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8 | may 2011 editor’s note 26 W elcome to the third issue of NYO

8 | may 2011

editor’s note

26

W elcome to the third issue of NYO Magazine, the downtown issue. Our cover star is New York’s resident Mad Man John Slattery, who opened up about his life behind the suits. For-

mer AdAge editor Jonah Bloom offered insight into the real Mad Men of New York. We also talked to dynamic downtown personalities like Casey Kaplan, founder of New York Gallery Week, architect Richard Meier and fashion icon Diane von Furstenberg. Another power personality, Diana Picasso, shared her insight into the newest exhibit at the Gagosian, “Marie-Thérèse.” The exhibit is a bit of a family affair for her, as the famed artist was her grandfather, and Marie- Thérèse, her grandmother. And what would a downtown issue be without exploring the many

peculiarities of the neighborhood? Our writers decoded the social scenes in downtown’s many bars and even explored the current locations of the city’s former brothels. We hope you enjoy our exploration of Manhat- tan’s most eclectic neighborhood.

exploration of Manhat- tan’s most eclectic neighborhood. Rachel Morgan , Senior Editor SENIOR EDITOR RACHEL

Rachel Morgan , Senior Editor

SENIOR EDITOR

RACHEL MORGAN

DESIGN DIRECTOR

IVYLISE SIMONES

WRITERS

MEREDITH

BENNETT-SMITH

BLAZE BERDAHL

JONAH BLOOM

CHARLOTTE GARDEN

ANDREW GUARINI

MEREDITH HOFFMAN

NATALIE HOWARD

CHIU-TI JANSEN

EVA KARAGIORGAS

CHELSIA MARCIUS

RACHEL OHM

LYSS STERN

LIZ WAGNER

SYDNEY SARACHAN

FASHION CONTRIBUTORS MARLEY LYNCH COCO MELLORS PRISCILLA POLLEY

CONTRIBUTING

PHOTOGRAPHERS

MICHAEL CHIMENTO

CHAD GRIFFITH

JAMES BERNAL

PHOTOGRAPHERS MICHAEL CHIMENTO CHAD GRIFFITH JAMES BERNAL SENIOR DESIGNERS LAUREN DRAPER SCOTT DVORIN
PHOTOGRAPHERS MICHAEL CHIMENTO CHAD GRIFFITH JAMES BERNAL SENIOR DESIGNERS LAUREN DRAPER SCOTT DVORIN

SENIOR DESIGNERS

LAUREN DRAPER

SCOTT DVORIN

PUBlISHER

ROBYN WEISS

SAlES SPENCER SHARP BETTY LEDERMAN DAN D’ANDREA MITCHELL BEDELL DAVID BENDAYAN PAUL KORNBLUEH KAREN KOSSMAN MICHELE MORGAN ALExANDER NUCKEL DAVID M. WOLFF

OBSERVER MEDIA GROUP PUBlISHER JARED KUSHNER EDITORIAl DIRECTOR ELIZABETH SPIERS PRESIDENT CHRISTOPHER BARNES EXECUTIVE V.P. BARRY LEWIS ASSOCIATE PUBlISHER JAMIE FORREST V.P. ADVERTISING STEPHEN GOLDBERG V.P. SAlES AND MARKETING DAVID GURSKY ClASSIFIED ADVERTISING DIRECTOR KEN NEWMAN MARKETING MANAGER JILL GUTEKUNST V.P. CIRCUlATION KRATOS VOS

PRODUCTION MANAGER TYLER RUSH PHOTO EDITOR PETER LETTRE ADVERTISING PRODUCTION LISA MEDCHILL

CIRCUlATION

ALExANDRA ENDERLE

PETER PARRIS

CARLOS RODRIGUEZ

Gerhard richter (b. 1932)

Abstraktes Bild · oil on canvas · 24 3/8 x 20 1/2 in. (62 x 52 cm.) · Painted in December 1991

$300,000–500,000

© Gerhard Richter 2011
© Gerhard Richter 2011

Post-War and Contemporary Art

Featuring Property from an Important Private European Collection Afternoon Session

New York · 12 May 2011

Collection Afternoon Session New York · 12 May 2011 Viewing 7–11 May Contact Andrew Massad

Viewing

7–11 May

Contact

Andrew Massad amassad@christies.com +1 212 636 2100 20 Rockefeller Plaza, New York, NY 10020

christies.com

Jim Hodges (b. 1957) A Model of Delicacy white brass chain, silk and wire 56
Jim Hodges (b. 1957)
A Model of Delicacy
white brass chain, silk and wire
56 x 64 x 17 in. (142.2 x 162.5 x 43.2 cm.)
$800,000-1,200,000
Post-War and Contemporary Art
Evening Sale
11 May 2011
Viewing: 7–11 May
Contact
Robert Manley
rmanley@christies.com
+1 212 636 2100
christies.com

10 | may 2011

contents

+1 212 636 2100 christies.com 10 | may 2011 contents 20 14 NEIGHBORHOOD BUZZ Our picks
20
20

14

NEIGHBORHOOD BUZZ Our picks for downtown’s best shopping, dining and dancing.

16

PARTY PAGES The best spring fetes, through the eyes of Patrick McMullan.

20

COVER Mad Men’s John Slattery opens up about Sterling, his fellow Mad Men and why he loves New York.

26

COVER Jonah Bloom, former editor of AdAge, staffs a modern-day Sterling Cooper.

28

ART Our resident expert talks about doing business in China.

32

GALLERIES Diana Picasso curates her grandfather’s newest exhibit.

36

ARTIST PROFILE Trey

Speegle resurrects paints by numbers.

38

ARTIST

PROFILE

Michael Glancy

strives for

perfection with

his glass-blown

works.

40

ARTIST PROFILE Rene Pierre Allain’s steel manipulations.

32

42

GALLERIST Casey Kaplan talks about founding New York Gallery Week

44 PEOPLE

Ballerina Michele Wiles opens up about finding happiness onstage and off.

48 FASHION Diane

von Furstenberg’s

fashion-inspired exhibit at Pace Bejjing.

54 FASHION Gaby

Basora of Tucker makes her mark.

48

NATURA vegetable-dyed hand-knotted in Afghanistan designed with the world and tomorrow in mind Delray Beach

NATURA

vegetable-dyed hand-knotted in Afghanistan

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56

FASHION Rachel Antonoff brings back old-school style.

 

58

FASHION The dreamy designs of Erin Fetherston.

60

FOOD Culinary entrepreneur John McDonald talks Tasting Table and Lure Fishbar.

64

FOOD COLUMN Our food expert picks the eateries frequented by pretty young things.

68

WINE Andy Fisher, owner of the massive downtown Astor Wines, shares his vino expertise.

70

PLACES Our analysis of the best downtown bars —and their clientele.

72

FITNESS Celebrity trainer David Kirsh shares his get-fit tips.

74

PARENTING Lyss Stern’s family-friendly picks for spring.

76

ARCHITECTURE Richard Meier talks about the iconic glass towers, the Pritzker and his signature style.

80

PEOPLE The luxe bathrooms of one bachleor’s downtown apartment.

contents

82

INTERIOR DESIGN Brad Ford designs a rustic-chic downtown apartment.

88

PLACES The city’s brothels: Where are they now?

90

PLACES A community garden thrives on the Lower East Side.

92

ARCHITECTURE Enrique Norten talks about heading up two firms —one in Mexico, one in New York.

96

REAL ESTATE Brokers analyze the current state of the downtown real estate market.

112

PHILANTHROPY Rich Palermo and the Anti Violence Project.

58
58

66

TIMING FOR CHAMPIONS www.edox.ch 1 866-425-9882
TIMING
FOR
CHAMPIONS
www.edox.ch
1 866-425-9882
NYO
NYO

downtown Buzz

1

Discover

Downtown

Our picks for the best shopping, eats and deliciously downtown dives. It’s the coolest neighborhood in Manhattan for a reason

14 | may 2011

By Charlotte Garden & Blaze Berdahl o Photos by Michael Chimento

Garden & Blaze Berdahl o Photos by Michael Chimento Adeline Adeline caters to the urban biker—functional

Adeline Adeline caters to the urban biker—functional without sacrificing style. The store is stocked with classic 1970s designs and brings glamour and femininity back to the bicycle, as it re- cently partnered with Kate Spade to offer customers a bike in that classically perfect shade of green (147 Reade St., 212-227-

1150).

MooShoes has a storied history. A decade ago, two sisters from Queens bought an old butcher shop in Gramercy Park, intending to open the city’s first “cruelty- free” vegan shoe store. The result was MooShoes, which sells non-leather/vegan shoes, clothing, books, wallets, belts and bags. There are vegan cookbooks, too (78 Orchard St., 212-254-6512).

A gastronome’s dream, Broadway

Panhandler carries wares ranging from beginner cookware to industrial items to top-of-the-line espresso makers. And it’s a family business—owner Norman Kornbleuth is the son of a Lower East Side restaurant supply store owner (65 East 8th St., 212-966-3434).

Need a new topper? Head to Arth, which carries nearly every type of hat you can imagine, men, women and unisex (75 West Houston St., 212-539-1431).

We’d go anywhere with a slogan like “We make balls.” The Meatball Shop, headed up by Daniel Holzman and Michael Cher- now, have a wide array of tasty nuggets, from classic beef to spicy pork balls to vegetable balls (84 Stanton St., 212-982-

8895).

If you dream of ninjas jumping out at you

while you dine, Ninja New York is your spot. Enough said (25 Hudson St., 212-

274-8500).

Get alterations on the cheap at Orchard Express, the incomparable downtown tailor. Opened by Ramon Jimenez in 1975, this place has staying power—and with prices that run generally 50 percent less ($4 for a hem, $20 to take in a jacket) than any tailor in the city, we can see why (136 Orchard St., 212-677-1099).

And who can forget downtown staple Strand (828 Broadway, 212-473-1452)? Yes, it’s been around for a while, but it’s a classic for a reason. o

staple Strand (828 Broadway, 212-473-1452)? Yes, it’s been around for a while, but it’s a classic

2

3

4
4

1. Adeline Adeline

2. Broadway Panhandler

3. The Strand

4. Arth

5. Ninja

6. The Meatball Shop

5

3. The Strand 4. Arth 5. Ninja 6. The Meatball Shop 5 The Short List Our

The

Short

List

Our other favorite downtown spots

Aedes

de Venustas

9 Christopher St.,

212-206-8674

Darling

1 Horatio St.,

646-336-6966

Odin

199 Lafayette St.,

212-966-0026

Edon Manor

391 Greenwich St.,

212-431-3890

The New

World Order

13 Avenue B,

212-777-3600

Mxyplyzyk

125 Greenwich Ave.,

212-989-4300

Babycakes

248 Broome St.,

212-677-5047

Lomography

Gallery Store

41 W. 8th #1,

212-529-4353x212

Pas de Deux

328 East 11th St.,

212-475-0075

Banchet Bianca

Flowers

809 Washington St.,

212-989-1088

6
6
NYO
NYO

EVENTS

16 | MAY 2011

STEVE BUSCEMI, FISHER STEVENS, CELINE DANHIER LINDSAY LOHAN AT THE AFTER-PARTY OF MAGNOLIA PICTURES’ CEREMONY
STEVE BUSCEMI, FISHER STEVENS,
CELINE DANHIER
LINDSAY LOHAN AT
THE AFTER-PARTY OF
MAGNOLIA PICTURES’
CEREMONY
NUR KHAN,
ERIN FETHERSTON
BRITNE OLDFORD,
TERRY
DANNY FLAHERTY
RICHARDSON
MAY ANDERSON
MAX WINKLER, HENRY WINKLER
MAX WINKLER,
HENRY WINKLER

HEIDI BIVENS, JUSTIN THEROUX

DAVID ARQUETTE AND CURTIS 50 CENT

AT A PRIVATE SCREENING OFSCREAM 4

DREE HEMINGWAY
DREE HEMINGWAY

Jeff Zucker anD kevin pollack aTTenD

Jeff Zucker anD kevin pollack aTTenD carnegie Hall’s 120TH anniversary gala
carnegie Hall’s 120TH anniversary gala

carnegie Hall’s 120TH anniversary gala

regina spekTor Tom Brokaw micHael Douglas name Hereggg name Hereggg anDrew saffir, BeTH sTern anD
regina spekTor
Tom Brokaw
micHael Douglas
name Hereggg
name Hereggg
anDrew saffir, BeTH sTern anD Daniel
BeneDicT aT new yorkers for cHilDren eigHTH
geralDo rivera, erica rivera
annual spring Dinner Dance, “a fool’s feTe”
nickolas asHforD, valerie simpson
nickolas
asHforD,
valerie
simpson

BeTTe miDler

anD James Taylor

lara meilanD sHaw,

 

cHrisTian siriano,

 

mereDiTH melling Burke

seliTa eBanks, mary alice sTepHenson, kerry wasHingTon, amy sacco, wyclef Jean, amy mcfarlanD, coralie cHarriol

seliTa eBanks, mary alice sTepHenson, kerry wasHingTon,

seliTa eBanks, mary alice sTepHenson, kerry wasHingTon, amy sacco, wyclef Jean, amy mcfarlanD, coralie cHarriol paul
amy sacco, wyclef Jean, amy mcfarlanD, coralie cHarriol paul
amy sacco, wyclef Jean, amy mcfarlanD, coralie cHarriol paul

amy sacco, wyclef Jean, amy mcfarlanD, coralie cHarriol paul

Patrick mcmullan’s favorite New Yorkers

donavan green, ayana

 

green, LiSa oz, dr. mehmet

 

oz at dr. oz’S heaLth CorpS

gaLa to fight ChiLd oBeSity

aLonzo mourning, Star JoneS Ben vereen tom CoLiCChio
aLonzo
mourning,
Star JoneS
Ben vereen
tom CoLiCChio
hugh JaCkman
hugh JaCkman
eriC ripert, meLanie dunea, nigeL parry
eriC ripert, meLanie dunea, nigeL parry
keLLy rutherford, marCuS ernSt
keLLy rutherford,
marCuS ernSt

Cynthia nixon, BiLL koenigSBerg

 

attend City harveSt’S 17th annuaL

an evening of praCtiCaL magiC

 

Stefan oppenheimer, arnie arnaSon,

Stefan oppenheimer, arnie arnaSon, Bonnie arnaSon, aLiSon kaLLman, Jim kaLLman
Bonnie arnaSon, aLiSon kaLLman, Jim kaLLman

Bonnie arnaSon, aLiSon kaLLman, Jim kaLLman

Stephanie WinSton WoLkoff
Stephanie
WinSton
WoLkoff
Courtney Love Lee PaCe
Courtney Love
Lee PaCe

Keanu reeves and vera farMiga at

Keanu reeves and vera farMiga at the after Party for “henry’s CriMe”
the after Party for “henry’s CriMe”

the after Party for “henry’s CriMe”

ParKer Posey Kevin Zegers taj MahaL attends jaZZ at LinCoLn Center’s gaLa after Party
ParKer Posey
Kevin Zegers
taj MahaL attends jaZZ
at LinCoLn Center’s
gaLa after Party
Mary aLiCe stePhenson
Mary aLiCe
stePhenson
george wein
george wein
wynton MarsaLis, john Legend, ashLey

wynton MarsaLis, john Legend, ashLey

sChiff-raMos with guest

wynton MarsaLis, john Legend, ashLey sChiff-raMos with guest

gayLe King, newarK

may 2011

19

Mayor Cory BooKer

NYO
NYO

XXXXXXX

Groomer, Valissa Yoe; Stylist, Priscilla Polley ; Leather jacked by Bruno Cuccinelli; Tshirt by James Perse

20 | APRIL 2011

Valissa Yoe; Stylist, Priscilla Polley ; Leather jacked by Bruno Cuccinelli; Tshirt by James Perse 20
Valissa Yoe; Stylist, Priscilla Polley ; Leather jacked by Bruno Cuccinelli; Tshirt by James Perse 20
Valissa Yoe; Stylist, Priscilla Polley ; Leather jacked by Bruno Cuccinelli; Tshirt by James Perse 20
Valissa Yoe; Stylist, Priscilla Polley ; Leather jacked by Bruno Cuccinelli; Tshirt by James Perse 20
XXXXXXX NYO APRIL 2011 | 21

XXXXXXX

NYO
NYO
APRIL 2011 | 21
APRIL 2011 | 21
NYO
NYO

COVER STORY

J ohn Slattery has a bit of an obsession with Collyer Brothers Syndrome. The longtime actor turned Mad Men icon talked animatedly about the hoarding disorder at a photo shoot as he posed in a gray hooded sweatshirt and thick black-rimmed

glasses, his trademark silver locks ruffled. The conversation quickly shifted to stalkers.

“I had a stalker once,” he said. “It was an older guy and he would travel around by bus to all my shows. He’d write me like 16 postcards a day. And every time I would see him, he was missing

a few more teeth and he would never be wearing

a coat. And I would say to him, ‘Where’s your

coat?’” and he’d say, ‘I don’t need no coat!’” Slat- tery said in his best codger accent, as far from the silver-tongued, silver-haired Roger Sterling as he could get. “Finally, I said to him, ‘Look, here’s my number’—which was probably not a good idea— ‘Call me if you are ever in trouble.’ A few months went by. I was sitting in my apartment and was in bed, reading. I heard the phone ring, but it was across the apartment, so I just let the machine pick up.” The caller was a police officer, who had found the body of the stalker. “He was actually an over-enthusiastic fan,” Slattery later quantified. The officer had called the only number found inside the apartment, which was packed so full

a hole had to be cut in the door in order to gain

entrance. It turns out the man suffered from Collyer Brothers Syndrome, named after the first documented case of hoarding—two broth- ers who lived in a Harlem brownstone who were found deceased in their home, buried by their own belongings. “Inside the apartment, within the piles and piles of shit, the only number they found was mine,” Slattery said. The man was later buried in a military ceremony, as he was an honorably discharged veteran. The fact that Slattery even cared where and when this man was buried spoke volumes. The fact that he remembered the man and was telling the story, years later, said more. This, it seems, is John Slattery—a far cry from

his drinking, smoking, fucking, alter ego Roger

Sterling. While Slattery had always been rela- tively well known on the small and big screens,

it was really his foray into the 1960s that thrust

him into stardom. At the close of the last season, Sterling was struggling with an unfulfilling marriage, an affair with an ex-fling and the feeling of becom- ing obsolete in an increasingly modernizing profession. As for what’s next for Mad Men’s resident silver fox, Slattery is either tight-lipped or uninformed. “I don’t know,” he said. “I hope he doesn’t

22 | MAY 2011

commit suicide. I don’t think that would be the course of action, but I really don’t even know one

thing. I think Matt [Weiner] is trying to figure it out.” Any Mad Men fan worth his salt has no doubt been following the conflict between show creator Matthew Weiner and studio Lionsgate TV and AMC. And the irony isn’t lost on us—the creator of a show about advertising locked in a massive conflict with its studio, who ironically wants, well, more advertising. Fans have alter- nately hated Weiner for delaying the next season and lauded him for maintaining the show’s integrity, characters and length. “I don’t know the ins and outs of it, but what

I know is that it wasn’t all on Matt Weiner’s shoulders,” Slattery said. As far as Roger Sterling’s womanizing ways. Slattery, a happily married man, has no qualms about playing the character. In fact, he sort of enjoys it. “That part of it is terrific,” he said. “Being able to work with somebody like Christina Hendricks (who plays the enigmatic secretary–turned– office manager and Slattery’s on-again, off-again love interest, Joan), who is obviously beautiful and such a good actress, is a pretty good perk of this character.” Friends of Slattery paint him as a humble, normal guy, quite unlike his television counterpart. “The first time I met John was at a lunch in Grand Central around Christmastime,” said Brian Kolb, longtime boyfriend of Slattery’s niece, Maggie Kinnealey. “After lunch, we were helping John shop for his son’s Christmas pres- ent. John said he wanted to get a Nintendo Wii for his son but was having trouble finding one.

I thought that was a joke since I remembered

Wii being the popular gift the year before, so I

figured it should be easy to find. As those words came out of my mouth, we took a corner and saw

a huge line coming out of Best Buy. John went

up to the first girl in line and asked her what they were in line for. The girl replied, ‘Nintendo Wii, of course. Hey, aren’t you that actor guy?’” This is something that happened quite often to Slattery in the years before his Mad Men fame, Kolb said. “John replied, ‘Yeah, I am that actor guy. Can

I cut you in line?’ The girl looked at him, thought about it for a second and politely declined his offer,” Kolb said. “He looked back at me and said, ‘I should have told her I was Steve Carell.’’ Steve Carell or not, Slattery has built up

a rather impressive résumé of his own. He’s directed several episodes of Mad Men and is currently writing a short film, not surprising for an actor who seems to have mastered the trifecta of the entertainment business—film, television and Broadway. “I’ve realized it’s good to stay busy—you

trifecta of the entertainment business—film, television and Broadway. “I’ve realized it’s good to stay busy—you
Sweatshirt by Mollusk Brooklyn; Shirt by Hickey Freeman; Glasses by Ray Ban; Jeans by APC
Sweatshirt by Mollusk Brooklyn; Shirt by Hickey Freeman; Glasses by Ray Ban; Jeans by APC
Sweatshirt by Mollusk Brooklyn; Shirt by Hickey Freeman; Glasses by Ray Ban; Jeans by APC
Sweatshirt by Mollusk Brooklyn; Shirt by Hickey Freeman; Glasses by Ray Ban; Jeans by APC
Sweatshirt by Mollusk Brooklyn; Shirt by Hickey Freeman; Glasses by Ray Ban; Jeans by APC
Sweatshirt by Mollusk Brooklyn; Shirt by Hickey Freeman; Glasses by Ray Ban; Jeans by APC

Sweatshirt by Mollusk Brooklyn; Shirt by Hickey Freeman; Glasses by Ray Ban; Jeans by APC

MiCHAEl YAriSH/AMC

MiCHAEl YAriSH/AMC XXXXXXX Actors Vincent Kartheiser, Jon Hamm and John Slattery on the Mad Men set

XXXXXXX

MiCHAEl YAriSH/AMC XXXXXXX Actors Vincent Kartheiser, Jon Hamm and John Slattery on the Mad Men set
Actors Vincent Kartheiser, Jon Hamm and John Slattery on the Mad Men set last season.
Actors Vincent Kartheiser,
Jon Hamm and John Slattery
on the Mad Men set last season.

can’t count on much in this business and in this economy,” he said. “It’s good to keep your hand in a couple of things, see what pans out.” But it seems Slattery hasn’t had trouble keep- ing busy—his résumé boasts a steady stream of work since 1988. Today, Slattery is past the point of simply taking any job that is offered. Pre–Mad Men, Slattery didn’t always have that option. “In the beginning, I did things because they were offered and I was surprised that I got the job at all,” he said. “I don’t want to denigrate anything. They were all valuable experiences. I couldn’t pick one out and say, ‘I shouldn’t have done this.’ You’re trying to find material that you feel an emotional and intellectual connection to, that excites you. That’s what anybody wants, and there’s only so much of it to go around. There

24 | MAY 2011

was a while in the beginning where I wasn’t as discerning as I might have been—I don’t even know if I could have been. In the beginning of any career, you’re a kid. You take what people give you.” Now, Slattery faces the problem of separating himself from the trademark suits of Mad Men. In fact, he opted out of wearing any sort of suit at all for the photo shoot. This slight aversion notwithstanding, Slattery is quick to point out that Mad Men is simply a damn good show. “It was so obviously a good script,” he said. “You read a good novel, a good screenplay, a good play, and suddenly the whole world is right there in front of you.” The show’s cultlike following agrees—in fact,

Sweater by Ermenegildo Zegna; Jeans by APC

it’s hard to discern if they are more obsessed with the show or its characters. Upon news that I would be interviewing Slattery, my Facebook page was inundated with praise for the historically accurate series, mostly from men. Perhaps they all wish they could live the life of Roger Sterling. Or maybe, Don Draper. “Roger Sterling is one of the best roles in tele- vision history,” one Facebook friend remarked. Another was more forthcoming in his praise. “Ask him if I could one day be Don Draper. Ask him if I can touch Jon Hamm. Ask him how badass it is being the silver fox. Ask him if I can touch his hair. Ask him if he’s my real dad. Tell him I love him. Ask if he’ll send me an advance copy of this season of Mad Men.” Speaking of John Hamm, Slattery originally read for the part of Don Draper. Once he was at the studio, producers told him they actually wanted him to play the part of Roger Sterling, a part so minor they were afraid he wouldn’t even come in to read for it. “I didn’t find out until down the line that they had brought me in for Roger,” he said. “It was in the room that they said, ‘We actually have this person [to play Draper.]’ That happens all the time: You’re reading for someone and then you find out that they’ve already offered it to so-and- so. That’s frustrating, but it happens.” We couldn’t help but wonder—in an alternate universe, could Slattery have been Don Draper and Jon Hamm been Roger Sterling? “Absolutely not,” Hamm said. “John’s mixture of humor and pathos is the perfect counterpoint to Don’s guarded world-weariness. I couldn’t do what he does nearly as well. Now Peggy, I

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COVER STORY

would’ve knocked out of the park.” Despite the initial casting snafu, Hamm maintains that the pair gets along famously. “After the first day of shooting we were pretty close,” Hamm said. “There’s always a feeling-out period within a cast that doesn’t know one another, and I’m very happy to say that with us, that period lasted about the length of two or three takes. At least that’s what he tells me.” At the time, no one had any idea just how big the show would be. “It’s hard to figure out how any show gets the attention it gets, especially now, with everything that’s out there, with all the venues, all the shows, all the cable channels and new networks popping up all over the place,” Slattery said. “It’s hard to know how anyone gains a foothold.” Lucky for Slattery, Mad Men seems to be have done just that. In spending time with Slattery, it becomes obvious fairly quickly that he has a sense of humor, much like his onscreen persona. So did Slattery affect Sterling, or did Sterling mold Slattery? Turns out, a bit of both. “The character’s sense of humor develops along the way. The lines get blurry between what’s written, and the writers will see you do things with certain actors and they’ll say, ‘Well, they work well together, let’s write a scene for them,’” he said. “Ideas happen, story lines change. It isn’t because of any one thing. Sometimes, the writers will see an actor do a certain thing or the story line goes a certain way.”

SIXTY SECONDS WITH SLATTERY What’s the last book you bought? Jennifer Egan’s A Visit From
SIXTY SECONDS WITH SLATTERY
What’s the last book you bought?
Jennifer Egan’s
A Visit From the Goon Squad.
Do you read
The Observer?
No. I’m not going to lie.
What’s the last piece of art you bought?
I bought a drawing by an artist named
Jonas Wood.
Describe yourself in three words.
I can’t. I have no interest.
I heard you’re a Red Sox fan and your son is
a Yankees fan.
Yes, and my wife was born in New York, too, so
I’m outnumbered.
So you buy your wife shoes to romance her?
I have before; it’s not like I’m a shoe buyer. My
father is in the shoe business, the leather busi-
ness. So I have a leg up.

Hamm will also vouch for Slattery’s sense of humor—and sheer acting prowess, for that matter. “The funniest look I’ve ever seen on Slat- tery’s face may have been when a piece of the set fell and hit me on the head and blood started dripping down my neck,” Hamm said. “The mixture of sheer what-the-fuck humor, turning to shock, [then] horror and, ultimate- ly, compassion was an acting master class.” Slattery, a Boston transplant–turned–true New Yorker—he’s lived here for a quarter of a century, so he’s earned the title—lives downtown with his wife, Talia Balsam—who plays his bitter ex-wife Mona Sterling on the show—and their 11-year old son, Harry. He’s earned attention over the years for his involve- ment in the community, a fact he doesn’t see as particularly out of the ordinary, or even laudable. “Like anyone, you’re involved with your community because it’s where you live,” he said. “This sanitation situation that was going on in my neighborhood, I thought and still think that there is a better alternative to what the Sanitation Department and the city decided to do. I’m not in it for the civic duty necessarily, but it’s my community.” Slattery is referring the stink surrounding the Department of Sanitation’s controversial facility —120 feet tall with a $400 million price tag, no less —at Spring Street and the West Side Highway, Slattery’s hood. The proposed building, which would include truck and salt storage, is still on track for completion, despite protests by Slattery, Kirsten Dunst and James Gandolfini. It’s hard not to be impressed that a suc- cessful actor and a New Yorker would be that interested in his own neighborhood. But Slat- tery doesn’t see it as out of the ordinary. “Most of the actors I know, when they’re not working are just doing the same things every- body else is,” he said. “They take their kids to school. They get up and go to work. When they come home from work, they put their kids to bed, even the really, extremely successful ones. Everybody just wants to live their life.” I ask him again about his stalker. “That guy wasn’t really a stalker,” he said. “He was just a guy who was an enthusiastic fan and seemed to be having some difficulties. Anybody would have done the same thing, I think. Someone once asked me, ‘You live in New York City?’ And I said, ‘Yeah.’ And he said, ‘Day in and day out?’ Like New York City is such a grind to live in. Every time someone gets stuck in a subway door or falls down on the street, there are about four people to help them up. New York City is a nice neighbor- hood.” o

help them up. New York City is a nice neighbor- hood.” o THE MAD MEN (AND
THE MAD MEN (AND WOMEN) OF NEW YORK We’d pick these five Madison Avenue luminaries
THE MAD MEN
(AND WOMEN)
OF NEW YORK
We’d pick these five
Madison Avenue luminaries
to staff a modern-day
Sterling Cooper.
By Jonah Bloom

Bob Greenberg, Chairman and CEO, R/GA Clients: Nike, Wal-Mart Mad Men alter ego: I’m tempted to compare Bob Greenberg to Bert Cooper, the iconoclastic, bow-tied senior partner at Sterling Cooper with a penchant for Japanese culture and a habit of wandering around the office in just his socks. Yet Greenberg could school Cooper in eccentricity. From the wavy gray locks to his berets to his ninja-style black outfits finished off with a belt holstering his wire-rimmed spectacles and an array of digital devices, Greenberg is clearly not your regular adman. Yet dismiss Greenberg at your peril—he’s become arguably New York’s most successful adman in the last decade. Why he’d make the cut: Greenberg has mastered the art of re-creating a business on the fly, having morphed his outfit from an Oscar-winning special- effects and motion graphics studio in the late ’70s, into a TV and film production studio in the ’80s, into an interactive ad agency in the ’90s, and later into an integrated, technology-driven marketing shop with a plethora of awards and more employees than any other agency in New York. Greenberg and his lieutenants at R/GA espoused the theory that you had to put aside the old-media marketing approach of making ad campaigns and instead build real, always- on products and platforms for the client that actually enhance the consumer’s experience—like the Nike Plus run-tracking and sharing tool.

Tom Carroll, President and CEO, TBWA Worldwide Clients: Adidas, Apple, Nissan Mad Men alter ego: Tom Carroll might just be the last of the Mad Men as Matthew Weiner intended. Now in his mid-50s, Carroll generally limits himself to a few glasses of wine rather than an endless stream of vodka gimlets. But he still has the silver drink

XXXXXXX NYO From le : Drogas, Greenberg, Carroll, Robertson, Senecal. ILLUSTRATION BY SCOTT DVORIN platter
XXXXXXX NYO From le : Drogas, Greenberg, Carroll, Robertson, Senecal. ILLUSTRATION BY SCOTT DVORIN platter
XXXXXXX NYO From le : Drogas, Greenberg, Carroll, Robertson, Senecal. ILLUSTRATION BY SCOTT DVORIN platter

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From le : Drogas, Greenberg, Carroll, Robertson, Senecal.

ILLUSTRATION BY SCOTT DVORIN

platter in his office and counts Absolut and Jameson Whiskey among his key accounts. Carroll has a Roger Sterling twinkle in his eye, and is as likely to make you laugh. But unlike Sterling, he’s not prone to morose moments or regrets. Why he’d make the cut: As CEO, he oversees 8,000 employees in more than 200 offices around the world, but remains a hands-on ad account guy, adored by clients and creatives alike. Carroll has somehow turned a mishmash of once-independent shops into an integrated global network, without forcing them all to look and behave the same way. It’s not unusual for him to be in Europe one day and Asia the next and the tales of his randomly timed sleepless-in-Seattle/Shanghai/Hamburg phone calls are myriad.

Lori Senecal, President and CEO, Kirshenbaum Bond Senecal + Partners Clients: BMW, Vanguard, Armani Mad Men alter ego: The haze of cigarette smoke has given way to gym memberships, the art of persua- sion through TV ads to the art of engagement through multimedia efforts, but one thing hasn’t changed too much—white men still monopolize the top jobs on Madison Avenue. Perhaps that’s why people took notice when Lori Senecal took her current post. Full disclosure: I work at KBS+P, so it probably wouldn’t be behoove me to compare her to one of the women in the secretarial pool at Sterling Cooper. It also wouldn’t be accurate. Senecal drinks modestly, dresses in all black and eschews a corner office for long hours at an open-plan desk alongside the rank and file. Why she’d make the cut: In recent years, Senecal defected to Kirshenbaum Bond from global giant McCann-Erickson, where she’d been running their

flagship New York office. McCann had always been perceived as the ultimate boys club—to be fair, it is now changing—and somewhat inevitably her departure spawned a legal spat with McCann charg- ing that she’d poached executives and tried to poach business too. And she riled a few of the Kirshenbaum Bond old guard when she set out reinventing the agency that now bears her name by bringing in new talent—notably a host of creative technologists—and launching initiatives such as a Client Stock Index that aligns employee rewards with client financial performance.

Andrew Robertson, CEO, BBDO Worldwide Clients: AT&T, FedEx, GE Mad Men alter ego: Andrew Robertson cuts per- haps the most Don Draper–ish dash of any of today’s Madison Avenue luminaries, yet also has a bit of Mad Men’s quintessential Englishman Lance Pryce about him. From the schoolboy haircut to the perfectly tailored suits to the BBC-newsreader elocution, everything about Robertson screams English gent. Why he’d make the cut: Robertson was brought in for his current role of running the 287-office BBDO Worldwide in its New York headquarters from his previous post in London, where he’d been running the U.K. outpost of the agency. His task was to transform the most American of ad agen- cies from a 30-second commercial factory into a more media-agnostic, future-forward shop that could continue to thrive in a digital world. He set about that rather daunting job in an unflappable, no-nonsense type of a way—he had to fire several industry stalwarts in order to make the change— that certainly had a little old-school British sangfroid about it. And in the economic maelstrom of late 2009, BBDO was particularly badly affected

because Chrysler was its biggest client. There were several times when Robertson seemed so saddened by the cuts he had to make that I couldn’t help wondering whether he might just walk away. But he didn’t. Now he and his agency have regained the spring in their step.

Dave Droga, Founder and Creative Chairman,

Droga5

Clients: Activision, Method, Prudential Mad Men alter ego: He hasn’t stolen anyone’s iden-

tity and coming from Australia only sort of qualifies as having a dark past, but if someone has got to be our modern-day Don Draper, then Droga’s our man. Why he’d make the cut: In a city that had for many years proven strangely inhospitable to start-up creative agencies, Droga and his partners have built a shop revered for its creativity that is now growing at

a clip—and has become arguably the most influential

independent agency in the United States. Such success always begets criticism in the perennially in- secure ad business, but Droga —a reformed smoker, like Draper—is one of those friendly guy-at-the-bar types that almost everyone, especially the ladies, professes to like. He’s always enthusing about some fascinating new idea that’s popped into his head, works as hard as he expects others to work, gives

credit it where it’s due and can still laugh at himself. Last time I saw him he was just on his way to be interviewed for CNN’s Icon series, which featured

a number of luminaries from various fields. “I think

it’s me and Rem Koolhaas,” he said “Pretty fucking ridiculous.” o

Rem Koolhaas,” he said “Pretty fucking ridiculous.” o Jonah Bloom is the executive director of content

Jonah Bloom is the executive director of content strat- egy at KBS+P. He was formerly the editor of Advertis- ing Age. Follow him on Twitter @jonahbloom.

CHINA

Happenings

Seven deadly sins when doing business in one of the world’s fastest-growing economies.

By Chiu-Ti Jansen A chicken and a pig were about to enter into a joint
By Chiu-Ti Jansen
A chicken and a pig were about to
enter into a joint venture. The
chicken said to the pig, “Why
don’t we talk over breakfast?”
The pig said, “Great! What would
you like to eat?” The chicken
responded, “Bacon and eggs.” This is a classic fable
about Sino-foreign joint ventures, which have his-
torically become storied examples for star-crossed
marriages. Tackling the Chinese markets is an
imperative for most businesses in today’s world. But
many entrepreneurs remain mystified by the rules of
the game in China. The apprehension and attendant
mistrust are often mutual from the perspectives
of the non-Chinese and the Chinese alike. Wang
Qingsong, a contemporary Chinese artist, illustrated
this tenuous relationship with his photographic
work Can I Cooperate with You?, which pits China’s
five-star flag against the logos of McDonald’s and
Coca-Cola. Wang Guangyi, another prominent
contemporary Chinese artist, juxtaposed Western
pop art and advertisement iconography with Chinese
socialist propaganda visual language in his Great
Criticism series.
The effect is striking—while the poses of the
socialist soldiers speak of physical violence, the
predominant Western brand exerts silent aggres-
sion. It’s an uneasy marriage between the socialist
and capitalist ideologies.
Surely many Western businesses have entered
into joint ventures or partnerships with the Chinese
involuntarily due to the Chinese government’s
restriction on foreign investments. There are also
examples of voluntary collaborations that yield
successful results. Unlike manufacturers of con-
sumer products or mass market goods, Western art
galleries do not necessarily need to rely on a Chinese
partner to assist with the distribution, especially in
the early stage of contemporary art that is catered
to the Western collectors. Unlike auction houses
which are off-limit to foreign investments, wholly
owned foreign galleries are permitted to operate in
China. Arne Glimcher, founder of the Pace Gallery,
has teamed up with Leng Lin, a prominent professor
and art scholar–turned–art dealer. While I am not
privy to their commercial arrangements, Leng Lin
retains his own gallery, Beijing Commune. Glimcher
also works with blue chip Chinese artists on a non-
exclusive basis, taking away the pressure from these
artists to commit themselves to a business model
that they are yet to be accustomed to.
Given my own Wall Street background, I often
cringe over any business practice in China that does
not meet the highest standard of “best practice.”
I have discovered that the Chinese may act in a
certain way informed not only by their cultural >

28 | MAY 2011

Can I Cooperate With You?

by Wang Qingsong.

photo courtesy wang qingsong

AwAsiA

AwAsiA BreathTaking (2006), by shi Xinning. Cheat SHEET for doing business in China 1. Regional differences

BreathTaking (2006), by shi Xinning.

Cheat

SHEET

for doing business in China

1. Regional differences can mean varying degrees of busi- ness sophistication.

2. Things can happen much

faster in China. One needs to work harder to keep up.

3. Just as many things in

China can disappoint you, there are many things in China that can delight you.

4. In terms of technology application, China has migrated to hand-held devices faster than the West.

5. For timely communica-

tions, text messaging is more effective than email. Most Chinese do not use voice mail.

30 | may 2011

upbringings, but also by their historical circum- stances. I’ve found that these “seven deadly sins” could undermine Westerners’ effectiveness to do deals in China. Telling the Chinese how to build Rome. While we all know the old adage, “When in Rome, do as the Romans do.” It seems that when in China, many Westerners tend to tell the Chinese what to do based on an assumption that the Westerners know better. That may have held true 30 years ago, but no more. Seiji Ozawa, one of the first foreign-born conductors to take helm at a prestigious American orchestra, once talked about his own experience. He said, if you are a foreigner, they will not hire you if you are as good as them. You have to be better . Mistaking lack of sophistication for lack of intelligence. It’s a common human tendency to underestimate an individual coming from a business environment that is perceived as less sophisticated.Forinstance,withinthepastdecade, Chinese art markets leapfrogged from a handful of commercial galleries to high-flying art funds and art exchanges without the critical support of an established infrastructure made up of museums, art professionals, art critics, art laws and so forth. Chinese are very keenly aware of its tumultuous history in the past 200 years and the West-centric worldview that has until recently largely dictated international politics and economics. Anyone who wants to do business with the Chinese must first embrace the idea that they are very proud of the recent rise of China, despite some misgivings about certain unwelcomed social consequences. Handing off all China strategies to one’s “China Head.” Many CEOs of multination- als reasoned that, out of the respect for the Chinese cultural differences, business or otherwise, they would be better off to hand their China strategy over to their “China Heads.” Then they often found how wrong they were. Given the importance of China market to most of the Western businesses, business leaders are well advised to stay engaged at the very top level. It would be oversimplifying it to apply one represen- tative’s viewpoint to the China as a whole. Believing that Guanxi is a talisman. One of the first Chinese expressions that a West-

erner would learn about China is guanxi—roughly translated as “connections” or “networks of influ- ence.” As a result, foreigners new to the game tend to think that guanxi is everything in China. There is no free lunch, even in China. Guanxi is part of a complex web of bartered give-and-take’s that are passed through generations or circles of relation- ships. To manage a project in China, whether to establish an art museum or a cultural foundation, you typically would need to manage guanxi at the national, provincial and local levels. Good guanxi alone cannot supplant fundamental business logics. Expecting risk-free returns.Ioftenfound many Western businessmen unwilling to take any risk in China. They are so wrapped up in their view of China as a ruthless, dangerous place that they feel paralyzed to take any action or reasonable risk assess- ment. Their desire to achieve a risk-free return that is not even possible in their own homeland, let alone in a business environment of its own distinctive charac- teristics, is puzzling to me. Trading common sense for cultural differences. A long lineage of literature on doing business in China has attributed countless horror stories and cautionary tales to two perceived cultural polarities: socialism vs. capitalism and Western vs. Chinese. While there is certain truth to these polari- ties, we cannot succeed in any transnational setting unless we find common ground in our humanity. Taking a short-term view about China. Chinese people, like people elsewhere, respond less favorably to opportunistic investors with no long- term commitment to their market. Many Chinese business leaders often observed that some foreign investors were unwilling to “pay tuition” to study and learn about their market. Success in China, as in any other business environment, is not always based on getting an upper hand over one’s counterparty. Interestingly, sometimes the Chinese themselves are not even free from their own versions of these deadly sins. Perhaps this is the lesson from the chicken and pig fable—in any relationship, one is never sure whether one is the chicken or the pig.

Chiu-Ti Jansen is the founder of China Happenings™,amultimediaandadvisoryplatform that focuses on the cultural and lifestyle industries in contemporaryChina. o

that focuses on the cultural and lifestyle industries in contemporaryChina. o

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© 2011 estate of PaBlo Picasso/aRtists Rights society (aRs), New yoRk. Photo By BéatRice hatala. couRtesy gagosiaN galleRy”.

getty iMages

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hatala. couRtesy gagosiaN galleRy”. getty iMages A Pic A sso A f f A ART NYO

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A

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Art historian Diana Widmaier Picasso curates the newest Picasso exhibit at the Gagosian Gallery with Picasso biographer John Richardson. Picasso—one of the first in her clan to really delve into the arts—sounds off on the inspiration for the exhibit—her grandmother, Maya, no less – her favorite of the more than 80 works in the exhibition and how it really feels to have the surname Picasso

By Rachel Morgan

Why the decision to do the Picasso exhibit now? This project has been a dream for many years. “The Marie-Thérèse years” were a period of exceptional creativity in Picasso’s life. One can establish parallels with the early Cubist years and work from the 1950s, three phases in which Picasso threw himself into the most fecund experimentations of his artistic life.

How does it feel, knowing your grandmother was Picasso’s muse? There is something magical about the way they met. Some kind of providence was cast upon them when Picasso noticed the curious beauty of the 17-year-old girl and immediately hastened to enlist her as his model. I never met my grandparents, but strangely—because Picasso’s work is a diary unto itself—I have become a voyeur of their relationship.

When did you begin to work with John Richard- son? It was very intense. We organized it in less than a year with Valentina Castellani, the director of the Gagosian Gallery. For both John and I, Marie-Thérèse was already very much at the center of our research. In the third volume of his biography on Picasso, A Life of Picasso: The Triumphant Years, 1917-1932, published in 2010, John wrote about his new findings. I have also written several articles on the subject— “The

Pablo Picasso, Marie-Thérèse au béret rouge et au col de fourrure, left. Diana Picasso, right.

rouge et au col de fourrure, left. Diana Picasso, right. Encounter of Pablo Picasso and Marie-Thérèse

Encounter of Pablo Picasso and Marie-Thérèse Walter (1927)”; “Thoughts on a Historiographical Revision” (Chemnitz, Kunstsammlungen, 2003); and “Marie-Thérèse Walter and Pablo Picasso:

New Insights Into a Secret Love” (Munster, Picasso Graphiksammlung, 2004).

Which work in the exhibition is your favorite? The monumental original plaster from Boisgeloup, Bust of a Woman (1931), is one of my favorites. I also love an incredibly intimate drawing of Marie- Thérèse made in 1935, just after she gave birth to my mother, Maya. There are so many exceptional works that it is difficult to choose.

How did you select the works to appear in the exhibit? The works presented are from one of the most astonishing periods of Picasso’s oeuvre. From 1927 to 1941, Marie-Thérèse was the subject of numerous sensual metamorphoses. We wanted the exhibition to reflect the remarkable variety of techniques—painting, sculpture, drawing and print—and materials—plaster, charcoal and pastel, among others. Painting and sculpture seem to confront each other in the artist’s representation of Marie-Thérèse, which is shown in the exhibition’s assortment of works. >

May 2011 | 33

© 2011 EstatE of Pablo Picasso/artists rights sociEty (ars), NEw york. Photo by rob MckEEvEr. courtEsy gagosiaN gallEry”.

york. Photo by rob MckEEvEr. courtEsy gagosiaN gallEry”. © 2011 EstatE of Pablo Picasso/artists rights sociEty
© 2011 EstatE of Pablo Picasso/artists rights sociEty (ars), NEw york. thE MusEuM of ModErN
© 2011 EstatE of Pablo Picasso/artists rights sociEty (ars), NEw york. thE MusEuM of ModErN art/
licENsEd by scala/art rEsourcE, Ny. courtEsy gagosiaN gallEry”.

34 | may 2011

Pablo Picasso, Femme écrivant une lettre, top left. Pablo Picasso, Fille dessinanat á l’in´trieur, bottom left. Pablo Picasso, Buste de femme, below.

© 2011 EstatE of Pablo Picasso/artists rights sociEty (ars), NEw york. Photo by béatricE hatala.
© 2011 EstatE
of Pablo
Picasso/artists
rights sociEty
(ars), NEw york.
Photo
by béatricE
hatala.
courtEsy gagosiaN
gallEry

Have these works been shown anywhere else? The exhibit? Most of the works have never been exhibited in United States. We are so pleased to show loans from major institutions such as the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Museum of Modern Art, the Guggenheim, the Tate, and the Foundation Beyeler.

What is it like to have the surname Picasso? He was an artistic genius. You just want to share in the experience of a man with an insatiable curiosity and constant need to chal- lenge himself.

I suppose it goes without saying that your ancestry inspired your career path? Maybe so. I love art. I always have. Music and movies are also very much part of my life.

Did you ever meet Picasso? Unfortunately, I didn’t. He died when I was just born.

Why choose the Gagosian Galley to show the exhibit in? I was impressed when I saw the exhibition “Mosqueteros,” which took place in 2009 at the Gagosian Gallery in Chelsea. I suggested that the gallery organize an exhibition on Marie- Thérèse and Larry Gagosian loved the idea.

Picasso and Marie-Thérèse: L’amour fou will be on display at the Gagosian Gallery through June 25 (522 West 21st St.) The exhibit embodies the period of Picasso known as the “The Marie- Thérèse years” (1927-1941) and is accompanied by a fully illustrated catalog with essays by Rich- ardson, Diana Picasso and Elizabeth Cowling, Professor Emeritus of History of Art at Edin- burgh University; and never before published family photographs of Marie-Thérèse. o

Emeritus of History of Art at Edin- burgh University; and never before published family photographs of

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art

trey speegle.
trey speegle.

Paint By

num8ers

Trey Speegle brings back an old classic

By rachel morgan

The artist sounds off on his paint-by-number work, what inspires him and his Texas roots.

Tell me about your re- cent exhibition at Benri- mon Contemporary, ‘It’s Not About You.’ What were the major themes behind the work? The inspiration? Every piece has the word “you” in its title. Hence, ‘It’s Not About You.’ It’s ironic and a bit subversive at the same time. Everyone is always coming from their own perspective and living in their own head. The ten- dency is to take the world personally. This may be the time we live in or perhaps it’s a uniquely American trait, always making

or perhaps it’s a uniquely American trait, always making everything about us. What was theme of
or perhaps it’s a uniquely American trait, always making everything about us. What was theme of

everything about us.

What was theme of your show, ‘What Are You Waiting For?’ As with ‘It’s Not About You,’ ‘What Are You Wait- ing For?’ is both ironic and earnest, speaking to the viewer and my own internal dialogue at once. The surface and paint-by- number is the hook that pulls you in; once enticed, hopefully, you will linger enough to find some per- sonal meaning.

How does being from Houston influence your aesthetic? I’m not sure it really does. But being gay and

getting out of Texas probably influenced a lot, though.

So you also collect paint-by-number paintings—why do they speak to you? This all started when

I inherited a collec-

tion of some 200-plus vintage paint-by-number paintings from Michael O’Donoghue, a great friend and the original head writer of Saturday Night Live. When he passed away suddenly, his widow, Cheryl Hardwick, gave

the collection to me. Now I have something like 3,000.

I use them as a visual

vocabulary to informs the

work, but my work is not about paint-by-number[s.]

What book is on your nightstand right now? Clear Your Clutter with Feng Shui.

Where did you eat your

last meal? I ordered from my favor- ite West Village sushi joint, Sakura, and ate it in bed

What specific artist do you collect, if any? Warhol, Keith Haring, McDermott & McGough, Mark Morrisroe, Charles Lutz, Wayne Coe, Doug & Mike Starn, David Byrne,

Lawrence Weiner. I also participate in Art Jambo-

It’s Later Than You Think, top, It’s Not About You, below.

ree, which is a downtown artist’s collective— everything is $50 and under. I have gotten some great work there— Scott Lifshutz, Leah Durner, Maripol, Joshua Jordan, Richard Haines.

If you weren’t an artist, you would be?

I always thought it

would be nice to run a flower shop somewhere, but after having already been an art director and designer for Vogue, Vanity Fair, Us Weekly, etc. It took me decades to actu- ally even consider calling myself an artist and now I can’t imagine not wearing that hat.

Anything else?

I have to tell you, this

makes me think of a line my late friend Quentin Crisp once said. He was being interviewed at great length when he finally said, ‘You must stop this inter- view now as I have come to end of my personality.’ Me too.

Speegle will appear at the Chelsea Market Anthro- pologie May 7 from 10 a.m. to noon. He has a group show at Fair Folks and a Goat in New York opening June 1. o

show at Fair Folks and a Goat in New York opening June 1. o downtown’s best

downtown’s best GALLeRIes

Sperone WeStWater (257 Bowery, 212-999-7337) • GaGosian Gallery (522 west 21st st., 212-741-1717) • Cheim & read (547 west 25th st., 212-242-7727) The PaCe Gallery (534 west 25th st., 212-929-7000) • david Zwirner (525 west 19th st., 212-727-2070) • Casey KaPlan (525 west 21st st., 212-645-7335) >

36 | may 2011

ART WALLY FINDLAY EST. 1870
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art

quest for perfection

Michael Glancy’s science-infused glass and metal sculptures steal the show.

By Andrew Guarini

Fifteen years of Michael Glancy’s glass and metal sculptures take the stage at Infinite Obsessions at Barry Friedman, Ltd. This Rhode Island School of Design professor discusses his first New York exhibi- tion in more than five years and his newest literary venture.

Why use glass as a medium? It’s all about smoke and fire. Man’s involvement with glass spans from obsidian, volcanic ash used to make spears and ar- rowheads for 10,000 years or molten glass, which is refined glass that is five millennia old.

Why make the leap from the art world to the liter- ary one? The book [Infinite Obsessions, edited by Barry Friedman] gives a glimpse into my creative process for the last 15 years, which will hopefully enrich the exhibition for viewers.

Tell me about teaching at Rhode Island School of Design—why do you do it? I’m a graduate of RISD and I’ve been teaching there since after receiving my master’s [degree.] I think it’s incredibly stimulating to surround myself with

young, creative people. I do

it because they contribute

to my reality as much as I contribute to theirs.

What do you hope to convey to the literary world? In a world of e-books, our goal is to show that there are people who still believe in beautifully pro- duced books as cherished objects that are a rewarding experience. Books outlive artists, so we take them seriously.

What is the inspiration behind your art? The natural world, na-

ture and the physical world. Albert Einstein said, ‘What

I see in nature is a grand

design only imperfectly, one which a responsible person must look at with humility.’

How does your work relate to science? I think science informs

the work by inspiring the artist. In 1968, I was exposed to a very powerful film by Charles and Ray Eames called Powers of Ten. Essentially it deals with macro and micro phases

in nature, and I believe my work is an abstraction of either inner or outer space.

Do you feel that you are on a quest for perfection? I do. I began my explora- tion of the material of glass

Biologic star X. MArty doyle
Biologic star X.
MArty doyle

in 1970 and it took a decade before I had a show in Manhattan. It’s an impos- sible goal to master the material of glass. Perfection is a quest.

When did you first real- ize that you wanted to be an artist? I don’t know. Probably in first grade when I made a clay sculpture of an owl that my mom still has. She’s 93. I didn’t realize I wanted to be an artist until I came to college and hated business school and began taking art classes for therapy.

What book is on your nightstand? The Shape of Time by George Kubler and Explor- ing the Invisible by Lynn Gamwell.

What is the last piece of clothing you bought?

Michael Glancy.

A fleece by Under Armour. My son works for them as a designer.

The last meal you ate? Grilled lamb chops, which I made with mashed potatoes.

What is the project you have always wanted to do but never got around to? Building a classic wooden sailboat. I race sailboats during the sum- mer, namely my Beetle Cat, which is a beautiful little boat made in the 1920s in Massachusetts. It’s too big a learning curve to build, unfortu- nately, so I don’t think I’ll ever have the chance.

“Infinite Obsessions” runs from May 5 through July 15 at Barry Friedman, Ltd., 515 West 26th St. o

July 15 at Barry Friedman, Ltd., 515 West 26th St. o downtown’s best GALLeRIes TaxTer &

downtown’s best GALLeRIes TaxTer & Spengemann (459 West 18th st., 212-924-0212) • Gary Snyder (250 West 26th st., 212-929-1351) paul KaSmin (293 10th Ave., 212-563-4474) • Sean Kelly (528 West 29th st., 212-239-1181) • Friedman Benda (515 West 26th st., 212-239-8700) >

38 | may 2011

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john BeRens

john BeRens painting it on using a paintbrush. What is your inspiration? Architecture, bunkers, frescoes, heraldry,

painting it on using a paintbrush.

What is your inspiration? Architecture, bunkers, frescoes, heraldry, insignia, disruptive patterns, gar- dens, abstract art, African masks, Chinese land- scapes, Japanese temples. In this series, rhythmic patterns.

When did you first real- ize that you wanted to be an artist? I [have] made drawings and paintings since grade school, but it was at age 27

Steel Bar No. 32-5; below, Steel Bar No. 32-2.

while working as a news photographer and photo- graphing artists in their studios that I decided to go to art school and pursue art full-time.

What exhibit or work of yours are you most proud of? Why? What I’m working on is always what I like the best .

Did you start off in photography and sculp- ture? Why the move to painting? In the first years of my art practice, I was mainly making sculpture. When I

moved to New York in 1984, my small studio forced me to make sculptures closer to the wall and then on the wall. They were construct- ed with wood and steel and a pigmented plaster coating. Working on the wall kindled my awareness of the picture plane and other issues of painting. I subsequently called my fabrications ‘constructed paintings.’

What book is on your nightstand?

A book on African art.

What is the last piece of clothing you bought?

A Carhartt shirt at my fa-

vorite clothing store, Dave’s New York (581 Avenue of the Americas).

The last meal you ate? Crepes made by my 15-year-old daughter.

“Steel Bars” runs through May 14 at Ricco Maresca Gallery at 529 West 20th St. o

May 14 at Ricco Maresca Gallery at 529 West 20th St. o NYO art Burning metal
NYO
NYO

art

Burning

metal

Rene Pierre Allain manipulates his steel ‘canvases’ with chemicals and acid.

By Rachel Morgan

Rene Pierre Allain shares the story behind his mini- malist works—and how he manipulates acid, fire and chemicals to burn images on steel.

Tell me about your new- est exhibit, ‘Steel Bars.’ ‘Steel Bars’ is the latest series of what I call steel paintings—paintings made on steel without any use of pigments or paint. They are painted with steel-blackening compound and a heat torch on steel panels. In a departure from my more characteristically flatly painted finish, in this new work, brush strokes, gestural marks and drips interact with the hard edges of the geometry.

Why use steel? What does the use of this material convey? Steel is just another material, one that I have become comfortable working with. People think of steel as cold, unfriendly and unyielding—but I see it as totally malleable. I like it when it looks like it floats on the wall, somewhat dematerialized, while still retaining [the]characteris- tics [of] metal.

Rene Pierre Allain.
Rene Pierre Allain.

Tell me about the process. In the current work, the metal surface is prepared to a silvery satin finish on which some parts of the image are created with gun blue and other parts are made with heat from a torch. Gun blue is a mild acid that chemically blackens steel and is usu- ally applied as a patina. But in these works, I am

is usu- ally applied as a patina. But in these works, I am Mitchell-innes & nAsh

Mitchell-innes & nAsh (534 WeST 26Th ST., 212-744-7400) • Lehmann maupin (540 WeST 26Th ST., 212-255-2923)

marLborough (545 WeST 25Th ST., 212-463-8634) • mary boone (541 WeST 24Th ST., 212-752-2929) • benrimon Contemporary (514 WeST 24Th ST., 212-924-2400)

downtown’s best GALLeRIes

40 | may 2011

rader Galleries

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

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
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 
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

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

CARY WHITTIER

Exhibition view of Liam Gillick’s “Discussion Bench Platforms, A Volvo Bar + Everything Good Goes,” Casey Kaplan, New York, NY, February 18 - March 27, 2010.

Art

Kaplan, New York, NY, February 18 - March 27, 2010. Art Artistic AffAir NYO Casey Kaplan,

Artistic AffAir

NYO
NYO

Casey Kaplan, founder of New York Gallery Week and of Casey Kaplan Gallery, sounds off on the week-

Casey Kaplan.
Casey Kaplan.

How did you get started in the art world? I grew up in New York surrounded by the art world. No one in my family is in the business, but everyone collected art. They all bought art and put it on their walls, but once their walls were full, they were done. I grew up going to art galleries, going to museums, things like that. It just took.

What’s the earliest piece of art you remem-

42 | may 2011

long arts event, his own art background and how collecting starts early in his family.

By Rachel Morgan

ber seeing? My grandparents had

a Basquiat when I was a

kid that they bought from Mary Boone. I remember that was a really big deal because no one else had art quite like that.

How did the idea for Gallery Week come to fruition? It started under this idea

that when the recession initially hit, [we] felt that people stopped coming to galleries. It occurred to me that if people stop coming to galleries exclusively for financial reasons, then we as dealers were not pre- senting ourselves correctly.

If everyone was only look-

ing at art commercially, then we were at fault and we needed to band together

and show that the gallery

is much more of a site of education.

What does Gallery Week entail? On Friday, all the galler- ies in Chelsea and uptown who are participating will stay open late until 8 p.m. On Saturday, there’s going to be an event at the Whitney from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. On Sunday, the galler- ies on the Lower East Side, the Bowery and Soho will stay open late until 8 p.m. During this entire time, galleries will be having various events to augment the shows that they’re already having.

What’s the motivation behind having the gal- leries open later? It’s to create more possibilities for people to

come. Certainly people who work can come after work. It’s also to give it a more opening type of feel, more celebratory.

Is your daughter interested in art as well? Will she carry on the tradition? Absolutely. Her mother is a fashion designer. I’m an art dealer. So she’s around art and artists. Her room is filled with art. She already has somewhat of her own collection. A lot of it’s been given to her from gallery artists and some things I’ve bought for her. She’s 7. She’s around it every day.

What kinds of trends are you seeing in terms of sales? There are many clients and collectors that have

come back to the galleries. They’ve gotten used to the way things are in terms of the economy. There are also people who are inter- ested in putting money in art rather than in real estate or in other things. No matter what, if you have a great piece by the right artist and it’s priced right, there’s always someone for that.

The second annual New York Gallery Week takes place May 6-8 and features 60 contemporary art galleries and not-for-profit spaces in addition to the free events and programming. NYGW will benefit the Whitney Museum. For a full list of events, visit www.newyorkgalleryweek. com. Casey Kaplan Gallery is located at 525 West 21st St. o

For a full list of events, visit www.newyorkgalleryweek. com. Casey Kaplan Gallery is located at 525

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people

The

e volution

of a

Ballerina

The American Ballet Theatre’s principal dancer Michele Wiles talks about finally finding happiness in her own success. By Liz Wagner

American Ballet Theatre principal dancer Mi- chele Wiles found herself performing for an unusual audience one October morning—a small group of pot-bellied, frizzy-haired little girls in pink tights, at the Bedford-Stuyve- sant YMCA. Wiles, 30, taught the “Tiny Toes” class how to execute a chaînés without getting dizzy. She showed the girls how to look at a fixed point in the mirror for as long as possible before whipping their bodies around, and encouraged them to try it with her. They concentrated, but wobbled like zombies, spinning in circles. Wiles—Amy Adam’s blonder, thinner dop- pelgänger —evaluated their attempts, nodding and smiling politely. “Very good,” she finally pronounced. After the children made a few passes across the room she demonstrated what the turns could look like after some prac- tice. She placed her hands on her slender hips and catapulted into motion, spinning like a dreidel on ice, impossibly fast yet utterly composed. The girls burst into applause, and when Wiles stopped, she erupted with laughter. She got a kick out of them getting a kick out of her. She was happy. “I’m not stuck anymore,” she said later referring to her new attitude toward ballet, which took years of self-evaluation to acquire. She is among the most experienced ballerinas in the world today and has spent 13 years—nearly her entire adult life—at the American Ballet Theatre, which Mikhail Barysh- nikov made famous in the 1980s. Wiles, a Pasadena, Maryland, native, joined the corps de ballet at age 18. Two years later she moved up to soloist. And at age 25, she was promoted principal dancer—the highest rank in the ballet world. Since then she’s toured the globe dancing countless lead roles, and has secured a spot among New York City’s artistic elite. Currently, she is rehearsing the part of Kitri in Don Quixote, which she will perform at the Met in May. She is also prep- ping for her latest turn in Swan Lake, where she will yet again dance the part of angel-and-devil twins Odette and Odile—the same role Natalie Portman’s character, dancer Nina Sayers, portrayed in the movie Black Swan. Wiles is all too familiar with the film’s theme of self-induced pressure, though she has yet to experience a psychotic meta- morphosis from ethereal ballerina to paranoid demon-bird. But she recently went on her own transformative journey. All she ever wanted was to become the ultimate ballet dancer—but

44 | may 2011

didn’t expect to be completely confused when she succeeded.

“I thought that balloons were going to drop from the sky,”

she said. “I thought that the white horses would come in. Actu-

ally quite the opposite. I went through these crazy emotional outpourings after I was promoted. For so long, it was like,

I want to be principal. [I was] promoted and then years of

emotional backup came pouring out. I was forced to take a look at myself.”

A few days after her YMCA appearance, Wiles spent the

morning at the Manhattan Movement & Arts Center on the Upper West Side, rehearsing her part in Theme and Variations, which she performed last November in Cuba. She left the practice studio pink-faced and flushed, red Ly- cra leotard stained with sweat below her breasts, blond hairs

sticking out of her once-tight French twist. Still, she looked stunning, tall—she’s 5-foot-8—lean, muscled yet delicate, porcelain skin. She untied her size-8 Pointe shoes, slipped on

a pair of black boots and wrapped a knitted sweater around

her shoulders. Susan Jaffe, one of Wiles’ ballet coaches—and retired ABT principal dancer and Baryshnikov’s former protégé—followed Wiles out of the studio. Jaffe seemed to ap- preciate that Wiles was in the throes of dissecting her life.

“She is searching to be a real artist,” Jaffe said, “an artist with depth.” When Jaffe left, Wiles headed for the center’s cafe and grabbed a coffee and sesame bagel with cream cheese (yes, dancers do eat; they have to, to replenish the massive amounts of calories lost, Wiles said), plopped down on a chair and began to retrace her personal odyssey. She recalls her parents taking her to the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C., to watch the Royal Ballet’s production of Swan Lake with Darcey Bussell dancing the lead.

“I fell in love with the ballet and I fell in love with her,”

Wiles said. “I thought it was so beautiful and elegant and magical and a world I thought I wanted to be in.” Her father, a home builder, constructed a ballet studio in the basement of their house, which she rarely left. She agonized over missed steps and—perhaps channeling Nina Sayers—practiced until she was nearly perfect. She dismissed her parents’ demands to go to sleep in favor of staying up late to study ballet tapes and rehash routines she learned in class. “She was relentless with it,” Larry Wiles said of his >

Michele Wiles as Kitri in Don Quixote .

Michele Wiles as Kitri in Don Quixote.

GENE SCHIAVONE

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daughter during a phone conversation. “She would come home and practice at night what she learned for hours.” She convinced her parents to enroll her at the Kirov Academy of Ballet in D.C., a school specializing in classical Russian techniques. She received a full scholarship to attend, which obliged her to board full time at the institu- tion—at age 10. Being an hour and a half away from her parents and older brother tore Wiles up, but the determination to dance won out over homesickness. “It was something inside of me making me do it.” She took normal academic courses for five hours in the morning, but the majority of the curriculum involved ballet:

dance class from 2:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., indi- vidual rehearsal from 8:30 p.m. to 10 p.m. Even at a school of exceptional dancers, Wiles stood out. “She was extremely outstand- ing when she was here,” John Dougherty, Wiles’ social studies teacher said via phone. “When she took an [dancing] exam everyone went to go watch her because she was better than everybody else. Her legs could go higher than anybody’s.” Wiles entered three dance competitions during her last year at Kirov and won awards at all three, including the Gold Medal prize at the prestigious International Ballet Competition in Varna, Bulgaria. At 16, Wiles left Kirov Academy and headed straight to New York City to take on the Ameri- can Ballet Theatre. But after a four-month ap- prenticeship with ABT, Wiles didn’t make the company. Instead she was placed in the studio company, a lesser ensemble, which groomed dancers who had potential. “I came from a school where I was a star,” she said. “Prodigy. I got the attention. I came to [American Ballet Theatre] and I wasn’t really anybody here yet. It [was] like starting all over again.” Her family believed in her talent and made sacrifices to nurture it—Wiles’ mother staying with her two weeks a month for about two years, her father sometimes sleeping in his car at the Vince Lombardi Service Area just north of the New Jersey Turnpike to rest during long treks back to Pasadena. But, as Larry Wiles puts it, “I felt totally energized because I was doing this for someone who wanted to do it so bad.” Within a year, Wiles worked her way into the main company. She leapt into a manic rehearsal schedule, dancing up to 12 hours some days. Her body ached constantly. Since ABT is primarily a touring company—the New York season only lasts from May through July— Wiles quickly adapted to life on the road. She

46 | may 2011

quickly adapted to life on the road. She 46 | may 2011 will give performances in

will give performances in London, Washing- ton, D.C., Miami, Los Angeles and parts of Ja- pan this year, on top of class and rehearsal. She has graced the stage at the world’s most famous opera houses and has seen her name printed in international newspapers next to words such as “powerful,” “talented” and “impressive.” Wiles’ current dance partner, Cory Stearns, said he was slightly intimidated by her star status when they began working together three years ago. He was 21 at the time, and still a solo- ist. (He was promoted to principal in January). Ballet became Wiles’ identity. Wiles was ballet. But soon she realized she wasn’t O.K. with that. “I remember one day literally standing on the stage thinking, ‘What am I doing here?’” she said. “I think up until now I just went through this period of searching.” She described herself as an “automaton” ballerina who did everything for the ballet and said she often cried before performances to calm her nerves. “It was almost like I was searching for my soul in a way, you know?” Her personal journey was played out on- stage, and critics took note. A big blow came after a March 2009 London performance of Swan Lake, the same ballet, ironically, that Wiles fell in love with as a girl. She danced Odette/Odile, which requires both mechani- cal and emotional commitment, as reinforced in spectacularly manic fashion in Black Swan. While nearly every review praised Wiles’ technical prowess they also panned her acting. The Times in London cited her lack of “striking dramatic personality.” A Telegraph reviewer wrote he didn’t “buy her” as delicate Odette or as flirtatious Odile. A critic from The New York Times penned that she had a “reluctance to carry the story” as if it were her own, also opin- ing that she was “on the music but never in it.” Wiles admits that it’s difficult to hear nega- tive criticism, but concedes the London per-

Wiles as Myrta in Giselle.

formance was a bit hollow. She says the crisis of faith in her career was a big reason why. As Wiles plucked oversize bobby pins from her updo and let her thick hair fall just past her shoulders, she looked completely unaffected by that tough time in her life. Bigger things have transpired since then. Primarily, James McCullough, her husband. Her “soulful businessman, Jamessss.” Wiles said, lingering on the “s” just a bit. The couple was set up by one of ABT’s board members. McCullough, CEO of biotechnology com- pany Exosome Diagnostics, said he knew Wiles was utterly dedicated to her career but was surprised to learn she had dimension beyond the ballet. On that first date, they discussed their shared love of history and philosophy. “She’s a big thinker,” McCullough said on the phone. After two years of dating, they wed in early October at Madison Avenue Presbyterian Church. They recently returned from their honeymoon road-tripping across northern Italy. Now it seems Wiles isn’t drowning in dance now that the marriage is her focus. She no longer obsesses over titles—corps member, soloist, principal, star. She has also learned how to convert negative drivers—like the strife for perfection—into helpful energy. “That’s when you find your real confidence,” Wiles recently wrote in an email. “I like to ask myself how I want to feel and then I picture myself dancing in a positive way—this is a great technique to overcome pre-perfor- mance anxiety.” McCullough noticed the maturity in his wife’s dancing when she reprised the role of Odette/Odile at the Met last June. Wiles noticed the change in herself as well. “I feel like my dancing has flipped,” she said. “Like it’s coming from the inside out instead of the outside with nothing in.” During an early scene in Black Swan, ar- tistic director Thomas Leroy, played by Vin- cent Cassel, encourages high-strung Nina to take a chill-pill. “Perfection is not just about control,” he tells her. “It’s also about letting go.” Wiles recently had a similar revelation. She explained that she had heard someone say that if you clutch sand in your hand too tightly, it will slip away. She demonstrated, extending a graceful arm punctuated with a clenched fist. Wiles believes the same is true of the ballet. “If you can let it go,” she said, slowly opening her hand like a rosebud in bloom, “I think there’s something else that happens. You have space. Space to go to another dimension. Be an artist.” o

“I think there’s something else that happens. You have space. Space to go to another dimension.
Richard Serra Drawing A Retrospective Through August 28 The exhibition is made possible in part

Richard Serra Drawing

A Retrospective

Richard Serra Drawing A Retrospective Through August 28 The exhibition is made possible in part by
Richard Serra Drawing A Retrospective Through August 28 The exhibition is made possible in part by

Through August 28

The exhibition is made possible in part by the Jane and Robert Carroll Fund. It was organized by the Menil Collection, Houston.

metmuseum.org

Richard Serra, September, 2001, paintstick on handmade paper, Private collection. © Richard Serra. Photo: Rob McKeever.

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Diane von Furstenberg on China, New York and her new exhibit at the Pace Gallery in Beijing.

By Chiu-Ti Jansen

48 | may 2011

W hen Diane von Furstenberg published her autobiography Diane: A Signature Life in 1998, I rushed out to get myself a copy and devoured it

overnight. I did not grow up with her wrap dress—although now I do own one in her vintage reprint—but I was drawn to her free spirit, which travels between the old countries and the new world, between fashion and art. But little did I ever expect that someday I would interview her in China. For von Furstenberg, China was not a surprising destina- tion. I caught up with her in the few hours counting down to the opening reception for her “Journey of a Dress” exhibi- tion that opened at Pace Beijing in Beijing’s trendy 798 Art District on April 2. The exhibit, which highlights the 40- plus years of von Furstenberg’s career, includes 80 pieces. The original wrap dress from 1973, photographs, letters and von Furstenberg’s art collection, including a Warhol, will all be on display through May 14. In Shanghai, where I attended Pearl Lam’s dinner for von

Furstenberg’s family and friends and her black-tie Red Ball, I had plenty of opportunities to observe her in her interac- tions. Surrounded by her family members, including her only brother, Philippe, who flew in from Belgium, she spoke alternatively in French and in English, looking simultane- ously engaged and relaxed. “China inspires me today in the same way that New York has inspired me,” she said. She went on to explain that when she first moved from Europe to America at the age of 22, she was drawn to America because it seemed anything was possible. She said she feels very much the same way about China today. “Journey of a Dress” is a journey of an exhibition. It ends with China. The designer believed that the show would give the Chinese, who in the past four decades lived through a world very different from America, a window to an Ameri- can cultural history. Born to a Russian-born father and a Greek-born mother >

Erin Boisson Aries Ross Gayde Shelley Saxton Wesley Morrow Joan Goldberg Christopher Scianni Alyson Donnelly

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Erin Boisson Aries Ross Gayde Shelley Saxton Wesley Morrow Joan Goldberg Christopher Scianni Alyson Donnelly Richard

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Erin Boisson Aries Ross Gayde Shelley Saxton Wesley Morrow Joan Goldberg Christopher Scianni Alyson Donnelly Richard

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Erin Boisson Aries Ross Gayde Shelley Saxton Wesley Morrow Joan Goldberg Christopher Scianni Alyson Donnelly Richard

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Saxton Wesley Morrow Joan Goldberg Christopher Scianni Alyson Donnelly Richard Rothbloom Lara Leonard True Luxury

Alyson Donnelly

Morrow Joan Goldberg Christopher Scianni Alyson Donnelly Richard Rothbloom Lara Leonard True Luxury TriBeCa. Excl.

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TriBeCa. Excl. 4,200SF exquisitely designed loft with dramatic 23 foot ceilings, 3 bedrooms, 2.5 baths + home office, priceless silk walls + wall of glass opens to private 900SF patio. $9M. WEB# 1060870. Craig Filipacchi 212-452-4468 Jacques Foussard 212-452-4475

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WEB#1216060. Candace Roncone 212-906-0556 Craig Filipacchi We are pledged to the letter and spirit of U.S.
WEB#1216060. Candace Roncone 212-906-0556 Craig Filipacchi We are pledged to the letter and spirit of U.S.

We are pledged to the letter and spirit of U.S. policy for the achievement of equal housing opportunity throughout the Nation. We encourage and support an affirmative advertising and marketing program in which there are no barriers to obtaining housing because of race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin.

The Highline. features—and neighborhood feel—are what makes it enduringly popular, some brokers said. “Less density,

The Highline.

features—and neighborhood feel—are what makes it enduringly popular, some brokers said. “Less density, cobblestone streets, original loft buildings interspersed with new buildings within the context of the neighborhood,” said Kenneth Malian, senior executive vice presi-

dent and director of sales at Prudential Douglas Elliman. “Downtown still feels like a neighbor- hood; we have a new Hudson River Promenade, unique product, more light and air and terrific public transportation.” Shii Ann Huang, senior vice president and associate broker at Corcoran, also sees a neighborhood-like atmosphere downtown. “There is a real village or small-town feeling about many of the downtown areas that buyers often cite as the reason they are buying in the area,” Huang said. “Cobblestone streets and the charm of old New York contribute to that feeling. That and easy access to amenities draws in a broad crowd.” As for what’s next for the

neighborhood, continued growth seems to be the answer. “With section two of the High Line opening in June and Related’s soon-to-begin Hudson Rail Yards construction, West Chelsea has tremendous continued growth opportu- nity,” Zollinger said. “The new Avenues School, set to open in 2012, will make downtown an even greater home destination for families wanting proximity to a school on par with Dalton, Collegiate and Spence.” Stimpson and Hanja predict growth as well. “[It] will continue to expand

winner. Mostly things with character.” In terms of real estate popularity, downtown has always emerged as somewhat of a front- runner. When asked why, brokers’ pointed out the neighborhood’s unique feel. “[What makes the neighborhood unique is] the close proximity of neighborhoods with

distinct personalities,” Grant said. “Soho has a totally different feel from its neighbor Little Italy, which is different from Chinatown.” Zollinger also names area amenities as a major draw. “The downtown real estate market is unique because it offers exciting new areas for recre- ation and entertainment, including the High Line, Hudson River Park, celebrity architecture and exciting new restaurants,” he said. “These kinds of neighborhood attractions bring buyers because they don’t exist anyplace else.” Jill Mangone, vice president and director at Brown Harris

Stevens also said the High Line was a major plus for the area. “The High Line has had a tremendous effect on West Chelsea,” she said. “I think it has humanized what was a desolate and gritty area.” An eclectic group of people is what makes this area hot, some brokers said. “There is a juxtaposition [be- tween] young and old, wealthy and middle class, creative types and business execs, all harmoni- ous together,” said Meg Siegel, senior vice president at Sotheby’s International Realty. The neighborhood’s unique

brokers’ pick: Iconic down- towners
brokers’
pick:
Iconic
down-
towners

Robert De Niro Andy Warhol Ian Schrager Lou Reed Serge Becker Andre Balazs Sarah Jessica Parker Julian Schnabel Susan Sarandon Edward Burns Christy Turlington Anna Wintour Joey Ramone

100 | may 2011

eastward,” they said.

A plethora of new buildings has also popped

up downtown. The Financial District is marked by hot new developments like the Gehry-designed rental building 8 Spruce Street and condominiums developments 99 John, 88 Greenwich, 20 Pine Street, 67 Liberty Street, 75 Wall and the Wil-

liam Beaver House. In fact, some brokers think this area is on its way up.

“I really think that FiDi is going to be the

next big thing,” Hedaya said. “The value and building quality are really thing[s] that will emerge once more conveniences and retailers come down there.” In Battery Park City, the Visionaire and 1 Rector Park are in high demand. Soho boasts the Trump Soho Hotel Condominium with a hefty number of penthouse residences—11 to be exact—and amenities to match. Soho Mews is another luxury high-rise popping up in the trendy hood. Soho’s Jean Nouvel–designed 40 Mercer is also hot. Brokers point to One Jackson Square in Greenwich Village as a standout. Palazzo Chupi is another fan favorite. Developments along the waterfront in Greenwich Village are other marks of the area’s development—like Richard Meier’s Perry Street condos or Superior Ink at 400 West 12th St. “The Richard Meier towers on Perry Street instigated waterfront development along the West Side Highway,” Grant said. It’s no wonder that potential renters and buyers are flocking downtown now more than ever—with the abundance of shops, eateries and brand-new green space like the High Line, life down south (in Manhattan of course) is looking better and better. o

and brand-new green space like the High Line, life down south (in Manhattan of course) is
introducing The Zollinger Collection For Sale: 450 West 17th Street, 1509 3BR | 3BA |
introducing The Zollinger Collection For Sale: 450 West 17th Street, 1509 3BR | 3BA |

introducing

The Zollinger Collection

introducing The Zollinger Collection For Sale: 450 West 17th Street, 1509 3BR | 3BA | 1637

For Sale: 450 West 17th Street, 1509 3BR | 3BA | 1637sf Interior; 1753 sf Terrace Asking: $4,750,000 (CC. $2,110.49)

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For Sale: 450 West 17th Street, 1705 Conv. 2BR | 2BA | 827sf Interior; 196 sf Balcony Asking: $1,675,000 (CC: $875.21)

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For Sale: 450 West 17th Street, 1508/1509 4BR+ | 4BA+ | 2900 sf Interior; 1753 sf Terrace Asking: $7,145,000 (CC. $2,110.49)

1753 sf Terrace Asking: $7,145,000 (CC. $2,110.49) For Sale: 404 West 48th Street, 3B 1BR |

For Sale: 404 West 48th Street, 3B 1BR | 1BA | 500 sf Asking: $429,000 (Maint. $485.00)

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for exclusives, property tours, and client resources 450 WEST 17TH ST. #1403 NEW YORK, NY 10011
for exclusives, property tours, and client resources 450 WEST 17TH ST. #1403 NEW YORK, NY 10011

450 WEST 17TH ST. #1403 NEW YORK, NY 10011

resources 450 WEST 17TH ST. #1403 NEW YORK, NY 10011 • For Sale: 450 West 17th

For Sale: 450 West 17th Street, 1508 2BR | 2BA | 1266 sf Asking: $2,395,000 (CC. $1,225.55)

2BR | 2BA | 1266 sf Asking: $2,395,000 (CC. $1,225.55) Sold: 450 West 17th Street, 2507

Sold: 450 West 17th Street, 2507 2BR | 2.5BA | 1885 sf Asking: $4,575,000 (CC. $2,007.15)

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102 | MAY 2011

A NOTE FROM

THE OBSERVER MEDIA GROUP

THANK YOU

TO OUR

GENEROUS

SPONSORS

On March 16, friends and supporters of The Observer Media group gathered to toast the launch of NYO Magazine at The Aldyn on the Up- per West Side.

A lively mix of guests enjoyed cocktails crafted

with Bombay Sapphire, beer from Radeberger, and wines from Sud de France wines: Maison Al- bert Bichot - C’est la Vie, Domaine de la Patience - Chardonnay, Château Fontanche - Les Terroirs.

wines: Maison Al- bert Bichot - C’est la Vie, Domaine de la Patience - Chardonnay, Château
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106 | MAY 2011
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NYO MARKETPLACE MAY 2011 | 109

NYO directOrY

NYO directOrY Described as authentically modern, the apartments at 25 Broad at The Exchange offer sleek,

Described as authentically modern, the apartments at 25 Broad at The Exchange offer sleek, modern finishes in a historically landmarked building. Doorman living in the heart of the financial district offers residents the ideal location for easy access to dining, shopping and transportation. And within the building, ame- nities include residents’ lounge, game room, fitness center, children’s play room, golf simulator and more. 888. 430.6085 | 25broadnyc.com

golf simulator and more. 888. 430.6085 | 25broadnyc.com The affordaBle arT fair Spring 2011 , May

The affordaBle arT fair Spring 2011, May 5-8, 2011:

Celebrating the continued in- terest in owning original art, the Affordable Art Fair New York City (AAF NYC) re- turns to 7W New York (7 West 34th Street) present- ing contemporary art priced from $100 - $10,000. For tickets, programming, and more information www.aafnyc.com.

tickets, programming, and more information www.aafnyc.com. aBC CarpeT and home offers a diverse selection of globally

aBC CarpeT and home offers a diverse selection of globally sourced product at the cutting edge of design, beauty and sustainability. ABC encourages you to create your home as an expression of your vision and values. Its dynamic and inspiring assortment includes vintage & antiques, ABC Goodwood furniture from responsibly managed forests; chemical free organic beds; indigenous artistry from global cooperatives; jewelry and apothecary; tabletop and lighting, and the largest collection of rugs and carpets in the world. 888Broadway, New York, NY 10003, www.abchome. com, 212-473-3000

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Brown harriS STevenS, established in 1873, is the premier provider of residential real estate servic- es in New York. The company has offices through- out New York City, the Hamptons, North Fork and Palm Beach. Brown Harris Stevens offers more lux- ury residential exclusives than any other Manhattan firm, and serves as the exclusive affiliate of Christie’s International Real Estate Inc., a subsidiary of Chris- tie’s International PLC, the world’s oldest fine arts auctioneer. For more information, please visit www. BrownHarrisStevens.com.

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CuSTom BrokerS with 30 years in Manhattan Real Estate is a leader in the exchange of personal attention and spe- cialized expertise. Think private banking; discreet and intimate. Our boutique-style firm stands out in a world where more and more business is conducted in cyberspace. We believe nothing can replace the personal touch in a very personal profession! We combine modern tools with old-fashioned work ethic.CuSTom BrokerS

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W. 27th St. #200, 212.268.4952. www.flomenhaftgallery.com 29Th annual fred & adele aSTaire awardS , the only

29Th annual fred & adele aSTaire awardS, the only awards honoring excellence in dance & cho- reography on Broadway and on film, will be the most electrifying evening of the theater season as the greatest talents of the dance world step to the stage of the Skirball Center for the Performing Arts at NYU on May 15. Hosted by Bebe Neuwirth & Lee Roy Reams the evening will feature dazzling numbers from this year’s smash musicals plus specially created production numbers guaranteed to light up the stage and the greatest tal- ents will be honored with the coveted prize including 2011 Douglas Watt Lifetime Achievement Award Win- ner legendary dancer and choreographer Jacques D’amboise. General seating tickets $150 & $75; VIP packages including pre-cocktail reception, Awards

Show & post performance with the winners and guest stars including Tony Award winners Brian Stokes Mitchell and Len Cariou $425. To order tickets go to www.theastaireawards.org

Cariou $425. To order tickets go to www.theastaireawards.org Established in 1938, Jaguar of greaT neCk was

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JuST ShadeS, The source for cus- tom and ready made lampshades, has been serving the trade and public for over 40 years. This ìgo-toî shop for interior designers and setJuST ShadeS

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Both of ligne roSeT’S Man- hattan locations display Eu- rope’s largest collection of bril- liant contemporary furniture designs. We are proud to intro- duce new groups of upholstered chairs created by the late, renowned Pierre Paulin just before his death last spring. Our talented design staffs are always ready to work with you on that one special piece or on a total plan for your new condominium. For the full Ligne Roset collection and Quick Ship program go to www.lignerosetny.com. 250 Park Avenue South at 20th, 212-375-1036 155 Wooster Street at Houston Street, 212-253-5629.

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110 | MAY 2011

NYO directOrY

NYO directOrY Nikki Field , Senior Vice Presi- dent, Associate Broker, has been a dynamic presence

Nikki Field, Senior Vice Presi- dent, Associate Broker, has been a dynamic presence with Sotheby’s International Realty since 1998, consistently ranking among the global agency’s top five producers and accomplish- ing sales of over one billion dol- lars. America’s Top 400 Real Estate Professionals, an annual ranking sponsored by The Wall Street Jour- nal, ranked Nikki in the top 100 agents in America and in the top 10 in New York City for Sales Volume. For more information, visit www.nikkifield.com.

Volume. For more information, visit www.nikkifield.com. JaN hasheY , Managing Direc- tor, PrudeNTial dOuGlas el-

JaN hasheY, Managing Direc- tor, PrudeNTial dOuGlas el-

limaN, began her interest in NY Real Estate 20 years ago visiting from London where she had been

a painter. “I was stunned by the

scale of these exquisite volumes / lofts which many artists occupied.” Jan has consis- tently led the quest for space downtown achieving RECORD SALES and INDUSTRY AWARDS annually. “Steve Halprin has worked with me for 10 years, an indispensable partner bringing financial wizardry to the team.”

sOThebY’s The East Side Manhattan office is just steps away from Central Park in one of the most de- sirable neighborhoods in the city. It is known for itssOThebY’s

prime Manhattan real estate, which includes some of the city’s most elegant historic and prewar homes. Our brokerage staff offers unsurpassed service to our clients. Our agents are thoroughly familiar with the neighborhoods in this area, and with all aspects of sales, including the demands of the luxury market. For more information, please visit www.sothebyshomes.com/nyc

For more information, please visit www.sothebyshomes.com/nyc Does your home or office have a great view? Explore

Does your home or office have a great view? Explore and enjoy it to the utmost with Oberwerk Long- Range Binoculars and Binocular Telescopes. High- est quality optics provide Stunning clarity and sharp- ness at surprisingly affordable prices. See us online at www.giantbinoculars.com For free catalog, call 866-623-7937 or email to info@oberwerk.com OBERWERK CORPORATION 866-623-7937. www. giantbinoculars.com.

Olde GOOd ThiNGs – your source for cool and eclectic altered and archi- tectural uniques and arti- facts! You name it we may even have it! Designers and dealers welcome! Vintage and industrial chic our specialty! Marble mantles and chandeliers ga- lore. Any further information needed please e-mail mail@oldegoodthings.com. Chelsea Flagship-Store Union-Sq Upper West Side, 124 W. 24th St. 5 East 16th St., 450 Columbus Av., 212-989-8401. 212-989- 8814. 212-341-7668.Olde GOOd ThiNGs

PhiliP CaTaNia’s magnificent artwork originates from daily life. The complexi- ties and simplicities within each piece inspire an intuitive sense of hope, cour- age, and energy which move your sensi- bilities. His ideas are in accordance with current trends and perspectives. Catania’s timeless and therapeutic art are gifts which he gladly shares with the entire world. phone: (607) 965-8048. www. philipcatania.com. philipsprints@hotmail.com

965-8048. www. philipcatania.com. philipsprints@hotmail.com For nearly a century, PrudeNTial dOuGlas elli- maN has
965-8048. www. philipcatania.com. philipsprints@hotmail.com For nearly a century, PrudeNTial dOuGlas elli- maN has

For nearly a century, PrudeNTial dOuGlas elli- maN has been recognized as a leader in the residen- tial real estate industry. With more than 3,500 agents and over 60 offices from Manhattan to Montauk, the company’s reach is unsurpassed. Prudential Douglas Elliman offers its customers a comprehensive array of services including residential sales and rental bro- kerage, retail and commercial sales & leasing, relo- cation, new development marketing, property man- agement, mortgage brokerage and title insurance. So whether you’re in Manhattan, Brooklyn, Queens, Westchester or Long Island, including the Hamptons and North Fork, there is a Prudential Douglas Elliman office and agent ready to assist you in any of your real estate needs. Please contact 1.800.ELLIMAN or visit elliman.com

JOsh rubiN, Senior Vice President, Associate Broker, and Founder of the Rubin Group at JOsh rubiN Prudential douglas elliman . With a combined 30 years experience, the Rubin Group is Prudential douglas elliman. With a combined 30 years experience, the Rubin Group is one of the top producers

in the entire Prudential network.

Josh’s philosophy is simple: Listen intently to the cli- ent’s needs, provide undivided attention and a work ethic that has been described as “always on”. Recent sellers had this to say: Josh stands out as the most knowledgeable, responsible, resilient, responsive, ac- countable and effective real estate partner we have ever worked with.

SLATE

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sOThebY’s The Downtown Manhattan office is located in the fashionable SoHo area and specializes in all down- town neighborhoods, from the up-and coming to the established. Our agents can bring valuable insights to your search, whether for a detailed historic town- house or a sleek modernist loft. They possess in-depth knowledge about these properties, their history and their surroundings and understand the rich and varied personalities of the many neighborhoods we serve, whether uptown or downtown. For more information, please visit, www.sothebyshomes.com/nyc

more information, please visit, www.sothebyshomes.com/nyc sTribliNG sells the fin- est downtown residences from full

sTribliNG sells the fin- est downtown residences from full service offices in Chelsea and Tribeca. In fact, only Stribling can trace its brokerage roots to the original development of Chelsea in 1819. StriblingsTribliNG

brokers are experienced, knowledgeable profession- als who bring exceptional results and the highest levels of service to the sale of gem studios, luxurious lofts, dream penthouses and everything in between. In Flatiron, Gramercy, Chelsea, Meat Packing, East and West Villages, Soho, Tribeca, FIDI and the Lower East Side, the right broker makes all the difference. Visit us at stribling.com

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JAMES BERNAL

PHILANTHROPYJAMES BERNAL Keeping the Peace Rich Palermo of the Anti- Violence Project makes it his mission

Keeping the Peace Rich Palermo of the Anti- Violence Project makes it his mission to
Keeping
the Peace
Rich Palermo of the Anti-
Violence Project makes it his
mission to eradicate violence
within the LGBTQ community.
By Natalie Howard

Palermo, who was chairman of the board for three years and received the Stonewall Foundation’s Allan Morrow Prize for Excellence in Board Leadership, sounds off on what it’s really like to work at the largest LGBTQ anti-violence organization in the country.

Why did you decide to become involved specifically with AVP? I felt that any work I did with AVP would re- ally make a difference. AVP is the largest LGBTQ anti-violence organization in the country—and we only have 23 employees. Their mission also really drew me in. AVP is a safety net for our community, for people who are vulnerable, for people who are the victims of hate crimes or domestic violence.

What is your role at AVP? AVP has five standing committees, and I’m on the development committee. We’re in charge of organizing and planning events and reaching out to new supporters. In September, [I’ll be] co-hosting the Courage Awards, our biggest fund-raiser of the year.

Tell me more about the Courage Awards. The Courage Awards is AVP’s largest annual fund-raiser, where AVP honors outstanding in- dividuals, organizations and corporations whose work on behalf of the LGBTQ and HIV-affected communities has made a difference. This year, the 15th Annual Courage Awards will take place

112 | MAY 2011

on Sept. 22 at Studio 450 (450 West 31st St.). I am serving as a co-host of the event, with Kyle Blood, Brenda Bello and party promoter Daniel Nardicio.

Why is this event so important? It gives us a chance to honor the great work being done by the honorees in the past, we have honored politicians, Fortune 500 companies, activists, journalists and bloggers. It offers our supporters and people new to the organization a fun way to get together and learn more about AVP and its important work.

How does AVP serve the community? Our direct client services include provid- ing support for victims of violence. There’s an entire spectrum of violence that runs the gamut, from walking down the street in Chelsea holding hands with your boyfriend and feeling scared to instances far more serious, like getting beat up. Through our community outreach, we’re working hard to make people safe. We offer training in things like safe online dating and we work with the police to understand our community better.

What is the most important service AVP offers? Definitely our 24-hour bilingual hot line. It’s important to realize that our number is available for anyone with any problem at all. You can call it if you’ve just been called a fag; you got punched in the face; you had an argument with your part- ner; or you’re feeling scared, depressed, suicidal, anything. On average, our hot line receives one call every four hours.

What is the most memorable moment of your time with AVP? Years ago, an acquaintance of mine was leav- ing a bar in Chelsea with friends. They left and got in a cab. While he was waiting for another cab, a group came over to him, called him a fag and punched him in the face, breaking his jaw. When I found out, I reached out to him. I sent him an email, telling him about AVP. He emailed me back saying that when it happened, he had remembered my talking about AVP and had contacted them. They brought him in, gave him counseling, took him to the police station and made sure it got classified as a hate crime—and they already had someone in custody.

From where does AVP get its funding? More than 50 percent of our funding comes from our amazing donors and private founda- tions. The rest is from the government—city, state and federal.

What is the most difficult part of being a part of AVP? Day after day, dealing with people who are victims of hatred and fear takes a toll. It’s a really hard thing. As soon as you’ve finished help- ing someone and you’re feeling good, you get another call.

What book is on your nightstand right now? A Confederacy of Dunces by John Kennedy Toole. It’s been sitting on my nightstand for quite some time.

Where did you eat your last meal, and what was it? My last meal was a great, traditional, Sunday Italian dinner on Long Island at my parents’ house.

For more information about AVP, visit www.avp.org. o

Sunday Italian dinner on Long Island at my parents’ house. For more information about AVP, visit
CHAMBER
CHAMBER

ORCHESTRA

CHAMBER ORCHESTRA H O N O R I N G Kim Bleimann and Laurie and Richard
CHAMBER ORCHESTRA H O N O R I N G Kim Bleimann and Laurie and Richard

H O N O R I N G

Kim Bleimann and Laurie and Richard Brueckner

A R T I S T I C

H O N O R E E

Toby Perlman and the Perlman Music Program

FEATURING

Ryu Goto violin

ROSSINI

SIBELIUS

ME NDE L S S OHN

SARASATE

MOZART

TCHAIKOVSKY

Overture to L’Italiana in Algeri Valse Triste Excerpts from A Midsummer Night’s Dream Zigeunerweisen, Op. 20 with violinist Ryu Goto Ave verum corpus, K. 618 Serenade in C for Strings, Op. 48

MONDAY MAY 16, 2011 7:00 PM

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AT JAZZ AT LINCOLN CENTER

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and a personal music air. ” — LORIN MAAZEL PHOTOS: ORPHEUS (LARRY FINK AT STUDIO 535);

PHOTOS: ORPHEUS (LARRY FINK AT STUDIO 535); GOTO (© UNIVERSAL MUSIC)

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Hai Bo anD Pace Beijing, © 2010

Hai Bo anD Pace Beijing, © 2010 Diane von Furstenberg, 2010, by Hai Bo.

Diane von Furstenberg, 2010, by Hai Bo.

stuDio By AnDy WArhol. © DiAne Von FurstenBerg stuDio© 2011 the AnDy WArhol FounDAtion For the VisuAl Arts, inc. / Artists rights society, neW yorkDVF

NYO
NYO

FASHION

Diane von Furstenberg, 1974, by Andy Warhol.

who was a Holocaust survivor, von Fursten- berg grew up in Belgium and moved to New York after she married the late Prince Egon von Furstenberg of Germany. Before she of- ficially became a princess, she vowed to retain her independence by having a career. Despite no formal training in fashion design, she has an instinct for “mak[ing] life elegant and easy for women” and a good busi- ness acumen befitting for an economics major at the University of Geneva in Switzerland, where she met Prince von Furstenberg. In 1973 she introduced the iconic wrap dress. By 1976, five million dresses had been sold, land- ing her on the cover of Newsweek. In 1985, she moved to Paris, where she started the French publishing house Salvy. She returned to America in the early ’90s, finding herself a stranger again to New York. She reintroduced the wrap dress in 1997, writing her own comeback story. When von Furstenberg first set up her design studio and showroom in the then backwater meatpack- ing district in the late ’90s, she led the pack of

China inspires me today in the same way that New York has inspired me.

DVF danced at the Pace Beijing opening after-party.

fashion designers who eventually migrated downtown. She told me that she was often asked if she would have thought about ending up in China. Growing up in Europe, she was always fascinated with China: from the The Adventures of Tintin, a series of comic strips known as a quintessential story about China— to 18th-century chinoiserie aesthetics to the Cultural Revolution. The retrospective at Pace Beijing was a well-timed branding strategy for von Furst- enberg’s dream of “selling every Chinese a T- shirt.” Currently, her DVF brand operates two boutiques in Beijing and Shanghai. Before the brand announces a major nationwide rollout, von Furstenberg would be building on her celebrity draw to create a following among the seasoned buyers in Beijing and Shanghai. >

50 | may 2011

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Chen Lei

NYO
NYO

Fashion

DVF with her wrap dresses prior to her Pace Beijing retrospective opening.

The wrap dress is, physically and meta- phorically, a journey for von Furstenberg. The garment itself is an embodiment of freedom— free from a zipper, buttons, iron and the dictate of a ’70s feminist bow-tie pant suit. The wrap dress means freedom to feel like a woman. I asked the designer why freedom was so important to her. “Maybe it came from my mother—when she was 20 she was a prisoner [at a concentra- tion camp] in Germany. She was reduced to nothing. It was a miracle that she survived. I was a miracle that was born 18 months later. My pursuit of freedom, strength and inde- pendence and [my determination to] never be a victim very much came from my mother’s experience.” While celebrating women’s confidence and independence, she did not subscribe to a she-man version of womanhood. “Feel like a woman, wear a dress”—the slogan that von Furstenberg has made popular—was a

52 | may 2011

breakthrough of the false dichotomy between he and she and between career track and sex appeal. She taught women that it was possible to be sexy and powerful at the same time. Von Furstenberg was one of the first fash- ion designers who significantly intersected with the world of contemporary art. Andy Warhol painted her in both the ’70s and the ’80s. Francesco Clemente painted a portrait the day she first became a grandmother. The Beijing show has incorporated new artworks that did not exist in its previous incarnations in Russia and Brazil. She re- cently posed for Hai Bo’s photographic por- trait in the artist’s studio in the outskirts of Beijing. She also sat for Chuck Close in his New York studio, who took a picture of her swollen face and bruised cheekbones right after a bad skiing accident. “The last thing I would want to do [after the accident] was to be photographed. But it came out great,” she told me.

Zhang Huan created three ash paintings, applying ashes collected from Buddhist temples in Shanghai to canvases of an

American flag, a Chinese flag and a portrait of von Furstenberg inspired by fashion photog- rapher Peter Lindbergh’s photograph of her for the October 2009 issue of Harper’s Bazaar.

Li Songsong’s thick impasto portrait of her

was based on a photograph that appeared on

the cover of Interview magazine in March

1977. (She did not sit for Zhang and Li.) In the

artistic renderings as well as in real life, she was glamorous, but with a European noncha- lance and bohemian flair that reminded me

of a Parisian artist. There was no trace of a

plastic beauty from Hollywood. There could be no better example of how art and fashion intersect than through the lens of von Furstenberg and her iconic designs, a fact she is well aware of. “Art is a reflection of our time,” she said. “Fashion is a reflection of our time.” o

fact she is well aware of. “Art is a reflection of our time,” she said. “Fashion
“Bright Day”, Oil and Acrylic on Canvas, 2011, 82 x 62 inches
“Bright Day”, Oil and Acrylic on Canvas, 2011, 82 x 62 inches

America Martin

M G
M G

New Works

Mark Gallery

11 Grand Avenue, Englewood, NJ 07631

T: 201-568-6275

Mon. through Sat. 10 am to 6 pm or by appointment

www.mark-gallery.com

alexey yurenev

a look from Tucker.
a look from
Tucker.
NYO
NYO

fashion

MotherTucker

alexey yurenev a look from Tucker. NYO fashion MotherTucker Tucker designer Gaby Basora talks print inspiration,

Tucker designer Gaby Basora talks print inspiration, designing for Target and what’s next for New York’s most colorful brand. By Coco Mellors

Designer Gaby Basora.
Designer
Gaby Basora.

You started out in the fashion industry as a stylist. What made you take the leap from styling to designing?

When I was styling, I was always trolling through vintage and fabric stores finding pieces for jobs. I would buy fabrics that appealed to me and keep them in my closet until one day

I would decide that I needed a trench coat

and [would] make one out of it. People started asking me on the street where I got my clothes.

I think that little bit of attention compelled me to think about designing for other people.

You have four sisters. Did growing up around so many women influence the feminine aesthetic of your clothing? I grew up in Los Angeles in a house filled to the brim with my sisters and our girlfriends, so there is femininity to the brand. At the same time, there’s also versatility.

Where do you draw inspiration from for your designs? The women that I love and constantly refer- ence in terms of aesthetic are Monica Vitti, Julie Christie and Brigitte Bardot.

New York is a city dominated by black clothing; why did you choose to create a

line so imbued with color? I love to wear black and think there’s a real beauty and simplicity to it. But I think a lot of people wear black because they’re scared to risk color or make mistakes and not look sophisticated.

How has the line developed? It started with the top and then it was a bit like “This is the House that Jack Built” in the sense that the blouse became a dress, which became a skirt, and so on. I don’t have formal training, so the first blouse came from work- ing on a dress form and pinning it together. Even though we’ve grown so much, I always

try to operate like a small business where there is a real thoughtfulness to everything we do.

Why did you decide to make all your gar- ments in New York? I think there are only a handful of designers that are committed to more local production, and for me it just feels right. I have a deep affinity towards the woman who owns the fac- tory that sews most of our collections. There’s something about the process that is really artistic. The way that the clothing is produced is the way luxury goods are, minus certain finishings that would raise our price point. o

is produced is the way luxury goods are, minus certain finishings that would raise our price

54 | may 2011

Participating Galleries and Not for Profits

303 Gallery Miguel Abreu Gallery Alexander and Bonin Artists Space

Nicelle Beauchene Gallery Marianne Boesky Gallery Tanya Bonakdar Gallery Bortolami Gallery Gavin Brown’s enterprise CRG Gallery Canada Cheim & Read James Cohan Gallery Lisa Cooley

Creative Time D’Amelio Terras Elizabeth Dee Gallery The Drawing Center Eleven Rivington Derek Eller Gallery Feature Inc. Zach Feuer Gallery Foxy Production Friends of the Highline James Fuentes LLC Laurel Gitlen Marian Goodman Gallery Alexander Gray Associates Greenberg Van Doren Gallery Greene Naftali Jack Hanley Gallery Harris Lieberman Hauser & Wirth Casey Kaplan

Sean Kelly Gallery Anton Kern Gallery Kimmerich The Kitchen Nicole Klagsbrun Andrew Kreps Gallery Lehmann Maupin Gallery Galerie Lelong Luhring Augustine Metro Pictures Mitchell-Innes & Nash David Nolan New York On Stellar Rays The Pace Gallery Participant Friedrich Petzel Gallery Printed Matter Public Art Fund Andrea Rosen Gallery SculptureCenter Jack Shainman Gallery Sikkema Jenkins & Co. Swiss Institute Taxter & Spengemann Team Gallery Rachel Uffner Gallery Wallspace White Columns Tracy Williams, Ltd. David Zwirner

Wallspace White Columns Tracy Williams, Ltd. David Zwirner Participating Artists Radcliffe Bailey Kim Beck Frank Benson
Wallspace White Columns Tracy Williams, Ltd. David Zwirner Participating Artists Radcliffe Bailey Kim Beck Frank Benson
Wallspace White Columns Tracy Williams, Ltd. David Zwirner Participating Artists Radcliffe Bailey Kim Beck Frank Benson
Wallspace White Columns Tracy Williams, Ltd. David Zwirner Participating Artists Radcliffe Bailey Kim Beck Frank Benson
Wallspace White Columns Tracy Williams, Ltd. David Zwirner Participating Artists Radcliffe Bailey Kim Beck Frank Benson
Wallspace White Columns Tracy Williams, Ltd. David Zwirner Participating Artists Radcliffe Bailey Kim Beck Frank Benson
Wallspace White Columns Tracy Williams, Ltd. David Zwirner Participating Artists Radcliffe Bailey Kim Beck Frank Benson
Wallspace White Columns Tracy Williams, Ltd. David Zwirner Participating Artists Radcliffe Bailey Kim Beck Frank Benson
Wallspace White Columns Tracy Williams, Ltd. David Zwirner Participating Artists Radcliffe Bailey Kim Beck Frank Benson
Wallspace White Columns Tracy Williams, Ltd. David Zwirner Participating Artists Radcliffe Bailey Kim Beck Frank Benson

Participating Artists

Radcliffe Bailey Kim Beck Frank Benson and Ken Price Ashley Bickerton Fernando Bryce John Chamberlain

Donald Judd

Olga Chernysheva

Matt Keegan

Steven Claydon

William Kentridge

Caetano de Almeida

Martin Kippenberger

Folkert de Jong

Jakob Kolding

Willem de Kooning

Leon Kossoff

Brian DeGraw

John Knight

John Divola

Sean Landers

Cheryl Donegan & Tom

Louise Lawler

Meacham

Judy Ledgerwood

Debo Eilers

Nate Lowman

Roe Ethridge

Florian Maier-Aichen

Josh Faught & William J. O’Brien

Robert Mapplethorpe

Ori Gersht

Katy Moran

Amy Granat

Robert Moskowitz

Renée Green

Carter Mull

Mark Grotjahn

Naoto Nakagawa

Subodh Gupta

Jaume Plensa

Hilary Harnischfeger

Raha Raissnia

Jaume Plensa Hilary Harnischfeger Raha Raissnia www.newyorkgalleryweek.com David Ratcliff Alexander Ross
Jaume Plensa Hilary Harnischfeger Raha Raissnia www.newyorkgalleryweek.com David Ratcliff Alexander Ross
Jaume Plensa Hilary Harnischfeger Raha Raissnia www.newyorkgalleryweek.com David Ratcliff Alexander Ross
Jaume Plensa Hilary Harnischfeger Raha Raissnia www.newyorkgalleryweek.com David Ratcliff Alexander Ross
Jaume Plensa Hilary Harnischfeger Raha Raissnia www.newyorkgalleryweek.com David Ratcliff Alexander Ross
Jaume Plensa Hilary Harnischfeger Raha Raissnia www.newyorkgalleryweek.com David Ratcliff Alexander Ross
Jaume Plensa Hilary Harnischfeger Raha Raissnia www.newyorkgalleryweek.com David Ratcliff Alexander Ross

www.newyorkgalleryweek.com

David Ratcliff

Alexander Ross

Salvatore Scarpitta

Stephen Vincent

Joan Semmel

Kara Walker

Dasha Shishkin

Gillian Wearing

Alan Shields

Garth Weiser

Xaviera Simmons

Jesse Willenbring

Li Songsong

Michael Williams

Richard Tuttle

Ivan Witenstein

Juan Usle

Aaron Young

NYGW 2011 benefits the Whitney Museum of American Art

A special thanks to the NYGW Sponsors and Partners

Founding Sponsor

Museum of American Art A special thanks to the NYGW Sponsors and Partners F o u

Sarra Fleur aBou-el-Haj @ lVa+ lindSey ByrneS

NYO
NYO

fashion

a rachel

antonoff

look.

Old School Style

ByrneS NYO fashion a rachel antonoff look. Old School Style Rachel Antonoff designs inspire a sense

Rachel Antonoff designs inspire a sense of nostalgia By Priscilla Polley

Lifelong New Yorker Rachel Antonoff started off her collection with just three dresses. Since then, her nostalgic pieces have become a go-to for fashion’s latest set of ingenues. Antonoff’s first stint in fashion was work- ing in public relations at Rebecca Taylor. She left for a career in writing, vowing never to return to the world of fashion. But it seems it was inevitable that she do just that. “One magical summer I was living in the West Village with my equally clothing-ob- sessed roommate Alison Lewis,” Antonoff said. “Every night we would get dressed up and go out on the town. We had all these ideas for dresses that we wish we had, so we decided to make them.” Thus, a fashion label was born. The pair convinced the now-defunct Nolita boutique I Heart to sell their wares under the collection name Mooka Kinne