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Contents -2- 

Corporate Identity Manual


International House of Prayer, Kansas City
Edition III June 2008

Contents 

Introduction ....................................................................................................... 3

Objective ........................................................................................................... 4

Branding ............................................................................................................ 5

Logo ................................................................................................................. 7

Color ............................................................................................................... 15

Font ................................................................................................................. 19

Graphics Style ................................................................................................... 24

Type Style ........................................................................................................ 26

I. References to the Trinity .................................................... 28

II. Theological Events and Dispensations ..................................... 29

III. Locations ........................................................................ 29

IV. Entities .......................................................................... 30

V. Grammar ....................................................................... 31

VI. Punctuation .................................................................... 33

VII. Numbers ........................................................................ 38

VIII. Dates and Times ............................................................... 39

IX. Miscellaneous .................................................................. 40

Credits ............................................................................................................. 42
 Introduction

“Delivering consistency
in a changing environment.”

Our Guidelines

Welcome to the second edition of the Corporate Identity Manual. The following guidelines outline the elements that
make up the IHOP–KC visual identity kit of parts. This manual consists of logo, color, font and style.

All communication within and from IHOP–KC departments must adhere to these guidelines as our desire is to ensure
that the brand identity is delivered consistently across all media both to us and to the outside world.

All instances of the logo in various computer formats, MACINTOSH and PC versions of the font type Perpetua and a PDF
version of this booklet are all available on the CD at the back of this manual.
Objective 

Strengthening the Brand Identity


Our aim is to strengthen the International House of Prayer brand across our entire missions base and into the public sector
to build confidence and create consistency for our customers. There are many facets to the missions base and it is critical
that we present a united front. No department of IHOP–KC is separate from the vision of the International House of
Prayer. We are building one identity with multiple facets.

In order to remain consistent in communication it is important to ensure that everyone familiarize themselves with the
Manual and ensure it is used and adhered to in every piece of communication and design. This will bring cohesion and
cumulative recognition across all communication channels from advertising to literature, exhibition spaces, packaging,
TV and video.

If for your project or design you do not see here what you need or you would like to try something a little different,
please do not hesitate to contact the Marketing Department. We would be more than happy to sit down and discuss your
requirements.

Communication is important both internally and externally with our customers. We desire to grow a strong brand that
will be recognizable for many years to come.
 Branding

The Four Elements of the IHOP–KC Brand

Logo Color Font Style

1805

The flame and the altar: Pantone 1805: Red. Perpetua: traditional, Historical, timeless, age,
Two shapes, one theme. Now that the logo has been stylish and classic. depth, character.
For specifications and in ciculation for a few years, When it comes to The style we chose for
requirements, see Logo it has become apparaent branding products and IHOP–KC is to graphically
on page 7. that IHOP–KC is now communication pieces, portray all of the above.
defined by the color red. As Perpetua is the main font Prayer has been around for
the color pallette contains or typeface to be used. centuries. It is historical
only this one color (besides We are open to you using and timeless. It is deep and
black) we do not want you other fonts as part of your therefore carries a lot of
to be limited when it comes design. For a complete list weight. The image of wear
to designing your project. of other fonts to use, see and tear envokes a sense of
The Red is about brand and page 19. something long-lasting. For
should therefore be used more on graphic style, see
whenever the logo and page 24.
name is needed to identify
your project with IHOP–
KC. You may use any other
color for the rest of your
layout. For examples, see
page 15.

As we updated the Corporate Identity Manual in early 2007, it became apparent when talking with
many of the graphic design staff on the base that our style was becoming more defined in these four
areas. In order that our product and communications stay consistent, we would ask that whatever
your design project, you incorporate at least two of these four elements.


Logo
 Logo

Where Did It Come From? 1.

There were many graphic images that came to mind


when we thought about the International House of
Prayer and all that it stands for.The most obvious source
of ideas comes from the meaning of the word prayer.

Prayer is communication or dialogue with God.


Designing a logo that would communicate this seemed 2.
like a daunting task. A key vision statement of
IHOP–KC from Leviticus 6:12 also helped give further
ideas in the design process: “may the fire on the altar
never go out.”

In initial sketches we defined communication between


an individual or body, and God who listens and answers
(1). The two markers indicate a two way conversation:
prayer rising up and answers coming down.

Further sketches (2 and 3) turned the bowl into a


3.
definitive altar and the two-pronged flame (4) continues
the two sides of communication.

4.
Logo 

Different Ways to Display the Logo

As different media require different layouts, we have devised these different formats as ideas for how you can place the
logo with the International House of Prayer name. You can see the colors remain consistent so as to keep the corporate
brand strong and recognizable.

We are keen to communicate clearly not only with our logo symbol, but also in our name. When writing the name next
to the logo, either use International House of Prayer, International House of Prayer in Kansas City, or IHOP–KC with an
en dash (see page 33).

International House of Prayer

International House of Prayer in Kansas City

INTERNATIONAL
HOUSE OF PRAYER

IHOP–KC
10 Logo

Shapes Around the Logo

Over the years we have come to love the fire and altar logo in a circle.The illustrations below depict just how good it looks
in the circle and how bad it looks in any other shape.

RIGHT

WRONG
Logo 11

Exclusion Zone

The exclusion zone is how much space must be left around the logo when using it in printed media. The logo must always
be surrounded by an area that is entirely clear of any type or graphical devices. The minimum area is represented here by
the grey line that surrounds the logo.

In this example the exclusion zone around the entire logo is one quarter of an inch. Of course, this measurement will
change respectively as the logo is used at different sizes.

1/4 of an inch

Particularly when the logo is placed in a circle there should be ample breathing space between it and the edge of the
circle.

Right Wrong
12 Logo

Logotype Minimum Size

The minimum size for reproducing the International House of Prayer logo is a quarter of an inch or 7mm.
The measurement is from the base of the altar to the tip of the flame.

1/4 of an inch (7mm)

If you are reproducing the logo smaller than 1/2 an inch please place it in a red, grey or black solid circle. This will ensure
the logo does not get lost in the design of your document.

1/2 of an inch (12mm)


Logo 13

How Not to Use the Logo

These examples show inconsistent use of the logo. Altering the logo will undermine the impact of the identity and result
in the weakening of the brand.

1. Do not slant or italicize the logo.

2. Do not rotate the logo.

3. Do not change the color of the logo or apply a gradient.


You may only use solid colors: white, black or red.

4. Do not break the logo apart.


14 Logo

How Not to Use the Logo

5. Do not deface the logo.

6. Do not place the logo on backgrounds that make it hard


to read. If the background you are placing it on is too close
to red, we suggest placing the it in a red, grey or black solid
circle (see page 9).

7. Do not squash or compress the logo. When resizing always


keep the proportions of height and width the same.

8. Do not alter the shape of the logo.


15

Color
16 Color

The IHOP–KC Color Palette

The entire International House of Prayer logo is made up of the fire and the altar. The relationship between the two is
continuous, therefore one color should be is used for the whole. Never should more colors be added.

Brand Colors
Any other color may be used outside these three for your project, however, these are primary to build consistency.

Red Black White

PANTONE 1805 PANTONE 5855


#990000 #000000 #FFFFFF

Additional Brand Colors


Within black there are hundreds of shades of grey that may also be used. Here are four examples:

80% Black 60% Black 40% Black 20% Black

Project Colors
Using colors such as these given below for example, will increase consistency of the brand. These type of colors fit with
our key words: historical, timeless, age, depth, long lasting (see page 5).You are however not limited to these colors
only. Please check with the Marketing Department if you are unsure of which color to use for your project.

Brown Burgundy Olive Fawn

PANTONE 1405 PANTONE 188 ` PANTONE 3985 PANTONE 132


#663300 #663333 #999933 #996600

The colors printed here have neither been checked or approved by PANTONE, Inc as being accurate for the respective solid PANTONE Color.
PANTONE® is a registered trademark of Pantone Inc.
Color 17

The IHOP–KC Red

PANTONE 1805 is the definitive red across all media (with the exception of Web for which there is an alternative color
reference; see page 15). This unique variation is due to PANTONE 1805 appearing very dull on screen graphics, therefore
a brighter web version was chosen.

If you would like to use another color for the logo (in a background wallpaper for example; see fig. 1), please contact the
IHOP–KC Marketing Department.

WRONG RIGHT WRONG

Fig. 1
18 Color

Colorways
The full color logo should only be produced in Red PANTONE 1805, WHITE or BLACK.

(1) Use of COLOR logo on colored backgrounds or photography.


When printing a red logo on greyscale, make sure the background is either 100% black or no darker than 40% black.
When printing a white logo on red, make sure the red is always a solid 100% PANTONE 1805 (or #990000 for screen).
When printing the logo on a color photograph, make sure to place it in an area that is uncluttered and free of any text.
If the logo is placed on an image intense background, place it inside a circle (see page 9).

(2) Use of BLACK & WHITE logo in grayscale printing.


When printing a black logo, make sure the background is no darker than 40% black.
When printing a white logo, make sure the background is no lighter than 40% black.
19

Font
20 Font

An Overview

There are three fonts to choose from when designing for IHOP–KC print and screen. Perpetua is our main font, Gill Sans
and Helvetica Neue Bold Condensed are additional. Below and on the next two pages are some examples of how these
fonts look in their various applications.

PASSION
Perpetua Gill Sans Helvetica Neue Bold Condensed

FOR JESUS
Some Examples in Print
MARCH 6-8, 2008
KANSAS CITY, MO SESSION I
June 14-28

Mike Bickle lou engle FASCINATE 08


June 26-28
SESSION II
and iHoP–kc l eadersHiP June 30-July 12
SESSION III*
TEACHING TRACKS July 14-20
Treasures from Song of Solomon The Revelation of the Emotions of God The End Times
Prophetic and Healing Luke18 Project: Revival Prayer on Campuses
with Children and Teen Equipping Tracks

AN INTERNATIONAL HOUSE OF PRAYER, KANSAS CITY NATIONAL CONFERENCE

It is good that we are dissatisfied with lukewarm, “business as usual” Christianity.


go to IHOP Revival is comingfor more info or to download the application
.org/atc
to the Body of Christ in our nation. Jesus prophesied that God’s people would love God with
all their heart and strength (Matthew 22:37). Jesus referred to this as “the first commandment”
because it is the commandment that is God’s first priority. Thus, the Holy Spirit will restore the
first commandment to first place in the Church before the Lord returns. It is our inheritance to be
Pretty much any typeface looks good in print as long as it is big. We don’t recommend you use Helvetica Neue Condensed
empowered to love God with all our heart. God reveals His affections to us as the way to enable
Bold as body text. This typeface does not look good when small and there’s lots of it. When writing captions or very small
us to give our affections
textback to Him. reversed
(particularly This is the
outway to please
text), pursueuse
theGill
deep
Sansthings of or
Regular God’s heart
Bold. This will help readability.
(1 Corinthians 2:10-12).This conference is for those who desire to understand the passion that God
has for them, and in turn, live with passion for Jesus. August 8-16
LEAD THE CHARGE FROM KC TO DC AND BE A PART
register at IHOP.org/passionforjesus
OF THECALL DC. Go to IHOP.org/atc for more info.
AGES 16-25 HALF PRICE * SESSION III is a singer/musician intensive
Font 21

An Example in Web

When designing for web we reccomend using any of the three fonts opposite (again particularly using san serif fonts when
type is small) but for body type please use Verdana (shown below left). Standardizing fonts like this will help the viewer
when viewing a lot of pages on the site.

Verdana Regular
Verdana Italic
Verdana Bold
Verdana Bold Italic
22 Font

Some Examples in TV

When designing for the screen we reccomend using any of the fonts if they are reproduced in large format but only the san serif
fonts Gill and Helvetica if reproduced small. As with web the serif fonts are more difficult to read particularly in animations
where text is sometimes moving. Below are two examples of screen graphics from a recent Conference promotion.

Mike Bickle
Passion for Jesus Conference, IHOP–KC
23

Graphic Style
24 Style

The IHOP–KC Style


This page demonstrates a sample of the International House of Prayer design style. It is a style that looks aged and worn
but that gives a sense of deep historic roots and strong spiritual history. The traditional typeface style Perpetua is used
across all media as the main font. Notice on the yellow design the logo is solid red ensuring clear representation of the
brand. Some might say the style is too old, that contemporary style is clean and minimal, but this is not neccesarily true.
The advent of mixed media and grunge design has become very popular to date. More importantly, the style, whether
outdated or not, is not the question. It is important how close we can remain true to the style, in order that consistency
might build a sure foundation on which the public recognizes IHOP–KC well into the future.
25

Type Style
26 Style — Type

Simplicity, Excellence and Consistency

Lack of clarity is the primary hurdle when presenting the IHOP–KC message. The overarching goal of this section is to
bring clarity to the IHOP–KC message when writing copy. The secondary goal is to present a single, unified public face
from IHOP–KC to the world.

These goals are accomplished through simplicity, excellence and consistency in writing. This will ensure that the general
public understands the mission, vision and values of the International House of Prayer in Kansas City. Adhering to these
type style guidelines across the entire missions base in every public document is a primary step toward accomplishing
these goals.

With this big picture as our goal, each IHOP–KC writer, editor and designer is invited to reach for a level of unified
professionalism only available as we uphold the IHOP–KC Style Guidelines together in every public document across the
entire missions base.

I. References to the Trinity .................................................... 28

II. Theological Events and Dispensations ..................................... 29

III. Locations ........................................................................ 29

IV. Entities .......................................................................... 30

V. Grammar ....................................................................... 31

VI. Punctuation .................................................................... 33

VII. Numbers ........................................................................ 38

VIII. Dates and Times ............................................................... 39

IX. Miscellaneous .................................................................. 40


Style — Type 27

I. References to the Trinity


A. Personal pronouns
1. Always capitalized
a. He, Himself, His, Them, They, Thou, Thee, Thine,You,Your,Yours, etc.
B. Modifiers
1. Capitalized when directly referring to deity
a. Ex: Martha didn’t know Who was in her house.
b. Ex: Mary fell in love with this One.
C. Titles
1. Capitalized, except for adjective/adverb
a. Savior, passionate Bridegroom, righteous Judge, Son of Man, King of kings, the Word, the Light of the World.
2. Same rules apply for poetic or not-yet-mainstream titles, as long as they directly refer to deity
a. The divine One, the Divine.
3. When using the Old Testament term “LORD”, it is written in small caps
D. Verse quotations
1. Above rules do not apply to biblical quotes
a. Many newer Bibles, like the newest versions of the NKJV, are capitalizing overt references to deity, however
some Bibles don’t capitalize personal pronouns of God yet. Since it is a quote, we must quote it exactly as it
appears
i. A quote is a quote is a quote is a quote; we must quote it exactly, even if we disagree with their
capitalization decisions
28 Style — Type

II. Theological Events and Dispensations


A. Due to the religious and theological nature of all IHOP–KC content, the following events and
dispensations are capitalized when referred to as proper nouns (chronological demarcations in which
theological history creates natural history)
1. Creation
2. Fall
a. the Fall
b. the Fall of man, mankind, humankind
3. Flood
a. Hint: as a general rule, if the event is preceded by the word the, it probably falls under this rule referencing a
specific timeframe; if it is preceded by the word a, it is probably a generic term and would not be capitalized
i. Ex: Jesus carried a cross (or, His cross) up a hill. The Crucifixion is the highest act of love and
justice.

III. Locations
A. Capitalized when directly referring to an actual location
1. Exs:
a. Lakeland, FL or Lakeland, Florida
b. Paris, France
c. Heaven — it’s a real place with a real King
i. Caps unless referred to in a general or poetic/symbolic sense
- ex: The sparrow flew up to the heavens and disappeared into the azure expanse.
- ex: I died and went to Heaven.
e. Earth — a proper noun, just like Mars and Jupiter
i. Caps unless referred to in a general sense, or as “soil, terra firma”
f. Hell — caps when referring to the real location of eternal torment
g. Kingdom of God — it’s a real place with a real King and a real government in the spiritual realm
Style — Type 29

IV. Entities
A. The Church
1. Caps when referring to the worldwide Body of Christ as a whole
2. Lowercase when referring to some church you could walk into, unless it’s in a title, i.e. Bayview Christian Church
B. The Bride
1. Caps when referring to the worldwide Body of Christ as a whole or the eternal spiritual identity of a redeemed
person
2. Lowercase when referring to a human bride and groom
a. Ex: Just as a bride and bridegroom embrace each other here on Earth, the eternal Bridegroom will embrace
His Bride in the age to come.
b. Ex: I must come to understand that I am Jesus’ Bride.
3. Do not capitalize believers, saints, redeemed, family of God
C. Body of Christ
1. Capitalize “B” and “C” when referring to the worldwide Body of Christ as a whole
D. The One Thing Internship and “the one thing needed”
1. The One Thing six month internship program is two words with the “O” and “T” capitalized
2. When used in the context of “the one thing necessary, passion for Jesus Himself,” it is two words as would commonly
be written
E. NightWatch is a combined word with two capital letters
F. There are three ways to refer to IHOP-KC:
1. Written word for word: International House of Prayer, Kansas City, Missouri (or MO)
2. Written as “IHOP–KC” after using #1 above to distinguish it from other houses of prayer
G. The other acronyms are ours specifically and can be referenced once they are initially explained
1. GBF, FSM, EGS, FMA, FCF, CEC, JoCo, etc.
2. When writing a web article, if in doubt, always link the word to the IHOP–KC Glossary on the website
3. http://www.IHOP.org/Publisher/Article.aspx?id=26446
30 Style — Type

V. Grammar
A. End Times and end-time
1. When used as a noun (speaking of the final epoch of history), it is not hyphenated and the “E” and “T” are capitalized.
The logic is parallel to referencing the Middle Ages or the Dark Ages
a. Ex: The End Times refers to the final decades of human history. The Church will be triumphant in the End
Times. Jesus will come back to Earth right after the End Times.
b. Ex: Many of the end-time prophecies can be found in the book of Joel. When we look at God’s end-time
strategy, it seems like a re-hash of the stoic Old Covenant God
2. When used as an adjective (describing), it is hyphenated but not capitalized
a. Ex: Everyone plays a part in the end-time purposes of God, whether they like it or not. When we look at
God’s end-time strategy, it seems like a re-hash of the mean Old Covenant God.
3. Overall hint: if it ends in “S”, it is probably a noun and will be capitalized; otherwise it will probably not be capitalized
B. Do not use the words “that” and “of ” unless they are grammatically correct as well as absolutely
necessary; they are a writer’s crutch ... it will help you stretch more as a writer when you express an
idea using precise words
C. Do not use contractions when you want to make a strong point; verbal strength is felt in complete
words
D. If you want to make a strong point in a sentence, place it first in the sentence structure
1. Strong example: Lack of clarity is the primary hurdle when presenting the Forerunner Message.
2. Weak example: The primary hurdle when presenting the Forerunner Message is the lack of clarity.
E. Do not use the term “and/or” in text; choose one or the other
F. Always use “who” to modify people; use “that” for almost everything else
1. CORRECT — There are those who believe in a triune God.
2. WRONG — There are those that believe in a triune God.
G. Limit the use of Christianese/IHOPese until the terms are introduced and explained
1. Write for your audience; know your demographic thoroughly
2. When writing a web article, if in doubt, always link the word to the IHOP-KC Glossary on the website
3. http://www.IHOP.org/Group/Group.aspx?id=1000004152
H. Avoid ending sentences with prepositional phrases if possible
I. Avoid using clichés if possible
1. If you must use them, state them as fact rather than as a cliché phrase in quotes
a. Ex: We have all heard that it takes God to love God.
J. Who and whom
1. If you can figure this out, use who in all subjective case situations. Use whom only when it immediately follows a verb
or preposition; be especially careful about using whom where it clearly does not belong
K. “Forerunner Ministry” is capitalized
L. “Bridal Paradigm” is capitalized
M. “Harp and (no ampersand symbol—&) Bowl Model” is capitalized
N. The words “prayer room”, “healing room” and “intercessory missionary” are always lowercase
Style — Type 31

V. Grammar (continued)
O. The words “missions base” and “house(s) of prayer” are lowercase unless used within the full title
“International House of Prayer (or IHOP–KC) Missions Base”
1. Ex: We desire to raise up and send teams to plant churches and houses of prayer throughout the nations in conjunction
with various missions bases.
P. Initialized names
1. No spaces in between the initials
a. CORRECT — The great C.S. Lewis had a personal and professional relationship with J.R.R. Tolkien.
b. WRONG — The great C. S. Lewis had a personal and professional relationship with J. R. R. Tolkien.
Q. Media is written this way:
1. DVD and DVDs
2. CD and CDs
3. MP3 and MP3s
4. MP4 and MP4s
5. PDF and PDFs
6. DOC and DOCs
R. Use “less than” arrows to show cascading website directions
1. Instead of writing: …scroll over the “Media” button in the top drop down menu, then scroll over “Watch” and click on
“Prayer Room Webstream Signup”…
2. Write it the following way: Media >> Watch >> Prayer Room Webstream Signup
32 Style — Type

VI. Punctuation
A. Comma use
1. In a string of items, do not put a comma before the and
2. Exceptions: there are times to put a comma before the and
a. When it will bring definitive clarity to the sentence
b. When the intention is to cause the reader to pause mentally or verbally before continuing; when the reader
should take a “breath” in their reading
c.When emphasis needs to be placed on a certain part of the sentence and the best way to do that is with a comma
d. When separating two halves of a sentence containing two strings, the editor can choose if the comma is needed
3. This type of comma use is becoming increasingly common; when in doubt, take it out
B. Ellipses […]
1. Ellipses replace whatever they stand in for: all words and punctuation; there is no need to put in the punctuation that
ellipses replace
a. Meaning, if the ellipses end a sentence, do not put in a fourth dot (the closing punctuation). Simply start the
next sentence with a capital letter after a space. This will usually only happen in Scripture quotations
i. Ex: There was once a young fellow who loved everything yellow … Do you have a favorite color?
ii. Ex: Surely He took up our infirmities and carried our sorrows … But He was pierced for our
transgressions, He was crushed for our iniquities; the punishment that brought us peace was upon
Him, and by His wounds we are healed. (Isaiah 53:4–5)
2. Correct way to use ellipses: space before and after
a. Ex: He thought to himself … for a long time.
3. For two sentences separated by ellipses, where the ellipses complete the thought of the first sentence and the second
portion is the start of the second sentence, capitalize the second portion. This is common in block quotes of Scripture, but
you will not encounter this often in normal writing
a. Ex: And Jesus said to them, “…But the days will come when the Bridegroom will be taken away from them,
and then they will fast.”
4. The only exception is when an ellipses begins or ends a paragraph
a. No spaces
i. Ex: …And they all lived happily ever after. Sure, that’s what we’ve been told, but my life seems
different.
5. The shortcut for ellipses is ALT + semicolon on Macs
C. Do not use symbols in text
1. Ampersand symbol — &
2. Octotroph symbol — #
3. Percent Symbol — %
4. This applies to writers and editors dealing with text, not to graphics
Style — Type 33

VI. Punctuation (continued)


D. Phrase in quotes ending a sentence
1. If the punctuation is part of the phrase, end quotes go outside the closing punctuation
2. If the punctuation is NOT part of the phrase, the end quotes go inside the closing punctuation
a. Ex: Do you know what it means to “love the Lord utterly”?
3. If there is any question/concern, simply rephrase the sentence to avoid the situation; clarity and simplicity is the goal
E. Hyphens and dashes
1. There are two types of dashes and one hyphen: the hyphen (-), en dash (–) and em dash (—); the en dash is the width
of an N within the font you are using; the em dash is the width of a capital M within the font you are using. They each have
very specific uses.
2. Hyphen keystroke: -
a. The hyphen is used for compound words like “first-place”
3. En dash Mac keystroke: OPTION (or ALT) + -
a. The en dash is used to indicate every kind of duration (time, date, length, etc.) and is generally used as a
substitute for the words to or through
i. Ex: Enoch lived from 1700 BC–1600 BC and is still Egypt’s most wanted.
ii. Ex: All children ages 3–10 may attend.
iii. Ex: Isaiah 53:4–5
b. En dash is also used in a compound adjective when one of the items is two words or a hyphenated word
i. Ex: The Internet café was filled with the
over–sixty-five crowd.
ii. Ex: She took the New York–London plane to be at the opening of the post–Vietnam War
presentation.
4. Em dash Mac keystroke: OPTION (or ALT) + SHIFT + -
a. Used to show a sudden change in direction or to emphasize information with an almost-shout; parentheses
accomplish the same goal but seem like an aside or a whisper
i. Notice the difference:
- ex: Everyone says she’s a liar—but not me.
- ex: Everyone says she’s a liar (but not me).
b. Always limit using them. One on every page is too much; one every other page is probably fine, but may still
be excessive
c. Improper placement: space before and after em dash
i. Ex: “I would like to say — and let me be perfectly clear — that Jesus is fully God and fully human.”
d. Proper placement: no space before or after em dash
i. Ex: “I would like to say—and let me be perfectly clear—that Jesus is fully God and fully human.”
34 Style — Type

VI. Punctuation (continued)


5. HTML codes:
a. Em dash: —
i. This is useful when writing or editing an Article in WebOffice. Click on SOURCE, then find where
you want the em dash to go, then type it in like this: “I would like to say—and let me be
perfectly clear—that Jesus is fully God and fully human.”
ii. Make sure not to put any spaces around the em dash code unless you actually want them to show
up in the published document
b. En dash: –
F. Limit the use of exclamation points at all
1. All professional websites shy away from exclamations
2. If you absolutely must use them, only use one
G. Limit the use of parenthetical sentences as much as possible; it adds to confusion and may be supplying
more information than necessary
1. For example, if it can’t be said without parentheses, it might be unnecessary to say; using parentheses tends to muddy
the information and cause a lack of focus
H. Brackets
1. Used to clarify by adding a word or phrase not in the original version
a. Ex: And when [Jesus] had come into the house, the blind men came to Him.
i. The bracketed term replaced the word “He” for the sake of clarity
I. Match quotation marks to the font style; running a “Find and Replace” for all quotes and apostrophes
is an easy way to correct them
1. Hint: all pasted scriptures (from Biblegateway, e-Sword, Mac-Sword, etc.) will have to be corrected
J. Do not put two spaces after closing punctuation
1. Two spaces after closing punctuation was proper for typewriters and e-mails back when computers were just becoming
popular
2. One space is the standard in online and printed resources
K. Take out extra spaces at the end of each paragraph
L. Line (block) justify so the words stretch the length of the line completely
M. Do not indent paragraphs in public IHOP–KC documents
1. This does not include personal e-mails, personal support letters, etc.
Style — Type 35

VI. Punctuation (continued)


N. Scripture sections [for books, some of this comes down to style decisions that are part of the overall
look and feel of the book; the layout designer should take the lead on this]
1. Within a sentence:
a. Reference after the verse, in parentheses, after the quotes, no spaces; the verse reference itself is not part of
the passage, that is why it is not included within the quotation marks
- ex: ... they will become one flesh” (Genesis 2:24).
2. Formatting block quotations of Scripture:
a. Separate it with a paragraph break and indent the entire block
b. The left and right indents should both be o.5
c. Do not put it in a smaller font
i.You may choose to use a different font style, but this is not necessary
d. Do not italicize the block quotation; italicizing within blocks of Scripture is reserved for emphasis only (see
section f. below)
e. Don’t put quotes on it at all until someone starts talking within the block. The reader already knows it is a
direct quote, especially if you separate it in these various ways and give the reference following
f. When emphasizing a word or phrase within the block, italicize the emphasized portion and write “emphasis
added” after the verse reference
i. Ex: Surely He took up our infirmities and carried our sorrows, yet we considered Him stricken
by God, smitten by Him, and afflicted. But He was pierced for our transgressions, He was crushed
for our iniquities; the punishment that brought us peace was upon Him, and by His wounds we are
healed. (Isaiah 53:4–5, NASB, emphasis added)
3. Scripture references
a. Can be accomplished in one of two basic ways, but use only one way per manuscript
i. After closing punctuation and a space, in parentheses, same line
ii. Line below the block quotation, long dash and space before, and then choose to center, right align
or left align the Scripture reference; each alignment will give a different “feel” (this version was
created to avoid unnecessary, advanced or difficult punctuation issues)
— Isaiah 53:4–5 or — Isaiah 53:4–5 or — Isaiah 53:4–5
iii. If using one version of the Bible for an entire manuscript, version abbreviation is not needed.
However, when using a different version of the Bible than the rest of the manuscript, add a comma
and give the version in caps after the reference. NKJV is the default version for IHOP
- ex: (Isaiah 53:4–5, NASB)
- ex: — Isaiah 53:4–5, NASB
36 Style — Type

VI. Punctuation (continued)


O. For multiple Scripture references, separate with a semi-colon unless it is within the same book
1. Noah 4:17; 2 Macabees 6:66; Revelation 23:4–24:8, 25:13, 28:47).
2.You can also use the word “and” before the last reference within the same book
a. Noah 4:17; 2 Macabees 6:66; Revelation 23:4–24:8, 25:13 and 28:47).
P. In books, do not underline or put words in bold for emphasis; it’s cheesy and B-rated … it looks like
we’re self-publishing in the ’80s
1. Stick with italics, use word cues or rephrase the sentence
Q. For web, italics are preferred for emphasis and bold is okay (though it is mostly used for article
headings), but do not underline. Underline is reserved for hyperlinked text
R. To place an accent over an E, the HTML code is:
1. é
a. The E following the & symbol is the E within the word
2. In WebOffice the sentence will be written like this: I have been asked to be Jesus’ protégé.
3. The sentence will appear like this: I have been asked to be Jesus’ protégé.
Style — Type 37

VII. Numbers
A. Write numbers from one through one hundred in word form
B. Beyond one hundred, “involved numbers” can be written numerically (288, 357, 1379, 5723, etc.), while
“round numbers” can be spelled out in word form (fifty, ten, five, three hundred, eight thousand, etc.)
1. Ex: David paid 288 musicians and four thousand singers to worship around the Ark seven days a week
2. When writing out numbers, the word ending in –ty is hyphenated
a. Ex: twenty-two, four hundred sixty-three, etc.
3. Scripture references are always written numerically, regardless where they appear
a. Ex: In John 3, Nicodemus runs a covert operation code-named “Late Night with J.C. and the Heavenly
Band.”
b. Ex: 2 Samuel instead of II Samuel
4. If a number begins a sentence, spell it out unless it is a year
5. The World Wars are written in all caps with Roman Numerals
a. Ex: WWI, WWII
C. Simple fractions are spelled out.When, as in the first examples below, a fraction is considered a single
quantity, it is hyphenated. When, less commonly, individual parts of a quantity are in question, as in the
second example, the fraction is spelled open
1. Ex 1: She has read three-quarters of the book …
2. Ex 2: We cut the cake into four quarters; John took three quarters, and Susan took one.
38 Style — Type

VIII. Dates and Times


A. For absolute clarity within the US as well as internationally, dates should have the month written
out as follows:
1. Correct: 12 Dec 2009, or 12 December 2009, or Dec 12, 2009
2. Wrong: 12.12.2009 or 12/12/2009
3. Note: only put –st, –rd, –nd and –th on dates in the following two instances
a. 21st of January
b. January 24th — without including the year
B. When abbreviating a four digit year (1980), a backwards apostrophe takes the place of “19” and it
does not contain a possessive apostrophe at the end
1. Ex: I am part of the class of ’08.
C. AD and BC are written either in small caps with no spaces (preferred) or in caps with no spaces
(secondary). BC comes after the year, while AD is placed before the year.
1. Ex: Atlantis was successfully invaded in 55 BC and AD 1066.
D. Time signatures immediately follow the digit and are written either in small caps with no spaces
(preferred) or in caps with no spaces (secondary)
1. Ex: I got up today sometime between 10PM and 4PM.
2. Take out the “:00” after the main integer; it is unnecessary
E. For the sake of clarity, twelve PM is referred to as “noon”, while twelve AM is called “midnight”
Style — Type 39

IX. Miscellaneous
A. Omit needless words; give meat, not fluff
B. The Ten Commandments, the First Commandment, the Great Commission and the like are
capitalized
C. Spell out all Scripture references; no abbreviations
1. One exception: Song of Songs can be abbreviated to “Song”
D. Psalm vs. Psalms
1. “Psalm” refers to a single verse or a single chapter
2. “Psalms” refers to the entire book or two or more collective chapters
E. Revelation vs. Revelations
1. “Revelation” is the book of the Bible
2. “Revelations” is not
F. IHOP–KC’s default version of the Bible is the New King James Version (NKJV); reference is not
necessary unless using a different version
G. Technical note for web articles: articles should have only one point/concept to get across. If an
article has more than one point, break it up into several articles. The reader needs one nugget of truth
to meditate on; giving them too much may cause them to not meditate on it at all
H. For fonts, it is generally best to use sans serifs for headings and serifs for the body
1. High Tower, Didot and Baskerville are serif fonts; they have a short decorative line at the start or finish of a stroke in a
letter
2. Arial, Lucida Grande and Verdana are sans serif fonts; they have no fine lines (serifs) at the ends of the main strokes of
the characters
3. Do not use closing punctuation for headings
I. For articles, keep the same voice throughout: first-person, third-person, past, present, etc.
1. For articles, it is best to write with one person in mind since only one person will be reading the article at a time; make
it personal and applicable by using words like you, your, I, me and my
2. When speaking in public, it is best to phrase things as if there are 1,000 listeners; make it universal and include yourself
in examples by using words like we, our and us
J. It’s 24/7, not 24-7
K. It’s God-Man (both capital letters and hyphenated), not God-man
L. It’s Millennial, not Milennial
M. It’s the Gospel, not the gospel
N. It’s Nazirite, not Nazarite
1. This spelling is based on the Hebrew word for consecrate: nazir
O. It’s Bible, not bible
P. It’s biblical, not Biblical
1. Ex: Back in biblical times, it was appropriate to smite someone. No, no, that theory is plainly not biblical.
Q. It’s email, not e-mail
1. On the website, email addresses are bold (and underlined when hyperlinked)
40 Style — Type

IX. Miscellaneous (continued)


R. It’s webstream (or webstreaming), not web stream
S. Both terms “Internet” and “Web” are capitalized, but “website” is not
T. For website articles, add two or three extra lines at the bottom of the page to give a clean look
without making it look chopped off
U. For street addresses, add an extra space before zip code
V. To denote US currency for international audiences, use “US$”
1. Ex: US domestic shipping and handling is $3, US$4 for Canadian addresses, US$6 for international.
W. Bullet points never have closing punctuation; outlines can have closing punctuation, but only for
the sake of clarity
X. Larger works are italicized, smaller works are put in quotes
1. Album, book, movie and TV show titles are italicized
a. If the context is already in italics, it is to be un-italicized to differentiate it in the same way it would be
differentiated if it were normal
i. Ex: Editor’s note: if you enjoyed the CD Scream It IfYou Believe It, be sure to check out the companion
book by Father Mousy McVowsky, Vows of SilenceWere Meant to be Broken.
- in an italicized sentence, all punctuation is italicized unless it is part of the book or album title
- in a regular sentence, punctuation is not italicized unless it is part of the book or CD title
2. Song and poem titles are put in quotes
Y. All phone numbers are written with dots/periods, not parentheses or dashes
1. Ex: 816.763.0777, not (816)763-0777 or 816–763–0777
2. Extensions are written as “X.”
a. Ex: For more information call 816.763.0777 X. 777
Z. The website is written with capital letters for our name, but without the www.
1. Ex: Visit our website at IHOP.org.
Credits 41

IHOP–KC Marketing ............................................................................. Tracey Sliker

Brand Design and Management .......................................................... Tom Morse-Brown

Style Guide Design and Layout ............................................................ Tom Morse-Brown

Type Style Content and Administration .................................. Joshua Farmer/Hannah Kasper

Creative Team ...................... Tom Morse-Brown


Seth Parks
Joshua Inkenbrandt
Jane Chao
Jono Hall
Matt Dickey
Angel Soto
Randy Bohlender
Tami Singer
Shawn Blanc
Joseph Taylor
Tammy Knatcal

All queries regarding the IHOP–KC Style Guide should be directed to:
IHOP–KC Marketing Department 816.763.0200 X. 2531 marketing@ihop.org
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