to six
years working at the International Center before I actu-
ally began to understand it. The frst step in address-
ing a challenge is honesty about its existence and its
probable causes. But this must be done with
an eye on our blessings, which are truly
extraordinary. We are in a defnite
predicament, but it’s hardly all
doom and gloom.
The challenges
The Synod headquarters
is in a fnancial crisis. It is,
however, a very specifc cri-
sis—that is, a lack of undes-
ignated/unrestricted dol-
lars. Years of stopgap mea-
sures and overspending rev-
enues have caught up to us.
Throughout this current fscal
year, Synod headquarters has
functioned with the equivalent
of only eight days worth of unre-
stricted resources on hand, whereas a
minimum of 30 days is where a nonproft of
our size should be functioning. On top of that, Synod
had already borrowed some $11.1 million from funds
designated for other purposes . . . just to operate!
The crisis involves the quickly shrinking pot of
undesignated funding ($19.3 million, down almost
$10 million in the past decade), most of which comes
from districts.
What got us here?
> The Synod has consistently spent every penny it
receives and more.
>There has been a very signifcant yearly reduction
in dollars given by congregations to districts and
districts to Synod. These unrestricted funds are
used to pay the bills for things you can’t easily
raise funds for—like keeping the lights on, main-
taining a system for reconciliation and a hundred
other things.
>LCMS World Mission had consistently overspent its
revenues, such that year by year, millions of unre-
stricted dollars had to be pulled away from other
areas of need. Fan into Flame, while bringing great
blessings, has cost signifcantly more and raised
signifcantly less than projected.
>There has been a very defnite shift in the way
people prefer to give. Donors (individuals, congre-
gations and districts) want to give to very specifc
needs, so it’s harder and harder to fund the basic
operations (i.e., the “plumbing” it takes to get and
keep a missionary in the feld, or a program or
service to the church, like maintaining Synod’s
roster and statistics, or accounting/auditing, or
a Commission on Constitutional Matters, or a
Concordia University System Board).
>Some 26 percent of the unrestricted dollars
received go to service the $20 million in historic
debt of the Concordia University System, including
interest and to subsidize educational operations.
>Theological disagreement and institutional distrust
have afected congregational and district giving.
What’s been done thus far?
>We have signifcantly reduced spending and elimi-
nated (with great pain) close to $2 million in staf-
ing paid for by unrestricted dollars.
Blessings, Gifts and Challenges
lw: from the president
[
Web page: www.lcms.org/president
blog: www.wmltblog.org
> e-mail: president@lcms.org >
26208LW N2-11 Appleton, Wisconsin • Minneapolis, Minnesota • Thrivent.com • 800-THRIVENT (800-847-4836)
Make one small change.
See a major impact.
Improve your financial life
Whether you choose to start simple or take a
big first step, you’ll see the benefits really
add up. Thrivent Financial for Lutherans has
been empowering our members to build
financial security for more than 100 years.
Share your idea and
we’ll make a donation
Complete an online form committing
to do one thing differently and
we’ll donate $1 to a nonprofit financial
literacy organization.
201100299
The frst step
in addressing a
challenge is honesty
about its existence
. . . but this must be
done with an eye
on our blessings.
continued
on page 3
1
lcms.org/
witness

Official periodical of The Lutheran
Church—Missouri Synod
David L. Strand executive director,
communications
James H. Heine executive editor
Adriane Dorr managing editor
Vicky Schaeffer senior designer
Robert Sexton marketing manager,
advertising sales
Jim Stange production coordinator
Carla Dubbelde editorial manager,
district editions
Karen Higgins editorial assistant
Witness
®
staff
Editorial office: 1333 S. Kirkwood Road,
St. Louis, MO 63122-7295
314-996-1202
© 2011 The Lutheran Church—Missouri
Synod. Reproduction of a single article
or column for parish use only does not
require permission of THE LUTHERAN
WITNESS. Such reproductions, however,
should credit THE LUTHERAN WITNESS
as the source. Cover images are not
reproducible without permission. Also,
photos credited to sources outside the
LCMS are not to be copied.
Published 11 times per year by
Concordia Publishing House
3558 S. Jefferson Ave., St. Louis, MO
63118-3968

Individual subscription $22.00 per year.
Organized congregation subscriptions
and district editions offered at reduced
rate if submitted through local churches.
To subscribe, renew, or to give a gift
subscription, call Concordia Publishing
House at 1-800-325-3040.
For subscription information or address
changes, e-mail: magazines@cph.org.
The Lutheran Church—Missouri Synod
1-888-THE LCMS (843-5267)
www.lcms.org
e-mail: lutheran.witness@lcms.org
Member: Associated Church Press
Evangelical Press Association
May 2011 (ISSN: 0024-757X)
Vol. 130, No. 05
Fan into Flame .................9
by Kim Plummer Krull
How much has the campaign
raised and what’s left to go?
The Constancy of Change......4
by Lawrence R. Rast Jr.
The LCMS has suffered from and
survived challenges since its
beginning.
Body and Soul Work ........... 6
by Albert B. Collver/Kim Plummer Krull
Why does caring for others’
spiritual and physical needs go
hand-in-hand?
Righting the Financial Ship
..................................10
by Kim Plummer Krull
Learn how one district got out
of debt and back on budget.
contents
Providing Missouri Synod
laypeople with stories and
information that complement
congregational life, foster personal
growth in faith, and help interpret the
contemporary world from a Lutheran
Christian perspective.
  
®
Cover photo by Rich Abrahamson/
The Fort Collins Coloradoan
TM
The Lord Gives
Christians manage...........12
by Jerald C. Wulf
Why is trust the key to giving?
LCmS agencies ..............14
by Agency Representatives
Interested in what the Synod’s
agencies have to offer you?
LCmS Seminaries............16
by Roland Lovstad
Discover why the Synod’s
seminaries are magnets for
Lutherans worldwide.
LCmS Schools ................18
by William D. Cochran
Has Lutheran education proved
its worth since its Reformation
beginnings?
From the President ............ 1
by Matthew C. Harrison
Learn more about the Synod's bless-
ings, gifts and challenges.
mission Heritage
.................................... 7
by Kim Plummer Krull
Find out why the Synod’s number
of career missionaries has
changed.
You can download a Lutheran Witness widget for your church's (or
your personal) website or blog at www.lcms.org/lutheranwitnesswidget
On behalf of the staf of The Lutheran Witness
and the LCMS Ofce of the President, we thank
for assisting
in funding this special May issue. For Thrivent’s
generosity, we are truly grateful. —The Editor

> Go to lcms.org/witness to download the
full text of this issue.
> Visit lcms.org/reporter for more on
— The church body’s response to the
March 11 earthquake and tsunami
in Japan,
— Why some 2,800 Lutheran educators
spent three days in Cincinnati, and
— Plans for the new Vacation Bible
School program from Concordia
Publishing House.
on the web
Martyria, witness
(1 John 5:7-8)
Diakonia, mercy
(Mark 10:45)
Koinonia, life together
(1 Cor. 1:9)
The Concordia University
System ........................20
by Adriane Dorr
What is unique about the
education the Concordias offer?
Witness, mercy, Life Together
and Restructuring ............23
by Albert B. Collver III
Read more on what the newly
restructured Synod will look like.
The Future Is Here ...........26
by Barbara A. Below
Where does the Synod go
from here?
>We’ve taken action to cease overspending in LCMS World
Mission.
>We have eliminated whole departments and areas of ser-
vice and signifcantly consolidated staf for efciency.
>We are launching the “Koinonia Project” to begin to deal
with the theological issues that have caused us to distrust
each other. We are attempting to lead in a way that does
not divide.
The new structure of the Synod is focused laserlike on
Witness, Mercy, and Life together—the heart and soul of what it
means to be the Church.
The blessings
It’s the devil’s trick to make us think that somehow we
are hurting fnancially or that we don’t have the resources col-
lectively to do what the Church needs to do for the sake of
Christ and His Gospel. This is the Missouri Synod’s worldwide
moment, and together we have the resources to step forward
with the Gospel and Luther’s teaching on the worldwide
platform awaiting our arrival.
>Lutheran Church Extension Fund (LCEF), with only
4 percent of the LCMS participating, manages $2 billion
in investor assets, which are used to provide aford-
able loans to congregations and other LCMS entities.
Thankfully, Synod headquarters has not needed to draw
on its line of credit with LCEF in over two years.
>Concordia Plan Services manages another $3 billion in
retirement and disability assets—kept healthy through
the constant infux of young teachers and pastors.
>Concordia Publishing House (CPH) has the blessing of
$30 million in the bank—revenue due largely to a wildly
successful new hymnal!
>The LCMS Foundation is doing well as it manages the
various fnancial assets entrusted to it by congregations,
organizations and individuals.
>Even as undesignated giving from districts has declined,
folks from those same districts have exploded in pro-
viding designated funds for specifc mission and mercy
needs!
>Through the prudent management of resources, LCMS
World Relief and Human Care is currently operating with
a healthy reserve of over $3 million, afording it fexibil-
ity to address critical needs during turbulent times. The
Synod should strive to operate in the same way.
By the grace of God and for the sake of the mission of
this church, it’s time for us, together, to get our fnancial
house in order. We are working hard at it here in St. Louis.
Will you help? Will you assist your congregation and district
in resolving this challenge? I know you can. I pray you will.
PastorMatthewHarrison
continued
from page 1
3
lcms.org/
witness
“Let’s go!” Mark 1:38 >
from the president

C
limate change, economic collapse, familial
displacement, rapid social change, changing
morals—so chaotic were the circumstances
of life that some began to predict the imminent
end of the world. These were the conditions that
faced our Synod. Were. This situation, which seems
so familiar to us today, was precisely the one into
which C. F. W. Walther and F. C. D. Wyneken, the
frst two presidents of the LCMS, stepped as they
established and led the Synod during uncertain and
challenging times. We could just as easily say that
they are the circumstances that face our Synod
today, for we, too, live in a period of rapid and
somewhat unsettling change.
Blessings and challenges
The Lutheran Church—Missouri Synod ofers
one of the great stories of American Christianity: a
story of blessings and challenges. Founded in 1847
with just 12 pastors and 16 congregations, it was
merely one among many small Lutheran synods
(at least 58 were formed between 1840–1875). Why
did Missouri survive? More pointedly, why did it
thrive?
One key reason was its willingness to engage
its context and apply its confession in creative
ways. What the Synod attempted didn’t always
work according to human standards, and at
other times, it did so in incredibly difcult
circumstances.
Missouri at its beginning was German, and its
outreach was to immigrants. However, by 1911, the
Synod welcomed the English Evangelical Lutheran
Synod of Missouri, Ohio, and Other States into its
structure as the non-geographical “English District.”
Between 1917–1936, more than two-thirds of the
Synod’s congregations moved to using English in
worship.
Even as the Synod shifted its language, it
began to take on some of the characteristics of
an American denomination. As its institutions
fourished, its assets and holdings increased, its
bureaucracy began to expand and more institutions
competed for limited dollars.
The result was a budget shortfall. In 1917,
a group of twelve laymen addressed the Synod’s
$100,000 debt and then continued their eforts,
eventually forming the Lutheran Laymen’s League
(LLL). Their next project was to raise $2.7 million
to fund a pension plan for professional church
workers.
The roaring twenties, however, were a time of
limited numerical growth for the LCMS. The Synod
simultaneously began to accrue a signifcant defcit,
which, by 1928, totaled more than $750,000. But
things were about to get worse.
The LCMS was hit hard by the Great Depression.
Synod’s programs were trimmed, the budget expe-
rienced extreme tension and receipts declined. The
people of the congregations were generous in their
support, but their discretionary spending was lim-
ited. The result was real hardship. Not surprisingly,
congregations struggled to support their pastors,
and many graduates of the seminaries endured
sustained waits for calls into the ministry.
Finally, depression gave way to war, which in
turn gave way to a “baby boom” and a period of
incredible numerical and institutional growth for
the LCMS. The Synod doubled in size. Its bureau-
cracy and budget expanded even more. So fast was
the expansion that the Synod began to experience
stress.
In the 1960s, a new set of fnancial and theo-
logical pressures arose. As some became concerned
over what they perceived were “changes” in theolo-
gy and centralization/bureaucratization, they with-
held their oferings in signifcant enough amounts
to impact the Synod’s budget. In 1962, Synod
lCms history
b y l awr e n c e r . r a s t j r .
4
may 2011
> rev. oliver harms served as president of the
lCms from 1962–1969.
Economic collapse, rapid social
change, troubling finances . . .
is this the LCMS of 1911 or 2011?
The Constancy of Change

5
lcms.org/
witness
Dr. Lawrence R. Rast Jr. (lawrence.rast@ctsfw.edu) is aca-
demic dean of Concordia theological seminary, fort wayne, Ind.
>
adopted the “Faith Forward” efort, but it did not
generate meaningful interest. Even as Synod tried
to trim down, the pointed remarks of an active
missionary told the real story: “Synod says it has no
money. We in the mission felds feel like crying.”
In response, in 1965 the Synod approved a
major “thank ofering” to be held within the next
two years. By January 1966, The Lutheran Witness
reported that President Oliver Harms would soon
proclaim 1967 as the “Ebenezer Year.” The goal of
“Ebenezer” (“Stone of Help” or “Rock of Salvation”
[1 Sam. 7:12]) was to raise at least $40 million.
But Ebenezer was by all accounts a failure. The
1969 convention heard that less than $15 million
had actually been received. As a result, the Synod
had to pare its mission eforts back even further.
Difcult years followed as membership peaked in
1971 and declined in most years since. Still, at the
end of the 1970s, “Forward in Remembrance,” the
largest capital campaign by an American Protestant
church up to that point in time, highlighted how
God had blessed the LCMS.
Today we fnd ourselves again in a challeng-
ing time. Finances are tight. Membership has not
increased as we had hoped as we approach the
500th anniversary of the Reformation in 2017.
Things seem to be changing more quickly than ever.
In the midst of change
Blessings and challenges: That is the way of
history as we move through a world toward a
future that is, humanly speaking, uncertain. But we
have always faced change and will continue to do
so until that absolutely certain day, that fnal day
when our Lord returns and gathers all of His people
to Himself.
In the meantime, we pray to be faithful in the
midst of change. And here the experiences of our
Synod over time—both positive and negative—can
be instructive. The early leaders of our Synod
helped people through difcult periods of transi-
tion. They did so by simultaneously holding fast
and frmly to biblical doctrine as faithfully con-
fessed in the Lutheran Confessions, successfully
interpreting a rapidly changing culture that was
entirely new to them and then providing the vision-
ary leadership to move the Synod forward in vigor-
ous mission and ministry.
The story of the LCMS leads us to rejoice in
God’s faithfulness, even as we have no illusions
about the human challenges before us. However,
as we frame our life together in terms of God’s rich
and abundant grace, we can recognize that God has
given us, through our predecessors, extraordinary
gifts and a capacity beyond anything our parents in
the faith could have dreamed. The challenges are
indeed great. God’s blessings are even greater. 
The Constancy of Change
Oh, save your people and bless your
heritage! Be their shepherd and carry
them forever (Ps. 28:9).
p
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President Oliver Harms presided over the 1967 Synod convention and over the
Ebenezer year.
Ministries (an LCMS Recognized Service
Organization based in Cabot, Pa.) and carried
out by the ELCK, an LCMS partner church.
Through this home-based care program,
more than 400 children have what generous
donors and ministry partners want for every
child—a caring family and the love of Christ.
(Sponsors include individuals, families and
congregations who provide $400 annually
for “their” orphan. Many children still need
sponsors, and gifts of any amount strengthen
general program support.)
At the rescue centers, the children par-
ticipate in Bible and catechism clubs where
they compete to develop dances, chants
and songs based upon Scripture verses and
Luther’s Small Catechism. This happens under
the direction of Rev. David Chuchu, 1001
Orphans project administrator for the ELCK.
While receiving care for their bodies (Mercy),
the children learn the Scriptures and the
Small Catechism (Witness). The entire per-
son, body and soul, is cared for. In addition,
a project designed to take care of the needs
of underprivileged and orphaned children
in Kenya (Mercy) works to build up a Life
Together between the LCMS and the ELCK, as
well as among RSOs, districts and volunteers
within the LCMS.
The 1001 Orphans Project in Kenya
(which is working to expand into other coun-
tries) is not the only example of Mercy fos-
tering Witness and Life Together. In fact, the
goal of all LCMS WR-HC projects is to foster
the three-fold emphasis as the love of Christ
is shared in support of the entire person,
body and soul. 
T
hroughout its history, LCMS World Relief
and Human Care (WR-HC) has cared for
people in body and soul in response to
disasters, hunger, poverty and other needs.
Apart from disasters, some of the best-sup-
ported programs involve the care and help of
children, such as the 1001 Orphans Program.
This program also demonstrates how a proj-
ect focused on Mercy can be integrated with
Witness and Life Together.
Rev. John Fale vividly recalls the faces of
hungry and homeless children from a 2003
trip to Kenya. “Everywhere we looked, we saw
these street children, mostly orphans whose
parents had died from HIV-AIDS,” says Fale,
interim executive director with WR-HC, who
served on a team that trekked to Africa at the
request of the Evangelical Lutheran Church
in Kenya (ELCK). “Many had sufered abuse—
physically, sexually, emotionally.” After this
trip, WR-HC began to work on ways to assist
these Kenyan children in need (Mercy) by
partnering with the ELCK (Life Together).
As the needs of children in Kenya became
known among LCMS members in the United
States, other opportunities for Life Together
emerged. Over the years,
WR-HC has partnered
with North Dakota volun-
teers to open orphan res-
cue centers (or halfway
houses) in Kenya through
Project 24 and start an
orphan support program
in partnership with the
New England District.
In 2009, the Synod’s
mercy arm expanded
orphan care through
1001 Orphans (www.lcms
.org/1001) in partnership
with Concordia Lutheran
Uniquely Equipped for Body
and Soul Work
Go to lcms.org/elckbibleclub to watch students from
the othoro rescue Center recite Luther's Small Catechism.
> 6
may 2011
Mercy
What can I do to help contribute to mercy?
Go to lcms.org/projects
>
a young student at an ELCK school
in Kenya.
p
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w
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h
C read more about our lutheran foundation for mercy
in “theology for mercy,” written by pres. matthew
C. harrison when he was wr-hC executive director.
(request the booklet or download a copy at www.shop
.lcms.org.) to learn more about wr-hC mercy work,
visit www.lcms.org/worldrelief or call 800-248-1930,
ext. 1380.
b y a l b e r t b . c o l lv e r I I I
a n d k I m p l u mme r k r u l l
Witness
Mission Heritage Sets
Stage for Global Reach
7
lcms.org/
witness
What can I do to help contribute to witness?
Go to lcms.org/projects
>
I
n 1971, a peak high of
more than 350 LCMS
missionary families dedi-
cated their lives to serving
the Lord in foreign felds.
Today, 59 such career mis-
sionary families (which
often include both a hus-
band and wife with calls
to serve) work in other
countries. But instead of
focusing on decline, Dr.
Dave Birner (DB), associate
executive director, inter-
national, for LCMS World
Mission, explains to The Lutheran Witness
staf (LW) that those numbers say more about
dramatic changes in our world and how our
church bears witness in the 21st century.
LW:Briefy explain why the Synod’s historic
practice of sending career missionaries into
the feld has changed.
DB:In 1895, the Synod began mission work
in India, our frst foreign mission feld. The
LCMS sent its frst international missionary
50 years after the Synod was established.
That’s worth noting because many of our
partner churches are just now reaching that
50-year mark themselves. It’s around that
time when a church body, with the beneft of
two to three generations of believers, has the
ability to sustain its own missionary force,
which is what we’re seeing today with many
partner churches whose roots are in LCMS
mission work.
LW: Why the decline in the number of career
missionaries over the past 40 years?
DB:A variety of issues have contributed to
the decline, including geopolitical, economic
and cultural factors. The logistics of over-
seas travel (including visa requirements)
and unpredictable world politics have made
it more difcult. The social upheavals of the
1960s and 1970s and the changing role of the
United States abroad made people more reluc-
tant to venture into a hostile world. Refecting
the changing American lifestyle and economic
standards, baby boomers coming of age in the
1970s and 1980s were accus-
tomed to diferent needs and
challenges than their parents
and grandparents who came
out of the Depression and
World War II.
Changes within our
Synod also impacted mis-
sion work. Internal conficts
in the 1970s dramatically
disrupted the mission board
and missionary recruitment.
During the same period, the
Synod made the decision to
grant partner-church status
to a number of church bodies
that began as a result of mis-
sionary work. Those partners
often replaced the work of
missionaries with workers
from their own countries.
Just as the Saxons who
founded our Synod started a
school before they started a
church, the LCMS helps our
As of March 2011, the LCMS
supports 59 international career
missionary families, flling 69 paid
positions (some husband-wife cases).
> 33 clergy
> 1 deaconess
> 4 DCE/DCO
> 8 teachers
> 2 medical missionaries
> 21 laypersons
The team also includes:
>53 international educators
serving in 6 countries in Asia
>80 GEO (globally engaged in
outreach) missionaries serving
1–2 years
>476 individuals served on short-
term teams throughout 2010
>72 individuals served or are
serving in short-term opportunities
during 2010–2011
q u I c k f a c t s
1970 1980 1990 2000 2010
350
300
250
200
150
100
50
0
c a r e e r mI s s I o n a r I e s
to learn more about mission work,
go to lcms.org/missionaries
>
b y k I m p l u mme r k r u l l
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partners put into place ministries to sustain
a believing community with schools, semi-
naries, clinics and other human-care work.
We’ve also seen dramatic increases in
costs to support a missionary family over-
seas—at least $500,000 to support one mis-
sionary family for the frst fve years of mis-
sionary service. We have expenses we didn’t
have in the 1960s and 1970s (health care,
insurance, retirement, children’s education,
etc.), and at the same time, people are giving
less to the church.
LW: In spite of changes and challenges, you
sound enthusiastic about the future of LCMS
mission work. Why?
DB:There are exciting opportunities! We’ve
seen a dramatic increase in the number of
short-term missionaries who supplement the
work of long-term, career missionaries. The
world is more accessible today to our con-
gregations, and they are responding. They
have a mission passion and want to go serve.
But at the same time, we also need more
career missionaries. They are the ones who
invest years to learn language and customs
and become close friends with our partners.
Eventually, those partners build their own
missionary force.
Today, our partner churches are working
shoulder to shoulder with LCMS missionar-
ies around the world. In some countries, our
partner-church missionaries have discovered
a natural afnity for work among a particular
people.
So as we join with our brothers and
sisters who share our Lutheran roots and
church family tree, we are discovering that
a brand new global missionary force is
emerging to meet the needs of the 21st
century world.
God used LCMS missionaries to plant
new church bodies in the last century, and
I believe by doing so that He prepared us.
Now He is placing us within a global body
of believers for mission. And He will use us
powerfully within this expanded multina-
tional missionary force to plant even more
sustainable communities of believers in the
many parts of the world that long for hope
and Good News. 
continued
from page 7
mission work heritage
Kim Plummer Krull (kimkrull@sbcglobal.net) is a member
of st. pauls lutheran Church, des peres, mo.
>
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fan into flame
lCms congregations had a median budget
of $175,000 in 2009.
>
T
he capital fund-raising campaign Fan
into Flame has led to blessings as well
as challenges.
That’s important for LCMS members to
know, says LCMS President Rev. Matthew C.
Harrison, because “in order for us to solve our
fnancial challenges, we must be honest, trans-
parent and clear with the people who provide
the money.”
The campaign, endorsed by the 2004 Synod
convention, seeks to secure $100 million to
further mission work in the United States and
abroad. “The campaign has brought and contin-
ues to bring tremendous blessings,” Harrison
says. “Much is happening around the world for
the sake of the Gospel that would not be occur-
ring without Fan into Flame.”
Through March, the campaign had raised
$63.8 million in cash and pledges. Of that
amount, $44.9 million has been collected in
cash. To achieve the original goal, $36.2 million
still needs to be raised by Reformation Day,
Oct. 31, when the formal campaign ends.
Challenges persist. Fan into Flame was
designed to incur operational costs of no
more than $10 million of its original $100
million goal—the lowest reasonable operational
expense in order to maximize new funds for
work in the mission feld. But those expenses
(which include costs for materials, management
and staf) have exceeded $18.3 million.
The economic recession and additional
operational expenses (not included in the
Fan into
Flame
Update
the Fan into Flame campaign generated
roughly 20,000 gifts.
>
original campaign budget) have contributed to
increased costs.
While some districts chose not to take
part in Fan into Flame, other districts have
been enthusiastic and successful participants.
Another plus: The campaign enabled the Synod
to connect with some 8,000 new donors. “These
are good people who care about the ministry
of the church and simply want the Gospel to go
forth and want to use their gifts to help make
that happen,” Harrison says.
The LCMS president expresses great appre-
ciation for the Synod’s principal gift ofcers,
people who visit with donors and connect them
with giving opportunities. “They believe deeply
in the Gospel and the mission of the church,”
Harrison says of the development staf. “They
operate with complete integrity, and I couldn’t
be more proud of them.”
“We’ve learned a great deal from Fan into
Flame,” Harrison says. “Blessings from those
gifts will continue for years and years to
come—into eternity.” But, he adds, the solu-
tion to the Synod’s fnancial challenges doesn’t
reside at the LCMS International Center in
St. Louis. “The solutions are sitting in the
pews of our churches every Sunday morning,”
he says. “They are the people who want—
and need—to be informed.” 
"The campaign has brought and continues
to bring tremendous blessings."
How much has the
capital campaign
raised, and what's
left to go?
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Rev. Joshua Hollmann (center) moderates a 2008 muslim-Christian public dialogue.
His outreach work for his congregation, ascension, montreal, Canada, and the
SELC District was aided by Fan into Flame gifts.
b y k I m p l u mme r
k r u l l
10
may 2011
district Giving
W
e were spending a lot more than we
were receiving,” says South Wisconsin
District (SWD) President Rev. John
Wille, explaining as simply as possible why
that district had fallen into an operating def-
cit of $880,000 and a capital indebtedness
of $5.5 million when he became president in
2006. Today, the SWD is back on a smoother
fnancial track, operating within a
balanced budget and enthusiasti-
cally reaching out through local
congregations as well as national
LCMS ministries.
In this edited interview with
The Lutheran Witness (LW), Wille
(JW) discusses how his district of
215 congregations and 120,000
baptized members shifted fnan-
cial gears and now touches “more
people and more cultures with the
Gospel than ever before.”
LW:How did the SWD right its fnancial ship?
JW: We locked in austerity measures, elimi-
nating district positions we couldn’t aford.
We changed some of our value system to bet-
ter refect the reason why the district exists:
for the purpose of helping our local parishes
carry out their mission of reaching the lost.
Our capital indebtedness is now $3.5 million.
We have made the commitment to spend only
what the congregations entrust to us. Every
one of those dollars is very precious so we
use them wisely.
LW: One might assume that the SWD, after
going through tough fnancial times, now
holds tightly to fnancial resources and is
reluctant to share beyond the district. How
does the SWD support the Synod and why?
JW:Wesupport the national church, although
not at the level that we once did. We hope
to improve. We have very enthusiastic
support for the Dominican Republic as our
b y k I m p l u mme r k r u l l
Righting the
Financial Ship
foreign mission feld in cooperation with LCMS
World Relief and Human Care (WR–HC), LCMS
World Mission (WM) and Bethesda Lutheran
Communities. Over the past few years, we
have raised over $100,000 in the SWD for work
in the Dominican Republic. It’s exciting. We tell
our congregations that the best way to reach
people is to channel their support through
those who are trained, experienced and who
can see that the work is accomplished.
At the same time, we have been able to
reach more people of various cultures here
in South Wisconsin than ever before. People
may think our district is primarily of German
descent, but Hispanics and immigrants from
Africa, Southeast Asia, China and other coun-
tries live here. Our newest congregation is
the International Lutheran Church of Zion,
made up of immigrants from the Democratic
Republic of the Congo. They worship at
Benediction Lutheran Church in northwest
Milwaukee. Our congregations are our partners
in reaching those cultures here. In those cases,
they are our direct link to accomplishing our
mission of getting out the Word to save the
lost.
LW:How does your district act as the Synod
in the SWD?
JW:It’s easy for us to work here in the SWD,
but we can’t reach out into the world by our-
selves, to the Dominican Republic, to Haiti,
to Thailand and China. That’s where our part-
nership with the LCMS is vital. We are able to
accomplish so much more for the Kingdom
working together than we ever could alone.
[That work] is prayers and dollars, mission
trips and partnerships. I don’t have the exper-
tise to coordinate that mission and tackle the
challenges, for example, in the Dominican
Republic. As Christian people with a heart and
passion for reaching the lost, it is essential
that we work together, that we cooperate and
collaborate. It is what church is about. 
south wisconsin
district president
rev. John wille
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the lCms has 35 districts and roughly 2.3 million members.
there are over 6,000 congregations in the lCms.
>
11
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witness
Increase/(Decrease) Baptized
District Pledge ($) Pledge ($) Percent members
Atlantic 59,500 (1,000) (1.7%) 35,702
Cal-Nev-HA 175,000 (25,000) (12.5%) 44,295
Eastern 73,000 (44,000) (37.6%) 45,906
English 203,000 2,000 1.0% 57,418
Florida/Georgia 258,000 (87,000) (25.2%) 62,450
Illinois-Central 552,000 (76,500) (12. 2%) 70,551
Illinois-Northern 667,274 (45,415) (6.4%) 127,882
Illinois-Southern 249,600 (2,850) (1.1%) 43,005
Indiana 745,000 (95,000) (11.3%) 109,910
Iowa East 143,000 (7,000) (4.7%) 43,210
Iowa West 754,650 (19,350) (2.5%) 62,089
Kansas 543,000 (192,000) (26.1%) 60,251
Michigan 1,883,250 (465,000) (19.8%) 211,216
Mid-South 461,986 (17,054) (3.6%) 28,839
Minn. North 612,136 5,536 0.9% 59,734
Minn. South 1,350,000 (50,000) (3.6%) 127,679
Missouri 560,000 (90,000) (13.8%) 138,631
Montana 134,000 4,000 3.1% 14,493
Nebraska 1,147,500 (27,500) (2.3%) 107,562
New England 117,585 (7,695) (6.1%) 19,030
New Jersey 50,000 9,500 23.5% 14,125
North Dakota 227,868 2,868 1.3% 21,813
Northwest 170,050 (99,450) (36.9%) 65,387
Ohio 308,700 (21,300) (6.5%) 63,550
Oklahoma 200,000 0 0.0% 21,937
Pacifc Southwest 200,000 0 0.0% 99,206
Rocky Mountain 230,000 (30,000) (11.5%) 53,520
SELC 206,000 2,000 1.0% 16,958
South Dakota 310,400 0 0.0% 30,672
Southeastern 490,116 6,410 1.3% 67,241
Southern 131,000 0 0.0% 29,804
Texas 1,711,000 (143,100) (7.7%) 132,988
Wisconsin North 645,000 (255,000) (28.3%) 101,886
Wisconsin South 315,000 0 0.0% 116,773
Wyoming 151,000 10,000 7.1% 13,848
Totals 16,035,615 (1,758,900) (9.9%) 2,312,111
like most lCms districts, the
southeastern district (sed) has
experienced a decline in giving from
congregational budgets during the
economic downturn. But despite fnancial
challenges, sed congregations have
enthusiastically supported the Fan into
Flame campaign. at the same time, the
district continues to increase giving to the
synod, making support for the national
church a stewardship priority.
In this edited interview with The
Lutheran Witness (LW), sed president
rev. Jon t. diefenthaler (JD) discusses
how the district encourages healthy
giving habits in an ailing economy and
how district support for the work of the
national church models stewardship that
God has blessed. the sed includes 206
congregations and nearly 70,000 baptized
members in maryland, delaware, virginia,
north Carolina and south Carolina, plus
washington, d.C. and york County, pa.
LW: despite challenging economic times,
the southeastern district has healthy
giving habits. how have you helped your
district grow in good stewardship?
JD: the sed has experienced a decline
in income received from congregational
budgets during the recessionary period
that began in 2008. But from the
beginning, we made a commitment to
remain faithful to all our commitments to
our new missions and their workers. we
have also made efforts to stay connected
continued
on page 25
Turning
a Corner
What can I do to help? Give to wmlt where
needed most at lcms.org/projects
>
The unrestricted monies that districts send to Synod have been
trending downward for years. Other trends are more diffcult to
chart: (1) Congregations are sending less to districts; (2) Districts are
responding to local opportunities; and (3) Designated gifts to Synod
from individuals and congregations increased substantially through
2007 before beginning to decline. (See the chart on page 13.)
LCMS District Pledges 2011–2012
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district pledge information provided by the
lCms accounting department and Business services.
>
12
may 2011
restricted gifts are funds used only for the purpose
designated by the donor.
>
Giving
I
t is suppertime, and the telephone rings.
With a certain amount of apprehension, you
pick up the receiver. Caller ID does not show
a familiar name, so you wonder, “Which will it
be: a telemarketer, a political poll or an appeal
for monetary support from a charitable
organization?”
Across the phone line comes a plea to help
victims of some disaster or other. The story
pulls at your heart, and when the inevitable
request for a gift is presented to you, usu-
ally proceeded by, “If only you make a dona-
tion, how good you will feel because you have
helped someone in need,” you cannot help
but respond.
But if we only give because it makes us
feel good about ourselves, have we failed to
acknowledge the Source of all things?
It is important for Christians to acknowl-
edge that God is the creator—and owner—of
everything. If you do not believe this important
truth, read Job 41:11, wherein God, as He is
talking to Job, lays claim to all of creation. Or
read Ps. 24:1, where the Psalmist acknowledges
God’s ownership of not only the world, but all
The Lord
Gives.
Christians
Manage.
b y j e r a l d c . wu l f
who dwell therein. Christians must realize that
they are merely stewards, not owners, of the
bounty that our God has bestowed and contin-
ues to bestow on us. The Lord gives. Christians
merely manage. Only when this basic truth is
understood can Christian giving occur.
The most important element of Christian
giving is trust. When we place our Sunday
morning oferings on the altar or when our
member congregations share with their dis-
tricts, we trust that the ofcers will administer
those gifts in a God-pleasing way. So, too, when
our 35 districts send a portion of the resources
that God has entrusted to them to our beloved
Synod, they trust that the ofcers will use those
resources in supporting the ministries and
other activities that have been delegated
to Synod.
The key term is trust. We frst and fore-
most put our “trust in God above all things,”
as the explanation of the First Commandment
bids us. We trust that our congregational lead-
ers, our district leaders and our Synod leaders
have all been selected with the guidance of the
Holy Spirit. When we trust that the Holy Spirit
guides those selections, why are we hesitant to
allow those servants the latitude to administer
our gifts to meet the needs of the ministries
we have decided to do together, as a district or
as the Synod? It is time for us to return to the
Lord, putting our trust in Him, confdent that
He will reward those who are “good and faithful
servants” and will deal appropriately with those
who are not.
> unrestricted gifts are funds the synod can use
where needed most.
Why do we give to the church?
Is it because it makes us feel good or
because everything we have is the Lord’s?
©

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witness
Jerald C. Wulf (jerald.wulf@lcms.org) serves as
the synod’s chief financial officer (Cfo).
>
At the same time, we must realize that at
least a portion of each gift will be used to pay
for utilities, postage and other administrative
needs of the soliciting organization. These
activities are vital to the support of the orga-
nization. This is true for congregations, dis-
tricts and the Synod. The challenge is to be as
efcient as possible so that the administrative
support costs are kept to a minimum.
In the past few years, total giving (both
restricted and unrestricted) to districts and to
the Synod has decreased. While restricted gifts
have been declining, yet they have increased
since the early part of the decade. (That dra-
matic increase in restricted funding—it should
be noted—refects the outpouring of gifts in
response to Hurricane Katrina and the Indian
Ocean tsunami.) Both kinds of giving are need-
ed and certainly welcomed. But church mem-
bers must understand that it is not always in
the best interest of the ministries to receive a
majority of restricted gifts.
Gift restrictions do not allow the fexibility
to address ministry opportunities as needed.
For example, if gifts are donor directed solely
for the relief of victims of the Japanese earth-
quake, but an earthquake occurs in New
Zealand, resources received for Japan cannot
be directed to earthquake relief in New
Zealand. A generous portion of unrestricted
gifts are necessary to allow leaders to address
needs and ministry opportunities as they
occur.
Study the First Article of the Apostles’ Creed
and its explanation. Refect on the Scripture
citations above and consider the many blessings
the Lord has poured out upon you, the greatest
of which is the assurance of the forgiveness of
sins through the life, death and resurrection of
our Lord and Savior, Christ Jesus, who willingly
wore the crown of thorns that we deserved so
that we may wear the crown of life. 
for more, read “funding: what’s at stake?” and
“funding the mission” at lcms.org/witness.
>
Year 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010
30
25
20
15
60
50
40
30
$28.7
$25.6
$24.7
$23.8
$24.1
$21.9
$21.6
$21.6
$20.8
$19.3
$35.4
$31.8
$32
$41.6
$48.8
$59.5
$48.2
$46.8
$44.7
Ecclesiastical Service and Commissions 3%
Supplemental Retirement/Vets of the Cross 1%
KFUO 2%
Black Ministry 1%

Missions 37%
General and
Administrative
13%
Human Care 12%
District and
Congregational Services 11%
Communications 2%
University Education 6%
Synodical Offcers
& Administration
8%
4%
Pastoral Education
Trends of Giving to Synod
LCMS, Inc. Operating Budget 2010–2011
$ in millions
Unrestricted Giving
Restricted Giving
$33.8
Cph's exhibit at the st. louis world's fair in 1904 was
awarded the grand prize for excellence of workmanship
and materials.
lCms agencies
>
From coal-fred steam presses in 1869
to the most advanced digital technology
today, the purpose of Concordia Publishing
House has remained the same: to provide
the churches, schools and homes of The
Lutheran Church—Missouri Synod with
resources that are faithful to the Holy
Scriptures and the Lutheran Confessions.
CPH is the largest and oldest continually
operating Lutheran publishing house in the
world, employing 220 staf and reaching out
across the globe in a variety of languages.
The number of resources that CPH provides
is impressive. From Arch Books to advanced
commentaries, the goal of all resources from
CPH is to proclaim the Good News of Jesus
Christ to the glory of God.
Blessings
• One in Christ—new day school curriculum
with educational technology included.
• PrayNow—the frst Lutheran daily prayer
app for Apple devices (Android coming
soon).
• The Lutheran Study Bible—frst-ever Study
Bible using exclusive Lutheran resources
(in print and digital formats).
Challenges
• Educating people on the dangers of other
publishers’ materials that claim to be
Christ-centered and faithful to Scripture,
but actually are neither.
• Ever-growing demand for our uniquely
Lutheran resources, and responding to
those needs as quickly as possible.

14
may 2011
LCMS Agencies
Since 1965, the LCMS has
entrusted Concordia Plan Services
with administering the Concordia
Plans for LCMS workers and their
families.
Benefts include health, retire-
ment, death and disability plans. A
staf of 110 supports 32,000 work-
ers, 58,000 dependents, 17,000
retirees and 6,000 employers
(congregations, schools, etc.). All
together, the employee beneft trust
funds represent $3.2 billion of
assets under management.
Blessings
• A highly qualifed board dedi-
cated to our mission.
• Strong relationships with Synod
leaders and ministries.
• High participation in beneft
programs.
• New products and services, such
as a retirement savings plan with
match incentives, health cover-
age for seminarians and families,
retirement planning workshops,
wellness programs and fnancial
education.
Challenges
• An increasingly complex regu-
latory environment, including
health-care reform.
• Prudently managing the trusts
in a new economy.
• Educating workers and employers
on the value of collectively par-
ticipating in Synod’s self-funded
beneft plans.
Concordia
Publishing House
Synod's Publisher
Concordia Plan
Services
Synod's Benefits
©

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agency: an instrumentality that the synod
has caused to be formed to further the
synod’s objectives.
>
>
15
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witness
In 1927, Concordia historical Institute was
incorporated into the church to provide for the
preservation of its records.
Concordia Historical Institute
is the Department of Archives and
History of the LCMS. It preserves
the records of the Synod from its
founding to the present and makes
them available to help the church
appreciate God’s blessings and plan
for the future.
Three full-time and eight part-
time Institute employees man-
age and preserve the collections,
answer requests for information
and assist scholars doing research
on the history of Lutheranism in
America.
Blessings
• The Institute is blessed with the
largest collection of resources on
the history of Lutheranism in the
country.
• The Institute has received gen-
erous support from the Synod
and individuals to meet special
needs.
Challenges
• The Institute needs to make the
church more aware of its history
and of the treasures available
in the Institute’s collections.
• The Institute needs ongoing
support to engage adequate staf
and to use current technology
to manage its collection and
provide services to the church.
Since 1958, the LCMS
Foundation has provided expertise
and services to help Christians
plan and direct their passion for
giving to family and ministries of
the church. Through the gift plan-
ning process, individuals make
personalized plans for distributing
their assets both during their life-
time and when the Lord calls them
home.
Each year, the Foundation
processes over $40 million in cur-
rent gifts, prepares $75 million in
future gifts and distributes over
$20 million in matured planned
gifts. The Foundation has 79 full-
time and part-time employees,
manages $900 million in assets and
provides stewardship-based gift
planning training to over 100 indi-
viduals from ministries throughout
the country.
Blessings
• Extensive partnerships in
biblical stewardship-based gift
planning.
• Over $1.2 billion distributed to
ministries since 1958.
• Excellent investment returns.
Challenges
• To help more Christians create
personalized gift plans.
• To equip church professionals
and volunteers with gift-planning
skills.
Be steadfast, immovable, always abound-
ing in the work of the Lord, knowing
that in the Lord your labor is not
in vain (1 Cor. 15:58).
The Lutheran Church Extension
Fund (LCEF) provides funds and
services for ministry expansion and
enrichment. The 200 national and
district staf members are stewards
of a $1.9 billion portfolio with loans
to 3,000 partners supported by
nearly 60,000 investors.
Blessings
• Dedicated investors that help
maintain a strong asset base,
even during tough economic
conditions.
• Organizations and rostered
church workers committed to
conducting their ministry using
LCEF’s loans and services, such
as capital funding, demograph-
ics, architectural expertise and
construction assistance through
Laborers For Christ and NAILS.
• New opportunities to serve
through stewardship education
and school marketing.
• International ministries assisted
by loans and investments, such
as those in Kenya, Latvia, Vietnam
and Brazil.
Challenges
• Responding to the changing needs
of the LCMS and its
members.
• Elevating LCEF’s exposure among
younger members.
• Providing appropriate fnancial
tools and resources to ministries
facing economic difculties.
Lutheran Church
Extension Fund
Synod's Financial
Resource
LCMS
Foundation
Synod's Gifts
Concordia
Historical Institute
Synod's Repository
©

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lCms seminaries
16
may 2011
the campus of Concordia theological seminary, fort
wayne, was designed by the architect of the st. louis
Gateway arch, eero saarinen.
>
What comprises a seminary curriculum?
Pastoral ministry students at the LCMS
seminaries—Concordia Theological Seminary
(CTS), Fort Wayne, and Concordia Seminary
(CSL), St. Louis—can be divided into two
categories: residential and contextual (dis-
tance education). The seminaries also enroll
women in programs leading to deaconess
certifcation. Additional students are enrolled
in graduate programs. Regardless of what
they study, the students receive the same
high-quality instruction from seminary
professors.
The substance of their study is in four
areas: understanding and interpreting
Scripture (exegetical theology), the life and
heritage of the Church (historical theology),
the pastoral care of souls (pastoral theol-
ogy) and Christian doctrine and the Lutheran
Confessions (systematic theology). Plus, stu-
dents apply their learning through feld edu-
cation, cross-cultural and vicarage/internship
experiences in congregational settings.
Residential students attend classes on
campus in the traditional format of higher
education, which usually involves four years
of seminary enrollment. Both seminaries
ofer residential programs in pastoral
ministry and deaconess studies.
Contextual students already are serving
in ministry situations, such as a rural con-
gregation, a specialized parish responsibility
or ethnic ministry. Typically, these students
listen to lectures, participate in discussion
groups and turn in assignments via the
Internet. They meet personally with a
pastor-mentor and attend an annual two-
week course on campus. Both seminaries
ofer distance education for pastors, and
CTS also ofers deaconess studies via
distance education.
What is the cost to educate a
seminarian?
The operating budgets of the two semi-
naries for the fscal year ending June 30,
2010, were $18.5 million at St. Louis and
$11.1 million at Fort Wayne. Of this amount,
about 2 percent (some $374,000 in St. Louis;
$280,000 in Fort Wayne) was provided in
subsidy direct from the LCMS operating
budget. The major sources of income to
the seminaries are tuition, fees and direct
contributions from LCMS congregations and
individual donors.
It would be unfair to attribute all the
operating costs directly to educating a semi-
narian. Faculty, whose salaries and benefts
comprise a signifcant part of the budget,
also teach continuing-education classes in
the feld for pastors and laypeople. They
serve as presenters for district conventions
and pastors conferences, on LCMS commis-
sions, as resources to the church on con-
temporary topics and as authors on subjects
beneftting the church at large.
The seminary campuses also serve a
wider function in the church, hosting church
groups or lending books and materials from
their libraries.
How is the cost worth the outcome?
The most direct answer is that the
care of souls provided by pastors has eter-
nal implications for all who are entrusted
to their care. Dr. Glen Thomas, executive
director of the former Board for Pastoral
Education, says that the seminaries are more
than mere “preacher factories” or “trade
schools for pastors.”
“While our seminaries instruct students
in skills they will utilize in preaching, teach-
ing and many other aspects of pastoral min-
istry, excellent skills must be accompanied
LCMS Seminaries
b y r o l a n d l o v s ta d
What does it take to be an LCMS pastor? And what
makes the seminaries that form those pastors so unique?
MAGNETS FOR
WORLDWIDE
LUTHERANISM
enrollment of deaconess students during 2010–
2011: 39 at fort wayne and 28 at st. louis.
>
photo courtesy Concordia theological
seminary, fort wayne
Concordia seminary, st. louis, was founded
in 1839 in perry County, mo., by a group
of German immigrants.
> 17
lcms.org/
witness
by deep theological knowledge
and understanding, drawn from
and shaped by God’s Word and
the Lutheran Confessions,” says
Thomas.
“When St. Paul writes that an
overseer should be ‘apt to teach’
(1 Tim. 3:2),” he says, “we believe
he implies that a pastor must not
only know ‘how’ to teach, but of
even greater importance, he must
have knowledge and understanding
of the content he is teaching so that
he can apply God’s Word in ways
that are faithful and meaningful.”
Why do the seminaries draw
students from church bodies
worldwide?
The graduate programs of the
LCMS seminaries draw students
from every denominational back-
ground and from the four corners
of the world. International graduate
students cite three reasons
for attending an LCMS seminary:
confessional Lutheran theology,
learned professors who are also
skilled teachers and study that
is relevant to the ministry of the
Church.
The seminaries also ofer inter-
national students the skills to share
that knowledge upon returning
home where they serve in signif-
cant teaching and leadership roles.
International graduates include
seminary professors, heads of
church bodies and executive staf in
partner churches, as well as church
bodies not formally in fellowship
with the LCMS.
Often the presence of these
students helps to develop rela-
tionships between the LCMS and
church bodies that are not partner
churches. Seminary faculty who
serve short- and long-term teaching
assignments in partner churches
and in mission areas where current
and future pastors need theological
instruction also aid in those rela-
tionships.
What is the average debt of a
seminary graduate?
Data compiled by Thomas indi-
cate that the average educational
debt that 2010 seminary graduates
carried into the pastoral ministry
was a little over $32,000. This fg-
ure includes debt incurred during
undergraduate education, a concern
that has led the seminaries to delay
admission for some with exces-
sive incoming debt. Compounding
the concern are cases in which the
applicant’s spouse has also accumu-
lated a large educational debt.
“Our seminaries are working
hard to keep costs down and God’s
people are responding generously
to support our future pastors,”
Thomas adds. “The average amount
of fnancial aid awarded per stu-
dent last year exceeded $15,000 at
both seminaries. We thank the Lord
of the Church for this support. It
demonstrates the high priority we
place upon the preparation of our
future pastors and how thankful we
are for those who desire to serve
our Lord in this special way.” 
Devote yourself to the public reading
of Scripture, to exhortation, to
teaching (1 Tim. 4:13).
Roland Lovstad (roland.lovstad@lcms.org)
is a member of Immanuel lutheran Church,
perryville, mo.
>
Will there be enough LCMS pas-
tors to replace those who will
retire over the next two decades?
The two largest groups of active LCMS
pastors are those 55–59 and 60–65
years old, totaling 36 percent of all
active pastors. While 62 percent of
active LCMS pastors are 50 years old
or older, only 16 percent are under
40. The LCMS clergy roster is heavily
weighted toward the upper end of the
age range, which suggests that the
demand for seminary graduates will
increase in the near future.
What about the demand for pas-
tors over the next two decades?
In recent years, a growing number of
non-calling pastoral vacancies (598 in
February 2011 versus 418 in February
2007), pastors delaying retirement
or serving after they retire and a
devastating economic downturn have
contributed to a shortage of calls for
seminary graduates. While no one can
predict the future demand for pas-
tors with absolute certainty, it seems
likely that the demand for pastors
will sharply increase over the next
two decades and that our seminaries
will need to be prepared to meet that
demand.—Dr. Glen Thomas
©

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Dr. Dien ashley Taylor,
Redeemer Evangelical
Lutheran Church, Bronx, Ny
Q. What is the average teacher’s salary?
A. The average starting salary for a frst-year
teacher in a Lutheran elementary school in 2010
was $28,800. For an experienced teacher with
a bachelor’s degree serving in an elementary
school, the average salary is $32,167. The aver-
age starting salary for a Lutheran high school
teacher in 2010 was $29,000 with the average
for all high school teachers with a bachelor’s
degree being $37,855.
Q. What makes the LCMS parochial school
system unique?
A. The Lutheran Church—Missouri Synod oper-
ates the largest, single-denomination, non-
Catholic, Christian school system in the United
States. While those numbers have declined in
the past decade due to demographic and fnan-
cial issues, the church has been able to maintain
and enhance the quality of her school system.
The large schools are getting larger, and many
are becoming the school of choice in their
neighborhoods.
Averagecostperpupil
Early childhood centers $2,909
Elementary school $6,024
High school $9,960
Averagenumberofattendees
Early childhood center 48
Elementary school 110
High school 187
Q. How have LCMS schools grown over
the last 40 years?
A. There has been a steady growth in the total
number of Lutheran schools, which peaked
at 2,525 schools in 2006. That includes a sig-
nifcant growth in the number of free-standing
early childhood centers, which reached a high
of 1,406 in 2009. In addition, there has been
growth in the number of Lutheran high schools
to a high of 108 in 2009. During the last three
years, the economy has had an impact on the
number of elementary schools. The church has
lost over 100.
Q. How many students are currently
enrolled in school?
A. The 2010–2011 school year saw 243,212
students enrolled in all Lutheran schools. That
number includes 128,351 enrolled in early child-
hood programs, 98,213 enrolled in grades K–8
and 16,648 students enrolled in Lutheran high
schools.
Q. How many schools are currently
in existence?
A. There are currently 2,382 Lutheran schools in
the United States. That number breaks down to
1,393 free-standing early childhood centers, 899
pre-K–8 schools and 90 Lutheran high schools.
Q. How many teachers are there?
A. There are about 16,000 teachers serving the
2,382 Lutheran schools. That number includes
both full- and part-time teachers.
Q. What is the number of rostered
teachers?
A. Of the 16,000 teachers in Lutheran schools,
6,000 of those are on the roster of The Lutheran
Church—Missouri Synod. An additional 3,800
are non-rostered Lutheran teachers.
18
may 2011
59 percent of lCms congregations operate
schools and centers.
> In the 2010–2011 school year, 36,556 students
are enrolled in before- or after-school care.
>
A Snapshot of LCMS
Pre-K–12 Education
b y wI l l I a m d . c o c h r a n
lCms schools
21
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witness
William D. Cochran (william.cochran@lcms.org)
is the synod's director of school ministry.
>
EthnicityofstudentsinLCMSschools
Caucasian 82 percent
Black 7 percent
Hispanic 5 percent
Asian 3 percent
Other 3 percent
Student–churchafliation
LCMS operating congregation 39 percent
Non-Lutheran church 36 percent
Un-churched 17 percent
Other LCMS congregation 5 percent
Other Lutheran church 3 percent
Topfveschoolsbyenrollment
Faith Lutheran—Las Vegas, Nev.
Lutheran High of Orange—Orange, Calif.
Prince of Peace Christian—Carollton, Texas
Rockford Lutheran—Rockford, Ill.
St. John's Lutheran—Orange, Calif.
[Martin] Luther [and his co-worker Philipp] Melancthon developed
the principles that underlay the Evangelical educational reforms of
the sixteenth century, and their ideas still inform Lutheran education
today. Although Luther was the leader of the education reforms at
Wittenberg in 1518 and had a very clear vision of the purpose and
content of education, he was not the primary force in the reform
of education in sixteenth-century Germany. When Luther became
preoccupied with religious affairs after 1518, Melancthon assumed
the leadership of education reform, and was so infuential that his
contemporaries dubbed him praeceptor Germanieae, or “teacher
of Germany.”
Melancthon stressed the importance of . . . subjects, such
as language, rhetoric, history, dialectic, and poetry, but he also
emphasized the value of moral philosophy, natural philosophy, and
mathematics (especially arithmetic, geometry, and astronomy). All
of these subjects led students to a greater understanding of God’s
creation, and thus indirectly to a greater understanding of divine will,
of God’s law. Such understanding could not but help students to
develop a greater insight into the condition of man, which would lead
them to the Gospel.
Lutheran education has proved its worth over the centuries.
Lutheran education retains the Scriptures at its heart, but also
teaches students about the world in which they live. Lutheran
education today still makes a connection between faith and learning,
a connection that Luther and Melancthon instilled in education. An
active faith is an educated one; learning should help students to build
character as well as to develop knowledge and skills; to serve well in
the world, Christians need to know something about the world and
its people. These were worthy goals in the sixteenth century. They
remain worthy goals in the twenty-frst century. Thus, the mission
of Lutheran education in the twenty-frst century is . . . the same as
it was in the sixteenth century: to help students to develop in mind,
body and spirit for service to Christ in the Church and in the world.
By Susan Mobley, “Historical Foundations in the Lutheran Reformation,”
in Learning at the Foot of the Cross: A Lutheran Vision for Education, ed. Joel
D. Heck and Angus J. L. Menuge (Austin: Concordia University Press, 2011).
To order this new resource on Lutheran education, go to
www.concordia.edu and search for “Concordia University Press.”
by Susan Mobley
The fear of the Lord is the
beginning of knowledge
(Prov. 1:7).
Historical Foundations
in Lutheran Education
photo courtesy st. paul
lutheran school, des peres, mo
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Concordia university system
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The Concordia University
System (CUS)
Q. What is the current number of students
enrolled in a church vocation, and how
does that compare to past years?
2010 1,954
2009 1,900
2008 2,034
2007 2,237
2006 2,406
Five church-work professional programs saw
increased enrollment in the 2010–2011 aca-
demic year: pre-seminary, teacher, director of
Christian outreach, deaconess, and director
of parish music.
Concordia College, selma, recently began a 35-acre
expansion, doubling the campus's current size.
> the inaugural class of 71 students began at
the pharmacy school at Concordia university
wisconsin in september 2010. 
>
Q. WhatistheConcordiaUniversity
System(CUS)?
The CUS consists of:
Ten colleges and universities
27,000 students
Over 2,000 full- and part-time faculty
Over 200 programs of study
One solid foundation, God’s Word, for a
Christ-centered educational environment 
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> Concordia university, portland, projects
fall 2011 for the completion of the new
law school building in Boise, Id.
21
lcms.org/
witness
Q. What do the 2010–2011 CUS
enrollment numbers look like?
This has been a record-breaking
year for many of the Concordias.
Selma posted one of its highest
student enrollments—a 10 per-
cent increase over last year—and
Seward’s total enrollment for fall
2010 was the largest in its 117-year
history.
Mequon, WI 7,485
River Forest, IL 5,223
Irvine, CA 2,969
St. Paul, MN 2,842
Austin, TX 2,573
Seward, NE 2,146
Portland, OR 2,114
Bronxville, NY 777
Ann Arbor, MI 668
Selma, AL 657

For no one can lay a foundation other
than that which is laid, which is
Jesus Christ (1 Cor. 3:11).
2006 2007 2008 2009 2010
30,000
25,000
20,000
20,091
21,839
23,318
25,516
27,454 For 18 consecutive
years, enrollment has
increased at a pace
of fve to seven percent.
The church vocation
student count for 2010
is up 54 students from
2009.
Q. Istherefnancialaidavail-
abletochurch-workstudents?
A. Each of the ten campuses, in
addition to the national ofce of
CUS, raises funds to provide fnan-
cial aid to students. In the 2009–10
academic year, the CUS ofered
more than $88 million in fnancial
aid to students. While individual
awards will vary, the average fnan-
cial aid package for church-work
students was $10,615 in that same
year.
Q. AretheConcordiasrecog-
nizedoutsideoftheLCMSfor
thequalityoftheeducation
theyprovide?
A. For the 11th consecutive year,
all 10 of the Concordia colleges/
universities were included in the
annual rankings of “America’s Best
Colleges” by U.S. News & World
Report.
Q.Howdoindividualsprepare
toserveaschurch-work
professionals?
A. God prepares future workers for
the church through a process that
usually starts in the home, contin-
ues in the local congregation and
culminates in centers of higher
education, the church’s colleges/
universities or the seminaries.
Serving as church professionals,
the workers model the joy of shar-
ing the love of Jesus Christ though
uplifting words and actions. CUS
programming options prepare
pastors, teachers, deaconesses,
directors of Christian education,
Christian outreach, family life
ministry, parish music, and lay
ministers.
(CUS) Headcount
> for additional information, please visit us
at www.lcms.org/universities or email
cus.info@lcms.org
22
may 2011
Q. WhatmakestheConcordia
UniversitySystem(CUS)unique?
A. The Concordias are distinct because
they provide a Christ-centered, Lutheran,
foundational education.
Q. Why is the CUS so important in the
training of church workers?
A. I believe these colleges are capable of
infuencing the world. Not only are there
numerous pastors and other church work-
ers who have gone through one of the
Concordias, but also many who now serve
as lay leaders—engineers, doctors, lawyers,
architects, communication and art direc-
tors and small business owners. And now
they are using the gifts that God has given
them to serve Him.
Q. What challenges does the CUS
face?
A. Some of our schools have struggled
both in terms of fnances and leadership.
But we mustn’t lose sight of the fact that
we’re also in a battle. We’re fghting Satan.
By the grace of God, however, things
are turning around. Capable leaders are
now heading these institutions and more
people are recognizing the value of our
Concordias. They are gems we just can’t
let go.
A CUS Q&A wi th Dr. Davi d Mai er
Q. What does the CUS do for the
church?
A. Eternity is important. Kids vary in
terms of their spiritual maturity. But when
they get their foundational religion and
doctrine classes at a Concordia, they’re
enlightened and inspired. They’re strength-
ened. They’re equipped to go into so many
felds, enabled to see what’s wrong and
right, to stand for truth and live in respect-
ful awe of the grand design of an awesome
God.
Q. How can LCMS members encourage
students to consider a Concordia?
A. It takes parishioners and professional
church workers praying that we take these
particular gifts of God—students and our
colleges—seriously. God will answer, for
He is far more willing to give than we are
to receive. Everyone can do something.
We should be continually talking about our
Concordias, taking our youth on trips to
a Concordia. Ask, “Have you ever consid-
ered . . . ?” Highlight the eternal diference
young people can make with the Jesus who
is for them, in them and works through
them. If it’s in church work, great. If not,
that’s great too. No matter what, God is
ready to use and bless all His children.
—A.D.
> Pray regularly for the Lord to
send workers into His harvest,
as well as for those who serve in
congregations, schools, missions
and other ministries. 
> Keep professional church-work
professions, Synod schools, and
the need for more workers con-
stantly before the eyes of the
congregation.
> Ofer opportunities for both
youth and potential second-
career church-work students
to participate actively in the
life of the church.
[The Concordias]
are gems we just
can't let go.
—President David Maier,
Michigan District
> Help students attending non-
Lutheran colleges make contact
with campus pastors and nearby
Lutheran churches. Provide an
intentional efort to stay in touch
with them.
> Invite former members who have
entered full-time church work
to return to your congregation
to speak or meet with interested
youth and adults.
> Visit www.whataway.org or blog
.whataway.org for more informa-
tion on church-work programs.
How can I encourage a young person
to consider church work?
Concordia university system
> adriane Dorr (adriane.dorr@lcms.org) is the
managing editor of The Lutheran Witness.
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witness
a
mong the blessings, gifts and
challenges that our Synod faces
is the task of restructuring.
With the passing of Res. 8–08A at
the Synod’s convention in July 2010,
the Synod decided to create a more
fexible organization by aligning its
work around two mission boards.
The President’s Ofce was given the
monumental task of (1) continuing
existing activities throughout the
world and (2) consolidating the for-
mer seven program boards and six
commissions around the Board for
National Mission and the Board for
International Mission.
The job of restructuring an
organization that has a total budget
between $72 million (2011–2012)
and $87 million (just over a decade
ago) presents many challenges. At
the same time, the Lord provides
blessings and gifts in the restruc-
turing, one of which is seeing the
restructuring through the lens of
Witness, Mercy, and Life together.
The internal structure of the
national ofce of The Lutheran
Church—Missouri Synod is not of
interest in and of itself but only in
its role in service to the work of the
church. According to the Augsburg
Confession, Article 7, the church is
the “congregation of saints in which
the Gospel is purely taught and the
Sacraments are correctly adminis-
tered.” Christ’s church is primarily
about gathering sinners around the
preached Word and the Sacraments
of Holy Absolution, Holy Baptism
and Holy Communion for the for-
giveness of sins.
restructuring
• International
Evangelistic
Outreach
• International
Church Planting
and Development
• International
Theological
Education
• International
Schools
• Military Chaplaincy

Mercy
(Mark 10:45)
Witness
(1 John 5:7–8)
• Mercy Care and
Community
Development
around the World
• Disaster Response
and Recovery
• Mercy Medical
Teams
• Sanctity of Life
• National Housing
• Institutional
Chaplaincy
• Veterans/Soldiers
of the Cross
Life
Together
(1 Cor. 1:9)
• Lutheran Day
Schools/Early
Childhood
• Stewardship
• Youth
• Worship
• Pastoral Education
• RSO Granting and
Management
• Parish Nursing
• Revitalizing/
Strengthening
Congregations
for Outreach
• National Outreach
and Church
Planting
• Black, Hispanic,
and Ethnic
Congregational
Outreach and
Support
• Communications
• Fund Development
• Partner Church
Relations
• Rural/Small Town
Outreach
b y a l b e r t b . c o l lv e r I I I
> to download a word study on witness, mercy,
life together, go to www.lcms.org/emphasis
Witness, Mercy,
Life Together and
Restructuring
That is the emphasis of Witness (martyria).
Once there are two or three believers, the church
has a Life together (koinonia). When individual
Christians or the body of Christ sees the neigh-
bor in need, the love of Christ and faith produce
works of Mercy (diakonia). The activities of the
church can thus be described as Witness (mar-
tyria), Mercy (diakonia), Life Together (koinonia).
With this in mind, President Harrison asked
his staf and the Restructuring Work Group to
develop a structure for the national ofce mod-
eled after the threefold emphasis. This structure
not only refects the three important emphases
for today’s church but also echoes the operation
of the frst-century church as described by Paul
in Gal. 2:7, 9–10. “On the contrary, when they
saw I had been entrusted with the Gospel to the
uncircumcised, just as Peter had been entrusted
with the Gospel to the circumcised . . . And
when James and Cephas and John, who seemed
to be pillars, perceived the grace that was given
to me, they gave the right hand of fellowship
to Barnabas and me, that we should go to the
Gentiles and they to the circumcised. Only, they
asked us to remember the poor, the very thing
I was eager to do.” The apostles proclaimed the
Gospel (Witness). The apostles extended the right
hand of fellowship to each other (Life Together).
The apostles remembered the poor (Mercy).
The basic premise of the new structure is to
take the work formerly done by the seven pro-
gram boards and six commissions and to orga-
nize it into the three basic categories: Witness,
Mercy, Life Together. The chart on the previous
page shows the basic activity for each area. The
Witness (martyria) area focuses on activities
centered on the preaching of the Lord’s Word
24
may 2011
Know that the Lord, He is God!
It is He who made us, and we
are His; we are His people,
and the sheep of His pasture
(Ps. 100:3).
and the administration of the Sacraments. The
Mercy (diakonia) area centers on human care
and compassion. The Life Together (koinonia)
includes aspects of the church’s life that help
and support the church’s work of Witness and
Mercy.
While not included as “program areas”
operated by the President’s Ofce through the
Chief Mission Ofcer (CMO), conceptually, the
Concordia University System, the seminaries,
the various commissions (e.g., the Commission
on Constitution Matters [CCM], the Commission
on Structure, the Commission on Handbook, the
Commission on Church Relations and Church
Theology [CTCR] and so on) are a part of our Life
Together, as is communications, fund develop-
ment and partner-church relations.
The structure of the LCMS as seen through
the lens of Witness, Mercy, Life Together helps
every person who serves the church fnd a place
where he or she can contribute according to his
or her position and vocation. It helps us keep our
attention on the work of the church while we live
and exist in this world of budgets, organizational
charts and all the other necessary items that
go along with being a church whose legal exis-
tence is as a nonproft corporation in the state
of Missouri. It helps us keep a churchly, biblical
focus.
The threefold emphasis of Witness, Mercy,
Life Together is scalable from the Synod at large,
to districts, to congregations and even to the
individual as we live out our daily Witness, show
Mercy to our neighbor, and have a Life Together
in Christ under His cross of forgiveness. 
> Dr. albert B. Collver III (al.collver@lcms.org) is
the director of church relations and assistant to lCms
president rev. matthew C. harrison.
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The LCmS President’s Office established a Restructuring Work Group
to assist in the restructuring efforts mandated by the 2010 LCmS convention.
From left to right, myron Koehn, executive director, LCmS Information
Technology; albert Dowbnia, communications director, LCmS World Relief and
Human Care; Travis Torblaa, personnel-care manager, LCmS World mission.
Standing, restructuring consultant Jim Lowitzer of Collierville, Tenn.
25
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witness
©2011 Concordia Publishing House Printed in the USA 512117-08
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to our congregations and their leaders. since last fall, we have
offered to conduct an “sed sunday” in any district congregation
to let the people in the pew know about the ways the mission
continues to move forward throughout our district. we don’t ask
for money. we thank congregations for their support. nearly 90
of our congregations have taken us up on this offer so far, and we
expect more will do so. we are also looking for some good ways
to conduct an sed “stewardship renaissance.”
LW: It can be tempting to keep gifts close to home. How has the
district encouraged fnancial support for the work of the national
church?
JD: we have made fnancial support for the synod a matter of
stewardship for ourselves and for our congregations. our board
of directors made a promise before the economic downturn to
increase the percentage of what we pass on to the synod from our
congregations by a half percent each year. we decided to keep that
turning a Corner
continued
from page 11
promise in 2008, and we have continued to do so each year since
then, believing that if we want our congregations to act in a similar
fashion with respect to the work of the church beyond themselves,
we must set the example as a district. we also know that God will
bless this kind of stewardship. In 2010, in fact, we fnished the
year in the black.
LW: Why is it important for districts to support the national
church?
JD: for me, the driving force is the concept of partnerships. there
are features of the work of getting the Gospel out to people in
our world that may seem impossible for any of us to do all by
ourselves, but [that work] can and does get done when we partner
with one another as the district and the synod. the work of the
Gospel involves not just the local congregation but the cluster of
congregations in the circuit, the district and the synod operating
in the global context of today’s world.—Kim Plummer Krull
The Future Is Here
ordination of the frst Dominican Republic
Lutheran pastor.
Together with Rev. Ted Krey, LCMS
Regional Director for Latin America, the
mission work in the Dominican has never
slowed down and has now expanded to
include several congregations and preach-
ing stations, where people gather weekly to
hear the Gospel proclaimed and to receive
the Sacraments.
While the Dominicans were learning
about the Church through the Scriptures
and the Lutheran Confessions, the mis-
sionaries were also teaching them how to
be the Church by reaching out with Christ’s
mercy to the many orphaned and disabled
children in the Dominican Replublic. These
little ones are cared for by the government
in institutional settings, where they receive
minimal attention, limited medical treat-
ment, no education and no therapy services
to improve their condition.
That’s why, from the beginning, the
Lutheran mission desired to better the lives
of and care for these children through acts
of Mercy. Over many years of working with
and visiting these institutions, an agree-
ment was reached in December 2010 with
the Dominican government to allow the
frst six children to be placed at the Good
Shepherd Lutheran Group Home.
While everyone involved gave thanks
and praise to God for His great wonder
and many glories revealed in the Witness
and Mercy work of the mission, the
Dominican Republic Lutheran Mission was
also expanding its role in the koinonia or
Life Together emphasis of the mission. In
September 2010, the mission opened the
doors of Concordia Lutheran School in
Palmar Arriba. There the school provides
a Lutheran education to 80 children with
plans to double enrollment next year. In
March 2011, mission leaders signed an
b y b a r b a r a a . b e l o w
O
n a beautiful
spring eve-
ning in Palmar
Arriba, Dominican
Republic, as pictures
were displayed on
a makeshift screen
set up in the street
outside the three-
bedroom home, little
Ramona stood in the
spotlight and danced.
Along with over 200
other people who
gathered from the
community, Ramona
enjoyed the dedica-
tion of the Good
Shepherd Lutheran
Home, a group home
for children with
disabilities, where
she and fve other
children with devel-
opmental disabilities
now live. This is their
new home, the com-
munity in which they
attend church and
school. This is their
new life. This is their
future.
It was just
fve years ago that Danelle Putnam, LCMS
Developmental Disabilities Outreach
Missionary, and Rev. Walter Ries, Jr. of the
Evangelical Lutheran Church in Brazil, came to
the Dominican Republic and began the Witness
emphasis of this LCMS mission through evan-
gelistic outreach eforts and theological educa-
tion. Five years ago, Willy Gaspar had asked
the missionaries to come to Santo Domingo
and “teach us about Jesus.” In March 2010, the
Witness eforts of the mission resulted in the
26
may 2011
the future Is here
> for more stories on witness, mercy, life
together, visit www.lcms.org/partnerstories
Barbara Below spends
time with a child from
the Good Shepherd
Lutheran Home in the
Dominican Republic.
p
h
o
t
o

c
o
u
r
t
e
s
y

l
C
m
s

w
r
-
h
C
> "we have therefore for our synodical work a clear and simple rule:
everything that does not serve the course of the Gospel . . . does not
belong in the circle of our considerations" (friedrich pfotenhauer, 1911).
> Barbara a. Below (barbara.below@lcms.org) serves as
assistant to lCms president rev. matthew C. harrison.
27
lcms.org/
witness
God is faithful, by whom you
were called into the fellowship
of His Son, Jesus Christ our
Lord (1 Cor. 1:9).
agreement with the Evangelical Lutheran
Church of Argentina to assist in theologi-
cal education with the goal of establishing a
Lutheran seminary in the Dominican Republic
by 2017.
No wonder Dr. Jack Preus of Bethesda
Lutheran Communities of Watertown, Wis., at
a recent partnership meeting in the Dominican
Republic, spoke in favor of the President’s
three-fold emphasis and humorously quipped
that “The Dominican mission was doing
Witness, Mercy, Life Together long before
President Harrison came up with the idea.”
While Witness, Mercy, Life Together is the
President’s emphasis for our Synod, it is also
the way in which the New Testament church
operated (Gal. 2:9–10). Both Jews and Greeks
bore Witness to the Gospel, extending the
right hand of fellowship in Life Together and
showing Mercy to the poor. As this was the
model for the frst-century church, so also has
it become the way of life for the Dominican
Republic Lutheran Mission and a way to move
forward into the future for The Lutheran
Church—Missouri Synod.
The President’s Transition Team and the
Restructuring Work Group, charged with devel-
oping recommendations for a new structure,
used these three emphases to think about how
best to reorganize and focus the work of the
national ofce. The recommendations adopted
by the President will organize the national
ofce around work teams and program units
that focus on the emphasis of Witness, Mercy,
and Life Together.
Just as in the Dominican mission feld
Witness eforts are done side-by-side with
Mercy and Life Together eforts, so too must
the program units of the national ofce work
side-by-side, thus ridding the national ofce
of a “siloed” culture, one of the desired accom-
plishments for restructuring mentioned in
Res. 8-08A.
Lutheran Church Extension Fund
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St. Louis, MO 63127-1020 • 1-800-843-5233
LCEF’s redesigned website
makes it easier for you to fnd
an investment product, loan program
or a ministry service that works for
you and the ministry you serve.
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to sell investments, nor a solicitation to buy. The offer is made
solely by LCEF’s Offering Circular. Investors should carefully read
the Offering Circular, which more fully describes associated risks.
Copyright © 2011. Used by permission. All rights reserved.
www.lcef.org
continued
on page 28
28
may 2011
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RETIRE IN PARIS
Grace Lutheran Village, a retirement
community of independent living units
with a community center. no buy in. low
monthly rent. Ground level,1300 sq.ft.,
2 bedroom, with attached garage, owned
by Grace lutheran Church.
Contact us at Grace lutheran village
140 Concordia drive
paris, Illinois 61944
or call
Janet, the secretary  217-463-4663;
or residents Gerald 217-463-1207
or norma 217-463-2068
web site: www.luthvillage.org
e-mail: glvillage@comwares.net
As Ramona danced, she celebrated
the new life and future she is able to
enjoy at the group home. Many oth-
ers recently celebrated the ordination
of the frst Dominican Lutheran pas-
tor, Rev. Willy Gaspar, and the bright
future of the Lutheran Church in the
Dominican Republic.
We in the LCMS have much to thank
and praise God for because of all that
He has accomplished in the Dominican
Republic. The wonders He has done
there show us that our own future with
the Lord is a bright one as our Synod
presses forward to bear Witness to the
Gospel, to grow in showing Mercy and
to rejoice in our Life Together around
a common confession of Jesus Christ,
our crucifed and risen Savior. To God
alone be the glory! 
continued
from page 27
the future Is here
X11JS02


Support our seminary students today with your prayers and generosity.
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For information on how you can include The LCMS Joint
Seminary Fund in your estate plan please call
Rev. Paul D. Kienker at 1-800-327-7912 ext. 1675.


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Saint Louis
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Theological Seminary
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