NYO_MAG_Downtown_COVER.

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RM027_NYObserver_Feb22_2011_Ad.indd 2-3 RM027_NYObserver_Feb22_2011_Ad.indd 2-3 RM027_NYObserver_Feb22_2011_Ad.indd 2-3 RM027_NYObserver_Feb22_2011_Ad.indd 2-3 RM027_NYObserver_Feb22_2011_Ad.indd 2-3 RM027_NYObserver_Feb22_2011_Ad.indd 2-3 RM027_NYObserver_Feb22_2011_Ad.indd 2-3 RM027_NYObserver_Feb22_2011_Ad.indd 2-3 RM027_NYObserver_Feb22_2011_Ad.indd 2-3 RM027_NYObserver_Feb22_2011_Ad.indd 2-3 RM027_NYObserver_Feb22_2011_Ad.indd 2-3 RM027_NYObserver_Feb22_2011_Ad.indd 2-3 RM027_NYObserver_Feb22_2011_Ad.indd 2-3 RM027_NYObserver_Feb22_2011_Ad.indd 2-3 RM027_NYObserver_Feb22_2011_Ad.indd 2-3 RM027_NYObserver_Feb22_2011_Ad.indd 2-3 RM027_NYObserver_Feb22_2011_Ad.indd 2-3 RM027_NYObserver_Feb22_2011_Ad.indd 2-3 RM027_NYObserver_Feb22_2011_Ad.indd 2-3 RM027_NYObserver_Feb22_2011_Ad.indd 2-3 RM027_NYObserver_Feb22_2011_Ad.indd 2-3 RM027_NYObserver_Feb22_2011_Ad.indd 2-3 RM027_NYObserver_Feb22_2011_Ad.indd 2-3 RM027_NYObserver_Feb22_2011_Ad.indd 2-3 RM027_NYObserver_Feb22_2011_Ad.indd 2-3 RM027_NYObserver_Feb22_2011_Ad.indd 2-3 RM027_NYObserver_Feb22_2011_Ad.indd 2-3 RM027_NYObserver_Feb22_2011_Ad.indd 2-3 RM027_NYObserver_Feb22_2011_Ad.indd 2-3 RM027_NYObserver_Feb22_2011_Ad.indd 2-3 RM027_NYObserver_Feb22_2011_Ad.indd 2-3 RM027_NYObserver_Feb22_2011_Ad.indd 2-3 RM027_NYObserver_Feb22_2011_Ad.indd 2-3 RM027_NYObserver_Feb22_2011_Ad.indd 2-3 RM027_NYObserver_Feb22_2011_Ad.indd 2-3 RM027_NYObserver_Feb22_2011_Ad.indd 2-3 RM027_NYObserver_Feb22_2011_Ad.indd 2-3 RM027_NYObserver_Feb22_2011_Ad.indd 2-3 RM027_NYObserver_Feb22_2011_Ad.indd 2-3
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2/16/2011 2:47:11 PM 2/16/2011 2:47:11 PM 2/16/2011 2:47:11 PM 2/16/2011 2:47:11 PM 2/16/2011 2:47:11 PM 2/16/2011 2:47:11 PM 2/16/2011 2:47:11 PM 2/16/2011 2:47:11 PM 2/16/2011 2:47:11 PM 2/16/2011 2:47:11 PM 2/16/2011 2:47:11 PM 2/16/2011 2:47:11 PM 2/16/2011 2:47:11 PM 2/16/2011 2:47:11 PM 2/16/2011 2:47:11 PM 2/16/2011 2:47:11 PM 2/16/2011 2:47:11 PM 2/16/2011 2:47:11 PM 2/16/2011 2:47:11 PM
Mille spread-final.indd 3 4/29/11 11:45:36 AM
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RUCHÉ one-arm sofa with table by Inga Sempé.
250 Park Avenue South
New York
(212) 375-1036
www.lignerosetny.com
155 Wooster Street
New York
(212) 253-5629
www.lignerosetny.com
4131 Main Street
Philadelphia
(215) 487-2800
www.rosetphilly.com
160 NE 40th Street
Miami
(305) 576-4662
www.lignerosetmiami.com
LR0053_NYObserver_Ruche.indd 2 4/20/11 4:35 PM
ligne roset.indd 2 4/29/11 11:47:06 AM
RUCHÉ one-arm sofa with table by Inga Sempé.
250 Park Avenue South
New York
(212) 375-1036
www.lignerosetny.com
155 Wooster Street
New York
(212) 253-5629
www.lignerosetny.com
4131 Main Street
Philadelphia
(215) 487-2800
www.rosetphilly.com
160 NE 40th Street
Miami
(305) 576-4662
www.lignerosetmiami.com
LR0053_NYObserver_Ruche.indd 2 4/20/11 4:35 PM
ligne roset.indd 3 4/29/11 11:47:24 AM
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TO MAKE SURE IT NEVER LEAVES IT.
VISIT YOUR TRI-STATE CADILLAC DEALER CADILLAC CTS-V COUPE / cadillactristate.com
GMLN03810000_NewYork_CTSV.indd 1 4/28/11 11:44 AM
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BRAKE LIGHT DOUBLES AS A SPOILER
TO MAKE SURE IT NEVER LEAVES IT.
VISIT YOUR TRI-STATE CADILLAC DEALER CADILLAC CTS-V COUPE / cadillactristate.com
GMLN03810000_NewYork_CTSV.indd 1 4/28/11 11:44 AM
Caddy spread.indd 3 4/29/11 11:48:14 AM
8 | may 2011
SENIOR EDITOR
RACHEL MORGAN
DESIGN DIRECTOR
IVYLISE SIMONES
WRITERS
MEREDITH
BENNETT-SMITH
BLAZE BERDAHL
JONAH BLOOM
CHARLOTTE GARDEN
ANDREW GUARINI
MEREDITH HOFFMAN
NATALIE HOWARD
CHIU-TI JANSEN
EVA KARAGIORGAS
CHELSIA MARCIUS
RACHEL OHM
LYSS STERN
LIZ WAGNER
SYDNEY SARACHAN
FASHION CONTRIBUTORS
MARLEY LYNCH
COCO MELLORS
PRISCILLA POLLEY
CONTRIBUTING
PHOTOGRAPHERS
MICHAEL CHIMENTO
CHAD GRIFFITH
JAMES BERNAL

SENIOR DESIGNERS
LAUREN DRAPER
SCOTT DVORIN
PUBlISHER
ROBYN WEISS
SAlES
SPENCER SHARP
BETTY LEDERMAN
DAN D’ANDREA
MITCHELL BEDELL
DAVID BENDAYAN
PAUL KORNBLUEH
KAREN KOSSMAN
MICHELE MORGAN
ALExANDER NUCKEL
DAVID M. WOLFF

OBSERVER MEDIA GROUP
PUBlISHER
JARED KUSHNER
EDITORIAl DIRECTOR
ELIZABETH SPIERS
PRESIDENT
CHRISTOPHER BARNES
EXECUTIVE V.P.
BARRY LEWIS
ASSOCIATE PUBlISHER
JAMIE FORREST
V.P. ADVERTISING
STEPHEN GOLDBERG
V.P. SAlES AND
MARKETING
DAVID GURSKY
ClASSIFIED
ADVERTISING DIRECTOR
KEN NEWMAN
MARKETING MANAGER
JILL GUTEKUNST
V.P. CIRCUlATION
KRATOS VOS
PRODUCTION MANAGER
TYLER RUSH
PHOTO EDITOR
PETER LETTRE
ADVERTISING
PRODUCTION
LISA MEDCHILL
CIRCUlATION
ALExANDRA ENDERLE
PETER PARRIS
CARLOS RODRIGUEZ
editor’s note
26
W
elcome to the third issue of NYO Magazine, the downtown
issue. Our cover star is New York’s resident Mad Man John
Slattery, who opened up about his life behind the suits. For-
mer AdAge editor Jonah Bloom ofered insight into the real Mad Men of
New York. We also talked to dynamic downtown personalities like Casey
Kaplan, founder of New York Gallery Week, architect Richard Meier and
fashion icon Diane von Furstenberg.
Another power personality, Diana Picasso, shared her insight into the
newest exhibit at the Gagosian, “Marie-Thérèse.” The exhibit is a bit of a
family afair for her, as the famed artist was her grandfather, and Marie-
Thérèse, her grandmother.
And what would a downtown issue be without exploring the many
peculiarities of the neighborhood? Our writers decoded the social scenes
in downtown’s many bars and even explored the current locations of the
city’s former brothels. We hope you enjoy our exploration of Manhat-
tan’s most eclectic neighborhood.
Rachel Morgan ,
Senior Editor
Under writers:
Take out
Daisy Prince
Alexis Thoman Rudisill
Alex Cacioppo
Add to Fashion Contributors
Marley lynch
Add to writers:
Jonah Bloom
liz Wagner
lyss Stern
Blaze Berdahl
NYO_MAG3_P8_EditorsNoteMasthead.indd 8 4/29/11 5:58:55 PM
christies.com Contact
Andrew Massad
amassad@christies.com
+1 212 636 2100
20 Rockefeller Plaza, New York, NY 10020
Viewing
7–11 May
Post-War and Contemporary Art
Featuring Property from an Important Private European Collection Afternoon Session
New York · 12 May 2011
Gerhard richter (b. 1932)
Abstraktes Bild · oil on canvas · 24 3/8 x 20 1/2 in. (62 x 52 cm.) · Painted in December 1991
$300,000–500,000
©

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02098-39_NYO Fullpage.indd 1 4/27/11 10:59:38 AM
chrisites.indd 1 4/29/11 11:48:53 AM
10 | may 2011
XXXXXXX
14 NEIGHBORHOOD
BUZZ Our picks for
downtown’s best
shopping, dining and
dancing.
16 PARTY PAGES The best
spring fetes, through
the eyes of Patrick
McMullan.
20 COVER Mad Men’s John
Slattery opens up about
Sterling, his fellow Mad
Men and why he loves
New York.
26 COVER Jonah Bloom,
former editor of AdAge,
stafs a modern-day
Sterling Cooper.
28 ART Our resident
expert talks about doing
business in China.
32 GALLERIES Diana
Picasso curates her
grandfather’s newest
exhibit.
36 ARTIST PROFILE Trey
Speegle resurrects
paints by numbers.
38 ARTIST
PROFILE
Michael Glancy
strives for
perfection with
his glass-blown
works.
40 ARTIST
PROFILE Rene
Pierre Allain’s
steel manipulations.
42 GALLERIST Casey
Kaplan talks about
founding New York
Gallery Week
44 PEOPLE
Ballerina Michele
Wiles opens up about
fnding happiness
onstage and of.
48 FASHION Diane
von Furstenberg’s
fashion-inspired
exhibit at Pace
Bejjing.
54 FASHION Gaby
Basora of Tucker
makes her mark.
contents
32
20
48
Contact
Robert Manley
rmanley@christies.com
+1 212 636 2100
Viewing: 7–11 May
Post-War and Contemporary Art
Evening Sale
11 May 2011
christies.com
Jim Hodges (b. 1957)
A Model of Delicacy
white brass chain, silk and wire
56 x 64 x 17 in. (142.2 x 162.5 x 43.2 cm.)
$800,000-1,200,000
02192-15_NYO Mag_Pwc.indd 1 4/28/11 12:55:53 PM
NYO_MAG3_PAGE10,12_TOC.indd 10 4/29/11 6:02:42 PM
NATURA
designed with the world and tomorrow in mind
vegetable-dyed hand-knotted in Afghanistan
Manhattan 646 602 3400 Bronx 718 842 8770
Delray Beach 561 279 7777 South Hackensack 201 641 3400 abchome.com
Untitled-19 1 4/29/11 11:52:43 AM
contents
sõ FASHION Rachel
Antonof brings back
old-school style.
s8 FASHION The dreamy
designs of Erin
Fetherston.
õo FOOD Culinary
entrepreneur John
McDonald talks Tasting
Table and Lure Fishbar.
õa FOODCOLUMN Our
food expert picks the
eateries frequented by
pretty young things.
õ8 WIN£ Andy Fisher,
owner of the massive
downtown Astor
Wines, shares his vino
expertise.
/o ÞLAC£S Our analysis
of the best downtown
bars —and
their
clientele.
/z FITN£SS Celebrity
trainer David Kirsh
shares his get-fit tips.
/a ÞAR£NTING Lyss
Stern’s family-friendly
picks for spring.
/õ ARCHIT£CTUR£
Richard Meier talks
about the iconic glass
towers, the Pritzker and
his signature style.
8o Þ£OÞL£ The luxe
bathrooms of one
bachleor’s downtown
apartment.
8z INT£RIORD£SIGN
Brad Ford designs a
rustic-chic downtown
apartment.
88 ÞLAC£S The city’s
brothels: Where are they
now?
¤o ÞLAC£S A community
garden thrives on the
Lower East Side.
¤z ARCHIT£CTUR£
Enrique Norten talks
about heading up two
firms —one in Mexico,
one in New York.
¤õ R£AL£STAT£
Brokers analyze
the current state
of the downtown real
estate market.
¡¡z ÞHILANTHROÞY Rich
Palermo and the Anti
Violence Project.

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CROSSING OV£R
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NYO_MAG3_PAGE10,12_TOC.indd 12 4/29/11 6:08:29 PM
T I M I N G F O R C H A M P I O N S
www.edox.ch
1 866-425-9882
B-42 BLACK MARS 500
Automatic, Day / Date, Titanium / PVD
Offcial supplier of the Mars 500 Mission
The world‘s frst manufacturer of automatic wristwatches
since 1912 swiss
catalogue and further information
www.fortis-watches.com
1800-425-9882
gevril.indd 2 4/29/11 11:59:32 AM
14 | may 2011
NYO
downtown Buzz
Discover
Downtown
Our picks for the best shopping, eats and deliciously
downtown dives. It’s the coolest neighborhood
in Manhattan for a reason
By Charlotte Garden & Blaze Berdahl o Photos by Michael Chimento
Adeline Adeline caters to the urban
biker—functional without sacrifcing
style. The store is stocked with classic
1970s designs and brings glamour and
femininity back to the bicycle, as it re-
cently partnered with Kate Spade to ofer
customers a bike in that classically perfect
shade of green (147 Reade St., 212-227-
1150).
MooShoes has a storied history. A decade
ago, two sisters from Queens bought
an old butcher shop in Gramercy Park,
intending to open the city’s frst “cruelty-
free” vegan shoe store. The result was
MooShoes, which sells non-leather/vegan
shoes, clothing, books, wallets, belts and
bags. There are vegan cookbooks, too (78
Orchard St., 212-254-6512).
A gastronome’s dream, Broadway
Panhandler carries wares ranging from
beginner cookware to industrial items
to top-of-the-line espresso makers. And
it’s a family business—owner Norman
Kornbleuth is the son of a Lower East Side
restaurant supply store owner (65 East
8th St., 212-966-3434).
Need a new topper? Head to Arth, which
carries nearly every type of hat you can
imagine, men, women and unisex (75 West
Houston St., 212-539-1431).
We’d go anywhere with a slogan like “We
make balls.” The Meatball Shop, headed
up by Daniel Holzman and Michael Cher-
now, have a wide array of tasty nuggets,
from classic beef to spicy pork balls to
vegetable balls (84 Stanton St., 212-982-
8895).
If you dream of ninjas jumping out at you
while you dine, Ninja New York is your
spot. Enough said (25 Hudson St., 212-
274-8500).
Get alterations on the cheap at Orchard
Express, the incomparable downtown
tailor. Opened by Ramon Jimenez in 1975,
this place has staying power—and with
prices that run generally 50 percent less
($4 for a hem, $20 to take in a jacket) than
any tailor in the city, we can see why (136
Orchard St., 212-677-1099).
And who can forget downtown staple
Strand (828 Broadway, 212-473-1452)?
Yes, it’s been around for a while, but it’s a
classic for a reason. o
1
NYO_May2011_NeighborhoodBuzz.indd 14 4/29/11 5:41:54 PM
May 2011 | 15
2
The
Short
List
Our other favorite
downtown spots
Aedes
de Venustas
9 Christopher St.,
212-206-8674
Darling
1 Horatio St.,
646-336-6966
Odin
199 Lafayette St.,
212-966-0026
Edon Manor
391 Greenwich St.,
212-431-3890
The New
World Order
13 Avenue B,
212-777-3600
Mxyplyzyk
125 Greenwich Ave.,
212-989-4300
Babycakes
248 Broome St.,
212-677-5047
Lomography
Gallery Store
41 W. 8th #1,
212-529-4353x212
Pas de Deux
328 East 11th St.,
212-475-0075
Banchet Bianca
Flowers
809 Washington St.,
212-989-1088
1. Adeline Adeline
2. Broadway Panhandler
3. The Strand
4. Arth
5. Ninja
6. The Meatball Shop
4
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5
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NYO_May2011_NeighborhoodBuzz.indd 15 4/29/11 5:42:25 PM
NYO
16 | MAY
EVENTS
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NUR KHAN,
LRIN FL1HLRS1ON
DRLL HLMINGWAY
DAVID ARQUL11L AND CUR1IS 50 CLN1
A1 A PRIVA1L SCRLLNING OFSCRLAM 4
1LRRY
RICHARDSON
HLIDI ßIVLNS, JUS1IN 1HLROUX
NAML HLRLGGG
ßRI1NL OLDFORD,
DANNY FLAHLR1Y
MAX WINKLLR,
HLNRY WINKLLR
LINDSAY LOHAN A1
1HL AF1LR-PAR1Y OF
MAGNOLIA PIC1URLS’
CLRLMONY
MAY ANDLRSON
S1LVL ßUSCLMI, FISHLR S1LVLNS,
CLLINL DANHILR
ANDRLW SAFFIR, ßL1H S1LRN AND DANILL
ßLNLDIC1 A1 NLW YORKLRS FOR CHILDRLN LIGH1H
ANNUAL SPRING DINNLR DANCL, “A FOOL’S FL1L”
NYO_MAG3_PXX_PartyPics.indd 16 4/29/11 5:34:51 PM
Tom Brokaw
Dree Hemingway
BeTTe miDler
anD James Taylor
HeiDi Bivens, JusTin THeroux
nickolas
asHforD,
valerie
simpson
name Hereggg name Hereggg
seliTa eBanks, mary alice sTepHenson, kerry wasHingTon,
amy sacco, wyclef Jean, amy mcfarlanD, coralie cHarriol paul
micHael Douglas regina spekTor
Jeff Zucker anD kevin pollack aTTenD
carnegie Hall’s 120TH anniversary gala
geralDo rivera, erica rivera
lara meilanD sHaw,
cHrisTian siriano,
mereDiTH melling Burke
may 2011 PB
anDrew saffir, BeTH sTern anD Daniel
BeneDicT aT new yorkers for cHilDren eigHTH
annual spring Dinner Dance, “a fool’s feTe”
NYO_MAG3_PXX_PartyPics.indd 17 4/29/11 5:35:44 PM
Sade LythC
tom CoLiCChio
aLonzo
mourning,
Star JoneS
Ben vereen
eriC ripert, meLanie dunea, nigeL parry
Stefan oppenheimer, arnie arnaSon,
Bonnie arnaSon, aLiSon kaLLman, Jim kaLLman
keLLy rutherford,
marCuS ernSt
Cynthia nixon, BiLL koenigSBerg
attend City harveSt’S 17th annuaL
an evening of praCtiCaL magiC
donavan green, ayana
green, LiSa oz, dr. mehmet
oz at dr. oz’S heaLth CorpS
gaLa to fight ChiLd oBeSity
PB | may 2011
hugh JaCkman
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Stephanie
WinSton
WoLkoff
events
NYO_MAG3_PXX_PartyPics.indd 18 4/29/11 5:36:45 PM
events
NYO
may 2011 19
Courtney Love
Lee PaCe
Kevin Zegers
ParKer Posey
taj MahaL attends jaZZ
at LinCoLn Center’s
gaLa after Party
Keanu reeves and vera farMiga at
the after Party for “henry’s CriMe”
gayLe King, newarK
Mayor Cory BooKer
KeLLy rutherford,
MarCus ernst
wynton MarsaLis, john Legend, ashLey
sChiff-raMos with guest
Mary aLiCe
stePhenson
george wein
NYO_MAG3_PXX_PartyPics.indd 19 4/29/11 5:37:58 PM
Sade LythC
tom CoLiCChio
aLonzo
mourning,
Star JoneS
Ben vereen
eriC ripert, meLanie dunea, nigeL parry
Stefan oppenheimer, arnie arnaSon,
Bonnie arnaSon, aLiSon kaLLman, Jim kaLLman
keLLy rutherford,
marCuS ernSt
Cynthia nixon, BiLL koenigSBerg
attend City harveSt’S 17th annuaL
an evening of praCtiCaL magiC
donavan green, ayana
green, LiSa oz, dr. mehmet
oz at dr. oz’S heaLth CorpS
gaLa to fight ChiLd oBeSity
PB | may 2011
hugh JaCkman
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WinSton
WoLkoff
events
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events
NYO
may 2011 19
Courtney Love
Lee PaCe
Kevin Zegers
ParKer Posey
taj MahaL attends jaZZ
at LinCoLn Center’s
gaLa after Party
Keanu reeves and vera farMiga at
the after Party for “henry’s CriMe”
gayLe King, newarK
Mayor Cory BooKer
KeLLy rutherford,
MarCus ernst
wynton MarsaLis, john Legend, ashLey
sChiff-raMos with guest
Mary aLiCe
stePhenson
george wein
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20 | APRIL
NYO
Groomer, Valissa Yoe;
Stylist, Priscilla Polley ; Leather
jacked by Bruno Cuccinelli;
Tshirt by James Perse
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20 | APRIL
NYO
Groomer, Valissa Yoe;
Stylist, Priscilla Polley ; Leather
jacked by Bruno Cuccinelli;
Tshirt by James Perse
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APRIL | 21
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COVER STORY
22 | MAY 2011
NYO
J
ohn Slattery has a bit of an
obsession with Collyer Brothers
Syndrome.
The longtime actor turned Mad
Men icon talked animatedly about
the hoarding disorder at a photo
shoot as he posed in a gray hooded
sweatshirt and thick black-rimmed
glasses, his trademark silver locks rufed.
The conversation quickly shifted to stalkers.
“I had a stalker once,” he said. “It was an older
guy and he would travel around by bus to all my
shows. He’d write me like 16 postcards a day.
And every time I would see him, he was missing
a few more teeth and he would never be wearing
a coat. And I would say to him, ‘Where’s your
coat?’” and he’d say, ‘I don’t need no coat!’” Slat-
tery said in his best codger accent, as far from the
silver-tongued, silver-haired Roger Sterling as
he could get.
“Finally, I said to him, ‘Look, here’s my
number’—which was probably not a good idea—
‘Call me if you are ever in trouble.’ A few months
went by. I was sitting in my apartment and was
in bed, reading. I heard the phone ring, but it was
across the apartment, so I just let the machine
pick up.”
The caller was a police ofcer, who had found
the body of the stalker. “He was actually an
over-enthusiastic fan,” Slattery later quantifed.
The ofcer had called the only number found
inside the apartment, which was packed so full
a hole had to be cut in the door in order to gain
entrance. It turns out the man sufered from
Collyer Brothers Syndrome, named after the
frst documented case of hoarding—two broth-
ers who lived in a Harlem brownstone who were
found deceased in their home, buried by their
own belongings.
“Inside the apartment, within the piles and
piles of shit, the only number they found was
mine,” Slattery said. The man was later buried
in a military ceremony, as he was an honorably
discharged veteran. The fact that Slattery even
cared where and when this man was buried
spoke volumes. The fact that he remembered
the man and was telling the story, years later,
said more.
This, it seems, is John Slattery—a far cry from
his drinking, smoking, fucking, alter ego Roger
Sterling. While Slattery had always been rela-
tively well known on the small and big screens,
it was really his foray into the 1960s that thrust
him into stardom.
At the close of the last season, Sterling was
struggling with an unfulflling marriage, an
afair with an ex-fing and the feeling of becom-
ing obsolete in an increasingly modernizing
profession. As for what’s next for Mad Men’s
resident silver fox, Slattery is either tight-lipped
or uninformed.
“I don’t know,” he said. “I hope he doesn’t
commit suicide. I don’t think that would be the
course of action, but I really don’t even know one
thing. I think Matt [Weiner] is trying to fgure it
out.”
Any Mad Men fan worth his salt has no doubt
been following the confict between show
creator Matthew Weiner and studio Lionsgate
TV and AMC. And the irony isn’t lost on us—the
creator of a show about advertising locked in a
massive confict with its studio, who ironically
wants, well, more advertising. Fans have alter-
nately hated Weiner for delaying the next season
and lauded him for maintaining the show’s
integrity, characters and length.
“I don’t know the ins and outs of it, but what
I know is that it wasn’t all on Matt Weiner’s
shoulders,” Slattery said.
As far as Roger Sterling’s womanizing ways.
Slattery, a happily married man, has no qualms
about playing the character. In fact, he sort of
enjoys it.
“That part of it is terrifc,” he said. “Being able
to work with somebody like Christina Hendricks
(who plays the enigmatic secretary–turned–
ofce manager and Slattery’s on-again, of-again
love interest, Joan), who is obviously beautiful
and such a good actress, is a pretty good perk of
this character.”
Friends of Slattery paint him as a humble,
normal guy, quite unlike his television
counterpart.
“The frst time I met John was at a lunch in
Grand Central around Christmastime,” said
Brian Kolb, longtime boyfriend of Slattery’s
niece, Maggie Kinnealey. “After lunch, we were
helping John shop for his son’s Christmas pres-
ent. John said he wanted to get a Nintendo Wii
for his son but was having trouble fnding one.
I thought that was a joke since I remembered
Wii being the popular gift the year before, so I
fgured it should be easy to fnd. As those words
came out of my mouth, we took a corner and saw
a huge line coming out of Best Buy. John went
up to the frst girl in line and asked her what they
were in line for. The girl replied, ‘Nintendo Wii,
of course. Hey, aren’t you that actor guy?’”
This is something that happened quite often
to Slattery in the years before his Mad Men fame,
Kolb said.
“John replied, ‘Yeah, I am that actor guy. Can
I cut you in line?’ The girl looked at him, thought
about it for a second and politely declined his
ofer,” Kolb said. “He looked back at me and said,
‘I should have told her I was Steve Carell.’’
Steve Carell or not, Slattery has built up
a rather impressive résumé of his own. He’s
directed several episodes of Mad Men and is
currently writing a short flm, not surprising for
an actor who seems to have mastered the trifecta
of the entertainment business—flm, television
and Broadway.
“I’ve realized it’s good to stay busy—you
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MAY 2011 | 23
Sweatshirt by Mollusk
Brooklyn; Shirt by Hickey
Freeman; Glasses by Ray
Ban; Jeans by APC
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24 | MAY 2011
can’t count on much in this business and in this
economy,” he said. “It’s good to keep your hand
in a couple of things, see what pans out.”
But it seems Slattery hasn’t had trouble keep-
ing busy—his résumé boasts a steady stream of
work since 1988. Today, Slattery is past the point
of simply taking any job that is ofered. Pre–Mad
Men, Slattery didn’t always have that option.
“In the beginning, I did things because they
were ofered and I was surprised that I got the
job at all,” he said. “I don’t want to denigrate
anything. They were all valuable experiences. I
couldn’t pick one out and say, ‘I shouldn’t have
done this.’ You’re trying to fnd material that you
feel an emotional and intellectual connection to,
that excites you. That’s what anybody wants, and
there’s only so much of it to go around. There
was a while in the beginning where I wasn’t as
discerning as I might have been—I don’t even
know if I could have been. In the beginning of
any career, you’re a kid. You take what people
give you.”
Now, Slattery faces the problem of separating
himself from the trademark suits of Mad Men.
In fact, he opted out of wearing any sort of suit at
all for the photo shoot.
This slight aversion notwithstanding, Slattery
is quick to point out that Mad Men is simply a
damn good show.
“It was so obviously a good script,” he said.
“You read a good novel, a good screenplay, a good
play, and suddenly the whole world is right there
in front of you.”
The show’s cultlike following agrees—in fact,
it’s hard to discern if they are more obsessed
with the show or its characters.
Upon news that I would be interviewing
Slattery, my Facebook page was inundated with
praise for the historically accurate series, mostly
from men. Perhaps they all wish they could live
the life of Roger Sterling. Or maybe, Don Draper.
“Roger Sterling is one of the best roles in tele-
vision history,” one Facebook friend remarked.
Another was more forthcoming in his praise.
“Ask him if I could one day be Don Draper. Ask
him if I can touch Jon Hamm. Ask him how
badass it is being the silver fox. Ask him if I can
touch his hair. Ask him if he’s my real dad. Tell
him I love him. Ask if he’ll send me an advance
copy of this season of Mad Men.”
Speaking of John Hamm, Slattery originally
read for the part of Don Draper. Once he was
at the studio, producers told him they actually
wanted him to play the part of Roger Sterling, a
part so minor they were afraid he wouldn’t even
come in to read for it.
“I didn’t fnd out until down the line that they
had brought me in for Roger,” he said. “It was in
the room that they said, ‘We actually have this
person [to play Draper.]’ That happens all the
time: You’re reading for someone and then you
fnd out that they’ve already ofered it to so-and-
so. That’s frustrating, but it happens.”
We couldn’t help but wonder—in an alternate
universe, could Slattery have been Don Draper
and Jon Hamm been Roger Sterling?
“Absolutely not,” Hamm said. “John’s mixture
of humor and pathos is the perfect counterpoint
to Don’s guarded world-weariness. I couldn’t
do what he does nearly as well. Now Peggy, I
SweaterbyErmenegildo
Zegna;JeansbyAPC
ActorsVincentKartheiser,
JonHammandJohnSlattery
ontheMadMensetlastseason.
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COVERSTORY
NYO
Bob Greenberg, Chairman and CEO, R/GA
Clients: Nike, Wal-Mart
Mad Men alter ego: I’m tempted to compare Bob
Greenberg to Bert Cooper, the iconoclastic, bow-tied
senior partner at Sterling Cooper with a penchant for
Japanese culture and a habit of wandering around
the of ce in just his socks. Yet Greenberg could school
Cooper in eccentricity. From the wavy gray locks to
his berets to his ninja-style black outfits finished of
with a belt holstering his wire-rimmed spectacles
and an array of digital devices, Greenberg is clearly
not your regular adman. Yet dismiss Greenberg at
your peril—he’s become arguably New York’s most
successful adman in the last decade.
Why he’d make the cut: Greenberg has mastered
the art of re-creating a business on the fly, having
morphed his outfit from an Oscar-winning special-
efects and motion graphics studio in the late ’70s,
into a TV and film production studio in the ’80s, into
an interactive ad agency in the ’90s, and later into
an integrated, technology-driven marketing shop
with a plethora of awards and more employees than
any other agency in New York. Greenberg and his
lieutenants at R/GA espoused the theory that you
had to put aside the old-media marketing approach of
making ad campaigns and instead build real, always-
on products and platforms for the client that actually
enhance the consumer’s experience—like the Nike
Plus run-tracking and sharing tool.
Tom Carroll, President and CEO, TBWA
Worldwide
Clients: Adidas, Apple, Nissan
Mad Men alter ego: Tom Carroll might just be the
last of the Mad Men as Matthew Weiner intended.
Now in his mid-50s, Carroll generally limits himself
to a few glasses of wine rather than an endless stream
of vodka gimlets. But he still has the silver drink
would’ve knocked out of the park.”
Despite the initial casting snafu, Hamm
maintains that the pair gets along famously.
“After the first day of shooting we were
pretty close,” Hamm said. “There’s always a
feeling-out period within a cast that doesn’t
know one another, and I’m very happy to
say that with us, that period lasted about the
length of two or three takes. At least that’s
what he tells me.”
At the time, no one had any idea just how big
the show would be.
“It’s hard to figure out how any show gets
the attention it gets, especially now, with
everything that’s out there, with all the venues,
all the shows, all the cable channels and new
networks popping up all over the place,”
Slattery said. “It’s hard to know how anyone
gains a foothold.” Lucky for Slattery, Mad Men
seems to be have done just that.
In spending time with Slattery, it becomes
obvious fairly quickly that he has a sense of
humor, much like his onscreen persona. So
did Slattery afect Sterling, or did Sterling
mold Slattery? Turns out, a bit of both.
“The character’s sense of humor develops
along the way. The lines get blurry between
what’s written, and the writers will see you
do things with certain actors and they’ll say,
‘Well, they work well together, let’s write a
scene for them,’” he said. “Ideas happen, story
lines change. It isn’t because of any one thing.
Sometimes, the writers will see an actor do a
certain thing or the story line goes a certain
way.”
Hamm will also vouch for Slattery’s sense
of humor—and sheer acting prowess, for that
matter.
“The funniest look I’ve ever seen on Slat-
tery’s face may have been when a piece of
the set fell and hit me on the head and blood
started dripping down my neck,” Hamm said.
“The mixture of sheer what-the-fuck humor,
turning to shock, [then] horror and, ultimate-
ly, compassion was an acting master class.”
Slattery, a Boston transplant–turned–true
New Yorker—he’s lived here for a quarter
of a century, so he’s earned the title—lives
downtown with his wife, Talia Balsam—who
plays his bitter ex-wife Mona Sterling on the
show—and their 11-year old son, Harry. He’s
earned attention over the years for his involve-
ment in the community, a fact he doesn’t see
as particularly out of the ordinary, or even
laudable.
“Like anyone, you’re involved with your
community because it’s where you live,”
he said. “This sanitation situation that was
going on in my neighborhood, I thought and
still think that there is a better alternative to
what the Sanitation Department and the city
decided to do. I’m not in it for the civic duty
necessarily, but it’s my community.”
Slattery is referring the stink surrounding
the Department of Sanitation’s controversial
facility —120 feet tall with a $400 million price
tag, no less —at Spring Street and the West
Side Highway, Slattery’s hood. The proposed
building, which would include truck and salt
storage, is still on track for completion, despite
protests by Slattery, Kirsten Dunst and James
Gandolfini.
It’s hard not to be impressed that a suc-
cessful actor and a New Yorker would be that
interested in his own neighborhood. But Slat-
tery doesn’t see it as out of the ordinary.
“Most of the actors I know, when they’re not
working are just doing the same things every-
body else is,” he said. “They take their kids to
school. They get up and go to work. When they
come home from work, they put their kids to
bed, even the really, extremely successful ones.
Everybody just wants to live their life.”
I ask him again about his stalker.
“That guy wasn’t really a stalker,” he said.
“He was just a guy who was an enthusiastic
fan and seemed to be having some dif culties.
Anybody would have done the same thing, I
think. Someone once asked me, ‘You live in
New York City?’ And I said, ‘Yeah.’ And he
said, ‘Day in and day out?’ Like New York City
is such a grind to live in. Every time someone
gets stuck in a subway door or falls down on
the street, there are about four people to help
them up. New York City is a nice neighbor-
hood.” o
SIXTY SECONDS WITH SLATTERY
What’s the last book you bought?
Jennifer Egan’s A Visit From the Goon Squad. A Visit From the Goon Squad A Visit From the Goon Squad
Do you read The Observer?
No. I’m not going to lie.
What’s the last piece of art you bought?
I bought a drawing by an artist named
Jonas Wood.
Describe yourself in three words.
I can’t. I have no interest.
I heard you’re a Red Sox fan and your son is
a Yankees fan.
Yes, and my wife was born in New York, too, so
I’m outnumbered.
So you buy your wife shoes to romance her?
I have before; it’s not like I’m a shoe buyer. My
father is in the shoe business, the leather busi-
ness. So I have a leg up.
THE MAD MEN
(AND WOMEN)
OF NEW YORK
We’d pick these five
Madison Avenue luminaries
to staf a modern-day
Sterling Cooper.
By Jonah Bloom
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platter in his of ce and counts Absolut and Jameson
Whiskey among his key accounts. Carroll has a Roger
Sterling twinkle in his eye, and is as likely to make you
laugh. But unlike Sterling, he’s not prone to morose
moments or regrets.
Why he’d make the cut: As CEO, he oversees
8,000 employees in more than 200 of ces around
the world, but remains a hands-on ad account guy,
adored by clients and creatives alike. Carroll has
somehow turned a mishmash of once-independent
shops into an integrated global network, without
forcing them all to look and behave the same way.
It’s not unusual for him to be in Europe one day
and Asia the next and the tales of his randomly timed
sleepless-in-Seattle/Shanghai/Hamburg phone calls
are myriad.
Lori Senecal, President and CEO, Kirshenbaum
Bond Senecal + Partners
Clients: BMW, Vanguard, Armani
Mad Men alter ego: The haze of cigarette smoke
has given way to gym memberships, the art of persua-
sion through TV ads to the art of engagement through
multimedia eforts, but one thing hasn’t changed
too much—white men still monopolize the top jobs
on Madison Avenue. Perhaps that’s why people took
notice when Lori Senecal took her current post.
Full disclosure: I work at KBS+P, so it probably
wouldn’t be behoove me to compare her to one of the
women in the secretarial pool at Sterling Cooper. It
also wouldn’t be accurate. Senecal drinks modestly,
dresses in all black and eschews a corner of ce for
long hours at an open-plan desk alongside the rank
and file.
Why she’d make the cut: In recent years, Senecal
defected to Kirshenbaum Bond from global giant
McCann-Erickson, where she’d been running their
flagship New York of ce. McCann had always been
perceived as the ultimate boys club—to be fair, it
is now changing—and somewhat inevitably her
departure spawned a legal spat with McCann charg-
ing that she’d poached executives and tried to poach
business too. And she riled a few of the Kirshenbaum
Bond old guard when she set out reinventing the
agency that now bears her name by bringing in new
talent—notably a host of creative technologists—and
launching initiatives such as a Client Stock Index
that aligns employee rewards with client financial
performance.
Andrew Robertson, CEO, BBDO Worldwide
Clients: AT&T, FedEx, GE
Mad Men alter ego: Andrew Robertson cuts per-
haps the most Don Draper–ish dash of any of today’s
Madison Avenue luminaries, yet also has a bit of Mad
Men’s quintessential Englishman Lance Pryce about
him. From the schoolboy haircut to the perfectly
tailored suits to the BBC-newsreader elocution,
everything about Robertson screams English gent.
Why he’d make the cut: Robertson was brought
in for his current role of running the 287-of ce
BBDO Worldwide in its New York headquarters
from his previous post in London, where he’d been
running the U.K. outpost of the agency. His task
was to transform the most American of ad agen-
cies from a 30-second commercial factory into a
more media-agnostic, future-forward shop that
could continue to thrive in a digital world. He set
about that rather daunting job in an unflappable,
no-nonsense type of a way—he had to fire several
industry stalwarts in order to make the change—
that certainly had a little old-school British
sangfroid about it. And in the economic maelstrom
of late 2009, BBDO was particularly badly afected
because Chrysler was its biggest client. There were
several times when Robertson seemed so saddened
by the cuts he had to make that I couldn’t help
wondering whether he might just walk away. But
he didn’t. Now he and his agency have regained the
spring in their step.
Dave Droga, Founder and Creative Chairman,
Droga5
Clients: Activision, Method, Prudential
Mad Men alter ego: He hasn’t stolen anyone’s iden-
tity and coming from Australia only sort of qualifies
as having a dark past, but if someone has got to be our
modern-day Don Draper, then Droga’s our man.
Why he’d make the cut: In a city that had for many
years proven strangely inhospitable to start-up
creative agencies, Droga and his partners have built a
shop revered for its creativity that is now growing at
a clip—and has become arguably the most influential
independent agency in the United States. Such
success always begets criticism in the perennially in-
secure ad business, but Droga —a reformed smoker,
like Draper—is one of those friendly guy-at-the-bar
types that almost everyone, especially the ladies,
professes to like. He’s always enthusing about some
fascinating new idea that’s popped into his head,
works as hard as he expects others to work, gives
credit it where it’s due and can still laugh at himself.
Last time I saw him he was just on his way to be
interviewed for CNN’s Icon series, which featured
a number of luminaries from various fields. “I think
it’s me and Rem Koolhaas,” he said “Pretty fucking
ridiculous.” o
Jonah Bloom is the executive director of content strat-
egy at KBS+P. He was formerly the editor of Advertis-
ing Age. Follow him on Twitter @jonahbloom.
From le: Drogas, Greenberg,
Carroll, Robertson, Senecal.
ILLUSTRATIONBYSCOTT DVORIN
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28 | MAY
CHINA
Happenings
Seven deadly sins
when doing business
in one of the world’s
fastest-growing
economies.
By Chiu-Ti Jansen
A
chicken and a pig were about to
enter into a joint venture. The
chicken said to the pig, “Why
don’t we talk over breakfast?”
The pig said, “Great! What would
you like to eat?” The chicken
responded, “Bacon and eggs.” This is a classic fable
about Sino-foreign joint ventures, which have his-
torically become storied examples for star-crossed
marriages. Tackling the Chinese markets is an
imperative for most businesses in today’s world. But
many entrepreneurs remain mystified by the rules of
the game in China. The apprehension and attendant
mistrust are often mutual from the perspectives
of the non-Chinese and the Chinese alike. Wang
Qingsong, a contemporary Chinese artist, illustrated
this tenuous relationship with his photographic
work Can I Cooperate with You?, which pits China’s
five-star flag against the logos of McDonald’s and
Coca-Cola. Wang Guangyi, another prominent
contemporary Chinese artist, juxtaposed Western
pop art and advertisement iconography with Chinese
socialist propaganda visual language in his Great
Criticism series.
The efect is striking—while the poses of the
socialist soldiers speak of physical violence, the
predominant Western brand exerts silent aggres-
sion. It’s an uneasy marriage between the socialist
and capitalist ideologies.
Surely many Western businesses have entered
into joint ventures or partnerships with the Chinese
involuntarily due to the Chinese government’s
restriction on foreign investments. There are also
examples of voluntary collaborations that yield
successful results. Unlike manufacturers of con-
sumer products or mass market goods, Western art
galleries do not necessarily need to rely on a Chinese
partner to assist with the distribution, especially in
the early stage of contemporary art that is catered
to the Western collectors. Unlike auction houses
which are of-limit to foreign investments, wholly
owned foreign galleries are permitted to operate in
China. Arne Glimcher, founder of the Pace Gallery,
has teamed up with Leng Lin, a prominent professor
and art scholar–turned–art dealer. While I am not
privy to their commercial arrangements, Leng Lin
retains his own gallery, Beijing Commune. Glimcher
also works with blue chip Chinese artists on a non-
exclusive basis, taking away the pressure from these
artists to commit themselves to a business model
that they are yet to be accustomed to.
Given my own Wall Street background, I often
cringe over any business practice in China that does
not meet the highest standard of “best practice.”
I have discovered that the Chinese may act in a
certain way informed not only by their cultural >
Can I Cooperate With You?
by Wang Qingsong.
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30 | may 2011
upbringings, but also by their historical circum-
stances. I’ve found that these “seven deadly sins”
could undermine Westerners’ efectiveness to do
deals in China.
•Telling the Chinese how to build
Rome. While we all know the old adage, “When
in Rome, do as the Romans do.” It seems that
when in China, many Westerners tend to tell the
Chinese what to do based on an assumption that
the Westerners know better. That may have held
true 30 years ago, but no more. Seiji Ozawa, one of
the frst foreign-born conductors to take helm at a
prestigious American orchestra, once talked about
his own experience. He said, if you are a foreigner,
they will not hire you if you are as good as them. You
have to be better .
•Mistaking lack of sophistication for
lack of intelligence. It’s a common human
tendency to underestimate an individual coming
from a business environment that is perceived as less
sophisticated. For instance, within the past decade,
Chinese art markets leapfrogged from a handful of
commercial galleries to high-fying art funds and
art exchanges without the critical support of an
established infrastructure made up of museums, art
professionals, art critics, art laws and so forth.
Chinese are very keenly aware of its tumultuous
history in the past 200 years and the West-centric
worldview that has until recently largely dictated
international politics and economics. Anyone
who wants to do business with the Chinese must
frst embrace the idea that they are very proud of
the recent rise of China, despite some misgivings
about certain unwelcomed social consequences.
•Handing off all China strategies to
one’s “China Head.” Many CEOs of multination-
als reasoned that, out of the respect for the Chinese
cultural diferences, business or otherwise, they
would be better of to hand their China strategy
over to their “China Heads.” Then they often found
how wrong they were.
Given the importance of China market to most
of the Western businesses, business leaders are
well advised to stay engaged at the very top level. It
would be oversimplifying it to apply one represen-
tative’s viewpoint to the China as a whole.
•Believing that Guanxi is a talisman.
One of the frst Chinese expressions that a West-
erner would learn about China is guanxi—roughly
translated as “connections” or “networks of infu-
ence.” As a result, foreigners new to the game tend
to think that guanxi is everything in China. There
is no free lunch, even in China. Guanxi is part of a
complex web of bartered give-and-take’s that are
passed through generations or circles of relation-
ships. To manage a project in China, whether to
establish an art museum or a cultural foundation,
you typically would need to manage guanxi at the
national, provincial and local levels. Good guanxi
alone cannot supplant fundamental business logics.
•Expecting risk-free returns. I often found
many Western businessmen unwilling to take any
risk in China. They are so wrapped up in their view
of China as a ruthless, dangerous place that they feel
paralyzed to take any action or reasonable risk assess-
ment. Their desire to achieve a risk-free return that is
not even possible in their own homeland, let alone in a
business environment of its own distinctive charac-
teristics, is puzzling to me.
•Trading common sense for cultural
differences. A long lineage of literature on doing
business in China has attributed countless horror
stories and cautionary tales to two perceived cultural
polarities: socialism vs. capitalism and Western vs.
Chinese. While there is certain truth to these polari-
ties, we cannot succeed in any transnational setting
unless we fnd common ground in our humanity.
•Taking a short-term view about China.
Chinese people, like people elsewhere, respond less
favorably to opportunistic investors with no long-
term commitment to their market. Many Chinese
business leaders often observed that some foreign
investors were unwilling to “pay tuition” to study
and learn about their market. Success in China, as in
any other business environment, is not always based
on getting an upper hand over one’s counterparty.
Interestingly, sometimes the Chinese themselves are
not even free from their own versions of these deadly
sins. Perhaps this is the lesson from the chicken
and pig fable—in any relationship, one is never sure
whether one is the chicken or the pig.
Chiu-Ti Jansen is the founder of China
Happenings™, a multimedia and advisory platform
that focuses on the cultural and lifestyle industries in
contemporary China. o
1. Regional diferences can
mean varying degrees of busi-
ness sophistication.
2. Things can happen much
faster in China. One needs to
work harder to keep up.
3. Just as many things in
China can disappoint you, there
are many things in China that
can delight you.
4. In terms of technology
application, China has migrated
to hand-held devices faster than
the West.
5. For timely communica-
tions, text messaging is more
efective than email. Most
Chinese do not use voice mail.
Cheat
SHEET
for doing
business
in China
A
w
A
s
i
A

BreathTaking(2006),byshiXinning.
NYO_MAG3_PXX_China.indd 30 4/29/11 5:27:12 PM
CenterCharge 212-721-6500 | www.ChineseArtsRevival.org
Based in New York, Shen Yun Performing Arts is the world’s premier Chinese dance and music company.
June 23–26 | LinCoLn CenteR |
DAviD H. KoCH
tHeAteR
Experience
the divine
CenterCharge 212-721-6500 | www.ChineseArtsRevival.org
Based in New York, Shen Yun Performing Arts is the world’s premier Chinese dance and music company.
June 23–26 | LinCoLn CenteR |
DAviD H. KoCH
tHeAteR
Experience
the divine
chinese arts.indd 1 4/29/11 12:00:51 PM
XXXXXXX
32 | may 2011
NYO
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NYO_MAG_Picasso.indd 32 4/29/11 5:28:20 PM
ART
May 2011 | 33
NYO
Why the decision to do the Picasso exhibit now?
This project has been a dream for many years. “The
Marie-Thérèse years” were a period of exceptional
creativity in Picasso’s life. One can establish parallels
with the early Cubist years and work from the 1950s,
three phases in which Picasso threw himself into the
most fecund experimentations of his artistic life.
How does it feel, knowing your grandmother was
Picasso’s muse?
There is something magical about the way they
met. Some kind of providence was cast upon them
when Picasso noticed the curious beauty of the
17-year-old girl and immediately hastened to enlist
her as his model. I never met my grandparents, but
strangely—because Picasso’s work is a diary unto
itself—I have become a voyeur of their relationship.
When did you begin to work with John Richard-
son? It was very intense.
We organized it in less than a year with Valentina
Castellani, the director of the Gagosian Gallery.
For both John and I, Marie-Thérèse was already
very much at the center of our research. In the
third volume of his biography on Picasso, A Life of
Picasso: The Triumphant Years, 1917-1932, published
in 2010, John wrote about his new fndings. I have
also written several articles on the subject— “The
Encounter of Pablo Picasso and Marie-Thérèse
Walter (1927)”; “Thoughts on a Historiographical
Revision” (Chemnitz, Kunstsammlungen, 2003);
and “Marie-Thérèse Walter and Pablo Picasso:
New Insights Into a Secret Love” (Munster, Picasso
Graphiksammlung, 2004).

Which work in the exhibition is your favorite?
The monumental original plaster from Boisgeloup,
Bust of a Woman (1931), is one of my favorites. I
also love an incredibly intimate drawing of Marie-
Thérèse made in 1935, just after she gave birth to my
mother, Maya. There are so many exceptional works
that it is difcult to choose.
How did you select the works to appear in the
exhibit?
The works presented are from one of the most
astonishing periods of Picasso’s oeuvre. From
1927 to 1941, Marie-Thérèse was the subject of
numerous sensual metamorphoses. We wanted
the exhibition to refect the remarkable variety
of techniques—painting, sculpture, drawing and
print—and materials—plaster, charcoal and pastel,
among others. Painting and sculpture seem to
confront each other in the artist’s representation of
Marie-Thérèse, which is shown in the exhibition’s
assortment of works. >
A P i c A s s o f A m i ly
A f f A i r
Art historian Diana Widmaier Picasso curates the newest Picasso exhibit at the Gagosian Gallery with Picasso biographer John
Richardson. Picasso—one of the frst in her clan to really delve into the arts—sounds of on the inspiration for the exhibit—her grandmother,
Maya, no less – her favorite of the more than 80 works in the exhibition and how it really feels to have the surname Picasso
ByRachelMorgan

PabloPicasso, Marie-Thérèse au béret rouge et
au col de fourrure, lef.DianaPicasso,right. g
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NYO_MAG_Picasso.indd 33 4/29/11 5:28:41 PM
34 | may 2011
Have these works been shown anywhere
else? The exhibit?
Most of the works have never been
exhibited in United States. We are so pleased
to show loans from major institutions such
as the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the
Museum of Modern Art, the Guggenheim,
the Tate, and the Foundation Beyeler.
What is it like to have the surname
Picasso?
He was an artistic genius. You just want
to share in the experience of a man with an
insatiable curiosity and constant need to chal-
lenge himself.
I suppose it goes without saying that your
ancestry inspired your career path?
Maybe so. I love art. I always have. Music
and movies are also very much part of my life.
Did you ever meet Picasso?
Unfortunately, I didn’t. He died when I was
just born.
Why choose the Gagosian Galley to show
the exhibit in?
I was impressed when I saw the exhibition
“Mosqueteros,” which took place in 2009 at the
Gagosian Gallery in Chelsea. I suggested that
the gallery organize an exhibition on Marie-
Thérèse and Larry Gagosian loved the idea.
Picasso and Marie-Thérèse: L’amour fou will be
on display at the Gagosian Gallery through June
25 (522 West 21st St.) The exhibit embodies the
period of Picasso known as the “The Marie-
Thérèse years” (1927-1941) and is accompanied
by a fully illustrated catalog with essays by Rich-
ardson, Diana Picasso and Elizabeth Cowling,
Professor Emeritus of History of Art at Edin-
burgh University; and never before published
family photographs of Marie-Thérèse. o
PabloPicasso, Femme écrivant une
lettre,toplef.PabloPicasso, Fille
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The artist sounds of on
his paint-by-number
work, what inspires him
and his Texas roots.
Tell me about your re-
cent exhibition at Benri-
mon Contemporary, ‘It’s
Not About You.’ What
were the major themes
behind the work? The
inspiration?
Every piece has the word
“you” in its title. Hence, ‘It’s
Not About You.’ It’s ironic
and a bit subversive at the
same time. Everyone is
always coming from their
own perspective and living
in their own head. The ten-
dency is to take the world
personally. This may be the
time we live in or perhaps
it’s a uniquely American
trait, always making
everything about us.
What was theme of your
show, ‘What Are You
Waiting For?’
As with ‘It’s Not About
You,’ ‘What Are You Wait-
ing For?’ is both ironic
and earnest, speaking to
the viewer and my own
internal dialogue at once.
The surface and paint-by-
number is the hook that
pulls you in; once enticed,
hopefully, you will linger
enough to fnd some per-
sonal meaning.
How does being from
Houston infuence your
aesthetic?
I’m not sure it really
does. But being gay and
getting out of Texas
probably infuenced a lot,
though.
So you also collect
paint-by-number
paintings—why do
they speak to you?
This all started when
I inherited a collec-
tion of some 200-plus
vintage paint-by-number
paintings from Michael
O’Donoghue, a great friend
and the original head
writer of Saturday Night
Live. When he passed
away suddenly, his widow,
Cheryl Hardwick, gave
the collection to me. Now I
have something like 3,000.
I use them as a visual
vocabulary to informs the
work, but my work is not
about paint-by-number[s.]
What book is on your
nightstand right now?
Clear Your Clutter with
Feng Shui.
Where did you eat your
last meal?
I ordered from my favor-
ite West Village sushi joint,
Sakura, and ate it in bed
What specifc artist do
you collect, if any?
Warhol, Keith Haring,
McDermott & McGough,
Mark Morrisroe, Charles
Lutz, Wayne Coe, Doug &
Mike Starn, David Byrne,
Lawrence Weiner. I also
participate in Art Jambo-
ree, which is a downtown
artist’s collective—
everything is $50 and
under. I have gotten some
great work there— Scott
Lifshutz, Leah Durner,
Maripol, Joshua Jordan,
Richard Haines.
If you weren’t an artist,
you would be?
I always thought it
would be nice to run a
fower shop somewhere,
but after having already
been an art director and
designer for Vogue, Vanity
Fair, Us Weekly, etc. It took
me decades to actu-
ally even consider calling
myself an artist and now I
can’t imagine not wearing
that hat.
Anything else?
I have to tell you, this
makes me think of a line
my late friend Quentin
Crisp once said. He was
being interviewed at great
length when he fnally said,
‘You must stop this inter-
view now as I have come
to end of my personality.’
Me too.
Speegle will appear at the
Chelsea Market Anthro-
pologie May 7 from 10 a.m.
to noon. He has a group
show at Fair Folks and a
Goat in New York opening
June 1. o
Paint By
num8ers
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It’s Later Than You
Think,top,It’s Not
About You,below.
Trey Speegle brings
back an old classic
Byrachelmorgan
speeglecaptions
speegle.itslaterthanyouthink–it’slaterthanyou
think,2010.archivalpigment,acryliconcanvas.photo
courtesyBenrimoncontemporary.
speegle.youareHere–youareHere,2010.archival
pigment,acryliconcanvas.photocourtesyBenrimon
contemporary.
speegleportrait–treyspeegleandhisdoglamonte.
photocreditariancamileri.
speegleit’snotaboutyou–it’snotaboutyou,2010.ar-
chivalpigment,acryliconcanvas.photocourtesyBenrimon
contemporary.

Sperone WeStWater (257 Bowery, 212-999-7337) • GaGosian Gallery (522 west 21st st., 212-741-1717) • Cheim & read (547 west 25th st., 212-242-7727)
The PaCe Gallery (534 west 25th st., 212-929-7000) • david Zwirner (525 west 19th st., 212-727-2070) • Casey KaPlan (525 west 21st st., 212-645-7335) >
downtown’s best GALLeRIes
36 | may 2011
treyspeegle.
NYO_MAG3_P36,38,40_ArtistsProfiles.indd 36 4/29/11 5:17:49 PM
E
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WALLY FINDLAY
Hugo Gre nvi l l e
reclining nude with scarf
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WALLY FINDLAY
Hugo Gre nvi l l e
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WA L L Y F I N D L A Y G A L L E R I E S
PA L M B E A C H • N E W Y O R K • B A R C E L O N A
124 EAST 57
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Wally FIndley.indd 1 4/29/11 12:02:44 PM
38 | may 2011
Fifteen years of Michael
Glancy’s glass and metal
sculptures take the stage
at Infnite Obsessions at
Barry Friedman, Ltd. This
Rhode Island School of
Design professor discusses
his frst New York exhibi-
tion in more than fve years
and his newest literary
venture.
Why use glass as a
medium?
It’s all about smoke and
fre. Man’s involvement
with glass spans from
obsidian, volcanic ash used
to make spears and ar-
rowheads for 10,000 years
or molten glass, which is
refned glass that is fve
millennia old.
Why make the leap from
the art world to the liter-
ary one?
The book [Infnite
Obsessions, edited by Barry
Friedman] gives a glimpse
into my creative process
for the last 15 years, which
will hopefully enrich the
exhibition for viewers.
Tell me about teaching
at Rhode Island School
of Design—why do you
do it?
I’m a graduate of RISD
and I’ve been teaching there
since after receiving my
master’s [degree.] I think
it’s incredibly stimulating
to surround myself with
young, creative people. I do
it because they contribute
to my reality as much as I
contribute to theirs.
What do you hope to
convey to the literary
world?
In a world of e-books,
our goal is to show that
there are people who still
believe in beautifully pro-
duced books as cherished
objects that are a rewarding
experience. Books outlive
artists, so we take them
seriously.
What is the inspiration
behind your art?
The natural world, na-
ture and the physical world.
Albert Einstein said, ‘What
I see in nature is a grand
design only imperfectly,
one which a responsible
person must look at with
humility.’
How does your work
relate to science?
I think science informs
the work by inspiring
the artist. In 1968, I was
exposed to a very powerful
flm by Charles and Ray
Eames called Powers of Ten.
Essentially it deals with
macro and micro phases
in nature, and I believe my
work is an abstraction of
either inner or outer space.
Do you feel that you
are on a quest for
perfection?
I do. I began my explora-
tion of the material of glass
in 1970 and it took a decade
before I had a show in
Manhattan. It’s an impos-
sible goal to master the
material of glass. Perfection
is a quest.
When did you frst real-
ize that you wanted to be
an artist?
I don’t know. Probably
in frst grade when I made a
clay sculpture of an owl that
my mom still has. She’s 93.
I didn’t realize I wanted to
be an artist until I came to
college and hated business
school and began taking art
classes for therapy.
What book is on your
nightstand?
The Shape of Time by
George Kubler and Explor-
ing the Invisible by Lynn
Gamwell.
What is the last piece of
clothing you bought?
A feece by Under
Armour. My son works for
them as a designer.
The last meal you ate?
Grilled lamb chops,
which I made with
mashed potatoes.
What is the project you
have always wanted to
do but never got around
to?
Building a classic
wooden sailboat. I race
sailboats during the sum-
mer, namely my Beetle
Cat, which is a beautiful
little boat made in the
1920s in Massachusetts.
It’s too big a learning
curve to build, unfortu-
nately, so I don’t think I’ll
ever have the chance.
“Infnite Obsessions” runs
from May 5 through July
15 at Barry Friedman,
Ltd., 515 West 26th St. o
NYO
art
MichaelGlancy.
quest for
perfection
Michael Glancy’s science-infused glass and
metal sculptures steal the show.
ByAndrewGuarini
C
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BiologicstarX.
M
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downtown’s best GALLeRIes TaxTer & Spengemann (459 West 18th st., 212-924-0212) • Gary Snyder (250 West 26th st., 212-929-1351)
paul KaSmin (293 10th Ave., 212-563-4474) • Sean Kelly (528 West 29th st., 212-239-1181) • Friedman Benda (515 West 26th st., 212-239-8700) >
o
>
NYO_MAG3_P36,38,40_ArtistsProfiles.indd 38 4/29/11 5:18:06 PM
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40 | may 2011
Rene Pierre Allain shares
the story behind his mini-
malist works—and how he
manipulates acid, fre and
chemicals to burn images
on steel.
Tell me about your new-
est exhibit, ‘Steel Bars.’
‘Steel Bars’ is the latest
series of what I call steel
paintings—paintings
made on steel without
any use of pigments or
paint. They are painted
with steel-blackening
compound and a heat
torch on steel panels. In a
departure from my more
characteristically fatly
painted fnish, in this
new work, brush strokes,
gestural marks and drips
interact with the hard
edges of the geometry.
Why use steel? What
does the use of this
material convey?
Steel is just another
material, one that I have
become comfortable
working with. People think
of steel as cold, unfriendly
and unyielding—but I see it
as totally malleable. I like
it when it looks like it foats
on the wall, somewhat
dematerialized, while still
retaining [the]characteris-
tics [of] metal.
Tell me about the
process.
In the current work, the
metal surface is prepared
to a silvery satin fnish
on which some parts of
the image are created
with gun blue and other
parts are made with heat
from a torch. Gun blue is a
mild acid that chemically
blackens steel and is usu-
ally applied as a patina.
But in these works, I am
painting it on using a
paintbrush.

What is your
inspiration?
Architecture, bunkers,
frescoes, heraldry, insignia,
disruptive patterns, gar-
dens, abstract art, African
masks, Chinese land-
scapes, Japanese temples.
In this series, rhythmic
patterns.

When did you frst real-
ize that you wanted to be
an artist?
I [have] made drawings
and paintings since grade
school, but it was at age 27
while working as a news
photographer and photo-
graphing artists in their
studios that I decided to go
to art school and pursue art
full-time.
What exhibit or work
of yours are you most
proud of? Why?
What I’m working on is
always what I like the best .

Did you start of in
photography and sculp-
ture? Why the move to
painting?
In the frst years of my
art practice, I was mainly
making sculpture. When I
moved to New York in 1984,
my small studio forced me
to make sculptures closer
to the wall and then on the
wall. They were construct-
ed with wood and steel
and a pigmented plaster
coating. Working on the
wall kindled my awareness
of the picture plane and
other issues of painting.
I subsequently called my
fabrications ‘constructed
paintings.’
What book is on your
nightstand?
A book on African art.

What is the last piece of
clothing you bought?
A Carhartt shirt at my fa-
vorite clothing store, Dave’s
New York (581 Avenue of
the Americas).
The last meal you ate?
Crepes made by my
15-year-old daughter.
“Steel Bars” runs
through May 14 at Ricco
Maresca Gallery at 529
West 20th St. o
PB | may 2011
Burning
metal
Rene Pierre Allain manipulates his
steel ‘canvases’ with chemicals and acid.
ByRachelMorgan
NYO
art
April 8-23 | Poi- soned Apples and Smoking Lamps: Interpreting Fairy Tales and Adventure Stories
Third-year students in the School of Visual Arts’ B.F.A. Illustration and Cartooning Department take a cue from their childhood fantasies in this fairy-tale–inspired exhibi-
tion. Department Chair Thomas Woodruff curates. Free and open to the public (10 a.m.–6 p.m., Monday–Saturday, Visual Arts Gallery, 601 West 26 St., 15th foor).
j
o
h
n
B
e
R
e
n
s
From top:
Steel Bar No.
18-3,
Steel Bar No.
32-2,
Steel Bar No.
32-1.
Steel Bar No. 32-5; below, Steel Bar No. 32-2.
headshot1.RenePierreAllain(photo
byjohnBerens)1
headshot2.RenePierreAllain(photo
byjohnBerens)2
downtown’s best GALLeRIes Mitchell-innes & nAsh (534 WeST 26Th ST., 212-744-7400) • Lehmann maupin (540 WeST 26Th ST., 212-255-2923)
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NYO_MAG3_P36,38,40_ArtistsProfiles.indd 40 4/29/11 5:19:57 PM
Aroc.r Goii.r:.s O//.rs ti. Ori· Suostort:oi Stoci :r ti. Voric o/ Aucuoor's B:rcs orc
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Martin Lewis (1881·1962)
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Watercolor and pencil on paper
$igned lower lett. Mort:r L.u:s
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Reginald Marsh (1898·195+)
Moriottor Si·i:r.. 1937
Watercolor on paper
$igned lower right. R..:roic Morsi Au. ! !937
$90.000
Frederick Catherwood and Henrv Papprill
N.u·Yori. Toi.r /ro¬ ti. Nortiu.st Ar.i. o/ Fort Coiu¬ous. Go:.rror's
Isiorc. New York. 18+6
Aouatint engraving with original hand color
$35.000
lohn Hill atter William O. Wall
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$2+.000
arader ad.indd 1 4/29/11 12:04:42 PM
42 | may 2011
XXXXXXX Art
NYO
How did you get started
in the art world?
I grew up in New York
surrounded by the art
world. No one in my
family is in the business,
but everyone collected art.
They all bought art and put
it on their walls, but once
their walls were full, they
were done. I grew up going
to art galleries, going to
museums, things like that.
It just took.
What’s the earliest
piece of art you remem-
ber seeing?
My grandparents had
a Basquiat when I was a
kid that they bought from
Mary Boone. I remember
that was a really big deal
because no one else had art
quite like that.
How did the idea for
Gallery Week come to
fruition?
It started under this idea
that when the recession
initially hit, [we] felt that
people stopped coming to
galleries. It occurred to me
that if people stop coming
to galleries exclusively for
fnancial reasons, then we
as dealers were not pre-
senting ourselves correctly.
If everyone was only look-
ing at art commercially,
then we were at fault and
we needed to band together
and show that the gallery
is much more of a site of
education.
What does Gallery Week
entail?
On Friday, all the galler-
ies in Chelsea and uptown
who are participating
will stay open late until 8
p.m. On Saturday, there’s
going to be an event at the
Whitney from 7 p.m. to 9
p.m. On Sunday, the galler-
ies on the Lower East Side,
the Bowery and Soho will
stay open late until 8 p.m.
During this entire time,
galleries will be having
various events to augment
the shows that they’re
already having.
What’s the motivation
behind having the gal-
leries open later?
It’s to create more
possibilities for people to
come. Certainly people
who work can come after
work. It’s also to give it a
more opening type of feel,
more celebratory.
Is your daughter
interested in art as well?
Will she carry on the
tradition?
Absolutely. Her mother
is a fashion designer. I’m an
art dealer. So she’s around
art and artists. Her room is
flled with art. She already
has somewhat of her own
collection. A lot of it’s been
given to her from gallery
artists and some things I’ve
bought for her. She’s 7. She’s
around it every day.
What kinds of trends
are you seeing in terms
of sales?
There are many clients
and collectors that have
come back to the galleries.
They’ve gotten used to the
way things are in terms of
the economy. There are
also people who are inter-
ested in putting money
in art rather than in real
estate or in other things.
No matter what, if you have
a great piece by the right
artist and it’s priced right,
there’s always someone for
that.
The second annual New York
Gallery Week takes place
May 6-8 and features 60
contemporary art galleries
and not-for-proft spaces in
addition to the free events and
programming. NYGW will
beneft the Whitney Museum.
For a full list of events, visit
www.newyorkgalleryweek.
com. Casey Kaplan Gallery is
located at 525 West 21st St. o
Artistic AffAir
Casey Kaplan, founder of New York Gallery Week and of Casey Kaplan Gallery, sounds of on the week-
long arts event, his own art background and how collecting starts early in his family. ByRachelMorgan
C
A
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CaseyKaplan.
ExhibitionviewofLiamGillick’s“Discussion
BenchPlatforms,AVolvoBar+Everything
GoodGoes,”CaseyKaplan,NewYork,NY,
February18-March27,2010.
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Vincent van Gogh
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Still Life with Two Sacks and a Bottle

Circa 1884-1885
Canvas laid on panel
Canvas: 12” high x 16” wide
Frame: 19
1
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1
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Vi nce nt
Van gogh
Antiques • Fine Art • Jewelry
MS Rau.indd 1 4/29/11 12:05:48 PM
NYO
people
44 | may 2011
American Ballet Theatre principal dancer Mi-
chele Wiles found herself performing for an unusual
audience one October morning—a small group of pot-bellied,
frizzy-haired little girls in pink tights, at the Bedford-Stuyve-
sant YMCA. Wiles, 30, taught the “Tiny Toes” class how to
execute a chaînés without getting dizzy. She showed the girls
how to look at a fxed point in the mirror for as long as possible
before whipping their bodies around, and encouraged them to
try it with her. They concentrated, but wobbled like zombies,
spinning in circles. Wiles—Amy Adam’s blonder, thinner dop-
pelgänger —evaluated their attempts, nodding and smiling
politely. “Very good,” she fnally pronounced.
After the children made a few passes across the room she
demonstrated what the turns could look like after some prac-
tice. She placed her hands on her slender hips and catapulted
into motion, spinning like a dreidel on ice, impossibly fast yet
utterly composed. The girls burst into applause, and when
Wiles stopped, she erupted with laughter. She got a kick out of
them getting a kick out of her. She was happy.
“I’m not stuck anymore,” she said later referring to her new
attitude toward ballet, which took years of self-evaluation to
acquire. She is among the most experienced ballerinas in the
world today and has spent 13 years—nearly her entire adult
life—at the American Ballet Theatre, which Mikhail Barysh-
nikov made famous in the 1980s.
Wiles, a Pasadena, Maryland, native, joined the corps de
ballet at age 18. Two years later she moved up to soloist. And at
age 25, she was promoted principal dancer—the highest rank
in the ballet world. Since then she’s toured the globe dancing
countless lead roles, and has secured a spot among New York
City’s artistic elite.
Currently, she is rehearsing the part of Kitri in Don Quixote,
which she will perform at the Met in May. She is also prep-
ping for her latest turn in Swan Lake, where she will yet again
dance the part of angel-and-devil twins Odette and Odile—the
same role Natalie Portman’s character, dancer Nina Sayers,
portrayed in the movie Black Swan.
Wiles is all too familiar with the flm’s theme of self-induced
pressure, though she has yet to experience a psychotic meta-
morphosis from ethereal ballerina to paranoid demon-bird.
But she recently went on her own transformative journey. All
she ever wanted was to become the ultimate ballet dancer—but
didn’t expect to be completely confused when she succeeded.
“I thought that balloons were going to drop from the sky,”
she said. “I thought that the white horses would come in. Actu-
ally quite the opposite. I went through these crazy emotional
outpourings after I was promoted. For so long, it was like,
I want to be principal. [I was] promoted and then years of
emotional backup came pouring out. I was forced to take a look
at myself.”
A few days after her YMCA appearance, Wiles spent the
morning at the Manhattan Movement & Arts Center on the
Upper West Side, rehearsing her part in Theme and Variations,
which she performed last November in Cuba.
She left the practice studio pink-faced and fushed, red Ly-
cra leotard stained with sweat below her breasts, blond hairs
sticking out of her once-tight French twist. Still, she looked
stunning, tall—she’s 5-foot-8—lean, muscled yet delicate,
porcelain skin. She untied her size-8 Pointe shoes, slipped on
a pair of black boots and wrapped a knitted sweater around
her shoulders. Susan Jafe, one of Wiles’ ballet coaches—and
retired ABT principal dancer and Baryshnikov’s former
protégé—followed Wiles out of the studio. Jafe seemed to ap-
preciate that Wiles was in the throes of dissecting her life.
“She is searching to be a real artist,” Jafe said, “an artist
with depth.”
When Jafe left, Wiles headed for the center’s cafe and
grabbed a cofee and sesame bagel with cream cheese (yes,
dancers do eat; they have to, to replenish the massive amounts
of calories lost, Wiles said), plopped down on a chair and
began to retrace her personal odyssey.
She recalls her parents taking her to the Kennedy Center
in Washington, D.C., to watch the Royal Ballet’s production of
Swan Lake with Darcey Bussell dancing the lead.
“I fell in love with the ballet and I fell in love with her,”
Wiles said. “I thought it was so beautiful and elegant and
magical and a world I thought I wanted to be in.”
Her father, a home builder, constructed a ballet studio
in the basement of their house, which she rarely left. She
agonized over missed steps and—perhaps channeling Nina
Sayers—practiced until she was nearly perfect. She dismissed
her parents’ demands to go to sleep in favor of staying up late
to study ballet tapes and rehash routines she learned in class.
“She was relentless with it,” Larry Wiles said of his >
The American Ballet Theatre’s principal dancer Michele Wiles talks about
fnally fnding happiness in her own success. ByLizWagner

e vol ut i on

of a

Ballerina
The
R
o
s
a
L
i
e
o
’C
o
n
n
o
R
NYO_MAG3_PXX_MicheleWilesABT.indd 44 4/29/11 5:10:24 PM
NYO
people
44 | may 2011
American Ballet Theatre principal dancer Mi-
chele Wiles found herself performing for an unusual
audience one October morning—a small group of pot-bellied,
frizzy-haired little girls in pink tights, at the Bedford-Stuyve-
sant YMCA. Wiles, 30, taught the “Tiny Toes” class how to
execute a chaînés without getting dizzy. She showed the girls
how to look at a fxed point in the mirror for as long as possible
before whipping their bodies around, and encouraged them to
try it with her. They concentrated, but wobbled like zombies,
spinning in circles. Wiles—Amy Adam’s blonder, thinner dop-
pelgänger —evaluated their attempts, nodding and smiling
politely. “Very good,” she fnally pronounced.
After the children made a few passes across the room she
demonstrated what the turns could look like after some prac-
tice. She placed her hands on her slender hips and catapulted
into motion, spinning like a dreidel on ice, impossibly fast yet
utterly composed. The girls burst into applause, and when
Wiles stopped, she erupted with laughter. She got a kick out of
them getting a kick out of her. She was happy.
“I’m not stuck anymore,” she said later referring to her new
attitude toward ballet, which took years of self-evaluation to
acquire. She is among the most experienced ballerinas in the
world today and has spent 13 years—nearly her entire adult
life—at the American Ballet Theatre, which Mikhail Barysh-
nikov made famous in the 1980s.
Wiles, a Pasadena, Maryland, native, joined the corps de
ballet at age 18. Two years later she moved up to soloist. And at
age 25, she was promoted principal dancer—the highest rank
in the ballet world. Since then she’s toured the globe dancing
countless lead roles, and has secured a spot among New York
City’s artistic elite.
Currently, she is rehearsing the part of Kitri in Don Quixote,
which she will perform at the Met in May. She is also prep-
ping for her latest turn in Swan Lake, where she will yet again
dance the part of angel-and-devil twins Odette and Odile—the
same role Natalie Portman’s character, dancer Nina Sayers,
portrayed in the movie Black Swan.
Wiles is all too familiar with the flm’s theme of self-induced
pressure, though she has yet to experience a psychotic meta-
morphosis from ethereal ballerina to paranoid demon-bird.
But she recently went on her own transformative journey. All
she ever wanted was to become the ultimate ballet dancer—but
didn’t expect to be completely confused when she succeeded.
“I thought that balloons were going to drop from the sky,”
she said. “I thought that the white horses would come in. Actu-
ally quite the opposite. I went through these crazy emotional
outpourings after I was promoted. For so long, it was like,
I want to be principal. [I was] promoted and then years of
emotional backup came pouring out. I was forced to take a look
at myself.”
A few days after her YMCA appearance, Wiles spent the
morning at the Manhattan Movement & Arts Center on the
Upper West Side, rehearsing her part in Theme and Variations,
which she performed last November in Cuba.
She left the practice studio pink-faced and fushed, red Ly-
cra leotard stained with sweat below her breasts, blond hairs
sticking out of her once-tight French twist. Still, she looked
stunning, tall—she’s 5-foot-8—lean, muscled yet delicate,
porcelain skin. She untied her size-8 Pointe shoes, slipped on
a pair of black boots and wrapped a knitted sweater around
her shoulders. Susan Jafe, one of Wiles’ ballet coaches—and
retired ABT principal dancer and Baryshnikov’s former
protégé—followed Wiles out of the studio. Jafe seemed to ap-
preciate that Wiles was in the throes of dissecting her life.
“She is searching to be a real artist,” Jafe said, “an artist
with depth.”
When Jafe left, Wiles headed for the center’s cafe and
grabbed a cofee and sesame bagel with cream cheese (yes,
dancers do eat; they have to, to replenish the massive amounts
of calories lost, Wiles said), plopped down on a chair and
began to retrace her personal odyssey.
She recalls her parents taking her to the Kennedy Center
in Washington, D.C., to watch the Royal Ballet’s production of
Swan Lake with Darcey Bussell dancing the lead.
“I fell in love with the ballet and I fell in love with her,”
Wiles said. “I thought it was so beautiful and elegant and
magical and a world I thought I wanted to be in.”
Her father, a home builder, constructed a ballet studio
in the basement of their house, which she rarely left. She
agonized over missed steps and—perhaps channeling Nina
Sayers—practiced until she was nearly perfect. She dismissed
her parents’ demands to go to sleep in favor of staying up late
to study ballet tapes and rehash routines she learned in class.
“She was relentless with it,” Larry Wiles said of his >
The American Ballet Theatre’s principal dancer Michele Wiles talks about
fnally fnding happiness in her own success. ByLizWagner

e vol ut i on

of a

Ballerina
The
R
o
s
a
L
i
e
o
’C
o
n
n
o
R
NYO_MAG3_PXX_MicheleWilesABT.indd 44 4/29/11 5:10:24 PM
people
G
E
N
E
S
C
H
I
A
V
O
N
E
MicheleWilesasKitri
inDon Quixote.
NYO_MAG3_PXX_MicheleWilesABT.indd 45 4/29/11 5:10:55 PM
NYO
XXXXXXX
46 | may 2011
people
daughter during a phone conversation. “She
would come home and practice at night what
she learned for hours.”
She convinced her parents to enroll her at
the Kirov Academy of Ballet in D.C., a school
specializing in classical Russian techniques.
She received a full scholarship to attend, which
obliged her to board full time at the institu-
tion—at age 10.
Being an hour and a half away from her
parents and older brother tore Wiles up, but
the determination to dance won out over
homesickness. “It was something inside of me
making me do it.” She took normal academic
courses for fve hours in the morning, but the
majority of the curriculum involved ballet:
dance class from 2:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., indi-
vidual rehearsal from 8:30 p.m. to 10 p.m.
Even at a school of exceptional dancers,
Wiles stood out. “She was extremely outstand-
ing when she was here,” John Dougherty,
Wiles’ social studies teacher said via phone.
“When she took an [dancing] exam everyone
went to go watch her because she was better
than everybody else. Her legs could go higher
than anybody’s.” Wiles entered three dance
competitions during her last year at Kirov and
won awards at all three, including the Gold
Medal prize at the prestigious International
Ballet Competition in Varna, Bulgaria.
At 16, Wiles left Kirov Academy and headed
straight to New York City to take on the Ameri-
can Ballet Theatre. But after a four-month ap-
prenticeship with ABT, Wiles didn’t make the
company. Instead she was placed in the studio
company, a lesser ensemble, which groomed
dancers who had potential.
“I came from a school where I was a star,”
she said. “Prodigy. I got the attention. I came to
[American Ballet Theatre] and I wasn’t really
anybody here yet. It [was] like starting all over
again.”
Her family believed in her talent and made
sacrifces to nurture it—Wiles’ mother staying
with her two weeks a month for about two years,
her father sometimes sleeping in his car at the
Vince Lombardi Service Area just north of the
New Jersey Turnpike to rest during long treks
back to Pasadena. But, as Larry Wiles puts it, “I
felt totally energized because I was doing this
for someone who wanted to do it so bad.”
Within a year, Wiles worked her way into
the main company. She leapt into a manic
rehearsal schedule, dancing up to 12 hours
some days. Her body ached constantly. Since
ABT is primarily a touring company—the New
York season only lasts from May through July—
Wiles quickly adapted to life on the road. She
will give performances in London, Washing-
ton, D.C., Miami, Los Angeles and parts of Ja-
pan this year, on top of class and rehearsal. She
has graced the stage at the world’s most famous
opera houses and has seen her name printed in
international newspapers next to words such
as “powerful,” “talented” and “impressive.”
Wiles’ current dance partner, Cory Stearns,
said he was slightly intimidated by her star
status when they began working together three
years ago. He was 21 at the time, and still a solo-
ist. (He was promoted to principal in January).
Ballet became Wiles’ identity. Wiles was ballet.
But soon she realized she wasn’t O.K. with that.
“I remember one day literally standing
on the stage thinking, ‘What am I doing
here?’” she said. “I think up until now I just
went through this period of searching.” She
described herself as an “automaton” ballerina
who did everything for the ballet and said she
often cried before performances to calm her
nerves. “It was almost like I was searching for
my soul in a way, you know?”
Her personal journey was played out on-
stage, and critics took note. A big blow came
after a March 2009 London performance of
Swan Lake, the same ballet, ironically, that
Wiles fell in love with as a girl. She danced
Odette/Odile, which requires both mechani-
cal and emotional commitment, as reinforced
in spectacularly manic fashion in Black Swan.
While nearly every review praised Wiles’
technical prowess they also panned her acting.
The Times in London cited her lack of “striking
dramatic personality.” A Telegraph reviewer
wrote he didn’t “buy her” as delicate Odette or
as firtatious Odile. A critic from The New York
Times penned that she had a “reluctance to
carry the story” as if it were her own, also opin-
ing that she was “on the music but never in it.”
Wiles admits that it’s difcult to hear nega-
tive criticism, but concedes the London per-
formance was a bit hollow. She says the crisis
of faith in her career was a big reason why. As
Wiles plucked oversize bobby pins from her
updo and let her thick hair fall just past her
shoulders, she looked completely unafected by
that tough time in her life.
Bigger things have transpired since then.
Primarily, James McCullough, her husband.
Her “soulful businessman, Jamessss.” Wiles
said, lingering on the “s” just a bit. The couple
was set up by one of ABT’s board members.
McCullough, CEO of biotechnology com-
pany Exosome Diagnostics, said he knew Wiles
was utterly dedicated to her career but was
surprised to learn she had dimension beyond
the ballet. On that frst date, they discussed
their shared love of history and philosophy.
“She’s a big thinker,” McCullough said on
the phone.
After two years of dating, they wed in early
October at Madison Avenue Presbyterian
Church. They recently returned from their
honeymoon road-tripping across northern
Italy. Now it seems Wiles isn’t drowning in
dance now that the marriage is her focus. She
no longer obsesses over titles—corps member,
soloist, principal, star.
She has also learned how to convert negative
drivers—like the strife for perfection—into
helpful energy. “That’s when you fnd your real
confdence,” Wiles recently wrote in an email.
“I like to ask myself how I want to feel and then
I picture myself dancing in a positive way—this
is a great technique to overcome pre-perfor-
mance anxiety.”
McCullough noticed the maturity in his
wife’s dancing when she reprised the role
of Odette/Odile at the Met last June. Wiles
noticed the change in herself as well.
“I feel like my dancing has fipped,” she said.
“Like it’s coming from the inside out instead of
the outside with nothing in.”
During an early scene in Black Swan, ar-
tistic director Thomas Leroy, played by Vin-
cent Cassel, encourages high-strung Nina to
take a chill-pill. “Perfection is not just about
control,” he tells her. “It’s also about letting
go.” Wiles recently had a similar revelation.
She explained that she had heard someone
say that if you clutch sand in your hand too
tightly, it will slip away. She demonstrated,
extending a graceful arm punctuated with
a clenched fst. Wiles believes the same is
true of the ballet. “If you can let it go,” she
said, slowly opening her hand like a rosebud
in bloom, “I think there’s something else
that happens. You have space. Space to go to
another dimension. Be an artist.” o
Wilesas
MyrtainGiselle.
wiles.jpg
MicheleWiles.Photo:RosalieO’Connor.
dqwiles3ro.jpg
MicheleWilesasKitriinDonQuixote.Photo:Rosalie
O’Connor.
gwiles1gs.jpg
MicheleWilesasMyrtainGiselle.Photo:GeneSchiavone.
sbwiles3gs.jpg
MicheleWilesastheLilacFairyinTheSleeping
Beauty.Photo:GeneSchiavone.
slwiles2ro.jpg
MicheleWilesasOdetteinSwanLake.Photo:Rosalie
O’Connor.

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NYO_MAG3_PXX_MicheleWilesABT.indd 46 4/29/11 5:11:13 PM
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metmuseum.org Through August 28
Richard Serra Drawing
A Retrospective
The exhibition is made possible in part by the Jane and Robert Carroll Fund.
It was organized by the Menil Collection, Houston.
Richard Serra, September, 2001, paintstick on handmade paper,
Private collection. © Richard Serra. Photo: Rob McKeever.
MET-0066-Serra_NYOMag_8.875x10.75_May4_v2.indd 1 4/26/11 5:37 PM
The Met.indd 1 4/29/11 12:06:29 PM
FASHION
48 | may 2011
NYO
W
hen Diane von Furstenberg published her
autobiography Diane: A Signature Life in 1998, I
rushed out to get myself a copy and devoured it
overnight. I did not grow up with her wrap dress—although
now I do own one in her vintage reprint—but I was drawn to
her free spirit, which travels between the old countries and
the new world, between fashion and art. But little did I ever
expect that someday I would interview her in China.
For von Furstenberg, China was not a surprising destina-
tion. I caught up with her in the few hours counting down to
the opening reception for her “Journey of a Dress” exhibi-
tion that opened at Pace Beijing in Beijing’s trendy 798 Art
District on April 2. The exhibit, which highlights the 40-
plus years of von Furstenberg’s career, includes 80 pieces.
The original wrap dress from 1973, photographs, letters and
von Furstenberg’s art collection, including a Warhol, will all
be on display through May 14.
In Shanghai, where I attended Pearl Lam’s dinner for von
Furstenberg’s family and friends and her black-tie Red Ball,
I had plenty of opportunities to observe her in her interac-
tions. Surrounded by her family members, including her
only brother, Philippe, who few in from Belgium, she spoke
alternatively in French and in English, looking simultane-
ously engaged and relaxed.
“China inspires me today in the same way that New York
has inspired me,” she said. She went on to explain that when
she frst moved from Europe to America at the age of 22,
she was drawn to America because it seemed anything was
possible. She said she feels very much the same way about
China today.
“Journey of a Dress” is a journey of an exhibition. It ends
with China. The designer believed that the show would give
the Chinese, who in the past four decades lived through a
world very diferent from America, a window to an Ameri-
can cultural history.
Born to a Russian-born father and a Greek-born mother >
Diane von Furstenberg on China, New York and her new exhibit
at the Pace Gallery in Beijing.
By Chiu-Ti Jansen
FaS HI ON’ S aRT
mUS E
NYO_MAG_DVF.indd 48 4/29/11 5:06:03 PM
May 2011 | PB
DianevonFurstenberg,
2010,byHaiBo.
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NYO_MAG_DVF.indd 49 4/29/11 5:06:20 PM
Ross Gayde
Shelley Saxton
Wesley Morrow
Joan Goldberg
Christopher Scianni
Alyson Donnelly
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Untitled-24 1 4/29/11 1:48:44 PM
100 | may 2011

winner. Mostly things with character.”
In terms of real estate popularity, downtown
has always emerged as somewhat of a front-
runner. When asked why, brokers’ pointed out
the neighborhood’s unique feel.
“[What makes the neighborhood unique
is] the close proximity of neighborhoods with
distinct personalities,” Grant said. “Soho has
a totally diferent feel from its neighbor Little
Italy, which is diferent from Chinatown.”
Zollinger also names area amenities as a
major draw.
“The downtown real estate market is unique
because it ofers exciting new areas for recre-
ation and entertainment, including the High
Line, Hudson River Park, celebrity architecture
and exciting new restaurants,” he said. “These
kinds of neighborhood attractions bring buyers
because they don’t exist anyplace else.”
Jill Mangone, vice president
and director at Brown Harris
Stevens also said the High Line
was a major plus for the area.
“The High Line has had a
tremendous efect on West
Chelsea,” she said. “I think it has
humanized what was a desolate
and gritty area.”
An eclectic group of people is
what makes this area hot, some
brokers said.
“There is a juxtaposition [be-
tween] young and old, wealthy
and middle class, creative types
and business execs, all harmoni-
ous together,” said Meg Siegel,
senior vice president at Sotheby’s
International Realty.
The neighborhood’s unique
features—and neighborhood feel—are what
makes it enduringly popular, some brokers said.
“Less density, cobblestone streets, original
loft buildings interspersed with new buildings
within the context of the neighborhood,” said
Kenneth Malian, senior executive vice presi-
dent and director of sales at Prudential Douglas
Elliman. “Downtown still feels like a neighbor-
hood; we have a new Hudson River Promenade,
unique product, more light and air and terrifc
public transportation.”
Shii Ann Huang, senior vice president
and associate broker at Corcoran, also sees a
neighborhood-like atmosphere downtown.
“There is a real village or small-town feeling
about many of the downtown areas that buyers
often cite as the reason they are buying in the
area,” Huang said. “Cobblestone streets and
the charm of old New York contribute to that
feeling. That and easy access to amenities draws
in a broad crowd.”
As for what’s next for the
neighborhood, continued
growth seems to be the answer.
“With section two of the
High Line opening in June
and Related’s soon-to-begin
Hudson Rail Yards construction,
West Chelsea has tremendous
continued growth opportu-
nity,” Zollinger said. “The new
Avenues School, set to open in
2012, will make downtown an
even greater home destination
for families wanting proximity
to a school on par with Dalton,
Collegiate and Spence.”
Stimpson and Hanja predict
growth as well.
“[It] will continue to expand
eastward,” they said.
A plethora of new buildings has also popped
up downtown.
The Financial District is marked by hot new
developments like the Gehry-designed rental
building 8 Spruce Street and condominiums
developments 99 John, 88 Greenwich, 20 Pine
Street, 67 Liberty Street, 75 Wall and the Wil-
liam Beaver House.
In fact, some brokers think this area is on its
way up.
“I really think that FiDi is going to be the
next big thing,” Hedaya said. “The value and
building quality are really thing[s] that will
emerge once more conveniences and retailers
come down there.”
In Battery Park City, the Visionaire and 1
Rector Park are in high demand. Soho boasts
the Trump Soho Hotel Condominium with a
hefty number of penthouse residences—11 to
be exact—and amenities to match. Soho Mews
is another luxury high-rise popping up in the
trendy hood. Soho’s Jean Nouvel–designed 40
Mercer is also hot.
Brokers point to One Jackson Square in
Greenwich Village as a standout. Palazzo
Chupi is another fan favorite.
Developments along the waterfront in
Greenwich Village are other marks of the area’s
development—like Richard Meier’s Perry Street
condos or Superior Ink at 400 West 12th St.
“The Richard Meier towers on Perry Street
instigated waterfront development along the
West Side Highway,” Grant said.
It’s no wonder that potential renters and
buyers are focking downtown now more than
ever—with the abundance of shops, eateries and
brand-new green space like the High Line, life
down south (in Manhattan of course) is looking
better and better. o
brokers’
pick:
Iconic
down-
towners
Robert De Niro
Andy Warhol
Ian Schrager
Lou Reed
Serge Becker
Andre Balazs
Sarah Jessica Parker
Julian Schnabel
Susan Sarandon
Edward Burns
Christy Turlington
Anna Wintour
Joey Ramone
The Highline.
NYO_MAG3_P96,100,102_RealEstateOverview.indd 100 4/29/11 3:54:22 PM
450 WEST 17TH ST. #1403 NEW YORK, NY 10011 • ZOLLINGERNYC.COM
For Sale: 404 West 48th Street, 3B
1BR | 1BA | 500sf
Asking: $429,000 (Maint. $485.00)
For Sale: 450 West 17th Street, 1509
3BR | 3BA | 1637sf Interior; 1753sf Terrace
Asking: $4,750,000 (CC. $2,110.49)
Sold: 450 West 17th Street, 2507
2BR | 2.5BA | 1885sf
Asking: $4,575,000 (CC. $2,007.15)
For Sale: 450 West 17th Street, 1508/1509
4BR+ | 4BA+ | 2900sf Interior; 1753sf Terrace
Asking: $7,145,000 (CC. $2,110.49)
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introducing
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ERIC ZOLLINGER
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Z&A NYO AD_033011.indd 1 3/30/2011 2:37:23 AM
Untitled-26 1 4/29/11 2:22:50 PM
450 WEST 17TH ST. #1403 NEW YORK, NY 10011 • ZOLLINGERNYC.COM
For Sale: 404 West 48th Street, 3B
1BR | 1BA | 500sf
Asking: $429,000 (Maint. $485.00)
For Sale: 450 West 17th Street, 1509
3BR | 3BA | 1637sf Interior; 1753sf Terrace
Asking: $4,750,000 (CC. $2,110.49)
Sold: 450 West 17th Street, 2507
2BR | 2.5BA | 1885sf
Asking: $4,575,000 (CC. $2,007.15)
For Sale: 450 West 17th Street, 1508/1509
4BR+ | 4BA+ | 2900sf Interior; 1753sf Terrace
Asking: $7,145,000 (CC. $2,110.49)
For Sale: 450 West 17th Street, 1705
Conv. 2BR | 2BA | 827sf Interior; 196sf Balcony
Asking: $1,675,000 (CC: $875.21)
For Sale: 450 West 17th Street, 1508
2BR | 2BA | 1266sf
Asking: $2,395,000 (CC. $1,225.55)
introducing
The Zollinger Collection
Visit ZOLLINGERNYC.COM
for exclusives, property tours,
and client resources
ERIC ZOLLINGER
PRESIDENT • LICENSED REAL ESTATE BROKER
212.380.1139 ofce • eric@zollingernyc.com
Expertise. Commitment.
Professionalism.
These are the hallmarks of Eric Zollinger and
the core values behind Zollinger & Associates,
New York City’s smart, independant and
choice residential real estate brokerage.
Z&A NYO AD_033011.indd 1 3/30/2011 2:37:23 AM
Untitled-26 1 4/29/11 2:22:50 PM
On March 16, friends and supporters of
The Observer Media group gathered to toast the
launch of NYO Magazine at The Aldyn on the Up-
per West Side.
A lively mix of guests enjoyed cocktails crafted
with Bombay Sapphire, beer from Radeberger,
and wines from Sud de France wines: Maison Al-
bert Bichot - C’est la Vie, Domaine de la Patience
- Chardonnay, Château Fontanche - Les Terroirs.

THANK YOU
TO OUR
GENEROUS
SPONSORS
A NOTE FROM
THE OBSERVER MEDIA GROUP
On March 16, friends and supporters of The Observer Media group gathered to
toast the launch of NYO Magazine at The Aldyn on the Upper West Side.
THANK YOU TO OUR
GENEROUS SPONSORS
A NOTE FROM THE OBSERVER MEDIA GROUP
A lively mix of guests enjoyed cocktails crafted with Bombay Sap-
phire, beer from Radeberger, and wines from Sud de France wines:
Maison Albert Bichot - C’est la Vie, Domaine de la Patience - Char-
donnay, Château Fontanche - Les Terroirs.
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On March 16, friends and supporters of
The Observer Media group gathered to toast the
launch of NYO Magazine at The Aldyn on the Up-
per West Side.
A lively mix of guests enjoyed cocktails crafted
with Bombay Sapphire, beer from Radeberger,
and wines from Sud de France wines: Maison Al-
bert Bichot - C’est la Vie, Domaine de la Patience
- Chardonnay, Château Fontanche - Les Terroirs.

THANK YOU
TO OUR
GENEROUS
SPONSORS
A NOTE FROM
THE OBSERVER MEDIA GROUP
On March 16, friends and supporters of The Observer Media group gathered to
toast the launch of NYO Magazine at The Aldyn on the Upper West Side.
THANK YOU TO OUR
GENEROUS SPONSORS
A NOTE FROM THE OBSERVER MEDIA GROUP
A lively mix of guests enjoyed cocktails crafted with Bombay Sap-
phire, beer from Radeberger, and wines from Sud de France wines:
Maison Albert Bichot - C’est la Vie, Domaine de la Patience - Char-
donnay, Château Fontanche - Les Terroirs.
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106 | MAY 2011
back of mag.indd 106 4/29/11 3:39:32 PM
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106 | MAY 2011
back of mag.indd 106 4/29/11 3:39:32 PM
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MAY | 107
back of mag.indd 107 4/29/11 3:39:57 PM
Tired of feeling hungry
while losing weight?
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back of mag.indd 108 4/29/11 3:40:50 PM
Tired of feeling hungry
while losing weight?
This is not a diet.
Patented biofeedback device
www.mandoleannyc.com • Upper East Side, Manhattan
Contact us to schedule a free tour
and information session.
646-386-7745
or
info@mandonyc.com
No packaged foods • No calorie counting
No points • No supplements
No restricted foods
Mandolean ofers an individualized eating
behavior program that teaches you how to
eat, with proven weight loss results.
NYO MARKETPLACE
MAY 2011 | 109
back of mag.indd 109 4/29/11 3:41:18 PM
Tired of feeling hungry
while losing weight?
This is not a diet.
Patented biofeedback device
www.mandoleannyc.com • Upper East Side, Manhattan
Contact us to schedule a free tour
and information session.
646-386-7745
or
info@mandonyc.com
No packaged foods • No calorie counting
No points • No supplements
No restricted foods
Mandolean ofers an individualized eating
behavior program that teaches you how to
eat, with proven weight loss results.
NYO MARKETPLACE
MAY 2011 | 109
back of mag.indd 109 4/29/11 3:41:18 PM
Described as authentically
modern, the apartments at
25 Broad at The Exchange
ofer sleek, modern fnishes
in a historically landmarked
building. Doorman living in
the heart of the fnancial district ofers residents the
ideal location for easy access to dining, shopping
and transportation. And within the building, ame-
nities include residents’ lounge, game room, ftness
center, children’s play room, golf simulator and more.
888. 430.6085 | 25broadnyc.com
The affordaBle arT fair
Spring 2011, May 5-8, 2011:
Celebrating the continued in-
terest in owning original art,
the Afordable Art Fair New York City (AAF NYC) re-
turns to 7W New York (7 West 34th Street) present-
ing contemporary art priced from $100 - $10,000.
For tickets, programming, and more information
www.aafnyc.com.
aBC CarpeT and home
ofers a diverse selection of
globally sourced product at
the cutting edge of design,
beauty and sustainability. ABC encourages you to
create your home as an expression of your vision and
values. Its dynamic and inspiring assortment includes
vintage & antiques, ABC Goodwood furniture from
responsibly managed forests; chemical free organic
beds; indigenous artistry from global cooperatives;
jewelry and apothecary; tabletop and lighting, and
the largest collection of rugs and carpets in the world.
888Broadway, New York, NY 10003, www.abchome.
com, 212-473-3000
BeTTina equiTieS: Living Well,
In the World’s Greatest City. Bet-
tina is known for afordable prices
that make Manhattan living in the
fnest buildings within reach, with
NO FEE! Attractive studios, spa-
cious three-bedroom duplexes and
triplexes in the most desired neighborhoods: East/
West Side, Clinton, Murray Hill, Gramercy Park, Union
Square and East Village. Experience the diference
in the way our buildings are run with a quality com-
mitment and ongoing attention to amenities such
as exceptional maintenance/upgrades, a responsive
management staf and roomy, comfortable layouts.
www.bettinaequities.com. (212) 744-3330.
Brown harriS STevenS, established in 1873, is
the premier provider of residential real estate servic-
es in New York. The company has ofces through-
out New York City, the Hamptons, North Fork and
Palm Beach. Brown Harris Stevens ofers more lux-
ury residential exclusives than any other Manhattan
frm, and serves as the exclusive afliate of Christie’s
International Real Estate Inc., a subsidiary of Chris-
tie’s International PLC, the world’s oldest fne arts
auctioneer. For more information, please visit www.
BrownHarrisStevens.com.
CaSa oliveira wineS & li-
quorS Located in the heart
of the West Village one block
south of the Christopher St/
Sheridan Sq subway station,
Casa Oliveira carries a full selection of wine, cham-
pagne, and liquor, including single malt scotch and
vintage port. Free tastings Tuesday & Friday nights.
Open Mon – Wed: Noon - 11, Thurs – Sat: Noon – 11:45,
Sun: Noon – 8. 98 7th Avenue South, 212 929 0760
www.casaoliveiranyc.com
CuSTom BrokerS with 30 years in
Manhattan Real Estate is a leader in the
exchange of personal attention and spe-
cialized expertise. Think private banking;
discreet and intimate. Our boutique-style
frm stands out in a world where more
and more business is conducted in cyberspace. We
believe nothing can replace the personal touch in a
very personal profession! We combine modern tools
with old-fashioned work ethic.
For over 60 years elgoT has
been Manhattan’s premiere
source for kitchen and bath
design, remodeling and major
appliance sales and installa-
tion. That’s why discerning New
Yorkers rely on Elgot for quality, service and experi-
ence. Our staf is always happy to help you choose
energy efcient and eco-friendly products to allow
you to support green living in Manhattan. From
too-tight spaces to arcane building codes to co-op
regulations, we’ve seen and done it all! 937 Lexing-
ton Avenue (68th/69th Sts.), New York, NY 10065,
212-879-1200. www.elgotkitchens.com
flomenhafT gallery rep-
resents work of renowned con-
temporary artists and has out-
standing 20th century works by historically important
artists. Works available by: Pierre Alechinsky, Emma
Amos, Joan Barber, Romare Bearden, Siona Benjamin,
Paul Brach, Amy Ernst, Neil Folberg, Rimma Gerlo-
vina & Valeriy Gerlovin, John Henry, Mira Lehr, Builder
Levy, Faith Ringgold, Dina Recanati, Miriam Schapiro,
Roger Shimomura, Jaune Quick-to-see Smith, Linda
Stein, Pat Steir, Carrie Mae Weems, Flo Oy Wong, and
Estelle Yarinsky. 547 W. 27th St. #200, 212.268.4952.
www.fomenhaftgallery.com
29Th annual fred & adele
aSTaire awardS, the only awards
honoring excellence in dance & cho-
reography on Broadway and on flm,
will be the most electrifying evening
of the theater season as the greatest talents of the
dance world step to the stage of the Skirball Center
for the Performing Arts at NYU on May 15. Hosted
by Bebe Neuwirth & Lee Roy Reams the evening
will feature dazzling numbers from this year’s smash
musicals plus specially created production numbers
guaranteed to light up the stage and the greatest tal-
ents will be honored with the coveted prize including
2011 Douglas Watt Lifetime Achievement Award Win-
ner legendary dancer and choreographer Jacques
D’amboise. General seating tickets $150 & $75; VIP
packages including pre-cocktail reception, Awards
Show & post performance with the winners and guest
stars including Tony Award winners Brian Stokes
Mitchell and Len Cariou $425. To order tickets go to
www.theastaireawards.org
Established in 1938, Jaguar of
greaT neCk was the frst Jaguar
dealership in the Country. Our ex-
perience has led to a reputation of
value, personal service and after-sale support that
is unrivaled. For 70+ years we have been selling to
and servicing the New York area with the pride and
attention it deserves. Model for model, option for
option, no one is more competitive than us. We will
beat any advertised price in New York...Guaranteed!
Fulfll your passion for perfection with one of our
awesome 2011 Jaguar XJ models. One is waiting for
you at Jaguar of Great Neck. www.GreatNeckJaguar.
com, 888-263-4158
JuST ShadeS, The source for cus-
tom and ready made lampshades,
has been serving the trade and
public for over 40 years. This ìgo-toî
shop for interior designers and set
designers features an extensive selection of mod-
ern and traditional shades in a wide range of sizes,
from shades small enough to ft a chandelier or wall
sconce to shades large enough to hang as pendants.
A staf of expert professionals is always on hand to
provide assistance in selecting the perfect shade for
your lamp. If you canít make it in person, assistance
is available by phone or e-mail. There is also a large
selection of fnials to top of that perfect shade! 21
Spring Street, New York, NY 10012, 212-966-2757,
info@justshadesny.com
Both of ligne roSeT’S Man-
hattan locations display Eu-
rope’s largest collection of bril-
liant contemporary furniture
designs. We are proud to intro-
duce new groups of upholstered chairs created by
the late, renowned Pierre Paulin just before his death
last spring. Our talented design stafs are always
ready to work with you on that one special piece or
on a total plan for your new condominium. For the
full Ligne Roset collection and Quick Ship program
go to www.lignerosetny.com. 250 Park Avenue
South at 20th, 212-375-1036 155 Wooster Street at
Houston Street, 212-253-5629.
mando group ny ofers
treatment for overweight and
obesity through the Man-
dolean treatment program.
Our team develops an individualized treatment and
uses behavioral modifcation methods to help you
learn healthy practices for food intake, physical ac-
tivity, and sleep patterns. Our patented biofeedback
device, the Mandometer, is used at meals to help
you eat the right amount of food at the right rate of
speed, while monitoring your body’s natural signals
of hunger and fullness.
NYO directOrY
110 | MAY 2011
INDEX 110-111 D-TOWN NYO.indd 110 4/29/11 3:36:16 PM
Nikki Field, Senior Vice Presi-
dent, Associate Broker, has
been a dynamic presence with
Sotheby’s International Realty
since 1998, consistently ranking
among the global agency’s top
fve producers and accomplish-
ing sales of over one billion dol-
lars. America’s Top 400 Real Estate Professionals, an
annual ranking sponsored by The Wall Street Jour-
nal, ranked Nikki in the top 100 agents in America
and in the top 10 in New York City for Sales Volume.
For more information, visit www.nikkifeld.com.
Does your home or ofce have a great view? Explore
and enjoy it to the utmost with Oberwerk Long-
Range Binoculars and Binocular Telescopes. High-
est quality optics provide Stunning clarity and sharp-
ness at surprisingly afordable prices. See us online
at www.giantbinoculars.com For free catalog, call
866-623-7937 or email to info@oberwerk.com
OBERWERK CORPORATION 866-623-7937. www.
giantbinoculars.com.
Olde GOOd ThiNGs –
your source for cool and
eclectic altered and archi-
tectural uniques and arti-
facts! You name it we may even have it! Designers
and dealers welcome! Vintage and industrial chic
our specialty! Marble mantles and chandeliers ga-
lore. Any further information needed please e-mail
mail@oldegoodthings.com. Chelsea Flagship-Store
Union-Sq Upper West Side, 124 W. 24th St. 5 East
16th St., 450 Columbus Av., 212-989-8401. 212-989-
8814. 212-341-7668.
PhiliP CaTaNia’s magnifcent artwork
originates from daily life. The complexi-
ties and simplicities within each piece
inspire an intuitive sense of hope, cour-
age, and energy which move your sensi-
bilities. His ideas are in accordance with
current trends and perspectives. Catania’s timeless
and therapeutic art are gifts which he gladly shares
with the entire world. phone: (607) 965-8048. www.
philipcatania.com. philipsprints@hotmail.com
For nearly a century, PrudeNTial dOuGlas elli-
maN has been recognized as a leader in the residen-
tial real estate industry. With more than 3,500 agents
and over 60 ofces from Manhattan to Montauk, the
company’s reach is unsurpassed. Prudential Douglas
Elliman ofers its customers a comprehensive array
of services including residential sales and rental bro-
kerage, retail and commercial sales & leasing, relo-
cation, new development marketing, property man-
agement, mortgage brokerage and title insurance.
So whether you’re in Manhattan, Brooklyn, Queens,
Westchester or Long Island, including the Hamptons
and North Fork, there is a Prudential Douglas Elliman
ofce and agent ready to assist you in any of your
real estate needs. Please contact 1.800.ELLIMAN or
visit elliman.com
JaN hasheY, Managing Direc-
tor, PrudeNTial dOuGlas el-
limaN, began her interest in NY
Real Estate 20 years ago visiting
from London where she had been
a painter. “I was stunned by the
scale of these exquisite volumes /
lofts which many artists occupied.” Jan has consis-
tently led the quest for space downtown achieving
RECORD SALES and INDUSTRY AWARDS annually.
“Steve Halprin has worked with me for 10 years, an
indispensable partner bringing fnancial wizardry to
the team.”
JOsh rubiN, Senior Vice President,
Associate Broker, and Founder of
the Rubin Group at Prudential
douglas elliman. With a combined
30 years experience, the Rubin
Group is one of the top producers
in the entire Prudential network.
Josh’s philosophy is simple: Listen intently to the cli-
ent’s needs, provide undivided attention and a work
ethic that has been described as “always on”. Recent
sellers had this to say: Josh stands out as the most
knowledgeable, responsible, resilient, responsive, ac-
countable and efective real estate partner we have
ever worked with.
slaTe, one of New York’s
only venues with private and
semiprivate reception spaces;
featuring 16,000 square feet of sleek décor over 2
foors, accommodating parties of 10 to 1200 guests.
Slate provides on-site catering of sumptuous mod-
ern American cuisine, activities such as billiards,
ping pong and foosball, state-of-the-art surround
sound and audiovisual capabilities as well as a spa-
cious dance foor. Slate is ideal for all of your spe-
cial and private events including corporate parties,
Bar/Bat Mitzvahs, fashion shows, birthday parties,
flm shoots, meetings/seminars, rehearsal dinners
and receptions. 54 West 21st Street, Btw. 5th and
6th Avenues, NYC. www.slate-ny.com 212.989.0096.
event@slate-ny.com
sOThebY’s The Downtown
Manhattan ofce is located
in the fashionable SoHo area
and specializes in all down-
town neighborhoods, from the up-and coming to the
established. Our agents can bring valuable insights
to your search, whether for a detailed historic town-
house or a sleek modernist loft. They possess in-depth
knowledge about these properties, their history and
their surroundings and understand the rich and varied
personalities of the many neighborhoods we serve,
whether uptown or downtown. For more information,
please visit, www.sothebyshomes.com/nyc

sOThebY’s The East Side
Manhattan ofce is just
steps away from Central
Park in one of the most de-
sirable neighborhoods in the city. It is known for its
prime Manhattan real estate, which includes some of
the city’s most elegant historic and prewar homes.
Our brokerage staf ofers unsurpassed service to
our clients. Our agents are thoroughly familiar with
the neighborhoods in this area, and with all aspects
of sales, including the demands of the luxury
market. For more information, please visit
www.sothebyshomes.com/nyc
sTribliNG sells the fn-
est downtown residences
from full service ofces
in Chelsea and Tribeca. In
fact, only Stribling can trace its brokerage roots to
the original development of Chelsea in 1819. Stribling
brokers are experienced, knowledgeable profession-
als who bring exceptional results and the highest
levels of service to the sale of gem studios, luxurious
lofts, dream penthouses and everything in between.
In Flatiron, Gramercy, Chelsea, Meat Packing, East
and West Villages, Soho, Tribeca, FIDI and the Lower
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Visit us at stribling.com
Because New Yorkersí
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TeChliNe sTudiO- furniture
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East 19th Street, NY, NY 10003.. 212-674-1813. www.
techlinestudio.com
Expertise. Commitment. Profession-
alism. These are the hallmarks of
ZOlliNGer & assOCiaTes, New
York City’s smart, independent and
choice residential real estate broker-
age. Zollinger & Associates provides
personalized attention for all forms
of home ownership including new developments,
condominiums, townhouses and cooperatives. Mar-
rying the traditional services of a large brokerage
with the personalized attention of a boutique agen-
cy, Zollinger & Associates provides cutting-edge and
thorough salesmanship for both sellers and buyers
alike. For more information, please contact eric@
zollingernyc.com or call 212.380.1139

MAY 2011 | 111
SLATE
NYO directOrY
INDEX 110-111 D-TOWN NYO.indd 111 4/29/11 3:36:36 PM
Why did you decide to become involved
specifically with AVP?
I felt that any work I did with AVP would re-
ally make a diference. AVP is the largest LGBTQ
anti-violence organization in the country—and
we only have 23 employees. Their mission also
really drew me in. AVP is a safety net for our
community, for people who are vulnerable, for
people who are the victims of hate crimes or
domestic violence.
What is your role at AVP?
AVP has five standing committees, and I’m
on the development committee. We’re in charge
of organizing and planning events and reaching
out to new supporters. In September, [I’ll be]
co-hosting the Courage Awards, our biggest
fund-raiser of the year.
Tell me more about the Courage Awards.
The Courage Awards is AVP’s largest annual
fund-raiser, where AVP honors outstanding in-
dividuals, organizations and corporations whose
work on behalf of the LGBTQ and HIV-afected
communities has made a diference. This year,
the 15th Annual Courage Awards will take place
on Sept. 22 at Studio 450 (450 West 31st St.). I
am serving as a co-host of the event, with Kyle
Blood, Brenda Bello and party promoter Daniel
Nardicio.
Why is this event so important?
It gives us a chance to honor the great work
being done by the honorees in the past, we have
honored politicians, Fortune 500 companies,
activists, journalists and bloggers. It ofers our
supporters and people new to the organization
a fun way to get together and learn more about
AVP and its important work.
How does AVP serve the community?
Our direct client services include provid-
ing support for victims of violence. There’s
an entire spectrum of violence that runs the
gamut, from walking down the street in Chelsea
holding hands with your boyfriend and feeling
scared to instances far more serious, like getting
beat up. Through our community outreach,
we’re working hard to make people safe. We
ofer training in things like safe online dating
and we work with the police to understand our
community better.
What is the most important service AVP
ofers?
Definitely our 24-hour bilingual hot line. It’s
important to realize that our number is available
for anyone with any problem at all. You can call
it if you’ve just been called a fag; you got punched
in the face; you had an argument with your part-
ner; or you’re feeling scared, depressed, suicidal,
anything. On average, our hot line receives one
call every four hours.
What is the most memorable moment of
your time with AVP?
Years ago, an acquaintance of mine was leav-
ing a bar in Chelsea with friends. They left and
got in a cab. While he was waiting for another
cab, a group came over to him, called him a fag
and punched him in the face, breaking his jaw.
When I found out, I reached out to him. I sent
him an email, telling him about AVP. He emailed
me back saying that when it happened, he had
remembered my talking about AVP and had
contacted them. They brought him in, gave him
counseling, took him to the police station and
made sure it got classified as a hate crime—and
they already had someone in custody.
From where does AVP get its funding?
More than 50 percent of our funding comes
from our amazing donors and private founda-
tions. The rest is from the government—city,
state and federal.
What is the most dif cult part of being a
part of AVP?
Day after day, dealing with people who are
victims of hatred and fear takes a toll. It’s a really
hard thing. As soon as you’ve finished help-
ing someone and you’re feeling good, you get
another call.
What book is on your nightstand right
now?
A Confederacy of Dunces by John Kennedy
Toole. It’s been sitting on my nightstand for
quite some time.
Where did you eat your last meal, and what
was it?
My last meal was a great, traditional, Sunday
Italian dinner on Long Island at my parents’
house.
For more information about AVP, visit
www.avp.org. o
112 | MAY
NYO
PHILANTHROPY
Keeping
the Peace
Rich Palermo of the Anti-
Violence Project makes it his
mission to eradicate violence
within the LGBTQ community.
By Natalie Howard
Palermo, who was chairman of the board for three years and received
the Stonewall Foundation’s Allan Morrow Prize for Excellence in Board
Leadership, sounds off on what it’s really like to work at the largest
LGBTQ anti-violence organization in the country.
J
A
M
E
S
B
E
R
N
A
L
NYO_May2011_Philanthropy.indd 112 4/29/11 5:31:58 PM
Why did you decide to become involved
specifically with AVP?
I felt that any work I did with AVP would re-
ally make a diference. AVP is the largest LGBTQ
anti-violence organization in the country—and
we only have 23 employees. Their mission also
really drew me in. AVP is a safety net for our
community, for people who are vulnerable, for
people who are the victims of hate crimes or
domestic violence.
What is your role at AVP?
AVP has five standing committees, and I’m
on the development committee. We’re in charge
of organizing and planning events and reaching
out to new supporters. In September, [I’ll be]
co-hosting the Courage Awards, our biggest
fund-raiser of the year.
Tell me more about the Courage Awards.
The Courage Awards is AVP’s largest annual
fund-raiser, where AVP honors outstanding in-
dividuals, organizations and corporations whose
work on behalf of the LGBTQ and HIV-afected
communities has made a diference. This year,
the 15th Annual Courage Awards will take place
on Sept. 22 at Studio 450 (450 West 31st St.). I
am serving as a co-host of the event, with Kyle
Blood, Brenda Bello and party promoter Daniel
Nardicio.
Why is this event so important?
It gives us a chance to honor the great work
being done by the honorees in the past, we have
honored politicians, Fortune 500 companies,
activists, journalists and bloggers. It ofers our
supporters and people new to the organization
a fun way to get together and learn more about
AVP and its important work.
How does AVP serve the community?
Our direct client services include provid-
ing support for victims of violence. There’s
an entire spectrum of violence that runs the
gamut, from walking down the street in Chelsea
holding hands with your boyfriend and feeling
scared to instances far more serious, like getting
beat up. Through our community outreach,
we’re working hard to make people safe. We
ofer training in things like safe online dating
and we work with the police to understand our
community better.
What is the most important service AVP
ofers?
Definitely our 24-hour bilingual hot line. It’s
important to realize that our number is available
for anyone with any problem at all. You can call
it if you’ve just been called a fag; you got punched
in the face; you had an argument with your part-
ner; or you’re feeling scared, depressed, suicidal,
anything. On average, our hot line receives one
call every four hours.
What is the most memorable moment of
your time with AVP?
Years ago, an acquaintance of mine was leav-
ing a bar in Chelsea with friends. They left and
got in a cab. While he was waiting for another
cab, a group came over to him, called him a fag
and punched him in the face, breaking his jaw.
When I found out, I reached out to him. I sent
him an email, telling him about AVP. He emailed
me back saying that when it happened, he had
remembered my talking about AVP and had
contacted them. They brought him in, gave him
counseling, took him to the police station and
made sure it got classified as a hate crime—and
they already had someone in custody.
From where does AVP get its funding?
More than 50 percent of our funding comes
from our amazing donors and private founda-
tions. The rest is from the government—city,
state and federal.
What is the most dif cult part of being a
part of AVP?
Day after day, dealing with people who are
victims of hatred and fear takes a toll. It’s a really
hard thing. As soon as you’ve finished help-
ing someone and you’re feeling good, you get
another call.
What book is on your nightstand right
now?
A Confederacy of Dunces by John Kennedy
Toole. It’s been sitting on my nightstand for
quite some time.
Where did you eat your last meal, and what
was it?
My last meal was a great, traditional, Sunday
Italian dinner on Long Island at my parents’
house.
For more information about AVP, visit
www.avp.org. o
112 | MAY
NYO
PHILANTHROPY
Keeping
the Peace
Rich Palermo of the Anti-
Violence Project makes it his
mission to eradicate violence
within the LGBTQ community.
By Natalie Howard
Palermo, who was chairman of the board for three years and received
the Stonewall Foundation’s Allan Morrow Prize for Excellence in Board
Leadership, sounds off on what it’s really like to work at the largest
LGBTQ anti-violence organization in the country.
J
A
M
E
S
B
E
R
N
A
L
NYO_May2011_Philanthropy.indd 112 4/29/11 5:31:58 PM
AT JAZZ AT LINCOLN CENTER
Debut
Performance
PHOTOS: ORPHEUS (LARRY FINK AT STUDIO 535); GOTO (© UNIVERSAL MUSIC)
C H A M B E R O R C H E S T R A
— LORI N MAAZEL
“Ryu Goto is a sterling
violinist with impeccable
technical credentials and
a personal music air.”
Tickets: $25, $50, $75
Jazz at Lincoln Center Box O∂ce
Broadway at 60th Street, Ground Floor
Monday–Saturday, 10am-6pm; Sunday, 12pm-6pm
CenterCharge: 212.721.6500 | www.jalc.org
WWW.ORPHEUSNYC.ORG
F E AT UR I NG
Rose Theater in Frederick P. Rose Hall
Home of Jazz at Lincoln Center
MONDAY
MAY 16, 2011
7:00 PM
Ryu Goto violin
R OS S I NI Overture to L’Italiana in Algeri
S I B E L I US Valse Triste
ME NDE L S S OHN
Excerpts from
A Midsummer Night’s Dream
S AR AS AT E
Zigeunerweisen, Op. 20
with violinist Ryu Goto
MOZ ART Ave verum corpus, K. 618
T CHAI KOVS KY Serenade in C for Strings, Op. 48
HONOR I NG
Kim Bleimann and Laurie and Richard Brueckner
ART I S T I C HONOR E E
Toby Perlman and the Perlman Music Program
Orpheus-Gala Concert-NY Observer Full Pg Ad.indd 1 4/25/11 12:48 PM
back of mag.indd 113 4/29/11 2:18:44 PM
WWW. ULY S S E - NAR DI N. COM F OR A C ATALOG, C AL L 5 6 1 - 9 8 8 - 8 6 0 0 OR E MAI L : US A8 9 @ULY S S E - NAR DI N. COM
e ecutive dual time
Self-winding. Patented time zone quick setting.
Black ceramic bezel and 18 ct rose gold case.
Water-resistant to 100 m. Rubber band.
NY_Observer_NYO_Mag_MAY4.indd 1 4/25/11 4:58 PM
back of mag.indd 114 4/29/11 2:19:07 PM
FASHION
48 | may 2011
NYO
W
hen Diane von Furstenberg published her
autobiography Diane: A Signature Life in 1998, I
rushed out to get myself a copy and devoured it
overnight. I did not grow up with her wrap dress—although
now I do own one in her vintage reprint—but I was drawn to
her free spirit, which travels between the old countries and
the new world, between fashion and art. But little did I ever
expect that someday I would interview her in China.
For von Furstenberg, China was not a surprising destina-
tion. I caught up with her in the few hours counting down to
the opening reception for her “Journey of a Dress” exhibi-
tion that opened at Pace Beijing in Beijing’s trendy 798 Art
District on April 2. The exhibit, which highlights the 40-
plus years of von Furstenberg’s career, includes 80 pieces.
The original wrap dress from 1973, photographs, letters and
von Furstenberg’s art collection, including a Warhol, will all
be on display through May 14.
In Shanghai, where I attended Pearl Lam’s dinner for von
Furstenberg’s family and friends and her black-tie Red Ball,
I had plenty of opportunities to observe her in her interac-
tions. Surrounded by her family members, including her
only brother, Philippe, who few in from Belgium, she spoke
alternatively in French and in English, looking simultane-
ously engaged and relaxed.
“China inspires me today in the same way that New York
has inspired me,” she said. She went on to explain that when
she frst moved from Europe to America at the age of 22,
she was drawn to America because it seemed anything was
possible. She said she feels very much the same way about
China today.
“Journey of a Dress” is a journey of an exhibition. It ends
with China. The designer believed that the show would give
the Chinese, who in the past four decades lived through a
world very diferent from America, a window to an Ameri-
can cultural history.
Born to a Russian-born father and a Greek-born mother >
Diane von Furstenberg on China, New York and her new exhibit
at the Pace Gallery in Beijing.
By Chiu-Ti Jansen
FaS HI ON’ S aRT
mUS E
NYO_MAG_DVF.indd 48 4/29/11 5:06:03 PM
May 2011 | PB
DianevonFurstenberg,
2010,byHaiBo.
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FASHION
50 | may 2011
NYO
who was a Holocaust survivor, von Fursten-
berg grew up in Belgium and moved to New
York after she married the late Prince Egon
von Furstenberg of Germany. Before she of-
fcially became a princess, she vowed to retain
her independence by having a career.
Despite no formal training in fashion
design, she has an instinct for “mak[ing] life
elegant and easy for women” and a good busi-
ness acumen beftting for an economics major
at the University of Geneva in Switzerland,
where she met Prince von Furstenberg. In
1973 she introduced the iconic wrap dress. By
1976, fve million dresses had been sold, land-
ing her on the cover of Newsweek.
In 1985, she moved to Paris, where she
started the French publishing house Salvy.
She returned to America in the early ’90s,
fnding herself a stranger again to New York.
She reintroduced the wrap dress in 1997,
writing her own comeback story. When von
Furstenberg frst set up her design studio and
showroom in the then backwater meatpack-
ing district in the late ’90s, she led the pack of
fashion designers who eventually migrated
downtown. She told me that she was often
asked if she would have thought about ending
up in China. Growing up in Europe, she was
always fascinated with China: from the The
Adventures of Tintin, a series of comic strips
known as a quintessential story about China—
to 18th-century chinoiserie aesthetics to the
Cultural Revolution.
The retrospective at Pace Beijing was a
well-timed branding strategy for von Furst-
enberg’s dream of “selling every Chinese a T-
shirt.” Currently, her DVF brand operates two
boutiques in Beijing and Shanghai. Before the
brand announces a major nationwide rollout,
von Furstenberg would be building on her
celebrity draw to create a following among the
seasoned buyers in Beijing and Shanghai. >
China inspires
me today in
the same way
that New York
has inspired
me.
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1974,byAndyWarhol.
NYO_MAG_DVF.indd 50 4/29/11 5:06:51 PM
T H R OC K MOR T ON F I NE A R T
145 EAST 57TH STREET, 3RD FLOOR, NEW YORK, NY 10022
TEL 212.223.1059 FAX 212.223.1937
info@throckmorton-nyc.com www.throckmorton-nyc.com
PORTALS OF TRANSFORMATION
MEZCAL A TEMPLES
May 11th - June 4th, 2011
Hardbound catalogue available: $75.00
Image: Mezcala, Double-sided “Temple Model” with four columns, Pre-classic, 1100-300 BCE, Metadiorite, H: 4 1/2 in.
throckmorton ad.indd 1 4/29/11 12:07:10 PM
Fashion
52 | may 2011
NYO
The wrap dress is, physically and meta-
phorically, a journey for von Furstenberg. The
garment itself is an embodiment of freedom—
free from a zipper, buttons, iron and the
dictate of a ’70s feminist bow-tie pant suit.
The wrap dress means freedom to feel like a
woman. I asked the designer why freedom
was so important to her.
“Maybe it came from my mother—when
she was 20 she was a prisoner [at a concentra-
tion camp] in Germany. She was reduced to
nothing. It was a miracle that she survived. I
was a miracle that was born 18 months later.
My pursuit of freedom, strength and inde-
pendence and [my determination to] never be
a victim very much came from my mother’s
experience.”
While celebrating women’s confdence
and independence, she did not subscribe
to a she-man version of womanhood. “Feel
like a woman, wear a dress”—the slogan that
von Furstenberg has made popular—was a
breakthrough of the false dichotomy between
he and she and between career track and sex
appeal. She taught women that it was possible
to be sexy and powerful at the same time.
Von Furstenberg was one of the frst fash-
ion designers who signifcantly intersected
with the world of contemporary art. Andy
Warhol painted her in both the ’70s and the
’80s. Francesco Clemente painted a portrait
the day she frst became a grandmother.
The Beijing show has incorporated new
artworks that did not exist in its previous
incarnations in Russia and Brazil. She re-
cently posed for Hai Bo’s photographic por-
trait in the artist’s studio in the outskirts of
Beijing. She also sat for Chuck Close in his
New York studio, who took a picture of her
swollen face and bruised cheekbones right
after a bad skiing accident.
“The last thing I would want to do [after the
accident] was to be photographed. But it came
out great,” she told me.
Zhang Huan created three ash paintings,
applying ashes collected from Buddhist
temples in Shanghai to canvases of an
American fag, a Chinese fag and a portrait of
von Furstenberg inspired by fashion photog-
rapher Peter Lindbergh’s photograph of her
for the October 2009 issue of Harper’s Bazaar.
Li Songsong’s thick impasto portrait of her
was based on a photograph that appeared on
the cover of Interview magazine in March
1977. (She did not sit for Zhang and Li.) In the
artistic renderings as well as in real life, she
was glamorous, but with a European noncha-
lance and bohemian fair that reminded me
of a Parisian artist. There was no trace of a
plastic beauty from Hollywood.
There could be no better example of how art
and fashion intersect than through the lens of
von Furstenberg and her iconic designs, a fact
she is well aware of.
“Art is a refection of our time,” she said.
“Fashion is a refection of our time.” o
DVFwithherwrapdresses
priortoherPaceBeijing
retrospectiveopening.
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NYO_MAG_DVF.indd 52 4/29/11 5:07:22 PM
Mark Gallery
M
G
Amer i ca Mar t i n
New Wor ks
11 Grand Avenue, Englewood, NJ 07631
www.mark-gallery.com T: 201-568-6275
Mon. through Sat. 10 am to 6 pm or by appointment

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Mark Gallery.indd 1 4/29/11 12:07:49 PM
54 | may 2011
NYO
fashion
You started out in the fashion industry
as a stylist. What made you take the leap
from styling to designing?
When I was styling, I was always trolling
through vintage and fabric stores fnding pieces
for jobs. I would buy fabrics that appealed to
me and keep them in my closet until one day
I would decide that I needed a trench coat
and [would] make one out of it. People started
asking me on the street where I got my clothes.
I think that little bit of attention compelled me
to think about designing for other people.

You have four sisters. Did growing up
around so many women infuence the
feminine aesthetic of your clothing?
I grew up in Los Angeles in a house flled to
the brim with my sisters and our girlfriends, so
there is femininity to the brand. At the same
time, there’s also versatility.

Where do you draw inspiration from for
your designs?
The women that I love and constantly refer-
ence in terms of aesthetic are Monica Vitti,
Julie Christie and Brigitte Bardot.
New York is a city dominated by black
clothing; why did you choose to create a
line so imbued with color?
I love to wear black and think there’s a real
beauty and simplicity to it. But I think a lot
of people wear black because they’re scared
to risk color or make mistakes and not look
sophisticated.
How has the line developed?
It started with the top and then it was a bit
like “This is the House that Jack Built” in the
sense that the blouse became a dress, which
became a skirt, and so on. I don’t have formal
training, so the frst blouse came from work-
ing on a dress form and pinning it together.
Even though we’ve grown so much, I always
try to operate like a small business where
there is a real thoughtfulness to everything
we do.
Why did you decide to make all your gar-
ments in New York?
I think there are only a handful of designers
that are committed to more local production,
and for me it just feels right. I have a deep
afnity towards the woman who owns the fac-
tory that sews most of our collections. There’s
something about the process that is really
artistic. The way that the clothing is produced
is the way luxury goods are, minus certain
fnishings that would raise our price point. o
MotherTucker
Tucker designer Gaby Basora talks print
inspiration, designing for Target and what’s next
for New York’s most colorful brand. ByCocoMellors
a
l
e
x
e
y
y
u
r
e
n
e
v
alookfrom
Tucker.
Designer
GabyBasora.
NYO_May2011_Designer_Gaby.indd 54 4/29/11 4:41:32 PM
303 Gallery
Miguel Abreu Gallery
Alexander and Bonin
Artists Space
Participating Galleries
and Not for Profts
Nicelle Beauchene Gallery
Marianne Boesky Gallery
Tanya Bonakdar Gallery
Bortolami Gallery
Gavin Brown’s enterprise
CRG Gallery
Canada
Cheim & Read
James Cohan Gallery
Lisa Cooley
Creative Time
D’Amelio Terras
Elizabeth Dee Gallery
The Drawing Center
Eleven Rivington
Derek Eller Gallery
Feature Inc.
Zach Feuer Gallery
Foxy Production
Friends of the Highline
James Fuentes LLC
Laurel Gitlen
Marian Goodman Gallery
Alexander Gray Associates
Greenberg Van Doren Gallery
Greene Naftali
Jack Hanley Gallery
Harris Lieberman
Hauser & Wirth
Casey Kaplan
Sean Kelly Gallery
Anton Kern Gallery
Kimmerich
The Kitchen
Nicole Klagsbrun
Andrew Kreps Gallery
Lehmann Maupin Gallery
Galerie Lelong
Luhring Augustine
Metro Pictures
Mitchell-Innes & Nash
David Nolan New York
On Stellar Rays
The Pace Gallery
Participant
Friedrich Petzel Gallery
Printed Matter
Public Art Fund
Andrea Rosen Gallery
SculptureCenter
Jack Shainman Gallery
Sikkema Jenkins & Co.
Swiss Institute
Taxter & Spengemann
Team Gallery
Rachel Uffner Gallery
Wallspace
White Columns
Tracy Williams, Ltd.
David Zwirner
Radcliffe Bailey
Kim Beck
Frank Benson and Ken Price
Ashley Bickerton
Fernando Bryce
John Chamberlain
Olga Chernysheva
Steven Claydon
Caetano de Almeida
Folkert de Jong
Willem de Kooning
Brian DeGraw
John Divola
Cheryl Donegan & Tom
Meacham
Debo Eilers
Roe Ethridge
Josh Faught & William J. O’Brien
Ori Gersht
Amy Granat
Renée Green
Mark Grotjahn
Subodh Gupta
Hilary Harnischfeger
Participating Artists
Donald Judd
Matt Keegan
William Kentridge
Martin Kippenberger
Jakob Kolding
Leon Kossoff
John Knight
Sean Landers
Louise Lawler
Judy Ledgerwood
Nate Lowman
Florian Maier-Aichen
Robert Mapplethorpe
Katy Moran
Robert Moskowitz
Carter Mull
Naoto Nakagawa
Jaume Plensa
Raha Raissnia
David Ratcliff
Alexander Ross
Salvatore Scarpitta
Joan Semmel
Dasha Shishkin
Alan Shields
Xaviera Simmons
Li Songsong
Richard Tuttle
Juan Usle
www.newyorkgalleryweek.com
NYGW 2011 benefts the
Whitney Museum of American Art
Founding Sponsor
A special thanks to the NYGW Sponsors and Partners
Stephen Vincent
Kara Walker
Gillian Wearing
Garth Weiser
Jesse Willenbring
Michael Williams
Ivan Witenstein
Aaron Young
Untitled-20 1 4/29/11 12:11:15 PM
56 | may 2011
NYO
fashion
Lifelong New Yorker Rachel
Antonoff
started of her collection with just three
dresses. Since then, her nostalgic pieces
have become a go-to for fashion’s latest set of
ingenues.
Antonof’s frst stint in fashion was work-
ing in public relations at Rebecca Taylor. She
left for a career in writing, vowing never to
return to the world of fashion. But it seems it
was inevitable that she do just that.
“One magical summer I was living in the
West Village with my equally clothing-ob-
sessed roommate Alison Lewis,” Antonof
said. “Every night we would get dressed up
and go out on the town. We had all these
ideas for dresses that we wish we had, so we
decided to make them.” Thus, a fashion label
was born.
The pair convinced the now-defunct Nolita
boutique I Heart to sell their wares under the
collection name Mooka Kinney.
“Our frst dresses cost us $125 to make,
and we sold them for $100,” she said. “At the
time we thought it was an amazing deal for
us to get the pieces out of our closets and into
a store.” Jane Keltner of Teen Vogue wrote a
piece on the collection, and their 16-piece or-
der at I Heart quickly turned into a 300-piece
order at Barneys.
“It felt like one of those dreams where you
show up to school and you didn’t know it was
the day of the fnal,” Antonof remembers.
“We weren’t prepared. It was crazy. Everyone
loved the clothes, but we had zero idea how to
produce a collection, and we made one mis-
take after another.” Fortunately, the duo were
quick learners.
They worked together for three years until
they decided to part ways in 2008. Since then,
Antonof has quickly built up a steady fan
base and her collection, Rachel Antonof, has
taken of in a dramatic way.
Recent collections have centered on nos-
talgic themes such as high-school dances and
slumber parties. For her fourth presentation
in February, Antonof created an elaborate
dance setting at LaGuardia High School com-
plete with disco balls, streamers and a kissing
couple on the dance foor. The result was a
multi-dimensional spectacle that blurred the
lines between the models and attendees—
which included the crème de la crème of
editors, It Girl fan Alexa Chung and super-
bloggers Tavi and Susie Bubble. And that was
exactly Antonof’s intention.
“My goal has always been to bring the
world alive that I feel the clothing lives in.” o
Old School Style
Rachel Antonof designs inspire a sense of nostalgia ByPriscillaPolley
S
a
r
r
a
F
l
e
u
r
a
B
o
u
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a
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@
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+
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S
arachel
antonof
look.
rachel
antonof
NYO_May2011_Designer_RachelAntonoff.indd 56 4/29/11 4:43:22 PM
56 | may 2011
NYO
fashion
Lifelong New Yorker Rachel
Antonoff
started of her collection with just three
dresses. Since then, her nostalgic pieces
have become a go-to for fashion’s latest set of
ingenues.
Antonof’s frst stint in fashion was work-
ing in public relations at Rebecca Taylor. She
left for a career in writing, vowing never to
return to the world of fashion. But it seems it
was inevitable that she do just that.
“One magical summer I was living in the
West Village with my equally clothing-ob-
sessed roommate Alison Lewis,” Antonof
said. “Every night we would get dressed up
and go out on the town. We had all these
ideas for dresses that we wish we had, so we
decided to make them.” Thus, a fashion label
was born.
The pair convinced the now-defunct Nolita
boutique I Heart to sell their wares under the
collection name Mooka Kinney.
“Our frst dresses cost us $125 to make,
and we sold them for $100,” she said. “At the
time we thought it was an amazing deal for
us to get the pieces out of our closets and into
a store.” Jane Keltner of Teen Vogue wrote a
piece on the collection, and their 16-piece or-
der at I Heart quickly turned into a 300-piece
order at Barneys.
“It felt like one of those dreams where you
show up to school and you didn’t know it was
the day of the fnal,” Antonof remembers.
“We weren’t prepared. It was crazy. Everyone
loved the clothes, but we had zero idea how to
produce a collection, and we made one mis-
take after another.” Fortunately, the duo were
quick learners.
They worked together for three years until
they decided to part ways in 2008. Since then,
Antonof has quickly built up a steady fan
base and her collection, Rachel Antonof, has
taken of in a dramatic way.
Recent collections have centered on nos-
talgic themes such as high-school dances and
slumber parties. For her fourth presentation
in February, Antonof created an elaborate
dance setting at LaGuardia High School com-
plete with disco balls, streamers and a kissing
couple on the dance foor. The result was a
multi-dimensional spectacle that blurred the
lines between the models and attendees—
which included the crème de la crème of
editors, It Girl fan Alexa Chung and super-
bloggers Tavi and Susie Bubble. And that was
exactly Antonof’s intention.
“My goal has always been to bring the
world alive that I feel the clothing lives in.” o
Old School Style
Rachel Antonof designs inspire a sense of nostalgia ByPriscillaPolley
S
a
r
r
a
F
l
e
u
r
a
B
o
u
-
e
l
-
H
a
j
@
l
V
a
+
l
i
n
d
S
e
y
B
y
r
n
e
S
arachel
antonof
look.
rachel
antonof
NYO_May2011_Designer_RachelAntonoff.indd 56 4/29/11 4:43:22 PM
RobeRto beRnaRdi
G a l l e R y a R t i s t s , l o u i s K. M e i s e l G a l l e R y , s o H o
RapHaella spence
Rey Milici
M
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Y
Thom and ann’s, 2011
oil on canvas
42 1/4 x 47 3/4 inches
luci ed ombre, 2011
oil on canvas
23 3/4 x 25 1/2 inches
il canale di san marco, 2010, oil on canvas, 21 1/2 x 47 1/2 inches
A
Untitled-21 1 4/29/11 12:12:29 PM
58 | may 2011
NYO
fashion
Erin Fetherston inhabits a par-
ticular New York City, a modern fairy
tale defned by whimsy and romance. But
don’t be fooled by her taste for the fanciful.
Fetherston is an astute businesswoman with
a practical sensibility, lauded for creating
pieces as beautiful as they are wearable. She
grew up in the San Francisco Bay area and
received her B.A. from UC Berkeley before
moving to Paris to attend Parsons School of
Design. She debuted her haute couture line,
Erin Fetherston, six years ago.
She traces her dream of being a fashion
designer back to her childhood. She recalls beg-
ging her parents to sign her up for ballet class
for the sole purpose of acquiring a tutu. “I didn’t
continue the classes, but I wore my purple tutu
outft every day for a long time,” she said.
Despite the challenges of building a
business in a foreign country, Fetherston
maintains that Paris was the ideal place to
establish her aesthetic.
“I feel like it’s a good place to daydream,”
she said.
Fetherston quickly gained notoriety for her
unique designs and made the move to New York
in 2007. It seems her success has only grown
since. It began with the GO International line
she created in collaboration with Target, which
made the Fetherston line available to a broader
fan base. The limited-edition collection con-
sisted of chifon party dresses, oversize heart
handbags and rufed blouses, fnished with
signature Fetherston details like velvet bows
and Peter Pan collars.
In 2007, Fetherston won the Ecco Domani
Fashion Foundation Award, was nominated
for a Council of Fashion Designers of America
(CFDA) Swarovski Award for Womenswear and
made it to the fnal round of the CFDA/Vogue
Fashion Fund.
She credits a big part of her success to the
“nurturing” environment of New York City—at
least in the fashion industry.
“The way that the industry rallies around its
young designers is quite exceptional,” she says.
“There’s so much more support here available
for young designers, and one can feel really
embraced.”
Fetherston’s next venture is her new line,
Erin. The contemporary collection was pre-
sented during this spring’s Fashion Week and
will be available this July at much lower prices
than her original designs. Fetherston describes
it simply:
“The clothes are for that girl who always
wants to feel pretty, but wants something that
isn’t overly saccharine.” o
Ethereal Erin
Fetherston talks her aesthetic, her
inspiration—a tutu, no less—and her
new, afordable line ByMarleyLynch
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Looksfromthefall
2011presentation.
fetherston.
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May 2011 | 59
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BLOOMFLOWERS.COM
NYO_May2011_Designer_ErinFetherston.indd 59 4/29/11 4:46:34 PM
60 | may 2011
restaurateur profile
NYO
Lunch at
Lure Fishbar
The restaurateur and founder of Tasting Table, John McDonald, eats lunch with NYO.
By Meredith Hofman o Photography by E.F. Angel
J
ohn McDonald welcomed me to a curved leather booth
at the center of Lure Fishbar, whose teak ceilings and
orange-tinted windows resembled the inside of a private
yacht. As Gawker execs passed by and a waiter placed
fresh sushi rolls on a nearby table, McDonald ordered up
a round of raw oysters and ripped open a bright orange
packet of EBoost energy drink.
“We’re going to boost your tea!” he said, pouring the low-calorie,
all-natural powder into my beverage. “No one drinks this more than
my partner and I—that’s the way I am about everything, I think, ‘What
would I want to eat or drink?’”
Lure and EBoost are two in a long line of McDonald’s creations,
including the Web site Tasting Table and three other successful
restaurants. And now, with even more energy thanks to his EBoost
drink invention—found in every W Hotel room and in Dean and Deluca
stores—he seems unstoppable.
“You catch yourself saying you’re not going to open another restau-
rant, but at the end of the day you never know,” he said. “My work isn’t
any harder than the street vendor who wakes at 7 a.m. to haul out his
espresso cart. It’s just diferent work. It’s like I’m setting traps and then
checking, ‘What do we have here?’”
Three of those “traps” are on the same block—Lure Fishbar is
down the street from Burger and Barrel, opened in October, and
MercBar, open since 1993. Chinatown Brasserie, the fourth restau-
NYO_May2011_ChefProfile.indd 60 4/29/11 4:49:48 PM
May 2011 | 61
Restaurateur John
McDonald at Lure
Fishbar, one of his
many restaurants.
NYO_May2011_ChefProfile.indd 61 4/29/11 4:50:05 PM
May 2011 | 61
Restaurateur John
McDonald at Lure
Fishbar, one of his
many restaurants.
NYO_May2011_ChefProfile.indd 61 4/29/11 4:50:05 PM
62 | may 2011
NYO
chef profile
rant, is still close by, on Lafayette and Third Street. Every day McDon-
ald hops between the restaurants, each flling a basic gustatory desire.
“I want to answer the question of what’s for dinner or lunch—so if
you feel like oysters and Champagne, come to Lure, or a burger, come
to B and B.”
And though he spends the most time monitoring his newest venture,
Burger and Barrel, McDonald seems to enjoy Lure the most of all his
culinary children.
“I could eat here every day, because of the diversity of the food,” he said,
slurping down a Kumamoto oyster from its spoonlike shell. McDonald
envisioned the Lure concept to fll his own personal desires for such
cuisine, and he decided on aesthetics of the 140-seat space with designer
Serge Becker.
And when the “diverse” seafood options don’t match his desires,
McDonald orders half a turkey sandwich.
“Half, just half,” he told the waiter and turned to me. “It’s not on the
menu, but that’s the beauty of having my own kitchen.”
McDonald’s resolute request for his sandwich seems to mirror the
confdent choices he’s made to get him this far in his career. Beginning
as a “beach bum” at a Southern Californian college, he said he had an
“epiphany” that ne needed to move to New York, so he transferred to Co-
lumbia for his fnal two years of college. Then, though his plan was to work
in fnance, McDonald let “naïve” confdence and creative friends spur him
to open MercBar at age 23. With no previous restaurant experience, he
relied on his own preferences as a customer—a strategy he still employs.
A true believer in the power of the restaurant experience, McDonald
maintained that social media was unimportant in his business and
boasted that he doesn’t even have a Facebook account.
“In the past, broadcast mechanisms were slower but people had less to
consume,” he said. “It still boils down to what you’re doing and the experi-
ence you’re generating.”
He then complained about distracting cell phone use at the dinner
table, and has even written a lamentation piece called “The Death of
Dinner?” for the Hufngton Post. But McDonald was quick to open up his
laptop with me at the lunch table to show of his restaurants’ Web sites
and of course Tasting Table, a site he began three years ago for food news
and criticism.
Tasting Table began with McDonald’s idea to model a dining newslet-
ter and site after the online culture newsletter Daily Candy. Now Tasting
Table has one million subscribers, but McDonald said he doesn’t handle
the content or site management. His focus remains on his restaurants,
and he constantly snaps photos for their respective sites, using Tumblr to
update pictures and popular menu items.
“Restaurant sites are often like static brochures—but it’s gotten to
the point where you can fnd menu items and prices by visiting places
like Yelp, so why go to the site?” explained McDonald. David Karp, head
of Tumblr and devoted Lure customer, helped him remake his online
presence.
Karp isn’t the only media man to visit Lure. In fact, from the table next
to us, Rufus Griscom, cofounder of nerve.com and babble.com, peeked
over a low partition and struck up a conversation.
“I’ve started ordering the salmon avocado roll,” he told McDonald.
“No more Cobb salad?”
Griscom, who visits Lure biweekly, smiled at his new culinary
discovery.
“I may get in trouble for saying this … but, oh well,” Griscom began to
tell me. “Balthazar used to be where I’d go, but now Lure’s the new online
media club. I think it’s the free edamame,” he joked. “Really, it’s warm and
comfortable. You have a little more privacy to have a conversation.”
Of course, it’s still social enough to chat with the other media execs at
surrounding tables—or to snap a photo of Alec Baldwin at the bar, like a
recent photographer did (you can see the picture on Lure’s Tumblr).
“When I opened MercBar the only people who knew about the restau-
rant were the people there,” said McDonald.
Now, we can all be voyeurs. And when you see celebrities and model-
esque women dining at the restaurant, maybe you’ll crave the oysters and
Champagne even more. Maybe not. Either way, McDonald will be there,
dreaming up his next venture. o
Lure Fishbar.
NYO_May2011_ChefProfile.indd 62 4/29/11 4:50:39 PM
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Elgot.indd 1 4/7/11 4:39:08 PM
Untitled-22 1 4/29/11 12:14:12 PM
Indochine
Chilean Sea
Bass.
The timeless dilemma of the pleasure-seeking New Yorker
is where to go to dine with the beautiful people.
Shallow as it may seem, you know you want the answer.
By Eva Karagiorgas o Gilt City Restaurant Curator





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Burning white-hot in all its retro
glory, Indochine must be mentioned in any
article advising on where the pretty people
dine. Ancient in its 27-year reign and immune
to the fckle fashion world, this French-
Vietnamese restaurant is a true icon. Nary a
fashion trend has had lasting power like this
eatery (430 Lafayette St., 212-505-5111).
Scott Sartiano and Richie Akiva resurrected
the ghost of nightlife past with The Darby,
aptly housed in the former Nell’s space, and the
newest ode to the eat-until-you-party trend (a la
La Esquina). With Alex Guarnaschelli, formerly
of Butter, at the helm of the kitchen, this supper
club guarantees a pretty spectacular meal and a
place to dance with reckless abandon (24 West
14th St., 212-242-4411).
The newest restaurant servicing the
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food
NYO
>
64 | may 2011
NYOI_MAG3_PXX_FoodColumn.indd 64 4/29/11 4:51:42 PM
www.aafnyc.com
The
Affordable
Art Fair
New York
City
Let art take you places
May 5-8, 2011
7 W 34th Street
d
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NYObserver_9.375X11.125.indd 2 3/30/11 1:42 PM
Untitled-27 1 4/29/11 3:15:52 PM
Alexander Wang’d and ombre’d set, The Fat
Radish is a hot restaurant in every way. A
British-inspired menu is served in a room
attractive enough for a photo shoot among
diners cast for the part. Don’t miss out on the
duck rillette or thick fries cooked in duck fat
(17 Orchard St., 212-300-4053).
Always a classic, La Esquina is more than
just a gathering place for the pretty young
things. Chef Akhtar Nawab has re-created this
eatery’s menu and turned the venue into a
true food destination, serving what may be the
best tacos in the city to the most devastatingly
good-looking crowd to boot. After dinner in the
moody dining room, head to the bar for tequila
or a margarita, and get your fll of the pretty
people (106 Kenmare St., 646-613-7100).
For the morning hangover, there’s no better
place to congregate than Peels. Brought to
you by the team behind the still-popular
Freemans, this new venture delivers a hip
and sometimes hipster breakfast and brunch
crowd. It’s questionable whether the outfts
were worn the night before. Try out the very
appealing signature build-a-biscuit (325
Bowery, 646-602-7015).
Naturally, a collaboration between the
former gatekeeper of Beatrice Inn and the
legends behind Joe & Pat’s Pizzeria of Staten
Island births Rubirosa, the lovechild of
red sauce Italian food and red-hot diners.
The pizza is one of the best in the city (235
Mulberry Street, 212-965-0500).
Follow Eva on Twitter at @gastrogirls or
email her at ekaragiorgas@observer.com o
66 | may 2011
Clockwisefromtoplef:Rubirosa
arugulapizza;FatRadishcheeseburger
withduckfatfries;Indochineraviolli.
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First page: Indochine Chilean Sea Bass. Photo credit: Indochine.
second page: Clockwise from top left: Rubirosa arugula pizza, photo courtesy
Rubirosa; Fat Radish cheeseburger with duck fat fries, photo courtesy Kyle Dean
Reinford; Indochine raviolli, photo courtesy Indochine.
NYOI_MAG3_PXX_FoodColumn.indd 66 4/29/11 4:52:08 PM
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68 | may 2011
NYO
wine
How did you get started in
wine? I know this was a family
business, as it used to be Astor
Liquors.
The business my father,
Edwin, built was a chain-store
business. It began in 1950 in New
Jersey under the name Home
Liquors (now Home Wines and
Liquors) and grew to 24 stores
in northern New Jersey; the
furthest south was in Union, the
furthest north in Hackensack,
with a healthy number in Essex
County. To continue growing,
my father bought Astor Wines &
Spirits in 1968. He subsequently
bought a store in Maryland in 1973,
bringing the total number to 24 in
three states.
How did you get involved in the
family business?
I was [at law school at] N.Y.U.
and I lasted a week. I said, ‘I don’t
know what’s happening in my life,
but it’s not going to be this.’ So I
contacted Brown, whose graduate
program I’d been accepted to, and
asked to join the next semester,
but in the meantime, I had noth-
ing to do. So I started working at
the store to kind of fll time.
Did you ever make it to Brown?
No. It was the Brown Graduate
School for Art History. Anyway,
what I loved about art I found
in wine; and what I loved about
lacrosse I found in retail. No
regrets. And I’m sure no one at
Brown cares much either.
What does ‘biodynamic’ mean
in terms of wine?
The idea behind it is that you
think of the farm as a self-sus-
tained unit. Let’s say you’re using
manure. One of the techniques
is taking cow manure, putting it
into the horn of the cow, planting
it during the vernal equinox. The
idea is that you’re doing something
sustainable. There is the timing of
the treatments with the moon. If
you think about it, there are cer-
tain things we can agree upon; we
understand seasons,
we understand that
winter is a time of
rebirth, things fall of,
the ground re-charges
itself with what falls
of and that spring is
a time of growth. And
we also understand
with the moon that
we have tides, that
there’s a basic fow
of things. There
are ways in which
timing treatments
to the position of the
moon can maximize
their efectiveness.
All of this sounds
out there—but it’s
working. Biodynamic
companies have been
used in New Zealand,
in Austria and in
France.
How do you pick the types of
wine you stock in your store?
I have the fabulous wine-buying
group run by Lorena
Ascencios, and she has
a team of people, and
they taste and they
decide. She is assisted
by Elizabeth Patrick,
Valerie Corbin and
Angela Aguirre. As
they used to say in
the ’60s, sisterhood is
powerful.
Do you pay atten-
tion to any wine
critics when choos-
ing your wines?
Never. We have
never used a score,
not from The Specta-
tor, not from Parker,
nor from anybody.
And let me tell you
this mostly proves
that the gaining of
wealth is a recessive
gene with me. It’s always been
my feeling that customers are the
experts. I think [ratings] cheapen
the dialogue that you want to have
for humans to understand what
they’re buying.
What do you drink at home?
I have been mostly enjoying fa-
vorful white wines. By that I mean
white wines that have had some
exposure to air, wines that might
have been left in contact with
the skins and developed some
richness of favor. But of course,
we’re getting to the summer and
I’ll start drinking rosé.
Does the wine distributor play
a role in what you sell?
Diferent people will present
wines: small producers, import-
ers, wholesalers. But more and
more we choose our own wines
because there’s nothing they
know about selecting wines that
we don’t know about selecting
wines.
How has the Internet changed
your business?
It’s made it a whole lot more
fun. It’s the ability to inform.
We’re in that business all the time,
but for example now you can
go on the site and look at video
tastings with diferent members
of the staf. We’re also in a position
to know more quickly what our
customers think. Twitter is a great
way for people to say what they
like.
What are your favorite books
about wine?
The best writer ever on the
subject of wine is Gerald Asher.
He was a great man for wine and
his writing is just beautiful.
Astor Wines & Spirits is located at
399 Lafayette St., 212-674-7500.
For more information visit
www.astorwines.com. o
Down to Earth
Wine
Andy Fisher, the owner of Astor Wines & Spirits
and a wine educator, talks about the evolution of
the family business, biodynamic wines and how he
picks the wine for his colossal store downtown
By Rachel Morgan
andy’s
Picks
Morgon “Cuvee
Les Roches” 2009
by Chatelard
Gamay
from the Loire
Touraine Gamay
“Boudinerie” 2009
by Noëlla Morantin
Piedmont, Ebaluce
“Cariola”
2008 by Ferrando
“Timpune” Grillo
2008 by Caruso
and Minini
Côtes de Provence
Rosé “MiP” 2010 by
Dom. Sainte Lucie
Txakoli Rosé from
the Basque region
Txakolina Rosado
“Rubentis”
2010 by Ameztoi
Andy Fisher.
NYO_May2011_WineQA.indd 70 4/29/11 4:11:00 PM
Pamela Luss (vocals) • Houston Person (tenor saxophone) • Jon Weber (piano)
Jon Burr (bass) • & Alvin Atkinson, Jr. (drums)
For the last four years, the partnership of vocalist Pamela Luss and tenor saxophonist Houston Person has been
one of the most exciting teams on the contemporary jazz scene. It’s not simply that she sings and he plays, but
that they truly create music together, like two minds with but a single thought. Whether swinging on standards,
jamming on the blues, or instilling a romantic mood on a beautiful ballad, singer and saxist are completely in
sync with each other throughout. At Birdland, they’ll perform favorites from their four releases together (the
three albums, Your Eyes, Magnet, and Sweet & Saxy, and the single Bewitched) along with new numbers, both
classic and contemporary that they are constantly adding to their repertoire, to the delight of their many fans.
Pamela Luss with Houston Person at
BirdLand
Christopher Loudon of JazzTimes described Pamela and Houston as
“an exalted partnership, meshing like the jeweled movement of
a Patek Philippe,” and Pamela’s voice as “intoxicating.”
“and that band! Luss’s polish and the zip of Person,
Burr, atkinson, Jr. and Weber add up to musical party time.”
- Elizabeth ahlfors, Cabaret Scenes
www.pamelaluss.com
Monday, May 23rd, 2011 7:00 pm
Cover Charge: $25, $10 minimum
315 West 44th Street (between 8th/9th aves)- NYC
*Reservations Required* 212-581-3080
www.birdlandjazz.com
LUSS Magazine.indd 1 4/28/11 4:09:49 PM
MAY 2011 | 69
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70 | may 2011
NYO
inebriation
Downtown
Bars Decoded
Our very scientifc analysis of
downtown’s best bars. BySydneySarachan
Bar Westside Tavern
(360 West 23rd St., 212-366-3738)
attire Casual. We’re talking fannel here.
Best drink Any cocktail; you’ll thank the
heavy-handed bartender. Jack and Coke is a
good bet.
Bar anthem “Save Tonight,” Eagle Eye
Cherry
the crowd Westside Tavern is a place fre-
quented by corporate softball teams, N.Y.U.
types and the occasional closeted actor for a
game of pool and a shot of anonymity.

Bar Rose Bar at the Gramercy Park
Hotel (2 Lexington Ave., 212-920-3300)
attire Cocktail chic.
Best drink Ginger Fig Martini.
owner Ian Schrager.
Bar anthem “Cosmic Love,” Florence and
the Machine
the crowd Rose Bar employs a macabre
theme, with behemoth works of art, sky-
high ceilings, $20 drinks and a crowd to
match. As the evening unravels inside Rose
Bar, so do its patrons, the crowd devolving
from formal wear into loosened ties and
falling dress straps.

Bar Wilfe and Nell
(228 West Fourth St., 212-242-2990)
attire After work, biz-casual.
Best drink Witte Beer cocktail.
owner Mark Gibson.
Bar anthem “Keep the Car Running,”
Arcade Fire.
the crowd The lure of Wilfe and Nell is that
it’s billed as an “Australian bar,” though on the
occasions I’ve frequented the place, I’ve seen
nary a single Aussie. The watering hole attracts
professional types, post-collegiate girls and
30-something Village dwellers. There’s a
distinct casualness to the crowd that frequents
it and imbibers are known to strike up long
conversations with fellow patrons.
Bar Blue & Gold
(79 East Seventh St., 212-777-1006)
attire Whatever you show up in.
Best drink Shot of Southern Comfort plus an
IPA, $5.
owners When we called to inquire, the
information volunteered was, “They’re
Ukrainian.” Very strange, indeed.
Bar anthem “Crazy Bitch,” Buckcherry.
the crowd With $3 drinks and tables
carved with former drinkers’ names, their
spiritual guidance and a stray unmemorable
crass phrase, the place is grimy yet somehow
charismatic. The bartenders are notoriously
indelicate, as are a number of the patrons.
Bar Chloe 81 (81 Ludlow St., 212-677-0067)
attire Downtown hipsta.
Best drink The Chloe.
owner Sebastian Maczko.
Bar anthem “Some Girls,” the Rolling Stones
the crowd Gaggles of 20-somethings line
Ludlow in bright miniskirts and towering
heels to gain entry and teeter down a perilous
set of stairs and into the black-and-white-
tiled den of Chloe 81. Artists, wannabe artists,
hipsters in strange hats and a fock of Russian
expats may very well populate the round
booths on the subterranean level. o
WestsideTavern
Blue&Gold
RoseBar
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l
NYO_May2011_Bars.indd 70 4/29/11 4:10:04 PM
astair.indd 1 3/31/11 8:32:58 PM
BROADWAY CHOREOGRAPHER
Rob Ashford - How to Succeed in Business
Without Really Trying
Marguerite Derricks - Wonderland
Danny Mefford - Bloody, Bloody Andrew Jackson
Kathleen Marshall - Anything Goes
Jerry Mitchell - Catch Me if You Can
Casey Nicholaw - Book of Mormon
Toby Sedgwick - Warhorse
Susan Stroman - Scottsboro Boys
Anthony Van Laast - Sister Act
FEMALE DANCER, BROADWAY
Rachel de Benedet - Catch Me if You Can
Sutton Foster - Anything Goes
Jennifer Frankel - Catch Me if You Can
J. Elaine Marcos – Priscilla, Queen of the Desert
Patina Miller - Sister Act
Laura Osnes – Anything Goes
Angie Schworer – Catch Me if You Can
Megan Sikora - How to Succeed
Samantha Zack – How to Succeed

MALE DANCER, BROADWAY
Nick Adams - Priscilla, Queen of the Desert
Norbert Leo Butz - Catch Me if You Can
Colman Domingo - Scottsboro Boys
Colin Donnell - Anything Goes
Josh Gad - Book of Morman
Joshua Henry - Scottsboro Boys
Daniel Radcliffe - How to Succeed in Business
Without Really Trying
Aaron Tveit - Catch Me if You Can

2001 NOMiNEEs
Astair.indd 1 4/29/11 12:09:38 PM
NYO
72 | May 2011
fitness
What’s your workout routine?
As a single father, I don’t work
out at the crack of dawn anymore.
I wake up and, generally, the girls
are in bed with me. I get out of
bed, take a shower and make them
breakfast every day—steel cut
oatmeal, organic eggs, fruit. I have
oatmeal and one of my protein
shakes and I’m ready to start.
Tell me about your newest one
business venture.
I just launched my own protein
bar, the Kirschbar, and it’s some-
thing I’m very, very passionate
about.
Why go the protein bar route?
I wasn’t satisfed with anything
on the market. I was getting asked
at least fve times a day from
diferent clients what bar we
recommend, and there aren’t any
that I would recommend. I came up
with a bar that not only is the right
profle, but is amazingly tasty and is
like real food.
What celebrities do you work
with?
Currently, I’m working with
Anne Hathaway, Liv Tyler, Ellen
Barkin, Jimmy Fallon and Heidi
Klum.
How is training celebrities dif-
ferent than any other client?
Celebrities are often in more of a
time crunch when they’re working
out. They’re getting ready for a role
or a magazine shoot or an event
where there are going to be a lot of
eyes on them, like on the red carpet.
But their bodies are bodies just like
everyone else. People are people.
What’s your personal workout
routine?
I work out fve days a week. I’ve
always been passionate about it. I
was born with a gift and I recog-
nized it in my 20s and developed it
and it became what it is now.
What’s the most common
mistake people make in terms
of exercise?
The most common mistake
people make is that they go about
exercising the wrong way. They
might want a body they’re not
meant to have— they‘ve looked at
someone in the gym whose body
they want and follow whatever that
person’s doing. One of the things
that makes me unique as a trainer
is the mindfulness of the training. I
really force my client to think about
what they’re doing, why they’re do-
ing it and what efect they’re trying
to achieve.
What do people do wrong when
it comes to diet?
People are always looking for
that quick and easy fx. People
starve themselves really badly, they
don’t eat all day and only have din-
ner. They’re shutting their bodies
down and then they scarf down
everything they can get a hold of.
They use products that are not
incredibly safe sometimes, like diet
pills. I have a line of supplements
that are all natural and that achieve
certain things, so I do think there
are products and amino acids and
vitamins that will help keep you
healthy. But then there are things
that are out there on the market
that are advertised and are not very
safe.
What’s the worst excuse you’ve
heard for avoiding a workout?
I could write a book full of the
excuses I’ve heard for not showing
up, for showing up without gym
clothes, or using the trafc excuse.
Or that the subway broke down
and I’ve had fve other clients come
in on the same subway. Women
will come in and say to me, ‘Oh my
God, I can’t do it. It’s that time of
the month.’ So I’ll remind them
that they’ve used that excuse three
times in a month.
How do you use social media in
your business?
I Tweet. I Facebook. I don’t
always do in a timely way because
I have a life, but I do try to do it
regularly. My daughters are 19-and-
a-half-month-old twins. They keep
me busy, they keep me young, they
keep me focused and they keep my
priorities where they should be.
If you had 30 minutes to spend
with a client, what would you
have them do?
I’m the master of the ass. And
people know this, so they come in if
they want their asses lifted, toned,
frmed. I would give them exercises
right out of [David’s Butt Book] the
sumo lunge, the platypus walk, the
crossover lunge, single leg dead lift,
jump rope and very body-specifc
circuit training. o
David Kirsch talks
about his new business
ventures, his celebrity
clients and how he lifts
and tones the most
notable behinds in New
York ByRachelMorgan
Master
of ass
PersonaltrainerDavidKirschworkswithaclient.
D
a
v
i
D
K
i
R
s
c
h

NYO_May2011_PersonalTrainer.indd 72 4/29/11 4:04:56 PM
Book Your EvEnt
54 West 21st Street, Between 5th and 6th Avenues, nYC
www.slate-ny.com - 212.989.0096 - event@slate-ny.com
SLAtE
16,000 SQ. Feet • over 2 FloorS • event Space
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slate.indd 1 4/29/11 12:16:28 PM
NYO
74 | MAY
PARENTING
I often get asked for advice from families on
what to do downtown, and I’m always happy
to say that there are loads of fabulous things
to enjoy and explore in the area with your
kids. Here are some of my favorites.
Where should I go for weekend brunch
with the family?
When you think of a weekend family meal
below 14th Street, places like Bubby’s Pie
Company (120 Hudson Street) immediately
come to mind. Bubby’s definitely had delicious
food, but I love to think of weekends as a time to
discover new places in the city—and that’s even
more fun with the kids. It can be the perfect
time to squeeze into a hot new restaurant like
The Lion (62 West Ninth St.,) Maialino (2
Lexington Ave.) and Minetta Tavern (113
MacDougal St.) all have delicious brunch menus
with options for even the pickiest little one. And
if your kids’ favorite treat is pizza, try Mario
Batali’s OTTO (1 Fifth Ave.), Pulino’s Bar &
Pizzeria (282 Bowery) or one of the funky pie
specialists in the East Village. And don’t forget
how easy, enjoyable and inexpensive dim sum in
Chinatown is.
What’s your ideal weekend downtown day?
Is there anything better than strolling
on a sunny day in New York with your kids?
That’s really the best way to spend any day;
and it’s easy to maximize the fun downtown.
I love heading down with my kids to the
Bleecker Playground (Hudson St., Bleecker
St. and West 11 St.,) where chances are, you’ll
spot a celebrity or two—Sarah Jessica Parker
and Kate Hudson are fans—as you’re watch-
ing your little ones on the swings. If it’s
rainy, I take my boys to the New Museum
(235 Bowery), which has a welcoming and
unintimidating atmosphere—and a branch
of City Bakery in the lobby, for yummy
pretzel croissants.
And of course we squeeze in some deli-
cious treats, too, whether it’s the incredible
ice cream from il laboratorio del gelato
(95 Orchard St.), Sigmund pretzels from
Sigmund Pretzelshop (29 Ave. B) at the
Hester Street Fair (Hester and Essex
St., Saturdays 11 a.m.-6 p.m.) or just a clas-
sic cupcake from Magnolia Bakery (401
Bleecker St.) o
new
DOWNTOWN
HOTSPOTS
At Peels (325 Bowery), your kids
will love the food—and building
their own customized meal on a
delicious biscuit. And you’ll love
the relaxed atmosphere, the peo-
ple watching and the restaurant’s
undeniable but definitely unpre-
tentious cool.
Imperial No. Nine (9 Crosby St.)
at the new Mondrian SoHo is sur-
prisingly kid-friendly, particularly
on early weeknights and week-
ends. And don’t miss breakfast—
the banana bread Panini stuffed
with homemade peanut butter,
honey and a fried egg is definitely
the breakfast of champions.
Crewcuts Tribeca (50 Hudson
St.) is another great spot. If you’re
like me, you’re already addicted
to Crewcuts’ adorable and so-
phisticated clothes for little boys
and girls—and coveting them for
yourself.
Crib
Sheets
Our resident parenting
expert shares her
expertise on the
kid-friendliest places
downtown. By Lyss Stern
Lyss Stern is the founder and president of Divalysscious Moms
(www.divamoms.com,) the premiere luxury lifestyle company
for New York City moms, and is an expert on family, parent-
ing, beauty, fashion and anything on the “mommy radar.” This
mother of two boys—Jackson and Oliver— is also the co-author
or If You Give a Mom a Martini … 100 Ways to Find 10 Blissful
Minutes for Yourself.
M
A
R
C
E
L
T
H
O
M
A
S
Sarah Jessica Parker takes
her twin daughters Samantha
and Tabitha Broderick to
local Manhattan parks.
NYO_May2011_LyssCribSheet.indd 74 4/29/11 4:03:00 PM
Trim639 pt
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i
m
7
7
4

p
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Bleed657 pt
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7
9
2

p
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Untitled-18 1 4/29/11 11:42:11 AM
76 | may 2011
NYO
architecture
Tell me how you got started in
architecture.
I was a young person, like 13 or 14 years
old, and I remember my parents had guests
for dinner that asked me, what do you
want to do when you grow up? And I said, I
want to be an architect. I don’t know how I
decided on that, but I just said that’s what
I want to do. And I’ve never, ever turned
back. I probably didn’t know exactly what it
meant to be an architect at that time, but it
seemed like something that was interest-
ing. I liked making things, I liked drawing. I
had a place in the basement where I would
make models of diferent things, model
airplanes, model boats, even model houses.
You’re lucky that you knew what you
wanted to do at such a young age.
I feel very lucky about that because when
I was in college, I had a roommate who was
really talented. He could do so many difer-
ent things well, but he could never decide
which one he wanted to do. In some ways,
I feel badly for him. He studied psychol-
ogy and so he got a degree in that. Then he
decided he wanted to be a lawyer, so he got
a law degree. Then he decided he wanted to
be a writer, so he starting writing. So I feel
very lucky.
How would you describe your style? Do
you consider yourself a purist?
I would love to be a purist. I’m trying
to have as much clarity in the work as
possible. I don’t want to cover it with
overlays and other things. The structure is
expressed as structure, the transparency
and the openness and glazed surfaces are
related to opaque surfaces or wall planes.
So this relationship of the architecture be-
tween opaque and transparency, between
solid and void, are issues that I think are
important. And of course, if there’s light,
how light plays upon these things, how
the buildings refect light and refract light.
That’s also very important to me.
How do you hope the people interact
with the buildings?
So many people have come up to me
after they live in a building and say how
wonderful it is. Light is so important to
them, important in their lives, in where
they live. You become aware of the difer-
ence of season and the diference of color
throughout the day.
Do you think it takes a certain type of
person to live in one of your buildings
because of your style?
I don’t think it takes a certain type of
person. It takes a person who appreciates
their environment, who’s excited for their
environment and who feels like their envi-
ronment it is important in their lives.
Do you feel like having a signature
style traps you in that way?
Things change over time. What I do now
is very diferent from what I did 10 years
ago. There are certain principles that exist
in all of the works, like my attitude about
nature, about light, about space, about how
you move through space, how you relate to
space, how you experience your environ-
ment in relation to everything that’s
around you.
Over your 50-year career, how has
your style evolved?
Times have changed. What I did 20 or
30 years ago is certainly impactful on what
I would do today. We’ve always been very
concerned about the environment, about
sustainability and all of our work. We’re
equally concerned about the issues of
sustainability and textures and what goes
into the building, but also in terms of how
the environment will last for a long time.
Natural light has always been important
in my work and a certain openness and the
ability to relate the interior to the exterior
space. All these things are part of what I do
and always have been, but we do it difer-
ently today.
Do you think the design of a building
can make the people that live inside it
happier?
Absolutely. I’m an optimist in that
respect. I believe that, I really do.
What did you do when you found out
you had won the Pritzker Architecture
Prize?
I said to my daughter, ‘We have to cel-
ebrate.’ So I had dinner with my daughter
and had a glass of wine.
How do you think winning that prize
changed your career?
In some ways, I don’t think it did, but
maybe it did and I don’t know about it. >
When in
Glass Houses
Architect Richard Meier talks about his signature
purist style, his favorite New York buildings and
where he keeps his Pritzker Prize ByRachelMorgan
I
n
g
R
I
d
V
o
n
K
R
u
s
e
NYO_May2011_Architect_Meier.indd 76 4/29/11 4:53:18 PM
76 | may 2011
NYO
architecture
Tell me how you got started in
architecture.
I was a young person, like 13 or 14 years
old, and I remember my parents had guests
for dinner that asked me, what do you
want to do when you grow up? And I said, I
want to be an architect. I don’t know how I
decided on that, but I just said that’s what
I want to do. And I’ve never, ever turned
back. I probably didn’t know exactly what it
meant to be an architect at that time, but it
seemed like something that was interest-
ing. I liked making things, I liked drawing. I
had a place in the basement where I would
make models of diferent things, model
airplanes, model boats, even model houses.
You’re lucky that you knew what you
wanted to do at such a young age.
I feel very lucky about that because when
I was in college, I had a roommate who was
really talented. He could do so many difer-
ent things well, but he could never decide
which one he wanted to do. In some ways,
I feel badly for him. He studied psychol-
ogy and so he got a degree in that. Then he
decided he wanted to be a lawyer, so he got
a law degree. Then he decided he wanted to
be a writer, so he starting writing. So I feel
very lucky.
How would you describe your style? Do
you consider yourself a purist?
I would love to be a purist. I’m trying
to have as much clarity in the work as
possible. I don’t want to cover it with
overlays and other things. The structure is
expressed as structure, the transparency
and the openness and glazed surfaces are
related to opaque surfaces or wall planes.
So this relationship of the architecture be-
tween opaque and transparency, between
solid and void, are issues that I think are
important. And of course, if there’s light,
how light plays upon these things, how
the buildings refect light and refract light.
That’s also very important to me.
How do you hope the people interact
with the buildings?
So many people have come up to me
after they live in a building and say how
wonderful it is. Light is so important to
them, important in their lives, in where
they live. You become aware of the difer-
ence of season and the diference of color
throughout the day.
Do you think it takes a certain type of
person to live in one of your buildings
because of your style?
I don’t think it takes a certain type of
person. It takes a person who appreciates
their environment, who’s excited for their
environment and who feels like their envi-
ronment it is important in their lives.
Do you feel like having a signature
style traps you in that way?
Things change over time. What I do now
is very diferent from what I did 10 years
ago. There are certain principles that exist
in all of the works, like my attitude about
nature, about light, about space, about how
you move through space, how you relate to
space, how you experience your environ-
ment in relation to everything that’s
around you.
Over your 50-year career, how has
your style evolved?
Times have changed. What I did 20 or
30 years ago is certainly impactful on what
I would do today. We’ve always been very
concerned about the environment, about
sustainability and all of our work. We’re
equally concerned about the issues of
sustainability and textures and what goes
into the building, but also in terms of how
the environment will last for a long time.
Natural light has always been important
in my work and a certain openness and the
ability to relate the interior to the exterior
space. All these things are part of what I do
and always have been, but we do it difer-
ently today.
Do you think the design of a building
can make the people that live inside it
happier?
Absolutely. I’m an optimist in that
respect. I believe that, I really do.
What did you do when you found out
you had won the Pritzker Architecture
Prize?
I said to my daughter, ‘We have to cel-
ebrate.’ So I had dinner with my daughter
and had a glass of wine.
How do you think winning that prize
changed your career?
In some ways, I don’t think it did, but
maybe it did and I don’t know about it. >
When in
Glass Houses
Architect Richard Meier talks about his signature
purist style, his favorite New York buildings and
where he keeps his Pritzker Prize ByRachelMorgan
I
n
g
R
I
d
V
o
n
K
R
u
s
e
NYO_May2011_Architect_Meier.indd 76 4/29/11 4:53:18 PM
May 2011 | 77
NYO
architecture
Richard Meier.
NYO_May2011_Architect_Meier.indd 77 4/29/11 4:53:35 PM
78 | may 2011
architecture
NYO
Where do you keep it?
I have it in a drawer. It came with a
small sculpture, which I keep in my living
room.
How many people are in your frm
here?
Here in New York, we’re 60 people, and
in Los Angeles, we’re 40.
How involved are you in the design of
each project?
I’m very
involved with
what we do
here in New
York and
my partner,
Michael Pal-
ladino, is really
the one who
takes care of all
the work in our
Los Angeles of-
fce. I’m not as
involved there
as I am here.
What build-
ings do you
love in New
York City?
There are so many
good buildings here. I
love the Guggenheim
Museum. I love the
Seagram Building. I
love the Lever House.
Downtown, I think
One Chase Manhat-
tan Plaza is very good.
I look out my window
and I see the Empire
State Building, so
there are a lot of really
terrifc buildings in
New York. I wish
there were more, but
I appreciate what we
have.
What does it take to
be a good building?
It needs to relate to
its context. Take, for
instance, the Seagram
Building. It’s not just
the building itself, but
the plaza and how that
private space is given
to the public and how
they enjoy that space. A building has a respon-
sibility not only in terms of function but also in
terms of how it relates to its context.
Do you see a shift moving from big-name
frms toward more collaborative frms?
A lot of good, young architects are doing work
in New York City now, which is very encourag-
ing. You can go downtown and see a lot of things
happening there and a lot of good, young frms.
I’m an optimist, so I think you’re going to see a
lot of people doing interesting things.
You’re part of the New York Five. Do you
think there’s going to be a new generation
like that popping up?
Well, the times are diferent. We got together
because we were friends and respected each
other’s work. I don’t know if people are doing
that today. Maybe they are and I don’t know
about it.
Tell me about the process behind Perry
Street and Charles Street.
They’re not necessarily my biggest projects
here, but they’re very infuential. I’m very proud
that people realize that good architecture is
sellable and is proftable and they’re not just
buildings.
You designed the interior at Charles
Street but not at Perry Street. Why?
It was collaborative decision. At Perry
Street, we wanted people to come in, in a
sense, and make their own apartments. If
they wanted to live in a three-bedroom,
they could do that. If they wanted to live in
a one-bedroom, we could make a diferent
kind of confguration. You could do what
you wanted. But that proved to be a lot more
difcult than what we had anticipated, so at
Charles Street we designed everything. It
was diferent. I think in the long run, it made
more sense.
What is the most frustrating thing about
your craft?
It’s a long process. You sit and you work
and you design something, and sometimes it
takes 12 years, like with the Getty Center in
Los Angeles. It’s not something that happens
quickly. It happens over a long period of time
and you have to stick with it.
What’s your design process like?
I have music at home when I work, but not
in the ofce. I don’t want to have cofee or tea
on my desk because if I spill it, it would get all
over the papers and the drawings. o
Meier,
in short
What book is on
your bedside table
right now?
I’m reading John
Richardson’s three
volumes [A Life of
Picasso]. I can’t wait
for the fourth volume
to come out.
What inspires you?
The Picasso
exhibition at the Ga-
gosian inspired me
enormously.
Who in the architec-
ture world is doing
things really well?
I think there are a
lot of really talented
young architects.
I’m still working on
my list.
Do you use social
media in terms of
your career?
I don’t, but I should.
Someone here is in
charge of our Face-
book account.
What was the last
item you bought,
other than food?
New pots and pans.
My daughter picked
them out.
Are you getting into
cooking now?
No, but she is.
What’s the one thing
that’s always in your
refrigerator?
Grapefruit juice.
What’s your most
prized possession?
My library. It’s actu-
ally two rooms. Only
one of the rooms
has a ladder with
wheels.
m
a
r
k
s
e
l
i
n
g
e
r
meier’siconicthreeglasstowers—173and176Perryst.and165Charlesst.
NYO_May2011_Architect_Meier.indd 78 4/29/11 4:54:06 PM
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NYO
Matt Blesso designs top-of-the-line,
lush bathrooms in his downtown apartment
By Rachel Morgan
80 | may 2011
The outdoor shower on
the 2,100 square-foot
roofop deck.
NYO _MAG3_PXX_BestBathroom.indd 80 4/29/11 4:00:53 PM
Matt Blesso, the president and founder of Blesso Properties,
has the ultimate bachelor pad. The 3,100-square-foot residence is a
design collaboration between Blesso and architects Joel Sanders and
Andrea Steele.
While his downtown apartment is pretty innovative in itself, it’s really the
bathrooms that steal the show. Of Blesso’s three bathrooms, the frst has a
hidden drain in the sink and a shower that seems to magically appear out of
the ceiling. When the sink’s faucet is turned on, it trickles down the slightly
angled slab of a “sink” and down the wall, into a before-unnoticeable crack
where the wall meets the foor. Same with the shower. Turn it on and the
water runs over the cork fooring toward the hidden drain. The only thing
you have to do is move the toilet paper—the toilet is immediately adjacent to
the shower —so it doesn’t get wet.
Next up is the master bathroom—a glass-walled room that is completely
visible from the rest of the apartment. But, as Blesso demonstrates, when
he ficks a switch, the glass becomes frosted, thus allowing some semblance
of privacy. The centerpiece of this bathroom is a living, breathing green wall
surrounding the mirror, comprised of lush peace lilies, ferns, peperomia and
prayer plants .
But upkeep on this wall proved to be a bit of a challenge.
“I have a gardener come once a month to prune it,” he said. “It died a
couple of times, the irrigation didn’t work or during installation dust got all
over it.”
So why a green wall in a bathroom?
“I guess because I could,” he said. “I thought why not have it in a bath-
room? It’ll be like an oasis. A lot of what I did is blur the lines between inside
and outside.”
Teak sinks, a heated toilet seat and a shower with a teak and rock-fooring
fnish of this bathroom.
Next up is a bathroom immediately of the kitchen. A “hatbox toilet,” and
cylindrical sink are ofset by the
symmetry of the room.
“I like doing the round element
in a square room,” Blesso said.
But the proverbial high point
of the apartment has to be the
2,100-square-foot rooftop deck,
complete with lush landscaping, a
hot tub, grill and—you guessed it—
an outdoor shower. I look around
the skyline, noting a number of
windows immediately adjacent to
the shower, which is very much out in the open.
Don’t you worry about people seeing you when you shower? I ask. Blesso
seems undeterred.
“If it makes their day then all right, go ahead and take a photo.” o
Matt Blesso designs top-of-the-line,
lush bathrooms in his downtown apartment
ByRachelMorgan
ca s t l e
i n the sky
interior design
NYO
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theoutdoorshoweron
the2,100square-foot
roofopdeck.
aninteriorview
ofthemaster
bathroom.
thegreenwall
andteaksinksin
themasterbath.
MattBlesso.
NYO _MAG3_PXX_BestBathroom.indd 81 4/29/11 4:01:46 PM
82 | april 2011
NYO
interior Design
Back to His Roots
How one urban designer integrates Arkansas country and urban chic.
By Rachel MoRgan o PhotogRaPhy By Scott FRanceS
theBradFord-designed
oneJacksonSquare
penthouseboastsan
openlivingarea.
82 | may 2011
NYO_May2011_InteriorDesign.indd 82 4/29/11 5:12:36 PM
april 2011 | 83
interior design
NYO
Back to His Roots
How one urban designer integrates Arkansas country and urban chic.
By Rachel MoRgan o PhotogRaPhy By Scott FRanceS
NYO_May2011_InteriorDesign.indd 83 4/29/11 5:13:04 PM
84 | may 2011
interior Design
NYO
B
rad Ford hasn’t forgotten
where he came from. The
Arkansas native uses the
landscape of his home state
to inspire the casual elegance
that infuses his urban
designs.
One of Ford’s projects, a One Jackson Square
penthouse, incorporates the feel of natural
embellishment and comfort in the midst of an
urban landscape.
“It’s a great building and the architecture is
pretty phenomenal, but at the end of the day it
still just had white walls and glass,” Ford said of
the Kohn Pedersen Fox–designed Greenwich
Village building. “So one of the things I was
trying to do with the space was really warm it up
and bring a little bit of earthiness to it. Just give it
some texture.”
Ford incorporated rustic items like a biomor-
phic bubble light fxture by Jef Zimmerman,
vintage bar stools with Mongolian lamb seat
covers and a vintage Vladimir Kagan foating
ottoman upholstered in zebra skin.
“I think that it’s nice to try to bring some
earthy elements into a more urban environ-
ment, especially for me because I miss a lot of
those elements by being in the city,” Ford said.
But a magnifcent George Nakashima piece
takes center stage.
“One thing that was defnitely one of the frst
things we picked out was the dining room table,”
he said. “It’s a George Nakashima table that has
a live, organic edge. It’s like a slab of a tree. That
was the centerpiece of the apartment, and I
thought that it instantly brought the outdoors
in.”
The two-story penthouse’s foor plan is
extremely open, which did pose a bit of an issue
in designing a cozy, livable space.
“My biggest challenge with this particular
space was the fact that it was so open,” Ford said.
“It was hard to create a sense of intimacy, which
is why I created the diferent seating areas.”
Ford also incorporated several pieces of art in
the design scheme.
“I worked with a great art consultant, Ellen
Kern, and her company, Ellen Kern Fine Arts,”
he said. “We collaborate and talk about what I’m
looking for or what the client would be look-
ing for. She has relationships with all of the art
galleries and can go out and pull pieces and put
together a range for a client or I to look at.”
And he’s right—the space has pieces by Roni
Horn, Donald Mofett, James Welling, Jef
Chien-Hsing Liao and Vera Lutter, among
others.
Ford has a bit of a storied history in the way of
design. He established Brad Ford I.D. in 1998 and
has been bringing his rustic, outdoorsy designs
into New York’s residential spaces in the decade
since. And it seems these unique designs have
gotten him noticed. Ford was named one of the
“10 New Designers to Watch” by both New >
Right: Ford utilized
rustic accents like a
Vladimir Kagan ot-
toman upholstered
in zebra skin and a
biomorphic bubble
light fxture by Jef
Zimmerman. Below:
interior designer
Brad Ford.
NYO_May2011_InteriorDesign.indd 84 4/29/11 5:14:00 PM
L OCAL E XP E RTS WORL DWI DE
EAST SIDE MANHATTAN BROKERAGE I sothebyshomes.com/nyc
38 EAST 61ST STREET NEW YORK, NY 10065 T 212.606.7660 F 212.606.7661
Sotheby’s International Realty and the Sotheby’s International Realty logo are registered service marks used with permission. Operated by Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc. An Equal Opportunity Company.
47 WEST 9TH STREET: Impeccably renovated 28’ wide, 4 story plus
basement brownstone townhouse in the heart of Greenwich Village.
Designed in 1910, today the house has undergone complete renovation.
$28,500,000 WEB: NYO0017455. Serena Boardman, 212.606.7611
LOFT ON PARK AVE S.: Renovated by renowned Charles Gwathmey.
Sunny 50’+/- living/dining room with freplace, master bedroom with
double dressing and baths, library with bath, staff room. $5,395,000 WEB:
NYO0017576. L. Summers, 212.606.7789, G. Deviln, 212.606.7729
PRIME SOHO PENTHOUSE, 210 LAFAYETTE ST: Dramatic and
bright penthouse with expansive East and South views. This 2-bedroom, 2
½ baths was designed by Richard Gluckman. 12’ ceilings, modern appli-
ances. $3,950,000 WEB: NYO0017081. Eric Malley, 212.606.7625
50 WEST 15TH ST, MODERN DUPLEX PENTHOUSE: Enjoy
panoramic views extending to the North and South. Features include
6- zone heating and AC, 3,000+/- sq ft rooftop oasis, 3 bedrooms, 3 baths.
$7,995,000 WEB: NYO0016890. Eric Malley, 212.606.7625
109 GREENE STREET: Penthouse perfection awaits you in this duplex
loft featuring 1,600+/- sq ft of outdoor entertaining areas and open city
views. Living room with gas freplace, open chef ’s kitchen, 3 bedrooms, 2
baths. $5,250,000 WEB: NYO0017556. Stan Ponte, 212.606.4109
THE CALEDONIA: Spectacular Hudson River and skyline views from
every room of this high-foor, triple mint, 3-bedroom, 3-bath condo. Sun-
fooded living room, open kitchen. $3,950,000 WEB: NYO0017506.
Debra Peltz, 212.606.7635, Gabriele Devlin, 212.606.7729
Brokerage 1.indd 1 4/29/11 12:46:18 PM
NYO
86 | may 2011
interior Design
York magazine and New York Spaces magazine,
as well as one of America’s Top Young Designers
by House Beautiful and one of the Rising Stars of
Interior Design by the International Furnish-
ings and Design Association.
But Ford’s very frst project wasn’t in New
York—rather, it was his own home in Arkansas.
“It was nothing extravagant by any means, it
was just a small house, but I could aford it, and
I just loved the process,” he said. “That was what
really got me started thinking about [pursing
design as a career].”
And from there, he never looked back. Unless,
of course, it’s to garner new inspiration from his
home state.
“Arkansas’ state nickname is ‘the Natural
State,’ and I don’t think a lot of people realize
how gorgeous it is,” he said. “It had a really big
infuence.”
This natural philosophy helped Ford stand
out in a sea of urban designers.
“I have a very particular aesthetic,” he said. “If
you look at a range of my work, there’s defnitely
my thumbprint on each of the projects. There’s a
sort of natural, casual elegance that is somewhat
sophisticated but still approachable and not
of-limits. I defnitely feel I have a very distinct,
diferent point of view. And in this industry,
in order to stand out, you have to have a really
strong point of view.” o
Above: The
bedroom of
the penthouse
residence. Right:
the apartment
had a plethora of
windows, open
space and light.
NYO_May2011_InteriorDesign.indd 86 4/29/11 5:15:37 PM
L OCAL E XP E RTS WORL DWI DE
EAST SIDE MANHATTAN BROKERAGE I sothebyshomes.com/nyc
38 EAST 61ST STREET NEW YORK, NY 10065 T 212.606.7660 F 212.606.7661
Sotheby’s International Realty and the Sotheby’s International Realty logo are registered service marks used with permission. Operated by Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc. An Equal Opportunity Company.
D’ARTE HOUSE CONDO PENTHOUSE: Private house in the sky with
open city, park and river views. 2,800+/- sq ft sundrenched loft with 11’6”
ceilings, 2 bedrooms, 2 baths, 2 private terraces, 2,500+/- sq ft private roof
deck. $3,350,000 WEB: NYO0017163. Robson Zanetti, 212.606.7658
STUNNING DESIGNER LOFT: Art’s lovers dream. This exceptional loft
is 2,500+/- sq ft of perfection. Architect-designed home with 22’ gallery,
26’+ wide living/dining with gas freplace, 11+ ft ceilings, 2 bedrooms, 2
baths. $2,950,000 WEB: NYO0017341. Anne Corey, 212.606.7733
100 ELEVENTH AVE, JEAN NOUVEL CHELSEA: This brand new
1 bedroom, 1½ bath is the only unit of its kind available on the high
southwest corner foor. Dramatic panoramic views. $2,550,000 WEB:
NYO0017473. Royce Pinkwater, 212.606.7718, Jeffrey Firth, 212.606.7673
137 DUANE ST: Spectacular 2 bedroom TriBeCa Loft. Renovated by
award winning Jamie Drake and published in Interior Design Magazine.
3,000+/- sq ft, 16’ ceiling, iron columns, custom kitchen. $3,195,000 WEB:
NYO0016596. Lee. Summers, 212.606.7789, Gabriele Devlin, 212.606.7729
125 WEST 21ST STREET: Rare and unique home that is blend of style,
design and privilege. This duplex has 2 bedrooms, 2 baths, new chef ’s
kitchen with modern appliances, 11’ ceilings, 836+/- sq ft rooftop garden.
$2,695,000 WEB: NYO0017079. Eric Malley, 212.606.7625
221 CENTRE STREET PENTHOUSE: Sleek one-bedroom duplex
penthouse apartment boasts stunning open city views from every room
and access to an entertaining terrace. Flooded with sunlight throughout.
$2,500,000 WEB: NYO0017491. Serena Boardman, 212.606.7611
Brokerage 2.indd 1 4/29/11 12:47:12 PM
88 | may 2011
NYO
PLACES
A
ccording to Loyola University
Chicago professor Timothy J.
Gilfoyle’s essay “City of Eros:
New York City, Prostitution,
and the Commercialization
of Sex, 1790-1920,” there were close to 500
brothels in Manhattan by 1790. With so many
options, it comes as little surprise that books
like The Gentleman’s Directory would exist to
guide pleasure-seekers. This little black book
exists for one purpose only—to assist would-
be johns in making informed decisions about
which brothels to frequent, which to avoid
and which keeps a bear in its cellar.
Locale 1: 83 Crosby St.
The brisk, well-groomed British woman
introduced only as Loreen looked suspicious
at the revelation that her current employer,
the swanky Crosby Street Hotel, stands on the
site of what was once a rather lauded brothel.
In 1859, during the heyday of the city’s down-
town red-light districts, The Gentleman’s
Directory listed 83 Crosby Street as one of the
more refned options. It claimed the institu-
tion, operated by one Miss M. Stewart, was
“one of the safest retreats in town, conducted
principally on the assignation order.” Miss
M. received rave reviews herself, with the
guidebook praising her as a “lady possessed of
pleasing manner. Gentlemen wishing to enjoy
the comforts of connubial bliss with their
wives intended would do well to call here.”
One would think Loreen would be honored
to share a partial address with such a historic
provider of connubial bliss. Quite to the con-
trary, she snifed that she “doubted we would
be interested in being in that kind of piece
anyway” and provided the number of a PR
company in London. Safest retreats, indeed.
Locale 2: 111 Spring St.
The crumbling white facade of 111 Spring
Street is at least superfcially closer to its
carnal origins than the Crosby Hotel. But
this Spring Street establishment was panned
in The Gentleman’s Directory. Hattie Taylor,
the proprietor of the place, would not have
appreciated its classifcation as a “third class
house where may be found the lowest class
of courtesans.” It is patronized by roughs and
rowdies, and gentlemen who turn their shirts
wrong side out when the other side is dirty.”
Inside the storefront is the current tenant
Fossil, purveyor of watches and leather goods.
The girl working behind the counter seemed
mildly interested upon hearing the location
used to cater to the city’s less sophisticated
johns. “I’ve never heard anything about that,”
she said. “But it doesn’t surprise me. This is
New York.”
Locale 3: 127 West 26th St.
Apparently, sex was not the only thing for sale
along these narrow streets. Some of our more
interesting fnds were Madame Buemont’s 127
West 26th Street “boarding house,” which re-
portedly included a caged bear in the cellar. The
guide did not speculate as to why. The building’s
frst foor is currently animal-free, occupied
instead by a dimly lit bar called the Black Door.
The second foor is a now a church. No one an-
swered the buzzer for the First Alliance Church
on a recent Monday afternoon, but the patrons
of the Black Door, lounging along the sills of its
large, open windows, were more than happy to
discuss the building’s former sins of the fesh.
“No wonder I come here so often,” said Sean
Barkulis, 29, a frequent guest of the hangout. “I
see some shady stuf go down in the bathroom
stalls. They’re keeping true to the brothel
tradition.”
The Gentleman’s Directory still exists in its
original, pint-size form, locked away behind
the climate-controlled doors of the New York
Historical Society. o
A Storied
History
We explore the current
addresses of what used
to be the city’s most
risqué establishments.
ByMeredithBennett-Smith
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NYO_May2011_Brothel.indd 88 4/29/11 3:33:12 PM
Operated by Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc. Sotheby’s International Realty
®
is a registered trademark. Les Bords de l’Epte a Giverny, used with permission.
Local Experts Worl dwide
MANHATTAN &
BROOKLYN PROPERTIES
15TH STREET OASIS: Enormous loft condo in prime
Union Square. Gallery-style glass doors open to beautiful
landscaped terrace. 3 bedrooms plus home office and
library/den, 3 baths. Second terrace. WEB: NYOM0135558.
$4,895,000. Joshua Wesoky, 212.431.2465
NOHO STAR: Gravitas, NoHo full floor loft. Over-sized
windows, 11’3”± ceilings, Carrara marble baths, central
AC. Low maintenance. WEB: NYOM0135575.
$4,295,000. Sajj Ahmad, 212.431.2438
PERFECT RIVER AND PARK VIEWS: DUMBO.
Unique, renovated, sprawling Clocktower Condo corner
loft. Chef ’s kitchen, 2 bedrooms with en-suite baths plus
den. Oversized windows. Full service. $4,100,000
WEB: NYOM0135336. Karen Heyman, 212.810.4990
GOLD COAST PRE-WAR: Beautiful bright and quiet
corner 2 bedroom/1bath, wood burning fireplace in
elegant full service building in Greenwich Village. WEB:
NYOM0135568. $1,625,000. Paula Allen, 212.431.2455
KEY TO GRAMERCY PARK: Spacious, bright, corner
one bedroom with east and north open views, a large
dining alcove and windowed kitchen. Full service build-
ing with a renovated roof deck. WEB: NYOM0135566.
$699,000 Yvonne DeNigris, 212.431.2429
CORNER 1 BED WITH HARBOR VIEWS: High-
floor, corner one-bedroom with stunning city and harbor
views and a spacious floorplan. Greenwich Club is the pre-
mier building in Financial District. WEB: NYOM0135561.
$899,000. S. Dawson, 212.810.4975, B. Ingalls, 212.431.2457
MANHATTAN BROKERAGES I sothebyshomes.com/nyc
DOWNTOWN 379 WEST BROADWAY, NEW YORK, NY 10012 T 212.431.2440 F 212.431.2441
EAST SIDE 38 EAST 61ST STREET, NEW YORK, NY 10065 T 212.606.7660 F 212.606.7661
CHIC DUPLEX IN THE POLICE BUILDING:
Newly renovated sun-filled 1 bedroom, 1.5 bath duplex in
SoHo. 18’ ± ceilings, western exposure, fireplace and more.
Full service landmarked co-op. Offered furnished. WEB:
NYOM0135573. $2,695,000. Christina Visca, 212.431.2443
CHELSEA FULL FLOOR LOFT: Sun flooded through
3 exposures (South, North, and West) and 14 windows.
Open kitchen, two wood-burning fireplaces. 3 possibly
4 bedrooms, 3 baths. WEB: NYOM0135554. $2,850,000.
Glenn Norrgard, 212.431.2456, John Tenore, 212.431.2473
PRIME VILLAGE LOFT: Oversized south windows
bring stunning light to this full floor. High ceilings,
architectural finishes, 51’± living-dining area. 3 bedrooms
(or 4), 2 baths. WEB: NYOM0135509. $3,995,000.
Stephen McRae, 212.431.2424
Untitled-23 1 4/29/11 1:25:56 PM
90 | may 2011
places
NYO
Le Petit Versailles, a community
garden on the Lower East Side, wasn’t always
a bright spot in the neighborhood.
Peter Cramer and Jack Waters both lived on
Second Street, next to the garden’s lot. But that
space didn’t always boast the fora and fauna it
does now.
“The lot used to be an illegal auto-body chop
shop,” Cramer said. “It was also a center for a
lot of the neighborhood’s drug trade.”
The city had no plans for the space when it
was cleared in 1995, but Cramer and Waters
could see a diamond in all that roughage. So
they proposed their idea of turning the lot into
a garden to the community board.
“We thought it would be a great opportunity
to do something that could involve the whole
community,” Cramer said. “It was a chance to
combine the ideas of creating a public space
and creating a green space.”
Though Le Petit Versailles ofcially opened
in 1996, it took some time for it to actually
start to look like a garden. Cramer and Waters
called upon local volunteers and the program
GreenThumb, in conjunction with their own
company, Allied Productions Inc., a nonproft
organization that facilitates communica-
tion and collaboration between artists and
agencies.
“GreenThumb was placed under the
jurisdiction of the New York City Depart-
ment of Parks & Recreation in 1995,” said
Parks Department Deputy Commissioner for
Community Outreach Lance Scott Blackmon.
“[The program] assists community gardens
by providing materials, advice and workshops
to help the gardens’ volunteers become better
stewards for the community.”
The program only aids parks that fall under
the leadership of the Parks Department, but
fortunately for Le Petit Versailles, it does.
“GreenThumb provided us with all the
soil, wood and plants we needed to create
the garden,” said Cramer. “It took a good
number of years to get things into place and
get everything planted because the manual
labor is all on a volunteer basis.”
Le Petit Versailles really hit its stride in 2001.
“We met a whole new generation of artists
and activists interested in becoming involved
with the garden,” Cramer said. “They inspired
a whole new renaissance of artistic activities,
like what Allied Productions used to do in the
’80s. It was exciting to have a new generation
coming in, wanting to do things spontaneously
and for themselves.”
The garden nurtured this feeling and helped
it to grow by hosting public events and the work
of local artists.
“It’s a place to come and get involved in
performances and workshops,” Cramer said.
“Le Petit Versailles hosts flm screenings, music
concerts, theater performances, workshops in
yoga, herbal medicine, bookmaking, flm and
video. Film students often use the garden as the
setting for their pieces and then screen them
there. We’ve held a lot of birthdays here, and
even a wedding.”
Sounds like a marriage of the minds to us. o
diamond in the rough
One neighborhood turns an abandoned lot into a thriving square of green.
ByNatalieHoward
PeterCramer,oneofthefoundersofLePetitVersailles.
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NYO_MAG3_PXX_CommunityGarden.indd 90 4/29/11 3:49:56 PM
©2011. An independently owned and operated member of the Prudential Real Estate Afliates, Inc. is a service mark of Prudential Insurance Company of America. Equal Housing Opportunity. All material presented herein is intended for information
purposes only. While, this information is believed to be correct, it is represented subject to errors, omissions, changes or withdrawal without notice. All property outlines and square footage in property listings are approximate.
LONG ISLAND MANHATTAN BROOKLYN QUEENS THE HAMPTONS THE NORTH FORK RIVERDALE/BRONX WESTCHESTER/PUTNAM
DUPLEXLOFT/PRIVATEGARDEN
Soho • $3,195,000 • Sun-flooded duplex with private
landscaped garden. 2 bedroom, 2 bath, den, chef’s
kitchen, home office, central AC, washer/dryer. Tasteful
design with original preserved details. Garden facing
South/East. Web# 1350160. Rise Cale 212.206.2825
140PERRYSTREET
Far West Village
$4,500,000
Built 1909. Converted
to residential condo
1997. 2,700± sf main
level, 1,500± sf lower
level, 16 ft concrete
beamed ceiling, large
wood burning fireplace.
Residential with live/
work. Web# 1328318.
Jan Hashey, EVP
212.206.2804
Steve Halprin
212.206.2803
LIGHTFILLED3BEDROOM
West Village • $2,895,000 • Totally renovated with large
open kitchen, top appliances, 2 baths, master bedroom
suite with balcony, 2 additional balconies, washer/dryer,
custom built-ins, hardwood floors, and excellent closets.
Web# 1345331. Debra Kameros 212.242.6800
Susan Weiner 212.598.3196
ENORMOUSARTSYLOFTINSOHO
Classic Soho • $4,000,000 • Massive duplex loft is the
epitome of downtown loft living. Cast iron columns, ex-
posed brick with an eclectic blend of historic and modern
artistic features. 16 ft ceilings. Web# 1346317. Anne
Chang 212.769.9852 I Lisa Gilroy, VP 212.965.6030

SUN-FILLED
4-STORY
TOWNHOUSE
West Village
$6,295,000
Sun-filled four story
townhouse built in
1851. Currently a
duplex and two floor
throughs. Amazing
potential but does need
TLC. Delivered vacant.
Web# 1347353.
Debra Kameros
212.242.6800
Susan Weiner
212.598.3196
ELEGANT
RESTORATION
Chelsea
$5,995,000
This 22 ft wide 1830s
townhouse is in
excellent condition,
has fabulous historic
detail, high ceilings,
and 3 wonderful
outdoor spaces,
single family or
high-income rentals.
Web# 1336541.
Leslie Mason, SVP
212.206.2810
BEAUTYON
BEDFORDSTREET
Greenwich Village
$6,800,000
Behind this classic
restored façade awaits
an extraordinary art-
ist’s residence. Open,
modern, light filled
and utterly private
home is perfect for
quiet contemplation.
Web# 1333488.
Leslie Mason, SVP
212.206.2810
2,300SFOFPRIVATEROOFDECK
Soho • $7,500,000 • Mint penthouse duplex condo 4
bedrooms, 2.5 baths. 4,850 sf interior, 2,300 sf terraces.
Huge kitchen, 3 wood burning fireplaces, 3 exposures,
skylight, high ceilings, low CC/RET. Web# 1346843.
Josh Rubin 212.321.7111
70JANESTREET
Far West Village • $6,950,000 • Rarely do houses come
available with this sense of warmth and family enjoy-
ment. Surprisingly spacious & open for a 15.8 ft house.
South facing garden, original wood floors, 5+ bedrooms.
Web# 1322806. Jan Hashey, EVP 212.206.2804
Steve Halprin 212.206.2803
PDE 1.indd 1 4/29/11 1:26:44 PM
architecture
92 | may 2011
NYO
You split time between
New York and your
native Mexico. How do
you feel your buildings
in Mexico refect or
inspire your work in
New York?
I don’t know if one
would inform or not the
other; I would defnitely
say that both inform each
other. It’s many things
that inform the work.
Obviously, my having been
brought up in Mexico and being here all my life
had some impact in my architectural vocabu-
lary and my general outlook. I guess it’s sort
of like a continuous fabric where everything
informs the rest.
What would you say are the big difer-
ences between crafting architecture in a
place like New York City compared to just
about anywhere else?
New York would be at one end of the spectrum
and Mexico would be at the other end—highly
developed technological and economic societies
versus emerging societies. One of the big difer-
ences in Mexico is the work is very much based
on very good, inexpensive labor with handmade
conditions, whereas in New York or certain parts
of Europe you sort of rely on technology and fabri-
cated products lines with not-so-good and very
expensive labor. In one place you design knowing
you can use more labor like handcrafted condi-
tions, whereas in the other you try to avoid it.

What was your inspiration for the zigzag-
ging design of the Mercedes House?
There are many issues that led to that >
Cross-cultural
design
Mexican architect Enrique Norten
talks about splitting time between
New York and his native Mexico City;
conjunctly operating TEN Arquitectos
and his New York ofce; and his newest
project o ByAndrewGuarini
OneYork
Street,one
ofNorten’s
designs. P
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NYO_MAG_Enrique.indd 92 4/29/11 3:59:18 PM
©2011. An independently owned and operated member of the Prudential Real Estate Afliates, Inc. is a service mark of Prudential Insurance Company of America. Equal Housing Opportunity. All material presented herein is intended for information
purposes only. While, this information is believed to be correct, it is represented subject to errors, omissions, changes or withdrawal without notice. All property outlines and square footage in property listings are approximate.
LONG ISLAND MANHATTAN BROOKLYN QUEENS THE HAMPTONS THE NORTH FORK RIVERDALE/BRONX WESTCHESTER/PUTNAM
MINTCONDITION2BEDROOM,2BATH
165 Christopher Street • $1,250,000 • Corner renovated
South and East facing home with spacious layout and
gorgeous city views in the West Village/Meatpacking
District. Flexible co-op allows subletting. Web# 1335121.
Jessica Cohen, EVP 917.501.6350 I Maria Milkova
859.230.5493
SPACIOUSCONDOMINIUM
East 60s • $1,325,000 • Estate sale. 2 bedroom, 2 bath
easily converted to 3rd bedroom in luxury doorman
building. X-large bright corner unit. Bring your Architect.
Great opportunity and value. Web# 1344972. Laura Matiz
212.891.7252 I Julie Weintraub 917.612.2809
RIVERVIEWS,PRIVATEGARDEN
167 Perry Street, #1P • $899,000 • Rarely offered one
bedroom duplex on Hudson River with rose garden in
fully serviced co-op. Multiple dogs, subletting allowed.
Maintenance $1,591. Web# 1349378. Catherine Spencer
212.891.7681
PRIMEPREWARLOFT
Flatiron • Unique opportunity to buy 2 neighboring
units at the distinguished full service 15 Madison
Square North. High ceilings, solid walnut flooring,
top-of-the-line finishes. Web# 1330482. Adam Rothman
646.644.5600 I Patty Vance 212.350.8576

LIGHT,AIRANDVIEWS
Prime Soho Condo • $2,195,000 • Chic, loft-like corner
home boasts oversized windows, 10 ft+ ceilings, maple
strip floors, chef’s kitchen, spa baths, a top luxury full-
service building. A quality offering in a finest location.
Web# 1345809. Lucien Lidji 212.727.6166 I 917.566.4601
1927CONDOLOFT
Chelsea • $2,150,000 • 1,626 sf sleek and sun-drenched
condo loft with expansive living space, 10 ft ceilings, open
kitchen, 2 full baths on quiet tree-lined block. Spectacu-
lar. Web# 1347175. Monique Silberman 212.891.7120
AROOFOFONE’SOWN
West Village • $2,272,000 • Penthouse triplex 3
bedroom, 3 bath in Far West Village, plus about 500 sf
private roof space. Loft like living/dining; Full-floor
master suite; and two striking stairways unifying the
home. Web# 1349770. Armanda Squadrilli 646.824.8379
PRIMEPREWARSOHOLOFT
Soho • $2,499,000 • Spacious full floor loft with lots of
light and oversized windows. Top-of-the-line kitchen,
hardwood floors, restored tin ceilings, washer/dryer,
and tons of storage. Web# 1325690. Brett Forman
212.891.7194 I 917.837.6358
2BEDROOMRIVERFRONTLUXURY
West Village • $2,350,000 • Spectacular Hudson River
views from every room of this glorious 2 bedroom, 2 bath
apartment with 2 balconies and wood burning fireplace.
Cook’s kitchen, washer/dryer, custom closets galore.
Web# 1347302. Harry Kendrick 646.489.8760 I Susan
Wexford 212.627.0610
PDE 2.indd 1 4/29/11 1:27:14 PM
architecture
94 | may 2011
NYO
consideration and they’re all very site-specifc
conditions. One, obviously, we had this very big
site where we were suggested by the com-
munity boards to keep a certain scale on 11th
Avenue and then on the back, going east of the
site, we had some not very attractive high-rises
that were much higher. We understood we
needed to negotiate between these conditions
by producing height in the back and reduc-
ing height in the front. On the other side,
because it was such a big block, we also wanted
to obtain exterior apartments and interior
apartments. We sort of are working and trying
to create a solution where most apartments,
basically all of them, have quite interesting
views.
Hell’s Kitchen isn’t known for stunning
works of architecture, residential or
otherwise. Do you think Mercedes House
could set a precedent and begin a trend for
the area?
I think it’s a very interesting area, one I
would say is a bit abandoned.
Recently you’ve been dubbed a ‘starchi-
tect’ in the architecture world. How do
you feel about this descriptor?
I really don’t listen to those things. It really
doesn’t matter to me. It’s not important. It
really doesn’t mean [anything] to my work
process.
After having some projects not come to
fruition in New York City, how did it feel
to fnally get your chance with projects
like One York Street and 580 Carroll
Street?
It’s a very rewarding thing. For all of us, it’s
always sort of a dream condition to accomplish
things in New York. I feel very, very proud to
have been able to complete these projects .
How was the planning and building
process for the Hotel Americano difer-
ent from your work on One York? Did you
fnd yourself thinking about the process
diferently because it was a hotel?
There are never two projects that are
similar processes—it’s a hotel and the clients
were very diferent. The clients at the Hotel
Americano are people I’ve been working with
for 10 years; we know each other very well and
I know their concepts very well. It was a very
diferent thing. One York was sort of a secret
residential building that was going to be sold at
a big expense and [Hotel Americano] is a much
more fun and free, a place where people can
stay for a night or couple of nights, have fun
and leave. It’s a very diferent experience you
want to create.
In architect years, you’re still young. Do
you have any long-term goals or ideas for
projects in New York City?
Unfortunately in [this] profession, you can’t
always choose or design your own project. I
end up having to respond to opportunities that
come to me. I’d be very happy if I was able to
keep getting new opportunities. That’s where
it enriches my life; it gives me the possibility to
keep acting and being creative. o
‘For us, it’s always sort
of a dream condition
to accomplish things
in New York.’
Rightandlef:
Twoseparate
viewsofZorten’s
zigzagging
MercedesHouse
inHell’sKitchen.
RendeRings CouRTesy enRique noRTen/Ten ARquiTeCTos
NYO_MAG_Enrique.indd 94 4/29/11 3:59:39 PM
Raphael De Niro, Managing Director
690 Washington Street, New York, NY 10014
212.460.0655 TheDeNiroGroup@Elliman.com www.elliman.com/rad
#1 TEAM NATIONWIDE IN THE PRUDENTIAL NETWORK
©2011. An independently owned and operated member of the Prudential Real Estate Afliates, Inc. is a service mark of Prudential Insurance Company of America. Equal Housing Opportunity. All material presented herein is intended for information
purposes only. While, this information is believed to be correct, it is represented subject to errors, omissions, changes or withdrawal without notice. All property outlines and square footage in property listings are approximate.
77 Bleecker Street, PH1414 • $4,499,000
This light-filled penthouse offers sweeping city views and impeccable design throughout
the home including 12 ft ceilings, fireplace, enormous great room, Miele and Sub-Zero
kitchen, West-facing greenhouse overlooking Washington Square Village, 3 bedrooms +
office and a full-floor master suite with a 273 sf planted terrace. Web# 1336193.
166 Perry Street, 1A • $4,450,000
Desirable West Village location, 166 Perry Street now offers this 2,588 sf duplex
maisonette with 3 bedrooms and 3.5 baths exquisitely designed with high-end details
mirroring the building’s elegant architecture and luxurious amenities. Web# 1253731.
195 HudSon Street, 5B • $4,995,000
The heart of this 4 bedroom, 3 bath TriBeCa loft is the high-end, sun-filled corner
eat-in kitchen. Enjoy north and east exposures, 16 oversized windows, 11'3" ceilings,
decorative fireplace in the grand living room, vented washer/dryer, large on-floor
private storage and a deeded parking space. 195 Hudson Street is a 24-hour doorman
condo. Web# 1351385.
58 reAde Street, PH • $9,950,000
Over 4,400 sf interior and 1,200 sf exterior make this triplex TriBeCa penthouse an
architectural dream. Masterfully renovated with the highest standards of luxury and
taste, and offering 3 bedrooms and 3.5 baths, this property is truly a turn-key home.
Web# 1345310.
PDE 3.indd 1 4/29/11 1:27:48 PM
96 | may 2011
real estate
NYO
T
he downtown real estate
market is bouncing back with
a vengeance.
“The downtown real estate
market is healthy and growing
stronger by the deal,” said
Eric Zollinger, president of
Zollinger & Associates. “In West Chelsea, for ex-
ample, once-stalled condo projects are coming
back to life and being remarketed and sold. In-
ventory in new developments has been absorbed
with resale prices higher than their original
contract prices. In the Caledonia, located at 450
West 17th Street and adjacent to the High Line,
there were 11 resales in 2010 with an average
price 22.52 percent higher than the original sale,
with an average price per square foot of $1,616.
This sort of measured growth is a strong indica-
tor of the market’s growing strength.”
High demand paired with tight inventory
seems to describe the downtown real estate
market quite well.
“[The market is] great,” said senior vice presi-
dent of Halstead Property Anna Shagalov. “If
anything, I just wish there was more inventory.”
Nick Gavin, vice president and salesperson at
Corcoran, agreed.
“Downtown is seeing high demand due to a >
with
digs
like
these
By Rachel Morgan
o
Photographs by Michael Chimento
Dowtown real estate
market heats up just
in time for summer.
7 Hubert Street.
NYO_MAG3_P96,100,102_RealEstateOverview.indd 96 4/29/11 3:51:20 PM
Uptown: 924 Madison Avenue / 212- 570-2440
Downtown: 340 West 23rd Street / 212-243-4000
Tribeca: 32 Avenue of the Americas / 212- 941- 8420
Equal Housing Opportunity
Stribling.com
STRIBLING
S T R I B L I N G
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A Terrace in Tribeca. Light-filled and quiet prewar co-op loft with 3 bedrooms,
2.5 baths, 7 skylights and high ceilings. The large open living room, dining room
and kitchen are perfect for entertaining. Plus your own private terrace! Live-in
super. Co-exclusive. $2.6M. Web #1220856. Sharon Flynn 212-585-4579
Park Your Car Here! What joy to own your own garage! Plus nearly 3500 sf
flex living space in this gorgeous mint condo loft in prime E.Village. EIK, downstairs
den, 2 bths, pwdr rm. 12 ft ceils, expos brick, cement & maple flrs. Mint, move-in
cond w/lo monthlies. Very Cool. $2.995M. Web #1216447. C.Taub 452-4387
Gold Coast Village Townhouse. First offer. Grand, state-of-the-art, triple mint,
newly renov 28 ft wide, 5 sty Italianate residence. Offering 9000+sf sophisticated
& chic living. Trophy prop feat elev, screening rm, gym, wine cellar, garden & staff
quarters. $28.5M. Web #1210957. L.Melnick 452-4425/A.Lambert 452-4408
The Parkwood Penthse. E 28th. Intimate & sensationally lrg light-filled duplex.
Classic detail & perfectly proportiond loft. 1st flr living, entertaining & MBR suite w/
pvt balcony, 2nd BR & bth. 2nd flr grand rm, glass atrium wall w/glorious ESB view
w/terr. 24-hr drmn. $4.395M. Web #1188414. Brenda Vemich 646-436-3074
Duplex Living with Spectacular Views. Own half of both the 19th and
20th floors. Renovated 2 bedroom/2.5 bath duplex with walls of windows south
and west. Located in a East 30’s full service building with gym, roofdeck, bike
room and storage. $1.495M. Web #1210833. Julie Perlin 212-452-4373
Perfection Personified! This stunning loft studio in Richard Meier’s glass
tower has 11 foot ceilings, modern white kitchen, wenge wood floors & floor-to-
ceiling custom millwork with hidden murphy bed. Prime West Village! Full service
building with pool. $1.525M. Web #1221860. Millie Perry 646-234-3240
Highest Flr 1BR/1.5 Bath in New Soho Drmn Bldg. Flr-to-ceil windows
w/grt light/views. Gourmet kit with top applis & wine refrig. Master bth w/soak
tub, sep shower & California WIC. Common roofdeck. Very convenient to Tribeca
& Hudson River Park. $1.25M. Web #1118485. Susan Wires 646-613-2653
Brilliant Bing & Bing. West 12th. Savour mile-long southwest views from every
window of this perfectly renovated West Village 1BR. Prewar condo with a sunken
living rm & wood-burning fireplace. Pied-a-terre buyers welcome, as are their pets.
Low monthly charges. $1.995M. Web #1221135. J.Stockwell 646-613-2615
Welcome Home! Heart of Chelsea. West 22nd. Beautifully renovated single-
family townhouse. 4-5 bedrooms. 3 fireplaces. Double height living room. Chef’s
kitchen with top SS appliances. Wet bar. Wine Storage. Serene garden. Central
AC. This home has it all! $4.95M. Web #1061422. T.Garland 646-613-2626
Furnished W.Village 2BR/1.5 Bath Duplex. W 14th. Rare top flr S-facing
loft-like condo in 9 unit conv brownstone. Great rm w/15' ceils & o’sized windows.
S-facing terrace w/panoramic views. Renov kit w/top SS applis. Closets thru-out,
W/D, CAC. $10K per month rental. Web #1214909. J.Barbato 646-613-2633
Prime Soho. 1/5 Acre on Mercer. 9423 square feet gross. Largest simplex
loft downtown. 200' long. Widths from 35' to 70'. Brilliant light from east, west
and south. 12' ceilings. Two units combined, can sell separately. $8.45M. Web
#1175049. Siim Hanja 917-743-6786/Confidence Stimpson 917-991-9549
STRIBLING
A Privately Held Brokerage Firm
Distinguished Residences Worldwide
200 Offces and 48 Countries Globally
Is Now In Association With
28657 ObservMag May11.indd 1 4/26/11 10:58 AM
Untitled-25 1 4/29/11 2:20:20 PM
real estate
NYO
98 | may 2011
lack of inventory,” he said.
Richard Grossman, executive director of
downtown sales at Halstead Property, said
the lack of inventory in tandem with the right
pricing is key.
“There is a scarcity of properties and many
buyers,” he said. “Correctly-priced properties
are selling.”
The rapid pace of downtown real estate
transactions are causing many potential
downtowners to seek out brokers when fnding
a residence.
“Downtown Manhattan continues to be
the most desirable area of the city to live in,
hence the low vacancy and inventory rate,” said
Omari Toomer, senior associate salesperson
at Citi Habitats. “The lack of inventory and
high demand are making for an atmosphere
similar to three years ago. Both buyers and
renters seem to be getting frustrated with the
speed and intricacies of downtown [real estate]
transactions and seeking out professionals to
guide them through the process.”
William Matias, senior associate salesperson
at Citi Habitats, sees similar pressure to secure
a good place.
“Higher demand and lack of inventory have
renters signing leases before their current
leases expire in order to secure a good space,”
he said.
Corcoran Senior Associate and Salesperson
Bernice Leventhal puts it simply.
“Downtown real estate stands out because
not only do we have unique and charming
apartments, we also have limited inventory,
and what’s rare is desirable,” she said. “People
who live here don’t want to leave, and those who
don’t live here want to.”
When considering downtown, one has to
wonder—is the quintessential loft still the most
coveted of all the properties? The answer, in
short, is yes.
“Lofts are always the most coveted,”
Shagalov said.
Tom Doyle, senior vice president at Sotheby’s
International Realty, agreed.
“Buyers love the high ceilings, oversized
windows and original detailing of former
factories,” he said. “Lofts are hot as well as the
new ‘starchitect’ buildings on the West Side
Highway in the West Village and Chelsea.”
But lofts can sometimes only appeal to a
certain type of buyer, said Raphael De Niro,
managing director at Prudential Douglas
Elliman.
“Downtown, the loft apartment still reigns,”
he said. “It’s not for everyone, but many buyers
want those original details reminiscent of
downtown’s industrial past.”
But lofts don’t always make the cut.
“Traditional long, narrow lofts with only
front or rear exposures are not as popular as
other types of layouts with more square footage
and large living and common areas,” said Bill
Grant, vice president and director at Brown
Harris Stevens.
Confdence Stimpson and Siim Hanja, both
senior vice presidents at Stribling & Associ-
ates, would call it a draw between classic lofts
and high-rise luxury buildings in terms of
popularity.
“While the new and shiny condos are still
highly sought after, artist’s lofts in original or
close to original condition are becoming more
popular,” they said in a joint statement. “Many
people don’t want to live in a building where
everybody has the exact same layout, the same
kitchen, etc. Also, if you want privacy, you need
a full foor with an elevator opening directly
into the loft, and these are almost always in
smaller buildings.”
In terms of what downtown buyers want,
Shagalov named “open space and high ceilings”
as coveted features.
“Apartments with large living areas and
open kitchens in full-service buildings” attract
renters, Grant said.
Gavin said the most sought after features are
“light, charm or volume.”
And downtowners are no diferent in terms
of wants or needs.
“Space, light and a good price—like every-
one else,” said Daniel Hedaya, executive vice
president at Platinum Properties.
It all comes down to character, at least ac-
cording to Jefrey Wachtenheim of TDG / The
Real Estate Group.
“Lofts and townhouses [are popular,]”
he said. “Renovated prewars are always a >
166 Perry Street. Jackson Square.
“There is a real village or small-town feeling about many of the downtown areas
that buyers often cite as the reason they are buying in the area.”
NYO_MAG3_P96,100,102_RealEstateOverview.indd 98 4/29/11 3:52:27 PM