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HARRISBURG– Twelve Luzerne County munic-
ipalities will cash in on more than $12 million in
state revenue raised by the Mohegan Sun at Pocono
Downs casino in Plains Township.
The Commonwealth Financing Authority on
Thursday approved grant funding for 13 projects in
the county totaling more than
$12 million from the local
share assessment account, a
state fund to reinvest revenue
from Pennsylvania’s casinos
into surrounding municipal-
ities.
Funds for grants in Luzerne
County came from revenue generated by Mohegan
Sun, the county’s only casino, inPlains Township. A
total of 61 applications totaling more than $60 mil-
lion in funding were submitted this grant cycle,
making the odds of winning a casino-money grant
one in five.
Wilkes-Barre was the only municipality in the
countyawardedtwogrants, andwas alsothe overall
largest funding recipient with $2.75 million.
The city was awarded$706,044tocontinue resto-
ration work on the First National Bank building at
59-63 Public Square, which has been vacant since
GAMBL I NG F UNDS
12 towns
big casino
winners
Grant funding approved for 13 projects in the
county totaling more than $12 million.
By MATT HUGHES
mhughes@timesleader.com
First reported at
11:55
a.m.
timesleader.com
PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER
Mohegan Sun blackjack dealer Amy Johns of
Clarks Summit reacts to a casino patron hitting
21 at the blackjack table on Dec. 2.
See CASINO, Page 14A
NEW YORK — Solemnly
honoring victims of the Sept.
11 terror attacks, President
Barack Obama hugged survi-
vors, thanked the heroes of
one of the nation’s darkest
days and declared Thursday
that the killing of Osama bin
Laden after
all these
years was an
American
message to
the world:
“When we
say we will
never forget,
we mean
what we say.”
On a bril-
liant blue-sky
day, one of re-
flection more
than celebra-
tion, Obama offered New
Yorkers a moment of their
own. Standing at the gritty
construction site of ground
zero, where the towers fell
and a memorial now rises,
the president laid a wreath of
red, white and blue flowers
for the nearly 3,000 who died
as he marked a turning point
for the nation and this city of
steely resilience.
For Obama, the day was
about the importance of be-
ing in New York in the after-
math of the successful raid to
findandkill binLaden, the al-
Qaida leader. Obama ad-
dressed families who have
watched and wondered for
nearly a decade whether the
government would track
down its most infamous ene-
my.
On this special ground,
Obama never mentioned bin
Laden’s name.
"WHEN WE SAY we will never
forget, we mean what we say."
President Obama
Obama’s NYC visit solemn not celebratory
AP PHOTO
President Barack Obama prepares to lay a wreath Thursday at the National Sept. 11 Memorial at ground zero in New
York.
See OBAMA, Page 6A
President visits ground
zero after U.S. raid that
killed Osama bin Laden.
By BEN FELLER
AP White House Correspondent
The presi-
dent also
peppered
his brief
comments
with re-
minders of
the chal-
lenges
ahead.
WASHINGTON—TheAmericans
who raided Osama bin Laden’s lair
met far less resistance than the Oba-
maadministrationdescribedintheaf-
termath. The commandos encoun-
tered gunshots from only one man,
whom they quickly killed, before
sweepingthehouseandshootingoth-
ers, who were unarmed, a senior de-
fense official said in the latest ac-
count.
In Thursday’s revised telling, the
Navy SEALs mounted a precision,
floor-by-floor operation to find the al-
Qaidaleaderandhisprotectors—but
without the prolonged and intense
firefight that officials had described
for several days.
By any measure, the raid was
fraught with risk, sensationally bold
and a historic success, netting a man
who had been on the run for nearly a
decadeafterhisterroristorganization
pulled off the devastating attacks of
Sept. 11, 2001. Even so, in the ad-
New version of raid recounts far less resistance
See RAID, Page 6A AP PHOTO
Pakistani men on
Thursday look at
the house where
al-Qaida leader
Osama bin Laden
was caught and
killed in Abbotta-
bad. The town’s
residents were
confused and sus-
picious about the
killing of bin Laden,
which took place
Monday.
By ROBERT BURNS
and PAULINE JELINEK
Associated Press
INSIDE
A NEWS: Local 3A
Obituaries 8A
Birthdays 12A
Editorial 13A
B SPORTS: Scoreboard 2B
Baseball 3B
Business 8B
Stocks 9B
C CLASSIFIED: Funnies 12C
THE GUIDE
Entertainment/Movies
TV/Crossword
WEATHER
Millie Symbula
Mostly sunny.
High 68. Low 37.
Details, Page 10B
DALLAS TWP. – Chief Gather-
ing LLC has filed plans “under
protest” for a portion of its
Wyoming County Pipeline Pro-
ject with township officials be-
cause attorneys for the company
believe land devel-
opment and zoning
approvals aren’t re-
quired.
The proposed
6.25-mile, 24-inch
pipeline would
start at the border
of Wyoming and Luzerne coun-
ties, cross state Route 309 and
zigzag throughout 23 properties
in a southeast direction, where it
would tap into the Williams-own-
ed Transco interstate pipeline
near the Dallas School District
campus. The company also is
proposing a natural gas metering
station.
The project would have a 100-
foot right-of-way for construction
purposes that would last be-
tween two and three months.
Ted Wurfel, vice president of
environmental, safetyandregula-
tory affairs for Chief, said the
complete pipeline is “approxi-
mately 30 miles,” but he could
not release any more details
about the project.
A letter sent to township offi-
cials written by Chief attorney
Kenneth Komoroski states Chief
takes the position the company
“does not need local zoning, sub-
division, and/or land develop-
ment approval or review” to pro-
ceed with its plans for the pipe-
line project.
He also said Chief has never
had to apply for land develop-
ment in any other municipality
for a pipeline.
He argues the Pennsylvania
Municipal Planning Code does
Pipeline plans filed under protest
Chief Gathering lays out plans
in Dallas Twp. but says local
approvals not needed.
By SARAH HITE
shite@timesleader.com
See PIPELINE, Page 14A
WILKES-BARRE – Longtime
local engineer Michael J. Pason-
ick is no longer a principal own-
er of one of the architectural
and engineering firms he found-
ed 35 years ago, according to a
letter to Exeter Borough Coun-
cil.
Michael L.
Amato of Michael
J. Pasonick Jr. Inc.
wrote to council
on April 21 to ad-
vise members
that Amato and
three other men had become
the principals of the firm as of
January 2011.
The letter was written two
days after Michael Pasonick
signed a plea agreement with
the U.S. Attorney’s Office relat-
ing to his payment of a more
than $1,000 bribe to a Luzerne
County school board member.
Pasonick,
69, was offi-
cially charged
with the crime
in a complaint
filed Wednes-
day. Prosecu-
tors say Pa-
sonick paid
the money to reward the school
board member, who is not iden-
tified, for supporting the nam-
ing of Pasonick as the district’s
engineer and the architect for a
new school the district was
planning to build.
In the letter to Exeter, Amato
described the change as a “cor-
porate restructuring.” He iden-
tified himself and Daryl Paw-
lush, Andrew Pasonick and
Paul Pasonick as the new prin-
cipals.
“With geographic growth and
diversification of services in all
facets of our corporate family, it
is important that we have a cor-
porate structure in place that
supports the future direction of
our company and industry,”
Amato wrote. “We assure you
Pasonick no longer key owner
in engineering firm he started
The business makes the
announcement days after a
plea agreement.
By TERRIE MORGAN-BESECKER
tmorgan@timesleader.com
Pasonick
See PASONICK, Page 14A
K
PAGE 2A FRIDAY, MAY 6, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Chiampi, Patricia
Claudio, Samantha
Goryeb, Emil
Gross, Billie
Harding, Arthur
Kohan, Peter Jr.
Kozlowski, Eugene Jr.
Rolland, Thomas
Shelley, Douglas
Sims, Clarissa
Thomas, Fannie
Twyman, Anthony
Youngblood, Joseph
OBITUARIES
Page 8A
A PAGE1A STORY in Thurs-
day’s editions of The Times
Leader about tax relief in-
correctly named the Luzerne
County school district with
the highest per-property tax
relief. Eligible homeowners in
Wilkes-Barre Area School
District will see the biggest
savings per property. Informa-
tion in an accompanying chart
was accurate.
A STORY THAT APPEARED
on Page 8B in Thursday’s
editions of The Times Leader
misstated that Jack McHale
had an ownership at one time
in Two Jacks Cycle & Power-
sports in Wilkes-Barre.
A STORY ON PAGE 7A
Thursday regarding a $2.2
million award to salespersons
for Split Rock resort con-
tained the wrong first name
for the attorney for the plain-
tiffs. The attorney is Mark
Kearney of the Elliot Green-
leaf law firm in Blue Bell.
BUILDING
TRUST
The Times Leader strives to
correct errors, clarify stories
and update them promptly.
Corrections will appear in this
spot. If you have information
to help us correct an inaccu-
racy or cover an issue more
thoroughly, call the newsroom
at 829-7242.
HARRISBURG – No player
matched all five winning
numbers drawn in Thurs-
day’s “Pennsylvania Cash 5”
game so the jackpot rolls to
$330,000.
Lottery officials said 84
players matched four num-
bers and won $219.50 each
and 3,050 players matched
three numbers and won $10
each.
Monday’s “Pennsylvania
Match 6 Lotto” jackpot will
be worth at least $1,170,000
because no player holds a
ticket with one row that
matches all six winning
numbers drawn in Thurs-
day’s game.
LOTTERY
MIDDAY DRAWING
DAILY NUMBER 8-5-0
BIG FOUR 7-7-5-1
QUINTO 3-2-9-8-1
TREASURE HUNT
03-08-12-13-22
NIGHTLY DRAWING
DAILY NUMBER 0-4-4
BIG FOUR 4-9-5-5
QUINTO 9-8-6-5-0
CASH FIVE
10-12-17-26-35
MATCH 6 LOTTO
08-09-23-39-47-49
DETAILS
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Issue No. 2011-126
WILKES-BARRE – City
police reported the following:
• Anthony Donald Hill, 33,
of Philadelphia, was arrested
Thursday afternoon after city
police and members of the
state Attorney General’s Drug
Task Force raided a residence
on Bradford Street, police said.
Two guns and crack cocaine
with a street value of approxi-
mately $3,000 were seized,
police said.
Hill faces charges of illegal
possession of firearms, posses-
sion with intent to deliver and
possession of drug parapherna-
lia, police said.
• Christopher Herbert , no
age or address available, was
charged with possession of a
controlled substance after
police said they found him
using heroin Monday night in
a vehicle in a parking lot on
Stanton Street.
• Jason Kisthardt, no age or
address available, was charged
with harassment Thursday
afternoon, police said. Dawn
Browski told police Kisthardt
followed her to school after
she told him numerous times
to stop bothering her.
• John Shimko said Monday
a Honda generator valued at
$700 was stolen from his pick-
up while it was parked on Park
Avenue.
• Laurean Renous, of North
Main Street, reported Wednes-
day that an unknown person
posted personal information
on her Facebook account.
• Charlotte Raup, of Gardn-
er Avenue, reported a political
sign placed in the area of 86
Spring St. on Tuesday was
missing at 2 p.m. Wednesday.
• Police said they found
contraband inside a vehicle
that was stopped for a light
malfunction in the area of 10
E. Northampton St. on
Wednesday.
PLAINS TWP. – Township
police arrested James Rish
Featherstone, 30, of Wilkes-
Barre, on charges he threat-
ened two women and was
carrying a stolen firearm.
Featherstone was arraigned
by District Judge David Barilla
in Swoyersville on Wednesday
on charges of receiving stolen
property, illegal possession of
a firearm, firearms not to be
carried without a license,
driving with a suspended li-
cense, terroristic threats and
harassment by communica-
tion. He was jailed at the coun-
ty prison for lack of $10,000
bail.
Police allege Featherstone
was carrying a stolen .357-
caliber handgun when he
threatened two women known
to him at a motel on state
Route 315 early Monday morn-
ing, according to the criminal
complaint.
A preliminary hearing is
scheduled on May 10 before
District Judge Diana Malast in
Plains Township.
KINGSTON – A man was
arraigned Thursday in Wilkes-
Barre Central Court on charg-
es he stole items from a vehi-
cle.
William Michael Vontulgan-
burg, 22, of Dana Street,
Wilkes-Barre, was charged
with theft and receiving stolen
property. He was jailed at the
county prison for lack of
$10,000 bail.
Police allege Vontulganburg
stole items from a Jeep Grand
Cherokee on Elm Avenue on
Dec. 29, according to the crim-
inal complaint.
A preliminary hearing is
scheduled on May 11 before
District Judge Paul Roberts in
Kingston.
BUTLER TWP. – Township
police reported the following:
• A 77-year-old man from
Four Seasons Drive reported
he discovered his identity was
used without permission to
open an Internet account.
• A Hazleton woman escap-
ed injury after a hit-and-run
accident on Friday.
Janine Cain, 23, was pulling
out of Edgerock Drive when
her vehicle was struck from
behind by an older-model tan
vehicle, possibly a Buick. Po-
lice said the older vehicle sped
away on North Hunter High-
way.
• Police said Ian Oberren-
der, 20, of Hazleton, and Lau-
ren Ursta, 20, of Drums, were
cited with underage drinking
after a traffic stop in the 100
block of South Hunter High-
way on April 30.
• Police said they charged
Vladimir Zakovenko, 19, of
Fair Lawn, N.J., with underage
drinking, disorderly conduct,
criminal mischief and public
drunkenness after he allegedly
smashed a window to an apart-
ment at Highacres Commons
on Faith Drive on April 30.
HAZLE TWP. – State police
at Hazleton said a 16-year-old
male from Sheppton will be
charged with disorderly con-
duct after he allegedly became
aggressive with a school bus
driver for the Hazleton Area
School District on Tuesday.
PITTSTON – Police said
they charged Edward Tressa,
28, of Pittston, with possession
of drug paraphernalia after he
was allegedly found with used
syringes in his shoe in the area
of 142 S. Main St. on Wednes-
day.
Police said Tressa was
slumped over a rock and told
them he was sending a text
message. A used syringe was
found near the rock, police
said.
Tressa was arraigned by
District Judge Fred Pierantoni
in Pittston and jailed at the
county prison for lack of
$3,000 bail. A preliminary
hearing is scheduled on May
11.
POLICE BLOTTER
HANOVER TWP. – The Ha-
nover Area School Board is still
wrestling with budgetary prob-
lems. George Shovlin,solicitor,
said administrative staff has
agreed to a salary freeze, there
remains an effort to eliminate
teacher positions through retire-
ments and there are proposals
to cut programs, including sev-
enth- and eighth-grade sports.
But there are fiscal issues that
have yet to be resolved. One ma-
jor step in this process, accord-
ing to statements at the meet-
ing, is what Shovlin and John
Pericci, board president, called
the “early separation program.”
This step involves 23 teachers
accepting early retirement.
Shovlin said there are already
eight teachers who have told the
administration they will retire at
the end of the present term. But
overall, Pericci said, there are 23
teachers who have enough ser-
vice to qualify them for retire-
ment. If they accept, Pericci es-
timated that a savings of $1.6
million in salary and benefits
could be realized. Shovlin said
there are still plans to “eliminate
positions,” but the board hopes
to avert furloughs through these
retirements.
In addition, Shovlin said the
Hanover Area Education Associ-
ation has been approached
about supporting cost reduc-
tions and the union has given
indications that it is willing to
cooperate, but nothing
has been resolved. When
a question from the pub-
lic was raised about the
teachers accepting a
wage freeze, Shovlin re-
sponded, “They under-
stand we’re in a fiscal
crunch.”
In April, Hanover Ar-
ea learned it would lose
$1.6 million in state sub-
sidies under Gov. Tom
Corbett’s state budget
proposal.
Pericci said the teach-
ers, under the current contract,
are scheduled to receive wage
increases of 3 percent for the
next term. A new contract is al-
so slated for negotiation in 2011-
12.
Under budget proposals cur-
rently on the table, Hanover
Township residents face a prop-
erty tax increase of 1.6 mills,
said Superintendent Anthony
Podczasy. Pericci added, “But
we’re trying to reduce. that.”
A mill is a tax of $1 on every
$1,000 of assessed valuation.
Podczasy said the board did
get some welcome news in the
form of a $260,000 credit from
the Health Care Trust through
which the district provides em-
ployee health care benefits.
Besides issues related to
sports, Pericci said the board re-
mains on course to close the
Lyndwood Elementary School,
although that is “not final.”
When asked, Pericci said there
are no plans to sell or lease
Lyndwood, but “we’ll mothball
it for future use.”
In regard to the high school
swimming pool possibly being
closed, Pericci said the board in-
tends to keep the pool
open. However, “ there
will be a reduction in
usage and programs,”
he said.
Pericci added the
budget has to be adopt-
ed by June 30 and
there will be further
discussions this month
and in June. The board
has a work session
scheduled Monday,
June 6, and a regular
monthly session on
June 9.
At the outset, time was taken
to salute Raisha Piper, a student-
athlete, for her accomplish-
ments in the classroom as well
as on the basketball court, in
track and in field hockey. She
was cited as April’s Student of
the Month. Piper thanked her
teachers, the administration and
her coaches for their encourage-
ment and assistance.
In other actions:
• A professional services bill
of $4,992 was approved for pay-
ment to Shovlin.
• Approval was given to an
amendment to open bids for
supplies and services on May 26
at 10 a.m.
• The retirement of Carol A.
Smith as a paraprofessional was
accepted, effective June 15.
• Bridgette N. Petro, English,
was added to the substitute list.
• A contract with T&R
Sound/Video for audio-visual
equipment for graduation exer-
cises on June 16 was approved;
• A May trip to Ellis Island by
the sixth-grade class of Memo-
rial Elementary was approved.
Expenses will be provided by
Memorial PTA.
Hanover Area eyes its options
School board looks at early
retirements as one way for
the district to save money.
By TOMHUNTINGTON
Times Leader Correspondent
In April, Ha-
nover Area
learned it
would lose
$1.6 million in
state sub-
sidies under
Gov. Tom
Corbett’s
state budget
proposal.
MISERICORDIA ART EXHIBIT OPENS
S. JOHN WILKIN/THE TIMES LEADER
C
hris and Karen Borton watch a demonstration by Laura Sordoni on Thursday evening
at an art exhibit opening with artists from Verve Vertu Art Studio in the Speech and
Language Hearing Center at Misericordia University. The exhibit will be open 8 a.m. to
4:30 p.m. during regular business hours at the center.
BEAR CREEK TWP. -- A
new school schedule and
elective options for fifth-,
sixth-, seventh- and eighth-
graders at Bear Creek Com-
munity Charter School are
being well received by stu-
dents, the school’s principal
reported Thursday.
Margaret Foster told the
board of trustees that the
seventh- and eighth-graders
who heard about the new
schedule, which calls for
longer class periods to allow
for more in depth work, were
enthusiastic. The new plan,
which was developed by Fos-
ter and the middle school
teachers, will also include
new electives such as en-
hanced environmental sci-
ence and world culture stud-
ies, and new options for mu-
sic and physical education,
including guitar and dance.
“The kids are psyched and
they asked thoughtful, intel-
ligent questions about it,”
Foster said of her meeting
with next year’s seventh and
eighth graders.
Next year’s fifth- and sixth-
graders will be introduced to
the newschedule today, Fos-
ter said, and parents will
have an opportunity to meet
with her next week to go
throughthe scheduling proc-
ess.
Foster said most of the
changes, including the elec-
tives, will be done at little
cost. Besides a computer lab
that the school was already
considering, the main cost
will be for guitars, some text
books and some extra mate-
rials for Odyssey of the Mind
and a few other courses, the
board was told.
In other business, the
boardreviewedthe proposed
budget for the 2011-12 school
year. Tentatively set at
$4,679,579, the spending
plan will be finalized at next
month’s meeting.
The board also reviewed
changes to the student hand-
book and considered options
for revising the criteria for
honor roll.
Students at Bear Creek
Charter like new schedule
By JANINE UNGVARSKY
Times Leader Correspondent
PRINGLE – Sending schools
could see a small decrease in the
amount they pay to the West Side
Career and Technology Center if
a tentative budget approved
Wednesday gains final approval
later this month.
The tech school’s joint operat-
ing committee approved a tenta-
tive budget of $6.1 million, which
is $236,284 less than the final
budget approved for the 2010-11
school year. That would represent
a savings for the five districts that
send students to the tech school,
including Dallas, Lake-Lehman,
Wyoming Area, Northwest Area
and Wyoming Valley West. The
budget is set to be on the agenda
when the committee meets again
May 24.
The meeting began with a mo-
ment of silence in memory of
committee member Peter Farrell,
a Lake-Lehman representative to
the committee who died recently
in a car accident. In calling for
the moment of silence, fellow
Lake-Lehman director and tech
school committee President
Butch Rossi called Farrell a “great
school director who always put
the kids first.” Rossi said Farrell
would be missed.
In other business, the commit-
tee revised the school calendar
for the remainder of the 2010-11
school year. The final day for stu-
dents and graduation day will
now be June 13.
The board also approved the
transfer of Elaine Pallone, the cur-
rent principal’s secretary/main of-
fice supervisor, to the position of
secretary to the administrative di-
rector, effective July 1. Pallone
will retain the main office super-
visor’s duties and be paid accord-
ing to her current Act 93 con-
tract.
Other actions approved includ-
ed:
• A request by Dallas Little
League to use tech school fields,
due to the construction under
way at the Dallas High School
• Travel expenses totaling
$4,993 to send student Marissa
Solomon and two chaperones to
the National SKILLS competition
in Kansas City, Mo., in late June.
It was noted that $1,250 of the
cost will be funded by student
fundraisers.
WSCTC approves tentative $6.1M budget
Proposed spending plan calls
for small decrease in costs for
the member school districts.
By JANINE UNGVARSKY
Times Leader Correspondent
PRINGLE -- Pringle Borough
Crime Watch will meet at 6:30
p.m. Wednesday at the Elks
Lodge, 39 Evans St., Pringle.
Hoagie returns are needed.
Hoagie coupons are still avail-
able.
For information, call Connie at
287-4247.
KINGSTON – The Wyoming
Valley West School Board will
hold the May board meeting for
general purposes on Wednesday.
The work session will be at 7
p.m. followed by the board meet-
ing.
The meetings are open to the
public and will be at the middle
school, Chester Street, Kingston,
which is handicapped accessible
from the side of the building.
LARKSVILLE – The Larksville
Firemen’s Relief Association will
meet at 7 p.m. Monday at the
Larksville Volunteer Fire
Grounds, State Street.
The regular monthly meeting
of the Volunteer Fire Co. will be
at 7:30 p.m. Monday at the Larks-
ville Volunteer Fire Grounds.
LOCAL BRIEFS
Times Leader endorsements fill theeditorial pagetoday.
Doonesbury and Mallard Fillmore are on Page 7A
E D I T O R ’ S N O T E
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com FRIDAY, MAY 6, 2011 PAGE 3A
LOCAL
➛ timesleader.com
TUSCALOOSA, ALA.
Local men aid storm area
Zachary Smith, a 20-year-old emer-
gency medical technician from Pittston,
deployed with the American Red Cross
to Alabama on Thurs-
day to aid tornado
victims.
It is Smith’s first
deployment as a Red
Cross volunteer; he
answered the call for
volunteers when
hearing of the devas-
tation.
Smith, who is em-
ployed with Pittston Township Ambu-
lance and volunteers with Pittston
Township Fire Rescue, will be aiding in
Client Health Services as an EMT.
He joins first-time volunteer Scott
Gay, a 24-year-old EMT, from Dallas,
who deployed to Alabama on Monday.
Gay became a certified EMT at age
16 and has been working on ambulanc-
es and in hospital emergency rooms
ever since.
As important as his medical skills
are, Gay believes that the personal
connection he makes with patients is
equally important. As he says, “Some-
times people just need someone to talk
to.”
SUGARLOAF TWP.
PSU Hazleton graduation
Penn State Hazleton will have its
41st annual commencement at 7 this
evening in the Physical Education
Building on campus.
More than 100 bach-
elor’s and associate’s
degrees will be award-
ed during the ceremo-
ny.
Guest speaker for
the event will be Ha-
zleton native John B.
“Jack” Curcio, a leader
and pioneer in the commercial vehicle
sector for more than 50 years.
Among his many accomplishments,
Curcio has served as president, chair-
man and chief executive officer of
Crane Carrier Co. and chief executive
officer, president and chairman of the
board of Mack Trucks. He holds 11
patents in truck body and design.
The event is free and open to the
public. For more information, call the
Office of Academic Affairs at 450-3138.
WILKES-BARRE
Lemmond to be honored
Former state Sen. Charles Lemmond
will receive The Henry Hoyt Award For
Lifetime Achievement from the Lu-
zerne County Republican Party at its
“Spring Dinner” on
May 15.
The event will start
at 6 p.m. at the Best
Western Genetti Hotel
& Conference Center,
77 E. Market St.
Dinner organizers
said Lemmond is
being honored be-
cause of his strong influence and well-
known status in the area. Tickets are
$60 per person and $50 for Club GOP
Members who will also be invited to
attend a reception with U.S. Rep. Lou
Barletta, R-Hazleton.
Lemmond was first elected to the
20th Senatorial District post in 1985,
representing constituents in Luzerne,
Monroe, Pike, Susquehanna, Wayne
and Wyoming counties until 2006.
A graduate of Harvard University and
the University of Pennsylvania School
of Law, Lemmond served overseas in
the U.S. Army. He is a former Luzerne
County Court judge and had served as
a county first assistant district attorney.
To make reservations, call 854-1171
by Monday. Checks can be made out to:
Luzerne County Republican Party and
mailed to Luzerne County GOP Head-
quarters, Attn: Spring Dinner, 41 S.
Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA18701.
I N B R I E F
DENNIS DRENNER/AMERICAN RED CROSS
Scott Gay, a 24-year-old EMT from Dal-
las, lets Zoriah Beckham, 3, a resident at
the Red Cross administered shelter in
Tuscaloosa, Ala., listen to his heartbeat
through his stethoscope.
Smith
Curcio
Lemmond
WILKES-BARRE – Police allege a
drunken George Peter Moses smashed
his way into an occupied house min-
utes after crashing his pickup truck in-
to another car on North Washington
Street early Thursday morning.
Moses, 30, of Terrace Street, Wilkes-
Barre, was captured when he was spot-
ted climbing out a broken window of a
house after officers followed a blood
trail on the sidewalk, according to
charges filed.
Still wearing his clothes stained in
blood, Moses was arraigned several
hours later in Wilkes-Barre Central
Court late Thursday
morning on charges
of burglary, criminal
trespass, accidents in-
volving damage to un-
attended vehicle,
driving with a sus-
pended license, loi-
tering and prowling
at night, and driving under the influen-
ce.
He was jailed at the Luzerne County
Correctional Facility for lack of $10,000
bail.
According to the criminal complaint:
Police investigated a two-vehicle
crash at North Washington and Beau-
mont streets at about 2:30 a.m. When
an officer pulled up to the scene, he
spotted a man walking away on North
Washington Street.
Police said the two smashed vehi-
cles, a 2005 Chevrolet and a 2006 Lin-
coln Zephyr, were unoccupied. There
was a large amount of blood in the driv-
er’s seat area of the Lincoln, police
said.
Police followed blood spatter on the
sidewalk until a neighbor alerted an of-
ficer to someone smashing glass in the
area of 282 N. Washington St.
Moses was spotted climbing out of a
side window of the house and was
trapped by a 6-foot fence, the com-
plaint said.
Police said in the complaint that
Moses stated he lived at the house and
was there all night. He blurted out to
police, “I did not drive that truck that
crashed,” according to the complaint.
Moses was taken to Wilkes-Barre
General Hospital for a blood-alcohol
test and to be treated for crash injuries.
Police said Moses appeared intoxicat-
ed and had difficulty speaking.
Broken glass was found inside and
outside the residence, and Moses’ cell
phone was found near the broken win-
dow, the complaint says.
A preliminary hearing is scheduled
on May 11 in Central Court.
C R I M I N A L C A S E Police say man smashed his way into a house after he crashed his pickup on North Washington Street
Man arrested after W-B crash
By EDWARD LEWIS
elewis@timesleader.com
Moses
WILKES-BARRE – The King’s Col-
lege faculty chairman pointed out that,
prior to the presidency of
The Rev. Thomas O’Hara,
the people enjoying an
outdoor picnic Thursday
would have been dodging
traffic while noshing on
pulled pork. A junior told
O’Hara “Tunasema
Asante” – “We say thank
you” in Swahili.
But it was either ahigher power or just
a high-powered wind trying to get the
last word as the King’s community gath-
ered to honor O’Hara,
who found his speech
interrupted when a
gust sent a nearby
empty food tray clang-
ing to the ground.
“I think God is tell-
ing me to cut it down,”
O’Hara quipped.
The event – held on the tree-lined
brickMonarchCourt that previouslywas
Franklin Street – was a chance for stu-
dents andfaculty togather before the de-
parture of O’Hara, the 12-year president
who has been a student, teacher and ad-
ministrator at thecollege. O’Harais step-
pingdownJune30, takingaone-yearsab-
batical before returning to teach.
O’Hara said faculty members wanted
to do something before the school year
ends, and “I suggested a picnic, some-
Outdoor picnic becomes farewell party for King’s president
CLARK VAN ORDEN/THE TIMES LEADER
The Rev. Thomas O’Hara was honored for 12 years as president of King’s Col-
lege on Thursday with a picnic at Monarch Court on the campus. Faculty orga-
nized an open picnic to mark O’Hara’s departure as president. He steps down
June 30, though he plans to return to teach.
The Rev. Thomas O’Hara will leave
his post June 30 for a one-year
sabbatical and return to teach.
By MARK GUYDISH
mguydish@timesleader.com
O’Hara
See O’HARA, Page 4A
To see
video, visit
www.times
leader.com
WILKES-BARRE – More than a
week after a Luzerne County judge
banned the sale of synthetic bath
salts, city police Chief Gerard Des-
soye said there has been a decrease
of police calls involving the sub-
stances.
“We have seen a marked dropped
in instances,” Dessoye said Thurs-
day. “We’ve had only one confirmed
instance since the injunction went
into effect.”
County President Judge Thomas
F. Burke Jr. on April 25 granted a
permanent injunction banning the
transaction of bath salts containing
certain chemicals.
District Attorney Jacqueline
Musto Carroll sought the injunc-
tion after several highly publicized
episodes investigated by local po-
lice agencies.
She noted a West
Pittston couple hal-
lucinating on bath
salts endangered a
young child when
they used knives to
stab walls believing there were 90
people living in the walls.
Another incident that madehead-
lines involved two women charged
by city police with being high on
bathsalts while drivingina car with
two children.
Dessoye, whose lawenforcement
career has spanned38 years, saidhe
has never seen anyone as high on a
drug as the two women.
An undercover drug detective
said the effects of bath salts are sim-
ilar to methamphetamine and ec-
stasy, although bath salts are com-
monly called a legal alternative to
cocaine.
Dessoye said the injunction is a
“stopgap” measure until the state
Legislature and the federal govern-
ment lists bath salts as a controlled
substance.
State House lawmakers unani-
mously passed a bill on April 4 add-
ing chemicals used to manufacture
bath salts to the controlled sub-
stance act. The state Senate has not
taken any action on the bill despite
pleas fromdistrict attorneys, police
chiefs and elected officials to pass
the measure as quickly as possible.
“It certainly has the symptoms of
becoming an epidemic. Once we re-
alized what bath salts were, we
were seeing lots of cases of people
Bath salts down the drain?
Recent days have seen fewer
police calls about the druglike
substance in Wilkes-Barre.
By EDWARD LEWIS
elewis@timesleader.com
Synthetic bath salts are manufac-
tured using methylenedioxypyrovale-
rone, or MDPV, a powerful stimulant
found in ecstasy, and mephedrone,
another powerful stimulant. Bath
salts sell for approximately $40 for a
half-gram.
Traditional bath salts used for taking
a bath sell for $4 to $8 and are made
with mostly Epsom salts, oils and
fragrances to soften skin.
W H AT A R E B AT H S A LT S ?
See SALTS, Page 4A
HAVING FUN HANGING ON
CLARK VAN ORDEN/THE TIMES LEADER
T
hird-grade students at Lehman Jackson Elementary lean into a tug-of-war Thursday, one of many events staged for the annual “Field Day”
that gets students outdoors and active. From left are Anthony Carranante, Matthew McCulloch, Madeline Newman, Lily Wood, Bryan Morio,
Sean Sabaluski, and sixth-grader Kaitlyn Young. They won the war.
WILKES-BARRE – Dr. Mark Shiowitz, a sur-
geon who has held multiple leadership and ad-
ministrative roles at Wilkes-Barre General Hospi-
tal, was appointed to the Wilkes-Barre Area
School Board, fillingavacan-
cy created when Teresa
McGuire resigned in De-
cember.
Shiowitzwas amongeight
people whoappliedonce Lu-
zerne County Court became
involved. The school board
failed twice to approve a replacement for
McGuire, who left the board because she was
moving out of the area. Her termexpires this De-
cember.
In a letter accompanying his application, Shio-
witz noted he is not running for any of the avail-
Shiowitz gets
W-B board seat
Surgeon will fill vacancy created by Teresa
McGuire’s resignation.
By MARK GUYDISH
mguydish@timesleader.com
See SEAT, Page 4A
First reported at
4:15
p.m.
timesleader.com
C M Y K
PAGE 4A FRIDAY, MAY 6, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ N E W S
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able seats on the school board in
this year’s election, and that “giv-
en the demands of my profes-
sion,” he is unlikely to run for the
board in the future.
“However, given the extraor-
dinary loss of trust inour regional
political institutions and the po-
tential cut in state education
funds, this may be a good time for
some critical and unbiased think-
ing on this school board,” Shio-
witz wrote. “I can certainly bring
that to the table.”
A product of Wilkes-Barre’s
public schools, Shiowitz said he
worked as an unpaid junior high
football assistant coach in the dis-
trict last fall, and his son is in sev-
enth grade at Meyers High
School.
While expressing “great re-
spect” for teachers, he favors “a
means to reward excellence.” His
letter also notes he would like to
maintain all three high schools if
possible. The district’s three ag-
ing high schools are in various
states of disrepair. The school
boardhas debatedactionfor years
but continues tofixthings primar-
ily on an as-needed basis.
Shiowitz politely rebukes the
board for being unresponsive to
letters hehas writtenandsuggest-
ions he has made, adding, “I think
that is a practice that can and
should be reversed. Constructive
ideas originating outside this au-
gust body warrant consideration
and some formof response.”
He lists as priorities the needto
establish “thoughtful hiring crite-
ria, an anti-nepotismpolicy, and a
simple and specific code of eth-
ics/conduct” that would require
those who violate the code to re-
sign or be removed.
Three boardmembers resigned
after being charged with corrup-
tion in sweeping federal probe
since May 2009. During those
scandals it was revealedthe board
has no written hiring policy, and
that board members took turns
pickingcandidates for interviews.
The boardhas beenworking on
a new, written policy since March
2010, but has yet to unveil it.
SEAT
Continued from Page 3A
thing everyone could enjoy.”
For about two hours Monarch
Court became an open-air, self-
servecafeteriaasstudentsandfac-
ulty strolled among a wide array
food and beverages. Pop music
wafted through the air. Temper-
amental gusts of wind offset the
warmth of steady sunshine, and
about midway through the outing
Faculty Chair Joe Evansteppedto
a podiumto praise O’Hara.
“Twelveyears agoyouwouldbe
dodgingtrafficright now,”hesaid,
alluding to O’Hara’s success at
closing a block of Franklin Street
and converting it to Monarch
Court.
“Youwouldhavewalkedaround
the corner to see dilapidated
buildings,” Evan added, referring
to King’s acquisition and renova-
tion or replacement of run-down
buildingsontheEast sideof North
Main Street.
Student Government President
Giancarlo DiLonardo, a junior,
noted he had been greeted on
campus three years ago by “a pi-
ous, jovial man,” and that O’Hara
not only left his mark on the phys-
ical campus but also “on the
hearts andminds” of thestudents.
Junior Cynthia Darby, one of
the leaders inthe “Asante project”
last month that sent more than
200 students into the community
on cleanup projects, quoted from
Corinthians in the Bible: “We fix
our eyes not on what is seen, but
on what is unseen, since what is
seen is temporary, but what is un-
seen is eternal.” She also offered
the Swahili thank you, a nod to
Uganda, where O’Hara once
taught.
O’Hara took a few minutes to
praise the staff and students, not-
ing that though he will travel for a
year, he’ll be back.
“There is no better place for me
to be than King’s College.”
O’HARA
Continued from Page 3A
CLARK VAN ORDEN/THE TIMES LEADER
Monarch Court – a
city street before the
Rev. Thomas O’Hara
became president of
King’s College – host-
ed a picnic Thursday
honoring the out-
going president.
O’Hara steps down
June 30, though he
promised to return
after a sabbatical to
teach. O’Hara sug-
gested a picnic to
faculty members,
who wanted to do
something before the
year ended.
on bath salts,” Dessoye said.
In seeking an injunction to ban the
sale of bath salts, Dessoye said there
were concerns that more people
would take the synthetic substance.
“We wanted to make aware of how
serious this problem was and how
serious this product is,” he said. “Our
concerns were we were going to in-
advertently advertise it and people
were going to start using it.”
Musto Carroll said she was un-
aware of any retailer selling bath
salts since the injunction was grant-
ed.
SALTS
Continued from Page 3A
WILKES-BARRE – There
are a few things on Norm Kru-
lack’s list of qualifications for
the attorneys running for judge
in Luzerne County.
He heard from all 16 Thurs-
day night and came away a lit-
tle better informed about who
he will vote for in
the primary on
May 17.
“They helped
me with my deci-
sion,” said Krulack
after the forum held by the
League of Women Voters of the
Wilkes-Barre area in Snyder
Hall on the campus of King’s
College.
He was among the nearly
100 people in the audience to
hear from John Aciukewicz,
Michael Blazick, Mark Bufali-
no, Vito DeLuca, Lesa Gelb,
Jim Haggerty, Molly Hanlon
Mirabito, Dick Hughes, Jim
McMonagle, Fred Pierantoni,
Paula Radick, Jennifer Rogers,
Anthony Ross, Joe Saporito,
Joe Sklarosky and Michael
Vough. Most of the candidates
had family and supporters in
the audience.
Krulack had his mind made
up on three or four of the six
candidates who will be elected
to the court. They had already
met his criteria for the office.
“I want them to be honest
and fair,” said Krulack. “I want
them to be knowledgeable. I
want them get the job done.”
In the few minutes allotted
to each candidates to talk
about themselves, many of
them spoke about the impor-
tance of honesty and integrity,
especially since Mark Ciavarel-
la, Michael Conahan and Mi-
chael Toole stepped down from
the bench after being charged
in an ongoing public corrup-
tion probe.
Each of the candidates chose
to answer one of seven ques-
tions provided by the forum’s
host. None opted to answer the
question about what would
cause them to recuse them-
selves or what constitutes a
conflict of interest. Likewise
none chose the question about
his or her experience with the
juvenile justice system.
Four of them chose to an-
swer how they are qualified to
handle a variety of legal mat-
ters, such as mortgage foreclo-
sures, assessment appeals and
sentencings.
Three decided to talk about
what in their lives that pre-
pared them to deal with people
whose experiences are so dif-
ferent from the candidates.
Just one discussed how they
would prevent a recurrence of
the “issues” that happened in
the county court.
However, eight of the 16 se-
lected the question inquiring
about their courtroom experi-
ence during the past five years
handling civil and criminal
cases and jury trials in state
and federal courts.
John Gyory of Exeter had a
hard time believing the candi-
dates who said they spent
years gaining experience in the
county courtrooms didn’t see
anything that signaled the for-
mer judges were corrupt.
“That bothers me,” said Gyo-
ry, a professor of German at
King’s College who wore a but-
ton for Aciukewicz.
Honesty and openness on
the part of the candidates mat-
tered to Ed Gustitus of King-
ston.
But he said the candidates
didn’t get to the most impor-
tant question, “Why do they re-
ally want to be a judge?”
Gustitus said that before he
casts his votes he will look at
the individual and how that
person conducted him or her-
self in the practice of law.
About 100 turn out to judge candidates
AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER
John Gyory discusses the county judge candidate forum held Thursday night by the League of
Women Voters at Snyder Hall on the campus of King’s College.
League of Women Voters
event includes all 16 seeking
six county judge spots.
By JERRY LYNOTT
jlynott@timesleader.com
WILKES-BARRE – City police
reported the following:
• Police allege Brian Pillonato, of
Main Street, Edwardsville, stole
three MP3 players from the Rite Aid
on Amber Lane on Friday. A store
employee said Pillonato held up the
items as he fled the store and
thanked a cashier for the “free
stuff,” police said.
Pillonato was apprehended a
short time later by state police and
was in possession of the stolen
merchandise, as well as other items
taken in a Wilkes-Barre Township
theft, police said. He was released
into the custody of Wilkes-Barre
Township police so they could file
charges. Wilkes-Barre police said
they also would file charges against
Pillonato.
POLICE BLOTTER
K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com FRIDAY, MAY 6, 2011 PAGE 5A
➛ N A T I O N & W O R L D
BEIRUT
Syrian crackdown continues
T
he Syrian army said Thursday it
has begun withdrawing from a city
at the heart of the country’s uprising,
but the regime expanded its crackdown
elsewhere by deploying soldiers and
arresting hundreds ahead of a new
wave of anti-government protests.
The siege on Daraa — the southern
city where Syria’s six-week-old uprising
began — lasted 11 days with President
Bashar Assad unleashing tanks and
snipers to crush dissent there. Syria’s
state-run media said the military had
“carried out its mission in detaining
terrorists” and restored calm in Daraa.
Still, an activist who has been giving
The Associated Press updates from
Daraa cast doubt on the army claim.
The activist, who left Daraa early
Thursday, said residents were report-
ing that tanks and troops were still in
the city.
COLUMBUS, OHIO
Two die; one missing at sea
Two Ohio teenagers on a school
mission trip to Costa Rica died in the
Pacific Ocean when they were pulled
along by an undertow current, and a
third student swept out with them has
not been found, officials said Thursday.
The three were spending an after-
noon at the beach when Wednesday’s
accident occurred, according to a state-
ment from Patriot Preparatory Acade-
my in Columbus. They were among
eight members of the junior and senior
classes who were on a service trip in
the central American country and were
to return home Thursday, the school
said.
The first body recovered was that of
Caity Jones. James Smith’s body was
recovered Thursday, and authorities
were still searching for missing student
Kai Lamar, Red Cross spokesman Fred-
dy Roman said.
LONDON
Royals will visit California
Wills and Kate are heading west, off
to California in July.
Prince William and his wife, the
former Kate Middleton, will be in the
state for three days starting July 8 after
their official tour of Canada, the
prince’s office announced Thursday.
The palace did not provide details of
their itinerary.
The trip will be William’s first official
trip to the United States and Kate’s
first-ever visit to the country.
LOS ANGELES
Doc’s license under review
At a hearing Thursday, a California
deputy attorney general urged the
Medical Board of California to revoke
the medical license of the Beverly Hills
fertility doctor who assisted Nadya
Suleman in conceiving octuplets.
“Revocation is proper. It’s the only
way to ensure public protection,” Dep-
uty Attorney General Judith T. Alvara-
do said.
Dr. Michael Kamrava’s medical li-
cense could be revoked if it is deter-
mined that he was grossly negligent in
his treatment of Suleman and two
other female patients.
I N B R I E F
AP PHOTO
Inquisition Jews memorialized
Balearic Islands President Francesc
Antich speaks Thursday during a cere-
mony to honor Jews killed during the
Inquisition, in Palma de Mallorca,
Spain. More than three centuries after
37 Jews from the Mediterranean is-
land of Mallorca were killed during the
Inquisition for secretly practicing their
faith, the Balearic Islands regional
president Francesc Antich issued a
rare official condemnation. It was the
first time that the 1691 killings have
been officially criticized in Mallorca by
a government figure, and Spain’s
national Jewish federation said it may
have been the first event of its kind
for the nation.
HICKMAN, Ky. — Jail in-
mates filled sandbag after
sandbag to protect one of the
many Southern river cities
threatened by the swelling
Mississippi as it broke more
1930s flood records and crept
higher Thursday.
A flooding tributary threat-
ened to cut off Interstate 40, a
major east-west route through
Arkansas, and the Army
Corps of Engineers plannedto
blast a new breach in a Mis-
souri levee in hopes of con-
trolling the slow-motion di-
saster flowing downriver.
Thousands of people from
Illinois to Louisiana have al-
ready been forced from their
homes, and anxiety is rising
along with the river, though it
could be a week or two before
some of the most severe flood-
ing hits.
InHickman, a townof about
2,500, Morrison Williamson
was confident a towering
floodwall would save his hard-
ware store, despite small leaks
that let some flood waters
spray through.
Williamson was in a nearly
deserted downtown, keeping
his store open for customers
who needed flood-fighting
supplies. He said the decision
to break open the Missouri
levee upstream has kept the
river from topping the flood-
wall, saving many communi-
ties to the south.
“They say blowing up the
levee saved Cairo (Ill.) Well, it
did. But if this breaks, you’re
talking Dyersburg, Ridgely,
Tiptonville, water all the way
toMemphis,” Williamsonsaid
about places in neighboring
Tennessee.
About 120 Fulton County
jail inmate volunteers dressed
in orange or white prisoner
uniforms furiously filled sand-
bags for Hickman. They have
made 120,000 since April 26.
“We’re just going tokeepgo-
ing until they say stop,” jail
Sgt. James Buckingham said.
Up and down the Big Mud-
dy, farmers braced for a repeat
of the desperate strategy em-
ployed earlier this week in
southeast Missouri, where Ar-
my engineers blew up the lev-
ee and sacrificed vast stretch-
es of farmland to protect pop-
ulated areas upstream.
The corps had planned to
blast athirdandfinal breachin
the Birds Point levee around1
p.m. Thursday to allow water
to flow back out of the flood
plain into the river.
“I’ve never seen it this bad,”
said 78-year-old Joe Harrison,
who has lived in the same
house in Hickman since he
was 11 months old.
Thousands of people from Illinois to Louisiana have been evacuated
Anxiety and river on rise
AP PHOTO
Kristen Phil-
lips, an Auburn
student, as-
sists in the
clean-up of
debris on
Thursday in
Pleasant Grove,
Ala. A tornado
left a path of
total devas-
tation as it
passed through
on April 27.
Flooding is
extreme this
year in part
because of
drenching rain
over the past
two weeks.
By DYLAN LOVAN
and ADRIAN SAINZ
Associated Press
HADLEY, Mass. — Three
teenagers admitted Thursday
that they participated in the bul-
lying of a 15-year-old Massachu-
setts girl who later committed
suicide, with one of the girl’s
lawyers complaining that they
had been unfairly demonized as
“mean girls.”
Sharon Chanon Velazquez, 17,
and two 18-year-olds, Flannery
Mullins and Ashley Longe, were
sentenced to less than a year of
probation after they admitted to
sufficient facts to misdemeanor
charges in the bullying of
Phoebe Prince, a freshman at
South Hadley High School who
hanged herself in January 2010.
Prosecutors said Prince, who
had recently
emigrated from
Ireland, was
hounded by five
teens after she
briefly dated
two boys. Her
death drew in-
ternational at-
tention and was
among several
high-profile
teen suicides
that prompted
new laws aimed
at cracking
down on bully-
ing in schools.
By admitting to sufficient
facts, they acknowledged that
prosecutors could win a convic-
tion if the case went to trial.
The charges against the girls
were continued without a find-
ing and will be dismissed if they
successfully complete their pro-
bation.
Under a plea deal approved by
Prince’s family, prosecutors
agreed to dismiss more serious
charges against them.
Two other teens finalized sim-
ilar deals with prosecutors in
court Wednesday.
Attorneys for Velazquez and
Mullins offered condolences to
Prince’s family but said they be-
lieved the girls had been treated
overly harshly by both prosecu-
tors and the news media.
Alfred Chamberland, a lawyer
for Mullins, said it was not a
“relentless” three-month bully-
ing campaign, as retired District
Attorney Elizabeth Scheibel al-
leged when the teens were
charged last year.
In a statement he read to re-
porters, Chamberland said pros-
ecutors had “overcharged” the
girls and the media had unfairly
portrayed them as “mean girls
and bullies.”
Assistant District Attorney
Steven Gagne said that after
hearing rumors at school that
Prince had had “some sort of
romantic relationship” with her
boyfriend, she told at least one
classmate that “someone ought
to kick her ass,” referring to
Prince.
Gagne said Prince became
fearful, skipped class and went
to the school nurse several
times.
“She was frightened to go to
class and was unable to focus on
her studies,” Gagne said.
Deals are
reached in
bullying
suicide
Six teenagers were charged in
connection with 2010 suicide
of Phoebe Prince, 15.
By DENISE LAVOIE
AP Legal Affairs Writer
“She was
frightened
to go to
class and
was unable
to focus on
her stud-
ies.”
Steven Gagne
Assistant District
Attorney
MISRATA, Libya — Flies flickered
through flashlight beams and a foul
odor filled the air as the men tromped
down the stairs to a basement. Their
rubber boots splashed in shin-deep pu-
trid water as they scanned the dark-
ness for the bodies they’d come to re-
trieve.
“Here’s one,” someone said. Then
another. And another. And another.
The men are all volunteers for the
particularly morbid task of combing
Misrata’s war-shattered streets for the
unburied dead from two months of ur-
ban combat.
Since the uprising against Moam-
mar Gadhafi began in mid-February,
Libya’s third-largest city has endured
some of the country’s most violent bat-
tles. Gadhafi’s troops have surrounded
the coastal city from three sides and
subjected it to daily shelling.
Residents-turned-rebels mobilized to
fight back, pushing Gadhafi’s troops
from the city center in late April. That
battle and others have killed hundreds
— many of whom were buried hastily
or merely left where they fell.
The group has found well over 100
bodies, including 44 charred corpses in
one house, said Dr. Faraj Ahmed, a vet-
erinarian.
The group’s members are not trained
to deal with the dead, and no one
asked them to do it. Instead, the labor-
ers, businessmen and university stu-
dents organized themselves, driven by
the desire to follow the Islamic obliga-
tion to respect the dead.
“In the end, we are all sons of Adam
and need to be treated like sons of
Adam,” said Bashir Ibrahim. “We all
deserve a proper burial.”
AP PHOTO
A volunteer searches a building as
part of an effort to recover and bury
dead bodies in Misrata, Libya.
Search continues for unburied dead in Libya
By BEN HUBBARD
Associated Press
BAGHDAD — A suicide bomber
killed at least 16 people in southern Iraq
on Thursday as the country braced for
attacks from al-Qaida in Iraq in the after-
math of the death of Osama bin Laden.
The car bomber blew up his vehicle at
a police headquarters in the mainly Shi-
ite Muslim city of Hillah before 7 a.m. as
the police switched from overnight to
day shift. It was the second major attack
in Iraq since bin Laden was killed early
Monday.
The attacker in Hillah set off his ex-
plosives as officers gathered outside, ac-
cording to local government officials on
state television. At least 59 people were
injured.
The attack immediately triggered an-
ger toward Baghdad as local officials
sought to portray the capital as ignoring
their requests for more police and army.
“Several times we demanded to in-
crease the number of Iraqi police in Ba-
bil (Hillah’s province) and to move bat-
talions from the police and army to be in
some dangerous areas,” said Kahdim To-
man, head of Babil’s local council. He
also criticized the province’s police for
not drawing up a general security plan.
Other council members also blamed
the national government and made clear
the province had been on alert since the
announcement of bin Laden’s death.
“After the killing of bin Laden proac-
tive measures were taken,” council
member Haidar Ajeeli told state televi-
sion, adding that 20 suspected militants
had been jailed since Monday.
Babil province has long been a staging
ground for Sunni extremists to attack
Baghdad and Shiite areas in the south.
During the country’s civil war, northern
Babil province was viewed as a bastion
of al-Qaida in Iraq. The group continues
to take advantage of the distrust toward
the Shiite-dominant national govern-
ment to seek shelter in Sunni rural ar-
eas.
Blast kills 16 at Iraq police HQ
The attack happened in the mainly
Shiite Muslim city of Hillah. At least
59 people were injured.
By RAHEEMSALMAN
Los Angeles Times
AP PHOTO
An Iraqi man inspects his damaged car
Thursday at the site of a roadside
bomb attack targeting a police patrol.
AND ALL THAT JAZZ
AP PHOTO
F
estival-goers dance Thursday as Steve Riley and the Mamou Playboys, not pictured, perform at the New
Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival.
C M Y K
PAGE 6A FRIDAY, MAY 6, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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ministration’s haste to satisfy the
world’s hunger for details and ea-
ger to make the most of the mo-
ment, officials told a tale tar-
nished by discrepancies and ap-
parent exaggeration.
Whether that matters to most
Americans, gratified if not joyful
that bin Laden is dead, is an open
question. Republican House
Speaker John Boehner, for one,
shrugged off the backtracking to
focus on the big picture: “I had a
conversation with the president,
and the president outlined to me
theseries of actions that occurred
on Sunday evening. I have no
doubt that Osama bin Laden is
dead.”
President BarackObama’s visit
to New York’s ground zero on
Thursday was a somber and un-
derstated event, and he avoided
mentioning bin Laden by name.
A day earlier, he said the govern-
ment wouldnot release images of
binLaden’s body, adecisiontaken
in part to avoid the perception
that America was crowing about
killing him.
“We don’t need to spike the
football,” Obama said. He plans
to go to Fort Campbell, Ky., today
to meet aviators from the mis-
sion.
The senior defense official
spoke to The Associated Press
anonymously because he was not
authorized to speak on the re-
cord. He said the sole bin Laden
shooter in the Pakistan com-
poundwas killedinthe earlymin-
utes of the commando operation,
the latest of the details becoming
clearer now that the Navy SEAL
assault teamhas fully briefedoffi-
cials.
As the raiders moved into the
compoundfromhelicopters, they
were fired on by bin Laden’s cou-
rier, Abu Ahmed al-Kuwaiti, who
was intheguesthouse, theofficial
said. The SEALs returned fire,
and the courier was killed, along
with a woman with him. The offi-
cial said she was hit in the cross-
fire.
The Americans were never
fired on again as they encoun-
teredandkilleda manonthe first
floor of the main building and
then bin Laden’s son on a stair-
case, before arriving at bin La-
den’s room, theofficial said, revis-
inganearlier account that theson
was in the room with his father.
Officials have said bin Laden was
killed, shot in the chest and then
the head, after he appeared to be
lunging for a weapon.
White House and Defense De-
partment and CIA officials
through the week have offered
varying and foggy versions of the
operation, though the dominant
focus was on a firefight that offi-
cials said consumed most of the
40 minutes on the ground after
midnight Monday morninginPa-
kistan, Sunday in Washington.
“There were many other peo-
ple who were armed ... in the
compound,” White House
spokesmanJay Carney saidTues-
day when asked if bin Laden was
armed. “There was a firefight.”
“We expecteda great deal of re-
sistance and were met with a
great deal of resistance,” he said.
“For most of the period there,
there was a firefight,” a senior de-
fense official told Pentagon re-
porters in a briefing Monday.
White House counterterror-
ism adviser John Brennan origi-
nally suggested bin Laden was
among those who was armed.
“The nature of the mission, the
nature of what happenedSunday,
combined with the effort to get
that information quickly, result-
ed in the need to clarify some
facts,” Carney said aboard Air
Force One en route to New York.
He said the administration
shouldbegivencredit for correct-
ing mistakes when it found them.
RAID
Continued from Page 1A
AP FILE PHOTO
Osama bin La-
den, who was
killed by U.S.
commandos on
Monday, speaks
in December
1998 to a select-
ed group of re-
porters in the
mountains of
Helmand prov-
ince in southern
Afghanistan.
Still, this was where the terrorist in-
flictedhis greatest damageonasimilarly
sunny day in 2001 when hijacked airlin-
ers were crashed into the World Trade
Center. Nearly 200 other people died
when a third airliner hit the Pentagon —
Vice President Joe Biden led a ceremony
thereonThursday, andformer President
George W. Bush’s Defense Secretary Do-
nald Rumsfeld attended — and others
were killed when yet a fourth plane
crashed in Pennsylvania.
Enthusiastic, emotional New Yorkers
waited on streets to see the president,
but there were fewdisplays like the more
raucous exuberance of a fewdays earlier.
There were happy faces, shouts of “USA!
USA!” and flags waved in the crowd, but
there also was heavy security and most
people were cordoned off blocks from
where the president could be seen.
Referring to the daring U.S. raid to
take down bin Laden in Pakistan, Oba-
ma saidof all those who diedonSept. 11:
“It says we keep them in our hearts. We
haven’t forgotten.”
Days after the attacks, then-President
George W. Bush stood here with fire-
fighters and a bullhorn. There was a dif-
ferent feel a decade later as another pres-
ident paid his respects. Obama met with
firefighters, thenpolice, before
meeting privately with fam-
ilies of those who died.
“This is a symbolic site of
the extraordinary sacrifice
that was made on that terrible
day,” the president said at En-
gine 54, Ladder 4, Battalion 9.
The firehouse in New York’s
theater district lost 15 fire-
fighters on 9/11, more than
any other firehouse. The fire
crews gave him hearty ap-
plause.
Obama said the American pursuit of
the terrorist leader “sent a message
around the world but also sent a mess-
age here backhome that whenwe say we
will never forget, we mean what we say,
that our commitment to making sure
that justice is done is something that
transcended politics, transcended par-
ty.”
Bin Laden was shot dead in a raid on
his Pakistan compound early Monday in
Pakistan, the result of years of painstak-
ing intelligence work and a covert mil-
itary mission in which none of the U.S.
commandos was killed.
The president closed his eyes and
clasped his hands at the outdoor memo-
rial where the twin towers of the World
Trade Center once dominated the Man-
hattan skyline.
Now the nearby skyline is filled with
construction machinery. The emerging
skyscraper informally known
as Freedom Tower is more
than 60 stories high. Mam-
mothfountains andreflecting
pools mark the footprints of
the fallen towers.
Obama spoke with chil-
dren who lost parents and
adults who lost spouses. As
he bowed his head, a jetliner
screamed by, far overhead.
The president also pep-
pered his brief comments
with reminders of the chal-
lenges ahead, andhis call for a newspirit
of national unity.
It wasn’t a moment for celebrating the
military operation that killed bin Laden;
that may come today, when the presi-
dent visits Fort Campbell, Ky., home to
the Army unit involved in transporting
Navy SEALS in and out of bin Laden’s
compound. White House officials said
Obama intended to privately thank par-
ticipants in the raid.
ObamasaidThursdayhehopedthere-
sults of the raid on bin Laden’s com-
poundshowedthat “we didwhat we said
we were going to do, and that Ameri-
cans, even in the midst of tragedy, will
come together, across the years, across
politics, across party, across administra-
tions, to make sure that justice is done.”
Former NewYork Mayor Rudy Giulia-
ni, who led the city in the days after the
attacks, joined Obama during the day.
Obama invited Bush to join him
Thursday in New York, but the former
president declined.
Obama’s visit came as new details
emerged of the operation on bin Laden’s
Pakistan compound.
Obama also addressed bin Laden’s
burial at sea, saying in an interviewwith
CBS’ “60 Minutes” that: “Frankly, we
took more care on this than, obviously,
binLadentookwhenhekilled3,000peo-
ple.”
Such details perhaps mattered little to
New Yorkers who suffered most griev-
ously in the attacks.
Ahead of Obama’s arrival, Deanne
McDonald stood at the northeast corner
of the WorldTrade Center site wavingan
American flag in each hand and shout-
ing “Obama got Osama! Obama got Osa-
ma!” “God bless the Navy SEALS,” said
McDonald, 38, of Brooklyn.
OBAMA
Continued from Page 1A
AP PHOTO
From left, Capt. John McGee, firefighter Daniel Squire, Capt. Thomas Venditto,
firefighter Leonard Sieli and Battalion Chief Jack Joyce face the media at the
station for Engine 54 Ladder 4 Battalion 9 Thursday in New York.
Obama addressed
families who
have watched
and wondered for
nearly a decade
whether the
government
would track down
its most infa-
mous enemy.
WASHINGTON—Evidence
collected from Osama bin La-
den’s compound in Pakistan in-
dicates that al-Qaida considered
an attack on America’s rail sys-
tem in February 2010, U.S. offi-
cials said Thursday, but there
was no sign of concrete plans to
carry it out.
The plot was “aspirational,’’
said a U.S. official who spoke on
conditionof anonymity
because of the sensi-
tive nature of the infor-
mation.
The apparent threat
was found in the docu-
ments, computers,
hard drives, flash
drives, DVDs andother
material that U.S. com-
mandos recovered af-
ter they killed bin La-
den in his hideout
Monday. It was thefirst informa-
tionfoundinthe raidtobe made
public.
In response to the newintelli-
gence, the Department of
Homeland Security sent a bulle-
tin to state and local police
Thursday urging officers to re-
main at a “heightened state of
vigilance,’’ said spokesman
Matt Chandler.
“We have no information of
any imminent terrorist threat to
the U.S. rail sector, but wanted
to make sure our partners are
aware of the alleged plotting,’’
Chandler said.
Terrorists aligned with or in-
spired by al-Qaida have targeted
trains with deadly effect in the
past.
In March 2004, coordinated
bombings of commuter trains in
Madrid, Spain, killed191people
and injured about 1,800. In July
2005, four suicide bombers blew
up three subway trains and a
double-decker bus in London,
killing 56 people and injuring
about 700.
U.S. authorities have in-
creased the number of airport
security personnel, and tight-
ened screening for passengers
and cargo coming into the coun-
try since the raid.
Trains and subway systems
are more difficult to se-
cure, given the millions
of people whouse them
every day. Police and
bomb-sniffing dogs
make random checks
on platforms, stations
and aboard trains.
Mass-transit systems
and passenger trains
“unfortunately remain
a target,’’ John Pistole,
the Transportation Se-
curity Administration adminis-
trator, said at a congressional
hearing on rail security Wednes-
day. He said they had been “the
focus of numerous plots here in
the U.S.—unsuccessful, fortu-
nately.’’
Mass transit is “the most vul-
nerable,’’ said Rep. Peter King,
R-N.Y., chairman of the House
HomelandSecurity Committee,
which held the hearing. “and
having been to London and to
Madrid and seen the terrible
damage that was done there by
al-Qaida, you realize . . . how
much easier it is for terrorists to
attack mass transit ….’’
Report: al-Qaida eyed
attacks on U.S. rail
System in U.S. is put on alert
after 2010 plot found at
terrorist leader’s compound.
By BRIAN BENNETT
Tribune Washington Bureau
Terrorists
aligned with
or inspired by
al-Qaida have
targeted
trains with
deadly effect
in the past.
ISLAMABAD — Pakistan’s ar-
my broke its silence Thursday
over the U.S. commando raid
that killed Osama bin Laden, ac-
knowledging its own “shortcom-
ings” in efforts to find the al-Qai-
da leader but threatening to re-
view cooperation with Washing-
ton if there is another similar
violation of Pakistani sovereign-
ty.
The tough-sounding state-
ment was a sign of the anger in
the army. It also appeared aimed
at appeasing politicians, the pub-
lic and the media in the country
over what’s viewed by many here
as a national humiliation deliver-
ed by a deeply unpopular Amer-
ica.
While international concerns
are centered on suspicions that
elements of the security forces
sheltered bin Laden, most Pakis-
tanis seem more upset that unin-
vited American soldiers flewinto
the country, landed on the
ground and launched an attack
on a house — and that the army
was unaware and unable to stop
them. That it happened in an ar-
my town, next door to a military
academy and close to the capital
has added to the embarrassment.
Ties between the two coun-
tries were already strainedbefore
the raid because of American al-
legations that Islamabad was fail-
ing to crack down on Afghan Ta-
liban factions sheltering on Pa-
kistani soil. Pakistan was an-
gered over stepped-up U.S. drone
strikes and the case of Raymond
Davis, a CIA contractor who
killed two Pakistanis in January.
While U.S. Secretary of State
Hillary Rodham Clinton said
Washington would continue en-
gaging with Pakistan, the fallout
from Monday’s raid has added a
new layer of tensions to a rela-
tionship that is crucial to stabiliz-
ing Afghanistan and allowing
American troops to begin with-
drawing this year.
The U.S. needs Pakistan’s
cooperation for, among other
things, ferrying supplies to NA-
TO forces in Afghanistan. Wash-
ington has given the Pakistani ar-
my more than $10 billion in aid
over the past decade to help it
fight militants.
The tone of the army state-
ment was in sharp contrast to the
initial response to the raid by the
country’s civilian leaders. Prime
Minister Yousuf Raza Gilani had
hailed the operation as a “great
victory” but made no mention of
any concerns over sovereignty.
The army statement was is-
sued after the country’s 12 top
generals met with army chief
Gen. Ashfaq Kayani, regarded as
the most powerful man in the
country, to discuss the operation
and its implications on “military
to military relations with the
United States.”
It said Kayani told his col-
leagues that a decision had been
made to reduce the number of
U.S. military personnel to the
“minimum essential” levels. The
statement gave no more details,
and an army spokesman declined
to elaborate. The U.S. has about
275 declared U.S. military per-
sonnel in Pakistan at any one
time, some of them helping train
the Pakistani army. U.S. officials
were not immediately available
for comment.
The army warned the United
States not to launch another at-
tack like the one that took out
bin Laden. On Wednesday, U.S.
State Department spokesman
Mark Toner did not rule out the
possibility the U.S. would do just
that.
Many of the world’s most
wanted militants are believed to
be in Pakistan, including Ayman
al-Zawahri, the man likely to suc-
ceed bin Laden, as well as leaders
of the Afghan insurgency like
Mullah Omar and Siraj Haqqani.
Pakistan to U.S.: No more raids
AP PHOTO
Pakistan’s Foreign Secretary Salman Bashir addresses a news conference with spokesperson Teh-
mina Janjua, right, at the Foreign Office in Islamabad on Thursday.
Nation’s army admits to
“shortcomings,” displays
anger over the operation.
By CHRIS BRUMMITT
Associated Press
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com FRIDAY, MAY 6, 2011 PAGE 7A
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AUDITED
NEWSPAPER
IN LUZERNE COUNTY
– AUDIT BUREAU OF CIRCULATIONS (ABC)
DALLAS TWP. – Township
police are investigating the theft
of a black 2001 Honda ATV with
dark green handlebars from a
residence in the Dallas Mobile
Home Park Wednesday morn-
ing.
Police said the ATV, owned
by Denise Smith, has two Grate-
ful Dead stickers on the front
and has a wide rear axle.
Anyone with information
about the theft is asked to con-
tact Police Chief Robert Jolley
at 674-2001.
HANOVER TWP. – Township
police reported the following:
• Jai Pandya, of Lee Park,
reported Sunday that someone
used his debit card without
permission in April.
• Eva Gumolka, of Lynd-
wood, reported Monday a fam-
ily member used her credit card
without permission.
• A Glen Lyon man was tak-
en to a hospital after a crash at
Front and South streets in Up-
per Askam at 7:10 a.m. Monday.
Police said Jeff Pieszola struck a
utility pole at the intersection.
NANTICOKE – City police
reported the following:
• Len Stefaniak, of West
Green Street, reported someone
tried to enter his residence
through a basement door.
• Police cited Kenneth Sliker,
of Apollo Circle, with public
drunkenness after investigating
a disturbance in the Apollo
Circle apartment complex.
• Lillian Garcia, of East
Washington Street, reported
someone forced open the front
door to her residence, causing
damage.
• John Heck, of Coal Street,
reported a 9 mm handgun and a
loaded magazine were stolen
from his residence.
• Frank Castrignano reported
copper pipe was stolen from a
house he owns on East Ridge
Street.
• Donna Littzi, of East Green
Street, reported someone
slashed a tire on her vehicle.
• May Burger reported a
window was smashed on a
house she owns on East Ridge
Street.
• Steven Bruns, of West
Green Street, reported someone
vandalized his vehicle.
• Jamie Coen, of West South
Street, reported someone dam-
aged a wheel on her lawn mow-
er.
• Jill Jeffries, of River Street,
reported a two-cycle mini Har-
ley-Davidson and a weed trim-
mer were stolen from her shed.
• Robert Ottensman, of River
Street, reported a child’s gas-
powered quad was stolen from
his shed.
• John Storm, of River Street,
reported a pad lock was cut on a
storage trailer. No items were
stolen.
• Police charged William
James Cupp, 53, last known
address as West Green Street,
with violating a protection from
abuse order on April 28, when
Loretta Fenner claimed he
slapped her on West Green
Street.
• Police charged Desalegn Y.
Tefera, 30, of Wilkes-Barre, with
violating a protection from
abuse order on April 29, when
Rahel Alemu claimed he con-
tacted her at Luzerne County
Community College.
• Police charged William
Michael Conway, 25, of Nanti-
coke, with violating a protection
from abuse order on May 1,
when he allegedly confronted
his ex-girlfriend, Erin Shea,
while she was shopping at Weis
Markets.
WILKES-BARRE – City
police reported the following:
• Copper piping was stolen
from the former Hart Restau-
rant on Hazle Avenue, police
said Wednesday. Officers re-
sponded to a report of a pos-
sible break-in and found the
back door kicked in. Police said
that when they went inside they
saw that the piping had been
removed.
• Altiore Wheeler of Race
Street, Hillside, N.J., was
charged with violating a protec-
tion from abuse order Wednes-
day. Wheeler’s ex-girlfriend,
Marissa Corbett of Diebel
Street, Wilkes-Barre, said she
was driving south on North
River Street when she saw him
crossing the intersection at
North Street. Corbett said as
she passed Wheeler she over-
heard him yell a threat to harm
her. Corbett drove to police
headquarters, where she filed a
complaint, police said.
• A 17-year-old male was
charged with public drunk-
enness and underage drinking
after he was seen jumping in
and out of the path of vehicles
near the intersection of Dana
Street and South Pennsylvania
Avenue on Saturday night. The
teenager was highly intoxicated
when police responded to the
location, police said. The teen-
ager was taken into custody and
later released to his father.
• A flag valued at $115 was
reported stolen from a pole
outside St. Stephen’s Episcopal
Church between 10 p.m. Sunday
and 2:30 p.m. on Monday.
HAZLE TWP. – A Milnesville
man died at Lehigh Valley Hos-
pital in Allentown on Monday
from injuries he suffered in an
ATV crash.
State police at Hazleton iden-
tified the man as Michael Be-
nyo, 21.
Benyo was operating a 2009
Kawasaki ATV when he traveled
off the roadway while negotiat-
ing a curve, striking a utility
pole at about 6:43 p.m. Sunday,
state police said.
Benyo was flown to the hospi-
tal, where he died from multiple
traumatic injuries, according to
the Lehigh County Coroner’s
Office.
HAZLE TWP. – State police
Wednesday said they are in-
vestigating complaints by the
administration of Hazleton Area
High School of people in posses-
sion of devices that disrupt cell
phone signals.
Anyone with information
about the devices is asked to
call state police at 459-3890.
HAZLE TWP. – State police
are investigating the attempted
break-in to a safe at a Dunkin
Donuts store on North Church
Street.
Two employees said they saw
a man in the back room of the
store trying to open a safe
around 8:50 p.m. on Thursday.
Nothing was taken and the man
fled out a rear door, state police
said.
The white male was wearing
a dark-colored, hooded sweat-
shirt and dark pants. The hood
was pulled over his head and his
face was partially covered with
a bandana.
Anyone with information is
asked to call state police at
459-3890.
WILKES-BARRE – City
police reported the following:
• Three people were taken
into custody Thursday after two
of them were seen removing
pistols from a backpack and
placing them in their waist-
bands Thursday afternoon near
the intersection of East North-
ampton Street and Wilkes-Barre
Boulevard, police said.
When police made contact
with the three, Demitrius Par-
ham of, Parrish Street, Wilkes-
Barre, was seen moving his
hands to his waistband and
appeared to be chambering a
round into a pistol, police said.
Police said they found a pistol
on him and another pistol be-
hind a vehicle near him.
Parham was charged with
possession of a firearm and
attempted aggravated assault.
Police also charged Eric Cona-
han of North Hancock Street
with possession of a firearm. A
17-year-old juvenile with the
men tried to use a false name
and forged a signature on a
fingerprint card, police said. He
was released into the custody of
juvenile probation officers.
Parham and Conahan were
committed to the Luzerne
County Correctional Facility for
an overnight arraignment.
• Michael Williams , 31, of
Heisz Street, Edwardsville, was
arrested Sunday morning for
allegedly trying to break into
the Bell Furniture building on
South Main Street.
Williams had worked at the
store and knew of a laptop com-
puter inside, police said.
Williams faces charges of
attempted burglary, trespass
and criminal mischief. The state
probation and parole also had a
warrant out for him, police said.
• Victoria Moses reported
Monday someone stole items
from her vehicle on Old River
Road.
• Donald Boyer and Mark
Jude Krebs of Davis Place were
charged with public drunk-
enness Saturday night after
police said the two men were
highly intoxicated on Academy
Street. Krebs had to be taken to
a local hospital due to his high
level of intoxication, police said.
Boyer was taken to police head-
quarters and held until he was
sober.
• Annie Deyo, of Vanloon
Street, Plymouth, will be
charged with possession of drug
paraphernalia after police said a
hypodermic needle was found
in her vehicle during a traffic
stop on Sunday afternoon. Deyo
admitted it was hers and said
she injected Suboxone, police
said.
• Tires on three vehicles
were reported flattened Sunday.
The vehicles belonged to Joseph
Bitonti of Kado Street; Colleen
Whalen, in the rear of Scott
Street; and an unnamed owner
on Railroad Street.
• Alice Sennett of Stucker
Avenue told police Sunday that
her mother’s residence was
burglarized. An unknown
amount of money was reported
taken in the break-in.
• Thom Greco told police
Sunday that a window and two
potted plants were damaged at
a property he owns on North
Main Street.
• Drew Gommer of Summit
Street was charged with public
drunkenness Saturday night
after having an argument in
which he allegedly slapped
Mary Frey. Frey did not want to
file a harassment charge against
Gommer, but when an officer
located him, he was intoxicated
and taken into custody. Gom-
mer was released into the custo-
dy of a family member.
• Stephone Deshaw Hollman
of East Main Street, Plymouth
will be charged with harassment
after allegedly punching Melissa
Marie Curry of McCarragher
Street in the face on Saturday
afternoon.
• Joseph Jackiel of Amber
Lane was charged with public
drunkenness Saturday night
after he was reported to be
passed out in Frank’s Pizza on
South Main Street. Police found
him on the front sidewalk of the
business and said he was highly
intoxicated. He was taken into
custody and held until he was
sober.
• Gary Demski, of Thorny
Apple Drive, Hunlock Creek,
and Mark Heath, of Laird
Street, Wilkes-Barre, face charg-
es after they allegedly removed
copper piping from a Wilkes
University building on South
Franklin Street. Police were
dispatched on a report of two
men inside the building, found
the two men outside and de-
tained them.
• Brian Dougherty, of Mary
Street, Ashley, will be charged
with public drunkenness after
police said they found him
sleeping in a hallway of a build-
ing on High Street Friday night.
POLICE BLOTTER
Boy injured in Wilkes-Barre
DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER
A young boy was injured Thursday afternoon when the
bicycle he was riding came in contact with a car driven by
Justin Kita, 18, of Wilkes-Barre, on South Franklin Street.
Police said the boy entered the roadway mid-block as Kita
was traveling north. The boy, who was not identified, suf-
fered minor injuries and was taken to a local hospital for
treatment. The investigation into the accident is ongoing,
police said.
K
PAGE 8A FRIDAY, MAY 6, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ O B I T U A R I E S
The Times Leader publish-
es free obituaries, which
have a 27-line limit, and paid
obituaries, which can run
with a photograph. A funeral
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829-7224, send a fax to (570)
829-5537 or e-mail to tlo-
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confirm. Obituaries must be
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through Thursday and 7:30
p.m. Friday and Saturday.
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or must name who is hand-
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address and phone number.
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O B I T U A R Y P O L I C Y
G enetti’s
AfterFu nera lLu ncheons
Sta rting a t$7.95 p erp erson
H otelBerea vem entRa tes
825.6477
Tom “T.P.” Pape
Happy Birthday In Heaven
May 6, 1958
to
August 12, 2010
You may be gone, but you will
never be forgotten
Happy 53rd Birthday!
Miss you much, Your Sister,
Maryann
BIALAUS – Bernadine, funeral 10
a.m. Saturday from the Stanley S.
Stegura Funeral Home Inc., 614 S.
Hanover St., Nanticoke. Mass of
Christian Burial at 10:30 a.m. in
the secondary site of St. Fausti-
na’s Parish, formerly St. Mary of
Czestochowa Church, Hanover
Street, Nanticoke. Friends may
call 5 to 7 p.m. today.
CARLO – Arlene, funeral 9:30 a.m.
today from the Nat & Gawlas
Funeral Home, 89 Park Ave.,
Wilkes-Barre. Divine Liturgy at 10
a.m. in St. Anthony’s Maronite
Catholic Church, Park Avenue,
Wilkes-Barre.
DAVENPORT – Warren Jr., funeral 11
a.m. today from the Clarke Piatt
Funeral Home Inc., 6 Sunset Lake
Road, Hunlock Creek.
GEMBERLING – Rose, funeral 10
a.m. today from The Richard H.
Disque Funeral Home Inc., 672
Memorial Highway, Dallas.
JONES – Mary, memorial service 11
a.m. Saturday in the Reyburn
Bible Church, Shickshinny. Grave-
side military services by the
Shickshinny American Legion
Post.
KNAPP – Ronald, funeral 11 a.m.
Saturday at the Sunshine Full
Gospel Church, Sunshine Road,
Shickshinny. Friends may call at
the church 9 a.m. until the time
of services.
KOHAN – Peter Jr., funeral with
Panachida 9:30 a.m. Saturday
from the John V. Morris-Charles
J. Leagus Funeral Home, 281 E.
Northampton St., Wilkes-Barre.
Office of Christian Burial with
Divine Liturgy at 10 a.m. in St.
John the Baptist Byzantine
Catholic Church, 526 Church St.,
Wilkes-Barre Township. Visitation
and remembrances 4 to 7 p.m.
today with Parastas service at 6
p.m.
KOREY – George, a prayer service 2
p.m. May 28 at the Mercy Center
Chapel, Misericordia University
Campus, Dallas. All are welcome
to attend.
KOSSA – Frank, funeral 4 p.m.
Saturday from the Harold C.
Snowdon Funeral Home Inc., 140
N. Main St., Shavertown. Friends
may call 2 p.m. until the time of
services at the funeral home.
MOSHIER- Mary Lou, memorial
Mass 11 a.m. Saturday in St. Jude
Church, Mountain Top.
OKO – Stasia, funeral 9:30 a.m.
Saturday from the Mark V. Yanai-
tis Funeral Home, 55 Stark St.,
Plains Township. Mass of Chris-
tian Burial at 10 a.m. in St. Bene-
dict Church, Austin Avenue,
Wilkes-Barre. Friends may call 5
to 8 p.m. today at the funeral
home.
OLIVER - Alice, funeral 11 a.m. today
from the William A. Reese Funeral
Chapel, Rear 56 Gaylord Ave.,
Plymouth.
PERUGINO – Vittoria, funeral 9:15
a.m. today from the Kopicki
Funeral Home, 263 Zerbey Ave.,
Kingston. Mass of Christian Burial
at 10 a.m. in St. Therese’s Church.
RUTSKI – Joseph, funeral 10 a.m.
today at the Bednarski Funeral
Home, 168 Wyoming Ave., Wyom-
ing.
VALESHA – Anthony, funeral 9:30
a.m. Saturday from the Hugh B.
Hughes & Son Inc. Funeral Home,
1044 Wyoming Ave., Forty Fort.
Mass of Christian Burial at 10 a.m.
in St. Therese’s Church, Shaver-
town. Friends may call 5 to 8 p.m.
today at the funeral home.
WILLIAMS – Irene, family and
friends may call 9 to 9:30 a.m.
today at the Karl E. Blight Funeral
Home, 392 Wyoming Ave., King-
ston. A celebration of life at 11:30
a.m. today at the Dorranceton
United Methodist Church, 549
Wyoming Ave., Kingston.
FUNERALS
FANNIE COOPER THOMAS,
89, of Tucson, Ariz., formerly of
Forty Fort, died Monday, May 2,
2011, at Tucson Medical Center.
Born in Forty Fort, she was a
daughter of the late Frederick W.
and Margaret Gyurcsik Cooper.
She graduated from Forty Fort
High School. Preceding her in
death were husband, Edward R.
Thomas; and son, Russell W. Tho-
mas. Surviving are daughters,
Dianne E. Thomas and husband
Ronald Balog, Tucson, Ariz., and
Ruth Cassidy, Idaho; grandchil-
dren, Bradley Thomas, Lora Jones
and Elizabeth Cassidy; and daugh-
ter-in-law, Janet Thomas.
Funeral service will be held at
1:30 p.m. Saturday from the Hugh
B. Hughes & Son Inc. Funeral
Home, 1044 Wyoming Ave., Forty
Fort. Interment will be in Memo-
rial Shrine Cemetery, Kingston
Township. Friends may call from
12:30 p.m. until the time of servic-
es.
CLARISSA “TOOTSIE” SIMS,
60, a life resident of the Wyoming
Valley and formerly of Larksville,
died Wednesday, May 4, 2011.
Funeral arrangements are
pending fromthe Yeosock Funeral
Home, 40S. MainSt., Plains Town-
ship.
E
ugene L. Kozlowski Jr., 45, of
Shavertown (Jackson Town-
ship), passed away Tuesday, May 3,
2011, at the Geisinger Wyoming Val-
ley Medical Center, Plains Town-
ship, surrounded by his family.
Mr. Kozlowski was born May 5,
1965, in Nanticoke, and was a son of
Eugene andAda Rule Kozlowski Sr.,
of Jackson Township.
Gene graduated from Lake-Leh-
man High School in1983. He assist-
ed in coaching his daughter Hay-
ley’s softball teamfor Lake-Lehman
and loved to watch her play. Gene
was also a Flyer’s hockey fan.
He was employed by Travelocity,
Hanover Township, for the last five
years.
Surviving, in addition to his par-
ents, are his wife, Holly, whom he
married on August 7, 1992; and his
daughter, Hayley, with whomhe en-
joyed traveling, especially on cruis-
es. He is also survived by a sister,
Melissa, andher fiancé, Steve Pesta;
and nephewBrandon, all of Jackson
Township. He enjoyed golfing, on
occasion, with his father-in-law,
Floyd, and brothers-in-law, J.D. and
Mike.
Friends maycall from6 to 9 p.m.
today at the Curtis L. Swanson Fu-
neral Home Inc., corner of routes 29
and118, Pikes Creek. Funeral servic-
es will be private.
The family requests that inlieuof
flowers, memorial contributions be
sent to the SPCA of Luzerne Coun-
ty, 524 E. Main St., Fox Hill Road,
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702; or the
Make-A-Wish Foundation of Grea-
ter Pennsylvania, The Gulf Tower,
707 Grant St., 37th Floor, Pitts-
burgh, PA15219-1916.
Eugene L. Kozlowski Jr.
May 3, 2011
P
eter Kohan Jr., 88, of Chestnut
Street in the Georgetown sec-
tion of Wilkes-Barre Township,
passed into Eternal Life peacefully
early Wednesday morning, May 4,
2011, in the Little Flower Manor,
Wilkes-Barre.
Born July 11, 1922, in Wilkes-
Barre Township, he was a son of
the late Peter and Mary (Grohol)
Kohan Sr.
He was a graduate of the former
Wilkes-Barre Township High
School. Following his education,
he joined the military and served
with the U.S. Army during the Sec-
ond World War in the European
Theater. He earned the rank of ser-
geant, serving with Company D,
1308th Engineering General Ser-
vice. Later, his tours of duty would
include service inthe Pacific Thea-
ter prior to his honorable dis-
charge in 1946.
Until his retirement, he was em-
ployed by Johnson Engineering of
Wilkes-Barre as a machinist for
several years. He was a founder
and member of the Wilkes-Barre
Township American Legion Post
No. 815.
Mr. Kohan was preceded in
death by a brother, John; and by a
sister, Anna Kohan.
Surviving are his brother Mr. Jo-
seph Kohan and his wife, Anna, of
Wilkes-Barre Township; a niece,
Joanne Wood, and her husband,
Peter, of Kingston; and three great-
nephews.
Mr. Kohan’s family would like to
acknowledge Dr. John Kish, D.O.,
his staff, and the staff of Little
Flower Manor for the professional
care and compassion he received
from them over the years.
Funeral services with Pana-
chida will be conducted at
9:30 a.m. Saturday from the John
V. Morris-Charles J. Leagus Funer-
al Home, 281 E. Northampton St.,
Wilkes-Barre Heights, followed by
the Office of Christian Burial with
Divine Liturgy at 10 a.m. in Saint
Johnthe Baptist Byzantine Cathol-
ic Church, 526 Church St., Wilkes-
Barre Township. The Rev. Myk-
haylo Prodanets, pastor, will serve
as celebrant, andMr. George Daru,
cantor. Interment with Rites of
Committal will be in Saint Mary’s
Byzantine Catholic Cemetery,
Lake Street, Dallas. Relatives and
friends may join Mr. Kohan’s fam-
ily for visitation and remembranc-
es from 4 to 7 p.m. today. A Paras-
tas service will be conducted 6
p.m. with Fr. Prodanets officiating.
The Wilkes-Barre TownshipAmer-
ican Legion, Post No. 815 will con-
duct militaryhonors at 6:30p.m. at
the funeral home.
Memorial donations, if desired,
may be made in Peter’s memory to
Saint John the Baptist Byzantine
Catholic Church, 526 Church St.,
Wilkes-Barre Township, PA18702.
TosendMr. Kohan’s brother and
familyonline words of comfort and
friendship, please visit our website
at www.JohnVMorrisFuneral-
Homes.com.
Peter Kohan Jr.
May 4, 2011
ARTHUR W. HARDING, of
Kingston, passed away Tuesday,
May 3, 2011, inPinellas County, St.
Petersburg, Fla., where he has re-
sided for the past eight years. Art
was born in Plainsville on Novem-
ber 25, 1909, and resided in King-
ston from1933 until 2003.
A ceremony will be scheduled
for early June in Wilkes-Barre for
all of his family and friends still liv-
ing in the Wyoming Valley.
B
illie J. Gross, 84, of Port Orange,
Fla., passed away Tuesday, May
3, 2011, at Hospice Volusia Flagler
County, Port Orange, Fla.
BorninDuryea, he was a sonof the
late Joseph and Gertrude Miller
Gross. He was a graduate of Duryea
High School and the American Insti-
tute of Watch Repair, Philadelphia,
Pa.
Billie served in the U.S. Navy dur-
ing World War II. Prior to his retire-
ment, he was employedby Sears Roe-
buck, Wilkes-Barre.
He was a current member of Ger-
mania Hose Co., Duryea, where he
served as a fire chief for many years
prior to moving to Florida. He also
taught state fire school in the area.
Billie was a member of the Cross
Roads Baptist Church, Florida.
Surviving are his wife, the former
Gladys Vogel of Port Orange, Fla.;
son, William Joseph Gross, and his
wife, Susan, of Frederick, Md.;
daughter, Barbara Jean Jackson, and
her husband, Bruce, of Little River,
S.C.; two grandsons, William Gross
Jr. and Wesley Gross; as well as niec-
es and nephews.
Funeral services will be held
at 12:30 p.m. Saturday at the In-
dependent Bible Church, Duryea,
withthe Rev. Albert Cremardofficiat-
ing. Interment will be in Marcy Cem-
etery, Duryea.
If desired, Memorial Contribu-
tions may be made to Hospice Volu-
sia Flagler County, 3800 Woodbriar
Trail, Port Orange, FL 32129.
Arrangements are by the Bernard
J. Piontek Funeral Home Inc., 204
Main St., Duryea.
Billie J. Gross
May 3, 2011
E
mil A. Goryeb, of Kingston,
passed away Wednesday, May 4,
2011, at the Wilkes-Barre General
Hospital following complications
fromanillness. He is survivedby his
wife, Dorene Schmid Goryeb. To-
gether, they celebrated their 57th
wedding anniversary on February
14, 2011.
Born in Park Slope, Brooklyn,
N.Y., he was a son of the late Wadia
and Mountaha Khazhal Goryeb.
Emil attended Peekskill Military
Academy and served in the U.S. Ar-
my. He was stationedinHeidelberg,
Germany, during the Berlin Crisis.
Early in his professional career,
he created Babbage Systems, New
York City, named for Charles Bab-
bage, who originated the concept of
programmable computers. He
served as president for this mid-
sized computer company.
In 1978, Emil and his family
moved to Northeast Pennsylvania,
where he followed his passion for
food, and, along with his wife and
children, opened Jim Dandy’s Sa-
loon and Eatery in Edwardsville. In
1984, the Clarks Summit location
opened and the Goryeb family en-
joyed29 years of providing food, fun
and entertainment to the people in
and around the area.
Emil was responsible for coining
the phrase and restaurant slogan,
“You’ll Have a Jim Dandy Time,”
and could be heard singing and per-
forming voice-overs for the Jim
Dandy’s radio and television com-
mercials. He was known for singing
at both restaurant locations and
even sang the song for the first
dance at his children’s wedding re-
ceptions.
Emil was a devoted and loving
husband, father, grandfather, broth-
er and uncle who truly enjoyed
spending time with his family.
His son, Gregg; brother, Naim;
sister, Alice and her husband, Ha-
rold Nelson; and sisters-in-law, Mar-
guerite Goryeb, Marie Gilia, and
Grace and husband, Harold Knip-
per, preceded him in death.
Inadditiontohis wife, Dorene, he
is survived by his son, Glen, and his
wife, Bridget Goryeb, of Dalton; his
daughter, Tracy, and her husband,
Joseph Zarola, of Shavertown; four
grandchildren, Emily and Gregg
Goryeb, and Patrick and Adam Za-
rola; a brother, Joseph Goryeb of
Mendham, N.J.; a sister, Lila, and
her husband, Adrian Basili, of Gil-
lette, N.J.; sisters and brothers-in-
law, Virginia Goryeb of Whitehouse
Station, N.Y.; Mike and Maureen
Schmid of Lake Luzerne, N.Y.; and
Dave Gilia of Carbondale, Pa.; as
well as several nieces and nephews.
Celebration of Emil’s Life
will be held at 9 a.m. Saturday
fromMcLaughlin’s, 142 S. Washing-
tonSt., Wilkes-Barre, witha Funeral
Mass at 10 a.m. in the Church of
Saint Ignatius Loyola, North Maple
Avenue in Kingston. Interment will
be in Our Mother of Sorrows Ceme-
tery, FinchHill, Carbondale, Pa. Vis-
itation will be held from 5 to 8 p.m.
today from McLaughlin’s.
Memorial donations are pre-
ferred and maybe made to the
Transplant Foundation, Gift of Life
Donor Program, 401 N. 3rd St., Phi-
ladelphia, PA19123; or The Goryeb
Children’s Hospital, 100 Madison
Ave., Morristown, NJ 07962.
As he was a 2008 recipient of a
successful kidney transplant, Emil’s
family asks everyone to consider be-
coming an organ donor and extends
special thanks to Dr. Robert Engel,
Renal Consultants, the staff at
Wilkes-Barre General Hospital and
the University of Pittsburgh Medi-
cal Center, and Erwine Health Care
for their compassionate care.
Permanent messages and memo-
ries canbesharedwithEmil’s family
at www.celebratehislife.com.
Emil A. Goryeb
May 4, 2011
SAMANTHA V. CLAUDIO, 17,
of Edwardsville, died Monday,
May 2, 2011.
Funeral arrangements are
pending fromthe Yeosock Funeral
Home, 40S. MainSt., Plains Town-
ship.
P
atricia J. Chiampi, 72, of West
Pittston, peacefully passedaway
Wednesday afternoon, May 4, 2011,
at the Inpatient Unit of Hospice
Community Care at Geisinger
South Wilkes-Barre, surrounded by
her loving children and husband.
She was born March 24, 1939, in
Plains Township, a daughter of the
late Russell and Anna Vissotski
Gambini. She was a graduate of the
Plains Memorial High School and
married her husband of 52 years,
John “Ochie” Chiampi, on Septem-
ber 12, 1959. She was a life resident
of West Pittston and was a member
of Corpus Christie Parish/ Immac-
ulate ConceptionChurch, West Pitt-
ston.
In the later stages of her life, she
devoted her time, weekends and ho-
lidays caring for the elderly at The
Laurels in Kingston. Patricia dedi-
cated her life to the caring of
friends, family and strangers. She
was a devoted wife, loving mother,
caring grandmother, and was
adored by children and dogs. Pat
took the time to enjoy the simple
things in life such as cooking for her
family, long rides in the country,
and visiting family in California,
NewJersey andNorthCarolina. She
was compassionate, strong-willed,
and the anchor in her family. She
will be dearly missed.
She has been preceded in death
by her brothers, Russell and Ralph
“Buddy” Gambini.
Surviving are her husband of 52
years, John A. “Ochie” Chiampi Sr.;
sons, Joseph T. Chiampi and his
wife, Mary Ellen, West Wyoming;
and John A. Chiampi Jr. and his
wife, Cindy, West Pittston; and a
daughter, RoslynAnderson, andher
husband, Lance, Morristown, N.J.;
grandchildren, Anthony, Joseph
andJohnIII; sisters, Shirley Antosh,
Plains Township, and Barbara
McDermott, NorthCarolina; as well
as numerous nieces and nephews.
Funeral services will be held at
9 a.m. Monday fromthe Anthony L.
Recupero Funeral Home, 406 Sus-
quehanna Ave., West Pittston, with
a Mass of Christian Burial at 9:30
a.m. in Corpus Christie Parish/ Im-
maculate Conception Church, 605
Luzerne Ave., West Pittston, with
Msgr. John Sempa as Celebrant. In-
terment will be in West Pittston
Cemetery. Friends may call from 4
to 8 p.m. Sunday at the funeral
home.
The family wouldlike to especial-
ly thank the doctors and nurses at
the Carol G. Simon Cancer Center
in Morristown, N.J., and the caring
staff of Hospice Community Care at
Geisinger South Wilkes-Barre for
their compassion and care over the
last several years.
In lieu of flowers, the family re-
quests that memorial contributions
may be made inthe name of Patricia
Chiampi to Hospice Community
Care, 601 Wyoming Ave., Kingston,
PA18704.
Patricia J. Chiampi
May 4, 2011
D
ouglas Arthur Shelley, 68, a for-
mer resident of Harveys Lake,
died Saturday, April 30, 2011, at his
home in Zephyrhills, Fla., after a
lengthy battle with lung cancer. His
final days were spent withhis family
by his side.
Mr. Shelley was born November
15, 1942, a sontothe late Arthur and
Beatrice Shelley. He attended West-
moreland High School, Shaver-
town, and graduated from Wilkes-
Barre Business School, Wilkes-
Barre. After graduation, he met and
married Karen Faux Shelley on Au-
gust 3, 1968.
He belonged to the National
Guard 109th Artillery from 1964
through 1970.
His father, Arthur, built a coast-
to-coast tractor-trailer business in
1968, Arthur Shelley Inc., Dallas.
Arthur, his brother, Eugene, and
Douglas operated the business side
by side until the death of their fa-
ther, Arthur, in 1980. Douglas and
Eugene Shelley continued to work
side by side enabling the company
to be introduced to the third gener-
ation of the Shelley family in 1985.
In 2002, the company ceased oper-
ations.
His interests included traveling
in his motorhome during the sum-
mer months through the Rocky
Mountains andYellowstone Nation-
al Park for many years. After retire-
ment in 2002, he became a “snow-
bird,” living his winter months in
Florida and summer months with
his daughter in Pennsylvania. He
devoted his life to his wife, daugh-
ter, grandchildren, family and
friends.
He was preceded in death by his
parents and nephew Mark Shelley.
Mr. Shelleyis survivedbyhis wife
of 42 years, Karen; daughter, Bever-
ly Shelley; grandchildren, Kailee
and Steven Taylor, Hunlock Creek;
brother, Eugene, and wife Patricia,
Baltimore, Md.; as well as several
nieces; nephews, and cousins.
Familyandfriendswill beno-
tified of a memorial service
that will take place at a later time.
Donations may be made in lieu of
flowers to a Hospice Care Center of
the donor’s choice.
Douglas Arthur Shelley
April 30, 2011
ANTHONYA. TWYMAN, 14, of
Nanticoke, passed away Wednes-
day afternoon, May 4, 2011, at the
Hershey Medical Center, Hershey.
Funeral arrangements are
pending from the Bednarski &
Thomas Funeral Home, 27 Park
Ave., Wilkes-Barre.
T
homas D. Rolland, 30, of Lu-
zerne, passed away Wednesday
afternoon, May 4, 2011.
Born in Kingston, he was a son of
William Rolland Jr., of Shavertown,
and the late Mary Charlene (Den-
nis) Rolland.
Tommy was a graduate of Wyom-
ing Valley West High School, class
of 1999, and attended Indiana Uni-
versity of Pennsylvania.
He was a member of Cross Creek
Community Church, Carverton.
Tommy was an avid Notre Dame
Football fan and was a lover of mu-
sic. He was a very empathetic, fun-
loving guy who loved to fish and
mountain bike.
Surviving, in addition to his fa-
ther, are his wife, the former Ange-
lique Morris, Luzerne; brothers,
William Rolland III and his wife,
Stacy, Warrington, Pa., and Robert
Rolland and his wife, Liza, Dallas;
five nieces and nephews; paternal
grandmother, MiriamRolland; step-
mother, Sharon Rolland; father and
mother-in-law, Anthony and Elaine
Morris; as well as aunts, uncles and
cousins.
Funeral Services will be held at
theconvenienceof thefamily. There
will be no calling hours.
Arrangements are by the Corco-
ran Funeral Home Inc., 20 S. Main
St., Plains Township.
The family requests that flowers
be omitted and that memorial dona-
tions may be made to the Luzerne
Foundation in Tommy’s name, c/o
140 Main St., 2nd Floor, Luzerne,
PA18709.
Onlinecondolences maybemade
at www.corcoranfuneralhome.com.
Thomas D. Rolland
May 4, 2011
J
oseph T. Youngblood, 82, of Sha-
vertown, died Thursday, May 5,
2011, at his home.
Born in Kingston, Joe was a son
of the late Henry and Marie Bach-
mann Youngblood. He was a gradu-
ate of Kingston High School, class
of 1946.
Joe was a U.S. Army veteran serv-
ing during the Korean War.
Employed by Bell Telephone for
37 years, Joe worked as a construc-
tion foreman and retired in 1985 as
an outside plant engineer.
Joe served on the Board of Direc-
tors of DAMA for more than 30
years. He was a lifetime member of
the Shavertown Fire Co., a member
of Kingston Township Ambulance
Association and St. Conrad’s Young
Men’s Association, Wilkes-Barre.
Joe was a member of St. There-
se’s Church, Shavertown, and its
Holy Name Society.
Preceding him in death, in addi-
tion to his parents, were his son Mi-
chael J. Youngblood; brothers, Ed-
ward and Carl Youngblood; and a
sister, Margaret Hayden.
Surviving are his wife, the former
Ruth Cadden, with whomhe shared
60 years of marriage as of May 5,
2011; sons, Robert J. and wife Judi-
th, Hanover Township; William J.
and wife Joy, Dallas; Joseph C. and
James J., both of Shavertown; and
Paul J. and wife Mary Ann, Plains
Township; six grandchildren, six
great-grandchildren, as well as sev-
eral nieces and nephews.
Funeral services will be held
at 9:30 a.m. Monday from the
Harold C. Snowdon Funeral Home
Inc., 140 N. Main St., Shavertown. A
Mass of Christian Burial will follow
at 10 a.m. in St. Therese’s Church,
Shavertown. Interment will be
made in Mt. Olivet Cemetery, Carv-
erton. Friends may call from 4 to 7
p.m. Sunday at the funeral home.
Joseph T. Youngblood
May 5, 2011
WEST WYOMING -- The West
Wyoming recycling containers
are now located behind Hose
Co. No. 1. Recycling can be
dropped off any day of the week.
The borough accepts newspa-
per, magazines, office paper,
books, cardboard and commin-
gled items.
No. 1 recyclables include
soda, water, flavored beverage
bottles, salad dressing bottles,
peanut butter jars and may-
onnaise jars.
No. 2 recyclables include milk
jugs and laundry detergent
bottles, shampoo, drain cleaner
and aspirin bottles.
No plastic sheets or packing
materials will be accepted. Emp-
ty and rinse bottles, aluminum,
tin and food service cans. There
will be no foil or aluminum
trays, or glass bottles and jars
(no lids). Also, no windshields,
window glass, dinnerware or
ceramics. Newspaper, maga-
zines, and office paper recycling
includes newspapers and every-
thing delivered with them, in-
cluding inserts, coupons, etc.
All clean and dry paper can be
recycled, including office paper
and shredded paper, magazines,
junk mail, phone books, writing
paper (all colors), computer
paper, Xerox paper, catalogs and
brochures. Cardboard contain-
ers that are recyclable include
corrugated cardboard boxes,
cereal boxes, cake boxes, frozen
dinner boxes, paper egg cartons,
soda/beer carrying boxes, paper
grocery bags, gift boxes and
shoe boxes. Flatten or cut boxes
to fit them into the container.
LOCAL BRIEFS
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com FRIDAY, MAY 6, 2011 PAGE 9A
➛ N E W S
887Wyoming Avenue •Wyoming • 693-2584 887W i A W i 693 2584
Mon. - Fri
9a.m - 7 p.m.
Sat. & Sun.
9a.m - 6 p.m.
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$
4.95
1 gal. Perennials
WILKES BARRE -- Crowds of
workers came out Thursday
against proposed state budgetary
cuts that opponents say threaten
to devastate public education,
health care and the environment.
Therally, heldat theRiverCom-
monAmphitheaterandsponsored
by the NEPA Area Labor Federa-
tion, is one of many recent gather-
ings across thestateinresponseto
Gov. Tom Corbett’s proposed
2011-2012 bud-
get. His plan
would cut more
than $400 mil-
lion to public
K-12 education
and another
$650 million to
higher educa-
tion.
The plan will
also cut nearly
1,500 state jobs
and $150 mil-
lion in state
Medicaid fund-
ing while leas-
ing state forest-
land to gas and oil rights, and in-
crease spending on prisons by
morethan$180million. Themess-
age at the rally was one of unity
andstoppinganattackonthemid-
dle class.
Protesters held signs in support
of public schools and condemna-
tion of school voucher programs.
School districts stand to lose an
average of $2 million because of
the proposed cuts in education.
Luzerne County schools will lose
atotal of $22millionwhileschools
in Lackawanna County will see
$14.5 million cut. Opponents say
these cuts could force districts to
raisetaxesorcut programs, orpos-
sibly both. Some programs that
face being phased out include full-
day kindergarten, advanced place-
ment courses, art and sports pro-
grams.
"Seven out of 10 students who
graduatefromhighschool goonto
higher education; they’re not go-
ingtobeabletoaffordacollegede-
gree," said Glen S. Galante, presi-
dent of Northeastern Region of
the Pennsylvania State Education
Association. Cutting education at
any level will result in an increase
inclassroomsize anda dropinthe
quality of education.
Mark McDade, president of the
Riverside Education Association,
sees Senate Bill 1, the so-called
Voucher Bill, as one of the most
important issues that needs to be
brought to the public’s attention.
“Vouchers will only further segre-
gate our communities, destroy
our neighborhoodschools androb
our children of a great public
school education,” he said.
Voucher proponents argue the
bill will save taxpayers money and
improve education through com-
petition. Opponents say that
vouchers could cost taxpayers an
additional $1billion annually.
WhileCorbett plans tocut fund-
ing to public programs, he is also
proposing more than $170 million
in business tax credits.
StateRep. EddieDayPashinski,
D-Wilkes-Barre, reiterated the
day’s message of solidarity in his
speech to the crowdbefore ending
by leading the crowdona chant of
“We are one.”
Onsitewas agiant plasticbottle
that will befilledwithmessages to
Gov. Corbett, sealed, and sent
down the Susquehanna to Harris-
burg.
PENNSYLVANI A F I NANCES
Rally targets state budget cuts
FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Glen S. Galante, president of the Northeastern Region of the Pennsylvania State Education Associ-
ation, speaks at the Wilkes-Barre rally on Thursday.
FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Union member Diane Brewster of Edwardsville waves to traffic on
River Street in Wilkes-Barre at Thursday’s rally.
A regional labor federation
holds a demonstration at
Wilkes-Barre’s River Common.
By STEFFEN LIZZA
Times Leader Correspondent
“Vouchers
will only
further
segregate
our com-
muni-
ties…”
Mark McDade
Riverside
Education
Association
SALEM TWP. – Reactor Unit
No. 2 at the nuclear power plant
near Berwick will remain shut
downforanadditional fourtosix
weeks after an inspection re-
vealedsome defects insome tur-
bine blades.
PPLspokesmanJoe Scopelliti
said the reactor at the Susque-
hanna Steam Electric Station
has beenshut downsinceApril 5
for its biannual inspection and
the replacement of fuel rods and
some other upgrades.
When staff found “indications
of cracks” in some of the low-
pressure turbine blades, the de-
cision was made to extend the
outageandreplacethoseblades.
“The turbine blade inspection
is a normal part of our outage in-
spection, but wedidn’t expect to
find defects in the blades,” Sco-
pelliti said.
Eachof the tworeactors at the
plant heat water into steam,
whichiscarriedtoturbinegener-
ators. Eachgenerator has a shaft
with a high-pressure turbine on
one end attached to three low-
pressure turbines, the last of
which is attached to the genera-
tor shaft.
The blades of the turbines
catch the steam and cause the
shaft to spin at about 1,800 revo-
lutions per minute, which en-
ables the generator to create
electricity.
Each turbine weighs about
170 tons and has hundreds of
blades. Because defects were
foundina fewblades, most or all
will beinspected, Scopelliti said.
Every two years, the plant
shuts down one of the reactors
for about a month to replace
about 40 percent of the fuel rods
and perform other modifica-
tionsandupgradesalongwithan
inspection, he said.
Scopelliti said PPL is also up-
grading the plant’s control sys-
temto a newdigital system.
The work done during a bian-
nual outage usually totals be-
tween $20 million and $30 mil-
lion, he said.
Turbine problem
keeps reactor shut
By STEVE MOCARSKY
smocarsky@timesleader.com
TUNKHANNOCK – U.S.
Rep. Tom Marino, R-Lycoming
Township, will hold an open
house today ,11 a.m. to 1 p.m.,
at his Constituent Service
Center, 181 W. Tioga St., Tunk-
hannock. The public is invited
to meet with the congressman
at that time. For information,
call 836-8020.
PLYMOUTH – U.S. Reps.
Tom Marino, R-Lycoming
Township, and Lou Barletta,
R-Hazleton, will host a U.S.
Service Academy Day 11 a.m.
to 2 p.m. Saturday at Wyoming
Valley West High School, 150
Wadham St., Plymouth. Stu-
dents from all school districts
who are interested in learning
more about service academies
are welcome.
Representatives of the Army,
Navy, Air Force, Merchant
Marine and Coast Guard aca-
demies will be in attendance.
LEGISLATIVE BRIEFS
C M Y K
PAGE 10A FRIDAY, MAY 6, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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6” Non Stop Begonia
SUGAR NOTCH – Things be-
came a bit heated during the bor-
ough council meeting on
Wednesday night.
Disagreement arose during
discussions of a proposed bor-
ough recycling plan.
The borough has enough extra
money in the garbage fund this
year to order a Dumpster for re-
cycling. The proposed plan
would not be run by
the borough but by a
private company at a
cost of between $75 to
$150 per month, de-
pending on the size of
the Dumpster and how
often the recyclables
would be collected.
The debate on coun-
cil came not on the effi-
cacy or necessity of the program,
but in an apparent misunder-
standing of who was responsible
for researching the exact costs
and bringing that information to
the council. At last month’s
meeting, council member Do-
minic Panetta gave fellow coun-
cil member and Luzerne County
Council candidate Mario Fioruc-
ci information about the pro-
gramto further research the cost
and bring to this month’s meet-
ing. Fiorucci didn’t perform the
research that Panetta had intend-
ed, apparently believing that all
the necessary information was
already brought to council.
“The range is $75 to $150, so
the middle is $100 per month,”
Fiorucci said. “If you want recy-
cling, that is the cost.”
Panetta didn’t want council to
proceed with the program until
an exact cost is decided upon;
however, after some bickering,
the dispute became impas-
sioned.
Fiorucci also questioned the
occupancy fee of $35 whenever
someone moves into a new resi-
dence. He is challenging the or-
dinance in an appeals case of his
own, and the question
arose at the meeting of
whether the fee is to be
paid when a residence
becomes unoccupied
and then reoccupied or
if the fee needs to be
paid every time a person
moves into a residence
regardless of whether it
was ever vacated.
Fiorucci also questioned what
compensation Sugar Notch
could receive if a fire call in War-
rior Run turned out to be a false
alarm.
Emotions briefly ran high as
Fiorucci became exasperated
with running into opposition on
council, and Fiorucci and Panet-
ta began shouting at each other.
Someone left to get the borough
police, but the meeting had
calmed down and adjourned just
before they arrived.
Officials have heated talk
over issues in Sugar Notch
Emotions run high over a
recycling plan and amending
the resident occupancy fee.
By STEFFEN LIZZA
Times Leader Correspondent
The next regu-
larly scheduled
council meeting
is 7 p.m.
Wednesday,
June 1.
W H AT ’ S
N E X T
NANTICOKE – City Council
approved two motions and the
payment of monthly bills total-
ing $303,971 by unani-
mous votes Wednes-
day night.
The first vote was
the second reading of
an ordinance to allow
a procedural change.
That change allows
the use of first class
mail as an adequate
method to provide ser-
vice to violators of an ordi-
nance.
The second vote was a resolu-
tion to award the heating, venti-
lation and air conditioning ren-
ovation contract for the Nanti-
coke fire station to low bidder
PLDAssociates of Wilkes-Barre
for a bid amount of $147,777.
Holly Quinn, city administra-
tor, told council the city was set-
ting up procedures to switch
earned income tax collector
firms from Berkheimer to the
Don Wilkinson Agency. She
said this change was the result
of the state mandate that one
collector be used by all munici-
palities and school districts in
each county.
She said the Luzerne County
Tax Collection Committee, on
which she is the city’s represen-
tative, had selected the Don
Wilkinson Agency.
AShe said the change
would be implemented
during the next few
months.
City Clerk Mary Beth
Cheshinski announced a
free “City Wide Yard
Sale” on June 4. She said
more information can be
obtained fromfliers that
are being posted around Nanti-
coke or by calling her office at
City Hall.
Mayor Joseph Dougherty,
and council members Margaret
Haydock and Jon Metta were
present. Councilmen Brent Ma-
karczyk and James Litchkofski
were unable to attend the meet-
ing.
Council held a closed-door
executive session at the end of
the regular meeting.
Nanticoke OKs pact
for work on firehouse
The City Council modifies
procedure for notifying
violators of ordinances.
By WILLIAMBELL
Times Leader Correspondent
Nanticoke City
Council’s next
regular meet-
ing is sched-
uled for May 18
at 7 p.m.
W H AT ’ S
N E X T
WILKES-BARRE – A woman
accused by Kingston police and
Luzerne County detectives of
killing her boyfriend pleaded
not guilty to a criminal homi-
cide charge on Thursday.
Kathleen Jordan, 48, entered
her not-guilty plea through her
attorney, Demetrius Fannick, at
a formal arraignment before Lu-
zerne County Judge William
Amesbury. She remains jailed
without bail at the county pris-
on.
A formal arraignment is when
prosecutors inform the accused
of the details of the charges
against the defendant. In this
case, Jordan was officially ad-
vised she is charged with crimi-
nal homicide. The brief hearing
is also when the defendant of-
fers a plea of guilty or not guilty.
The formal arraignment also
begins the discovery phase of a
case, the exchanging of evi-
dence between prosecutors and
defense lawyers.
Investigators allege Jordan
killed Milo Vincent Reilly, 45,
inside a Valley View Drive, Prin-
gle, house on March 8. The cou-
ple had been in a relationship
for 18 months and lived in the
basement of the house, investi-
gators said.
Jordan allegedly told investi-
gators she left the house after
an argument with Reilly. She
said she returned later that
night and had to smash a win-
dow to unlock the door.
Jordan said the argument
continued for the rest of the
night. Reilly was on a bed, Jor-
dan told investigators, when
she reached into a closet and
grabbed a loaded shotgun that
she fired at his head, according
to the affidavit of probable
cause.
Several months before the
deadly shooting, Kingston po-
lice had charged Reilly with as-
saulting Jordan during a domes-
tic dispute at the home in De-
cember.
Assistant District Attorneys
Chester Dudick and Rebecca
Reimiller are prosecuting.
Woman pleads not guilty in death
Kathleen Jordan makes plea
in homicide case in which Milo
Vincent Reilly died in Pringle.
By EDWARD LEWIS
elewis@timesleader.com
WILKES-BARRE -- The Wilkes-Barre
NAACP will hold its second and last Meet-
the-Candidates Forum before the May 17
primaries on Tuesday at 6 p.m. in the Fel-
lowship Hall of Mt. Zion Baptist Church,
105 Hill St., Wilkes-Barre.
This forum will be for the judicial and
magistrate candidates, as well as for the
city mayor, council and Wilkes-Barre Area
School Board candidates who did not at-
tend the first Meet-the-Candidates Forum
held April 16.
Organizers said that because of the large
number of candidates running for Luzerne
County Council and the tight time con-
straints, the group cannot guarantee an
opportunity for them to speak. However,
those candidates are more than welcome.
The event is open to the general public,
and there will be snacks and refreshments.
NANTICOKE – Luzerne County judicial
candidate Mike Blazick will host a meet
and greet Saturday from 7 to 9 p.m. at the
Nanticoke Eagles Club, 48 E. Ridge St.,
Nanticoke. Admission is free and refresh-
ments will be served.
POLITICAL BRIEFS
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com FRIDAY, MAY 6, 2011 PAGE 11A
C M Y K
PAGE 12A FRIDAY, MAY 6, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Photographs and information must
be received two full weeks before your
child’s birthday.
To ensure accurate publication, your
information must be typed or comput-
er-generated. Include your child’s
name, age and birthday, parents’,
grandparents’ and great-grandparents’
names and their towns of residence,
any siblings and their ages.
Don’t forget to include a daytime
contact phone number.
We cannot return photos submitted
for publication in community news,
including birthday photos, occasions
photos and all publicity photos.
Please do not submit precious or
original professional photographs that
require return because such photos can
become damaged, or occasionally lost,
in the production process.
Send to: Times Leader Birthdays, 15
North Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711-
0250.
GUIDELINES
Children’s birthdays (ages 1-16) will be published free of charge
➛ C O M M U N I T Y N E W S
If your child’s photo and birthday
announcement is on this page, it will
automatically be entered into the
“Happy Birthday Shopping Spree”
drawing for a $50 certificate. One
winner will be announced on the first
of the month on this page.
WIN A $50 GIFT
CERTIFICATE
HAPPY BIRTHDAY!
Joseph Ryan Glazenski, son of
Dr. Joseph and Melody Glazen-
ski, Mountain Top, is celebrating
his eighth birthday today, May 6.
Joseph is a grandson of Joe
Glazenski Sr. and the late Blasine
Glazenski and the late Angela
Midgett.
Joseph R. Glazenski
FORTY FORT: A special
Vinyasa yoga class will be
offered in honor of Moth-
er’s Day at 9:30 a.m. on
Sunday at Balance Yoga &
Wellness, 900 Rutter Ave.,
second floor. All mothers
may attend free of charge.
Refreshments and sweet
treats compliments of Can-
teen 900 will follow.
For more information,
call 714-2777 or visit
www.balanceyogastudio-
.net.
HARDING: A roast beef
dinner will be served from
5 to 7 p.m. Saturday at
Mount Zion United Metho-
dist Church, Mount Zion
Road. Takeouts begin at
4:30 p.m.
Cost is $9 for adults and
$5 for children. For tickets,
contact Carole at 388-6565
or Bob at 823-2484.
IN BRIEF
May 15
DUPONT: Polish American
Citizens Club at 2 p.m. at the
club, Elm Street. Active PACC
members are encouraged to
attend. Refreshments will be
served.
PITTSTON: Knights of Lithuania
Council 143 at noon at St.
John the Evangelist Commu-
nity Church Hall. On the Serv-
ing Committee are Rita Craze,
Ursula Danoski and Marilyn
Fitzgerald. New members are
invited. Jean Mihalick will
preside.
MEETINGS
Kathleen Scaler Scott, an
assistant professor of speech-
language pathology at Miser-
icordia University, has had her
book, “Clut-
tering: A
Handbook of
Research,
Intervention
and Educa-
tion,’’ pub-
lished by
Psychology
Press in
February.
Scaler Scott edited the book
with David Ward. It was devel-
oped to release the latest
theories and research on
cluttering, a communication
disorder that affects a per-
son’s ability to speak in a clear,
concise and fluent manner.
Using evidence-based data, as
well as information regarding
the assessment and treatment
of cluttering within the field of
SLP, the first volume since
1992 includes the latest re-
search findings and work from
leading cluttering experts
around the world. The book is
intended for SLP clinicians,
faculty members, researchers
and students in the field of
speech pathology, and for
people who clutter or their
family members.
NAMES AND FACES
Scaler Scott
Plymouth Township Fire and Rescue Company, Tilbury Station 169,
is conducting its annual fund drive. Letters have been mailed to
township residents. Funds raised will be used to defray equipment
and insurance costs. The fire department reminds area residents to
check or replace batteries in their smoke detectors. Members of the
team, from left, are Mary Nash, fund drive chairwoman; Andy Novak,
line chief; Shane Bardo, firefighter; Merrit Nash, line chief; and John
Nash, chief engineer.
Fund drive will support Plymouth Twp. Fire and Rescue
‘Booked for Death,’ an original murder mystery, will be performed by local thespians affiliated with
the Eckley Players at 7 tonight and Saturday at St. Paul’s Lutheran Parish Hall in White Haven. Tickets
are $10 at the door and proceeds will benefit the White Haven Area Community Library. Some of the
cast members, seated, are Sandy Myers and Virginia Bell. Standing: Bobby Maso, Karen Esak, Kimberly
DelRegno, Bryan Dunnigan, Phil Voystock, Annette Maso, and Joe Scalise.
Eckley Players to perform murder mystery in White Haven
The Wyoming Valley Woman’s Club will present a Spring Fashion
Show and High Tea beginning at noon on May 24 at AppleTree Ter-
race, Newberry Estate in Dallas. Admission is $20. Tickets can be
purchased by calling Eileen Davis at 824-8461. The show will feature
the latest spring and summer fashions and accessories from partici-
pating businesses: The Dress Barn, Mary’s Bridal Trinkets, The Blue
Hydrangea, Humphrey’s Bootery & Bags and Mary Taylor’s Hair Sa-
lon. Chairwomen are Carol Carroll, Joan Hudak and RoseMarie Pan-
zitta. Committee members, seated, are Joan Hudak; Edna Morgan,
president, and Eileen Davis, ticket chairwoman. Standing: Carroll;
Alice Hudak, commentator; and Anna Elmer, board member.
Wyoming Valley Women’s Club to present High Tea
The Back Mountain Memorial Library welcomed its 2011 board of directors at a meeting in the li-
brary’s community room. The board includes, first row: Kathy Millington, board secretary; Pauline
Kutz, Frederick Krohle, Anne Davies and Tamera McMahon. Second row: Ernest Ashbridge, Martha
Butler, library director; Ron Moran, Kay Simmons, and Vi Gommer, board vice president. Third row:
Edward Ciarimboli, Thomas MacNeely, board president; Dan Volpetti, William Grant, and Kenneth
Chapple. Absent: Dick Orlowski, board treasurer; Shirley Moyer, Eric Martin, Dick Evans, Mary Ann
Finch and Joann Freeman.
Back Mountain Library announces board of directors
The Luzerne-Wyoming Counties Transportation Department has
added four wheelchair vans and five bus vans to its fleet as part of a
Community Transportation Capital Equipment Grant from the Penn-
sylvania Department of Transportation. For more information on the
van service, call 288-8420. Representatives, from left, are Tom Lan-
don, fleet manager, LWCTD; Luzerne County Commissioner Thomas
P. Cooney; Joseph DeVizia, director, Luzerne County Office of Human
Services; Mary K. Dysleski, interim director LWCTD; and Luzerne
County Commissioner Maryanne C. Petrilla.
Wheelchair and bus vans added to fleet
Cub Scout Pack 193 conducted a
‘Scouting for Food’ drive throughout
Swoyersville, Forty Fort, Kingston and
Luzerne. More than 550 food items
were collected and donated to Holy
Family’s food bank in Luzerne. Cub
Scout Pack 193 meets at Holy Name/St.
Mary’s Church and Holy Trinity Church
in Swoyersville. Scouts with the many
food items, first row, are Dylan Nastan-
ski, Even Janis, Noah St. Clair, Jacob
Dunsil, Caleb Troutman, Adam Cavalari,
Zeb Moses, Stephen Stemmler, and
Owen Kelly. Second row: Connor Nanki-
vell, Lucas Geiger, Charles Heckman,
Ian Cavalari, Tyler Sullivan, Chance
Trask, and Louis Heckman. Third row:
Andrew Fuller, Justin Hargrave, Riley
Dieffenbach, Gabe Gillespie, Cameron
Duesler, Zach Romig, Maxx Turner and
Colin Matello.
Cub Scouts perform drive
for Holy Family food bank
The Wilkes University Polish Room Committee is accepting new members. The committee provides
scholarships to students of Polish ancestry and participates in educational and cultural events related
to Polish history and culture. The group will meet at 5 p.m. on Tuesday in the Shawnee Room at Happy
Pizza, Main Street, in Plymouth. Reservations can be made by contacting Joyce Latoski at 823-5743.
At a recent meeting, kneeling, are Bernadine Tarasek, Delphine Bienick, and Helen Grebski. Seated:
Mary Ann Martin, Fran Macy, Marie Vojtek, Josephine Kline, Josephine Zuba, Jennie Witkowski, Martha
Broda, and Donna Stankiewicz. Standing: Mary Ann Drust, Rose Fritzen, Joyce Latoski, Joan Dzanko,
Jean Aritz, Wanda Hanna Witczak, Ivona Kocon, Renata Evan, Susan Najaka, Antoinette Luce, Barbara
Smith, Jean Lewandowski, and Janiece Demuro.
Wilkes University Polish Room Committee conducting membership drive
K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com FRIDAY, MAY 6, 2011 PAGE 13A
➛ S E RV I NG T HE P UB L I C T RUS T S I NC E 1 8 81
Editorial
C
HOOSING THE PEOPLE who
will guide Luzerne County’s
government as members of its
first county council shouldn’t be a
haphazard exercise – the ballot box
equivalent of playing darts while
blindfolded. Yet you and other voters
understandably might feel in the dark
on primary election day, May17, when
faced with so many choices.
Forty-nine candidates – 33 Demo-
crats and16 Republicans – are vying to
be among their respective political
party’s 11 picks to advance to the No-
vember general election and possibly
gain a seat on the council.
You probably won’t have an oppor-
tunity to meet all of them, much less
pepper each with questions for a half
hour.
We did. At least, we did our best.
An endorsement panel at The Times
Leader spoke with 46 council candi-
dates this spring; three others either
didn’t accept our invitation or were
unable due to scheduling conflicts.
Participants provided us with over-
views of their educational and career
highlights. They outlined personal
qualities and skills that might be per-
tinent to overseeing a government
with nearly 1,700 workers and an an-
nual budget of about $125 million.
And they described their viewpoints
on several of the major issues: ap-
pointing a county manager, adminis-
tering periodic property reassess-
ments and coping with the county’s
massive debt.
Our panel evaluated the candidates
based on their answers (or lack there-
of), their credentials and their ability
to communicate, the latter of which
will be key as part of an 11-person
council charged with making deci-
sions that impact 300,000-plus peo-
ple. Then we picked the men and
women best positioned to lead Lu-
zerne County.
Our endorsements of Republican
Party contenders appear on this page.
(Our endorsements of Democratic
Party candidates will be printed in
Saturday’s edition.)
The panel believed it important to
distinguish between the endorsed
candidates by using three categories:
“strongly recommended,” “recom-
mended” and “adequate.” Chiefly,
that’s because the candidates dis-
played wide variations in, among oth-
er things, their level of understanding
of county government’s operations
and scope.
You might have prior knowledge of
a handful of this year’s county council
candidates; you already might have
decided to vote for two or three whom
you consider especially well-quali-
fied, or with whom you are friends. Or
maybe you consider a few to be duds
who definitely won’t get your vote.
Our endorsements are intended to
help you and other conscientious vot-
ers sort out the muddle in the middle:
all those candidates about whom you
know little or nothing. We devoted
considerable hours to this process be-
cause of its importance in determin-
ing Luzerne County’s future direc-
tion. A majority of voters last Novem-
ber supported the home rule charter
initiative and wanted to see change;
this race is part of that change.
If you vote by relying on name rec-
ognition alone, you could do a disser-
vice to yourself and other county resi-
dents and taxpayers. Ditto for picking
candidates at random.
Use our endorsements, continuing
news coverage of the campaigns and
other resources to familiarize yourself
with the field. If desired, viewour pan-
el’s interviews with some or all – if you
have 23 hours to spare – of the candi-
dates. (Visit www.timesleader.com.)
Go to candidates’ webpages and
campaign events, too.
Our endorsement panel can’t con-
vey to you each candidate’s strengths,
much less their opinions on every
weighty topic, within a single edito-
rial page. Or even two. But we can re-
lay to you howwe – through our prism
as newspaper employees, county tax-
payers and homeowners who met with
the candidates individually – rank the
choices.
We took this task very seriously. We
hope you do, too.
OUR ENDORSEMENT: LUZERNE COUNTY COUNCIL – REPUBLICANS
For GOP voters, here are 1 1 worthy candidates
Zowie! Why all
these candidates?
Luzerne County voters in
November adopted a new,
home-rule form of govern-
ment. Instead of three com-
missioners, the county will
be guided beginning in
January 2012 by a Luzerne
County Council consisting
of 11 people.
The contest to determine
those council members has,
so far, attracted a whopping
49 candidates. The top 11
Republican vote-getters in
this month’s primary elec-
tion will face off in the fall
against the top 11 Demo-
cratic contenders, plus an
as-yet unknown number of
independent candidates.
Clip and carry
our picks to poll
The newspaper recom-
mends these 11 Republican
candidates for Luzerne
County Council receive
your votes.
Harry Haas
Eugene Kelleher
William McIntosh
Stephen J. Urban
William “Bill” James
Rick Morelli
Moderno “Butch” Rossi
John Ruckno
Michael Cabell
Kathleen Dobash
Edward Warkevicz
Full GOP field
deserves credit
These five Republican
candidates didn’t win our
endorsement panel’s sup-
port but they did earn our
respect merely for running:
Joyce Dombroski-Gebhardt,
Blythe H. Evans III, Joseph
A. Gorko, Gina Nevenglos-
ky (not interviewed by our
panel) and Linda J. Urban.
All demonstrated real de-
sire to help Luzerne County
thrive.
Don’t overlook
our endorsements
Read all of The Times
Leader’s endorsements for
the May 17 primary elec-
tion. Also, watch the candi-
dates’ interviews with our
endorsement panel and find
related news articles on our
website, www.timesleader-
.com.
Wednesday: Wilkes-Barre
mayor, Republican Party
Thursday: Wilkes-Barre
mayor, Democratic Party
• TODAY: Luzerne
County Council, Republican
Party
Saturday: Luzerne Coun-
ty Council, Democratic
Party
Sunday: Luzerne County
judges
STRONGLY RECOMMENDED
Harry Haas
The Wilkes-Barre resident, 35, teach-
es history at Dallas Middle School and
serves as an instructor of a citizen-
ship class for Luzerne County Com-
munity College in Hazleton. “I think a
big component of this job,” he said,
“is going to be the ability to work
collegially with people.”
Eugene Kelleher
The Dallas Township resident, 67, is a
retired mathematics teacher and
formerly served on Plymouth’s bor-
ough council. “I will be prepared so
that I could make logical decisions:
not political decisions, but logical
decisions,” he said.
William McIntosh
The Dallas Township resident, 42, has
worked in the public utility industry
for more than 16 years in technical
and management positions, most
recently as an electrical engineer.
“I’m fiscally conservative in my per-
sonal life, professional life and I would
be so in this position, too,” he said.
Stephen J. Urban
The Wilkes-Barre resident, 37, works
in the information technology field.
He is the son of current Luzerne
County Commissioner Stephen A.
Urban. “I believe in limited govern-
ment,” he said. “If government
doesn’t have to be involved, then they
shouldn’t be involved.”
RECOMMENDED
William “Bill” James
The Exeter Township resident, 66, own-
ed an electrical contracting business
and currently owns and trains race-
horses. “I would want to work my butt
off in every way possible, (examine)
every opening, before I’d want taxes
raised another iota.”
Rick Morelli
The Sugarloaf Township resident, 39,
works as a customer specialist in the
biopharmaceutical industry and
started a sleep and wellness center.
He served on both the Luzerne
County Government Study Commis-
sion and the subsequent Home Rule
Transition Committee.
Moderno “Butch” Rossi
The Lehman Township resident, 55, is
the purchasing and inventory coor-
dinator for the Wyoming Valley Sani-
tary Authority and has served for 12
years on the Lake-Lehman School
Board. “I feel my strengths are lead-
ership, and I treat everyone the
same.”
John Ruckno
The Dallas resident, 62, retired from
his job as a Mellon Bank investment
professional. He is the former presi-
dent of Forty Fort Lumber Co. “I
thought I could bring something to
the table,” he said. “I have some
business acumen … and I have no
political agenda.”
Michael Cabell
The Butler Township resident, 25, is
manager and operator of Traffic Control,
which offers roadside safety services
and commercial snow removal. He
serves as volunteer secretary for three
subcommittees assisting the county’s
Home Rule Transition Committee.
Kathleen Dobash
The Hazleton resident, 51, is an artist and
part-time therapeutic staff support
worker. “I can work with a group but still
make my own informed, independent
decision on what’s best for the taxpayers
of Luzerne County,” she said.
Edward Warkevicz
The Lehman Township resident, 63, has
worked in the financial services industry
for 39 years. “A lot of people are saying
that the unions are the big problem in
the county,” he said. “I think manage-
ment is a bigger problem than the
unions.”
ADEQUATE
C M Y K
PAGE 14A FRIDAY, MAY 6, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ N E W S
Telerx, a customer service call center
in the Hanover Industrial Estates, has
announced it will expand its work-
force by 40 to 50 thanks to a con-
tract with an international company.
We’re looking for you!
Lake Lehman
enjoys field
day fun
PHOTOS:
Volunteers of
America in
Wilkes-Barre
CLICK:
1974. The city alsowas awardeda
grant of more than $2 million it
applied for on behalf of Wilkes
University, which will partially
fundtheconstructionof anewsci-
ence building on campus.
Mayor Tom Leighton said
work, funded by a previous gam-
bling-revenue grant of $600,000,
has already begun at the former
bank, and that the newgrant will
be used to complete “mothball-
ing” of thebuilding, or makingre-
pairs to preserve structural integ-
rity and prevent further degrada-
tion.
Once repairs are completed,
the building, which was pur-
chased by the city for $225,000 in
2005, will bemoreattractivetoin-
vestorscurrentlyinterestedinthe
property but holding back be-
cause of the cost repairing the
bank, he said.
“It’s a structurally sound build-
ing that has great potential use,
andthis is the first stepinmoving
forward,” Leighton said.
The mayor said the building’s
design, character and structural
integritywouldmake it attractive
toanumber of businesses, adding
“we’ll do our due diligence to
make sure we have something in
there conducive to the revitaliza-
tion of the downtown.”
Science building
The grant to Wilkes University
will beput towardconstructionof
a new$35million, 70,000-square-
foot science building on South
RiverStreetbetweenStarkLearn-
ing Center and ConynghamHall.
Thebuilding, tobedesignedby
Saylor Gregg Architects, will
house the biology, chemistry and
earth sciences departments as
well as the Institute for Energy
and Environmental Research of
Northeast Pennsylvania, which
studies the impact of Marcellus
Shale drilling in the region.
The university plans to break
ground on the project by fall, and
expects to begin occupying the
building by the spring of 2013.
Wilkes President TimGilmour
called the grant funding “crucial”
to the project and said the build-
ing “will ensure Wilkes has the
leading-edge facilities needed to
train the best scientists, doctors,
engineers and researchers to
compete in today’s global econo-
my.”
Across the river, Kingston was
awarded $1 million to purchase
vehicles andequipment andtore-
vitalize a vacant strip mall on
Third Avenue.
Kingston Manager Paul Keat-
ing said the municipality applied
for $2.5millioninfunding; $2mil-
lion for the Jewish Community
Center project and $500,000 for
twodumptrucks, twopolicevehi-
cles andatruck-mountedvacuum
sweeper. He saidhe didnot know
how the grant funding would be
divided, but said he and Mayor
Jim Haggerty are “really excited
about the funding, and we feel
that it’s a good day for Kingston.”
According to Keating, the Jew-
ish Community Center of Wyom-
ing Valley plans to move into the
Kingston Plaza shopping center,
formerly home to Price Chopper.
A group of local Jewish investors
planning to develop the project,
Project Home RunLLC, also plan
to build medical office space and
senior housing units at the com-
plex.
JCC Director Rick Evans re-
ferredquestionsabout theproject
to members of the center’s board,
who did not return a request for
comment by deadline Thursday.
Tenother projects
Other projects receiving casi-
no-revenue funding for the first
time are:
• $1.48 million for the down-
town Pittston redevelopment
project. The grant will fund the
acquisition and demolition of 12
parcels to make way for a new
commercial building housing
medical and health care profes-
sionals with a public parking lot,
as well as façade andexterior ren-
ovation work to existing build-
ings.
• $898,000 for streetscape im-
provements and a parking lot ex-
pansion in Plymouth. The bor-
ough previously lost $1.255 mil-
lion in gambling tax money ear-
marked for the project in 2009
because it failed to provide re-
quested documentation about
the project to the state and prove
significant public input had been
sought.
• $461,350 to purchase ma-
chinery for a new regional yard
waste processing facility in Du-
pont.
•$226,332foracentral recycla-
ble materials depository to be
built in Foster Township.
•$100,000tobuildahelicopter
parking pad and security-camera
monitoring system at the Wyom-
ing Valley Airport in Forty Fort,
whichisownedbyLuzerneCoun-
ty.
•$100,000for theconstruction
of a paved parking area at Giant’s
Despair Heritage Park in Laurel
Run.
Some ongoing projects that
have received funds from previ-
ous rounds of local share grant
awards received additional fund-
ing this time around. They are:
• The Interstate 81, Exit 175
rampandstateRoute315corridor
improvement project in Jenkins
and Pittston townships. The pro-
ject has been promised $2.4 mil-
lioneachyear for fiscal years2007
through2011for atotal of $12mil-
lion, making it the largest total
dispersal to the county since the
program’s been in place.
• $1.25 million to construct
two parking decks above the
ChurchStreet Stationintermodal
transit center in Hazleton. The
project received an initial $1.05
million grant in 2010 and will get
another $1.25 million in funding
in each of the next two years for a
total allocation of $4.8 million.
• $1 million to continue the
East Side Landfill Development
project in Plains Township. The
project was promised $5 million
total with $1 million annual allo-
cations during a five-year span
that beganinfiscal year 2007. It is
nowcomplete.
• $500,000 to resurface 24
streets in Duryea. The borough
was awarded $200,000 of a prom-
ised $700,000 in 2010 for the pro-
ject, which began in May.
CASINO
Continued from Page 1A
that the policy and intent of our firm is
to continue to provide every client with
both the level of service and quality of
product consistent with has/her
needs.”
Amato on decision to restructure
Contacted Thursday, Amato said the
charges against Michael Pasonick were
not a factor in the decision to restruc-
ture the corporation.
“Mike has been out of the business
and we are the new principals,” Amato
said.
Asked if he thought the charges
against Michael Pasonick would nega-
tively impact the company, Amato de-
clined to comment.
Michael Pasonick formed Michael J.
Pasonick Jr. Inc., one of several corpora-
tions that bear his name, in 1976, ac-
cording to corporate records. Other
firms with which he is listed as an offi-
cer include Michael J. Pasonick Jr. &As-
sociates and Pasonick & Sergeant Inc.
Pasonick did not return a phone
message Thursday regarding the rea-
soning for the corporate restructuring.
His association with Pasonick & Associ-
ates is known to have negatively impact-
ed the business in at least one contract,
however.
Lost county contract in 2009
In December 2009, the Luzerne
County Housing Authority chose anoth-
er firm over Pasonick & Associates in
part due to allegations that had been
raised against Michael Pasonick, Au-
thority Director David Fagula said in a
previous interview.
At that time, Pasonick had been iden-
tified by attorney Michael Butera as the
person who paid a $1,400 bribe to for-
mer Housing Authority board member
William Maguire.
Butera’s client, Gerald Bonner, admit-
ted he passed the bribe to Maguire from
Pasonick. Maguire and Bonner each
pleaded guilty to charges related to that
case, but Pasonick was not charged.
Pasonick’s firms have done work for
numerous municipalities, school dis-
tricts and Luzerne County over the
years.
The county paid Pasonick’s firms
nearly $505,000 from2004 to April 2011,
but has no current contracts with Pason-
ick, according to the controller’s office.
County Commissioner Stephen Ur-
ban said he would oppose awarding any
future contracts to Pasonick companies
based on the charges.
“The allegations are he got business
by bribing someone. That is not a prop-
er course of conduct,” Urban said. “I
don’t want a company of that caliber
working for the county.”
Officials from several local municipal-
ities said they see no reason to stop us-
ing the firm, however.
Pasonick’s firm is involved in several
projects in Exeter, including updating
the borough’s zoning ordinance.
Council President Richard Murawski
said Thursday he does not believe the
charges against Michael Pasonick
should impact the borough’s dealings
with the firm.
“Personally, I’ve been involved with
the company for 20 years. I never had
any problem. When we request they do
something, they do it in a professional
and timely manner,” Murawski said.
Plans to retain Pasonick’s firm
Nanticoke City Administrator Holly
Sirko said she also does not see any rea-
son to stop using Pasonick’s firm.
“We employ the firmas the city’s engi-
neer. He is not a principal in the firm
anymore,” Sirko said. “We don’t plan to
make a change any time soon.”
John Bonita, business manager for
Pittston Township, echoed that senti-
ment. Pasonick was hired as engineer at
the township’s reorganization meeting
in January.
“It’s not going to matter to us at this
point,” Bonita said. “He is good till the
end of the year.”
Pasonick has been a licensed engineer
since 1970. It is not known yet what, if
any, impact the criminal charges will
have on his license.
Ron Ruman, spokesman for the state
Department of State, said he could not
comment specifically about Pasonick.
Speaking generally, he said the de-
partment would investigate should it
obtain information that any licensed
professional had been charged with a
crime.
“If we become aware of a criminal in-
vestigation, we can gather information
for our own investigation and take ap-
propriate action,” Ruman said. “That
could be anything from a fine to a revo-
cation of a license, depending on what
we find.”
PASONICK
Continued from Page 1A
not apply to pipelines, and Dal-
las Township goes beyond those
state guidelines.
He writes that by submitting
an application for land devel-
opment, the company is not
waiving its right to dispute the
need for an application, but
working with the township in
keeping officials and residents
informed.
Despite the letter, township
officials said the company will
still need to appear before the
township planning commission,
and construction will not begin
until land development approval
is granted.
The letter also says a zoning
application was submitted Jan.
19 and amended Feb. 24 for the
metering station, pipeline and
associated projects within the
township.
Therefore, Komoroski writes,
projects proposed in the town-
ship would follow its June 2008
zoning ordinance revision.
Township supervisors recent-
ly struck down proposed chang-
es to the zoning ordinance to
include regulations on natural
gas activities, but the board
passed a resolution to declare
its current zoning ordinance “in-
valid” to deal with “natural gas
exploration, processing, produc-
tion, transmission, odorizing,
metering, filtering, mainte-
nance, communication and re-
lated activities.”
This action gives the town-
ship 30 days to address the ordi-
nance’s inadequacies and 180 to
pass a curative amendment.
Solicitor Thomas Brennan
said he and Jack Varaly, the
township’s planning consultant,
will go over all natural gas ac-
tivity-based applications re-
ceived to determine if and how
the new measure applies.
Chief’s natural gas projects
have been the subject of three
continued zoning hearings since
February. The company first
had plans to build a compressor
station about 1,345 feet away
from the Dallas schools, but
due to local legislators’ and resi-
dents’ concerns, Chief amended
its application to include a me-
tering station for the site on the
Hayes property off Hildebrandt
Road.
PIPELINE
Continued from Page 1A
Township officials said May 31 is a
tentative continuation date for a
zoning hearing for Chief’s pro-
posed metering station off Hilde-
brandt Road.
W H AT ’ S N E X T
HARRISBURG — Policymak-
ers in Pennsylvania should im-
mediately strengthen rules that
make sensitive ecosystems, ar-
eas around water sources and
places where people live or work
off limits to natural gas drilling,
an environmental group said
Thursday.
The message comes as drilling
in Marcellus Shale natural gas
wells intensifies.
Philadelphia-based PennEnvi-
ronment said it has found per-
mitted Marcellus Shale sites
within two miles of numerous
day cares, schools and hospitals
in Pennsylvania. It also said
there are hundreds of instances
of environmental violations
flagged by state regulators at
Marcellus Shale drilling sites
within two miles of schools or
day cares.
State law pro-
vides for a buffer of
200 feet between a
drilling site and
buildings and pri-
vate water wells,
as well as a 100-
foot buffer around many water-
ways and wetlands.
Several bills awaiting action in
the GOP-controlled Legislature
would increase those buffers.
One, introduced by state Rep.
Karen Boback, R-Harveys Lake,
would increase existing buffers
to 1,000 feet. However, a compa-
ny would be able to get permis-
sion to drill within that buffer if,
for instance, it secured an own-
er’s permission or took extra pre-
cautions that satisfy state regu-
lators.
A bill introduced by state Sen.
Gene Yaw, R-Lycoming, would
increase the existing buffer
around water wells and buildings
to 500 feet. It would leave intact
the 100-foot buffer around water-
ways and wetlands, but allow
state regulators to impose a 500-
foot buffer around them for the
storage of hazardous chemicals
or materials.
Last year, House Environmen-
tal Resources and Energy Com-
mittee Chairman Bud George, D-
Clearfield, introduced a bill that
would have established a 1,000-
foot buffer around buildings and
water wells. It also would have
established a 2,500-foot buffer
around surface-water sources
and a 1,000-foot buffer around
groundwater sources for a driller
that uses hydraulic fracturing or
horizontal drilling.
That bill died without action
in the Democratic-controlled
House. He reintroduced it this
year.
For decades, energy compa-
nies have drilled shallow oil and
gas wells in Pennsylvania. How-
ever, in the last three years, fresh
environmental concerns have
arisen with the influx of energy
companies using high volumes
of chemical-laced water in a
process known as hydraulic frac-
turing to drill lucrative and deep
Marcellus Shale wells. They also
use the recent innovation of hori-
zontal drilling underground to
increase a well’s production.
Group wants stronger limits on drilling
PennEnvironment has found
Marcellus Shale sites near day
cares, schools and hospitals.
By MARC LEVY
Associated Press
NATIONAL DAY OF PRAYER OBSERVED
DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER
L
uzerne County Community College students Belinda Coulibaly and Hector M. Cancel
III joined faculty members and other students Thursday to take part in the National
Day of Prayer held each year on the first Thursday in May.
C M Y K
SPORTS S E C T I O N B
THE TIMES LEADER FRIDAY, MAY 6, 2011
timesleader.com
BOSTON —
Any resem-
blance to last
year is nothing
more than a
mocking coinci-
dence. Let us
begin there, as
the Flyers again contemplate
history.
Twelve months ago, they fell
into an 0-3 hole against the
Bruins in the second round of
the playoffs; same time, next
year. And while they do not
award style points in the NHL,
especially not in the springtime,
the reality is that the Flyers
played very well in those three
losses in 2010. By comparison,
they have been thrashed in two
of the three losses in 2011.
Wednesday night’s loss was a
deserved 5-1.
The identity of the more
complete team is not currently
in doubt. The probability that
the Flyers could pull off another
miraculous comeback, playing
at their current level, is ap-
proaching nil — which is why
they call them miracles, after
all.
“I think it does get tiring,”
defenseman Sean O’Donnell
said, when asked about this
team’s ridiculous penchant for
falling behind in games and
series. “But we have no one to
blame but ourselves.”
We will talk a lot about goal-
tending, because that is what
we do. And, yes, Brian Boucher
was pulled Wednesday night at
15:14 of the second period —
the sixth time in 10 playoff
games that the Flyers’ starter
was taken out of the game. It is
worth a long discussion, clearly.
But the only howler Boucher
allowed was the last one, when
the score was already 3-0 and
the Bruins were wringing the
life out of the game, and the
Flyers, with their neutral-zone
trap. They lost this one long
before Nathan Horton shot the
puck through Boucher’s legs
and forced Flyers coach Peter
Laviolette to go to his bullpen,
again.
As O’Donnell said, “We really
threw Boosh under the bus,
unfortunately.”
The only reason the Flyers
struggled to beat Buffalo in
seven games in the opening
round was their goaltending.
But this situation, in this series,
is much more complicated than
that. The Bruins, top to bottom,
appear to be the sturdier and
more persistent team. A Flyers
team with scoring on three lines
and more capable defensemen
than most teams has begun to
wilt.
The burden of coming from
behind, again and again, has
worn them down.
Defenseman Kimmo Timonen
talked about how “it felt like we
were skating in sand.” He said,
“We looked tired today, some-
how.” The Bruins really had
their hitting shoes on, despite a
stat sheet that awarded the
Flyers 31 hits to the Bruins’ 24.
The Flyers have begun to wear,
to fray.
Maybe they do miss defense-
man Chris Pronger that much;
another topic worthy of dis-
cussion. Pronger, with his mys-
terious series of undisclosed
ailments, has played in only
three games in the playoffs.
They are 2-1 with him and 2-5
without him. Again, this is
something that will be picked
over at length, one would as-
sume, after the season is over.
But it seems like more than
that. It isn’t just the goalie. It
isn’t just Pronger. It is the ex-
haustion, physical and mental,
from all of the digging out of
holes that they do.
The Flyers came out in the
first period and had nothing.
OPINION
R I C H H O F M A N N
Same story,
but different
chapter now
See HOFMANN, Page 6B
CHARLOTTE, N.C. – It’s a play that
Chris Collins knows he can’t take back.
While attempting to clear the puck dur-
ing a Charlotte power play early in the
third period on Wednesday, the Wilkes-
Barre/Scranton Penguins winger was
slashed on his wrist.
“It was a stinger and I went down,” Col-
lins said.
While he was on the ice, the player that
Collins was covering–Chris Terry, skated
in from the point and wristed home the
game-winning goal.
The Penguins ended up losing Game 4,
1-0, and fell behind in the series 3-1.
Collins blamed himself.
“I wasn’t happy about it. I had a pretty
tough night last night,” he said on Thurs-
day. “I take pride in killing penalties and I
was prettyupset havingbeena part of that
goal.”
Still, it’s fair to say that when the Pen-
guins face the Checkers tonight for Game
5, Collins will beinamuchdifferent frame
of mind.
Head coach John Hynes said he isn’t
worried about Collins’ mindset coming
into Game 5 andhe addedthat the winger
isn’t to blame for the Charlotte goal.
“He’s beenone of our best players all se-
ries and he’s the type of guy that I don’t
really have a fear of him coming through
adversity because he’s such a severe com-
petitor,” Hynes said. “One player or one
situation doesn’t win or lose a game. You
win or lose as a team. I knowhe (Collins)
tookit toheart. We needhimtomove on.”
After Thursday’s team meeting, it was
clear that Collins already has. He said a
few good talks about it with the coaching
staff and the incident is now serving as a
motivator for Game 5.
“I’m going to give everything I can to
make up for that,” Collins said. “I don’t
want to let these guys down.”
Lerg back on track
After missing the last two games of the
Norfolk series, Game 1 against Charlotte
and playing sparingly in Games 2 and 3,
winger Bryan Lerg was back to full
W B S P E N G U I N S
Collins trying to clear his mind
GAME 5
WBS Penguins at Charlotte Checkers
7 p.m. tonight
Charlotte leads series, 3-1
E A S T D I V I S I O N F I N A L S
By TOM VENESKY
tvenesky@timesleader.com
See PENGUINS, Page 6B
DALEVILLE – The Holy Redeemer
boys volleyball team is accustomed to
trading regular-season wins with North
Pocono.
The defending champion Royals stop-
ped the give-and-take with the Trojans
Thursday night and, in the process,
moved closer to a second straight
Wyoming Valley Conference champion-
ship.
“It’s a big win,” Holy Redeemer coach
Jack Kablick said after the 3-1 victory in
the meeting of the conference’s last two
unbeatens. “It has broken a trend.
“The last eight years, the home team
has won. It was four
years of winning at our
place and four years of
them winning at
theirs.”
North Pocono also
managed a league play-
off victory over Holy
Redeemer in 2008 in the middle of a
streak of three straight conference titles
before the Royals broke through last
season.
Thursday’s 25-13, 28-26, 17-25, 25-22
win, following Monday’s victory over
then third-place Coughlin, leaves the
Royals at 12-0. They need to win their
remaining four matches, two against
losing teams and the others against
Abington Heights and Tunkhannock,
for a second straight unbeaten WVC
season.
If Holy Redeemer does not slip, North
Pocono (11-1) will be stuck settling for
trying for its fifth straight District 2
Class AA championship.
“We were looking at this entire week:
Coughlin Monday and North Pocono
Thursday,” said 6-foot-11 senior Pete
Alexis, who led the way with 24 kills,
along with five service points. “When
you looked at it, everything about the
season built up to these two matches.”
H. S. BOYS VOL L EYBAL L
Royals take control
NIKO J. KALLIANIOTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Holy Redeemer’s Robert Wingert, foreground, celebrates with the rest of the teamafter a point during Thursday’s volleyball
game against North Pocono at North Pocono High School.
Victory moves Redeemer closer to title
By TOM ROBINSON
Special to the Times Leader 3
REDEEMER
1
NORTH
POCONO
See ROYALS, Page 4B
LOUISVILLE, Ky. — To go or not to
go. UncleMo’s connections still weren’t
saying whether the talented colt will
run in Saturday’s Kentucky Derby.
The sleek bay colt was recovering
from a stomach ailment, but looked
good as he galloped over the Churchill
Downs track on Thursday, though ap-
pearances could be deceiving. Uncle
Molooks about as exotic as his name —
average size, with no distinguishing
marks like the white splash on Zenyat-
ta’s forehead. But his power is apparent
as soon as he starts running.
Last year’s juvenile champion, Uncle
Mo is the 9-2 second choice behind 4-1
K E N T U C K Y D E R B Y
AP PHOTO
Exercise rider Hector Ramos takes
Kentucky Derby entrant Uncle Mo for
a workout at Churchill Downs on
Thursday.
Don’t know
if Uncle Mo
is set to go
Talented but ailing colt may or may
not recover from stomach troubles
in time to run in Saturday’s Derby.
By BETH HARRIS
AP Racing Writer
See UNCLE MO, Page 6B
MOOSIC – Scranton/Wilkes-Barre
pitcher Andrew Brackman has had his
troubles in the first in-
ning of games this sea-
son.
Entering Thurs-
day’s game versus
Pawtucket at PNC
Field, the righthander
allowed 11 of his 15
runs this season in the
first.
Add three more
runs to that total.
Brackman gave up
three more runs in the
first inning and the
Yankees couldn’t
climb out of the early
hole, losing to the Red
Sox 4-1and snapping a
two-game win streak.
In addition to those three runs,
Brackman gave up three hits and two
I N T E R N AT I O N A L L E A G U E
Red Sox strike
quickly in win
over Yankees
By DAVE ROSENGRANT
drosengrant@timesleader.com
4
RED SOX
1
YANKEES
See YANKEES, Page 6B
K
PAGE 2B FRIDAY, MAY 6, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ S C O R E B O A R D
MEETINGS
GAR Soccer Booster Club will meet
at 7 p.m. Wednesday at Mag’s
Halftime Pub, Moyallen Street,
Wilkes-Barre.
Hanover Area Boys Basketball
Booster will have an election of
officers meeting at 7 p.m. Monday
at Major League Sports Bar. All
parents are encouraged to attend.
Pittston Area Boys Basketball
Booster Club will meet at 7 p.m.
on May 12 at Tony’s Pizza in Pitt-
ston. For more information, call
Carl or Maria Stravinski at 570-
883-7220.
South Wilkes-Barre Mini Mohawks
monthly organizational meeting
will be held at 7 p.m. Monday at
Riverside Cafe, Old River Road,
Wilkes-Barre. Parents and coaches
are urged to attend.
West Side United Soccer Club will
hold its monthly coaches/parents
meeting at 6:30 p.m. today at the
Kingston Rec Center. West Side
United is a recreational club that
participates in the Wyoming Valley
Youth Soccer Association. For
more information, contact Mat-
thew at 570-779-7785.
REGISTRATIONS/TRYOUTS
Nanticoke Youth Soccer will hold
registration from 9 a.m. to noon on
May 7, 14, 21, 28 at the Lower
Broadway field. The cost is $40
per child and $75 per family.
Wilkes-Barre Cosmos Soccer Club
will hold registration for the fall
season on from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. on
May 11 and 12 at the concession
stand at Coal Street Park. Players
must be 4 years old by August 1,
2011. For more information, call
Tom at 823-5488 or email wilkes-
barrecosmos@gmail.com.
Wilkes-Barre Girls Softball League
has three open roster spots for
girls born between July 1, 1993 and
Dec. 31, 1997. The division opens
play May 31 and plays on Tuesday
or Thursday. Anyone interested
please call Gary at 822-3991 or log
onto www.wbgsl.com.
UPCOMING EVENTS
Lake-Lehman Baseball Booster
Club is running an Atlantic City
bus trip on June 5 with a 7 a.m.
departure from Thomas’ Market
parking lot in Shavertown and a
7:15 a.m. departure from the Sears
parking lot at the Wyoming Valley
Mall. The bus will go to The Trump
Plaza in Atlantic City and will
return home from Atlantic City at
6:30 p.m. Soda, water and snacks
will be provided. BYOB if you so
choose. The trip cost is $35 per
person with a $20 rebate. A 50/50
drawing and movie will be shown
on the bus. To reserve seats,
please contact Chris at 606-1961 or
Stan at 805-889-6671.
Second annual MLB pitch, hit and
run will be held at 5 p.m. Sunday.
Registration begins at 4 p.m. at
the Lake-Lehman varsity baseball
field. Age groups are 7-8, 9-10, 11-12,
13-14. Boys and girls compete
separately. Please bring a copy of
a valid birth certificate. For more
information, call (570) 255-2705.
CAMPS CLINICS
Crestwood Comet Boys Basketball
Camp, under the direction of head
coach Mark Atherton, is now
accepting applications. The camp
will be held the week of June 27 to
July 1. The morning sessions will be
for boys entering third through
fifth grade. The afternoon session
is for boys entering grades sixth
through ninth. Both sessions will
be held at the Crestwood Middle
School. For more information, call
Coach Atherton at 825-4116 or
email him at mark.ather-
ton@csdcomets.org.
Holy Redeemer Boys Basketball
Clinic for boys grades 4 through 9
will be held June 23 through June
25. For more information, contact
coach Mark Belenski at 262-9562.
(This is the correct number).
GOLF
Fifth Annual Daniel J. Distasio
Memorial Golf Tournament will be
held May 21 at the Blue Ridge Trail
Golf Course. Shotgun start at 1:30
p.m. The cost is $95 per golfer.
Price includes golf, gifts, refresh-
ments, dinner, awards and prizes.
Hole sponsorships are also avail-
able at $100 (Gold), $75 (Silver)
and $50 (Bronze). Please make
checks payable to: Daniel J. Dis-
tasio Memorial Fund and mail
checks to Ray Distasio, 575 Pierce
St., Suite 400, Kingston, Pa., 18704.
For more information or to assure
reservations, please call or email
Ray at 288-6464 (rayd@clem-
entecpa.com) or Dan Jr. at 906-
5964 (dan@sdklawfirm.com).
Northeast Gymnastics Academy
Athletic Association will hold its
inaugural benefit golf tournament
on Sunday, May 22 at the Blue
Ridge Trail Golf Club, Mountain
Top, Pa. The format is captain and
crew. All money raised will be used
to benefit the gymnastic team at
Northeast Gymnastics. Regis-
tration will be from12:30 – 1:15 p.m.,
with a shotgun start at 1:30 p.m.
Ken Pollock Nissan has donated a
car to be won for a hole-in-one on
a designated hole. There will be
raffles during play, along with
dinner & prizes following golf.
Dress is casual and soft spikes
only. For more information, please
contact Steve Brecher at 261-1981.
Third Annual Grace Episcopal Golf
Tournament will be held June 6 at
Sand Springs Country Club in
Drums. The captain-and-crew
event will begin with a shotgun
start at 1 p.m. The cost is $80 per
golfer or $35 for the dinner only.
Deadline for registration is May 31.
Hole sponsorships are available
from $3,000 to $100. For more
information, call Nancy at 570-287-
8440.
Wilkes-Barre Fire Department
Athletic Association is having its
22nd annual charity golf tourna-
ment June 5 at Ron Jaworski’s
Edgewood in the Pines Golf Course
in Drums. The cost per golfer is
$80 and includes a premium
dinner buffet, 18 holes of golf,
motorized cart, assorted beverag-
es, snacks and optional chances
for lots of prizes. The tournament
is a captain-and-crew format and
begins with a shotgun start at 1
p.m. Special prizes are being
offered for closest to the pin and
longest drive for both men and
women. To register or for more
information, contact tournament
chairman Shawn Williams at (570)
885-3026.
Bulletin Board items will not be
accepted over the telephone. Items
may be faxed to 831-7319, emailed to
tlsports@timesleader.com or dropped
off at the Times Leader or mailed to
Times Leader, c/o Sports, 15 N, Main
St., Wilkes-Barre, PA18711-0250.
BUL L E T I N BOARD
BASEBALL
Favorite Odds Underdog
American League
RED SOX ( 9.5 ) Twins
BLUE JAYS ( 9.0 ) Tigers
ORIOLES ( 8.0 ) Rays
RANGERS (10.5 ) Yankees
A’s ( 8.5 ) ROYALS
Indians ( 8.5 ) ANGELS
MARINERS ( 6.5 ) White Sox
National League
CUBS ( NL ) Reds
PHILLIES ( 7.5 ) Braves
PIRATES ( 7.5 ) Astros
MARLINS ( 7.5 ) Nationals
METS ( 7.5 ) Dodgers
CARDS ( 7.5 ) Brewers
PADRES ( 7.0 ) D’backs
GIANTS ( 6.5 ) Rockies
NBA
Favorite Points Underdog
Bulls 2.5 HAWKS
MAVERICKS 2 Lakers
Saturday
GRIZZLIES 3 Thunder
CELTICS 3 Heat
NHL
Favorite Odds Underdog
RED WINGS -$130/
+$110
Sharks
BRUINS -$170/
+$150
Flyers
Home Teams in Capital Letters
AME RI C A’ S L I NE
By ROXY ROXBOROUGH
BOXING REPORT: WBO welterweight title fight, Las Vegas, Nevada Manny
Pacquiao -$900 vs. Shane Mosley +$600. Note: In order to read the boxing lines,
use the following example; to wager on Manny Pacquiao, you would put up $900 to
win back $100, or, to wager on Shane Mosley, you would put up $100 to win back
$600.
As day number 27 of the young 2011harness racing season is here,
let’s take a quick look at the leading drivers and trainers.
Topping the driver standings is young Matt Kakaley. The 23-year-
old has made quite an impact in his second full season of driving at
the Downs. He’s the meet’s leading driver in wins, at 38; and also
earnings, with $399,890. Tyler Buter sits second, in his first season at
Pocono, with a win total of 29.
Carmine Fusco andLouPena. sit atop the trainer standings with19
wins each. Fusco has been a top trainer for years at the Plains Town-
ship oval and is no surprise to be on top. Pena has done it with just a
limited amount of starters, and is winning at an amazing 40 percent
clip.
BEST BET: BOBO’S EXPRESS (4TH)
VALUE PLAY: GRINNING BREED (5TH)
Post Time 6:30 p.m.
All Races 1 Mile
First-$6,100 Clm.Pace;clm.price $7,500
8 Rusty’s Martini G.Napolitano 1-5-4 Some turn around with Nap 7-2
5 No Mo Parking B.Simpson 2-1-2 Consistent mare 3-1
6 Gangsta Lady L.Porfilio 5-1-1 I’d certainly consider 8-1
1 Halter Top Hanover A.Napolitano 8-6-5 The summer is coming 15-1
4 Star Of India B.Sears 8-6-5 Down in price 9-2
9 Stormy Savannah Tn.Schadel 1-8-6 Tough spot to repeat 6-1
7 Jim Jam Gigolett J.Pavia 7-1-1 Had win streak snapped 10-1
3 Prairie Ganache P.Berry 7-4-2 Swept away 4-1
2 Bridezilla L.Stalbaum 4-3-8 Stomped 20-1
Second-$6,100 Clm.Trot;clm.price $7,500
1 Revington A.Santeramo 1-8-7 Hearbreaker last wk 4-1
6 Abaton Hanover L.Stalbaum 2-5-2 Lappe doing well here 6-1
5 Keystone Maxwell D.Ingraham 2-5-2 Just beat similar 3-1
3 Smooth Vintage G.Napolitano 7-2-6 George the new pilot 9-2
9 Indy Source B.Simpson 8-1-2 Hardly reliable 7-2
8 Firewall T.Buter 4-8-4 Having gait issues 20-1
7 Crushproof J.Pavia 5-3-5 Showing dents 8-1
4 Funny Briefs P.Berry 5-7-4 Undressed 10-1
2 Ashwood Diamond Tn.Schadel 7-8-7 Team Schadel ice cold 15-1
Third-$13,000 Cond.Trot;n/w 4 pm races life
6 Carpathian Hooray G.Napolitano 1-6-6 More stout Pena stock 3-1
1 Photo King P.Berry 3-2-1 Takes money from pole 7-2
2 Tango Dancer B.Simpson 3-3-4 First-time lasix user 6-1
7 Nightime Flash B.Sears 3-3-1 Getting closer 4-1
9 High Pan Tolerance J.Pavia 2-1-5 Well-staked colt 9-2
5 Fortissimo M.Kakaley 4-2-6 Sherman cooled off a bit 8-1
3 Andoversure D.Ingraham 1-9-4 Not so sure 15-1
4 Decolletage T.Buter 2-2-2 Give him a tightner 10-1
8 Detech Tn.Schadel 6-7-4 Unplugged 20-1
Fourth-$6,100 Clm.Trot;clm.price $7,500
6 Bobo’s Express B.Sears 5-3-6 Wins right off the claim 7-2
2 Tactical Advantage G.Napolitano 7-5-7 Driver change helps 3-1
3 Lotsa Speed NZ B.Simpson 5-6-6 New to Fusco stable 9-2
8 Persistent Spur Tn.Schadel 4-5-8 Has had no luck 8-1
5 Investor Springs L.Stalbaum 7-3-7 Save that deuce 4-1
1 Asolare A.Santeramo 5-7-4 Not won in a few years 6-1
4 Hipo Final Combat J.Taggart 6-6-9 Gunned down 20-1
7 Hetties Hope D.Ingraham 8-7-5 Yonkers shipper 10-1
9 Warrawee Lucky A.Napolitano 6-5-9 Not from this spot 15-1
Fifth-$11,000 Clm.Pace;clm.price $12,500
9 Grinning Breed J.Pavia 4-2-3 Darkhorse of the night 8-1
1 The Real Dan R.Pierce 2-3-6 Has Pierce and pole, solid 4-1
5 Forever Wild B.Sears 2-6-1 Must consider 7-2
4 Outlaw Blues A.Napolitano 6-1-5 Hit or miss type 5-1
8 Mountain Air L.Stalbaum 2-1-6 Fast early on in mile 6-1
2 The Tupelo Flash N G.Napolitano 4-6-7 Just claimed off of Burke 5-1
3 Mattifioso M.Kakaley 8-7-9 Usually near back of pack 12-1
6 All Got In M.Romano 5-8-5 Folds 12-1
7 Joshadamjacob D.Ingraham 6-2-4 Not up to these 20-1
Sixth-$9,000 Cond.Trot;n/w $5,000 last 5
6 Austin’s Jon Jon B.Simpson 2-2-7 Holds on tonight 3-1
5 Spicy Cavair J.Pavia 9-3-6 Reunites with Pavia 4-1
4 Around And Over A.Napolitano 2-8-8 Circles up for the show 8-1
1 Money Man K D.Ingraham 6-1-2 Has raced with better 9-2
7 Like A Hush A.McCarthy 6-5-8 Still searching for that form 10-1
2 Bigpepper D.Chellis 7-4-3 What a failure as the chalk 7-2
3 DJ French Baby J.Taggart 4-5-6 King training at .137 6-1
8 Marion Merlot G.Wasiluk 5-9-4 Waz yet to win in 2011 20-1
9 Reputation Tn.Schadel 4-2-7 Vote against 15-1
Seventh-$9,000 Cond.Pace;n/w $5,000 last 5
4 Bunkmeister J.Pavia 6-3-4 Rolls with late kick 7-2
2 Zarachino A.Napolitano 3-8-5 Can pose a danger 4-1
1 Fox Valley Largo G.Napolitano 4-3-7 2nd start since purchase 3-1
3 Dreams Are Real B.Simpson 4-5-2 Simpson down to just .244 6-1
5 Four Starz Alex L.Stalbaum 5-6-6 Moves out of claimers 9-2
7 Cannae Rocky A.McCarthy 8-5-8 Does pick up new hands 8-1
8 Sadies Legacy K.Sizer 9-3-8 Having issues 10-1
6 Sir Beach Dragon D.Ingraham 6-7-4 No fire left 15-1
9 Powered By Zeus M.Romano 5-6-5 Down on power 20-1
Eighth-$6,100 Clm.Trot;clm.price $7,500
4 Fast Vacation J.Pavia 2-2-5 No Civil Cause in here 3-1
1 Celebrity Caviar T.Buter 1-2-6 Deserving chalk 5-2
2 Mon Beau Somolli N A.McCarthy 2-6-9 Nosed out in last try 6-1
8 Pinocchio M.Kakaley 1-1-5 Shoots for 3 in a row 4-1
9 Allie Jae D.Ingraham 1-8-8 Newcomer from New York 10-1
3 Jeff’s Night Out A.Napolitano 8-1-8 Won last time out with ANap 5-1
5 Here Comes Monte P.Berry 6-8-3 Very limited trot 12-1
6 Our Little Dip J.Antonelli 7-4-4 Fails to fire 15-1
7 Mitleh Hadeed L.Stalbaum 5-7-6 Auto toss 20-1
Ninth-$13,000 Clm.Pace;clm.price $15,000
3 Lightning Moon G.Napolitano 1-2-2 The heavy favorite 5-2
7 Isaac Newtown T.Tetrick 1-2-1 Become a hot commodity 3-1
2 Master Of Wars R.Pierce 2-5-2 Stone cold closer 4-1
8 Sody’s Moonshine B.Sears 3-2-7 Now a winner of $200k life 15-1
5 Major Macho B.Simpson 4-1-1 Can be a player 6-1
9 Anais Kicker M.Kakaley 1-2-1 Bumps up off the win 10-1
4 Stormin Rustler A.McCarthy 1-3-6 I’ll take a pass on 5-1
1 All Shuttle T.Buter 8-6-1 Very good betting race 12-1
6 Pembroke Joe Dunn J.Pavia 8-8-6 Little since the claim 20-1
Tenth-$29,000 Open Trot
2 Calchips Brute B.Sears 4-3-6 Knocks down the wall 6-1
6 All About Justice T.Tetrick 1-5-7 Just scored a huge win 9-2
8 The Chancellor A.Miller 1-8-3 The public choice 3-1
5 Big Boy Lloyd T.Buter 3-4-2 Plenty of class 4-1
1 Summertime Yankee M.Kakaley 1-6-2 Matt picks up live mount 7-2
7 Jaavos Boy A.Napolitano 1-1-1 Tough spot for 4th straight 10-1
4 And Heez Perfect A.McCarthy 4-3-5 Rides the cones 8-1
3 A Gentleman G.Napolitano 7-5-3 Yet to hit his stride 20-1
9 Blazing Winner R.Pierce 1-2-2 Not an Open trotter 15-1
Eleventh-$13,000 Clm.Pace;clm.price $15,000
2 Alilability R.Pierce 1-5-1 Loves to win 3-1
8 Wesley Snip G.Napolitano 1-1-3 Pena training .512 at PD 5-2
5 Night Train Shane M.Kakaley 6-6-2 Best of the rest 4-1
3 Skeleton Key B.Sears 2-6-3 Sears been warming up 6-1
4 Kaydon Begone A.McCarthy 4-5-2 Gets another new reinsman 10-1
1 Pick A Trail L.Stalbaum 2-9-7 Chose another avenue 9-2
6 Lite The Fire A.Napolitano 8-7-9 No smoke here 12-1
7 Right To The Top B.Simpson 9-1-8 Falters 15-1
Twelfth-$9,000 Cond.Trot;n/w $5,000 last 5
2 Our Last Photo A.Miller 2-4-6 Keeps Miller and takes it 3-1
5 Master Buckin Uhl T.Tetrick 3-8-5 The main foe 9-2
4 Southern Beauty T.Buter 4-3-2 Races better near the lead 7-2
3 Sabana Hanover M.Romano 3-6-3 Romano the new driver 4-1
1 Lord Darby G.Napolitano 7-9-9 Finally a better draw 6-1
6 R Sam D.Ingraham 2-6-7 Off since Feb 15-1
7 Shelly Ross A.McCarthy 5-2-3 Beaten chalk vs easier 8-1
8 Conway Lane M.Kakaley 4-4-6 A long price 10-1
9 Donnegal G.Wasiluk 3-7-4 Better at Monti 20-1
Thirteenth-$9,000 Cond.Pace;n/w $5,000 last 5
7 Must Be The Bunny T.Tetrick 7-7-4 Hopes to get photo taken 4-1
5 Shadows Dream M.Kakaley 7-3-4 May flash speed tonight 7-2
4 Windsong Destroyer A.Napolitano 4-7-8 ANap trains and steers 8-1
2 Jazzy Jeff J.Pavia 5-8-5 Drops, but off form 3-1
1 Literate Hanover A.McCarthy 5-2-5 Stays close to the action 9-2
3 Thee Town Hero K.Sizer 3-6-4 Up from Florida 10-1
6 Out To Kill A G.Napolitano 8-7-5 No one is threatened 20-1
8 Eagle Real One J.Taggart 3-9-6 Field filler 6-1
9 Ted Or Alive R.Pierce 7-4-6 Dead 15-1
Fourteenth-$6,100 Clm.Trot;clm.price $7,500
8 Civil Cause T.Buter 1-2-4 Coast to coast 5-2
2 Colonel’s Dancer P.Berry 3-7-5 There if the Cause falters 6-1
9 Vijay Star M.Kakaley 4-6-1 Again gets a tough post 8-1
5 Alpha Entura G.Napolitano 3-2-5 Versatile trotter 7-2
6 Levitys Pride A.Kavoleff 2-2-2 Fast off the wings 4-1
1 Grace N Charlie A.Napolitano 8-5-6 Broke three of last four 15-1
3 Bar None M.Romano 9-4-2 Flattens out 5-1
4 Lil Lilly Philly J.Taggart 7-5-8 Wrong side of town 20-1
7 My Mac A.Miller 9-4-5 ….two more races to go 12-1
Fifteenth-$9,500 Cond.Pace;n/w 2 pm races life
8 Ronettica A.McCarthy 1-5-3 Kicks off late double 7-2
4 Cheyenne Ina R.Pierce 4-1-6 Last win was with Pierce 9-2
6 Behind The Scenes M.Kakaley 4-1-1 Newcomer to Pocono 4-1
7 Looktothewesternsky A.Miller 6-1-2 From barn of Erv Miller 3-1
3 Aspiration A.Napolitano 8-1-4 Flopped off the win 8-1
1 Undeniable Hanover J.Pavia 4-3-1 The wood never hurts 5-1
2 Mondatta L.Stalbaum 6-5-6 Did better in NY 10-1
5 Rhea Nourrir G.Napolitano 6-5-4 Gapper 12-1
Sixteenth-$9,500 Cond.Pace;n/w 2 pm races life
8 Artsy Princess R.Pierce 5-4-6 Nails it on the money 7-2
5 Busybeingfabulous A.Miller 2-4-4 Hung badly last wk 3-1
2 Keystone Kismet T.Schadel 2-6-6 Much improved 9-2
1 Pulse A Minute M.Kakaley 7-2-3 Beat keeps ticking 4-1
9 Block Party G.Napolitano 5-5-7 Another fifth 8-1
4 She’s A Cowgirl A.McCarthy 8-3-7 No 6-1
3 Mohegan Miss M.Romano 4-6-4 Doomed 15-1
7 The Daily Diary D.Ingraham 3-5-6 Read another book 10-1
6 Nuts And Jolts K.Sizer 6-7-1 That’s it folks 20-1
By MARK DUDEK
Times Leader Correspondent
ON THE MARK
L O C A L
C A L E N D A R
Friday, May 6
H.S. BASEBALL
(4:15 p.m.)
West Side Tech at MMI
Meyers at Lake-Lehman
Wyoming Valley West at Crestwood
Berwick at Dallas
H.S. SOFTBALL
(4:15 p.m.)
West Side Tech at MMI
Wyoming Seminary at Northwest
Meyers at Lake-Lehman
Dallas at Holy Redeemer
Coughlin at Nanticoke
H.S. GIRLS SOCCER
(4:15 p.m.)
Pittston Area at North Pocono
Coughlin at Holy Redeemer
GAR at Meyers
COLLEGE SOFTBALL
Freedom Conference playoffs
FDU-Florham at King’s, 1 p.m.
COLLEGE BASEBALL
Freedom Conference playoffs
King’s vs. Misericrodia, 4 p.m. Quakertown PA
Saturday, May 7
H.S. GIRLS SOCCER
North Pocono at Wyoming Seminary, 5 p.m.
W H A T ’ S O N T V
AUTO RACING
7 a.m.
SPEED—FormulaOne, practicefor TurkishGrand
Prix, at Istanbul
11:30 a.m.
SPEED — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, practice for
Southern 500, at Darlington, S.C.
2 p.m.
SPEED—NASCAR, Sprint Cup, “Happy Hour Se-
ries,” final practice for Southern 500, at Darlington,
S.C.
3:30 p.m.
ESPN2 —NASCAR, Nationwide Series, pole qual-
ifying for Royal Purple 200, at Darlington, S.C.
5 p.m.
SPEED—NASCAR, Sprint Cup, polequalifyingfor
Southern 500, at Darlington, S.C.
7:30 p.m.
ESPN2 — NASCAR, Nationwide Series, Royal
Purple 200, at Darlington, S.C.
BOXING
10 p.m.
ESPN2 — Junior lightweights, Gilberto Sanchez-
Leon (29-9-2) vs. Diego Magdaleno (18-0-0), at Las
Vegas
GOLF
9 a.m.
TGC — European PGA Tour, Open de Espana,
second round, at Barcelona, Spain
1 p.m.
TGC — Champions Tour, The Tradition, second
round, at Birmingham, Ala.
3 p.m.
TGC — PGA Tour, Wells Fargo Championship,
second round, at Charlotte, N.C.
HORSE RACING
5 p.m.
VERSUS — NTRA, Kentucky Oaks, at Louisville,
Ky.
MAJOR LEAGUE
BASEBALL
2:10 p.m.
WGN — Cincinnati at Chicago Cubs
7 p.m.
MLB, CSN — Atlanta at Philadelphia
SNY -- L.A. Dodgers at N.Y. Mets
ROOT – Houston at Pittsburgh
8 p.m.
YES – N.Y. Yankees at Texas
NATIONAL BASKETBALL
ASSOCIATION
7 p.m.
ESPN — Playoffs, conference semifinals, game 3,
Chicago at Atlanta
9:30 p.m.
ESPN — Playoffs, conference semifinals, game 3,
L.A. Lakers at Dallas
NATIONAL HOCKEY
LEAGUE
7 p.m.
VERSUS—Playoffs, conference semifinals, game
4, San Jose at Detroit
9:30 p.m.
VERSUS—Playoffs, conference semifinals, game
4, Philadelphia at Boston (joined in progress)
T R A N S A C T I O N S
BASEBALL
American League
BOSTON RED SOX—Recalled RHP Scott Atchi-
son from Pawtucket (IL). Selected the contract of
LHP Rich Hill from Pawtucket. Placed RHP Bobby
Jenks and RHP Dan Wheeler on the 15-day DL,
Jenks retroactive to May 2.
National League
CINCINNATI REDS—Activated RHPHomer Bailey
fromthe15-day DL. Optioned RHPJordan Smith to
Louisville (IL).
HOUSTONASTROS—Placed RHP Brandon Lyon
on the 15-day DL. Recalled RHP Jose Valdez from
Oklahoma City (PCL).
MILWAUKEE BREWERS—Optioned RHP Sean
Green to Nashville (IL). Recalled RHP Mike
McClendon from Nashville.
NEW YORK METS—Activated OF Jason Bay from
paternity leave. OptionedOFLucas DudatoBuffalo
(IL).
BASKETBALL
National Basketball
Association
NBA—Suspended L.A. Lakers F Ron Artest for one
game without pay for swinging his arm and striking
the face of the Dallas GJ.J. Barea in a game on May
4.
HOCKEY
American Hockey
League
BRIDGEPORT SOUND TIGERS—Agreed to
terms with F Brett Gallant on a one-year contract.
SOCCER
U.S. SOCCER FEDERATION—Named Tab Ra-
mos coach for the Under-20 soccer team on a two-
game trip to France this month.
Major League
Soccer
FC DALLAS—Waived D Kyle Davies.
COLLEGE
CALIFORNIA—Named Danna Durante women’s
gymnastics coach.
CONNECTICUT—Announced sophomore G-F Ja-
mal Coombs-McDaniel will transfer.
GEORGIATECH—Named Billy Schmidt men’s as-
sistant basketball coach and Amir Abdur-Rahim di-
rector of player development.
ILLINOIS STATE—Named Lauren Hutchcraft as-
sistant director for athletic communications, effec-
tive May 16.
IONA—Named Eugene Marshall, Jr. athletics di-
rector, effective June 1.
TOLEDO—Promoted men’s assistant basketball
coach Angres Thorpe to men’s associate head
coach.
B A S E B A L L
International League
All Times EDT
North Division
W L Pct. GB
Yankees ................................... 16 10 .615 —
Pawtucket (Red Sox) .............. 15 12 .556 1
1
⁄2
Lehigh Valley (Phillies) ........... 14 12 .538 2
Rochester (Twins) ................... 11 14 .440 4
1
⁄2
Buffalo (Mets)........................... 12 16 .429 5
Syracuse (Nationals)............... 9 16 .360 6
1
⁄2
South Division
W L Pct. GB
Durham (Rays)......................... 15 12 .556 —
Gwinnett (Braves) ................... 14 12 .538
1
⁄2
Charlotte (White Sox) ............. 10 16 .385 4
1
⁄2
Norfolk (Orioles) ...................... 10 16 .385 4
1
⁄2
West Division
W L Pct. GB
Columbus (Indians)................ 21 5 .808 —
Louisville (Reds) .................... 16 11 .593 5
1
⁄2
Toledo (Tigers)....................... 14 14 .500 8
Indianapolis (Pirates) ............. 8 19 .296 13
1
⁄2
Thursday's Games
Charlotte 10, Toledo 5
Pawtucket 4, Yankees 1
Lehigh Valley at Columbus, (n)
Buffalo 6, Louisville 5
Rochester 3, Gwinnett 2
Syracuse at Durham, (n)
Indianapolis at Norfolk, (n)
Friday's Games
Pawtucket at Scranton/Wilkes-Barre, 6:35 p.m.
Charlotte at Toledo, 7 p.m.
Gwinnett at Rochester, 7:05 p.m.
Syracuse at Durham, 7:05 p.m.
Lehigh Valley at Columbus, 7:05 p.m.
Louisville at Buffalo, 7:05 p.m.
Indianapolis at Norfolk, 7:15 p.m.
Saturday's Games
Pawtucket at Scranton/Wilkes-Barre, 1:05 p.m.
Louisville at Buffalo, 1:05 p.m.
Syracuse at Durham, 5:05 p.m.
Charlotte at Toledo, 7 p.m.
Gwinnett at Rochester, 7:05 p.m.
Lehigh Valley at Columbus, 7:05 p.m.
Indianapolis at Norfolk, 7:15 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Pawtucket at Scranton/Wilkes-Barre, 1:05 p.m.
Louisville at Buffalo, 1:05 p.m.
Gwinnett at Rochester, 1:05 p.m.
Lehigh Valley at Columbus, 1:05 p.m.
Indianapolis at Norfolk, 1:15 p.m.
Charlotte at Toledo, 2 p.m.
Syracuse at Durham, 5:05 p.m.
H O C K E Y
American Hockey
League
Playoff Glance
All Times EDT
(x-if necessary)
FIRST ROUND
BEST OF 7
EASTERN
CONFERENCE
Portland 4, Connecticut 2
Thursday, April 14: Portland 3, Connecticut 2
Saturday, April 16: Portland 3, Connecticut 2, OT
Sunday, April 17: Connecticut 3, Portland 1
Tuesday, April 19: Connecticut 3, Portland 1
Thursday, April 21: Portland 5, Connecticut 4
Saturday, April 23: Portland 6, Connecticut 4
Binghamton 4, Manchester 3
Thursday, April 14: Manchester 2, Binghamton 1
Friday, April 15: Binghamton 4, Manchester 3, OT
Sunday, April 17: Manchester 5, Binghamton 4, OT
Tuesday, April 19: Manchester 6, Binghamton 3
Wednesday, April 20: Binghamton5, Manchester 4,
OT
Friday, April 22: Binghamton 2, Manchester 1, 2OT
Saturday, April 23: Binghamton 6, Manchester 5,
OT
Wilkes-Barre/Scranton 4, Norfolk 2
Friday, April 15: Norfolk 2, Wilkes-Barre/Scranton 1
Saturday, April 16: Norfolk2, Wilkes-Barre/Scranton
0
Tuesday, April 19: Wilkes-Barre/Scranton2, Norfolk
1
Wednesday, April 20: Wilkes-Barre/Scranton 4,
Norfolk 2
Friday, April 22: Wilkes-Barre/Scranton 2, Norfolk 1
Saturday, April 23: Wilkes-Barre/Scranton 6, Nor-
folk 3
Charlotte 4, Hershey 2
Thursday, April 14: Charlotte 5, Hershey 4
Sunday, April 17: Hershey 4, Charlotte 2
Tuesday, April 19: Hershey 3, Charlotte 2
Wednesday, April 20: Charlotte 3, Hershey 2
Friday, April 22: Charlotte 5, Hershey 3
Sunday, April 24: Charlotte 2, Hershey 1, OT
WESTERN
CONFERENCE
Manitoba 4, Lake Erie 3
Saturday, April 16: Lake Erie 6, Manitoba 4
Sunday, April 17: Manitoba 3, Lake Erie 2, OT
Tuesday, April 19: Lake Erie 2, Manitoba 1
Thursday, April 21: Lake Erie 6, Manitoba 3
Friday, April 22: Manitoba 2, Lake Erie 0
Sunday, April 24: Manitoba 3, Lake Erie 1
Tuesday, April 26: Manitoba 4, Lake Erie 1
Hamilton 4, Oklahoma City 2
Thursday, April 14: Hamilton 5, Oklahoma City 2
Saturday, April 16: Hamilton 2, Oklahoma City 1
Tuesday, April 19: Oklahoma City 2, Hamilton 0
Wednesday, April 20: Oklahoma City 5, Hamilton 2
Friday, April 22: Hamilton 2, Oklahoma City 0
Sunday, April 24: Hamilton 4, Oklahoma City 1
Houston 4, Peoria 0
Wednesday, April 13: Houston 4, Peoria 1
Friday, April 15: Houston 3, Peoria 2, OT
Monday, April 18: Houston 5, Peoria 3
Tuesday, April 19: Houston 2, Peoria 1
Milwaukee 4, Texas 2
Thursday, April 14: Milwaukee 5, Texas 2
Saturday, April 16: Texas 3, Milwaukee 1
Tuesday, April 19: Texas 3, Milwaukee 2, OT
Wednesday, April 20: Milwaukee 3, Texas 2
Friday, April 22: Milwaukee 2, Texas 1, OT
Monday, April 25: Milwaukee 3, Texas 2, 2OT
DIVISION FINALS
BEST OF 7
EASTERN
CONFERENCE
Binghamton 3, Portland 2
Wednesday, April 27: Binghamton 3, Portland 2
Thursday, April 28: Binghamton 5, Portland 3
Saturday, April 30: Portland 3, Binghamton 2
Monday, May 2: Binghamton 6, Portland 1
Tuesday, May 3: Portland 6, Binghamton 2
Friday, May 6: Binghamton at Portland, 7 p.m.
x-Saturday, May 7: Binghamton at Portland, 7 p.m.
Charlotte 3, Wilkes-Barre/Scranton 1
Thursday, April 28: Charlotte 3, Wilkes-Barre/
Scranton 2
Saturday, April 30: Wilkes-Barre/Scranton 3, Char-
lotte 0
Monday, May 2: Charlotte2, Wilkes-Barre/Scranton
1, OT
Wednesday, May 4: Charlotte 1, Wilkes-Barre/
Scranton 0
Friday, May 6: Wilkes-Barre/Scranton at Charlotte,
7 p.m.
x-Saturday, May 7: Charlotteat Wilkes-Barre/Scran-
ton, 7:05 p.m.
x-Monday, May 9: Charlotte at Wilkes-Barre/Scran-
ton, 7:05 p.m.
WESTERN
CONFERENCE
Hamilton 2, Manitoba 2
Thursday, April 28: Hamilton 4, Manitoba 1
Sunday, May 1: Hamilton 4, Manitoba 2
Tuesday, May 3: Manitoba 5, Hamilton 4
Wednesday, May 4: Manitoba 2, Hamilton 1, 2OT
Friday, May 6: Hamilton at Manitoba, 8:30 p.m.
Sunday, May 8: Manitoba at Hamilton, 7:30 p.m.
x-Monday, May 9: Manitoba at Hamilton, 7:30 p.m.
Milwaukee 2, Houston 1
Friday, April 29: Milwaukee 3, Houston 1
Sunday, May 1: Houston 2, Milwaukee 0
Tuesday, May 3: Milwaukee 5, Houston 3
Thursday, May 5: Milwaukee at Houston, 8:05 p.m.
Friday, May 6: Milwaukee at Houston, 8:35 p.m.
x-Sunday, May 8: Houston at Milwaukee, 6 p.m.
x-Tuesday, May 10: Houston at Milwaukee, 8 p.m.
National Hockey League
Daily Playoff Glance
All Times EDT
(x-if necessary)
FIRST ROUND
Wednesday, April 20
Washington 4, N.Y. Rangers 3, 2OT
Pittsburgh 3, Tampa Bay 2, 2OT
Buffalo 1, Philadelphia 0
Anaheim 6, Nashville 3
Detroit 6, Phoenix 3, Detroit wins series 4-0
Thursday, April 21
Boston 5, Montreal 4, OT
Chicago 5, Vancouver 0
San Jose 6, Los Angeles 3
Friday, April 22
Buffalo 4, Philadelphia 3
Nashville 4, Anaheim 3, OT
Saturday, April 23
Tampa Bay 8, Pittsburgh 2
Washington 3, N.Y. Rangers 1, Washington wins
series 4-1
Boston 2, Montreal 1, 2OT
Los Angeles 3, San Jose 1
Sunday, April 24
Philadelphia 5, Buffalo 4, OT
Nashville 4, Anaheim 2, Nashville wins series 4-2
Chicago 4, Vancouver 3, OT
Monday, April 25
Tampa Bay 4, Pittsburgh 2
San Jose 4, Los Angeles 3, OT, San Jose wins se-
ries 4-2
Tuesday, April 26
Montreal 2, Boston 1
Philadelphia 5, Buffalo 2, Philadelphia wins series
4-3
Vancouver 2, Chicago 1, OT, Vancouver wins se-
ries 4-3
Wednesday, April 27
Boston 4, Montreal 3, OT, Boston win series 4-3
Tampa Bay 1, Pittsburgh 0, Tampa Bay wins series
4-3
CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS
(Best-of-7)
Thursday, April 28
Vancouver 1, Nashville 0
Friday, April 29
Tampa Bay 4, Washington 2
San Jose 2, Detroit 1, OT
Saturday, April 30
Boston 7, Philadelphia 3
Nashville 2, Vancouver 1, 2OT
Sunday, May 1
San Jose 2, Detroit 1
Tampa Bay 3, Washington 2, OT
Monday, May 2
Boston 3, Philadelphia 2, OT
Tuesday, May 3
Tampa Bay 4, Washington 3
Vancouver 3, Nashville 2, OT, Vancouver leads se-
ries 2-1
Wednesday, May 4
Boston 5, Philadelphia 1, Boston leads series 3-0
Tampa Bay 5, Washington 3, Tampa Bay wins se-
ries 4-0
SanJose4, Detroit 3, OT, SanJoseleads series 3-0
Thursday, May 5
Vancouver at Nashville, (n)
Friday, May 6
San Jose at Detroit, 7 p.m.
Philadelphia at Boston, 8 p.m.
Saturday, May 7
Nashville at Vancouver, 8 p.m.
Sunday, May 8
x-Boston at Philadelphia, 3 p.m.
x-Detroit at San Jose, 8 p.m.
Monday, May 9
x-Vancouver at Nashville, 8 p.m.
Tuesday, May 10
x-Philadelphia at Boston, TBA
x-San Jose at Detroit, TBA
Wednesday, May 11
x-Nashville at Vancouver, TBA
Thursday, May 12
x-Boston at Philadelphia, TBA
x-Detroit at San Jose, TBA
B A S K E T B A L L
NBA
Daily Playoff Glance
All Times EDT
FIRST ROUND
Friday, April 22
Boston 113, New York 96
Atlanta 88, Orlando 84
L.A. Lakers 100, New Orleans 86
Saturday, April 23
Indiana 89, Chicago 84
Portland 84, Dallas 82
Memphis 91, San Antonio 88
Oklahoma City 97, Denver 94
Sunday, April 24
Philadelphia 86, Miami 82
Boston 101, New York 89, Boston wins series 4-0
Atlanta 88, Orlando 85
New Orleans 93, L.A. Lakers 88
Monday, April 25
Memphis 104, San Antonio 86
Dallas 93, Portland 82
Denver 104, Oklahoma City 101
Tuesday, April 26
Orlando 101, Atlanta 76
Chicago 116, Indiana 89, Chicago wins series 4-1
L.A. Lakers 106, New Orleans 90
Wednesday, April 27
Miami 97, Philadelphia 91, Miami wins series 4-1
San Antonio 110, Memphis 103, OT
Oklahoma City 100, Denver 97, Oklahoma City
wins series 4-1
Thursday, April 28
Atlanta 84, Orlando 81, Atlanta wins series 4-2
L.A. Lakers 98, New Orleans 80, L.A. Lakers wins
series 4-2
Dallas 103, Portland 96, Dallas wins series 4-2
Friday, April 29
Memphis 99, San Antonio 91, Memphis wins series
4-2
CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS
(Best-of-7)
Sunday, May 1
Memphis 114, Oklahoma City 101
Miami 99, Boston 90
Monday, May 2
Atlanta 103, Chicago 95
Dallas 96, L.A. Lakers 94
Tuesday, May 3
Miami 102, Boston 91, Miami leads series 2-0
Oklahoma City 111, Memphis 102, series tied 1-1
Wednesday, May 4
Chicago 86, Atlanta 73, series tied 1-1
Dallas 93, L.A. Lakers 81, Dallas leads series 2-0
Friday, May 6
Chicago at Atlanta, 7 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at Dallas, 9:30 p.m.
Saturday, May 7
Oklahoma City at Memphis, 5 p.m.
Miami at Boston, 8 p.m.
Sunday, May 8
L.A. Lakers at Dallas, 3:30 p.m.
Chicago at Atlanta, 8 p.m.
Monday, May 9
Miami at Boston, 7 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Memphis, 9:30 p.m.
Tueseday, May 10
Atlanta at Chicago, 8 p.m.
x-Dallas at L.A. Lakers, 8 or 9:30 p.m.
Wednesday, May 11
x-Boston at Miami, 7 p.m.
x-Memphis at Oklahoma City, 8 or 9:30 p.m.
Thursday, May 12
x-Chicago at Atlanta, TBA
x-L.A. Lakers at Dallas, TBA
Friday, May 13
x-Miami at Boston, TBA
x-Oklahoma City at Memphis, TBA
Sunday, May 15
x-Atlanta at Chicago, TBA
x-Dallas at L.A. Lakers, 3:30 p.m.
x-Memphis at Oklahoma City, TBA
Monday, May 16
x-Boston at Miami, 8 p.m.
B O X I N G
Fight Schedule
May 6
At Mandalay Bay Resort & Casino, Las Vegas
(ESPN2), Diego Magdaleno vs. Gilberto Sanchez
Leon, 10, junior lightweights.
May 7
At Osaka, Japan, Koki Kameda vs. Daniel Diaz, 12,
for Kameda’s WBA World bantamweight title.
At Copenhagen, Denmark, Evander Holyfield vs.
Brian Nielsen, 12, heavyweights.
At Neubrandenburg, Germany, Sebastian Sylves-
ter vs. Daniel Geale, 12, for Sylvester’s IBF middle-
weight title;KaroMurat vs. Otis Griffin, 12, for theva-
cant IBF Inter-Continental light heavyweight title-
;Danny McIntosh vs. Eduard Gutknecht, 12, for
McIntosh’s European light heavyweight.
At MGMGrand, Las Vegas (PPV), Manny Pacquiao
vs. Shane Mosley, 12, for Pacquiao’s WBO welter-
weight title;Wilfredo Vazquez Jr. vs. Jorge Arce, 12,
for Vazquez’s WBO junior featherweight title;Mike
Alvaradovs. Ray Narh, 12, for thevacant WBCCon-
tinental Americas light welterweight title;Kelly Pav-
lik vs. Alfonso Lopez, 10, super middleweights.
May 13
At Chumash Casino, Santa Ynez, Calif. (ESPN2),
Kendall Holt vs. Julio Diaz, 10, light welterweights.
At Primm, Nev. (SHO), Sharif Bogere vs. Raymun-
do Beltran, 10, lightweights.
G O L F
PGA Tour
Wells Fargo Championship
Scores
Thursday
At Quail Hollow Club
Charlotte, N.C.
First Round
Bill Haas.....................................................32-32—64
Jonathan Byrd............................................33-33—66
David Toms ...............................................33-33—66
Lucas Glover .............................................32-35—67
Pat Perez....................................................33-34—67
Stuart Appleby...........................................32-36—68
Carl Pettersson .........................................34-34—68
Rickie Fowler.............................................32-36—68
Vijay Singh.................................................33-35—68
Jim Herman................................................34-34—68
Brandt Jobe ...............................................34-35—69
Padraig Harrington ...................................34-35—69
Sergio Garcia ............................................34-35—69
Ryan Moore ...............................................34-35—69
Kevin Na.....................................................35-34—69
Ryuji Imada................................................33-36—69
Phil Mickelson ...........................................35-34—69
Chez Reavie..............................................35-34—69
Billy Mayfair................................................36-33—69
Josh Teater ................................................34-35—69
Bobby Gates ..............................................35-34—69
Martin Kaymer ...........................................34-36—70
Anthony Kim..............................................33-37—70
Steve Marino .............................................36-34—70
Jeff Overton...............................................36-34—70
Brian Davis.................................................35-35—70
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com FRIDAY, MAY 6, 2011 PAGE 3B
➛ M A J O R L E A G U E B A S E B A L L
ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. —
David Price allowed one un-
earned run while pitching into
the ninth inning, Johnny Da-
mon got his 2,600th career hit
and the Tampa Bay Rays beat
the Toronto Blue Jays 3-1on
Thursday.
Price (4-3) is undefeated
against the Blue Jays, winning
eight times in nine starts. The
left-hander allowed four hits
and struck out 10 over 8 2-3
innings.
Damon had two hits, which
moved himpast Steve Garvey
(2,599) into 75th place on the
career list. His fifth-inning dou-
ble (490) tied himfor 59th place
with Mickey Vernon on that list.
The Rays won their 12th
consecutive home series over
Toronto, since 2007.
John Jaso had an RBI double,
Damon drove in a run with an
infield single and Matt Joyce hit
a sacrifice fly off Kyle Drabek
(2-2) to put the Rays ahead 3-0
in the third.
Royals 9, Orioles1
KANSAS CITY, Mo. —Melky
Cabrera homered, doubled and
singled while driving in four
runs, and Bruce Chen allowed
one run in seven innings.
Cabrera, who also scored
three times, hit a solo homer in
the eighth off Clay Rapada.
Chen (4-1) gave up his only
run in the first and then pitched
shutout ball for the next six
innings. The left-hander, who
was KC’s biggest winner last
year, allowed five hits and one
run, walking two and striking
out five. He has not lost a start
in Kauffman Stadiumsince Aug.
12, 2010, against the Yankees.
Since then, he’s 6-0 in nine
starts at home.
Chris Tillman (1-3) got al-
most no offensive support. In
his last six starts, the Orioles
have scored only five runs while
he was in the game.
Tigers 6, Yankees 3
DETROIT—Brennan
Boesch homered and drove in
three runs, and the Detroit
Tigers took advantage of some
sloppy fielding to beat the New
York Yankees for the third
straight time.
Derek Jeter didn’t play for the
Yankees, given the day off after
leaving the previous night’s
game with a right hip problem.
His replacement, Eduardo
Nunez, made two errors, in-
cluding a high throwin the
seventh that gave the Tigers
two runs.
Rick Porcello (2-2) allowed
two runs on eight hits for the
Tigers. He walked two and
struck out three.
A.J. Burnett (4-2) held De-
troit hitless until the sixth in-
ning but made an error of his
own that led to Detroit’s run in
the first. He allowed five runs
—only two earned —on three
hits, striking out five with one
walk.
Angels11, Red Sox 0
BOSTON—Rookie Mark
Trumbo hit his sixth homer of
the season and the Los Angeles
Angels salvaged a series split at
Boston, racking up18 hits.
Bobby Abreu drove in three
runs for Los Angeles, which was
0-6 against Boston entering the
four-game series.
After ending the skid in a
rain-delayed 5-3 win in13 in-
nings early Thursday, the An-
gels chased Boston starter John
Lackey (2-4) in the fifth after
scoring eight runs on10 hits.
Indians 4, Athletics 3
OAKLAND, Calif. —Jack
Hannahan and Lou Marson had
RBI singles in the12th inning,
lifting the Indians to the victory.
Hannahan’s bloop single to
left off Craig Breslow(0-2)
provided the go-ahead run, and
Marson followed with another
single to propel Cleveland to
another late-inning rally. A
night after their seven-game
winning streak was snapped,
the Indians won in their final
at-bat for the seventh time this
season.
A M E R I C A N L E A G U E R O U N D U P
Damon gets No. 2,600
as Rays defeat Blue Jays
The Associated Press
AP PHOTO
Detroit Tigers’ Brandon Inge watches his sacrifice fly ball that
scored Casper Wells from third base in the seventh inning of a
baseball game against the New York Yankees on Thursday in
Detroit. The Tigers scored three runs in the seventh inning on
the way to a 6-3 win.
PHILADELPHIA — Roy
Halladay struck out 10 in seven
sharp innings, Raul Ibanez and
Shane Victorino homered, and
the Philadelphia Phillies com-
pleted a three-game sweep with
a 7-3 victory over the Washing-
ton Nationals on Thursday
night.
Halladay, the reigning NL Cy
Young Award winner, allowed
two runs and six hits to win his
10th straight decision against
the franchise from Washington
and Montreal. Halladay (5-1)
has won 13 consecutive starts
against the NL East.
John Lannan (2-4) got
roughed up, allowing seven hits
and six runs in two-plus innings
to fall to 0-10 against the Phil-
lies.
Cardinals 6, Nationals 3
ST. LOUIS (AP) — Lance
Berkman homered and drove in
four runs, Matt Holliday had a
pair of RBIs and the St. Louis
Cardinals beat the Florida
Marlins 6-3 on Thursday.
Albert Pujols singled three
times against Johnson (3-1), the
National League pitcher of the
month who had an 0.88 ERA in
April. The hard-throwing pitch-
er allowed only 18 hits in 41
innings last month, but the
Cardinals battered him for
eight hits in 25 at-bats.
Holliday fought off an inside
pitch for the tying hit with one
out in the eighth, chasing John-
son after 114 pitches, and Berk-
man greeted Mike Dunn with
three-run homer.
Reds 10, Astros 4
CINCINNATI — Homer
Bailey returned from the dis-
abled list with six strong in-
nings, and Ryan Hanigan drove
in three runs with a three-hit
game for the Reds.
Bailey (1-0) developed a
shoulder problem during
spring training, forcing him to
go on a throwing program. The
right-hander gave up only four
hits and one run in six innings,
striking out seven — an encou-
raging return for the defending
NL Central champs.
Mets 5, Giants 2
NEW YORK — Mike Pelfrey
pitched into the eighth inning
against the Giants’ limited
lineup, Carlos Beltran homered
and the New York Mets averted
a series sweep.
San Francisco loaded the
bases with one out in the ninth
against Francisco Rodriguez,
but Miguel Tejada struck out
and pinch-hitter Buster Posey
grounded out to end the game.
Jose Reyes lined a two-run
triple and the Mets took ad-
vantage of more wildness from
Jonathan Sanchez (2-2) to win
for the second time in seven
games.
Braves 2, Brewers 1
ATLANTA — Martin Prado
hit a tiebreaking homer in the
eighth inning and the Atlanta
Braves beat the Milwaukee
Brewers to complete a four-
game series sweep.
Prado led off the eighth with
his third homer, a drive to left
off Kameron Loe (2-3). Prado
was Loe’s first batter in relief of
Shaun Marcum, who pitched
seven strong innings.
The Braves’ first four-game
sweep of the Brewers in fran-
chise history left Milwaukee
with a six-game losing streak.
Atlanta has won five straight.
N AT I O N A L L E A G U E R O U N D U P
Halladay Ks 10 as Phils top Nats
The Associated Press
Oswalt returns to Phillies
PHILADELPHIA — While his teammates played baseball, Roy
Oswalt spent the past week riding an excavator and moving fallen
trees off the property at his Mississippi home after tornadoes
ravaged the community.
Oswalt was back with the Philadelphia Phillies on Thursday, eight
days after he left the team to be with his family in Weir, Miss. He
threw a bullpen session and could start against Atlanta on
Saturday.
But pitching is hardly first on his mind these days.
“I’ve always said this right here, baseball, is a gift that you’re
given to ply, but this comes third or fourth on my list,” Oswalt said.
“I could walk away from the game today and be happy. As long as
you have your family, they’re going to be there a lot longer than
the game.”
STANDINGS/STATS
W E D N E S D A Y ’ S
L A T E B O X E S
Rockies 6, Diamondbacks 4
Colorado Arizona
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Fowler cf 5 0 1 0 CYoung cf 5 0 1 0
Herrer 2b 4 1 1 0 KJhnsn 2b 4 1 1 1
CGnzlz lf 4 1 2 0 J.Upton rf 3 0 0 0
Tlwtzk ss 5 0 0 0 Monter c 4 0 0 0
Helton 1b 3 2 1 2 RRorts 3b 4 0 0 0
S.Smith rf 2 0 1 1 Mirand 1b 3 1 1 1
MtRynl p 0 0 0 0 GParra lf 1 1 0 0
Street p 0 0 0 0 JoWilsn ss 4 0 1 0
Stewart 3b 4 1 1 1 Enright p 1 1 1 1
Iannett c 4 1 1 2 Branyn ph 1 0 0 0
Chacin p 3 0 1 0 Cllmntr p 0 0 0 0
Belisle p 0 0 0 0 Nady ph 1 0 0 0
Amezg rf 1 0 0 0 Patersn p 0 0 0 0
Demel p 0 0 0 0
JGutrrz p 0 0 0 0
Mora ph 1 0 1 1
Totals 35 6 9 6 Totals 32 4 6 4
Colorado ............................ 000 330 000 — 6
Arizona............................... 001 001 002 — 4
DP—Arizona 1. LOB—Colorado 7, Arizona 7.
2B—Fowler (11), Helton (7), Stewart (1). HR—Ian-
netta (4), K.Johnson (4), Miranda (2), Enright (1).
CS—Miranda (1).
IP H R ER BB SO
Colorado
Chacin W,4-2 .......... 7 3 2 2 4 6
Belisle.......................
2
⁄3 0 0 0 1 0
Mat.Reynolds...........
2
⁄3 1 2 2 1 1
Street S,11-11.........
2
⁄3 2 0 0 0 1
Arizona
Enright L,1-3............ 5 6 6 6 4 1
Collmenter ............... 2 1 0 0 0 0
Paterson...................
2
⁄3 0 0 0 0 1
Demel .......................
1
⁄3 0 0 0 0 0
J.Gutierrez............... 1 2 0 0 0 1
Indians 4, Athletics 3
Cleveland Oakland
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Brantly cf 6 1 1 0 DeJess rf 4 0 0 0
ACarer ss 5 0 2 2 Barton 1b 5 1 1 1
Choo rf 5 0 0 0 CJcksn lf 5 1 3 0
Duncan 1b 3 0 0 0 Wlngh dh 5 0 1 0
LaPort 1b 2 0 0 0 Sweeny cf 6 0 5 2
Hafner dh 5 0 2 0 KSuzuk c 5 0 0 0
OCarer 2b 5 1 1 0 Matsui ph 1 0 0 0
Kearns lf 4 0 1 0 M.Ellis 2b 3 1 1 0
Hannhn 3b 5 1 1 1 Crisp ph 1 0 0 0
Marson c 5 1 3 1 Kzmnff 3b 1 0 0 0
AnLRc
3b-2b 5 0 0 0
Pnngtn ss 5 0 0 0
Totals 45 411 4 Totals 46 311 3
Cleveland................. 000 002 000 002 — 4
Oakland.................... 000 010 010 001 — 3
E—A.Cabrera (3). DP—Cleveland 1. LOB—Cleve-
land 6, Oakland 12. 2B—C.Jackson (6), Sweeney
(3). 3B—Marson (1). SB—A.Cabrera (3), M.Ellis
(4). CS—Kearns (1).
IP H R ER BB SO
Cleveland
J.Gomez................... 5
1
⁄3 6 1 1 2 1
J.Smith H,1.............. 1 0 0 0 0 1
R.Perez H,4.............
2
⁄3 0 0 0 0 0
Pestano BS,1-1.......
2
⁄3 1 1 1 2 0
Sipp........................... 1
1
⁄3 0 0 0 0 0
Durbin W,2-1........... 2 2 0 0 0 1
C.Perez S,9-10 ....... 1 2 1 1 1 0
Oakland
Anderson ................. 9 7 2 2 0 5
Wuertz...................... 1 0 0 0 0 0
Fuentes .................... 1 1 0 0 0 0
Breslow L,0-2 ..........
2
⁄3 3 2 2 1 1
Blevins......................
1
⁄3 0 0 0 0 1
Rangers 5, Mariners 2
Texas Seattle
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Kinsler 2b 3 1 0 0 ISuzuki rf 4 0 0 0
Andrus ss 3 1 1 0 Figgins 3b 4 2 2 0
MiYong dh 4 0 1 0 Bradly lf 4 0 2 0
ABeltre 3b 3 1 1 1 Olivo c 2 0 0 2
DvMrp lf 4 0 1 1 Smoak 1b 4 0 1 0
Torreal c 4 0 0 0 Cust dh 3 0 0 0
Morlnd rf 3 1 1 1 JaWlsn 2b 4 0 1 0
C.Davis 1b 4 1 1 1 MSndrs cf 3 0 0 0
Borbon cf 4 0 1 0 Ryan ss 3 0 0 0
Totals 32 5 7 4 Totals 31 2 6 2
Texas.................................. 200 010 110 — 5
Seattle ................................ 101 000 000 — 2
E—Kinsler (5), Andrus (8). DP—Texas 2. LOB—
Texas 4, Seattle 5. 2B—A.Beltre (7). HR—More-
land (4), C.Davis (1). SB—Kinsler (6), Figgins 2 (5).
CS—Borbon (1). S—Andrus. SF—Olivo 2.
IP H R ER BB SO
Texas
C.Wilson W,4-1....... 9 6 2 1 1 12
Seattle
Pineda L,4-2............ 7 7 4 4 0 9
Ray............................ 1 0 1 1 2 1
Wilhelmsen.............. 1 0 0 0 1 0
S T A N D I N G S
AMERICAN LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
New York ....................................... 17 12 .586 — — 5-5 L-3 12-6 5-6
Tampa Bay..................................... 17 14 .548 1 — 7-3 W-1 9-10 8-4
Baltimore........................................ 14 16 .467 3
1
⁄2 2
1
⁄2 6-4 L-1 7-8 7-8
Boston............................................ 14 17 .452 4 3 4-6 L-2 8-8 6-9
Toronto........................................... 14 17 .452 4 3 5-5 L-1 6-5 8-12
Central Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Cleveland....................................... 21 9 .700 — — 8-2 W-1 13-2 8-7
Kansas City ................................... 17 14 .548 4
1
⁄2 — 5-5 W-1 14-6 3-8
Detroit............................................. 15 17 .469 7 2
1
⁄2 3-7 W-3 9-7 6-10
Minnesota...................................... 11 18 .379 9
1
⁄2 5 4-6 W-2 4-6 7-12
Chicago.......................................... 11 21 .344 11 6
1
⁄2 3-7 L-2 5-11 6-10
West Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Los Angeles .................................. 18 14 .563 — — 6-4 W-2 6-7 12-7
Texas ............................................. 17 14 .548
1
⁄2 — 3-7 W-1 11-5 6-9
Oakland.......................................... 16 16 .500 2 1
1
⁄2 5-5 L-1 8-8 8-8
Seattle ............................................ 14 17 .452 3
1
⁄2 3 6-4 L-1 6-9 8-8
NATIONAL LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Philadelphia................................... 20 9 .690 — — 7-3 W-2 11-5 9-4
Florida............................................ 19 11 .633 1
1
⁄2 — 6-4 L-1 10-5 9-6
Atlanta............................................ 18 15 .545 4 2
1
⁄2 7-3 W-5 9-7 9-8
Washington ................................... 14 16 .467 6
1
⁄2 5 4-6 L-2 9-7 5-9
New York ....................................... 13 18 .419 8 6
1
⁄2 5-5 W-1 6-10 7-8
Central Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
St. Louis......................................... 18 14 .563 — — 6-4 W-1 8-8 10-6
Cincinnati ....................................... 16 15 .516 1
1
⁄2 3
1
⁄2 5-5 W-2 10-9 6-6
Pittsburgh ...................................... 15 16 .484 2
1
⁄2 4
1
⁄2 6-4 W-1 4-8 11-8
Chicago.......................................... 14 16 .467 3 5 4-6 W-2 6-8 8-8
Milwaukee...................................... 13 18 .419 4
1
⁄2 6
1
⁄2 2-8 L-6 8-5 5-13
Houston ......................................... 12 19 .387 5
1
⁄2 7
1
⁄2 4-6 L-2 7-9 5-10
West Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Colorado........................................ 18 10 .643 — — 5-5 W-1 7-6 11-4
San Francisco ............................... 15 16 .484 4
1
⁄2 4
1
⁄2 5-5 L-1 4-5 11-11
Los Angeles .................................. 15 17 .469 5 5 4-6 L-2 9-9 6-8
Arizona........................................... 13 16 .448 5
1
⁄2 5
1
⁄2 5-5 L-1 9-9 4-7
San Diego...................................... 12 19 .387 7
1
⁄2 7
1
⁄2 4-6 L-1 5-13 7-6
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Wednesday's Games
Minnesota 3, Chicago White Sox 2
Toronto 3, Tampa Bay 2
Detroit 4, N.Y. Yankees 0
L.A. Angels 5, Boston 3, 13 innings
Baltimore 3, Kansas City 2
Oakland 3, Cleveland 1
Texas 5, Seattle 2
Thursday's Games
Detroit 6, N.Y. Yankees 3
Tampa Bay 3, Toronto 1
L.A. Angels 11, Boston 0
Kansas City 9, Baltimore 1
Cleveland 4, Oakland 3, 12 innings
Texas at Seattle, 10:10 p.m.
Friday's Games
Tampa Bay (Shields 2-1) at Baltimore (Britton 5-1),
7:05 p.m.
Detroit (Coke1-4) at Toronto (Litsch 2-2), 7:07 p.m.
Minnesota (S.Baker 1-2) at Boston (Wakefield 0-0),
7:10 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees (Nova 2-2) at Texas (Harrison 3-3),
8:05 p.m.
Oakland (G.Gonzalez 3-2) at Kansas City (O’Sulli-
van 1-1), 8:10 p.m.
Cleveland (Masterson 5-0) at L.A. Angels (Chat-
wood 2-1), 10:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Humber 2-3) at Seattle (F.Her-
nandez 3-2), 10:10 p.m.
Saturday's Games
Minnesota at Boston, 1:10 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Baltimore, 1:10 p.m.
Detroit at Toronto, 4:07 p.m.
Oakland at Kansas City, 7:10 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
Cleveland at L.A. Angels, 9:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Seattle, 9:10 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Detroit at Toronto, 1:07 p.m.
Minnesota at Boston, 1:35 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Baltimore, 1:35 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees at Texas, 2:05 p.m.
Oakland at Kansas City, 2:10 p.m.
Cleveland at L.A. Angels, 3:35 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Seattle, 4:10 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Wednesday's Games
Cincinnati 3, Houston 2
Chicago Cubs 5, L.A. Dodgers 1
Atlanta 8, Milwaukee 3, 1st game
Pittsburgh 7, San Diego 4
Philadelphia 7, Washington 4
San Francisco 2, N.Y. Mets 0
Atlanta 8, Milwaukee 0, 2nd game
Florida 8, St. Louis 7
Colorado 6, Arizona 4
Thursday's Games
Cincinnati 10, Houston 4
N.Y. Mets 5, San Francisco 2
St. Louis 6, Florida 3
Washington at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m.
Atlanta 2, Milwaukee 1
Colorado at Arizona, 9:40 p.m.
Friday's Games
Cincinnati (Volquez 2-1) at Chicago Cubs (Garza
1-3), 2:20 p.m.
Atlanta (D.Lowe 2-3) at Philadelphia (Cl.Lee 2-2),
7:05 p.m.
Houston (W.Rodriguez 1-3) at Pittsburgh (Maholm
1-4), 7:05 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Kuroda 3-2) at N.Y. Mets (Niese1-4),
7:10 p.m.
Washington (Zimmermann 2-4) at Florida (Nolasco
3-0), 7:10 p.m.
Milwaukee (Wolf 3-2) at St. Louis (J.Garcia 3-0),
8:15 p.m.
Arizona (Galarraga 3-2) at San Diego (Stauffer 0-1),
10:05 p.m.
Colorado (Jimenez 0-2) at San Francisco (Cain
2-2), 10:15 p.m.
Saturday's Games
Cincinnati at Chicago Cubs, 1:10 p.m.
Milwaukee at St. Louis, 4:10 p.m.
Atlanta at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m.
Houston at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 p.m.
Washington at Florida, 7:10 p.m.
Arizona at San Diego, 8:35 p.m.
Colorado at San Francisco, 9:05 p.m.
Sunday's Games
L.A. Dodgers at N.Y. Mets, 1:10 p.m.
Washington at Florida, 1:10 p.m.
Houston at Pittsburgh, 1:35 p.m.
Milwaukee at St. Louis, 2:15 p.m.
Cincinnati at Chicago Cubs, 2:20 p.m.
Arizona at San Diego, 4:05 p.m.
Colorado at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m.
Atlanta at Philadelphia, 8:05 p.m.
A L B O X E S
Tigers 6, Yankees 3
New York Detroit
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Gardnr lf 5 0 2 1 Kelly cf-rf 2 1 0 0
Swisher rf 4 0 0 0 SSizmr 2b 4 0 0 0
Cano 2b 4 0 2 0 Boesch rf 3 1 2 3
Teixeir 1b 4 0 0 0 AJcksn cf 0 0 0 0
Grndrs cf 3 1 1 0 MiCarr 1b 4 0 0 0
Posada dh 4 0 0 0 VMrtnz c 3 0 1 0
Chavez 3b 2 0 1 1 C.Wells pr 0 1 0 0
AlRdrg pr-3b 2 2 2 0 Avila c 1 0 0 0
Martin c 3 0 0 0 Ordonz dh 3 1 0 0
ENunez ss 4 0 2 1 Raburn lf 2 1 0 0
Inge 3b 2 0 0 1
Santiag ss 3 1 1 0
Totals 35 310 3 Totals 27 6 4 4
New York ........................... 000 200 001 — 3
Detroit................................. 100 001 31x — 6
E—A.J.Burnett (2), E.Nunez 2 (5). DP—Detroit 2.
LOB—New York 8, Detroit 3. 3B—Chavez (1).
HR—Boesch (2). S—Kelly. SF—Boesch, Inge.
IP H R ER BB SO
New York
A.J.Burnett L,4-2..... 7 3 5 2 1 5
Logan........................ 1 1 1 1 0 1
Detroit
Porcello W,2-2 ........ 7 8 2 2 2 3
Schlereth H,3 .......... 1 0 0 0 1 1
Valverde................... 1 2 1 1 0 1
HBP—by A.J.Burnett (Kelly, Raburn).
Umpires—Home, Tim Tschida;First, Jeff Nelson-
;Second, Marty Foster;Third, Bill Welke.
T—2:58. A—30,572 (41,255).
Indians 4, Athletics 3
Cleveland Oakland
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Brantly cf 6 1 1 0 DeJess rf 4 0 0 0
ACarer ss 5 0 2 2 Barton 1b 5 1 1 1
Choo rf 5 0 0 0 CJcksn lf 5 1 3 0
Duncan 1b 3 0 0 0 Wlngh dh 5 0 1 0
LaPort 1b 2 0 0 0 Sweeny cf 6 0 5 2
Hafner dh 5 0 2 0 KSuzuk c 5 0 0 0
OCarer 2b 5 1 1 0 Matsui ph 1 0 0 0
Kearns lf 4 0 1 0 M.Ellis 2b 3 1 1 0
Hannhn 3b 5 1 1 1 Crisp ph 1 0 0 0
Marson c 5 1 3 1 Kzmnff 3b 1 0 0 0
AnLRc
3b-2b 5 0 0 0
Pnngtn ss 5 0 0 0
Totals 45 411 4 Totals 46 311 3
Cleveland................. 000 002 000 002 — 4
Oakland.................... 000 010 010 001 — 3
E—A.Cabrera (3). DP—Cleveland 1. LOB—Cleve-
land 6, Oakland 12. 2B—C.Jackson (6), Sweeney
(3). 3B—Marson (1). SB—A.Cabrera (3), M.Ellis
(4). CS—Kearns (1).
IP H R ER BB SO
Cleveland
J.Gomez................... 5
1
⁄3 6 1 1 2 1
J.Smith H,1.............. 1 0 0 0 0 1
R.Perez H,4.............
2
⁄3 0 0 0 0 0
Pestano BS,1-1.......
2
⁄3 1 1 1 2 0
Sipp........................... 1
1
⁄3 0 0 0 0 0
Durbin W,2-1........... 2 2 0 0 0 1
C.Perez S,9-10 ....... 1 2 1 1 1 0
Oakland
Anderson ................. 9 7 2 2 0 5
Wuertz...................... 1 0 0 0 0 0
Fuentes .................... 1 1 0 0 0 0
Breslow L,0-2 ..........
2
⁄3 3 2 2 1 1
Blevins......................
1
⁄3 0 0 0 0 1
Umpires—Home, Jim Wolf;First, Derryl Cousins-
;Second, Jim Joyce;Third, Ron Kulpa.
T—3:42. A—14,353 (35,067).
Rays 3, Blue Jays 1
Toronto Tampa Bay
ab r h bi ab r h bi
RDavis rf 4 0 0 0 Fuld lf 4 0 0 0
CPttrsn cf 4 0 0 1 Zobrist 2b 3 1 1 0
YEscor ss 4 0 1 0 Damon dh 4 0 2 1
Lind dh 4 0 1 0 Longori 3b 3 0 0 0
JRiver lf 3 0 1 0 Joyce rf 3 0 1 1
Arencii c 3 0 0 0 BUpton cf 4 0 0 0
Encrnc 1b 3 0 0 0 Ktchm 1b 3 0 1 0
McCoy 3b 3 0 1 0 SRdrgz ss 4 1 1 0
JMcDnl 2b 3 1 1 0 Jaso c 2 1 1 1
Totals 31 1 5 1 Totals 30 3 7 3
Toronto............................... 000 000 001 — 1
Tampa Bay......................... 003 000 00x — 3
E—S.Rodriguez (1). DP—Tampa Bay 1. LOB—To-
ronto 3, Tampa Bay 8. 2B—Damon (3), S.Rodri-
guez (6), Jaso (6). SB—McCoy (2). SF—Joyce.
IP H R ER BB SO
Toronto
Drabek L,2-2 ........... 5
2
⁄3 6 3 3 4 3
Janssen.................... 1
1
⁄3 1 0 0 0 0
Dotel ......................... 1 0 0 0 0 0
Tampa Bay
Price W,4-3.............. 8
2
⁄3 4 1 0 0 10
Farnsworth S,6-7....
1
⁄3 1 0 0 0 0
Janssen pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.
Umpires—Home, Joe West;First, Angel Hernan-
dez;Second, Paul Schrieber;Third, Chad Fairchild.
T—2:31. A—12,682 (34,078).
Royals 9, Orioles 1
Baltimore Kansas City
ab r h bi ab r h bi
BRorts 2b 4 0 0 0 Getz 2b 4 1 2 1
Markks rf 4 1 2 0 MeCarr cf 4 3 3 4
D.Lee 1b 4 0 0 0 Gordon lf 5 1 1 1
Guerrr dh 3 0 0 0 Butler dh 4 0 1 1
AdJons cf 4 0 1 1 Francr rf 4 0 0 0
Scott lf 4 0 0 0 Betemt 1b 4 1 1 1
MrRynl 3b 3 0 1 0 Aviles 3b 3 0 2 1
Fox c 3 0 0 0 B.Pena c 3 1 0 0
Andino ss 3 0 1 0 AEscor ss 4 2 2 0
Totals 32 1 5 1 Totals 35 912 9
Baltimore............................ 100 000 000 — 1
Kansas City ....................... 410 300 01x — 9
LOB—Baltimore 6, Kansas City 6. 2B—Getz (2),
Me.Cabrera (10), Butler (9), Betemit (11), A.Esco-
bar (6). HR—Me.Cabrera (3). SB—Getz (6), Aviles
(7). S—Getz.
IP H R ER BB SO
Baltimore
Tillman L,1-3............ 3
2
⁄3 10 8 8 1 3
Rupe......................... 3
2
⁄3 1 0 0 1 2
Rapada.....................
2
⁄3 1 1 1 0 0
Kansas City
Chen W,4-1 ............. 7 5 1 1 2 5
Jeffress..................... 2 0 0 0 0 0
HBP—by Rupe (Aviles). WP—Tillman, Rupe.
Balk—Tillman.
Umpires—Home, Andy Fletcher;First, Tim Welke-
;Second, Jim Reynolds;Third, Mike DiMuro.
T—2:38. A—29,927 (37,903).
Angels 11, Red Sox 0
Los Angeles Boston
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Aybar ss 6 2 4 1 Ellsury cf 3 0 1 0
HKndrc
2b-1b 6 1 3 2 Crwfrd lf 3 0 1 0
Abreu lf 6 0 2 3 DMcDn lf 1 0 0 0
TrHntr dh 3 1 1 1 Youkils 3b 4 0 0 0
Callasp 3b 5 0 2 2 AdGnzl 1b 4 0 0 0
V.Wells rf 4 1 1 0 Ortiz dh 3 0 3 0
BoWlsn c 1 0 0 0 Lowrie ss 4 0 1 0
Trumo 1b-rf 3 1 1 2 J.Drew rf 2 0 0 0
Mathis c 4 1 1 0 Sltlmch c 3 0 0 0
Amarst 2b 1 0 0 0 Scutaro 2b 2 0 1 0
Bourjos cf 4 4 3 0
Totals 43111811 Totals 29 0 7 0
Los Angeles .................... 003 330 200 — 11
Boston.............................. 000 000 000 — 0
E—Scutaro (4). DP—Los Angeles 4, Boston 1.
LOB—Los Angeles 10, Boston 7. 2B—Abreu (8),
Callaspo 2 (5), Bourjos (6), Lowrie (6). HR—Trum-
bo(6). SB—Aybar 2(7), H.Kendrick (3), V.Wells (1).
CS—Trumbo (2).
IP H R ER BB SO
Los Angeles
Pineiro W,1-0 .......... 5
2
⁄3 3 0 0 4 2
Thompson................ 1
1
⁄3 1 0 0 1 2
F.Rodriguez............. 2 3 0 0 0 1
Boston
Lackey L,2-4............ 4 10 8 8 3 1
Atchison ................... 3
2
⁄3 7 3 3 1 2
R.Hill ......................... 1
1
⁄3 1 0 0 0 2
Lackey pitched to 2 batters in the 5th.
HBP—by Lackey (Bourjos).
Umpires—Home, Laz Diaz;First, Scott Barry;Se-
cond, John Hirschbeck;Third, Wally Bell.
T—3:10. A—37,013 (37,065).
N L B O X E S
Mets 5, Giants 2
San Francisco New York
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Rownd cf 4 0 1 0 JosRys ss 4 0 1 2
Burriss 2b 4 0 1 0 Hu 2b 3 0 0 0
Fontent ss 2 1 1 1 DWrght 3b 3 1 1 0
Huff 1b 4 0 0 0 Beltran rf 4 1 1 2
Schrhlt rf 3 1 0 0 Bay lf 3 1 1 0
C.Ross lf 4 0 1 0 I.Davis 1b 4 0 1 0
Tejada 3b 4 0 0 0 RPauln c 2 0 0 0
Whitsd c 2 0 0 0 Hairstn cf 2 1 0 0
Posey ph 1 0 0 0 Pridie cf 0 0 0 0
JSnchz p 2 0 1 1 Pelfrey p 2 1 0 0
Mota p 0 0 0 0 FRdrgz p 0 0 0 0
Ford ph 1 0 0 0
Runzler p 0 0 0 0
Totals 31 2 5 2 Totals 27 5 5 4
San Francisco.................... 000 110 000 — 2
New York ........................... 030 020 00x — 5
E—Jos.Reyes (2), Hu (1). DP—San Francisco 2,
New York 2. LOB—San Francisco 6, New York 4.
2B—Bay (3). 3B—Jos.Reyes (3). HR—Fontenot
(2), Beltran (5). SB—D.Wright (8), Hairston (1).
CS—Burriss (1).
IP H R ER BB SO
San Francisco
J.Sanchez L,2-2...... 5 5 5 5 6 6
Mota.......................... 2 0 0 0 0 0
Runzler..................... 1 0 0 0 0 1
New York
Pelfrey W,2-3 .......... 7
2
⁄3 4 2 1 2 5
F.Rodriguez S,7-8 .. 1
1
⁄3 1 0 0 2 2
Reds 10, Astros 4
Houston Cincinnati
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Bourn cf 4 1 0 0 Heisey cf-lf 3 1 1 1
Bourgs lf 2 1 1 1 Renteri ss 5 0 2 2
Pence rf 4 0 2 3 Votto 1b 5 1 1 0
Wallac 1b 4 0 0 0 Phillips 2b 4 0 0 0
CJhnsn 3b 3 0 0 0 Bruce rf 4 3 3 1
DelRsr p 0 0 0 0 JGoms lf 2 1 1 0
AngSnc 2b 1 0 0 0 LeCure p 0 0 0 0
Hall 2b 3 0 1 0 Hanign c 4 1 3 3
Fulchin p 0 0 0 0 Janish 3b 3 1 1 1
Bogsvc ph 1 0 0 0 HBaily p 2 0 0 0
Figuero p 0 0 0 0 FLewis ph 1 1 1 1
Barmes ss 4 1 1 0 Ondrsk p 0 0 0 0
Quinter c 4 0 1 0 Chpmn p 0 0 0 0
Myers p 2 0 0 0 Bray p 0 0 0 0
MDwns 3b 2 1 1 0 Masset p 0 0 0 0
Stubbs
ph-cf 1 1 1 1
Totals 34 4 7 4 Totals 34101410
Houston ........................... 000 001 300 — 4
Cincinnati ......................... 010 212 04x — 10
DP—Houston 1. LOB—Houston 6, Cincinnati 5.
2B—Pence (9), Bruce (4), J.Gomes (4), Stubbs (4).
HR—Bruce (6), F.Lewis (1). SB—Bourgeois 2 (11),
Pence (2), Heisey (2). CS—J.Gomes (2). SF—Hei-
sey, Janish.
IP H R ER BB SO
Houston
Myers L,1-2.............. 5
2
⁄3 9 6 6 3 4
Del Rosario..............
1
⁄3 0 0 0 0 0
Fulchino ................... 1 0 0 0 0 2
Figueroa................... 1 5 4 4 0 0
Cincinnati
H.Bailey W,1-0 ........ 6 4 1 1 1 7
Ondrusek .................
2
⁄3 2 2 2 0 1
Chapman ................. 0 1 1 1 2 0
Bray H,3 ...................
1
⁄3 0 0 0 0 0
Masset H,2 .............. 1 0 0 0 0 2
LeCure ..................... 1 0 0 0 0 1
Chapman pitched to 3 batters in the 7th.
Cardinals 6, Marlins 3
Florida St. Louis
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Coghln cf 3 0 0 0 Theriot ss 4 0 0 0
Bonifac lf 4 0 0 0 Rasms cf 3 3 2 0
HRmrz ss 4 0 1 0 Pujols 1b 3 1 3 0
GSnchz 1b 3 0 0 0 Hollidy lf 4 1 2 2
Stanton rf 4 0 0 0 Brkmn rf 2 1 1 4
Dobbs 3b 3 1 1 0 Jay rf 0 0 0 0
Helms 3b 0 0 0 0 Laird c 3 0 0 0
J.Buck c 4 2 2 0 Punto 2b 3 0 1 0
Infante 2b 3 0 2 2 Descals 3b 4 0 0 0
JJhnsn p 3 0 1 1 Westrk p 1 0 0 0
MDunn p 0 0 0 0 Miller p 0 0 0 0
MHmlt ph 1 0 0 0
Motte p 0 0 0 0
ESnchz p 0 0 0 0
Totals 31 3 7 3 Totals 28 6 9 6
Florida ................................ 000 020 100 — 3
St. Louis............................. 100 001 04x — 6
DP—Florida 1, St. Louis 3. LOB—Florida 4, St.
Louis 5. 2B—J.Buck (6). HR—Berkman (10). SB—
H.Ramirez (6). CS—Coghlan (4), Laird (1). S—
Westbrook. SF—Berkman.
IP H R ER BB SO
Florida
Jo.Johnson L,3-1.... 7
1
⁄3 8 5 5 4 7
M.Dunn.....................
2
⁄3 1 1 1 1 0
St. Louis
Westbrook ............... 6
1
⁄3 7 3 3 0 8
Miller .........................
2
⁄3 0 0 0 0 0
Motte W,1-0............. 1 0 0 0 1 1
E.Sanchez S,3-3..... 1 0 0 0 2 0
T—2:36. A—38,509 (43,975).
Braves 2, Brewers 1
Milwaukee Atlanta
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Weeks 2b 3 0 1 0 Prado lf 4 1 2 1
Morgan cf 3 0 1 0 Heywrd rf 4 0 0 0
Loe p 0 0 0 0 C.Jones 3b 4 0 2 0
Braun lf 4 0 1 0 McCnn c 2 0 1 0
Fielder 1b 4 0 0 0 Uggla 2b 4 0 0 0
McGeh 3b 4 0 1 0 Hinske 1b 4 1 2 1
YBtncr ss 4 1 0 0 Kimrel p 0 0 0 0
C.Hart rf 4 0 1 0 McLoth cf 3 0 0 0
Lucroy c 2 0 1 1 Hicks ss 2 0 0 0
Marcm p 3 0 0 0
AlGnzlz
ph-ss 1 0 0 0
CGomz cf 0 0 0 0 Beachy p 2 0 0 0
OFlhrt p 0 0 0 0
Conrad ph 1 0 0 0
Venters p 0 0 0 0
Fremn 1b 0 0 0 0
Totals 31 1 6 1 Totals 31 2 7 2
Milwaukee.......................... 000 010 000 — 1
Atlanta ................................ 010 000 01x — 2
E—Morgan (1), McCann (2), Hicks (1). LOB—Mil-
waukee 6, Atlanta 7. 2B—McGehee (7), Prado (10),
C.Jones 2 (11). HR—Prado (3), Hinske (2). CS—
Morgan (1). S—Morgan. SF—Lucroy.
IP H R ER BB SO
Milwaukee
Marcum.................... 7 5 1 1 1 8
Loe L,2-3.................. 1 2 1 1 1 0
Atlanta
Beachy ..................... 6 4 1 0 1 9
O’Flaherty ................ 1 1 0 0 0 2
Venters W,2-0......... 1 1 0 0 0 2
Kimbrel S,7-9 .......... 1 0 0 0 0 2
WP—Beachy 2.
Phillies 7, Nationals 3
Washington Philadelphia
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Espinos 2b 4 1 1 0 Rollins ss 5 1 2 0
Cora 3b 4 0 2 0 Victorn cf 3 1 1 2
Werth rf 3 1 1 1 Polanc 3b 5 1 2 0
L.Nix lf 3 0 0 0 Howard 1b 3 1 0 0
HRdrgz p 0 0 0 0 Mayrry rf 4 1 1 1
Morse ph 1 0 0 0 Ibanez lf 4 2 3 3
Slaten p 0 0 0 0 WValdz 2b 4 0 2 1
AdLRc 1b 4 1 2 0 Sardinh c 4 0 1 0
WRams c 4 0 1 1 Hallady p 2 0 0 0
HrstnJr cf 4 0 1 0 Bastrd p 0 0 0 0
Dsmnd ss 3 0 0 1 BFrncs ph 0 0 0 0
Lannan p 1 0 0 0 Madson p 0 0 0 0
Brdrck p 0 0 0 0
Stairs ph 1 0 0 0
Coffey p 0 0 0 0
Bixler lf 1 0 0 0
Totals 33 3 8 3 Totals 34 712 7
Washington ....................... 000 200 010 — 3
Philadelphia....................... 006 010 00x — 7
LOB—Washington 5, Philadelphia 8.
2B—Espinosa (4), Ad.LaRoche (4), Mayberry (3),
Ibanez (5). HR—Victorino (5), Ibanez (3). SB—Co-
ra (1), Rollins (7), Victorino (7). S—Halladay. SF—
Werth, Desmond.
IP H R ER BB SO
Washington
Lannan L,2-4............ 2 7 6 6 1 1
Broderick.................. 1 1 0 0 0 0
Coffey....................... 2 2 1 1 0 5
H.Rodriguez ............ 2 2 0 0 1 3
Slaten........................ 1 0 0 0 1 1
Philadelphia
Halladay W,5-1........ 7 6 2 2 0 10
Bastardo................... 1 2 1 1 0 1
Madson .................... 1 0 0 0 0 1
Lannan pitched to 6 batters in the 3rd.
HBP—by Lannan (Victorino). WP—H.Rodriguez,
Bastardo.
C M Y K
PAGE 4B FRIDAY, MAY 6, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ S P O R T S
KINGSTON – Getting to the playoffs
usually means needing a winning record.
Or at the very least finishing .500.
Not so in Division 1-B of Wyoming Valley
Conference girls soccer. Four wins – yes,
four wins in 13 games – could do the trick.
Lake-Lehman inched closer to that num-
ber Thursday, rallying for three second-half
goals for a 3-2 victory over Wyoming Valley
West.
Nikki Sutliff converted a penalty kick in
the 74th minute – her second goal of the
game – as Lehman improved to 3-5-2 to stay
in second place in the division. Valley West
remained in fourth, falling to 2-8-1 and
losing ground to idle Nanticoke (2-7-2) for
the third and final District 2 berth out of
the division.
The reason for the records in Division 1-B
is simple. In crossover games with powerful
Division 1-A, Division 1-B teams are 2-21-1.
So winning intradivisional games, like Leh-
man did Thursday, are critical.
Lehman was awarded the penalty kick
when freshman Shoshana Mahoney, one of
the WVC’s top newcomers, was pushed to
the ground in the left side of the penalty
area. Valley West keeper Maggie D’Angelo
guessed correctly which side Sutliff shot at,
but the ball was just out of reach.
Based on the first meeting – a 6-0 Leh-
man victory – it didn’t seem likely the Black
Knights would need a rally for a victory.
Yet, Valley West was up 2-0 at halftime.
“We did a tremendous job,” Valley West
coach Mike Davitt said, “but there are two
halves in soccer. We have to play a whole,
complete game. The wind helped us in the
first half and helped them a little bit in the
second half.
“But they are a good-skilled team, and
you have to be prepared at all times when
you go against a team with the playmakers
they have.”
Valley West’s Kelcie Hromisin poked in a
loose ball in the 36th minute during a
scramble after a corner kick by Juliet
Schmid for the first goal. Alex Lecce
banged a corner kick off a Lehman defender
for another goal about two minutes later.
“I was frustrated,” Lehman coach Kelly
Spencer Adamshick said. “We weren’t re-
laxed. We weren’t playing our game. We
were too jumpy. Once we settled down,
everything started clicking and we started
passing and putting things together. That’s
when the goals started to come.”
The first came 12 minutes into the sec-
ond half. Sutliff was situated between the
penalty box and the right sideline when she
unleashed a liner that sailed into the far
side of the goal.
Lehman tied the score seven minutes
later as Sarah Bray crossed the ball from
the right side and Marissa Moosic, who has
played in goal often this season, one-tou-
ched it in from10 yards out.
Lake-Lehman ............................................................................... 0 3 — 3
Wyoming Valley West ................................................................ 2 0 — 2
First half: 1. WVW, Kelcie Hromisin (Juliet Schmid), 36th min; 2.
WVW, Alex Lecce, 38th; Second half: 3. LL, Nikki Sutliff, 52nd; 4. LL,
Marissa Moosic (Sarah Bray), 59th; 5. LL, Sutliff (pen kick), 74th.
Shots: LL 29, WVW 15; Saves: LL 10 (Moosic/Ashley Jackson),
WVW 21 (Maggie D’Angelo); Corners: LL 4, WVW 5.
Honesdale 2, Hanover Area 0
Seneca Probst and Randi Jo Kowalczyk
scored one goal apiece as Honesdale shut
out Hanover Area.
Ciera Gensel stopped five shots in goal
for Hanover Area.
Honesdale ....................................................................................... 2 0 — 2
Hanover Area.................................................................................. 0 0 — 0
First half: 1. HON, Seneca Probst, 2nd min; 2. HON, Randi Jo Ko-
walczyk (Bridget Fennell) 19th.
Shots: HON 10, HAN 8; Saves: HON 4 (Brittany Kiner), HAN 5
(Ciera Gensel ); Corners: HON 3, HAN 2.
Crestwood 4,
Holy Redeemer 3
Gabby Termini’s second-half hat trick pro-
pelled Crestwood to a win over Holy Re-
deemer.
HannahCoffingot Crestwoodonthe board
inthe first half, whichendedwiththe Comets
trailing 2-1.
Hallie Rexer scored twice and added an as-
sist for the Royals, while Allison Capaci
notched a goal and an assist.
Crestwood ....................................................................................... 1 3 — 4
Holy Redeemer............................................................................... 2 1 — 3
First half: 1. HRHallie Rexer (Allison Capaci), 7th min; 2. CRHannah
Coffin, 13th; 3. HR Capaci (Rexer), 34th; Second half: 4. CR Gabby
Termini, 41st; 5. CR Termini, 48th; 6. HR Rexer, 57th; 4. CR Termini
(Coffin), 69th.
Shots: CR21, HR15; Saves: CR10 (Megan White), HR10 (Sara-
beth Kolodziej); Corners: CR 4, HR 6.
Wyoming Seminary 2,
Meyers 1
Bridget McMullenscoredtwogoals, includingthegame-winner with
only 50 seconds remaining, to lead the Blue Knights to victory over the
Mohawks.
Kaylee Macko scored Meyers’ only goal.
Meyers........................................................................................... 1 0 — 1
Wyoming Seminary..................................................................... 0 2 — 2
First half: 1. MEY, Kaylee Macko (LeAnne McManus) 30th min; Sec-
ond half: 2. WS, Bridget McMullen 70th; 3. WS, McMullen 80th.
Shots: MEY9, WS7; Saves: MEY: 3 (Alivia Weidler), WS: 6 (Lucie
Povova); (Corners: MEY: 2, WS 2.
Wyoming Area 9, MMI 3
Jenna Skrinak led Wyoming Area with a
hat trick as Wyoming Area routed MMI Prep.
Gabrielle Bohan added two scores for
Wyoming Area as the Warriors outshot MMI
26-7 en route to the win.
MMI Prep had goals fromErin Kislan, Kat-
lyn Frey and Alexis Haupt.
No other information was provided.
MMI ................................................................................................... 2 1 — 3
Wyoming Area................................................................................ 4 5 — 9
Dallas at Coughlin postponed
The Dallas at Coughlin game was post-
poned due to field conditions and resche-
duled for May 16.
AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER
Carrie Sedeski kicks the ball fromShosha-
na Mahoney.
H S S O C C E R
Sutliff gives L-L a kick
By JOHN ERZAR
jerzar@timesleader.com
Jess Newak took first place
in the 200 and the 400 meters
to help Crestwood beat Ber-
wick 93-57 in high school girls
track Thursday afternoon.
Crysta Hmelak won the
triple jump and the long jump
for the Bulldogs.
3200 RELAY -- 1. BER 11:48. 100 HUR-
DLES -- 1. CRE Dotzel 17.7; 2. CRE Blass; 3.
CRE Prezcop. TRIPLE JUMP -- 1. BER Hmelak
36’2; 2. CRE S. Hao; 3. CRE Sweeney. 100 --
1.CRE Mack 12.9; 2. CRE Dotzel; 3. CRE
Prezcop. 1600 -- 1. CRE Coffin 5:41; 2. CRE
Chrismer; 3. CRE Bull SHOT PUT -- 1. CRE
Womer 26’7; 2. CRE Roju; 3. CRE Bailey. 400 --
1. CRE Newak 62.1; 2. CRE Krupsky; 3. CRE
Sulkowski. 400 RELAY -- 1. CRE 53.8. 300
HURDLES -- 1. BER Kotaisky 55.7; 2. BER
Bower; 3. CRE Metzger. POLE VAULT -- 1. BER
Stout 8’6; 2. BER Whitenite; 3. BER Rigg.
DISCUS -- 1. CRE Roju 70’; 2. BER Bailey; 3.
CRE McCole. LONG JUMP -- 1. BER Hmelak
16’7; 2. CRE S. Hao; 3. BER Bretz. 800 -- 1.
CRE Coffin 2:26; 2. BRE Krupsky; 3. BER
Beaver. 200 -- 1. CRE Newak 27.2; 2. CRE
Wojnar; 3. CRE Ferdous. 3200 -- 1. BER
Leighow 13:08; 2. BER Bull; 3. CRE Roberts.
JAVELIN -- 1. BER Miller 86’1; 2. CRE Yocius; 3.
BER Bailey. 1600 RELAY -- 1. CRE 4:28. HIGH
JUMP -- 1. BER Rineheimer 4’8; 2. CRE Angler;
3. CRE Krupski.
Holy Redeemer 125, Nanticoke
20
Nicole Maximowicz placed
first in the triple jump, the long
jump and the high jump as
Holy Redeemer beat Nanti-
coke.
3200 RELAY -- 1. HR 12:57. 110 HURDLES
-- 1. HR Micca 17.7; 2. HR Warnagiris; 3. HR
Larralde. TRIPLE JUMP -- 1. HR Maximowicz
33’ 4 ¾; 2. HR Wignot; 3. HR Bernardi. 100 -- 1.
HR Ma. Kusakavitch 13.4; 2. HR McFarlane; 3.
NAN Carne. 1600 -- 1. NAN Gronkowski 6:28; 2.
HR Slavoski; 3. HR McCole. SHOT PUT -- 1. HR
Nicholas 27’ 7 1/2; 2. HR Warnagiris; 3. HR
Boice. 400 -- 1. HR Murray 68.3; 2. HR Gill; 3.
NAN Swanberry. 400 RELAY -- 1. HR 56.1. 300
HURDLES -- 1. HR Micca 56.6; 2. HR Larralde.
POLE VAULT -- 1. NAN Swanberry 6’6. DISCUS
-- 1. HR Boich 85’; 2. HR Warnagiris; 3. NAN
Dougherty. LONG JUMP -- 1. HR Maximowicz
16’2; 2. HR Wignot; 3. HR Kusakavitch. 800 -- 1.
HR Durako 2:37; 2. HR Ligotski; 3. NAN Gron-
kowski. 200 -- 1. HR Ma. Kusakavitch 29.2; 2.
HR Me. Kusakavitch; 3. NAN Carne. 3200 -- 1.
HR Cavanaugh 16:15; 2. HR Nitowski; 3. HR
McCole. JAVELIN -- 1. HR Boich 96’5; 2. NAN
Lopez; 3. NAN Dougherty. 1600 RELAY -- 1. HR
4:51.6. HIGH JUMP -- 1. HR Maximowicz 4’6; 2.
HR Wignot.
BOYS
Berwick 92, Crestwood 58
Adam Brobst led Berwick
past Crestwood, winning the
1600 and the 3200 while Sean
Ridall placed first in the triple
jump and the long jump.
Matt Sandroski won three
events for Crestwood.
3200 RELAY -- 1. BER 9:38. 110 HURDLES
-- 1. BER Thomas 17.3; 2. BER Goodson 17.5;
2. CRE Brosh. TRIPLE JUMP -- 1. BER Ridall
40’5 ½; 2. CRE Hagner; 3. CRE Zoinowski. 100
-- 1. CRE Sandroski 11.2; 2. BER Goodson 11.5;
2. BER Mejia. 1600 -- 1. BER Brobst 4:52; 2.
CRE Schwartz; 3. CRE Kotsko. SHOT PUT -- 1.
BER Hanter 43’7; 3. BER Whitebread; 3. BER
Cardoni. 400 -- 1. CRE Sandroski 53.4; 2. BER
Koch; 3. BER O’Donnell. 400 RELAY -- 1. BER
45.7. 300 HURDLES -- 1. BER Goodson 45.7; 2.
BER Thomas; 3. BER Gleason. POLE VAULT --
1. BER Curtin 11’; 2. CRE Roberts; 3. CRE
Cornelius. DISCUS -- 1. BER Cardoni 123’10; 2.
CRE Womer; 3. BER Whitebread. LONG JUMP
-- 1. BER Ridall 19’8; 2. CRE Merges; 3. BER
Steeber. 800 -- 1. BER McHenry 2:08; 2. BER
Moore; 3. CRE Wychock. 200 -- 1. CRE Sand-
roski 22.7; 2. BER Goodson; 3. CRE Zolowski.
3200 -- 1. BER Brobst 10:44; 2. CRE Kotsko; 3.
CRE Schwartz. JAVELIN -- 1. CRE Truschel
142’7; 2. CRE Zack; 3. CRE Roberts. 1600
RELAY -- 1. BER 3:53. HIGH JUMP -- 1. CRE
Steeber 5’6; 2. CRE Duboff; 3. CRE Mack.
Holy Redeemer 1041/2,
Nanticoke 441/2
David Bertram won the shot
put and the discus as the Roy-
als beat Nanticoke.
Paul Zannetti won the 400
for the Trojans while Brian
Zannetti captured first in the
300 hurdles.
3200 RELAY -- 1. NAN 9:35; 2. HR. 110
HURDLES -- 1.HR Razawich 16.1; 2. NAN B.
Zannetti; 3. HR Mark. TRIPLE JUMP -- 1. HR
Banas 36’2; 2. HR Pahler; 3. HR Wert. 100 -- 1.
HR Tarselli 11.7; 2. HR Carr; 3. NAN P. Zannetti.
1600 -- 1. NAN Weron 5:10; 2. HR Kabacinski; 3.
HR Albrecht. SHOT PUT -- 1. HR Bertram 38’ 5
1/2; 2.NAN Badowski; 3. NAN Stevenson. 400 --
1. NAN P. Zannetti 55.1; 2. HR Gdovin; 3. HR
Ghezzi. 400 RELAY -- 1. HR 48.5. 300 HUR-
DLES -- 1. NAN B. Zannetti 43.0; 2. HR Razaw-
ich; 3. HR Shandra. POLE VAULT -- 1. NAN
Steber 10’; 2. NAN Holt. DISCUS -- 1. HR
Bertram 112’6; 2. NAN Badowski; 3. HR Namey.
LONG JUMP -- 1. HR Tomasura 18’3 ½; 2. HR
Pahler; 3. HR Banas. 800 -- 1. HR Lambert 2:13;
2. HR Limongelli; 3. HR Layaou. 200 -- 1. HR
Tarselli 24.5; 2. HR Carr; 3. HR Mark. 3200 -- 1.
HR Limongelli 11:27; 2. HR Lambert; 3. HR
Murthy. JAVELIN -- 1. HR Bedrin 130’5; 2. HR
Bertram; 3. HR Martin. 1600 RELAY -- 1. NAN
3:49.9; 2. HR. HIGH JUMP -- 1. HR Banas 5’6; 2.
Tomasura.
H . S . T R A C K & F I E L D
Crestwood tops Berwick
The Times Leader staff
HAZLETON – Tom Delahan-
ty and L.J. Sedari won in sin-
gles play as Hazleton Area
defeated Delaware Valley in the
first round of the District II
Class 3A boys team tennis
champiosnhips, 3-2.
Hazleton Area advances to
face an opponent to be deter-
mined in the semifinals May 10
at Kirby park.
Peter Gallgher and Tim
Miley combined to win in No. 1
doubles for the Cougars.
SINGLES -- 1. Tom Delahanty (HAZ) def.
Joey Hunt 6-2, 7-6; 2. L.J. Sedari (HAZ) def.
Kevin Quinn 6-1, 3-6, 6-3; 3. Andrew Nidig (DV)
def. Nick Bartal 6-1, 6-1.
DOUBLES -- 1. Peter Gallagher/Tim Miles
(HAZ) def. Drew Corry/Lucas Churters 6-3, 5-7,
6-4; 2. Dan Kurtzman/Mauricio Chartaro (DV) def.
Dan Tedesco/Mike Kimmel 6-4, 6-2.
Wyoming Valley West 3,
Berwck 2
Caleb Fetterolf, Derek Vokel
and Brandon Heych swept
singles play to pace Wyoming
Valley West to a win over Ber-
wick.
SINGLES -- 1. Caleb Fetterolf (WVW) def.
Steve Brand, 6-0, 6-0; 2. Derek Vokel (WVW.)
def. Tyler Ryman, 6-2, 6-3; 3. Brandon Heych
(WVW.) def. Anthony Molino, 6-4, 6-1.
DOUBLES -- 1. Todd Kern/Eric Panglinian
(BER.) def. James Yozviak/Sabri Abntanos, 6-1,
6-1; 2. Mike Torres/Arlinson Reyes (BER.) def.
Chris Bloom/Tom Derby, 6-1, 6-0.
H.S. GIRLS LACROSSE
Wyoming Seminary 18,
Lewisburg 5
Annabelle Jones led the Blue Knights with
four goals in the victory against Lewisburg. Emily
Grenger followed with three goals while Larissa
Bohn stopped five shots as goalie.
H . S . R O U N D U P
Hazleton moves to semifinals
The Times Leader staff
DALLAS — Tommy Alexan-
der struck out 10 over 6
1
⁄3 in-
nings and Zane Stelevich closed
the door in the seventh with the
potential winning run at the
plate to give Wyoming Valley
West a 4-2 victory over Dallas
on Thursday.
The Mountaineers were down
to their final out when Paul
Narcum (3-4, triple, two RBI)
pulled them within two with a
run-scoring single. But Stelevich
followed it up with his second
strikeout of the inning to end
the game and pick up the save.
Chris Clocker led the Spar-
tans (7-3) at the plate, going
3-for-4 with an RBI. Steve Do-
siak added two hits and drove in
a run.
Marc Noyalis went the dis-
tance on the mound for Dallas
(5-4), striking out 11.
Wyoming Valley West Dallas
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Dosiak ss 4 1 2 1 Narcum c 4 0 3 2
Leonard 2b 0 1 0 0 DeBona cf 3 0 0 0
Soulivanh dh 3 0 0 0 Noyalis p 3 0 0 0
Pechulis 3b 4 0 1 0 Stepniak 1b 3 0 1 0
Pollick pr 0 0 0 0 Petorak 2b 2 0 0 0
Clocker 1b 4 1 3 1 Muldoon lf 3 0 1 0
Alexander p 4 0 1 1 Patel ss 2 1 0 0
Stelevich p 0 0 0 0 Napkora rf 0 0 0 0
Potoski c 3 0 0 0 Ivoska dh 2 0 0 0
Shillabeer lf 3 1 1 0 Dirsa dh 1 0 0 0
Yuhas rf 3 0 1 0 Saba 3b 3 1 1 0
Smicherko cf 3 0 0 0
Totals 31 4 9 3 Totals 26 2 6 2
Wyoming Valley West ........... 210 000 1 — 4
Dallas........................................ 000 010 1 — 2
3B – Narcum
IP H R ER BB SO
Wyo. Valley West
Alexander (W, 3-1) .. 6.1 4 2 1 3 10
Stelevich (S) ............. 0.2 2 0 0 0 2
Dallas
Noyalis (L, 2-1)......... 7.0 9 4 3 1 11
Tunkhannock 13,
Wyoming Area 9
The host Tigers scored five
runs in the bottom of the fifth to
erase a one-run deficit, holding
off Wyoming Area in a back-and-
forth contest.
Austin Cline fell a triple short
of the cycle, going 3-for-3 with
four RBI entering the lineup in
place of the injured Mike Papi.
Mike Healey added a double
and a homer for the Tigers
(10-1) while driving in three
runs and earning the win on the
mound, striking out eight in five
innings.
Ty Saylor finished 3-for-5 with
two doubles and Wes Custer
had two hits and two RBI.
P.J. Bone (3-for-4) doubled
twice and knocked in a run for
the Warriors (4-7). Ryan Carey
and Chris Murphy had two RBI
apiece.
Wyoming Area Tunkhannock
ab r h bi ab r h bi
RCarey rf 5 1 1 2 KCuster cf 5 1 1 0
Murphy 3b 4 1 1 2 Zaner 2b 0 0 0 0
Maloney 1b-p 4 0 1 1 Saylor dh 5 3 3 0
McDermtt ss 3 0 0 1 Healey p-3b 4 3 2 3
Nowicki c 3 1 0 0 Cndeelis 1b 2 2 1 1
Bone lf 4 3 3 1 WCuster c 4 2 2 2
MCarey p 0 0 0 0 McClain ss 4 0 2 1
Klus p 0 0 0 0 Goodwin lf 4 1 1 0
Klepadlo p 0 0 0 0 Cline 3b 3 1 3 4
Romanwski p 0 0 0 0 Knott p 1 0 0 0
Colarusso dh 4 1 0 0 Lee rf 2 0 0 0
Granteed ss 2 1 1 1
Grove ph 1 0 0 0
OBrien cf 4 1 2 0
Totals 34 9 9 8 Totals 33131511
Wyoming Area...................... 142 020 0 — 9
Tunkhannock ........................ 511 150 x — 13
2B – Murphy, Bone 2, Saylor 2, Healey, Condeelis,
Cline; HR – Healey, Cline
IP H R ER BB SO
Wyoming Area
MCarey (L, 0-1)........ 0+ 5 5 5 1 0
Klus............................ 3.1 6 3 3 1 0
Klepadlo.................... 1.1 3 2 1 0 2
Maloney..................... 0.1 1 3 0 0 0
Romanowski ............. 1.0 0 0 0 1 0
Tunkhannock
Healey (W, 4-1)........ 5.0 9 9 3 3 8
Knott .......................... 2.0 0 0 0 0 2
Coughlin 15, Crestwood 0
Anthony Grillini and Josh
Featherman combined on a
five-inning one-hitter on the
road to top Crestwood. Grillini
struck out eight in four innings
of work without surrendering a
hit.
Grillini went 2-for-4 with a
double and an RBI at the plate
for Coughlin (5-6). Joey Parsnik
(3-4), Dominick Gulius (2-3,
RBI), Kyle Cunningham (dou-
ble, two RBI) and Jordan Sod
(three RBI) all contributed.
Dominic Sartini singled for
the Comets (2-8).
Coughlin Crestwood
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Sorokas cf 3 1 1 1 Ritz cf 2 0 0 0
Parsnik ss 4 2 3 0 Munisteri cf 0 0 0 0
Grillini p-3b 4 3 2 1 Snyder ss 1 0 0 0
Gulius c 3 2 2 1 Casey p 0 0 0 0
Picketts lf 2 1 0 0 JEngler p 0 0 0 0
Francis ph 1 1 0 0 Piavis p 0 0 0 0
PAndrews 1b 2 1 1 1 Goyne p 0 0 0 0
Cnninghm 1b 1 1 1 2 Quintilni dh 2 0 0 0
Fthrmn 3b-p 1 0 0 0 Brynok 3b 1 0 0 0
Concini dh 2 0 0 0 Berg c 2 0 0 0
Haupt rf 1 1 0 2 Sweeney c 0 0 0 0
LePore ph 1 0 0 0 Sartini 1b 2 0 1 0
Sod 2b 3 1 1 3 Eyerman pr 0 0 0 0
ERinehmr rf 1 0 0 0
Williams rf 1 0 0 0
Survilla lf 2 0 0 0
Caladie 2b 1 0 0 0
Sadvary 2b 0 0 0 0
Totals 28151111 Totals 15 0 1 0
Coughlin ..................................... 306 24 — 15
Crestwood.................................. 000 00 — 0
2B – Grillini, Sorokas, Cunningham
IP H R ER BB SO
Coughlin
Grillini (W, 1-2) ......... 4.0 0 0 0 1 8
Featherman............... 1.0 1 0 0 0 1
Crestwood
Casey (L, 1-2) .......... 2.2 7 9 9 2 3
JEngler ...................... 1.1 2 2 1 2 0
Piavis......................... 0.2 2 4 0 1 1
Goyne........................ 0.1 0 0 0 0 0
Hanover Area 10, GAR 0
Mickey Ferrence allowed just
two hits and struck out five
while going 2-for-4 at the plate
in the Hawkeyes’ six-inning
victory.
Mike View (3-3, two RBI) and
Zack Kollar (2-5, double, three
RBI) both had big days while
Mike Sulcoski (RBI) and Kyle
Kreitzer (double, RBI) added
two hits apiece for Hanover
Area (6-3).
Lance Letteer doubled for the
Grenadiers (2-7).
GAR Hanover Area
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Thomas ss 2 0 0 0 Kollar ss 5 1 2 3
Curiel ss 1 0 0 0 Lkchnsky cf 2 0 0 0
Prednis lf 3 0 1 0 Pericci 2b 4 0 1 1
Smith cf 3 0 0 0 Sulcoski 3b 4 2 2 1
Letteer c 2 0 1 0 Ferrence p 4 1 2 0
Dudick 3b 2 0 0 0 View 1b 3 2 3 2
Rodriguez rf 2 0 0 0 Kreitzer c 3 2 2 1
Placencio rf 0 0 0 0 Zuranski rf 3 1 1 2
Moore 1b 1 0 0 0 Kocher lf 1 1 1 0
Ankner 2b 0 0 0 0 McDnnell lf 0 0 0 0
Skrpenak dh 2 0 0 0
Tyson p 2 0 0 0
Totals 20 0 2 0 Totals 29101410
GAR.......................................... 000 000 — 0
Hanover Area .......................... 213 103 — 10
2B – Letteer, Kollar, Kreitzer
IP H R ER BB SO
GAR
Tyson (L, 0-1)........... 5.1 14 10 9 6 3
Hanover Area
Ferrence (W, 3-1) .... 6.0 2 0 0 1 5
Royals-Trojans suspended
The Holy Redeemer at Nanti-
coke game was suspended be-
cause of darkness after nine full
innings with the score tied 9-9.
The contest is scheduled to
be resumed Saturday.
H S B A S E B A L L
Alexander, Stelevich close the door on Dallas
The Times Leader staff
Holy Redeemer dominated
much of the first game, win-
ning a series of battles at the
net to score 14 of 16 points
while opening a 20-7 lead.
“That was a great start,” said
Rob Wingert, who put together
a strong all-around match with
39 assists, 14 service points, six
kills and four blocks. “We kind
of asserted that we were going
to own net.
“That went away for a while
but we got it back.”
North Pocono opened leads
of 4-0 and 9-4 in Game Two.
Holy Redeemer rallied to tie
three times before taking its
first lead of the game, 19-18,
during a streak of four straight
service points by Dylan Mys-
lowski.
Myslowski, who finished
with 16 service points, includ-
ing two aces, played a promi-
nent role in the Royals winning
the first two games. He served
six straight points for a 13-5
lead in Game One and had four
more to help force the first tie
of Game Two at 9-9.
Wingert’s powerful jump
serves and Myslowski’s finesse
helped the Royals turn the mo-
mentum with their extended
streaks holding serve.
“We try to mix the serves,”
Kablick said. “We mix a couple
of guys with jump serves with
guys with float serves.
“Dylan’s serve comes at you
like a knuckleball and just three
or four inches above the tape. It
can be really tough to handle.”
The Royals showed the abil-
ity to start and finish.
Alexis twice had kills that
prevented North Pocono from
closing out Game Two when it
led, 24-23 and 26-25.
Holy Redeemer set up Alexis
for three attempts at the deci-
sive kill at the end of Game
Four. The Trojans defended
two and dug one out, only to
send it right back to Alexis, for
the match-ending kill.
“That just felt great,” Alexis
said.
Dan Kopicki had 11 kills, two
assists and two digs while John
McCarthy added nine kills for
the Royals.
First-year North Pocono
coach Bill Kline praised his
team’s effort in defending Alex-
is after the slow start.
“After Game One, we went
toe-to-toe with them,” Kline
said.
Dom Verdetto had 10 kills
and seven blocks for North Po-
cono. Ryan Rinaldi had 20 as-
sists, three kills and four
blocks. Tim Cummings had
seven kills, three digs and 10
service points. Matt Bartkow-
ski had five kills and three digs.
Cory Hannon had 12 service
points for North Pocono, in-
cluding four straight to rally
the Trojans into the Game Four
lead at 21-18.
Alexis had three kills as the
Royals scored seven of the
match’s final eight points.
Lake-Lehman 3, Berwick 0
Lake-Lehman defeated Ber-
wick with game scores of 25-16,
25-19 and 25-9. Steve Simko led
the Black Knights with nine
kills as well as eight service
points and four aces.
Brent Oliver followed with
29 assists, 13 service points and
three kills while J.J. Ford had
10 digs and eight service
points.
Justin Johnson had five
blocks and four service points
for Berwick while Kevin Bow-
man finished with six blocks
and three kills.
Wyoming Valley West 3,
Hanover Area 0
The Spartans earned a 25-15,
25-11, 25-15 road sweep of the
Hawkeyes.
Matt Pieszala (11 service
points, 5 aces, 8 kills), Alex
Himlin (four service points,
two aces, seven kills, four
blocks), Russ Pacovsky (six
service points, 18 assists)
topped Valley West.
Pat Connelly finished with
six service points for the Haw-
keyes.
Abington Heights 3, Dallas 1
Drew Shumaker had 11 kills
and three digs as Abington
Heights defeated Dallas with
scores of 25-17, 26-24, 25-15
and 25-23. Andy McLane added
10 service points and nine kills
while Eric Wasser (35 assists,
15 service points) contributed
in the win as well. David Miller
had 15 digs for Dallas while Aa-
ron Weir scored 24 kills and
seven blocks. Kevin Hine had
15 assits and nine digs.
ROYALS
Continued fromPage 1B
“It’s a big win. It has broken a trend.”
Jack Kablick
Holy Redeemer coach
SCRANTON -- Tunkhannock’s
Gavin Colley and Mike Baldwin
were part of a record-setting, 400-
meter relay team for the second
straight year during Thursday
night’srunningof the56thannual
Jordan Relays at Memorial Stadi-
um.
Nick Auriemma and Ryan Kar-
nopp joined Colley and Baldwin
inpostingatimeof 43.50seconds,
loweringt the mark of 43.75 that
Tunkhannock set last season
whenBillyKresgeandShawnCai-
neswere part of the team.
Pittston Area’s team of Bran-
don Hampton, Tyler Roman,
Dave McLean and Cody Rydzy
won the 1600-medley relay in
3:46.79.
Competing against a field oth-
erwise filled by Lackawanna
Track Conference schools, Tunk-
hannock finished in a three-way
tie for fifth and Pittston Area was
eighth.
The Pittston Area girls were
tied for sixth and Tunkhannock
finished 11th out of 12 teams in
Class 3A.
Tigers set 400-meter record at Jordan relays
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com FRIDAY, MAY 6, 2011 PAGE 5B
➛ S P O R T S
150 Special Notices
MONTY MONTY SA SAYS YS
Attention Lake
Winola fans!
The Blue Pelican
is up and running
under new man-
agement and
staff. The place
has been
cleaned from top
to bottom and
has a great new
look inside and
out.
PP&L
CUSTOMERS...
Save money each
month on your resi-
dential or business
electricity and help
the environment by
switching to GREEN
energy. Nothing to
buy, same reliable
energy, no con-
tracts,cancel any-
time, no cancella-
tion fees, receive
one bill.
For details call toll
free 855-256-4454
lynnbythelake@
hotmail.com
380 Travel
YANKEES SPECIAL
Yanks vs Boston
Sunday, 5/15 @ 8pm
Section 212
$126.00 ticket/bus
1-800-432-8069
406 ATVs/Dune
Buggies
SUZUKI`09
KING QUAD 750AXI
Hunter green. 214
miles. Excellent
condition. 50”
Moose plow with
manual lift included.
Asking $5,900
(570) 299-0560
427 Commercial
Trucks &
Equipment
DUMP TRAILER ‘05
10 yards, 4 ton limit,
very good condi-
tion. Asking $3,900
Also, E-350. Cheap
For more info, call
973-906-8404
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
DODGE `99 RAM
1500 CLUB CAB
Good condition.
Runs great. New
tires. Asking $4,000
or best offer.
(570) 239-3950
518 Customer
Support/Client Care
CUSTOMER SERVICE
REPRESENTATIVES
Will train reliable,
friendly and
dependable person.
Call 570-822-7730
522 Education/
Training
LUZERNE COUNTY
COMMUNITY
COLLEGE
POSITION
OPENINGS
Luzerne County
Community College
invites applications
for the following
positions:
FT MICROBIOLOGY/
BIOLOGY LAB ASSISTANT
Please send a cover
letter and resume to
Luzerne County
Community College,
John Thomas Sed-
lak, Dean of Human
Resources,
Attention: Human
Resources Dept.,
1333 S. Prospect St,
Nanticoke, PA
18634-3899 or e-
mail hr@luzerne.edu
no later than Friday,
May 13, 2011. No
phone inquires
please.
For additional infor-
mation on these
positions, please
visit our web site at
(www.luzerne.edu).
Equal Opportunity
Employer. Candi-
dates representing
all aspects of diver-
sity are encouraged
to apply.
LINE UP
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542 Logistics/
Transportation
Eastern Penn Sup-
ply (EPSCO) is seek-
ing a qualified indi-
vidual for Ware-
house/Local Deliv-
ery driver for our
Wilkes-Barre Coal
St. location. Must be
self motivated, have
a clean driving
record, be organ-
ized, computer liter-
ate & have the abili-
ty to work in a fast
paced environment.
We offer:
• A full time position
• Competitive hourly
wage
• Full benefit
package including:
• Family Health Care
• 401k
• Life insurance
• Dental/Vision
• Vacation time
based on longevity/
Holiday pay/ Sick/
Personal.
Qualified persons
are encouraged to
apply in person to:
Eastern Penn
Electric Supply
Attn: Marc Malvizzi
395 Coal Street
Wilkes-Barre, Pa
18702
548 Medical/Health
* OPTI CAL *
•Machine
Operator
•Lens Coating
Benefits for full
time employees.
SEND RESUME OR
APPLY IN PERSON
Monday-Friday
8:30a - 6pm to:
Luzerne Optical
180 N. Wilkes-
Barre Blvd.
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18702
To place your
ad Call Toll Free
1-800-427-8649
566 Sales/Retail/
Business
Development
DOOR TO DOOR SALES
Local company is
seeking individuals
for door to door
sales. Must be out-
going, self motivat-
ed & flexible. Please
email resume to:
reliablesales@
ptd.net
610 Business
Opportunities
BEER DISTRIBUTOR
License available
with option to lease
building or sold
separately.
570-954-1284
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
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DALLAS
119 Jackson Street
Saturday May 7th
8:00AM - 1:00PM
Contents of upscale
home. Lots of good
stuff. CHEAP!
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
47 Highland Dr.
May 6, 7, 8. Friday,
8-5; Saturday,
8-1; Sunday, 9-12.
Take S. Main to
Knox to Highland.
Huge sale!
Too much to list!
KINGSTON
261 Pringle Street
Saturday, 8am-5pm
Multi-Family. New
merchandise. Kid’s
clothes. French
doors, gameboy,
PS2 games, hot tub,
household, Steelers
Jerseys, furniture &
much more!
BEAUMONT
May 7 & May 8
10AM - 5 PM
Rooster collect-
ibles, garden &
outdoor items,
stained glass,
Victorian furniture,
primitives, pottery
& much more.
1103 Old Hwy. Rd
Directions: turn at
Kunkle corners
from Route 309,
right at Saab
Dealer, 1 mile on
blacktop.
570-675-3447
BIG RED BARN BIG RED BARN
Antiques &
Fabulous
Junque
MOUNTAINTOP
100 Brookfield Way
(Maplewood)
Saturday, May 7st
9 am to 12 pm
Boys clothes,
household items,
toys, books,
women’s small &
large clothes,
shoes. Something
For Everyone!!
NANTICOKE
1333 S. PROSPECT
STREET
13TH ANNUAL
LCCC ALUMNI
ASSOCIATION
FLEA MARKET &
COLLECTIBLES
SHOW
SATURDAY
MAY 7
8AM TO 2 PM
MORE THAN
60 VENDORS
Free Admission
Free Parking
NANTICOKE
302 ESPY STREET
May 7th @
8 am - 12 pm
Household items,
toys, clothes, much
more.May 7th 8am
SHAVERTOWN
106 Village Dr.
Saturday, May 7th
9:00am to 1:00 pm
Lots of beautiful
things for Mom &
Prom, plus luggage
bedding, books,
loads of household
items & more
INDOOR
SALE
SWOYERSVILLE
355 Kossack St.
(off Main St.)
Saturday, May 7
9am -1pm
Wide selection
WILKES-BARRE
315 Moyallen St.
Saturday, May 7th
9:00am - 2:00pm
Chain saw, mower,
generator, yard
tools, electronics,
household, skin
care products,rugs
vaccuums, clothes,
dehumidifier,
wheels & tires, etc.
WILKES-BARRE SOUTH
73 Amherst Avenue
(Off Old River Rd)
Saturday, May 7
8am - 1pm
Lots of toys & chil-
dren’s items. Cloth-
ing (including little
girl’s juniors and
boys size 6). Video
games, Household,
Books, Collectibles
& much more!
Too many baby
toys?
Pass them on, sell
them with an ad!
570-829-7130
906 Homes for Sale
FORTY FORT
151 Fort Street
Recently remodeled
3 bedroom home, 2
baths, all new
amenities, lots of
closet space, nice
corner lot with off
street parking,
garage, new car-
pet, windows &
door. Gas heat.
$129,900.00
Call (570) 852-9142
Mountaintop
Unbelievable
VALUE!
14 Oaklawn Ave,
Mountain top PA
18707 cape cod, 3
bedrooms, 2 bath-
rooms, dining room,
office/study, family
room, finished
basement, .38 acre,
deck. At Your Ser-
vice Realty Inc. Lisa
Poholek $85,450
Call (570)902-9983
906 Homes for Sale
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
315 Countrywood Dr
Pristine 3 bedroom
home boasts large
eat-in kitchen with
french door to patio,
formal dining room,
hardwood floors, tile
in kitchen and
baths, master bed-
room with walk-in
closet and master
bath with soaking
tub. Over-sized 2
car garage, con-
crete driveway.
Additional lot avail-
able for $35000.
MLS 11-1149
$259,000
Michael Slacktish
570-760-4961
CENTURY 21
SIGNATURE
PROPERTIES
570-675-5100
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
DALLAS
PRISTINE 2
BEDROOM. APT.
Available June 1st
Taking applications
now. $700/month. +
security. Includes
appliances, sewer
& trash. No smok-
ing & no pets!! Off
Street Parking,
References &
background check
required. Call
570-675-8627
leave message
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new apartment?
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DALLAS
Short term or
month to month as
needed. 2 bed-
room, completely
furnished apart-
ment in beautiful
area. Includes all
appliances, utilities,
cookware, dishes
etc. Carport includ-
ed. $800 month.
570-675-2486
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
WILKES-BARRE
447 S. Franklin St.
MUST MUST SEE! SEE!
1 bedroom, study,
off street parking,
laundry. Includes
heat and hot water,
Hardwood floors
and appliances.
Trash removal.
$575/per month,
Call (570) 821-5599
WILKES-BARRE
APARTMENTS
FOR RENT!
425 South Franklin
Street. For lease.
Available immedi-
ately, washer/dryer
on premises, no
pets. We have stu-
dio, 1, 2 bedroom
apts. On site park-
ing. Fridge, stove
provided. We have
a 24/7 security
camera presence
and all doors are
electronically
locked. $450-
650/per month,
water & sewer paid,
One month/security
deposit. Call (570)
793-6377 after
10:00 a.m. to set an
appointment or
email shlomo_voola
@yahoo.com.
wilkesliving.com
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950 Half Doubles
SUGAR NOTCH
3 bedrooms, quiet
street, yard. Fresh
paint. $525/month
+ utilities, lease,
security. No pets.
Call 570-332-1216
or 570-592-1328
746 Garage Sales/
Estate Sales/
Flea Markets
746 Garage Sales/
Estate Sales/
Flea Markets
746 Garage Sales/
Estate Sales/
Flea Markets
746 Garage Sales/
Estate Sales/
Flea Markets
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IN CLASSIFIED!
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on an automobile?
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Classified’s got
the directions!
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Of all
the times Bill Haas has played
Quail Hollow, he never had a
round quite like this.
Haas had stress-free birdies
on all the par 5s and did little
wrong on the rest of the holes
Thursday in the Wells Fargo
Championship, matching the
tournament record for lowest
opening round with an 8-under
64 for a two-shot lead.
“I’ve got good feelings around
this place,” Haas said.
It was his best score by four
shots at Quail Hollow on the
PGA Tour, and way better than
two dozen rounds he played as
a kid when he would tag along
with his father, Jay Haas, on the
special trips they made to the
course.
Haas had a two-shot lead
over David Toms and Jonathan
Byrd, who each had a 66 in the
morning when it was barely
above 40 degrees at the start of
the tournament with a north
wind that is uncommon for this
tournament.
Ultimately, the afternoon
turned out to be perfect —
much like Haas and his round.
He did have a few key par
saves, such as the 10-foot putt
he made at the turn on the 18th
hole. The key for Haas, though,
was getting off to a good start
on the slightly tougher back
nine, and knowing he could
afford to make a few mistakes.
Defending champion Rory
McIlroy made some errors
early, and he never quite caught
up. In his first trip back to
America after his Sunday col-
lapse in the Masters, the 22-
year-old from Northern Ireland
opened with a 75.
“The story of the day for me
is I really didn’t hit it very well,
which is unlike me,” McIlroy
said. “It’d be the strength of my
game and today I just wasn’t
striking it well. My timing was
off just a little bit.”
Pat Perez and Lucas Glover
were at 67, while Rickie Fowler
overcame a rugged start — two
bogeys on his opening three
holes — to lead a group at 68
that included Vijay Singh and
Stuart Appleby.
Phil Mickelson, in his first
event since the Masters, hit two
balls in the water on par 5s and
scrambled for par each time.
The first one was critical. He
already was 1 over for the tour-
nament through six holes when
he came out of the pine straw
and into the pond at No. 7. He
holed a 12-foot par putt, then
made birdie on the next four
holes.
He wound up with a 69,
along with Padraig Harrington.
“I hadn’t played in a few
weeks, and to shoot under par
was a good start,” Mickelson
said. “It could have been a lot
better, could have been a lot
worse. I’ll certainly take it.”
The cold air made Quail
Hollow play even longer in the
morning, and it was particular-
ly tough on the guys who don’t
blast it. Toms fits into that
category, which explains why
he had to hit fairway metals for
his second shot on three par 4s.
The good news is he made par
on all of them, and threw in
seven birdies for a 66.
“It was cold this morning,
and we were all out there with
our jackets and sweaters on and
playing these long par 4s,”
Toms said. “If I can shoot 3
under on the front nine, as long
as it played, I’ll take that any
day.”
Toms won the first edition of
this tournament in 2003.
Byrd rarely plays well here.
Except for a tie for fifth a few
years ago, he missed the cut in
his other five appearances. He
almost thought about skipping
the Wells Fargo Championship,
except that it’s close to his
South Carolina roots.
“It’s pretty odd,” said Byrd,
who opened the year with a
playoff win at Kapalua. “If it
wasn’t close to home, I might
start saying, ‘I just don’t play
well there, I need to go home.’
But my family is close to home
here in Columbia, South Car-
olina, and it’s not far from
Clemson. They just knock it
out of the park at this golf tour-
nament, and it’s a tournament I
can’t miss.”
Regions Tradition
BIRMINGHAM, Ala. — Tom
Lehman shot a bogey-free 5-
under 67 at Shoal Creek to take
a one-stroke lead after the first
round of the Regions Tradition,
the Champions Tour’s first
major of the season.
Lehman had two victories, a
second and a third in six events
this year on the 50-and-over
tour.
Nick Price, Mark Calcavec-
chia, Wayne Levi and Chien-
Soon Lu were tied for second in
the first professional event at
Shoal Creek since the 1990
PGA Championship. Jay Haas
had a 69.
Fred Couples opened with a
72.
Spanish Open
TERRASSA, Spain — Scot-
tish rookie Scott Jamieson shot
a 6-under 66 to take a one-shot
lead after the first round of the
Spanish Open at Real Golf Club
El Prat.
England’s Steve Webster,
India’s Jeev Milkha Singh,
France’s Romain Wattel and
Spain’s Pablo Larrazabal
opened with 67s. Miguel Angel
Jimenez shot a 71, and fellow
Spanish star Alvaro Quiros, the
winner last year in Seville, had
a 74.
P R O G O L F
AP PHOTO
Bill Haas chips to the ninth green during the first round of the
Wells Fargo Championship golf tournament at Quail Hollow Club
in Charlotte, N.C., on Thursday.
Everything going
right in for Haas
The Associated Press
COLLEGE PARK, Md. — Af-
ter sweating through crisp white
shirts and expensive suits for
more than three decades, Mary-
land basketball coach Gary Wil-
liams is finally ready to take it
easy.
Williams announced his retire-
ment Thursday, saying “it’s the
right time” for him to end a ca-
reer in which he led his alma ma-
ter to the 2002 national cham-
pionship.
Williams coached for 33 years,
the last 22 at Maryland, where he
played as a guard from1964-67.
“My entire career has been an
unbelievable blessing. I am
fiercely proud of the program we
have built here,” Williams said. “I
couldn’t have asked any more
from my players, my assistant
coaches, the great Maryland fans
and this great university. Togeth-
er, we did something very special
here.”
His career recordis 668-380, in-
cluding 461-252 at Maryland. Un-
der his direction, the Terrapins
went tothe NCAAtournament14
times, won or shared three Atlan-
tic Coast Conference titles and
reached the Final Four twice.
Williams was a fiery competi-
tor who despised losing and
loved the challenge of competing
against the best teams in the na-
tion — including Duke, which
usually got the best of him. But
the Terrapins never went down
without a fight, and rarely did
Williams ever take a seat on the
bench.
His frenzied style, and his pro-
pensity to sweat on the sideline
more than his players, was as
much a part of his legend as wins
and losses.
“I love Gary. What he has done
for Maryland and for college bas-
ketball is remarkable,” Duke
coach Mike Krzyzewski said. “He
is one of the great coaches of all
time. He is a coaches’ coach and
an ultimate competitor. His re-
tirement is a big loss for the ACC
and for college
basketball.”
Williams, 66,
arrived at Ma-
ryland in 1989,
when the pro-
gram was still
struggling un-
der the weight
of NCAA violations. The Terps
endured two straight losing sea-
sons before reaching the NCAA
tournament for the first time un-
der his direction in 1994, and he
never had another sub-.500 sea-
son the rest of the way.
“Gary Williams is a legend,”
Maryland athletic director Kevin
Anderson said. “His accomplish-
ments on the court have earned
him a place among the elite in
college basketball history. But
Gary’s legacy here at Maryland
goes far beyond basketball. From
his philanthropic efforts to his
tireless work with fans and alum-
ni to his impact with our stu-
dents, Gary has left an indelible
markof excellence onthis univer-
sity.”
Since 2004, Williams has
served as the scholarship co-
chair for Great Expectations, Ma-
ryland’s $1 billion fundraising
campaign. His efforts onbehalf of
Maryland students have helped
raise over $240 million for schol-
arships at the school.
The retirement announcement
comes one seasonafter the Terra-
pins endured a 19-14 record and
missed both the NCAA tourna-
ment and the NIT. Also, on
Wednesday, standout center Jor-
dan Williams formally entered
the NBA draft with two years of
eligibility left.
Williams began his college
coachingcareer at AmericanUni-
versity in 1978. He went to Bos-
ton College in 1982 and then
spent three seasons at Ohio
State, from 1986-89, before com-
ing to Maryland.
He had a chilly relationship
with Debbie Yow, who served as
Maryland’s AD from1994-2010.
C O L L E G E B A S K E T B A L L
Maryland’s Williams
announces retirement
Williams
The Associated Press
C M Y K
PAGE 6B FRIDAY, MAY 6, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ S P O R T S
They had played very well in
Monday’s overtime loss in
Game 2 and had reason to
think there might be something
to build on. But it was as if
they expended everything on
that big punch. They came out
flat-footed for Game 3 and the
Bruins ended up scoring twice
in the game’s first 63 seconds.
The first was a rocket
launched by Zdeno Chara, the
Bruins’ mammoth defenseman.
The second was scored by
David Krejci. Neither was re-
motely Boucher’s fault. That is
just what Laviolette told his
goaltender during the timeout
that he called right after the
second goal. It was an odd
scene — the rest of the team
gathered around assistant
coach Craig Berube, and Lavio-
lette and Boucher conversing,
alone.
The Bruins, with a lead, with
their trapping style when lead-
ing, and with their emphasis in
this game on hitting, just
seemed to keep the Flyers from
skating at all. Oh, and they
won a ridiculous 43 out of 55
faceoffs in the game, 78 per-
cent. It is impossible to look
good as a team when you lose
that many, when you are al-
ways chasing just to try to
regain possession.
For the Flyers, there were
none of the breathtaking rushes
in transition that marked Game
2. From the middle of the sec-
ond period on, there was little
doubt who was going to win
the game — especially when
you add in the fact that Tim
Thomas is a better-than-pretty-
good goaltender.
Little doubt. And now — and
with all due respect to what the
Flyers accomplished in 2010 —
it would appear to be all over
but the cliches. As forward
Danny Briere said, “We have to
take it one game at a time, try
to win one game ... We’re not
going to win four games on
Friday.”
All true enough. But it really
isn’t like last year.
HOFMANN
Continued fromPage 1B
Rich Hofmann is a columnist for
Philadelphia Daily News.
strength on Wednesday night.
Lerg had a goal and an assist in
four games during the first round
of the Calder Cup playoffs and,
considering the Penguins have
only scored six goals through
four games against Charlotte,
Hynes was happy to get his
skilled winger back into the li-
neup for a regular shift.
“He’s an impact player for us,”
Hynes said. “He adds a dynamic
to our lineup that we need.”
After trying to give it a go in
Games 2 and 3, Lerg was relieved
to be able to play a regular shift in
Game 4. He said it was a frustrat-
ing experience not being able to
play at 100 percent.
“It was (frustrating) not really
knowing how I’m going to feel,”
Lerg said. “It was just too hard to
predict until you got on the ice.”
Boiling point
The Penguins will try to be-
come the third team in the AHL
this postseason to win a series af-
ter being down 3-1. Since 1946, a
teamthat was down 3-1has come
back to win the series just 17
times in the AHL postseason.
There were several times in
Game 4 that the Penguins were
within inches of taking a1-0 lead,
and the fact that they were so
close has kept them confident
heading into Game 5 tonight.
Hynes said he may tweak a few
things in the Penguins’ game, but
for the most part they are going
to stay the course.
“It’s like when you try to boil
water. It’s at 211 (degrees) and
one more degree… it gets to 212
and starts to boil. That’s where
we’re at,” Hynes said. “Last night
we were at 211 and we’re looking
to get to 212.”
Finding the back of the net
The Penguins power play is 2-
for-23infour games against Char-
lotte, but hasn’t scored in its last
16 chances. The Penguins have
generated plenty of decent
chances with the man advantage,
however, and Lerg said they
aren’t panicking.
“We’re moving the puck
around pretty good. It’s just a
matter of time,” hesaid. “Wehave
to find the back of the net. The
season’s on the line.”
The Penguins have been strug-
gling to score goals throughout
the playoffs, averaging less than
two goals per game. Charlotte
goaltender Mike Murphy has al-
lowed only five goals in four
games against the Penguins
(Brad Thiessen has allowed six).
“We’ve been struggling a little
bit all playoffs to score goals, but
guys are getting chances and
that’s the important thing,” Col-
lins said. “We’ve been an inch or
two away from scoring a couple
goals. The chances we did get
came when we got pucks to the
blue paint and traffic in front. We
can do a little better job of creat-
ing screens and not letting Mur-
phy see the first shot. That’s go-
ing to be one of our keys (for
Game 5).”
PENGUINS
Continued fromPage 1B
ATLANTA — Larry Drew
likes the look of these playoffs.
He’s feeling pretty good about
his own team, too.
There are upsets all around in
the NBA postseason. Top-seeded
San Antonio has already been
eliminated. The defending cham-
pion Los Angeles Lakers are in
trouble. And Drew, the rookie
coach of the Atlanta Hawks, sees
no reason why his own team
can’t go farther than anyone
would’ve expected.
“This thing is wide open,” he
said Thursday.
The Hawks have already
knocked out Dwight Howard and
Orlando, a team that swept At-
lanta from the playoffs in lopsid-
ed fashion a year ago. They’re
trying to followa similar script in
the Eastern Conference semifi-
nals, having stolen a victory in
Game 1 against the Chicago
Bulls, a 62-win juggernaut dur-
ing the regular season.
Even coming off a series-tying
loss, the Hawks are exuding con-
fidence as they return home for
the next two contests. Game 3 is
Friday, which shapes up as the
most significant night in14 years
for a franchise that has largely
been an NBA wasteland.
“We feel good about where
we’re at,” said Jamal Crawford,
the Hawks’ super sub. “We feel
like we took their best punch.”
Chicago, of course, would pre-
fer to followthe script. The Bulls
won 18 more games than Atlanta
during the regular season and
are in no mood to be the fodder
for another playoff upset.
After a shocking 103-95 defeat
in the series opener, Chicago
played with a sense of despera-
tion Thursday night. The Bulls
dominated the boards 58-39,
turned the Hawks’ offense into a
stagnant mess (34 percent shoot-
ing), hustled for seemingly every
loose ball and pulled away for an
86-73 victory.
“We can always step it up. You
can always improve in each
game,” league MVP Derrick
Rose said. “But we’ve got to con-
tinue to make hustle plays be-
cause it’s just going to get har-
der.”
Indeed, the Hawks actually
took some comfort from the way
they lost.
Despite the obvious deficien-
cies, Atlanta was still in the game
with about 4 minutes left, trail-
ing by six and poised to pull off
another upset. It didn’t work out,
but the Hawks know they can
stick with a team that put up the
best record in the league.
“Whatever doubt might have
been seeping into our guys’
heads, that doubt was erased af-
ter Game 1,” Drew said. “Even
though we lost Game 2, there
wasn’t a knockout blow. There
was all this talk about how they
would come out with all this en-
ergy and everything. Well, we
didn’t feel that. ... They didn’t
put us away.”
At the end, they did.
Nowit’s back to Atlanta to play
in front of what figures to be a
raucous sellout crown, an anom-
aly in this attendance-challenged
city. This is the most important
home playoff game for the
Hawks since 1997, when they al-
so were tied1-1in a second-round
series against the Michael Jor-
dan-led Bulls.
That one didn’t work out so
well for Atlanta. The Bulls won
Game 3 — and the next two, as
well — to knock out the Hawks
on the way to Jordan’s fifth of six
titles.
N B A P L AYO F F S
Atlanta is eyeing
upset like a Hawk
By PAUL NEWBERRY
AP Sports Writer
UP NEXT
GAME 3
Chicago Bulls
at Atlanta Hawks
7 p.m., ESPN
walks as the PawSox sent eight
batters to the plate. Hector Lu-
na singled to drive in a run in
the frame and Nate Spears
drove in two with a single as
Pawtucket opened a 3-0 lead.
Brackman (2-1) only lasted four
innings giving up six hits and
walking five.
“I really have no clue what it
is. I just have togoout andfinda
way to get out of it and battle
through it,” said Brackman,
who noted that he felt good in
the bullpen before the game.
“Obviously something changes
when a batter steps in the box
and I need to figure out a way to
just keep it like it is in the bull-
pen.”
While Brackman – who has
onlygivenupthreeruns in19in-
nings other than the first of the
game – was struggling, PawSox
starter Matt Fox (3-2) was on
target. He faced the minimum
number of hitters until Brandon
Laird doubled with two outs in
the fourth for the first hit of the
game for SWB. The only other
baserunner for the Yankees
against Fox was Chris Dicker-
son’s walk in the first, but he
was picked off.
Pawtucket opened up a 4-0
leadinthe sixthafter Daniel Na-
va led off with a triple and
scored on a sacrifice fly by Josh
Reddick.
“You got to find a way to over-
come that (deficit),” Yankees
manager Dave Miley said. “It’s
not a deficit you can’t over-
come, but…”
Although the Yankees strug-
gled all night, they still brought
the tying run to the plate in the
ninth. Jesus Montero singled to
lead off the inning and came
around to score on a single by
Jordan Parraz to cut the deficit
to 4-1. Then, with two runners
on and two outs, Luis Nunez
struck out to end the game.
The Yankees also threatened
in the eighth off Pawtucket re-
liever Blake Maxwell, who was
called up from Double-A before
the game. SWB loaded the
bases with two outs on a hit bat-
ter a pair of singles by Parraz (2-
for-4) and Kevin Russo. But
Maxwell was taken out for clos-
er Michael Bowden, who got
out of the jam.
“That’s kind of been our
M-O,” Miley added. “We get
guys on and we’re one hit away
fromgettingus right backinthe
ballgame. It’s been a tough hit
to come by.”
NOTES: The PawSox had at
least one hit in every inning…A
pair of Notre Dame alums will
pitch today with Pawtucket’s
Kyle Weiland versus SWB’s Da-
vid Phelps…Dickerson saw his
first action since the Charlotte
series after battling a bulging
disk in his neck. He went 0-for-3
with a walk and a made superb
diving catch in centerfield in
the top of the ninth with the
bases loaded…Ramiro Pena
started the game at shortstop,
but was replaced by Luis Nunez
in the second inning due to be-
ing called up by New York be-
cause Eric Chavez suffered a
broken foot in Thursday’s game
at Detroit…Justin Maxwell
picked up his third outfield as-
sist so far this season when he
gunned down Drew Sutton at
the plate in the fourth.
HOWTHEY SCORED
RED SOX FIRST: Daniel Nava struck out.
DrewSutton doubled. Josh Reddick walked. Hec-
tor Luna singled, scoring Sutton and moving Red-
dick to third. Lars Anderson struck out. Luna stole
second. Tony Thomas walked. Nate Spears sin-
gled driving in Reddick and Luna and moving Tho-
mas to third. Reddick moved to second on throw
home. Luis Exposito flied out. RED SOX 3-0
RED SOX SIXTH: Daniel Nava tripled. Drew
Sutton grounded out. Josh Reddick hit sacrifice
fly, scoringNava. Hector Lunagroundedout. RED
SOX 4-0
YANKEES NINTH: Jesus Montero singled.
JorgeVazquezsingled; Monterotosecond. Justin
Maxwell struck out. BrandonLairdgroundedintoa
fielder’s choice, Vazquez forced out at second,
Montero to third. Jordan Parraz singled, scoring
Montero and moving Laird to second. Wild pitch
advances Laird to third and Parraz to second. Luis
Nunez struck out. RED SOX 4-1
PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER
Pawtucket’s Drew Sutton is called out at the plate in the fourth inning of Thursday’s game.
Looking on is Yankees catcher Jesus Montero.
YANKEES
Continued fromPage 1B
Looking Ahead
Next Game: 6:35 p.m. today
versus the Pawtucket Red Sox
at PNC Field
Probable Pitchers:
Pawtucket RHP Kyle Weiland
(2-2, 3.42) vs. Yankees RHP
David Phelps (1-3, 4.15)
On Deck: The Yankees short
four-game homestand runs
through the weekend with
afternoon games Saturday
and Sunday. SWB hits the
road again on Monday.
Radio: All games can be
heard on THE GAME
(1340-AM) with Mike Vander
Woude
WRIGHT TWP – Crestwood’s
scored seven runs in the sixth
inning to defeat Coughlin 10-0
in a high school softball game
shortened to six innings by the
mercy rule.
Alexander Hoops led the
output with a double and a
triple as well as two RBI. Cecilia
Schmid also had a triple and
two RBI. Cory Gallagher, Melan-
ie Snyder and Brittany Blass
also had two hits each.
Jessica Luton, Ashley Wincek
and Mary Ross had hits for
Coughlin.
Coughlin ...................................... 000 000 — 0
Crestwood................................... 012 007 — 10
WP – Allyssa Davies, 6 IP, 3H, 0R, 0ER, 0BB, 3K;
LP – Jessica Luton, 5.2 IP, 12H, 10R, 9ER, 1BB,
4K;
2B—CRE: Alexander Hoops, Cory Gallagher.
3B—CRE: Brittany Blass, Cecilia Schmid, Hoops.
Top hitters – CRE: Blass 2-for-4, Hoops 2-for-4
2RBI, Gallagher 2-for-4, Melanie Snyder 2-for-3,
Schmid 2RBI.
Tunkhannock 12,
Wyoming Area 5
Schyler Yatsko had four RBI,
including a two-run home run,
as the Tigers defeated Wyoming
Area for a home victory. Ashley
Inman added a home run for
Tunkhannock while striking out
five as the starting pitcher.
Sara Degnan had five strike-
outs for Wyoming Area.
Wyoming Area...................... 002 010 2 — 5
Tunkhannock ........................ 122 520 x — 12
WP – Ashley Inman, 7 IP, 5H, 5R, 2ER, 1BB, 5K;
LP – Nicole Combo, 6 IP, 10H, 12R, 9ER, 4BB,
5K;
2B—WA: Lexi Coolbaugh; TUN: Schyler
Yatsko, Emily Florba, Kaylee Ive. HR— TUN:
Yatsko, Inman. Top hitters – WA: Sara Degnan
2-for-4; TUN: Yatsko 3-for-4 4 RBI, Florba 2-for-3.
Dallas 3,
Wyoming Valley West 2, 8 inn.
Taylor Baker doubled home a
run in the bottom of the eighth
inning to give Dallas a win at
home over Wyoming Valley
West.
Kristen Baker struck out 14
on the mound for the Mountain-
eers and also went 2-for-4 with a
double.
Kimber Letter picked up two
hits for Wyoming Valley West.
Wyoming Valley West ......... 000 110 00 — 2
Dallas ..................................... 011 000 01 — 3
WP – Kristen Baker, 8IP, 5H, 2R, 1ER, 2BB, 14K;
LP – Abbey Owesn, 7.2IP, 9H, 3R, 2ER, 1BB, 1K;
2B— DAL: K. Baker, T. Baker; WVW: Letter,
Owens. Top hitters – DAL: K. Baker 2-for-4, T.
Baker 2-for-3, Sara Kohli 2-for-3; WVW: Kimber
Letter 2-for-3, Owens 1-for-3.
Nanticoke 11, Redeemer 0
Nanticoke pitchers Hannah
Rubasky (seven) and Brooke
Chapin (three) combined for 10
strikeouts in a shutout of the
Royals in six innings.
Kayla Benjamin went 2-for-3
with a double to lead Nanticoke
at the plate.
Alexis Shemanski topped the
Royals with two hits.
Holy Redeemer....................... 000 000 — 0
Nanticoke ................................. 000 263 — 11
WP – Rubasky, 5 IP, 4H, 0R, 0ER, 1BB, 7K; LP –
Staskiel, 4 IP, 1H, 2R, 0ER, 1BB, 1K;
2B—NAN, Benjamin, Chapin. Top hitters –
HR, Shemanski 2-2; NAN, Bertoni 2-4; Benjamin
2-3, Schinski 2-3
Northwest 5, Lake-Lehman 4
Northwest took back the lead
in the bottom of the sixth inning
and held on to earn a win at
home over Lake-Lehman. Pitch-
er Rachel Linso struck out nine
for the Rangers.
Lake-Lehman .......................... 100 003 0 — 4
Northwest................................. 001 112 x — 5
WP -- Linso, 7IP, 6H, 4R, 3ER, 3BB, 9K; LP --
Headman, 6IP, 7H, 5R, 4ER, 4BB, 6K;
2B— NWT: Perillo, Lewis
Hanover Area 10, GAR 0
Brittany McNair doubled and
hit a home run to lead the Haw-
keyes to victory over the Grena-
diers. Danielle Tuzinski pitched
five innings of one-hit ball to
notch the win. Tuzinski also
homered.
Sam Bryan paced GAR with a
triple.
GAR.......................................... 000 000 — 0
Hanover Area .......................... 302 203 — 10
WP –Danielle Tuzinski- 5IP, 1H, 0R, 0ER, 2BB,
11K; Brittany McNair 1IP, 1H, 0R, 0ER, 0BB, 2K.
LP –Nicole Krzywicki 5IP, 7H, 10R, 8ER, 3BB, 2K;
Sam Bryan 1IP, 2H, 0R, 0ER, 1W, 0K.
2B—HAN: Brittany McNair, Nicole McNair.
3B—GAR:-Sam Bryan.. HR—HAN: Brittany
McNair, Jen Maciejczak, Danielle Tuzinski. . Top
hitters – HAN: Brittany McNair, doubled and
homered. GAR: Sam Bryan tripled.
Hazleton Area 18, Pittston
Area 3 (4 inn.)
Candace Van Horn had four
hits as Hazleton Area defeated
Pittston Area in four innings.
Shannon Salvaterra went 3-for-4
in the win.
Antoinette Scalti and Kelly
Keener had hits for the Patriots.
Pittston Area.................................... 300 0 — 3
Hazleton Area ................................. 913 5 — 18
WP – Ally Schutz, 3 IP, 7H, 3R, 3ER, 1BB, 1K; LP
– Melissa Talerico, 3 IP, 11H, 13R, 10ER, 3BB, 4K;
2B—HAZ: Shannon Salvaterra, Sabrina Babula,
Carly Rossi. Top hitters – PA; Antoinette Scalti
1-for-2, Kelly Keener 1-for-2; HAZ: Salvaterra
3-for-4, Candace van Horn 4-for-4.
H . S . S O F T B A L L
Crestwood tops Coughlin
The Times Leader staff
Pawtucket 4, Scranton/Wilkes-Barre 1
Pawtucket SWB
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Nava, lf 5 1 1 0 Russo, 2b 3 0 1 0
Sutton, 2b 4 1 1 0 Dickrsn, cf 3 0 0 0
Reddick, cf 2 1 0 1 Montero, c 3 1 1 0
Luna, 3b 5 1 3 1 Vazqz, 1b 4 0 1 0
Anderson, 1b 4 0 2 0 Maxwell, lf 4 0 0 0
Thomas, dh 4 0 0 Laird, 3b 3 0 1 0
Spears, rf 4 0 3 2 Parraz, rf 4 0 2 1
Exposito, c 5 0 0 0 Pena, ss 0 0 0 0
Iglesias, ss 4 0 2 0 Nunez, ss 4 0 0 0
Molina, dh 3 0 0 0
Totals 37 412 4 Totals 31 1 6 1
Pawtucket .......................... 300 001 000 — 4
SWB ................................... 000 000 001 — 1
2B – PAW: Sutton, Nava; SWB: Laird
IP H R ER BB SO
Pawtucket
Fox (W, 3-2)............. 5 1 0 0 1 3
Pena ......................... 2 0 0 0 2 2
Maxwell .................... .2 2 0 0 0 1
Bowden (S, 4) ......... 1.1 3 1 1 0 2
SWB
Brackman (L, 1-2) ... 4 6 3 3 5 3
Mitchell ..................... 1 1 0 0 0 1
Ayala......................... 2 2 1 1 0 1
Sanit.......................... 1 1 0 0 0 2
Wordekemper ......... 1 2 0 0 1 0
early favorite Dialed In.
Owner Mike Repole anxiously
awaited results from the latest
vet exam, and promised to end
the drama by announcing a deci-
sion Friday.
“If he’snot what wedeemtobe
100 percent tomorrow, he’s not
going to be100 percent onSatur-
day,” he said.
Repole said he won’t sacrifice
Uncle Mo’s health to satisfy his
30-year dream of having a horse
inAmerica’sgreatest race. Either
way, hewon’t beshut out. Hehas
Stay Thirsty in the full field of 20
horses.
Still, the fast-talking Queens
native, whogot richsellinghisVi-
taminwater company to Coca-
Cola, doesn’t want to leave his
best horse in the barn.
“It’s tough,” he said. “Racing
needs superstars and if he’s 100
percent, Uncle Mo could be that
superstar.”
Hesurelookedit afterwinning
last year’sBreeders’ CupJuvenile
on the same Churchill Downs
track and taking a perfect record
into the Wood Memorial. There,
Uncle Mo led the field with a
quarter-mile to go, but two
horses passed him and he fin-
ished third by a length. After-
ward, Uncle Mo’s appetite fell off
and raised suspicions. An exam
turned up the stomach problem.
Outwardly, Uncle Mo looks as
healthyas, well, ahorse. Internal-
ly, noone’ssureexactlywhat’sgo-
ing on. That’s the quandary.
UncleMocouldbefine. Or Re-
pole and trainer Todd Pletcher
could be risking a repeat of the
Wood Memorial.
“If he runs and he runs sev-
enth, ToddandI will lookat each
other and guess he wasn’t 100
percent,” Repole said. “If he runs
andhewins bysevenlengths, we
can look at each other and say
‘Wow, we’re geniuses.”’
Count three-time Derby win-
ner Bob Baffert among those
who discount Uncle Mo’s bel-
lyache.
“From what I’ve seen visually,
there’s nothing there that tells
me the horse isn’t ready to run,”
the trainer of Midnight Interlude
said. “He’s a good horse, I’m not
believing that crap.”
Pletcher wasn’t talking Thurs-
day. But he’s said Uncle Mo re-
sponded well to treatment and
his appetitehas returned. Repole
said he’s gone off much of his
medication.
“Wegot tolistentowhat Uncle
Mo is telling us,” Repole said,
“and he’s telling us he’s getting
better. He’s telling us he’s pro-
gressing.
“If the three vets say,‘yes’ and
Toddsays,‘no,’ theanswer is ‘no,’
” he added.
It’s not as easyor obvious acall
aslastyear, whenPletcher’scan’t-
miss horse, Eskendereya, drop-
pedoutatthestartof Derbyweek
with a career-ending leg injury.
Orin2009, whenDerbyfavoriteI
Want Revenge was scratched on
the morning of the race with a
bad ankle.
“I’ve seen this movie. Every-
oneelsehasseenthismovie,” Re-
pole said. “It’s a horrible movie
and I don’t want to play a major
role in it, either.”
UNCLE MO
Continued fromPage 1B
NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) —
Ryan Kesler broke a tie with a
power-play goal at 7:28 of the
third period, and the Vancouver
Canucks beat the Nashville Pred-
ators 4-2 on Thursday night to
take a 3-1 lead in their Western
Conference semifinal series.
Christian Ehrhoff scored a
power-play goal and had two as-
sists, Kesler also had two assists,
and Alexander Edler had a goal.
Henrik Sedin notched his first
points in the series with two as-
sists and an empty-net goal with
20.6 seconds left.
N H L
Canucks grab
3-1 series lead
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com FRIDAY, MAY 6, 2011 PAGE 7B
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though they usually couch it
some other way, like ’she goes too
wideintheturns, or doesn’t know
howto switchthe stick.”’
Napravnikisn’tlikelytogetthat
dreaded last-minute call, in no
small part because Kelly Breen,
whotrainsPantsonFire, might be
too afraidto pick up the phone.
“I’d rather have her on our side
than have to run against her. And
nottoputthisinabadway, butRo-
sie is a redhead and she’s got that
fire in her eyes. When she loses,”
hesaid, rollinghiseyes, “she’sdef-
initely not a happy camper.”
At that point, Breen paused,
glanced behind him and turned
back, relieved.
“I hadtolookover myshoulder
when I said that,” he chuckled.
“Like, isRosieanywherenearby?”
For all that, Napravnik hardly
looks imposing. She stands 5-
LOUISVILLE,
Ky. — Rosie Na-
pravnik learned
toridehorsesbe-
fore she could
walk. Even so,
beingthe first fe-
male jockey to
win the Kentucky Derby was not
her driving ambition.
“I was determined to be the
youngest jockey ever to win the
Triple Crown, not just the first fe-
male,” she said not too long ago.
“But that wassupposedtohappen
whenI was16.”
It didn’t, of course, since Na-
pravnikturned23inFebruaryand
just picked up her first Triple
Crown-caliber mount, a dark bay
colt named Pants On Fire. For all
the progress the sport has made,
his name suggests what most of
themenwhostill control thethor-
oughbred racket would have to
experience before turning over
several million dollars worth of
horsefleshto a womanrider.
“It still is a man’s world,” Na-
pravnik said. “You still get that
just about every day: ’I don’t want
to ride a girl. The owner doesn’t
want to ride a girl. You’re not as
strong, you’re not as this, you’re
not as that.’
“It’s probablynot nearlywhat it
used to be,” she added, “but it’s
still out there.”
Diane Crump was the first
woman to ride in both a parimu-
tuel race — in 1969, at Hialeah
Park, where she needed a police
escort to get in — and the Ken-
tucky Derby the following year.
Since then, only four of her fellow
travelers, including Julie Krone,
the most successful, best known
and only female rider in the Hall
of Fame, have been up in the sad-
dle on the first Saturday in May.
The last was Rosemary Homeis-
ter Jr., in 2003. None has finished
higher than11th.
That should have changed two
years ago, when50-to-1shot Mine
That Bird charged up the rail to
steal the Derby. Chantal Suther-
land had been his regular rider,
lost him for two races during a
change of trainers, then showed
up at Churchill Downs three days
before the race with a promise
fromone of the owners she would
get the mount for the big race. It
went to veteran Calvin Borel in-
stead.
“I found out about it fromread-
ingtheRacingForm,” Sutherland
said in a phone interview Thurs-
day. “I never learnedthereason. If
somebody had said, ’We need a
jockey with experience; he’s al-
ready won it,’ I would have said
fair enough.
“But generally, I’vebeenlucky,”
she added. “There’s still the odd
person out there who says, ’I
won’t useher becauseshe’s agirl,’
foot-2 and weighs 111 pounds in
full ridinggear, withher hair bun-
dled in a bandanna tucked be-
neath her helmet. She credits fre-
quent fightswithanolder brother
for toughening her up.
Yet in a sense, her whole life
was preparationfor theracetrack.
Her mother, Cindy, ran a horse-
training center in New Jersey
while raising Rosie — her full
name is Anna Rose —and two ol-
der siblings. All three grew up
workingaroundhorses andinthe
barn. Rosie was riding by age 2,
racing ponies at 7 and when she
got her hands on a video called
“TheJewelsof theTripleCrown,”
knewwhat she wantedtodowith
the rest of her life.
“Julie wasn’t in the video,” Na-
pravnik said, referring to Krone,
“but shewas theonlyfemalejock-
ey I’dever heardof.”
Krone stepped away from rac-
ing in 2004 and remains the only
woman to have won a Triple
Crown race —the1993 Belmont,
aboard Colonial Affair. She said
earlierthisyearwhat sheadmired
most about Napravnik was her
strength and “chutzpah.” Flatter-
ingas thecomments andcompar-
isonsare, Napravnikinsistsondo-
ing things her ownway.
Shenotonlywonherdebutrace
at Pimlico in 2005, atop a filly
named Ringofdiamonds, she had
the presence of mind to remem-
ber something trainer Dickie
Small, one of her mentors, told
her years earlier, when he first let
her do oddjobs aroundhis barn.
“I toldherthedayshestartsrid-
ingtohitthehorseleft-handedun-
der the camera so all the jocks’
agents could see,” Small recently
told the Daily Racing Form.
“She’s galloping along five or six
in front through the stretch, and
boom! Rosie belted her left-hand-
ed.
“I’dcompletelyforgottenwhat I
told her,” he added, “but she re-
membered.”
That wasn’t the only thing, Na-
pravnik’s mentors saidabout her.
“One,” she recalled, “said the
thing that everyone hates about
meiswhat makesmesogood, and
that’s the way I carry myself. I feel
like I have tobe as toughas all the
guys, andI am. I do this every day
with them. I don’t let them mess
withme. ...
“I have to be like that, I’ve al-
ways been like that. It’s actually
gottenme,” she said, “really far.”
Toughness a trademark for female rider
OPINION
J I M L I T K E
JimLitke is a national sports colum-
nist for The Associated Press. Write
to him at jlitke(at)ap.org
C M Y K
T
o
d
a
y
A report card on YRC
YRC Worldwide has restructured
its debt to stave off a bankruptcy
filing. The question now: How is
the trucking company’s business
doing? Other truckers have seen
demand pick up as the economy
has continued its recovery from the
recession. But a harsh winter and
rising fuel costs have hurt first-
quarter earnings at some compa-
nies. YRC’s lenders and investors,
who agreed to the restructuring last
week, will be interested in how the
trucker made it through the quarter.
Another look at
consumer products
Church & Dwight is the
maker of well-known con-
sumer products like Arm &
Hammer baking soda and
detergent and Nair hair
remover. Its first-quarter
earnings report will show how
it coped with rising costs for
raw materials and supplies.
Some consumer products
companies have been charg-
ing more. Church & Dwight
might need to join them.
Assessing the job market
The market is likely to be on edge
when the Labor Department’s report
on April employment comes out.
We’ve had two disappointing reports
on the job market this week. The
number of new jobs in the private
sector reported by payroll firm ADP
was less than expected. And the
government said the number of
people seeking unemployment ben-
efits rose last week to an eight-month
high. The department is expected to
report that the number of new jobs
last month was down from March.
Price-to-earnings ratio: N/A
based on past 12 months’ results
0
5
10
$15
1Q ’10
Operating
EPS
1Q ’11
est.
-$8.25 -$1.53
YRCW $1.35
$12.79
’10 ’11
Source: FactSet
Jobs created
in thousands
Source: The Labor Department
Price-to-earnings ratio: 22
based on past 12 months’ results
Dividend: $1.36 Div. Yield: 1.7%
60
70
80
$90
1Q ’10
Operating
EPS
1Q ’11
est.
$1.11
$1.14
CHD $82.00
$69.31
’10 ’11
Source: FactSet
50
100
150
200
N D J F M A
’10
185
est.
Hampton Inn upgraded
The Hampton Inn Scranton at Mon-
tage Mountain hotel has completed
extensive property renovations that
include a new lobby.
The hotel opened in 1994 and the
renovations got underway last August,
according to the hotel’s general manag-
er, Ryan Alpert.
Other areas transformed by the reno-
vation include upgrades to all 129 gues-
trooms, public areas and meeting
space. In addition, the pool and fitness
center received upgrades and a new
guest laundry room was added to the
second floor of the hotel. All meeting
spaces received new carpeting, tables,
chairs, and artwork.
Bon-Ton’s revenue up
Department store operator Bon-Ton
Stores Inc. said Thursday that revenue
at stores open at least a year climbed
5.1 percent in April.
This figure is a key indicator of a
retailer’s health because it excludes
results from stores opened or closed
during the year.
For the four weeks ended April 30,
total revenue rose 4.6 percent to $197.7
million. Some of the stronger cate-
gories included fine jewelry, children’s,
coats, cosmetics and home including
furniture. Weakness was reported in
missy, petite and large-size sportswear.
Tony Buccina, vice chairman and
president of merchandising, said in a
statement that the monthly results fell
short of the company’s expectations
because of softness in seasonal and
moderate traditional clothing.
CVS Caremark income dips
CVS Caremark Corp. said Thursday
that its first-quarter net income fell
nearly 8 percent as its pharmacy bene-
fits management business continued to
report lower profits.
The Woonsocket, R.I., company said
its profit fell to $713 million, or 52
cents per share, from $771 million, or
55 cents per share. Its revenue grew 9
percent to $25.88 billion from $23.76
billion.
Excluding acquisition and other
charges, the company said it earned 57
cents per share. FactSet said analysts
expected a profit of 55 cents per share
and $25.76 billion in revenue.
Revenue from the company’s retail
stores rose 4.4 percent to $14.6 billion.
Revenue from Caremark rose 18.4
percent to $14 billion with the addition
of a contract with Aetna. About $2.7
billion in revenue is counted for both
businesses.
Profits at the Caremark pharmacy
benefits management business fell
because of costs connected to a new
contract with Aetna Inc.
Mortgage rates down
Fixed mortgage rates dipped to the
lowest level of the year this week. The
third straight weekly decline comes at
the start of the peak buying season.
Freddie Mac says the average rate on
the 30-year loan fell to 4.71 percent
from 4.78 percent the previous week.
That matched this year’s low reached
in January. But it is above the 40-year
low of 4.17 percent hit in November.
The average rate on the 15-year fixed
mortgage slipped to 3.89 percent from
3.97 percent. It reached 3.57 percent in
November, the lowest level on records
dating back to 1991.
I N B R I E F
$3.98 $2.90 $3.67
$4.06
07/17/08
BUSINESS S E C T I O N B
THE TIMES LEADER FRIDAY, MAY 6, 2011
timesleader.com
DOW
12,584.17
—139.41
S&P
1,335.10
—12.22
NASDAQ
2,814.72
—13.51
WALL STREET
HANOVER TWP. — Telerx,
a customer service call center
in the Hanover Industrial Es-
tates, has announced it will ex-
pand its work force by 40 to 50
thanks to a contract withanun-
named international soup mak-
er.
The company will hold hir-
ing events throughout May be-
ginning today at the Wyoming
Valley Mall.
The center opened in 1999
with two corporate clients and
space to accommodate more
than 300 customer service rep-
resentatives and support staff.
There are currently about 250
associates at that location and
with the expected hiring of
about 50 more over the next
three months, the center will
be maxed out.
“With the on-boarding of this
newest client at our Wilkes-
Barre location, we will be at ca-
pacity,” said Jim Neeley, the
company’s vice president of hu-
manresources. “If wesignaddi-
tional clients who require us to
place their business in Wilkes-
Barre we wouldbe lookingfor a
new location within Wilkes-
Barre.”
Currently this center pro-
vides customer service support
for two international food and
beverage companies. It alsohas
centers in Allentown, Hor-
sham, El Paso, Texas, Char-
lotte, N.C., and Penticton, Brit-
ish Columbia.
Telerx is the 11th largest US-
based multichannel contact
center and business process
outsourcer, and operates as an
independent, wholly owned
subsidiary of pharmaceutical
giant Merck.
Though the company isn’t a
household name, the compa-
nies it represents are and it’s
likely that you or someone you
know has spoken to one of the
company’s more than 1,700 op-
erators at one point.
It’s the company that an-
swers the phone when some-
one dials the 800 number on
the back of a box of cake mix, a
canof coffeeor a bagof pet food
with compliments, complaints
or questions.
The hiring events will take
place at the Wyoming Valley
Mall:
• Today, 4 to 9 p.m.
• Saturday, 10 a.m. to 9 p.m.
• Sunday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.
It will also host an open
house and job fair at its center
located at 600 Lasley Ave. in
the Hanover Industrial Estates
on:
• May 12, noon to 7 p.m.
• May 21, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.
• May 26, noon to 7 p.m.
Training will begin on June 1
for 30 new associates with a
second wave of hiring set for
August. Neeleysaidthecompa-
ny is lookingfor entry-level and
experienced customer service
professionals to join the local
“team.”
Neeley said that with the
newclient, whomhe saidconfi-
dentially requirements prevent
himfromidentifying, “I believe
this is thefirst newclient tojoin
our Wilkes-Barre locationsince
thesiteopenedin1999withthe
two original clients.”
Telerx call center looks to hire 40 to 50
By ANDREWM. SEDER
aseder@timesleader.com
SCRANTON–Deemeda“social com-
merce” website byits creators, Scranton
residents Alex, 27, andTedBrunelle, 32,
publicly unveiled their new business,
Nearbid.com, on Thursday morning.
The auction marketplace, which is
currently in a beta testing phase, will fa-
cilitate the creationof jobs inNortheast-
ern Pennsylvania, according to Chief
Technology Officer Ted Brunelle.
“We are to the services marketplace
what eBay is to the products market-
place,” he said.
The site offers registered users the
ability to post “jobs” and seek compet-
itive bids from local business owners to
have their work completed, from music
lessons to car repairs. Jobs are targeted
by category including travel, legal ser-
vices andentertainment that are broken
into subcategories to consolidate
searches and results.
Users need a free account to post a
new job but not to search for existing
work. They can post text and photos or
use an internal messaging service to
connect with prospective bidders about
their job.
“It doesn’t cost a penny to bid, it
doesn’t cost a penny to post,” Chief Ex-
ecutive Officer Alex Brunelle said. “It’s
the responsibility of the buyer and the
seller… to interact and have their trans-
action completed. Our fees are zero.”
The owners plan to earn revenue
through advertising.
Alex Brunelle said programmers Neil
Opet, Craig Simko and Amandeep Cho-
pra put in thousands of hours to make
the site a success.
“I owe the credit of the functionality
of the system to them.”
The site, the Brunelles said, was born
out of needs that they encountered as
business and rental property owners.
“We had a problem, and there was no
service to fulfill our requirements. This
is built through the mother of necessi-
ty,” Ted Brunelle said.
The brothers hope to have 1 million
local “jobs” createdbefore Dec. 31, 2012.
“We think it’s going to be very suc-
cessful, and it’s going to be a paradigm
inthe marketplace of creatingjobs,” Ted
Brunelle said.
Local elected officials in attendance
lauded the idea and the impact it could
have on area business.
“It’s people like AlexandTedwhocre-
ate jobs and who help build our econo-
my,” Lackawanna County Commission-
er Corey O’Brien said. The site will rely
on promotion through search engine
optimization and a strong social net-
working presence.
“This is effectively a merger of e-com-
merce and social networking to create
almost a social commerce,” Alex Bru-
nelle said.
Nearbid.com has offices in the Scran-
ton Enterprise Center, 201 Lackawanna
Ave. For more information, call (570)
309-3999 or visit www.nearbid.com.
JASON RIEDMILLER/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Nearbid.com co-founder and Chief Technology Officer Ted Brunelle addresses those gathered Thursday at the opening
of the company’s operations at 201 Lackawanna Ave., Scranton. The online company creates an auction market for jobs
and services, letting consumers and businesses vie for local work at the best possible price and terms, providing the
market with a new mechanism for job creation and pricing efficiency.
Nearbid.com will create jobs in area
By CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES
For The Times Leader
WASHINGTON—It would be
harder for tour bus companies to
win permission to operate and
easier for the government to put
rogue operators out of business
under a series of bus safety steps
announced Thursday by Trans-
portation Secretary Ray LaHood.
Other proposals announced by
LaHood would make it easier for
the government to take away bus
drivers’ commercial licenses if
they violate drug and alcohol
laws while operating a vehicle
other than a bus or if they fail to
pay fines.
Attention to bus safety by
Transportation Department offi-
cials and members of Congress
has been heightened since the
March12 crash of a bus returning
to NewYork City’s Chinatown af-
ter an overnight excursion to a
Connecticut casino. Fifteen were
killed when the bus — which
safety investigators say was trav-
eling at its maximum possible
speedof 78 mph—toppledoff an
elevated highway and struck a
utility pole, peeling off its roof.
Apassenger has said the driver
fell asleep; the driver has said he
was alert and well-rested.
The new proposals would re-
quire bus companies to pass a
safety audit before receiving fed-
eral permission to operate. The
audit would include an interview
with the company’s owners and a
safety examination of the compa-
ny’s drivers and vehicles.
The department also would
have greater authority to pursue
enforcement action against un-
safe "reincarnated" or "chamele-
on" companies, which are oper-
ations that go out of business in
one location after being cited for
safety violations and reopen in
another location under a new
name.
Tougher set
of tour bus
rules aired
By JOAN LOWY
Associated Press
DETROIT — General Mo-
tors Co. reported its highest
quarterly profit in more than a
decade, helped by demand for
fuel-efficient cars anda biggain
from selling its stake in its for-
mer auto parts business.
The biggest U.S. automaker
said Thursday that it earned
$3.2 billion, or $1.77 per share,
in the first quarter. It was a
great start considering the
spike in U.S. gasoline prices, a
trend that would have sunk the
company just a few years ago
when it relied on gas-guzzling
pickups and SUVs for profits.
GM’s results follow strong
earnings reports at crosstown
rivals Ford Motor Co. and
Chrysler Group LLC.
GMthrived in the quarter by
selling small cars like the new
Chevrolet Cruze, and efficient
crossover vehicles such as the
Chevrolet Equinox and GMC
Terrain. Revenue rose 15 per-
cent to $36.2 billion, driven by
a 25 percent jump in U.S. auto
sales and a 10 percent gain in
China.
GM’s quarterly net income is
more than triple the $865 mil-
lion it earned in the first quar-
ter of last year. It’s also a good
sign for the U.S. government,
which is hoping the profit
boosts GM’s stock price so it
can sell its stake in the compa-
ny and recoup more of the $50
billion taxpayer bailout that
saved GM two years ago.
AP FILE PHOTO
Tom Stephens, vice chairman of General Motors, holds up the
North American International Auto Show Car of the Year
trophy awarded to the Chevrolet Volt.
$3.2B GM profit best in more than a decade
By TOMKRISHER
and DEE-ANN DURBIN
AP Auto Writers
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com FRIDAY, MAY 6, 2011 PAGE 9B
➛ T H E M A R K E T I N R E V I E W
McGrwH 40.79 +.03 +12.0
McMoRn 16.60 -.51 -3.2
Mechel 25.42 -.35 -13.0
MedcoHlth 62.00 +.19 +1.2
Medtrnic 42.24 -.07 +13.9
MelcoCrwn 10.50 +.53 +65.1
MensW 32.04 +4.10 +28.3
Merck 36.25 -.31 +.6
Meritage 22.82 +.24 +2.8
Mesab 29.99 -1.51 -22.1
MetLife 44.75 -1.40 +.7
MetroPCS 17.71 -.14 +40.2
MicronT 10.91 +.17 +36.0
Microsoft 25.79 -.27 -7.6
MdsxWatr 18.00 +.04 -1.9
MobileTele 20.66 -.25 -1.0
Molycorp n 68.46 -3.55 +37.2
Monsanto 64.79 -.37 -7.0
Moog A 41.05 -.01 +3.1
Moog B 41.16 -.36 +3.4
MorgStan 25.14 -.26 -7.6
Mosaic 70.16 -.69 -8.1
MotrlaSol n 45.32 +.60 +19.1
MurphO 68.57 -4.67 -8.0
Mylan 24.04 -.04 +13.8
NCR Corp 19.34 +.06 +25.8
NII Hldg 43.26 +.95 -3.1
NRG Egy 23.72 -.09 +21.4
NV Energy 15.32 -.03 +9.0
Nabors 27.64 -.59 +17.8
NBkGreece 1.48 -.04 -11.9
NatFuGas 69.00 -1.03 +5.2
NatGrid 49.94 -.70 +12.5
NOilVarco 68.70 -1.22 +2.2
NatSemi 24.20 ... +75.9
NetApp 51.50 -.38 -6.3
Netflix 230.31 +1.12 +31.1
NetQin n 9.30 ... 0.0
NewAmHi 10.27 -.02 +3.1
NwGold g 9.51 -.48 -2.6
NJ Rscs 43.56 +.19 +1.0
NY Times 8.23 +.22 -16.0
Newcastle 5.70 -.20 -14.9
NewellRub 18.77 +.12 +3.2
NewmtM 54.69 -1.74 -11.0
NewsCpA 17.35 +.01 +19.2
NewsCpB 18.21 -.34 +10.9
Nexen g 24.57 -1.28 +7.3
NextEraEn 57.05 -.38 +9.7
NiSource 19.55 -.27 +11.0
NobleCorp 39.64 -.69 +10.8
NokiaCp 8.47 -.13 -17.9
Nordstrm 47.50 -.50 +12.1
NorflkSo 72.22 -.09 +15.0
NA Pall g 5.55 -.29 -20.0
NoestUt 35.26 -.47 +10.6
NthnO&G 19.80 -.85 -27.2
NthgtM g 2.67 -.12 -16.6
NorthropG 64.15 -.32 +9.2
NwstNG 44.55 -.42 -4.1
NovaGld g 10.84 -1.05 -24.0
Novartis 59.56 -.79 +1.0
Novlus 35.42 +2.49 +9.6
Nucor 44.70 -.65 +2.0
NustarEn 63.99 -.73 -7.9
NuvFloat 12.51 -.06 +5.9
NvMAd 13.22 +.01 +1.1
NvPA 13.20 +.07 -1.0
Nvidia 18.66 +.01 +21.2
OcciPet 105.96 -2.93 +8.0
OfficeDpt 4.20 +.02 -22.2
OfficeMax 9.07 -.14 -48.8
OilSvHT 148.07 -2.42 +5.4
OnSmcnd 11.02 +.74 +11.5
OplinkC 18.28 +.26 -1.0
Oracle 34.67 -.58 +10.8
OwensIll 31.24 -.30 +1.8
PECO pfA 71.00 -.99 +1.4
PG&E Cp 45.91 +.36 -4.0
PICO Hld 30.47 +.20 -4.2
PMI Grp 1.75 -.27 -47.0
PPG 90.24 -.15 +7.3
PPL Corp 27.39 -.17 +4.1
Pacholder 9.65 -.01 +14.2
PallCorp 55.44 -.75 +11.8
PanASlv 32.93 -1.60 -20.1
PatriotCoal 23.62 -.71 +21.9
PattUTI 28.04 -.38 +30.1
Paychex 32.16 -.57 +4.0
PeabdyE 61.75 -2.27 -3.5
PennVaRs 25.96 -.40 -8.3
PennWst g 23.58 +.05 -1.4
Penney 37.46 -1.96 +15.9
PeopUtdF 13.50 -.29 -3.6
PepcoHold 19.32 -.11 +5.9
PeregrineP 2.24 -.06 -2.6
Petrohawk 24.14 +.10 +32.3
PetrbrsA 30.57 -1.26 -10.5
Petrobras 34.48 -1.23 -8.9
PetRes 29.26 -.59 +8.3
Pfizer 20.39 -.25 +16.4
PhilipMor 68.39 -.96 +16.8
PimcoHiI 14.19 +.03 +11.6
PimcoMuni 12.95 ... +2.7
PinWst 43.84 -.27 +5.8
PioNtrl 88.71 -3.62 +2.2
PitnyBw 24.71 +.02 +2.2
PlainsEx 35.50 -.04 +10.5
PlumCrk 42.08 -.49 +12.4
Polycom 58.09 +1.38 +49.0
Polypore 65.88+10.51 +61.7
Popular 3.10 -.06 -1.3
Potash s 52.27 -1.15 +1.3
Power-One 7.93 +.15 -22.3
PwshDB 28.69 -2.06 +4.1
PS Agri 32.38 -.80 +.1
PS USDBull21.27 +.31 -6.3
PwShs QQQ58.28 -.32 +7.0
Praxair 102.90 -.40 +7.8
PrideIntl 41.37 -.21 +25.4
PrinFncl 31.18 -.19 -4.2
PrUShS&P 20.52 +.34 -13.6
ProUltQQQ 92.44 -1.13 +13.5
PrUShQQQ rs49.24+.51 -15.3
ProUltSP 54.02 -.96 +12.4
ProUShL20 34.11 -.67 -7.9
ProUltSOG 29.77 +1.18 -20.4
ProUSSP50015.47 +.40 -20.3
ProUSSlv rs24.34 +4.89 -38.0
PrUltCrde rs47.84-10.51 -4.3
PrUShCrde rs46.55+7.16 -8.5
ProSUltSilv179.34-54.86 +13.1
ProUShEuro16.87 +.64 -16.9
ProgrssEn 47.06 -.50 +8.2
ProgsvCp 21.57 -.28 +8.6
ProLogis 16.06 +.14 +11.2
ProUSR2K rs42.80 +.41 -14.8
ProvFnH 8.10 ... +11.9
Prudentl 62.99 +.56 +7.3
PSEG 32.05 -.29 +.8
PubStrg 115.96 -.39 +14.3
PulteGrp 8.02 +.02 +6.6
PPrIT 6.57 +.02 +4.6
Qlogic 18.00 +.44 +5.8
Qualcom 56.13 +.05 +13.4
QuantaSvc 19.33 +.21 -3.0
QstDiag 56.05 ... +3.9
QksilvRes 13.79 -.26 -6.4
Quidel 14.05 +.37 -2.8
RCM 5.73 +.02 +23.8
RF MicD 6.04 -.05 -17.8
RPM 22.97 -.22 +3.9
RadianGrp 5.68 -.22 -29.6
RadioShk 15.93 ... -13.8
Ralcorp 90.20 +2.81 +38.7
Raytheon 48.92 +.03 +6.4
RegionsFn 7.11 -.26 +1.6
Renren n 16.87 -1.14 -6.3
RepubAir 4.91 +.17 -32.9
RepFBcp 2.62 +.05 +7.4
RepubSvc 31.59 -.22 +5.8
RschMotn 47.29 -.08 -18.6
Revlon 16.20 -.17 +64.6
ReynAm s 37.13 -.16 +13.8
RioTinto 66.74 -2.13 -6.9
RiteAid 1.14 -.02 +29.1
Riverbed s 34.12 +.84 -3.0
RossStrs 78.55 +5.10 +24.2
RylCarb 41.96 +2.65 -10.7
RoyDShllA 72.84 -2.61 +9.1
SpdrDJIA 125.64 -1.33 +8.7
SpdrGold 143.47 -4.26 +3.4
S&P500ETF133.61-1.22 +6.3
SpdrHome 18.70 +.12 +7.5
SpdrKbwBk 25.19 -.36 -2.8
SpdrRetl 52.60 -.02 +8.8
SpdrOGEx 57.29 -1.25 +8.6
SpdrMetM 70.41 -1.56 +2.4
SPX Cp 81.25 -2.56 +13.7
Safeway 24.27 +.28 +7.9
StJoe 25.57 +.31 +17.0
Saks 11.27 -.31 +5.3
SanDisk 47.34 +.11 -5.1
SandRdge 10.67 -.33 +45.8
Sanofi 39.31 -1.27 +22.0
SaraLee 19.28 +.14 +10.1
Satcon h 2.89 -.16 -35.8
SaulCntr 42.63 -.25 -10.0
SavientPh 8.57 -2.51 -23.1
Schlmbrg 82.84 -1.95 -.8
SchoolSp 13.97 -.14 +.3
Schwab 17.82 -.06 +4.1
SeadrillLtd 32.38 -1.21 -4.5
SeagateT 17.10 -.21 +13.8
SearsHldgs 78.08 +.93 +5.9
SelCmfrt 16.56 +.38 +81.4
SemiHTr 36.38 +.14 +11.8
SempraEn 54.36 -.42 +3.6
ServiceCp 11.45 +.04 +38.8
ShawGrp 37.68 +.34 +10.1
SiderurNac 14.29 -1.00 -14.3
Siemens 137.52 -3.08 +10.7
SifyTech 6.22 -.28+175.2
SilvWhtn g 35.15 -1.98 -10.0
SilvrcpM g 10.77 -1.13 -16.1
Sina 122.26 +3.50 +77.7
SiriusXM 2.12 -.01 +30.1
SkywksSol 29.82 +.32 +4.2
SmithMicro 5.66 -1.60 -64.0
Smucker 73.89 -1.13 +12.6
SnapOn 60.00 -.48 +6.0
Sonus 2.98 -.01 +11.6
SouthnCo 39.29 -.23 +2.8
SthnCopper 35.19 -1.15 -27.8
SwstAirl 11.91 +.27 -8.2
SwstnEngy 41.81 -.42 +11.7
SpectraEn 27.63 -.50 +10.6
SpectPh 8.02 -.56 +16.7
SprintNex 5.19 -.08 +22.7
SprottSilv 15.19 -1.82 +8.0
SprottGold 12.46 -.53 +.9
SP Matls 39.03 -.47 +1.6
SP HlthC 35.25 -.23 +11.9
SP CnSt 31.36 -.24 +7.0
SP Consum40.26 -.11 +7.6
SP Engy 74.47 -1.58 +9.1
SPDR Fncl 16.03 -.21 +.5
SP Inds 37.74 -.18 +8.2
SP Tech 26.43 -.14 +4.9
SP Util 33.10 -.24 +5.6
StanBlkDk 74.00 +1.72 +10.7
Staples 20.92 -.05 -8.1
Starbucks 36.50 -.07 +13.6
StarwdHtl 58.60 +.81 -3.6
StateStr 45.88 -.49 -1.0
Statoil ASA 26.09 -1.21 +9.8
StillwtrM 19.60 -.84 -8.2
Stryker 59.71 +.24 +11.2
SubPpne 52.32 -2.21 -6.7
Suncor gs 40.95 -2.62 +6.9
Sunoco 40.06 -.47 -.6
Suntech 8.35 +.12 +4.2
SunTrst 28.02 -.44 -5.0
Supvalu 10.53 +.08 +9.3
SwisherH n 6.69 +.05 +40.8
Symantec 19.25 -.29 +15.0
Synovus 2.46 -.04 -6.8
Sysco 28.65 -.45 -2.6
TCW Strat 5.46 +.03 +4.6
TD Ameritr 20.90 -.30 +10.1
TE Connect 36.26 +.65 +2.4
TECO 19.12 -.16 +7.4
THQ 4.35 -.07 -28.2
TaiwSemi 13.55 +.11 +8.1
TalismE g 21.58 -.42 -2.7
Target 50.34 +1.14 -16.3
TastyBak 3.98 -.01 -37.3
TeckRes g 49.41 -2.40 -20.1
Tekelec 8.25 +.10 -30.7
Teleflex 62.28 -.23 +15.7
TelefEsp s 24.87 -.90 +9.0
TelMexL 18.18 -.11 +12.6
Tellabs 4.68 -.06 -31.0
TempleInld 22.98 +.22 +8.2
TmpDrgn 30.24 -.26 -1.6
TenetHlth 6.47 +.20 -3.3
Tenneco 42.32 -.76 +2.8
Teradyn 15.94 +.04 +13.5
Terex 31.65 -.29 +2.0
Tesoro 24.27 -.62 +30.9
TevaPhrm 47.25 -.03 -9.4
TexInst 35.02 +.20 +7.8
ThermoFis 59.72 -.73 +7.9
Thermon n 12.28 ... 0.0
3M Co 94.92 -1.28 +10.0
THorton g 48.24 -.24 +17.0
Timberlnd 30.65-10.92 +24.6
TimeWarn 36.01 -.48 +11.9
TitanMet 19.13 -.66 +11.4
TorDBk g 84.26 -.63 +14.9
Total SA 59.65 -2.40 +11.5
Toyota 79.56 -.20 +1.2
TrCda g 42.45 -.55 +11.6
Transocn 68.77 +.31 -1.1
Travelers 63.00 -.54 +13.1
TrimbleN 44.00 +3.51 +10.2
TriQuint 12.68 +.05 +8.5
TycoIntl 48.83 +.15 +17.8
Tyson 19.22 -.15 +11.6
UBS AG 19.20 -.58 +16.6
UDR 25.70 +.24 +9.3
US Airwy 9.82 +.52 -1.9
US Gold 7.53 -.56 -6.7
USEC 4.31 +.04 -28.4
UniSrcEn 37.47 +.05 +4.5
UnilevNV 32.37 -.64 +3.1
Unilever 32.01 -.62 +3.7
UnionPac 101.71 +1.15 +9.8
Unisys 27.42 -.09 +5.9
UtdContl 25.79 +1.40 +8.3
UPS B 73.96 -.29 +1.9
US Bancrp 25.20 -.34 -6.6
US NGs rs 10.99 -.79 -8.3
US OilFd 39.32 -3.94 +.8
USSteel 46.12 -.68 -21.1
UtdTech 88.53 -.85 +12.5
UtdhlthGp 49.58 +.02 +37.3
UnumGrp 26.01 -.52 +7.4
VOC ETr n 21.00 ... 0.0
Vale SA 30.91 +.01 -10.6
Vale SA pf 27.64 +.09 -8.5
ValeantPh 49.10 +.11 +73.6
ValenceT h 1.26 -.05 -25.0
ValeroE 26.31 -.38 +13.8
ValpeyFsh 3.22 +.02 -5.0
ValVis A 6.23 +.03 +2.0
VangEmg 48.09 -.51 -.1
VantageDrl 1.65 +.02 -18.7
VarianSemi 61.20 -.16 +65.5
Verisign 34.64 +1.18 +6.0
VertxPh 53.19 -2.12 +51.8
VestinRMII 1.31 -.03 -9.7
ViacomA 58.24 -.10 +27.0
ViacomB 50.27 -.05 +26.9
VirgnMda h 31.01 +.12 +13.8
Visa 78.70 -1.07 +11.8
VishayInt 16.53 -.10 +12.6
Vivus 7.76 -.26 -17.2
Vodafone 27.93 -.27 +5.6
Vornado 94.20 -.16 +13.0
VulcanM 41.38 -2.82 -6.7
Wabash 10.24 +.23 -13.6
WalMart 55.07 -.30 +2.1
Walgrn 42.50 -.28 +9.1
WeathfIntl 19.93 -.27 -12.6
WellPoint 77.49 +.29 +36.3
WellsFargo 28.13 -.65 -9.2
WendyArby 4.90 +.03 +6.1
WernerEnt 26.17 +.53 +15.8
WestellT 3.57 -.06 +9.2
WstnRefin 15.53 +.20 +46.8
WstnUnion 20.64 -.10 +11.1
Weyerh 22.10 -.02 +16.7
WhitingPt s 61.97 -2.08 +5.8
WholeFd 59.95 +.21 +18.5
WmsCos 30.76 -.62 +24.4
Windstrm 12.72 -.50 -8.8
WiscEn s 31.43 -.28 +6.8
WT India 23.35 -.15 -11.5
Worthgtn 20.22 -.21 +9.9
XL Grp 23.35 -.24 +7.0
XcelEngy 24.25 -.22 +3.0
Xerox 10.15 +.03 -11.9
Xilinx 35.61 +.46 +22.9
Yahoo 18.43 +.23 +10.8
Yamana g 11.91 -.39 -7.0
YumBrnds 53.25 -.18 +8.6
Zalicus 2.34 -.24 +48.1
Zimmer 66.32 +.15 +23.5
ZollMed 57.59 +.53 +54.7
Zweig 3.40 -.03 +1.5
ZweigTl 3.44 -.01 -3.4
DOW
12,584.17
-139.41
NASDAQ
2,814.72
-13.51
S&P 500
1,335.10
-12.22
6-MO T-BILLS
.06%
...
10-YR T-NOTE
3.16%
-.06
CRUDE OIL
$99.80
-9.44
GOLD
$1,480.90
-34.00
q q q q q q q q q q n n q q q q
EURO
$1.4530
-.0319
1,150
1,200
1,250
1,300
1,350
1,400
N D J F M A
1,320
1,360
1,400
S&P 500
Close: 1,335.10
Change: -12.22 (-0.9%)
10 DAYS
2,400
2,500
2,600
2,700
2,800
2,900
N D J F M A
2,800
2,860
2,920
Nasdaq composite
Close: 2,814.72
Change: -13.51 (-0.5%)
10 DAYS
Advanced 1172
Declined 1910
New Highs 99
New Lows 33
Vol. (in mil.) 4,714
Pvs. Volume 4,613
2,181
2,188
989
1580
47
48
NYSE NASD
DOW 12724.56 12521.28 12584.17 -139.41 -1.10% t s s +8.69%
DOW Trans. 5510.68 5367.56 5454.12 +61.41 +1.14% t s s +6.80%
DOW Util. 430.86 426.09 427.91 -3.03 -0.70% t s s +5.66%
NYSE Comp. 8506.61 8358.07 8397.40 -109.21 -1.28% t t s +5.44%
AMEX Index 2403.24 2355.40 2363.18 -40.07 -1.67% t t s +7.01%
NASDAQ 2845.85 2804.82 2814.72 -13.51 -0.48% t s s +6.10%
S&P 500 1348.00 1329.17 1335.10 -12.22 -0.91% t s s +6.16%
Wilshire 5000 14285.10 14085.24 14148.08 -116.09 -0.81% t t s +5.90%
Russell 2000 840.60 825.55 829.24 -3.66 -0.44% t t s +5.82%
HIGH LOW CLOSE CHG. %CHG. WK MO QTR YTD
StocksRecap
John Buckingham
Chief investment officer of Al Frank Asset Management
Consider it a buying opportunity. When good stocks fall, they go on sale,
he says. “If you can get them at a lower price, absolutely take advantage of it.”
He likes Marathon Oil, which is down 8 percent since Friday, and Taskos Energy
Navigation, a shipper that’s down nearly 1 percent.
Sam Dedio
Head of US equities at Artio Global Management
Keep your eye on the calendar. He says demand for stocks tends to slow
this time of the year. One reason: Many investors have made annual contributions to
401(k) and other retirement plans. He also says company earnings tend to weaken
during the summer. Total earnings for the S&P 500 have fallen between the second
and third quarters in 12 of the last 20 years. That encourages some investors to sell.
Andy Jung
Co-portfolio manager of the Aston/Montag & Caldwell Mid Cap Growth Fund
Keep a long-term approach. Investors should own stocks only if they
don’t need the money in the short term. If they have a long-term approach,
investors can tune out short-term fluctuations. “We don’t tend to get too whipped
around by day-to-day events,” he says. He holds stocks in his fund for an average
of about three years.
Stan Choe, Elizabeth Gramling • AP
The S&P 500 is down 2 percent this week after
reaching a high for 2011 last Friday. It lost nearly 1
percent Thursday as oil and other commodities fell
sharply. Investors were worried about a big rise in the
number of people filing claims for unemployment ben-
efits. Some of the selling likely came from speculative
investors who helped drive the market higher this year
and who are now pulling their money out.
Every bull market has its dips – as does every eco-
nomic recovery. The S&P 500 fell 14 percent between
April and August 2010. Investors were worried about
European debt and a possible double-dip recession in
the U.S. Since Sept. 1, the S&P 500 is up 27 percent.
There are seasonal factors, too. May through Octo-
ber has historically been the weakest stretch for the
market. Since 1945, the S&P 500 has gained an aver-
age 1.3 percent over those six months. On average, it
has risen 4.1 percent over any six-month period.
Here is advice from strategists about weathering
the market’s down times:
What to do now?
Mutual Funds
Alliance Bernstein
BalShrB m 14.80 -.08 +6.9
CoreOppA m 12.57 -.11 +9.2
American Beacon
LgCpVlInv 19.67 -.19 +6.2
LgCpVlIs 20.72 -.20 +6.3
American Cent
EqIncInv 7.57 -.06 +5.4
GrowthInv 27.32 -.20 +5.7
IncGroA m 25.58 -.22 +7.0
UltraInv 24.07 -.15 +6.3
American Funds
AMCAPA m 20.10 -.11 +6.7
BalA m 18.82 -.11 +5.5
BondA m 12.36 +.02 +2.6
CapIncBuA m52.30 -.39 +5.8
CapWldBdA m21.09 -.09 +4.2
CpWldGrIA m37.95 -.45 +6.7
EurPacGrA m43.71 -.49 +5.7
FnInvA m 39.07 -.41 +6.8
GrthAmA m 32.10 -.27 +5.5
HiIncA m 11.59 -.01 +5.3
IncAmerA m 17.49 -.12 +6.7
IntBdAmA m 13.51 +.01 +1.4
IntlGrInA m 33.36 -.34 +7.4
InvCoAmA m 29.58 -.31 +5.5
MutualA m 26.84 -.22 +6.6
NewEconA m 26.94 -.10 +6.4
NewPerspA m30.21 -.31 +5.6
NwWrldA m 55.71 -.42 +2.1
SmCpWldA m40.34 -.32 +3.8
TaxEBdAmA m11.94 +.04 +2.5
USGovSecA m14.04 +.03 +1.6
WAMutInvA m29.09 -.30 +7.5
Artio Global
IntlEqI 30.86 -.50 +2.4
IntlEqIII 12.75 -.21 +2.3
Artisan
Intl d 23.40 -.34 +7.8
IntlVal d 28.59 -.37 +5.5
MdCpVal 22.44 -.07 +11.8
MidCap 36.25 +.01 +7.8
Baron
Asset b 59.23 -.27 +7.2
Growth b 55.49 -.40 +8.3
SmCap b 25.99 -.09 +9.3
Bernstein
DiversMui 14.41 +.02 +2.2
IntDur 13.95 +.03 +3.0
TxMIntl 16.06 -.37 +2.1
BlackRock
EqDivA m 18.67 -.21 +7.0
EqDivI 18.71 -.21 +7.1
GlobAlcA m 20.23 -.23 +4.2
GlobAlcC m 18.85 -.22 +3.9
GlobAlcI d 20.34 -.23 +4.3
CGM
Focus 32.70 -.06 -6.0
Mutual 27.94 -.10 -5.2
Realty 29.27 +.11 +9.5
Calamos
GrowA m 56.85 -.21 +6.5
Cohen & Steers
Realty 64.85 -.02 +11.4
Columbia
AcornA m 31.06 -.18 +6.2
AcornIntZ 42.27 -.57 +3.3
AcornZ 32.10 -.19 +6.3
DivrEqInA m 10.70 -.10 +6.3
StLgCpGrZ 13.81 -.06 +9.5
ValRestrZ 52.01 -.43 +3.1
DFA
1YrFixInI 10.35 ... +0.4
2YrGlbFII 10.19 ... +0.4
5YrGlbFII 11.09 +.01 +1.9
EmMkCrEqI 22.29 -.23 +0.6
EmMktValI 36.17 -.42 0.0
IntSmCapI 18.28 -.32 +6.3
USCorEq1I 11.78 -.07 +7.3
USCorEq2I 11.73 -.08 +7.1
USLgCo 10.54 -.10 +6.8
USLgValI 21.84 -.20 +8.8
USMicroI 14.50 -.06 +5.4
USSmValI 27.01 -.10 +5.6
USSmallI 22.83 -.07 +7.0
DWS-Scudder
EnhEMFIS d 10.80 -.09 +0.6
HlthCareS d 27.61 -.19 +13.4
LAEqS d 48.95 -.56 -7.9
Davis
NYVentA m 35.88 -.36 +4.5
NYVentC m 34.61 -.35 +4.2
NYVentY 36.28 -.37 +4.6
Delaware Invest
DiverIncA m 9.35 ... +3.1
Dimensional Investme
IntCorEqI 11.86 -.23 +5.6
IntlSCoI 18.06 -.31 +5.2
IntlValuI 19.41 -.43 +5.9
Dodge & Cox
Bal 74.54 -.42 +6.7
Income 13.48 +.02 +3.0
IntlStk 37.63 -.51 +5.4
Stock 115.74 -.97 +7.8
Dreyfus
Apprecia 41.04 -.52 +7.5
EmgLead ... ... +4.2
TechGrA f 33.70 +.04 +3.7
Eaton Vance
HiIncOppA m 4.51 ... +5.7
HiIncOppB m 4.52 ... +5.4
LrgCpValA m 18.80 -.21 +3.4
NatlMuniA m 8.91 +.05 +2.0
NatlMuniB m 8.90 +.04 +1.6
PAMuniA m 8.66 +.03 +2.9
FMI
LgCap 16.67 -.12 +6.8
FPA
Cres d 28.35 -.11 +5.8
NewInc m 10.88 ... +1.3
Fairholme Funds
Fairhome d 33.88 -.19 -4.8
Federated
KaufmanR m 5.73 -.03 +4.2
Fidelity
AstMgr20 13.10 -.02 +2.8
AstMgr50 16.02 -.09 +4.2
Bal 19.10 -.09 +5.1
BlChGrow 48.21 -.29 +6.3
Canada d 59.39 -1.22 +2.1
CapApr 26.73 -.11 +5.5
CapInc d 9.87 -.02 +6.5
Contra 70.69 -.61 +4.5
DiscEq 24.28 -.21 +7.8
DivGrow 30.04 -.26 +5.7
DivrIntl d 31.55 -.59 +4.6
EmgMkt d 26.55 -.30 +0.8
EqInc 47.12 -.50 +6.7
EqInc II 19.43 -.21 +6.7
ExpMulNat d 22.95 -.22 +5.2
FF2015 11.83 -.09 +4.3
FF2035 12.07 -.16 +5.2
FF2040 8.44 -.11 +5.4
Fidelity 34.62 -.29 +7.7
FltRtHiIn d 9.90 ... +2.0
Free2010 14.17 -.10 +4.3
Free2020 14.43 -.13 +4.6
Free2025 12.09 -.13 +4.9
Free2030 14.46 -.17 +5.0
GNMA 11.63 +.03 +2.6
GovtInc 10.53 +.02 +1.7
GrowCo 90.49 -.43 +8.8
GrowInc 19.38 -.20 +6.2
HiInc d 9.23 ... +5.4
Indepndnc 25.77 -.12 +5.8
IntBond 10.70 +.02 +2.5
IntMuniInc d 10.12 +.02 +2.3
IntlDisc d 34.41 -.65 +4.1
InvGrdBd 7.53 +.02 +3.0
LatinAm d 56.78 -.52 -3.8
LevCoSt d 30.69 +.07 +8.0
LowPriStk d 41.68 -.22 +8.6
Magellan 74.98 -.47 +4.6
MidCap d 30.83 -.19 +6.9
MuniInc d 12.43 +.04 +2.8
NewMktIn d 15.80 ... +2.9
OTC 60.48 -.30 +10.1
Overseas d 34.14 -.63 +5.1
Puritan 18.78 -.10 +5.2
RealInv d 28.44 -.02 +10.7
Series100Index 9.25 -.11 +5.8
ShTmBond 8.51 +.01 +1.1
SmCapStk d 21.29 +.12 +8.6
StratInc 11.36 -.02 +4.5
StratRRet d 9.89 -.13 +3.7
TotalBd 10.91 +.02 +3.0
USBdIdx 11.47 +.03 +2.3
Value 73.67 -.54 +7.2
Fidelity Advisor
NewInsA m 20.75 -.17 +4.1
NewInsI 20.96 -.17 +4.2
StratIncA m 12.70 -.02 +4.5
ValStratT m 27.68 -.15 +6.9
Fidelity Select
Gold d 47.72 -1.78 -6.6
Pharm d 13.59 -.12 +12.4
Fidelity Spartan
ExtMktIdI d 40.53 -.15 +7.5
IntlIdxIn d 37.23 -.70 +6.2
TotMktIdAg d 38.85 -.32 +6.9
TotMktIdI d 38.85 -.31 +6.9
USEqIndxAg 47.31 -.43 +6.8
USEqIndxI 47.31 -.43 +6.8
First Eagle
GlbA m 48.83 -.43 +5.3
OverseasA m 23.69 -.19 +4.5
FrankTemp-Franklin
CA TF A m 6.71 +.03 +1.7
Fed TF A m 11.54 +.05 +3.4
GrowB m 45.31 -.21 +5.8
Growth A m 47.37 -.22 +6.1
HY TF A m 9.74 +.04 +3.0
Income A m 2.27 -.01 +6.9
Income C m 2.29 -.01 +6.6
IncomeAdv 2.26 -.01 +7.0
NY TF A m 11.34 +.04 +2.8
US Gov A m 6.78 +.01 +2.0
FrankTemp-Mutual
Beacon Z 13.08 -.07 +6.3
Discov A m 30.84 -.22 +5.7
Discov Z 31.23 -.23 +5.8
QuestZ 18.74 -.10 +5.9
Shares A m 21.97 -.11 +6.4
Shares Z 22.15 -.12 +6.5
FrankTemp-Templeton
Fgn A m 7.67 -.11 +9.9
GlBond A m 13.84 -.10 +3.3
GlBond C m 13.87 -.10 +3.2
GlBondAdv 13.80 -.10 +3.4
Growth A m 19.53 -.24 +9.8
World A m 15.98 -.19 +7.7
Franklin Templeton
FndAllA m 11.26 -.09 +7.6
GE
S&SProg 42.55 -.32 +5.8
GMO
EmgMktsVI 15.17 -.15 +3.9
IntItVlIV 23.49 -.47 +7.6
QuIII 21.47 -.23 +7.3
QuVI 21.48 -.23 +7.4
Goldman Sachs
GrOppIs 25.93 -.03 +6.5
HiYieldIs d 7.48 ... +5.3
MidCapVaA m38.09 -.18 +6.1
MidCpVaIs 38.41 -.19 +6.3
Harbor
Bond 12.33 ... +2.7
CapApInst 39.10 -.28 +6.5
IntlInstl d 64.50 -1.38 +6.5
IntlInv m 63.83 -1.37 +6.4
Hartford
AdvHLSIA 20.28 -.12 +5.0
CapAprA m 35.53 -.29 +2.6
CapAprI 35.57 -.29 +2.7
CpApHLSIA 44.52 -.36 +5.1
DvGrHLSIA 20.88 -.23 +7.1
TRBdHLSIA 11.21 +.03 +2.9
Hussman
StratGrth d 12.27 +.05 -0.2
INVESCO
CharterA m 17.30 -.11 +7.0
ComstockA m16.91 -.18 +7.9
ConstellB m 21.84 -.14 +4.3
CpGrA m 14.18 -.08 +5.1
EqIncomeA m 9.02 -.07 +5.5
GlobEqA m 11.56 -.17 +7.6
GrowIncA m 20.39 -.23 +6.3
PacGrowB m 22.15 -.19 -0.8
TaxESecY 10.48 +.03 +2.6
Ivy
AssetStrA m 25.98 -.28 +6.4
AssetStrC m 25.18 -.28 +6.1
JPMorgan
CoreBondA m11.57 +.02 +2.1
CoreBondSelect11.56+.01 +2.2
HighYldSel d 8.39 ... +5.4
IntmdTFSl 10.92 +.02 +2.5
ShDurBndSel 11.00 ... +0.8
USLCpCrPS 21.60 -.26 +4.5
Janus
OverseasJ d 49.14 -.43 -3.0
PerkinsMCVJ 24.09 -.17 +6.7
TwentyJ 67.20 -.70 +2.2
John Hancock
LifAg1 b 12.97 -.12 +5.6
LifBa1 b 13.50 -.07 +5.1
LifGr1 b 13.52 -.10 +5.3
RegBankA m 14.69 -.12 +0.3
SovInvA m 16.67 -.16 +6.4
TaxFBdA m 9.62 +.02 +2.3
Keeley
SmCapVal m 26.45 -.17 +5.9
Lazard
EmgMkEqtI d 21.75 -.04 -0.1
EmgMktEqO m22.13 -.04 -0.3
Legg Mason/Western
CrPlBdIns 10.99 +.03 +3.3
MgdMuniA m 15.21 +.06 +2.4
Longleaf Partners
LongPart 30.69 -.21 +8.6
Loomis Sayles
BondI 14.93 -.05 +6.5
BondR b 14.87 -.05 +6.3
Lord Abbett
AffiliatA m 12.09 -.12 +4.6
BondDebA m 8.09 -.01 +5.7
ShDurIncA m 4.63 +.01 +2.2
ShDurIncC m 4.65 ... +1.7
MFS
MAInvA m 20.42 -.21 +6.2
MAInvC m 19.72 -.19 +6.0
TotRetA m 14.70 -.07 +5.0
ValueA m 24.37 -.21 +7.1
ValueI 24.49 -.21 +7.3
MainStay
HiYldCorA m 6.01 ... +4.5
Manning & Napier
WrldOppA 9.32 -.14 +8.2
Merger
Merger m 16.24 -.02 +2.9
Metropolitan West
TotRetBdI 10.53 +.02 +3.2
TotRtBd b 10.53 +.02 +3.0
Morgan Stanley Instl
IntlEqI d 14.58 -.25 +7.1
MdCpGrI 41.25 -.28 +10.4
Natixis
InvBndY 12.50 -.02 +4.8
StratIncA m 15.51 -.05 +6.8
StratIncC m 15.59 -.05 +6.5
Neuberger Berman
GenesisIs 49.62 -.40 +8.0
GenesisTr 51.38 -.42 +7.9
SmCpGrInv 19.29 +.06 +7.9
Northern
HYFixInc d 7.54 ... +5.9
MMIntlEq d 10.26 -.15 +3.2
Oakmark
EqIncI 29.21 -.13 +5.3
Intl I d 20.62 -.23 +6.2
Oakmark I d 44.69 -.30 +8.2
Old Westbury
GlbSmMdCp 16.50 -.16 +6.7
Oppenheimer
CapApA m 45.65 -.47 +4.7
CapApB m 40.21 -.41 +4.4
DevMktA m 35.82 -.43 -1.8
DevMktY 35.46 -.43 -1.7
GlobA m 65.92 -.70 +9.2
GoldMinA m 45.15 -1.97 -9.4
IntlBondA m 6.71 -.07 +3.6
IntlBondY 6.71 -.06 +3.7
MainStrA m 33.51 -.28 +3.5
RocMuniA m 14.96 +.06 +0.3
RochNtlMu m 6.62 +.01 +2.3
StrIncA m 4.44 ... +5.7
PIMCO
AllAssetI 12.58 -.07 +4.9
AllAuthIn 10.96 -.09 +4.4
ComRlRStI 9.35 -.48 +3.4
DevLocMktI 11.07 -.12 +5.1
DivIncInst 11.63 ... +3.7
HiYldIs 9.53 ... +5.0
InvGrdIns 10.77 +.01 +4.6
LowDrIs 10.50 -.01 +1.9
RealRet 11.72 -.03 +4.5
RealRtnA m 11.72 -.03 +4.3
ShtTermIs 9.91 -.01 +0.9
TotRetA m 11.02 ... +2.6
TotRetAdm b 11.02 ... +2.6
TotRetC m 11.02 ... +2.3
TotRetIs 11.02 ... +2.7
TotRetrnD b 11.02 ... +2.6
TotlRetnP 11.02 ... +2.7
Parnassus
EqIncInv 27.96 -.23 +6.5
Permanent
Portfolio 47.99 -.54 +4.8
Pioneer
PioneerA m 42.90 -.36 +4.9
Principal
L/T2020I 12.31 -.08 +5.6
SAMConGrB m13.80 -.11 +5.2
Prudential Investmen
2020FocA m 16.81 -.15 +5.8
BlendA m 18.31 -.13 +6.4
EqOppA m 14.85 -.10 +7.0
HiYieldA m 5.64 -.01 +5.0
IntlEqtyA m 6.61 -.14 +6.8
IntlValA m 22.08 -.39 +7.2
JenMidCapGrA m29.89-.01 +9.2
JennGrA m 19.19 -.14 +6.3
NaturResA m 55.64 -1.46 -2.5
SmallCoA m 21.98 -.09 +8.3
UtilityA m 10.97 -.09 +7.7
ValueA m 15.88 -.16 +7.8
Putnam
GrowIncA m 14.48 ... +7.2
GrowIncB m 14.22 ... +6.9
IncomeA m 6.93 ... +4.6
VoyagerA m 24.29 -.18 +2.4
Royce
LowStkSer m 18.94 -.29 +3.7
OpportInv d 12.55 +.01 +3.9
PAMutInv d 12.51 -.09 +7.4
PremierInv d 22.19 -.28 +9.0
TotRetInv d 13.86 -.07 +5.4
ValPlSvc m 14.13 -.10 +5.3
Schwab
1000Inv d 39.75 -.33 +6.9
S&P500Sel d 20.89 -.19 +6.7
Scout
Interntl d 34.23 -.53 +5.7
Selected
AmerShS b 43.29 -.42 +4.5
American D 43.30 -.43 +4.6
Sequoia
Sequoia 143.88 -.45 +11.3
T Rowe Price
BlChpGr 40.37 -.24 +5.9
CapApprec 21.52 -.16 +6.0
DivGrow 24.38 -.18 +6.9
DivrSmCap d 17.52 -.09 +10.7
EmMktStk d 35.12 -.32 -0.5
EqIndex d 36.00 -.33 +6.7
EqtyInc 24.95 -.29 +5.7
FinSer 14.44 -.17 +1.9
GrowStk 33.80 -.19 +5.1
HealthSci 35.17 -.21 +16.1
HiYield d 6.99 ... +5.6
IntlBnd d 10.40 -.09 +5.4
IntlDisc d 46.08 -.65 +5.0
IntlGrInc d 14.37 -.26 +8.0
IntlStk d 14.80 -.20 +4.0
IntlStkAd m 14.74 -.20 +3.9
LatinAm d 52.94 -.43 -6.7
MediaTele 56.85 -.17 +9.9
MidCapVa 25.26 -.10 +6.5
MidCpGr 63.40 -.17 +8.3
NewAmGro 34.99 -.21 +6.1
NewAsia d 19.56 -.11 +2.0
NewEra 53.36 -1.18 +2.3
NewHoriz 36.93 -.12 +10.3
NewIncome 9.59 +.02 +2.3
R2015 12.50 -.08 +5.1
R2025 12.71 -.09 +5.6
R2035 12.95 -.11 +5.9
Rtmt2010 16.08 -.09 +4.8
Rtmt2020 17.32 -.12 +5.4
Rtmt2030 18.27 -.15 +5.7
Rtmt2040 18.43 -.16 +5.8
ShTmBond 4.87 +.01 +1.2
SmCpStk 37.22 -.14 +8.1
SmCpVal d 38.01 -.19 +5.2
SpecInc 12.67 -.02 +3.9
TaxFHiYld 10.37 +.03 +1.6
Value 25.03 -.27 +7.2
ValueAd b 24.77 -.27 +7.2
Templeton
InFEqSeS 21.62 -.36 +7.8
Third Avenue
Value d 52.54 -.47 +1.5
Thornburg
IntlValA m 30.09 -.27 +7.4
IntlValI d 30.76 -.27 +7.6
Tweedy Browne
GlobVal d 24.93 -.19 +4.7
VALIC Co I
StockIdx 26.46 -.24 +6.7
Vanguard
500Adml 123.14 -1.12 +6.8
500Inv 123.12 -1.12 +6.7
AssetA 26.01 -.17 +6.4
BalIdxAdm 22.36 -.08 +5.1
BalIdxIns 22.36 -.08 +5.2
CAITAdml 10.88 +.03 +3.0
CapOp d 35.25 +.01 +6.0
CapOpAdml d81.43 +.03 +6.1
CapVal 11.89 -.09 +7.9
Convrt d 14.02 -.03 +5.3
DevMktIdx d 10.64 -.21 +5.8
DivGr 15.39 -.14 +7.0
EmMktIAdm d40.18 -.44 +0.8
EnergyAdm d131.45-3.24 +8.7
EnergyInv d 70.00 -1.73 +8.6
ExplAdml 73.97 -.11 +9.0
Explr 79.45 -.12 +9.0
ExtdIdAdm 44.51 -.15 +7.8
ExtdIdIst 44.51 -.15 +7.9
ExtndIdx 44.47 -.15 +7.8
FAWeUSIns d97.94 -1.75 +4.4
GNMA 10.88 +.02 +2.4
GNMAAdml 10.88 +.02 +2.5
GlbEq 19.00 -.24 +6.4
GrowthEq 11.42 -.11 +5.8
GrowthIdx 33.41 -.23 +6.0
GrthIdAdm 33.42 -.22 +6.0
GrthIstId 33.42 -.22 +6.1
HYCor d 5.86 ... +5.3
HYCorAdml d 5.86 ... +5.4
HltCrAdml d 57.95 -.25 +13.1
HlthCare d 137.33 -.58 +13.0
ITBondAdm 11.34 +.04 +2.9
ITGradeAd 10.01 +.03 +3.5
ITIGrade 10.01 +.03 +3.4
ITrsyAdml 11.45 +.03 +1.9
InfPrtAdm 26.56 -.04 +4.7
InfPrtI 10.82 -.01 +4.7
InflaPro 13.52 -.02 +4.6
InstIdxI 122.28 -1.11 +6.8
InstPlus 122.29 -1.11 +6.8
InstTStPl 30.43 -.24 +7.1
IntlExpIn d 17.29 -.30 +3.7
IntlGr d 20.25 -.36 +4.7
IntlGrAdm d 64.46 -1.14 +4.8
IntlStkIdxAdm d27.47 -.48 +4.3
IntlStkIdxI d 109.90 -1.93 +4.2
IntlVal d 33.32 -.57 +3.6
LTGradeAd 9.60 +.07 +4.8
LTInvGr 9.60 +.07 +4.8
LifeCon 16.93 -.06 +3.9
LifeGro 23.30 -.20 +5.6
LifeMod 20.52 -.12 +4.9
MidCapGr 20.65 -.03 +8.7
MidCp 22.02 -.07 +8.4
MidCpAdml 100.00 -.30 +8.5
MidCpIst 22.09 -.07 +8.5
MidCpSgl 31.56 -.09 +8.5
Morg 19.24 -.10 +6.7
MuHYAdml 10.17 +.03 +2.4
MuInt 13.45 +.03 +2.7
MuIntAdml 13.45 +.03 +2.7
MuLTAdml 10.79 +.03 +2.6
MuLtdAdml 11.04 ... +1.2
MuShtAdml 15.89 ... +0.7
PrecMtls d 26.00 -.61 -2.6
Prmcp d 70.17 -.37 +6.6
PrmcpAdml d 72.83 -.38 +6.7
PrmcpCorI d 14.73 -.08 +7.0
REITIdx d 20.25 -.02 +10.9
REITIdxAd d 86.42 -.09 +11.0
STBond 10.59 +.01 +1.1
STBondAdm 10.59 +.01 +1.2
STBondSgl 10.59 +.01 +1.2
STCor 10.79 +.01 +1.6
STGradeAd 10.79 +.01 +1.6
STsryAdml 10.73 +.01 +0.8
SelValu d 20.25 -.05 +7.9
SmCapIdx 37.48 -.15 +7.9
SmCpIdAdm 37.53 -.15 +7.9
SmCpIdIst 37.53 -.15 +7.9
SmGthIdx 24.04 -.09 +9.7
SmGthIst 24.09 -.09 +9.7
SmValIdx 16.97 -.07 +6.0
Star 20.06 -.10 +5.1
StratgcEq 20.33 -.02 +11.0
TgtRe2010 23.29 -.09 +4.4
TgtRe2015 12.99 -.07 +4.6
TgtRe2020 23.18 -.14 +4.9
TgtRe2030 22.87 -.18 +5.5
TgtRe2035 13.85 -.12 +5.8
TgtRe2040 22.74 -.22 +5.8
TgtRe2045 14.29 -.13 +5.9
TgtRetInc 11.64 -.03 +3.7
Tgtet2025 13.27 -.10 +5.2
TotBdAdml 10.71 +.03 +2.2
TotBdInst 10.71 +.03 +2.2
TotBdMkInv 10.71 +.03 +2.2
TotBdMkSig 10.71 +.03 +2.2
TotIntl d 16.42 -.29 +4.2
TotStIAdm 33.65 -.27 +7.0
TotStIIns 33.65 -.27 +7.0
TotStISig 32.48 -.25 +7.0
TotStIdx 33.64 -.26 +7.0
TxMIn d 12.25 -.24 +5.8
TxMSCInv 29.02 -.10 +6.8
USValue 11.01 -.09 +9.0
ValIdxIns 22.29 -.23 +7.8
WellsI 22.60 -.04 +5.1
WellsIAdm 54.75 -.12 +5.1
Welltn 32.67 -.24 +5.7
WelltnAdm 56.43 -.42 +5.7
WndsIIAdm 49.17 -.45 +7.9
Wndsr 14.35 -.12 +6.2
WndsrAdml 48.43 -.39 +6.2
WndsrII 27.70 -.25 +7.9
Yacktman
Yacktman d 17.91 -.12 +8.3
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
52-WEEK YTD
HIGH LOW NAME TKR DIV LAST CHG %CHG
52-WEEK YTD
HIGH LOW NAME TKR DIV LAST CHG %CHG
Combined Stocks
ABB Ltd 25.79 -.72 +14.9
AEP Ind 28.33 -.48 +9.2
AES Corp 12.93 -.12 +6.2
AFLAC 55.17 -.34 -2.2
AGL Res 41.04 +.03 +14.5
AK Steel 15.09 -.38 -7.8
AMR 6.61 +.46 -15.1
ASM Intl 42.30 -.43 +20.8
AT&T Inc 31.22 -.57 +6.3
AbtLab 52.57 -.37 +9.7
AberFitc 73.28 +2.59 +27.2
AcadiaRlt 20.44 -.21 +12.1
Accenture 54.93 -.98 +13.3
ActionSemi 2.33 +.02 +8.4
ActivsBliz 11.26 -.06 -9.5
AdamsEx 11.20 -.12 +4.3
AdobeSy 32.94 -.28 +7.0
AdvBattery 1.45 -.12 -62.3
AMD 8.87 +.08 +8.4
Aeropostl 21.29 -4.20 -13.6
Aetna 41.80 +.56 +37.0
Agilent 49.17 -.33 +18.7
Agnico g 62.95 -1.57 -17.9
AkamaiT 35.17 +.82 -25.2
AlcatelLuc 6.26 +.06 +111.5
Alcoa 17.01 -.46 +10.5
AlignTech 23.18 -.77 +18.6
Allergan 81.54 -.33 +18.7
AlliBInco 7.66 ... -3.4
AlliantEgy 39.57 +.16 +7.6
Allstate 33.42 -.56 +4.8
AlphaNRs 51.73 -1.18 -13.8
AlteraCp lf 48.00 +.65 +34.9
Altria 26.68 -.17 +8.4
AmBev s 32.07 +.60 +3.4
Amazon 197.11 -2.86 +9.5
Ameren 28.88 -.33 +2.4
AMovilL 52.25 -.45 -8.9
AMovilA 52.47 -.23 -8.2
AmAxle 11.87 +.12 -7.7
AmCapLtd 10.37 -.18 +37.2
AEagleOut 14.79 -.92 +1.1
AEP 36.66 +.02 +1.9
AmExp 49.52 -.18 +15.4
AmIntlGrp 30.79 -.85 -36.2
AmSupr 12.25 +.88 -57.2
AmTower 52.96 +1.22 +2.6
AmWtrWks 29.20 -.13 +15.5
Ameriprise 60.06 -.43 +4.4
Ametek s 44.00 -.24 +12.1
Amgen 57.42 -.26 +4.6
Anadarko 74.30 -1.78 -2.4
AnglogldA 45.77 -2.22 -7.0
Annaly 17.94 +.01 +.1
A123 Sys 5.68 +.05 -40.5
Apache 122.84 -3.77 +3.0
Apple Inc 346.75 -2.82 +7.5
ApldMatl 14.96 -.13 +6.5
Arbitron 39.09 +.44 -5.9
ArcelorMit 35.09 -1.01 -8.0
ArchCoal 30.97 -.76 -11.7
AriadP 8.49 +.39 +66.5
ArmHld 27.51 -1.11 +32.6
AspenTech 15.44 +.59 +21.6
AstraZen 50.45 -.42 +9.2
Atmel 14.43 -.32 +17.1
ATMOS 33.95 -.27 +8.8
AutoData 53.54 -.77 +15.7
AvalRare n 8.13 -.67 +30.3
AvanirPhm 4.06 -.19 -.5
AveryD 42.02 +.30 -.8
Avon 28.71 -1.61 -1.2
BB&T Cp 26.66 -.05 +1.4
BHP BillLt 93.55 -2.72 +.7
BJs Whls 51.21 +.06 +6.9
BMC Sft 51.26 +2.19 +8.7
BP PLC 43.48 -.90 -1.6
BP Pru 108.60 -2.61 -14.2
Baidu s 140.19 +1.18 +45.2
BakrHu 69.74 -2.33 +22.0
BallardPw 1.77 -.11 +18.0
BallyTech 39.37 +.43 -6.7
BcoBrades 19.02 -.08 -6.3
BcoSantSA 11.88 -.40 +11.5
BcoSBrasil 11.19 +.11 -17.7
BkHawaii 48.35 -.28 +2.4
BkAtl A h .90 +.02 -21.7
BarcGSOil 25.99 -2.67 +1.5
Bar iPVix rs 25.35 +.70 -32.6
BarnesNob 12.71 +.70 -10.2
BarrickG 46.83 -1.28 -11.9
Baxter 57.29 -.75 +13.2
BeazerHm 4.20 -.05 -22.1
BerkHa A 119355 -2955 -.9
BerkH B 79.66 -1.92 -.6
BestBuy 30.91 -.40 -9.9
BigLots 39.36 -1.25 +29.2
BioRadA 122.80 -.94 +18.2
BlockHR 17.20 +.23 +44.4
BlueCoat 25.37 -2.17 -15.1
Boeing 78.45 -.39 +20.2
Boise Inc 8.28 +.03 +4.4
BostonSci 7.56 -.18 -.1
BrigExp 27.59 -.91 +1.3
BrMySq 28.49 -.22 +7.6
Broadcom 33.85 -1.01 -22.3
BrcdeCm 6.15 +.01 +16.3
BrkfldPrp 19.39 -.09 +10.6
Buckeye 62.56 -.44 -6.4
CA Inc 24.37 -.11 -.3
CB REllis 26.53 +.23 +29.5
CBS B 26.70 -.51 +40.2
CH Engy 52.44 -.42 +7.3
CMS Eng 19.83 -.07 +6.6
CNO Fincl 7.78 +.06 +14.7
CSS Inds 17.03 -.21 -17.4
CSX 77.83 +.96 +20.5
CablvsnNY 33.91 -1.36 +.2
CalaStrTR 9.67 -.17 +4.4
Cameron 48.21 -.49 -5.0
CampSp 33.43 -.23 -3.8
CdnNRs gs 42.67 -1.47 -3.9
CapOne 53.14 -.03 +24.9
CapitlSrce 6.34 -.16 -10.7
CapsteadM 13.21 -.02 +4.9
CpstnTrb h 1.75 -.06 +82.3
CardnlHlth 44.64 +.08 +16.5
Carnival 40.94 +2.04 -11.2
Caterpillar 109.39 -1.38 +16.8
CedarF 20.00 +.69 +31.9
CelSci .70 +.03 -15.1
Celanese 48.63 +1.51 +18.1
Celgene 58.85 -2.10 -.5
CellTher rsh .35 +.00 -5.5
Cemex 7.97 -.01 -22.6
CenterPnt 18.60 +.11 +18.3
CFCda g 19.95 -1.97 -3.8
CVtPS 22.93 +.22 +4.9
CntryLink 40.48 +.11 -12.3
Cephln 79.74 -.11 +29.2
Checkpnt 18.34 -.27 -10.8
Cheesecake30.17 +.70 -1.6
ChesEng 30.86 +.13 +19.1
Chevron 102.62 -2.06 +12.5
Chimera 3.94 -.06 -4.1
ChinaUni 19.99 +.26 +40.3
ChurchDwt 82.00 +.22 +18.8
CIBER 6.25 +.05 +33.5
CienaCorp 27.48 +.34 +30.5
Cirrus 16.15 -.06 +1.1
Cisco 17.48 +.01 -13.6
Citigrp 4.48 -.04 -5.3
Clearwire 4.83 -.29 -6.2
CliffsNRs 88.01 +.46 +12.8
Clorox 68.44 +.55 +8.2
CocaCE 27.44 -.81 +9.6
Coeur 27.15 -1.34 -.6
CognizTech 76.52 -.75 +4.4
ColgPal 84.90 -.75 +5.6
Comc spcl 24.07 -.31 +16.2
Comerica 37.54 -.29 -11.1
CmtyHlt 29.67 +.10 -20.6
ConAgra 25.07 -.44 +11.0
ConchoRes 94.00 -3.53 +7.2
ConnWtrSv 24.90 -.07 -10.7
ConocPhil 71.97 -1.68 +5.7
ConsolEngy49.00 -2.03 +.5
ConEd 52.75 -.24 +6.4
ConsolWtr 9.40 -.13 +2.5
CooperTire 25.24 -.35 +7.0
CornPdts 53.58 -.27 +16.5
Corning 20.11 -.28 +4.1
Costco 79.61 -.53 +10.2
Covidien 54.58 -.40 +19.5
CrownHold 39.01 -.31 +16.9
Cummins 115.89 +3.23 +5.3
CybrOpt 9.80 ... +14.8
CypSemi 20.93 +.65 +12.6
DCT Indl 5.73 +.07 +7.9
DNP Selct 9.63 -.01 +5.4
DR Horton 12.05 +.06 +1.0
DTE 50.84 -.63 +12.2
DanaHldg 17.88 +.13 +3.9
Danaher s 54.14 -.85 +14.8
Darden 48.93 +.73 +5.4
DeanFds 11.21 +.10 +26.8
Deere 91.54 -1.49 +10.2
Dell Inc 15.88 +.04 +17.2
DeltaAir 11.22 +.75 -11.0
DenburyR 20.74 -.15 +8.6
Dndreon 38.05 -1.39 +9.0
DeutschBk 61.92 -1.85 +19.0
DBGoldDS 7.12 +.38 -10.8
DevelDiv 14.53 -.14 +3.1
DevonE 83.46 -1.50 +6.3
Diageo 80.78 +.31 +8.7
DiaOffs 69.88 -.84 +4.5
DiamRk 11.00 +.02 -8.3
Diebold 32.75 +.01 +2.2
DirecTV A 48.29 -.21 +20.9
DrSCBr rs 36.27 +.53 -22.5
DirFnBr rs 41.55 +1.28 -12.1
DrxEBear rs15.78 +.94 -30.0
DrxFnBull 28.94 -.94 +3.9
DirxSCBull 83.42 -1.16 +15.2
DirxEnBull 72.71 -4.99 +24.4
Discover 24.01 -.04 +29.6
DishNetwk 29.28 +.54 +48.9
Disney 42.69 +.07 +13.8
DomRescs 46.54 -.48 +8.9
Dominos 21.30 +2.10 +33.5
Dover 65.16 +.01 +11.5
DowChm 39.23 -.41 +14.9
DryShips 4.56 +.01 -16.9
DuPont 53.87 -.64 +8.0
DukeEngy 18.72 -.13 +5.1
Dycom 14.53 +.26 -1.5
Dynegy rs 6.22 -.23 +10.7
ETrade rs 15.87 -.18 -.8
eBay 32.68 -.33 +17.4
EMC Cp 27.00 -.37 +17.9
ENI 50.34 -1.68 +15.1
EOG Res 104.35 -1.93 +14.2
Eastgrp 45.37 +.08 +7.2
EKodak 2.85 +.04 -46.8
Eaton s 51.55 -.38 +1.6
ElPasoCp 18.50 +.20 +34.4
EldorGld g 16.11 -.56 -13.2
ElectArts 21.68 +1.76 +32.4
EmersonEl 55.03 -.81 -3.7
EnbrEPt s 31.71 -.48 +1.7
EnCana g 32.13 -.49 +10.3
EndvSilv g 8.62 -1.37 +17.4
Energen 60.06 -1.40 +24.5
Energizer 75.89 +.98 +4.1
EngyConv 1.81 -.05 -60.7
EngyTsfr 49.84 -1.78 -3.8
ENSCO 54.50 -.27 +2.1
Entergy 68.70 -.60 -3.0
EntPrPt 40.54 -.36 -2.6
EnzoBio 3.85 +.01 -27.1
EpicorSft 12.46 -.03 +23.4
EricsnTel 14.78 -.28 +28.2
EtfSilver 34.40 -4.65 +11.9
ExcoRes 20.29 -.06 +4.5
Exelon 41.11 -.63 -1.3
Expedia 24.73 +.01 -1.4
ExpScrip s 57.40 -.19 +6.2
ExxonMbl 82.62 -2.19 +13.0
FMC Tch s 42.65 -.80 -4.1
Fastenal 65.92 -.30 +10.0
FedExCp 95.29 +2.65 +2.5
FifthThird 12.82 -.33 -12.7
Finisar 25.32 +.01 -14.7
FMajSilv g 16.83 -1.45 +15.9
FstNiagara 14.06 -.16 +.6
FirstEngy 41.24 -.61 +11.4
Flextrn 6.95 +.10 -11.5
Fonar 2.07 +.19 +59.2
FootLockr 21.77 +.46 +11.0
FordM 15.08 -.07 -10.2
ForestOil 30.05 -.93 -20.9
Fortress 5.76 -.45 +1.1
FortuneBr 63.50 -1.15 +5.4
FMCG s 49.85 -1.29 -17.0
FDelMnt 26.81 -.32 +7.5
FrontierCm 8.37 +.13 -14.0
FrontierOil 25.83 +.71 +43.4
FuelCell 1.50 -.13 -35.1
FultonFncl 11.48 -.24 +11.0
GabDvInc 16.60 -.21 +8.1
GabelliET 6.08 -.02 +7.2
Gafisa SA 10.93 -.09 -24.8
GameStop 25.87 +.19 +13.1
GamGld g 9.54 -.51 +16.5
Gannett 15.24 -.40 +1.0
Gap 22.93 -.20 +4.0
GenElec 19.90 -.37 +8.8
GenGrPr n 16.07 -.04 +3.8
GenMills s 38.41 -.40 +7.9
GenMot n 32.02 -1.02 -13.1
GenOn En 3.71 -.11 -2.6
Gentex 30.76 -.06 +4.1
Genworth 11.63 -.44 -11.5
GaGulf 33.35 -2.94 +38.6
Gerdau 10.54 -.61 -24.7
GileadSci 40.62 -.71 +12.1
GlaxoSKln 42.87 -.37 +9.3
GlimchRt 9.38 +.04 +11.7
GloblInd 7.27 -1.50 +4.9
GoldFLtd 15.90 -.76 -12.3
Goldcrp g 48.72 -2.06 +6.0
GoldStr g 2.80 -.05 -39.0
GoldmanS150.41 -1.11 -10.6
Goodyear 17.46 -.13 +47.3
Gramrcy 2.72 -.04 +17.7
GraphPkg 5.51 +.22 +41.6
GrtBasG g 2.26 -.13 -23.6
GtPanSilv g 3.22 -.22 +14.6
GreenMtC s73.67 -2.31+124.2
Greif A 61.54 -.81 -.6
GpoTMM 2.12 +.06 -15.2
HSBC 53.16 -.82 +4.2
Hallibrtn 46.85 -.50 +14.7
HanJS 14.67 +.02 -2.8
HarleyD 36.99 +.22 +6.7
HarmonyG 13.70 -.73 +9.3
HarrisCorp 47.64 -.89 +5.2
Harsco 34.03 -.56 +20.2
HartfdFn 27.10 -.95 +2.3
HawaiiEl 25.63 -.08 +12.5
HltMgmt 11.31 +.30 +18.6
HeclaM 7.98 -.33 -29.1
HercOffsh 5.91 -.12 +69.8
Hertz 16.75 +.15 +15.6
Hess 76.52 -.91 0.0
HewlettP 40.80 -.14 -3.1
HomeDp 37.01 -.18 +5.6
HonwllIntl 60.15 -.17 +13.1
Hospira 55.93 +.07 +.4
HostHotls 17.24 +.25 -3.5
HudsCity 9.50 -.11 -25.4
HuntBnk 6.65 -.11 -3.2
Huntsmn 19.97 +.48 +27.9
Hydrognc 4.93 -.15 +31.1
IAMGld g 19.70 -.89 +10.7
INGPrRTr 6.17 -.07 +8.4
ION Geoph 10.08 -.72 +18.9
iShGold s 14.38 -.43 +3.5
iSAstla 26.41 -.41 +3.8
iShBraz 72.85 -.53 -5.9
iSCan 32.04 -.72 +3.4
iShEMU 40.02 -1.16 +13.5
iSh HK 18.88 -.09 -.2
iShJapn 10.46 -.08 -4.1
iSh Kor 66.17 -.74 +8.1
iShMex 60.58 -.59 -2.2
iShSing 13.71 -.15 -1.0
iSPacxJpn 48.04 -.60 +2.3
iSTaiwn 15.68 +.05 +.4
iSh UK 18.20 -.44 +4.8
iShSilver 33.72 -4.55 +11.7
iShChina25 43.35 -.36 +.6
iShEMkts 47.63 -.46 0.0
iShB20 T 95.49 +.90 +1.5
iS Eafe 61.57 -1.24 +5.8
iSR1KV 68.97 -.66 +6.3
iSR2KV 73.90 -.37 +4.0
iSR2KG 94.21 -.45 +7.8
iShR2K 82.83 -.38 +5.9
iShREst 61.31 -.09 +9.6
ITT Corp 57.53 +.39 +10.4
Informat 51.53 -.12 +17.0
IngerRd 49.25 -.65 +4.6
InglesMkts 18.23 -.07 -5.1
Intel 23.61 +.11 +12.3
IBM 168.46 -2.16 +14.8
Intl Coal 14.45 -.02 +86.7
IntlGame 17.73 +.20 +.2
IntPap 31.33 -.34 +15.0
Interpublic 11.22 -.05 +5.6
Intersil 14.93 +.18 -2.2
Invesco 24.14 -.43 +.3
ItauUnibH 22.21 -.01 -7.1
JAlexandr 5.86 +.06 +11.6
J&J Snack 50.16 -.27 +4.0
JA Solar 6.11 -.03 -11.7
JDS Uniph 21.38 +1.38 +47.7
JPMorgCh 45.17 -.33 +6.5
Jabil 20.47 +.98 +1.9
JpnSmCap 8.59 -.11 -4.2
JetBlue 5.96 +.06 -9.8
JohnJn 65.01 -.66 +5.1
JohnsnCtl 39.47 -.23 +3.3
JoyGlbl 89.78 -4.91 +3.5
JnprNtwk 37.54 +.25 +1.7
KB Home 12.03 +.36 -10.8
KKR n 17.65 -.15 +24.3
KLA Tnc 44.52 +.69 +15.2
Kaydon 37.75 +.12 -7.3
Kellogg 56.55 -.21 +10.7
Kendle 14.98 +5.48 +37.6
KeyEngy 16.30 -.49 +25.6
Keycorp 8.50 -.13 -4.0
Kimco 19.34 -.06 +7.2
KindME 72.94 -.99 +3.8
Kinross g 14.78 -.73 -22.0
KodiakO g 6.08 -.20 -7.9
Kohls 52.79 -.56 -2.9
KrispKrm 5.50 +.05 -21.2
Kroger 24.30 +.14 +8.7
Kulicke 11.45 +.80 +59.0
LDK Solar 10.17 -.25 +.5
LSI Corp 7.30 -.02 +21.9
LamResrch 47.56 +.19 -8.1
LancastrC 60.13 +.23 +5.1
LVSands 42.68 +.15 -7.1
LawsnSft 11.06 -.03 +19.6
LeapWirlss 16.54 +1.47 +34.9
LeeEnt 1.17 +.15 -52.4
LennarA 18.72 +.20 -.2
LeucNatl 36.16 -.58 +23.9
Level3 1.59 -.03 +62.2
LibtyMIntA 17.53 -.21 +11.2
LillyEli 38.19 +.07 +9.0
LimelghtN 6.38 +.12 +9.8
Limited 40.42 +.10 +31.5
LincNat 29.78 -.54 +7.1
LinnEngy 36.66 -1.35 -2.2
LizClaib 6.17 +.10 -13.8
LloydBkg 3.48 -.31 -15.3
LockhdM 79.81 +.90 +14.2
Lowes 25.76 ... +2.7
LyonBas A 41.65 -1.18 +21.1
MEMC 11.09 -.27 -1.5
MFA Fncl 8.10 -.01 -.7
MMT 6.76 +.02 -2.0
MGIC 8.35 -.15 -18.1
MGM Rsts 14.32 +.10 -3.6
Macys 26.35 +.95 +4.2
Manulife g 17.22 -.29 +.2
MarathonO 49.55 -2.00 +33.8
MktVGold 56.11 -2.23 -8.7
MktVRus 37.37 -1.16 -1.4
MktVJrGld 35.79 -2.15 -10.3
MktV Agri 53.94 -.65 +.7
MarIntA 35.51 +.44 -14.5
MarshM 29.73 -.64 +8.7
MarshIls 7.81 -.14 +12.9
MarvellT 14.57 -.43 -21.5
Masco 13.19 -.13 +4.2
MassMCp s16.67 +.33 +9.1
Mattel 26.64 -.11 +4.8
MaximIntg 27.46 +.50 +16.3
McClatchy 2.98 +.03 -36.2
McCorm 48.83 -.22 +4.9
McDrmInt s 21.68 -.08 +4.8
McDnlds 78.60 -.47 +2.4
Name Last Chg %YTD Name Last Chg %YTD Name Last Chg %YTD Name Last Chg %YTD Name Last Chg %YTD Name Last Chg %YTD
The department’s store key revenue
measure for April rose 6.4 percent,
but Wall Street analysts had expect-
ed even faster growth.
The insurer’s quarterly profit jumped
52 percent, led by growth in its
health care division. Cigna also
raised its 2011 profit forecast.
The pizza chain reported a 10 per-
cent jump in first-quarter earnings
on sales gains at its stores over-
seas.
A free-fall in commodities and an unexpected
jump in unemployment claims dragged the stock
market lower. Oil fell nearly 9 percent. Silver lost
8 percent and gold fell 2.3 percent. Stocks fell
after the Labor Department said that first-time
unemployment claims rose last week to their
highest level in eight months. Forecasters had
expected claims would drop. The Dow fell 1.1
percent. The S&P 500 fell 0.9 percent. The Nas-
daq fell 0.5 percent.
16
18
20
$22
F M M A
Domino’s Pizza DPZ
Close: $21.30 2.10 or 10.9%
$10.66 $21.43
Vol.:
Mkt. Cap:
4.0m (4.0x avg.)
$1.28 b
52-week range
PE:
Yield:
14.7
...
40
45
$50
F M M A
Cigna CI
Close: $47.18 1.26 or 2.7%
$29.12 $47.74
Vol.:
Mkt. Cap:
4.3m (1.9x avg.)
$12.8 b
52-week range
PE:
Yield:
9.7
0.1%
30
35
$40
F M M A
J. C. Penney JCP
Close: $37.46 -1.96 or -5.0%
$19.42 $39.73
Vol.:
Mkt. Cap:
8.1m (2.1x avg.)
$8.61 b
52-week range
PE:
Yield:
23.6
2.1%
Story Stocks
Stocks of Local Interest
96.00 64.13 AirProd APD 2.32 92.15 -.94 +1.3
29.91 19.41 AmWtrWks AWK .88 29.20 -.13 +15.5
51.50 35.00 Amerigas APU 2.96 46.82 -.34 -4.1
23.79 16.52 AquaAm WTR .62 22.43 -.05 -.2
38.02 24.22 ArchDan ADM .64 34.08 -.64 +13.3
285.00 171.65 AutoZone AZO ... 285.28 +1.93 +4.7
18.15 10.91 BkofAm BAC .04 12.30 -.19 -7.8
32.50 23.78 BkNYMel BK .52 28.55 -.20 -5.5
18.20 6.08 BonTon BONT .20 12.08 -.19 -4.6
47.67 29.12 CIGNA CI .04 47.18 +1.26 +28.7
37.43 26.84 CVS Care CVS .50 36.79 +.67 +5.8
68.47 49.47 CocaCola KO 1.88 66.70 -.76 +1.4
27.16 16.30 Comcast CMCSA .45 25.56 -.40 +16.9
28.95 21.33 CmtyBkSy CBU .96 24.17 -.03 -13.0
42.50 22.33 CmtyHlt CYH ... 29.67 +.10 -20.6
37.19 25.61 CoreMark CORE ... 33.40 +.15 -6.2
14.82 4.97 Entercom ETM ... 10.06 -.12 -13.1
21.02 7.71 FairchldS FCS ... 19.80 -.10 +26.8
9.84 6.96 FrontierCm FTR .75 8.37 +.13 -14.0
18.71 13.09 Genpact G .18 15.89 -.28 +4.5
15.84 8.42 HarteHnk HHS .32 8.97 +.11 -29.8
51.84 40.00 Heinz HNZ 1.80 51.15 -.35 +3.4
58.20 44.75 Hershey HSY 1.38 56.27 -.44 +19.3
34.00 27.49 Kraft KFT 1.16 33.39 -.46 +6.0
27.93 19.35 Lowes LOW .44 25.76 ... +2.7
96.15 72.03 M&T Bk MTB 2.80 86.15 -.82 -1.0
80.94 65.31 McDnlds MCD 2.44 78.60 -.47 +2.4
25.32 19.27 NBT Bcp NBTB .80 21.91 -.20 -9.3
9.26 3.64 NexstarB NXST ... 8.14 -.02 +35.9
69.68 49.43 PNC PNC 1.40 62.50 -1.01 +2.9
28.14 23.75 PPL Corp PPL 1.40 27.39 -.17 +4.1
17.39 11.98 PennMill PMIC ... 16.82 +.17 +27.1
17.35 10.03 PenRE PEI .60 15.14 -.02 +4.2
69.94 60.32 PepsiCo PEP 2.06 68.83 -1.00 +5.4
69.92 42.94 PhilipMor PM 2.56 68.39 -.96 +16.8
66.95 39.37 ProctGam PG 2.10 65.88 -.59 +2.4
67.52 48.56 Prudentl PRU 1.15 62.99 +.56 +7.3
16.86 9.85 SLM Cp SLM .40 16.21 -.13 +28.8
57.83 32.41 SLM pfB SLMpB 4.63 57.45 -.38 +31.1
30.00 20.00 SoUnCo SUG .60 28.09 -.40 +16.7
15.18 7.06 Supvalu SVU .35 10.53 +.08 +9.3
54.00 39.56 TJX TJX .76 53.37 +.11 +20.2
33.53 24.30 UGI Corp UGI 1.04 32.05 -.34 +1.5
38.95 25.79 VerizonCm VZ 1.95 37.12 -.55 +3.7
57.90 47.77 WalMart WMT 1.46 55.07 -.30 +2.1
41.56 32.56 WeisMk WMK 1.16 39.67 +.13 -1.6
34.25 23.02 WellsFargo WFC .48 28.13 -.65 -9.2
USD per British Pound 1.6379 -.0138 -.84% 1.6189 1.5101
Canadian Dollar .9690 +.0113 +1.17% 1.0004 1.0314
USD per Euro 1.4530 -.0319 -2.20% 1.4045 1.2827
Japanese Yen 80.19 -.39 -.49% 81.32 93.65
Mexican Peso 11.7209 +.1060 +.90% 12.2000 12.6340
CURRENCY CLOSE PVS. %CH. 6MO. 1YR.
Copper 3.99 4.13 -3.28 +1.05 +28.42
Gold 1480.90 1514.90 -2.24 +5.98 +23.73
Platinum 1778.20 1826.30 -2.63 +0.53 +6.70
Silver 36.23 39.38 -8.00 +35.47 +107.12
Palladium 710.70 746.60 -4.81 +3.84 +38.51
METALS CLOSE PVS. %CH. 6MO. 1YR.
Foreign Exchange & Metals
C M Y K
PAGE 10B FRIDAY, MAY 6, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ W E A T H E R
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• 12’ Digging Depth
• 55 Hp Kubota Diesel
• Angle Blade
• Cab With Heat And Air
• Operating Weight 12,700lbs.
List Price $70,060
Kubota ZG227
• 54 Zero Turn
• 54” Mowerdeck
• 27Hp, Kubota Gas Engine
• Welded Pro Deck
List Price $9,700
Open House Price
$7,800
Kubota MX5100DT
Tractor
• R4 Industrial Tires
• 51Hp Kubota Diesel
• Gear Drive
List Price $22,035 .
Open House Price
$19,200
CHWaltz Sons, Inc
www.chwaltz.com
Kubota L3540HST-3
Tractor
• R4 Industrial Tires
• 35Hp, Kubota Diesel Engine
• 4 WD
• 3 Range Hydrostatic Transmission
List Price $22,219
Open House Price
$19,850
Kubota BX25LB-R
• Sub Compact Tractor
with Loader and Backhoe
• 23Hp, Kubota Diesel Engine
• 4 WD
List Price $19,315
Open House Price
$16,900
ALMANAC
REGIONAL FORECAST
NATIONAL FORECAST
For more weather
information go to:
www.timesleader.com
National Weather Service
607-729-1597
Forecasts, graphs
and data ©2011
Weather Central, LP
Yesterday 60/38
Average 67/45
Record High 90 in 1949
Record Low 27 in 1974
Yesterday 16
Month to date 40
Year to date 6067
Last year to date 5594
Normal year to date 6015
*Index of fuel consumption, how far the day’s
mean temperature was below 65 degrees.
Precipitation
Yesterday trace
Month to date 1.63”
Normal month to date 0.55”
Year to date 18.58”
Normal year to date 11.06”
Susquehanna Stage Chg. Fld. Stg
Wilkes-Barre 16.50 3.11 22.0
Towanda 10.33 -0.53 21.0
Lehigh
Bethlehem 3.73 1.41 16.0
Delaware
Port Jervis 6.98 1.01 18.0
Today’s high/
Tonight’s low
TODAY’S SUMMARY
Highs: 64-69. Lows: 41-46. Partly cloudy
and pleasant today. Becoming cloudy
with a chance of showers tonight.
The Poconos
Highs: 66-70. Lows: 48-52. Sunny to part-
ly cloudy skies today. Becoming mostly
cloudy with a chance of showers tonight.
The Jersey Shore
Highs: 55-67. Lows: 41-46. Partly to most-
ly cloudy today. Mostly cloudy with a
chance of showers tonight.
The Finger Lakes
Highs: 70-72. Lows: 48-50. Sunny to part-
ly cloudy skies today. Becoming mostly
cloudy with a chance of showers tonight.
Brandywine Valley
Highs: 68-72. Lows: 49-53. Increasing
clouds today. Mostly cloudy with a
chance of showers tonight.
Delmarva/Ocean City
Anchorage 47/34/.00 53/36/pc 50/37/pc
Atlanta 66/44/.00 75/53/s 79/60/pc
Baltimore 67/43/.00 72/49/t 70/54/pc
Boston 57/46/.01 69/51/s 62/50/sh
Buffalo 59/39/.00 55/44/c 56/46/pc
Charlotte 67/36/.00 71/47/t 76/54/pc
Chicago 63/35/.00 67/51/pc 62/53/t
Cleveland 61/38/.00 60/46/sh 60/49/t
Dallas 78/55/.00 85/67/pc 91/70/pc
Denver 68/28/.00 78/45/s 80/43/pc
Detroit 66/41/.00 61/44/sh 60/48/sh
Honolulu 82/73/.01 86/73/pc 87/73/pc
Houston 82/53/.00 86/63/s 87/71/pc
Indianapolis 62/36/.00 67/50/pc 67/55/t
Las Vegas 88/62/.00 96/71/s 94/68/s
Los Angeles 68/57/.00 70/55/s 65/54/s
Miami 82/74/.00 85/72/t 87/74/s
Milwaukee 62/39/.00 63/46/pc 52/45/sh
Minneapolis 62/46/.15 67/49/c 64/49/c
Myrtle Beach 66/48/.00 73/56/t 76/62/s
Nashville 66/38/.00 70/50/pc 76/60/pc
New Orleans 75/63/.00 82/63/s 84/68/s
Norfolk 67/50/.00 77/53/t 71/57/pc
Oklahoma City 78/52/.00 84/64/pc 88/66/pc
Omaha 67/48/.01 78/50/pc 73/55/pc
Orlando 83/64/.00 85/62/t 88/63/s
Phoenix 97/66/.00 100/70/s 99/70/s
Pittsburgh 63/35/.00 61/44/sh 65/49/pc
Portland, Ore. 56/47/.05 61/48/sh 58/45/sh
St. Louis 72/46/.00 71/55/pc 75/58/t
Salt Lake City 72/36/.00 71/51/pc 74/49/pc
San Antonio 83/53/.00 87/67/pc 91/71/pc
San Diego 71/62/.00 70/55/s 66/55/s
San Francisco 77/52/.00 63/51/pc 65/53/pc
Seattle 55/45/.02 57/46/sh 56/45/sh
Tampa 86/68/.00 84/65/t 86/67/s
Tucson 94/59/.00 96/61/s 95/60/s
Washington, DC 68/46/.01 72/51/t 71/55/pc
City Yesterday Today Tomorrow City Yesterday Today Tomorrow
Amsterdam 64/37/.00 69/48/s 74/52/pc
Baghdad 95/73/.00 98/76/pc 95/73/t
Beijing 75/52/.00 78/54/s 80/55/s
Berlin 59/32/.00 66/43/pc 70/47/s
Buenos Aires 70/52/.00 65/42/s 72/47/s
Dublin 59/50/.00 61/51/sh 62/53/sh
Frankfurt 66/36/.00 70/46/s 75/50/s
Hong Kong 81/72/.00 84/75/t 85/76/t
Jerusalem 91/69/.00 77/57/s 72/53/s
London 70/48/.00 70/55/c 72/57/c
Mexico City 82/54/.00 80/56/t 83/57/t
Montreal 45/41/.00 55/44/sh 61/45/c
Moscow 72/50/.00 68/55/sh 63/48/sh
Paris 70/43/.00 76/54/pc 77/55/pc
Rio de Janeiro 82/72/.00 86/73/s 83/70/s
Riyadh 93/77/.00 100/78/s 104/80/s
Rome 70/50/.00 71/51/s 75/52/s
San Juan 82/75/.00 86/73/pc 87/75/pc
Tokyo 63/55/.00 69/55/pc 69/59/sh
Warsaw 48/37/.00 58/36/pc 61/39/pc
City Yesterday Today Tomorrow City Yesterday Today Tomorrow
WORLD CITIES
River Levels, from 12 p.m. yesterday.
Key: s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sn-snow, sf-snowflurries, i-ice.
Philadelphia
72/51
Reading
73/46
Scranton
Wilkes-Barre
66/46
66/46
Harrisburg
71/48
Atlantic City
68/50
New York City
71/52
Syracuse
64/46
Pottsville
69/45
Albany
66/44
Binghamton
Towanda
66/44
67/43
State College
64/44
Poughkeepsie
68/45
85/67
67/51
78/45
92/58
67/49
70/55
60/51
75/57
66/41
57/46
71/52
61/44
75/53
85/72
86/63
86/73
50/38
53/36
72/51
Sun and Moon
Sunrise Sunset
Today 5:55a 8:06p
Tomorrow 5:54a 8:07p
Moonrise Moonset
Today 8:06a 11:33p
Tomorrow 9:04a none
First Full Last New
May 10 May 17 May 24 June 1
Very dry air con-
tinues to blanket
our region this
morning and
with a good deal
of sunshine and
light winds, tem-
peratures will
easily approach
70 this after-
noon. The sun's
rays are now as
strong as they
are on August 7.
Later today,
cloudiness will
herald the
approach of a
weak low pres-
sure trough
which will bring
a shower
overnight, but
tomorrow should
turn out to be
rather nice with
only the slight
chance for a
shower as the
trough axis
moves through.
A blocking pat-
tern will set up
allowing both
Sunday and
Monday to be
dry. And yes, I
can already
smell the scent
of freshly cut
grass.
- Tom Clark
NATIONAL FORECAST: A trough of low pressure will generate a few scattered showers and thunder-
storms from the eastern Great Lakes to portions of the Southeast. Low pressure over the northern
Plains will produce a few showers and thunderstorms, while afternoon thunderstorms will be possible
over portions of western Texas.
Recorded at Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Int’l Airport
Temperatures
Heating Degree Days*
Precipitation
TODAY
Mostly sunny
SATURDAY
Partly
sunny, a
shower
68°
46°
MONDAY
Mostly
sunny
68°
45°
TUESDAY
Partly
sunny
70°
45°
WEDNESDAY
Mostly
sunny
70°
45°
THURSDAY
Showers
possible
70°
50°
SUNDAY
Partly
sunny
68°
47°
68
°
37
°
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com FRIDAY, MAY 6, 2011 PAGE 1C
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412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
412 Autos for Sale
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
135 Legals/
Public Notices
135 Legals/
Public Notices
135 Legals/
Public Notices
REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS
TIRE LEASE PROGRAM
The County of Lackawanna Transportation
System (COLTS), the public transportation
provider in Scranton and Lackawanna
County, is accepting Proposals for the tire
lease program
Five (5) copies of the Proposals must be
submitted in the format outlined and
marked “Tire Lease Program” and deliv-
ered to : Jennifer Honick, Director of
Finance and Administration, COLTS, 800
North South Road, Scranton, PA 18504, no
later than noon (12:00 P.M. E.D.T.) on June
3, 2011
COLTS, being an equal opportunity
employer, will not discriminate against any
proposer because of race, color, religion,
sex, or national origin. Any firm or person
who enters into a contract with COLTS
must agree to comply with any and all
applicable Federal and Commonwealth of
PA laws regarding the prohibition of dis-
crimination. All proposers, by submitting a
Proposal, shall accept the affirmative duty
to ascertain and comply with such laws.
COLTS has also established a Disadvan-
taged Business Enterprise (DBE) goal for
this project of 4.2%. A listing of all certified
DBE firms in the Commonwealth of Penn-
sylvania can be viewed at
www.paucp.com.
Copies of the RFP can be transmitted
electronically by e-mailing Jennifer Honick
at jhonick@coltsbus.com, or by calling Jen-
nifer Honick at COLTS’ office at (570)346-
2061; Ext. 1264 between the hours of 9:00
A.M. and 4:00 P.M., Monday through Fri-
day.
COLTS reserves the right to reject any
and/or all proposals or portions thereof.
LEGAL NOTICE
Notice is hereby given that Dallas Borough
Council, Luzerne County, Pennsylvania,
will consider for adoption the following
Ordinance #3-2011, at a meeting to be held
on May 18, 2011 at 7:30 P.M. in the Dallas
Borough Municipal Building at 25 Main
Street, Dallas, PA 18612.
AN ORDINANCE OF THE BOROUGH
OF DALLAS, LUZERNE COUNTY,
PENNSYLVANIA, AMENDING ORDI-
NANCE 1-11-03 THE POLICE PEN-
SION FUND BENEFITS ORDINANCE
PURSUANT TO ACT 51 OF 2009, THE
PRE-RETIREMENT SURVIVOR BENE-
FIT, AND AMENDING THE DEFINITION
OF AVERAGE APPLICABLE COMPEN-
SATION AND SERVICE.
A copy of the full text of the Ordinance is
available for public inspection Monday to
Friday 9:00 AM to 4:00 PM at the Dallas
Borough Administrative office. Any ques-
tions pertaining to this notice should be
directed to the Dallas Borough Manager at
(570) 675-1389.
By Order of,
Lee Eckert
Dallas Borough Council President
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
Notice is hereby given that on May 11 2011, at or after (see times
below) U-Haul will hold a public sale for the purpose of satisfying
a landlord’s lien on self-service storage room. The goods to be
sold are described, generally as household, the terms of the sale
will be cash or certified funds. Any and all public sale advertised
by U-Haul are subject to change or cancellation without notice.
LOCATION OF SALE
10:00 AM 11:30 AM
U-Haul Center of U-Haul Center of Kingston
Wyoming Valley 714-716 Wyoming Avenue
231 Mundy St. Kingston, Pa 18704
Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 18702
ROOM NAME ROOM NAME
1119 Carl Garrison 0928 Ronny Jones
1226 Narine Hemchan 1232 Caleb Woodward
1431 Kenneth Miller
1435 Latisha Salley
1618 Teresa Grykevicz
LEGAL NOTICE
Notice is hereby given that Dallas Borough
Council, Luzerne County, Pennsylvania,
will consider for adoption the following
Ordinance #4-2011, at a meeting to be held
on May 18, 2011 at 7:30 P.M. in the Dallas
Borough Municipal Building at 25 Main
Street, Dallas, PA 18612
AN ORDINANCE OF THE BOROUGH
OF DALLAS, LUZERNE COUNTY,
PENNSYLVANIA, AMENDING ORDI-
NANCE 1-11-03 THE POLICE PEN-
SION FUND BENEFITS ORDINANCE
TO PROVIDE A PENSION SERVICE
INCREMENT TO ANY OFFICER WHO
RETIRED FROM APRIL 1, 2009
THROUGH DECEMBER 31, 2010
A copy of the full text of the Ordinance is
available for public inspection Monday to
Friday 9:00 AM to 4:00 PM at the Dallas
Borough Administrative office. Any ques-
tions pertaining to this notice should be
directed to the Dallas Borough Manager at
(570) 675-1389
By Order Of
Lee Eckert,
Dallas Borough Council President
steve@yourcarbank.com
www.yourcarbank.com
ÐUV MEME º PAV MEME º ÐUV MEME
DO IT NOW!
WVON¡MO VALLEV
AT
Down payments from $295
Weekly payments from $49
415 Kidder Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702
570.822.8870
steve@yourcarbank.com
www.yourcarbank.com
(Tax and Tags extra)
821-2772 •1-800-444-7172
MONDAY-THURSDAY 8:30-8:00pm
FRIDAY 8:30-7:00pm
SATURDAY 8:30-5:00pm
601 K IDDE R S T., W IL K E S -BA RRE , P A
4 Cylinder, 6 Cylinder, Automatic, A/C, Keyless Entry,
AM/FM/CD/MP3, Front Bucket Seats, PW, PDL
10
AVAIL.
Starting
At
Only
$
17,999
*
*Price & payment plus tax & tags. Payment $259/mo. plus tax for 72 mos. @ 4.9%APR
w/ $1999 down (cash or trade) to qualified buyers. #Z2448. Prior use daily rental.
2010 CHEVY M ALIBUS
LT • LTZ
LOW
M ILES
or
Buy
For
$
259
FIN AN CIN G
AS LOW AS1.9
%
APR
PER
M O.
You r Frie n d In
The Ca r B u s in e s s
P a rtia lL is ting !
260 S ou th R ive r S t, P la in s , P A • 570 - 8 22- 210 0
1
4
3
7
3
8
H OM E OF L OW M IL EAGE
QU AL ITY VEH ICL ES
W W W .AU TOB U D D IES ON L IN E.COM
2008 V W RA BBIT
5 S peed,49K M iles........................$11,995
1998 C A DILLA C DEV ILLE
68K M iles....................................$6,995
2003 PO NTIA C SUNFIRE
34K M iles....................................$7,495
2006 C HEV RO LET C O BA LT SS
S upercharged Edition,41K M iles...........$12,995
2001 BM W 325XI
A llW heelD rive,99K M iles.....................$9,995
2001 HY UNDA I ELA NTRA
75K M iles....................................$5,995
L OW M IL EAGE S P ECIAL S
OVER 50 VEH ICL ES IN S TOCK !
NEW
AD D R ESS AT
260 S. R ive rSt,
P la ins , P A
W E M AK E IT EAS Y!
Ca ll M a rc u m M otors
570 - 693- 30 76
w w w .m a rc u m m otors .c om
All Ve hic le s Com e w ith
2YR - 24,0 0 0 M ile W a rra n ty
N e e d a Ca r?
B a d Cre d it
N o Cre d it
NORTHEAST PA TOP JOBS
The following companies are hiring:
Your company name will be listed on the front page
of The Times Leader Classifieds the first day your ad
appears on timesleader.com Northeast PA Top Jobs.
For more information contact The Times Leader sales
consultant in your area at 570-829-7130.
Berwick Retirement
Village
SCI-Retreat
100
ANNOUNCEMENTS
110 Lost
LOST BLACK CAT.
1 yr old, a few white
hairs under chin.
Near Carverton
Road and 8th St.
REWARD!! Please
call 570-696-1309
110 Lost
ALL JUNK CARS
WANTED!!
ŠCALL ANYTIME
ŠFREE REMOVAL
ŠCA$H PAID
ON THE SPOT
570.301.3602
110 Lost
ALL
JUNK
CAR &
TRUCKS
WANTED
Highest Prices
Paid!!!
FREE
REMOVAL
Call V&G
Anytime
288-8995
LOST BEAGLE: 7
months old, 11 1/2 “
high, black back
with white belly and
legs. Last seen in
Falls, Coolbaugh
Mountain Road on
Wednesday 4/27.
REWARD. Call
570-388-2775 or
570-388-3239
Find Something?
Lose Something?
Get it back where it
belongs
with a Lost/Found ad!
570-829-7130
LOST RING
Anniversary
Diamond Band in
vicinity of Wood-
land’s on 4/29.
Please call
570-814-0004.
LOST, male Jack
Russell Terrier
named Sam. Black
& white. Lost on
Monday April 11 in
Krispin Road Dallas
Area. If seen, please
call 570-718-4050
570-714-1698
120 Found
FOUND - Keys for
SUBARU on RIver
St. 570-417-3689
FOUND, Brown and
white Beagle in St.
Mary’s cemetery in
Hanover Township
on Easter. Please
call Nick to identify.
(570) 407-0833
135 Legals/
Public Notices
ESTATE NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that Letters
Testamentary have
been issued to Paul
F. Hughes, Execu-
tor, of the Estate of
Alice Hand Hughes,
of Dallas Boro,
Luzerne County,
Pennsylvania, who
died on April 2, 2011.
All persons indebted
to the Estate are
required to make
payment and those
having any claims or
demands are to
present the same
without delay to
Paul F. Hughes, 500
Paxon Hollow Road,
Broomall, PA 19008.
135 Legals/
Public Notices
LEGAL NOTICE
DEADLINES
Saturday
12:30 on Friday
Sunday
4:00 pm on
Friday
Monday
4:30 pm on
Friday
Tuesday
4:00 pm on
Monday
Wednesday
4:00 pm on
Tuesday
Thursday
4:00 pm on
Wednesday
Friday
4:00 pm on
Thursday
Holidays
call for deadlines
You may email
your notices to
mpeznowski@
timesleader.com
or fax to
570-831-7312
or mail to
The Times Leader
15 N. Main Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18711
For additional
information or
questions regard-
ing legal notices
you may call
Marti Peznowski
at 570-970-7371
or 570-829-7130
To place your
ad call...829-7130
ESTATE NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that Letters
Testamentary were
granted May 2,
2011 in the Estate of
Anna D. Uzdilla,
a/k/a Anna Doleres
Uzdilla deceased,
late of Hanover Twp
Luzerne County,
Pennsylvania, who
died February 9,
2011, all persons
indebted to said
Estate are required
to make payment
and those having
any claims or
demands are to
present the same
without delay to the
Executor Mary
Krefski, in care of
the undersigned.
Patrick J.
Aregood, Esq.
1218 South Main St.
Wilkes-Barre,
PA 18706
LEGAL NOTICE
PUBLIC AUCTION
As approved by the
Luzerne County
Commissioners,
L.A.G.Auction
Services will hold
an Auction at Valley
Crest Nursing
home, May 7, 2011
at 10:00 AM. Partial
list consisting of
miscellaneous
equipment, furni-
ture, vehicles and
other items.
135 Legals/
Public Notices
NOTICE:
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that Letters
Testamentary have
been granted to
Susan Wisniewski in
the Estate of
BERNADINE M.
ORMAN, late of 23
Faith Drive, Hazle-
ton, Luzerne Coun-
ty, Pennsylvania,
who died testate on
March 30, 2011. All
persons indebted to
said estate are
requested to make
payment and those
having claims or
demands to present
the same, without
delay to the Execu-
tor c/o:
DAVID L. GLASS-
BERG, ESQUIRE
GLASSBERG &
DOGANIERO
81 NORTH LAUREL
STREET
HAZELTON, PA
18201
LEGAL NOTICE
“OFFICIAL NOTICE
is hereby given that
the WILKES-BARRE
AREA BOARD OF
EDUCATION will
hold a Budget
Finance Committee
Meeting on May
12, 2011 at
9:30 AM. Meeting
will be held in the
Board Room of the
Administration
Building, 730 South
Main Street, Wilkes-
Barre, Pa.
BY ORDER OF THE
BOARD
Leonard B.
Przywara, Board
Secretary
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ESTATE NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that Letters
Testamentary have
been granted in the
Estate of Dorothy J.
Klein late of Butler
Township, Luzerne
County, Pennsylva-
nia, who died
March 24, 2011 to
Alma Jane Van
Horn. All persons
having claims
against the estate
are requested to
make known the
same to the execu-
tor, c/o Peter J.
Fagan, Esquire, P O
Box 904, Conyng-
ham, Pennsylvania.
135 Legals/
Public Notices
ESTATE NOTICE
Estate of James V.
Tarone, Jr., late of
Hazleton Luzerne
County, Pennsylva-
nia.
Letters of Adminis-
tration on the above
estate having been
granted to Elaine
Ridley, all persons
indebted to the said
estate are request-
ed to make pay-
ment, and those
having claims to
present the same
without delay to her
attorney, Joseph
Kosierowski, Ridley,
Chuff, Kosierowski
& Scanlon, P.C., 400
Broad Street, 2
nd
Floor, Milford, PA
18337
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
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ESTATE NOTICE
Estate of John
Anthony Sr., Late of
Larksville, Pa. (Died
March 3, 2011). Let-
ters of Adminis-tra-
tion have been
granted to John J.
Anthony Jr. All per-
sons having claims
against the Estate
or indebted to the
Estate shall make
payments or pres-
ent claims to John
J. Anthony Jr.,
Executor, R. 390
W. Broadway St.
Larksville, PA 18651.
ESTATE NOTICE
Letters of Adminis-
tration were grant-
ed in the Estate of
Joseph J. Pribula,
deceased, late of
Exeter Borough,
Luzerne County, PA,
who died on Febru-
ary 17, 2011. Patrick
J. Pribula, Adminis-
trator. All persons
indebted to said
Estate are required
to make payment
and those having
claims and
demands to present
them without delay
to the Administrator
c/o Harry W. Skene,
Esquire, 900 Rutter
Ave, Forty Fort, PA
18704.
1-800-716-9529
135 Legals/
Public Notices
INVITATION
TO BID
The Commission on
Economic Oppor-
tunity (CEO), in con-
junction with the
Scranton Lacka-
wanna Human Dev-
elopment Agency
(SLHDA), will accept
sealed bids for the
following building
supplies:
HYBRID HEAT
PUMP WATER
HEATERS
Interested bidders
may obtain a speci-
fication package by
telephoning or mail-
ing the Weatheriza-
tion Director, Com-
mission on Eco-
nomic Opportunity,
32-34 West Union
Street, Kingston, PA
18704; telephone
number (570) 288-
8458.
Bids must be
received in the CEO
Main Office, 165
Amber Lane Wilkes-
Barre, PA 18702, by
CERTIFIED OR REG-
ISTERED mail not
later than 5:00 p.m.
EST on May 25,
2011. All envelopes
must be clearly
marked “BID FOR
WEATHERIZATION
MATERIALS”.
Bids will be opened
at 3:00 p.m. on May
26, 2011at the CEO
Main Office.
CEO reserves the
right to reject any or
all bids; otherwise
the bid will be
awarded to the low-
est responsible bid-
der whose bid con-
forms to all the
materials terms and
conditions of this
invitation within 45
days of the bid
opening.
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
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Legal Notice
Letters Testamen-
tary on the Estate of
Joyce J. Derr, late of
Salem Twp, PA,
have been granted
to Jodi K. Rowe,
Executrix. All per-
sons having claims
against the Estate
of the decedent are
requested to make
known the same,
and all persons
indebted to the
decedent are
required to make
payment without
delay to:
Brett B. Weinstein,
Esquire
705 W. DeKalb Pike
King of Prussia, PA
19406
ESTATE
NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that Letters
Testamentary have
been granted in the
Estate of MAR-
GARET A. BONK ,
Deceased, Late of
Laurel Run, Luzerne
County, Pennsylva-
nia, who died on
March 21, 2011, to
Robert Bonk, 150
Parris Rd., Laurel
Run, PA 18706-
9508. All persons
indebted to said
estate are request-
ed to make pay-
ment, and those
having claims or
demands are
requested to pres-
ent the same with-
out delay to Robert
Bonk, Executor,
care of C. Stephen
Gurdin, Jr., Esquire,
69 Public Square
STE 501, Wilkes
Barre, PA 18701-
2506.
135 Legals/
Public Notices
LEGAL NOTICE
Luzerne Bank, 118
Main Street, Luz-
erne, Pennsylvania,
intends to apply to
the Federal Reserve
Board for permis-
sion to purchase
select assets and
assume the liabili-
ties of a branch,
located at 10
Dessen Drive, Hazle
Township, Pennsyl-
vania, of First
Columbia Bank and
Trust Company, 232
East Street, Bloom-
sburg, Pennsyl-
vania. The Federal
Reserve considers
a number of factors
in deciding whether
to approve the
application, includ-
ing the record of
performance of
applicant banks in
helping to meet
local credit needs.
You are invited to
submit comments in
writing on this appli-
cation to Dede
Myers at the Fed-
eral Reserve Bank
of Philadephia, Ten
Independence Mall,
Philadelphia, PA
19106. The com-
ment period will not
end before May 6,
2011. The Board’s
procedures for pro-
cessing applications
may be found at 12
C.F.R. Part 262.
Procedures for pro-
cessing protested
applications may be
found at 12 C.F.R.
262.25. To obtain a
copy of the Federal
Reserve Board’s
procedures, or if
you need more
information about
how to submit your
comments on the
application, contact
Dede Myers, Vice
President and Com-
munity Affairs Offi-
cer, at (215) 574-
6482. The Federal
Reserve will consid-
er your comments
and any request for
a public meeting or
formal hearing on
the application if
they are received in
writing by the
Reserve Bank on or
before the last day
of the comment
period.
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
ESTATE NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that Letters
Testamentary have
been granted to
Margaret Mary
Edmondson in the
Estate of
MARGARET T.
DELMONICO,
late of 1447 E.
Broad Street,
Hazleton, Luzerne
County, Pennsylva-
nia, who died tes-
tate on March 30,
2011. All persons
indebted to said
estate are request-
ed to make pay-
ment and those
having claims or
demands to pres-
ent same, without
delay to the
Executrix c/o
DAVID L.
GLASSBERG,
ESQUIRE
GLASSBERG &
DOGANIERO
81 NORTH LAUREL
STREET
HAZLETON, PA
18201
Find Something?
Lose Something?
Get it back where it
belongs
with a Lost/Found ad!
570-829-7130
PAGE 2C FRIDAY, MAY 6, 2011 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
250 General Auction 250 General Auction
PIZZA & RESTAURANT
AUCTION
295 S. MAIN ST., WILKES-BARRE
SATURDAY- MAY 7th- NOON
INSPECTION - 10:00AM - NOON
COMPLETE PIZZA SHOP TO INCLUDE:
BERKEL MEAT SLICER, FRIGIDAIRE
FROST FREE FREEZER, LINCOLN GAS
PIZZA OVENS (3), GAS DEEP FRYER,
ELECTRIC TABLE TOP DEEP FRYER,
TABLES & CHAIRS, STAINLESS STEEL
UTENSILS, STAINLESS SINK, STAINLESS
WORK TABLES, DOUGH PRESS, RACKS,
REGISTER WITH P.O.S. SYSEM & TOUCH
SCREENS, JET TECH DISHWASHER,
PIZZA PREP TABLE W/MARBLE TOP,
DOUGH CRATES, PARTS FOR DOUGH
MACHINE, OAK DOORS, & MUCH MORE!
AUCT: MARVA MYSLAK AU-3247L
FOR INFO: 822-8249
10% BUYERS PREMIUM
WWW.AUCTIONZIP.COM
ID #3473
WE ACCEPT ALL CREDIT CARDS!
AUCTION CONDUCTED BY:
AUCTIONS BY MARVA
AUCTION AUCTION
SATURDAY MAY 7th
4:30 Outside 6:00 Inside
ROUTE 924 SHEPPTON PA
(868 Center st.)
Cub Cadet 50” riding mower; Jacobson tractor
with plow; Jenny gas air compressor; Shopsmith
with lots of accessories; all types of power & hand
tools; air tools; wood chipper; generator; all kinds
of hardware; dovetailing & mortising items;
kitchen sets; hoosier type cabinet; steel stack
bookcases; TVs; Cuckoo clock; stamp collection;
telescopes; bronze flatware set; toys; collectables;
glassware; VERY FULL AUCTION! Partial list-
ing AU1839-l
J & J AUCTION 570-384-4041
Note: Check web site jandjauction.net
for pictures and listing
PUBLIC AUCTION
MAY 7, 2011 - 10:00 AM
VALLEY CREST NURSING HOME
Wilkes-Barre, PA
(Rt. 315 next to
Wyoming Valley Mall)
VEHICLES:Cars, Trucks, Vans
OFFICE EQUIPMENT: Fax
Machines, Printers, Room Divider,
File Cabinet, etc.
Chairs and Tables
L.A.G. AUCTION SERVICES
(570) 883-1276 or
(570) 655-5366
Lic.# AU002629L
BUYER’S PREMIUM
CASH ONLY
468 Auto Parts
457 Wanted to Buy
Auto
468 Auto Parts
457 Wanted to Buy
Auto
468 Auto Parts 468 Auto Parts
$$$ HIGHEST PRICE PAID $$$
FOR JUNK
VEHICLES
PICKED UP
570-876-1010
570-346-7673
AS ALWAYS ****HIGHEST PRICES*****
PAID FOR YOUR UNWANTED
VEHICLES!!!
DRIVE IN PRICES
Call for Details (570) 459-9901
Vehicles must be COMPLETE !!
Plus Enter to Win $500.00 Cash!!
DRAWING TO BE HELD MAY 31
Harry’s U Pull It
www.wegotused.com
BUYING JUNK VEHICLES
$300 and Up
$125 extra if driven,
pulled or pushed in.
NOBODY Pays More
570-760-2035
Monday thru Saturday 6 am-9 pm
Sunday 8 am - 68 pm
AUTO
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
468 Auto Parts
All Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
FREE
PICKUP
570-574-1275
BEST PRICES
IN THE AREA
CA$H ON THE $POT,
Free Anytime
Pickup
570-301-3602
570-301-3602
CALL US!
TO JUNK
YOUR CAR
472 Auto Services
$ WANTED JUNK $
VEHICLES
LISPI TOWING
We pick up 822-0995
VITO’S
&
GINO’S
Like New
Tires
$15 & UP!
Like New
Batteries
$20 & UP!
Carry Out Price
288-8995
WANTED
Cars & Full Size
Trucks. For prices...
Lamoreaux Auto
Parts 477-2562
LAW DIRECTORY
Don’t Keep Your Practice a Secret!
Call
829-7130
To Place Your Ad
310 Attorney
Services
ADOPTION
DIVORCE
CUSTODY
Estates, DUI
ATTORNEY
MATTHEW LOFTUS
570-255-5503
BANKRUPTCY
FREE CONSULT
Guaranteed
Low Fees
Payment Plan!
Colleen Metroka
570-592-4796
DIVORCE No Fault
$295 divorce295.com
Atty. Kurlancheek
800-324-9748 W-B
Divorce, Custody,
Support, PFA
FREE Consultation.
Atty. Josianne
Aboutanos
Wilkes-Barre
570-208-1118
Line up a place to live
in classified!
310 Attorney
Services
ARD
DUI
TRAFFIC
VIOLATIONS
CRIMINAL
OFFENSES
FREE
CONSULTATION
MACK
LAW OFFICES
EXPERIENCED
AGGRESSIVE
REPRESENTATION
570.287.1388
www.MackLaw
Offices.com
Free Bankruptcy
Consultation
Payment plans.
Carol Baltimore
570-822-1959
310 Attorney
Services
FREE CONSULTATION
for all legal matters
Attorney Ron Wilson
570-822-2345
Attorney
Keith Hunter
Bankruptcies
MAHLER, LOHIN
& ASSOCIATES
(570) 718-1118
MARGIOTTI
LAW OFFICES
BANKRUPTCY
Free Consult
Payment Plans
(570) 970-9977
Wilkes-Barre
(570) 223-2536
Stroudsburg
SOCIAL SECURITY
DISABILITY
Free Consultation.
Contact Atty. Sherry
Dalessandro
570-823-9006
Job Seekers are
looking here!
Where's your ad?
570-829-7130 and
ask for an employ-
ment specialist
135 Legals/
Public Notices
ESTATE NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that Letters
Testamentary have
been granted in the
Estate of Peter
Cole, late of Wilkes-
Barre, Luzerne
County, Pennsylva-
nia, who died on
November 25, 2010.
All persons indebted
to said Estate are
required to make
payment without
delay, and those
having claims or
demands to present
the same without
delay to the Admin-
istrator,
MICHAEL J.
BENDICK, ESQUIRE
400 Third Avenue
Suite 318
Kingston, PA 18704
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140 Personals
Looking for single
female companion
in Kingston Area.
Call 714-1975 or cell
709-0984 after
4pm. Ask for Mike.
150 Special Notices
ADOPT
We can give your
infant love and
security, you can
help make us a
family. Expenses
paid. Please call
Denise & Howard
1-877-676-1660.
ADOPT: Adoring
Mom, Dad, Big
Brother would like
to share a lifetime
of hugs & kisses
in our loving home
with a newborn.
Please Call
Lynda & Dennis
888-688-1422
Expenses Paid
ADOPTION
A loving married
teacher couple
with so much to
offer would love
to adopt your
newborn. We
can provide a
lifetime of happi-
ness, security
& educational
opportunities.
Expenses paid.
Nancy/Kevin
1-866-254-3529
www.nancykevin
2adopt.com
75% of all
couples pay for
some or all of
their own
wedding.
bridezella.net
Dr. Moses &
The Crew with
special guest
Jack the Barber
Check out
150 Special Notices
DO YOU ENJOY
PREGNANCY ?
Would you like
the emotional
reward of helping
an infertile
couple reach
their dream of
becoming
parents?
Consider being a
surrogate. All
fees allowable by
law will be paid.
Call Central
Pennsylvania
Attorney,
Denise Bierly, at
814-237-6278
ext. 226
ALL
JUNK
CAR &
TRUCKS
WANTED
Highest Prices
Paid!!!
FREE
REMOVAL
Call V&G
Anytime
288-8995
MONTY MONTY SA SAYS YS
Attention Lake
Winola fans!
The Blue Pelican
is up and running
under new man-
agement and
staff. The place
has been
cleaned from top
to bottom and
has a great new
look inside and
out.
P PA AYING $500 YING $500
MINIMUM
DRIVEN IN
Full size 4 wheel
drive trucks
ALSO PAYING TOP $$$
for heavy equip-
ment, backhoes,
dump trucks,
bull dozers
HAPPY TRAILS
TRUCK SALES
570-760-2035
542-2277
6am to 8pm
PP&L
CUSTOMERS...
Save money each
month on your resi-
dential or business
electricity and help
the environment by
switching to GREEN
energy. Nothing to
buy, same reliable
energy, no con-
tracts,cancel any-
time, no cancella-
tion fees, receive
one bill.
For details call toll
free 855-256-4454
lynnbythelake@
hotmail.com
150 Special Notices
Wyoming County
Chorale presents:
“OLD TIME
AMERI-
CANA”
Saturday
May 7, 7:30PM
in Tunkhannock
Middle School.
Special guests
“The Coal
Town Rounders”
and featuring songs
from “O Brother
Where Art Thou”
plus many other
bluegrass, folk and
gospel numbers.
Tickets $8
(12 and under free)
available at door or
www.wyoming
380 Travel
BROADWAY SHOWS
That Championship
Season 5/21-NEW!;
Jersey Boys 7/20 &
9/10; Sister Act
7/23—NEW!; Lion
King 8/6; Phantom
of the Opera 8/6;
Wicked 10/19
1-800-432-8069
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
W WOULD OULD Y YOU OU LIKE LIKE
TO TO GO GO TO TO NY? NY?
Call us to make
your reservation!
570-824-2228
570-793-1769
YANKEES SPECIAL
Yanks vs Boston
Sunday, 5/15 @ 8pm
Section 212
$126.00 ticket/bus
1-800-432-8069
YANKEES TRIP
TO CINCINNATI
June 20, 21 and 22
(Monday, Tuesday,
Wednesday)
Catch the Yankees
take on the Reds at
The Great American
Ballpark in Cincin-
nati, Ohio
Trip Includes:
*Round trip bus
transportation
*Beer, soda & food
on the bus
*Great box level
seats to two games
(Mon & Tues night)
*Hotel accommoda-
tions at the Millenni-
um Hotel. Just three
blocks from stadium
and walking dis-
tance from Cincin-
nati Zoo and other
downtown attrac-
tions
Price: $350
Call 570-287-9701
for more info.
406 ATVs/Dune
Buggies
QUARTER MIDGET
RACE CAR
76 inch Bull Rider,
Honda 120 motor,
Kirkey seat,
new brake system,
A-Main feature wins
Asphalt/Dirt,
Many Extras,
Value $6,000,
Sell for $2,999
Call (570) 954-2749
SUZUKI`09
KING QUAD 750AXI
Hunter green. 214
miles. Excellent
condition. 50”
Moose plow with
manual lift included.
Asking $5,900
(570) 299-0560
YAMAHA`04 RHINO
Excellent condition,
200 hours. Priced
to sell. $6,500 or
best offer. Call
Keith 570-971-4520
409 Autos under
$5000
CADILLAC `94
DEVILLE SEDAN
94,000 miles,
automatic, front
wheel drive, 4
door, air condi-
tioning, air bags,
all power, cruise
control, leather
interior, $3,300.
570-394-9004
PONTIAC `00 SUNFIRE
4 door, auto, 87K.
Runs great. $3,300.
DEALER. Call
(570) 868-3914
VOLKSWAGEN `01
PASSAT GLS WAGON
Satin Silver Metallic.
1.8L 4 cylinder
turbo. Cold weather
package & traction
control. 101,700
miles. Great condi-
tion. Asking $4,300
(570) 417-7678
409 Autos under
$5000
SATURN ‘99 SC1
3 door coupe. Only
122,000 miles.
Cd player, AC,
Moonroof, leather
interior, alloy rims,
Like New tires.
Fresh detail and Full
of GAS...
ONLY $2,999
For more pics or
information, call
(570) 301-7221
advertisinguy
@gmail.com
412 Autos for Sale
2004 VOLVO XC70
Cross Country,
All Wheel Drive
$11880
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
2007 PONTIAC G6
GTP 1 OWNER
LEATHER AND
MOONROOF
$14950
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
ACURA `08 RDX
Good Condition.
53,000 miles.
AWD, Full Power,
AM/FM, CD
Changer, Blue
Tooth, XM Radio,
Leather Interior
& Sunroof
$20,000
(570) 814-8398
Call after 9:30 a.m.
Audi `02 A4
1.8 Turbo, AWD,
Automatic, white
with beige leather
interior. 84,000
Miles. Very Good
Condition. $8,900
(570) 696-9809
(570) 690-4262
AUDI `02 A4
3.0, V6, AWD
automatic, tiptronic
transmission. Fully
loaded, leather
interior. 92,000
miles. Good condi-
tion. Asking $9,500.
Call (570) 417-3395
AUDI `05 A4
Turbo, Navy Blue
with grey leather
interior, fully
loaded automatic.
93,000 miles. All
records. Excellent
condition. 4 new
tires & new
brakes. Asking
$10,000 or best
offer. Call for info
417-2010 Days
779-4325 Nights
BMW `02 330
CONVERTIBLE
83K miles. Beautiful
condition. Newly
re-done interior
leather & carpeting.
$13,500.
570-313-3337
BMW `04 325i
5 Speed. Like New!!
New Tires, tinted
windows, sun roof,
black leather
interior. Only
57,000 Miles!!!
PRICE REDUCED TO
$14,000!!
For more info,
call (570) 762-3714
BMW `07 328xi
Black with black
interior. Heated
seats. Back up &
navigation sys-
tems. New tires &
brakes. Sunroof.
Garage kept. Many
extras! 46,000
Miles.
Asking $19,500.
570-825-8888 or
626-297-0155
Call Anytime!
To place your
ad Call Toll Free
1-800-427-8649
BMW `93 325 IC
Convertible,
Metallic Green
Exterior & Tan
Interior, 5 Speed
Transmission,
Heated Seats. 2nd
Owner, 66k Miles.
Excellent Condition,
Garage Kept,
Excellent Gas
Mileage. Carfax
available. Price
reduced $7,995
or trade for SUV or
other. Beautiful /
Fun Car.
570-388-6669
BUICK ‘07 LUCERNE
One Owner.
Leather, CD,
Alloy Wheels
$15,580
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
412 Autos for Sale
ACME AUTO SALES
343-1959
1009 Penn Ave
Scranton 18509
Across from Scranton Prep
GOOD CREDIT, BAD
CREDIT, NO CREDIT
Call Our Auto Credit
Hot Line to get
Pre-approved for a
Car Loan!
800-825-1609
www.acmecarsales.net
07 CHYSLER 300C
Hemi, AWD, Slate
grey, grey int
06 CHYSLER 300
BLACK, AUTO, V6
06 PONTIAC G-6
Silver, 4dr, auto
05 FORD 500
AWD, grey, 4dr, V6
05JAGUAR X-TYPE
3.0, hunter green,
tan leather (AWD)
05 CHEVY MALIBU
green, 4 door, auto
03 HYUNDAI ACCENT
White, 4 door, 4cyl.
66,000 miles
04 CHRYSLER PT
CRUISER GT, slvr,blk
lthr, auto, sunroof
01 NISSAN ALTIMA
4 dr, slvr, auto, 4cyl
01 AUDI S8 QUATRO
Burg./tan lthr.,
Nav., 360 HP, AWD
01 AUDI A8 L
cashmere beige,
tan lthr., nav., AWD
00 NISSAN ALTIMA GXE
Blue/grey
leather, auto, 4cyl.
00 MERCEDES-BENZ
S-430 slvr/blck
lthr., 64,000 miles
00 SUBARU OUTBACK
STATION WAGON,
AWD (Burgundy/tan
leather, sunroof)
98 HONDA CIVIC EX,
2 dr, auto, silver
77 Pontiac Firebird
Black V6, T-Tops
73 VW BEETLE CONV.
olympic blu, blck
top, 4 speed
SUVS, VANS,
TRUCKS, 4 X4’s
08 CADILLAC ESCALADE
Blk/Blk leather, 3rd
seat, Navgtn, 4x4
07 CHEVY EQUINOX LT
grey, V6 AWD
07 DODGE NITRO SXT,
garnet red, V6, 4x4
06 DODGE GRAND
CARAVAN ES, red,
4dr, entrtnmt cntr,
7 pass mini van
06 JEEP COMMANDER
Slvr, 3rd seat, 4x4
06 DODGE RAM 1500
SLT, quad cab,
hemi, blk, 4 dr., 4x4
06 DAKOTA QUAD CAB
SLT, silver, auto.,
V6, 4x4
06 JEEP LIBERTY
SPORT white, V6,
4x4
05 MAZDA TRIBUTE S,
green, auto, V6,
4x4
05 GMC SIERRA
X-Cab, blk, auto,
4x4 truck
05 MERCURY MOUNT-
AINEER PREMIUM,
Silver, black leather,
3rd seat, AWD
05 CHEVY EQUINOX
Silver, 4 door, 4x4
05 FORD EXPLORER
XLT, white 4 door
4x4
04CHEVY SUBURBAN
LS, pewter silver,
3rd seat, 4x4
04 JEEP GRAND
CHEROKEE LAREDO,
Special Edition.
Grey, sunroof, 4x4
04 CHEVY TRAILBLAZ
ER, seafoam
grn/tan lthr., 4x4
04 GMC ENVOY XUV
slvr., 4 dr., V6, 4x4
04 DODGE DURANGO
LIMITED, Sandstone,
tan leather, 3rd
seat, 4x4
04 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER
LS, white, V6, 4x4
04 JEEP GRAND
CHEROKEE LAREDO
gold, 4 dr., V6, 4x4
03 FORD WINDSTAR
LX, green, 4 door,
entertainment sys.
7 pass. minivan
03 CHEVY 1500, V8,
X-cab, white, 4x4
02 DODGE RAM 1500
Quad Cab, SLT,
Red auto 4x4 truck
02 MERCURY MOUNT-
AINEER PREMIUM,
white, tan leather,
3rd seat, 4x4
02 MAZDA TRIBUTE
White, auto, 4x4
01 DODGE RAM 1500
regular cab, 4x4,
with cap
98 FORD F-150,
regular cab pick up
green, auto 4x4
98 FORD RANGER,
Flairside, reg cap
truck, 5 spd, 4x4
copper
To place your
ad call...829-7130
CADILLAC ‘06 STS
AWD, 6 cylinder, Sil-
ver, 52,600 miles,
sunroof, heated
seats, Bose sound
system, 6 CD
changer, satellite
radio, Onstar, park-
ing assist, remote
keyless entry, elec-
tronic keyless igni-
tion, & more!
$17,600
570-881-2775
CADILLAC `04
SEVILLE SLS
Beige. Fully loaded
Excellent condition.
Runs great. New
rotors, new brakes.
Just serviced.
108,000 miles. Ask-
ing $8,000. (570)
709-8492
CHEVROLET `05
TAHOE Z71
Silver birch with
grey leather interior,
3rd row seating,
rear A/C & heat,
4WD automatic with
traction control, 5.3l
engine, moonroof,
rear DVD player.
Bose stereo + many
more options. Imm-
aculate condition.
76,000 adult driven
miles. $15,600. Call
(570) 378-2886 &
ask for Joanne
CHEVROLET `88
MONTE CARLO SS
V8, automatic,
51,267 miles,
MUST SELL
$9,200 OBO
(570) 760-0511
412 Autos for Sale
CHEVROLET `86
CORVETTE
4x3 manual, 3 over-
drive, 350 engine
with aluminum
heads. LT-1 exhaust
system. White with
red pearls. Custom
flames in flake. New
tires & hubs. 1
owner. 61,000 origi-
nal miles. $8,500
(570) 359-3296
Ask for Les
CHEVROLET ‘06
CORVETTE
CONVERTIBLE
Silver beauty, 1
Owner, Museum
quality. 4,900
miles, 6 speed. All
possible options
including Naviga-
tion, Power top.
New, paid $62,000
Must sell $45,900
570-299-9370
CHEVY `06 COLORADO
Extended cab. Auto.
Power steering, a/c.
40k miles. 2 wheel
drive.
$12,600, negotiable.
570-678-5040
CHRYSLER ‘06
300C HEMI
Light green, 18,000
miles, loaded,
leather, wood trim,
$24,000.
570-222-4960
leave message
CHRYSLER `02
PT CRUISER
Inferno Red, flame
design. Chrome
wheels. 47,000
miles, one owner.
Looks and runs
great. New inspec-
tion. $5,800
Call (570) 472-1854
CHRYSLER `07 300
55,600 miles, auto-
matic, 4 door, anti-
lock brakes, air con-
ditioning, air bags,
all power, AM/FM
radio, CD player,
new new brakes.
$10,900.
570-760-6983
CHRYSLER ‘00
CIRRUS LX
4 dr., 4 cyl., auto
$1,850. DEALER
FORD ‘97 EXPLORER
2 dr., 6 cyl., auto
4x4, $1,850
FORD ‘96 TAURUS
4 dr. 6 cyl., auto
98k. $1650 DEALER
Current Inspection
on all vehicles
570-825-8253
DODGE `01 STRATUS
SE
4 door, automatic
Power windows,
seats & locks . V6,
Asking $2,900. Call
(570) 819-3140 or
(570) 709-5677
FORD `04 MUSTANG
Mach I, 40th
ANNIVERSARY EDITION
V8, Auto, 1,200
miles, all options,
show room condi-
tion. Call for info.
Asking $24,995
Serious inquiries
only. 570-636-3151
FORD `07 MUSTANG
63,000 highway
miles, silver, runs
great, $11,500.
negotiable.
570-479-2482
FORD `07
MUSTANG GT
Premium package,
silver, black leather
interior, 5 speed
manual. 20,000
miles. $18,900
(570) 868-3832
FORD `98 TAURUS
Gold. Good condi-
tion Runs great.
87,000 miles, R-
title, Recently
inspected.
$2,700. Call
(570) 814-6198
412 Autos for Sale
FORD ‘02
FOCUS WAGON
Low mileage,
One owner
$7,984
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
FORD ‘02 MUSTANG
GT CONVERTIBLE
Red with black top.
6,500 miles. One
Owner. Excellent
Condition. $18,500
570-760-5833
FORD ‘05 EXPLORER
SPORT TRAC XLT
1/2 Ton, 4WD,
automatic, V6
$15,992
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
FORD ‘10
TAURUS SEL
AWD, V6 & Alloys
$19,982
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
HONDA `06 CIVIC EX
2 door, 5 speed, air,
power windows &
locks, sun roof, CD,
cruise & alloys.
Excellent condition,
very well main-
tained with service
records, remaining
Honda warranty.
65K, $10,500.
570-706-0921
HONDA `07 CIVIC
EX. 34k miles.
excellent condition,
sunroof, alloys, a/c,
cd, 1 owner, garage
kept. $13,000. Call
570-760-0612
HONDA `07 CIVIC
Sport SI. Red, with
black interior,
75,000 miles. 6
speed, spoiler and
body kit. Tinted win-
dows,
Reduced $11,900
(570) 714-0384
VITO’S
&
GINO’S
Wanted:
Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Highest
Prices
Paid!!
FREE PICKUP
288-8995
HYUNDAI `04
TIBURON GT
Blue, 5 speed
manual, CD, Air,
factory alarm,
power windows &
locks. 38K.
$7,500 negotiable.
Call 570-540-6236
LINCOLN `00 LS
1 owner. Low miles.
V6, All leather. Ask-
ing $5,800. Call
(570) 819-3140
(570) 709-5677
412 Autos for Sale
HYUNDAI ‘11 SONATA
GLS, automatic.
Only 2,400 miles.
$19,880
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
JEEP `04 GRAND
CHEROKEE LIMITED
4WD, 6 cylinder
auto. Moonroof.
Fully powered. New
brakes & tires.
94,000 highway
miles. $11,500
(570) 822-6334
KIA `08 RONDO
Maroon with beige
interior. All options.
78,000 miles. Still
under warranty.
Received 60,000
mile servicing. New
tires. KBB Value
$8,500. Asking only
$7,900. A Must See!
(570) 457-0553
LANCE
MOTORS
565 E. Main St.
Plymouth, PA
04 Nissan X-Terra
$8995
02 Plymouth Grand
Voyager $3995
02 Chevy 4x4
$5995
01 Pontiac
Grand Am $3895
00 Ford F-150 4x2
$3995
00 Saturn Sedan
$3195
99 Jeep Grand
Cherokee $5495
99 Jeep Cherokee
Red $3895
99 Chrysler Sebring
LX, 78K $4495
99 Chevy Suburban
4x4 $4495
95 Plymouth
Acclaim $2495
93 Jeep Wrangler
$3395
See Pictures On
Our Website
lancemotors.com
LEXUS `95 ES 300
Beautiful, mint
condition. Grey with
leather interior. 2
owners.New brakes
rotors & shocks.
Ice cold AC. Fully
loaded. 112K.
Asking $4,900
(347) 452-3650
Mountain Top
LEXUS `98 LS 400
Excellent condition,
garage kept, 1
owner. Must see.
Low mileage, 90K.
Leather interior. All
power. GPS naviga-
tion, moon roof, cd
changer. Loaded.
Asking $10,000. Call
570-706-6156
LINCOLN`06
TOWN CAR LIMITED
Fully loaded.
46,000 miles,
Triple coated
Pearlized White.
Showroom
condition.
$18,900.
570-814-4926 or
(570) 654-2596
WANTED!
ALL
JUNK
CARS!
CA$H
PAID
570-301-3602
TOYOTA `05 PRIUS
65,000 miles, good
condition, keyless
entry, cassette/
radio + snow tires.
$12,500
570-474-5268
412 Autos for Sale
MAZDA `04 RX-8
Hunter Green,
80,000 miles.
New brakes &
rotors. New
alignment. Two
new rear tires.
No accidents.
PRICE REDUCED
$8,000 or best
offer. For more
information, call
(570) 332-4213
MERCEDES `95 SL 500
Convertible. Low
mileage. Hard top
included. Leather
interior. Excellent
condition, fully
loaded. $11,000.
Call 619-884-2266
or 570-696-1271
MERCEDES BENZ
`74 450 SE
SOLID CAR!
Interior perfect,
exterior very good.
Runs great! New
tires, 68K original
miles.
$5,500 FIRM.
570-905-7389
Ask for Lee
GET THE WORD OUT
with a Classified Ad.
570-829-7130
MERCEDES-BENZ `01
C-240
Loaded, automatic,
AC, heated leather
seats, 4 door.
$4,700
Call 570-388-6535
MERCEDES-BENZ `05
240C
4Matic, V6 - Gray,
77K highway miles,
Excellent condition,
dealer serviced. Sun
roof, heated seats.
$15,500. Call
570-288-3916
412 Autos for Sale
MERCEDES-BENZ `06
C-CLASS
Silver with leather
interior. Good condi-
tion. 34,000 miles.
$15,000 Negotiable
(570) 885-5956
MERCEDES-BENZ `95
SL 500
Convertible, with
removable hard
top, dark Blue,
camel interior,
Summer Driving
Only, Garage Kept.
Very Good
Condition, No
Accidents. Classy
Car. Price
Reduced!
$13,995
or trade for
SUV or other.
570-388-6669
MERCEDES-BENZ
`97 SL320
Blue, convertible,
40th Anniversary
Model. 47,000
miles. Minor
repairs. $7,500
or best offer.
Call 973-271-1030
MERCURY `95
GRAND MARQUIS
4 door, V8, fully
loaded, moon roof,
new tires & brakes.
Interior & exterior in
excellent shape. 2
owners. Call
(570) 822-6334 or
(570) 970-9351
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com FRIDAY, MAY 6, 2011 PAGE 3C
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
24
Mos.
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 5/31/11.
AM/FM WITH 6 DISC CD
POWER WINDOWS
POWER LOCKS
LEATHER SEATS
FOG LAMPS
SIDE AIR CURTAINS
PERSONAL SAFETY WITH
ANTI-THEFT SYSTEM
VIN #3LBR769066
MESSAGE CENTER
COCCIA
CALL NOW 823-8888 or 1-800-817-FORD CALL NOW 823-8888 or 1-800-817-FORD
Overlooking Mohegan Sun Overlooking Mohegan Sun
Just Minutes from Just Minutes from
Scranton or W-B Scranton or W-B
577 East Main St., 577 East Main St.,
Plains, PA Plains, PA
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease
21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 5/31/11.
17” Chrome Wheels, Message Center, SYNC, Side Air Curtains,
AM/FM with 6 Disc CD, Pwr. Windows, Pwr. Door Locks,
Leather Seats, Fog Lamps, Power Moonroof,
Personal Safety with Anti-Theft System
24
Mos.
NEW2011 LINCOLNMKZ FWD
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease
21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 5/31/11.
All Wheel Drive, 3.7L V6, Remote Keyless Entry, HID Headlamps, Reverse Sensing
Sys., THX Sound Sys. w/6 Disc CD, 20” Polished Cast Alum. Wheels, Dual Zone
Electronic Auto. Temp. Control, Pwr. Heat/Cool Leather Seats, SYNC, Personal
Safety Sys., Safety Canopy Sys., Anti-Theft Sys., Navigation Sys.,
Dual Panel Moonroof, Rearview Camera
NEW2011 LINCOLNMKS AWD
VIN #1LBG609563
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease
21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 5/31/11.
All Wheel Drive, 3.7L V6, Premium Pkg., Auto. Temp Control,
18” Alum. Wheels, Advanced Trac, 6 Disc CD, Leather Heated/
Cooled Seats, Keyless Entry
w/Keypad, Satellite Radio,
HID Headlamps, Side Air
Curtains, Pwr. Liftgate,
Rear Camera, SYNC,
MyLincoln Touch,
Reverse Sensing Sys.,
Remote Start
NEW2011 LINCOLNMKX AWD
VIN #3LBR768027
VIN #2LBBJ16332
24
Mos.
24
Mos.
ALL NEW FORDFOCUS S NEW2011 FORDFIESTA
Remote Keyless Entry, AM/FM/CD,
Pwr. Door Locks, Air, Anti-Theft Sys.,
Side Curtain Air Bags, Side Impact
Air Bags, Message Center, MyKey
72
Mos.
*Tax and tags extra. Security Deposit waived. All factory rebates applied
**Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable miles.
First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due
at delivery. See salesperson for details. All payments subject to credit approval by the
primary lending source, Tier 0 rate. Special APR financing cannot be combined with
Ford cash rebate. “BUY FOR” prices are based on 72 month at $18.30 per month per
$1000 financed with $2,500 down (cash or trade). Photos of vehicles are for illustration
purposes only. Coccia Ford is not responsible for any typographical errors. No
Security Deposit Necessary. See dealer for details. Sale ends
CALL NOW 823-8888 or 1-800-817-FORD CALL NOW 823-8888 or 1-800-817-FORD
Overlooking Mohegan Sun Overlooking Mohegan Sun
577 East Main St., Plains 577 East Main St., Plains
Just Minutes from Scranton or W-B Just Minutes from Scranton or W-B
Auto., Air, CD, Pwr. Mirrors, Advanced Trac
w/Electronic Stability Control, Cruise, PDL,
Side Curtains, Keyless Entry w/Keypad,
Sport Appearance Pkg., SYNC, Rear
Spoiler, 15”Alum. Wheels, Winter
Pkg., Heated Seats, Tilt Wheel
FORD CREDIT REBATE.....500
OFF LEASE REBATE........500
FORD REGIONAL DISCOUNT OFF MSRP....150
COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP. . .326
FORD REBATE................500
OFF LEASE REBATE........500
FORD REGIONAL DISCOUNT OFF MSRP....485
COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP. . .101
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease
21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 5/31/11.
NEW2011
FORDFIESTA SE
24
Mos. *Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied
**Lease payments based on 24 month
lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and
$2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 5/31/11.
24
Mos.
ALL NEW
FORDFOCUS SE
Auto., AM/FM/CD, Sirius Satellite Radio, Anti-Theft Sys., Side
Curtain Air Bags, 16” Steel Wheels, Tilt Wheel, AC, Instrument
Cluster, Message Center, PW, PL, Keyless Entry, Pwr. Side
Mirrors, Fog Lamps, MyKey, Convenience Pkg., Cruise,
MyFord, Map Lights,
Perimeter Alarm, SYNC,
FORD REBATE..................500
OFF LEASE REBATE...........500
COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP........91
Automatic, Air, Pwr. Mirrors, Tilt
Wheel, AM/FM/CD, Remote
Keyless Entry, Pwr. Door
Locks, Advance Trac
w/Electronic Stability
Control, Side Curtains
72
Mos.
FORD REBATE................500
OFF LEASE REBATE........500
PAGE 4C FRIDAY, MAY 6, 2011 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
548 Medical/Health
412 Autos for Sale
548 Medical/Health
412 Autos for Sale
548 Medical/Health 548 Medical/Health 548 Medical/Health
548 Medical/Health
548 Medical/Health 548 Medical/Health
DENTIST POSITION AVAILABLE
PA Department of Corrections currently has a Dentist
position available in Luzerne County at the State Correc-
tional Institution at Retreat in Hunlock Creek. This is a
permanent, full-time position with a salary range of
$78,827 - $113,546. No evening or weekend hours;
insurance indemnification provided. Comprehensive
health insurance; prescription, vision, and dental plan
coverage (after six months); liberal retirement/pension
plan with eligibility for full retirement at age 50/55. Paid
vacation, personal and sick leave, paid holidays, group
life insurance, and much more. Employees perform pro-
fessional dental work in the examination, diagnosis,
treatment, and care of inmates in the dental clinic at SCI-
Retreat. You must possess a license to practice dentistry
issued by the PA State Board of Dentistry and complete a
Civil Service application. SCI Retreat is designated a
Health Professional Shortage Area with education loan
repayment options.
For an employment application and additional
information contact Carl Kmiec,
Human Resources, SCI-Retreat,
660 State Route 11, Hunlock Creek, PA 18612
570-735-8754. www.cor.state.pa.us
Equal Opportunity Employer
Children's Behavioral Health Services, Inc.
is currently looking for:
BEHAVIORAL SPECIALIST
CONSULTANTS
Must have a a Master’s Degree in a Clinical field.
Full-Time Therapeutic
Staff Support Workers
Bachelor’s Degree/Associate Degree in Human
Services. Provide 1:1 interventions & support to
children. Full-time TSS are guaranteed a
minimum of 35 hours per week.
Full-time benefits include:
competitive pay, health insurance,
paid holidays and vacation days.
EOE
If you are outcome oriented and a team player
seeking a challenging opportunity, please send,
fax or e-mail your resume & letter of interest to:
Children’s Behavioral Health Services
Attn: Susan Hurd
104 Woodward Hill Rd., Edwardsville, PA 18704
Email: shurd@cbhsinc.com or fax to 714-7231
Director of Med-Surg
The Berwick Hospital Center is seeking an experienced,
self-motivated, dynamic individual to manage our
Med-Surg department. PA RN License required.
Three years of acute care experience and two years
of management experience preferred. Medical-Surgical
experience required. Strong leadership skills and a
commitment to customer service excellence required.
BSN or MSN preferred.
OB RN
Previous OB/GYN experience required.
Minimum of two years hospital or medical office setting
experience required.
We offer an excellent salary and benefit package.
Please apply on-line at www.berwick-hospital.com
or send resume to:
Berwick Hospital Center
Human Resources Department
701 E. 16th Street • Berwick, PA 18603
E-mail: carol_a_martinez@chs.net
Fax# 570-759-5035
E.O.E.
RN’s
Long Term Care
Berwick Retirement Village
Come be part of our RNAC team.
Full Time Position
Monday through Friday
MDS/PPS experience preferred
Long term care experience preferred
Must have valid PA RN license in good standing
We offer competitive rates, health benefits,
shift differential, paid vacation, sick and holiday time,
tuition reimbursement, 401K pension plan, life insurance
and long term disability.
For more information you may call 570-759-5033.
Please apply on-line at www.berwick-hospital.com
or send resume to:
Berwick Hospital Center
Human Resources Department
701 E. 16th Street • Berwick, PA 18603
E-mail: carol_a_martinez@chs.net
Fax# 570-759-5035
E.O.E.
RN Assessment Coordinator
Part Time 7-3 & 11-7
Accepting applications for
Per Diem RNs all shifts
Full Time 11-7 Part Time 3-11
Accepting applications for
Per Diem LPNs all shifts
Full Time 3-11
Part Time 7-3, 3-11 & 11-7
Per Diem All shifts Available
How to Apply?
Call 877-339-6999 x1
Fax: 866-854-8688
Email: Jobs@horizonhrs.com
Complete Application in Person
395 Middle Road, Nanticoke
Located directly across from
LCCC on LCTA Bus Route
AMAZING SHIFT DIFFERENTIALS
& PAY RATES
2nd shift $1.75
3rd Shift $1.00
Weekend Days - $1.00
RN’s
LPN’s
CNA’s
2
8
2
7
4
4
MOTORTWINS
2010 Wyoming Ave., Wyoming
718-4050
CALL STEVE MORENKO
NEW LOW PRICES!
02 Ford Escape
$
6,490
*
‘97 Plymouth
Breeze
$
2,890
*
4 Dr, 4 Cyl, A/C
‘99 Buick
Custom 4Dr
$
4,990
*
59K Miles
03 Ford
Windstar
$
6,990
*
*All Prices Plus Tax & Tags.
2000 GMC
Jimmy 4x4
$
4,990
*
‘02 Hyundai
Elantra GLS 4Dr
$
4,990
*
Loaded!
Loaded w/ 66K Miles
412 Autos for Sale
Rare, Exclusive
Opportunity To
Own...
‘26 FORD
MODEL T
Panel Delivery
100 point
Concours quality
restoration. Red
with black fend-
ers. Never Driven.
0 miles on
restoration.
RARE!
$40,000
$38,000
$36,500
2002 BMW 745i
The Flagship of
the Fleet
New - $87,000
Midnight Emerald
with beige leather
interior. 61K miles.
Mint condition.
Loaded. Garage
Kept. Navigation
Stunning,
Must Sell!
$20,000
$18,600
1993 CADILLAC
ALANTE
2 Door
Convertible
Exquisite Candy
Apple Red black
soft top. 13,000
original miles. All
available options,
including gold
alloy wheels.
Garage Kept. 1
owner. Final
Model Year.
Gorgeous
Automobile!
$31,000
$29,900
$27,900
From an Exotic,
Private Collection
Call 570-650-0278
MINI COOPER S `06
GARAGED
Pure silver metallic.
Roof & mirror caps
in black. Tartan red
cloth / panther black
leather interior.
Black bonnet
stripes. Automatic.
Steptronic paddles.
Dual moon roofs,
Cockpit chrono
package, conven-
ience, cold weather
(heated seats) &
premium packages.
Dynamic stability
control. Xenon
headlights, front
and rear fog lights.
Parking distance
control. Harmon-
Kardon sound sys-
tem. Chrome line
interior. Mint condi-
tion. 17,000 miles.
Must Drive!
$21,500
570-341-7822
NISSAN ‘05 ALTIMA
Auto, one owner,
Local trade
$11,435
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
PONTIAC `06
SOLSTICE
Only 16,000 miles!
Garage kept, 2.4
liter, manual 5
speed transmission,
black, a/c, cd play-
er, leather interior.
Real Nice. Fun Ride.
Asking $16,500
(570) 301-3433
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
PONTIAC ‘69 FIREBIRD 400
CONVERTIBLE
Blue/white top &
white interior.
Recent document-
ed frame-off
restoration. Over
$31,000 invested.
will sell $21,500.
570-335-3127
PORSCHE `02 BOXSTER
S
Great convertible,
black top, 6 speed
manual transmis-
sion, carbon fiber
dash, leather interi-
or, front & rear
trunk, fast & agile.
$18,000 or best
offer. Call
570-262-2478
412 Autos for Sale
SUBARU `02
IMPREZA WRX
Low mileage,
57,000 miles, 5
speed, all-wheel
drive, 4 door, anti-
lock brakes, air
conditioning, air
bags, power locks,
power windows,
power mirrors,
cruise control,
AM/FM radio, CD
changer, rear
defroster, new Blitz
Stainless Exhaust,
AEM Cold Air
Intake, TURBOXS
Blowoff Valve &
Boost Control.
$10,500.
(201) 704-8640
Call before
7:30 pm
SUBARU `05 LEGACY
SPORT AWD
Air, new tires &
brakes, 31,000
miles, great
condition. $11,995.
570-836-1673
SUBARU `94
IMPREZA L
Sudan, Automatic,
Air, Stero, Runs &
Looks Excellent.
25 mpg
$1,275
(570)299-0772
SUZUKI ‘10 SX4
5 door hatchback,
Only 8,600 miles
$15,892
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
TOYOTA `05
COROLLA LE
Automatic, Air,
Cruise, Till, Power
windows & door
locks, AM/FM
stereo & CD. Runs
& looks excellent!
$9,000.
(570) 654-3135
(570) 760-5519
Line up a place to live
in classified!
TOYOTA `06
AVALON
New tires, new
brakes, Inspected
March 4, AC,
AVPS, Fully
loaded, 18,000
mile bumper to
bumper warranty.
90,000 miles.
$12,900.
(570) 881-3712
TOYOTA `10
Camry SE. 56,000
miles. Red, alloy
wheels, black cloth
interior. Will consid-
er trade. $14,200
(570) 793-9157
TOYOTA `93 MR2
T-top, 5 speed.
AM/FM/CD, AC,
power antenna.
New tires. No rust.
Great condition.
$5,000
(570) 708-0269
after 6:00PM
TOYOTA ‘09
SCION XD
Automatic,
traction control,
remote start.
$14,680
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
VOLKSWAGEN `01 GTI
Great running
condition. Red with
cloth interior, power
door locks, power
windows, power
moon roof,
5 speed, just
serviced, 117k.
Asking $5,300
570-885-2162
412 Autos for Sale
VOLKSWAGEN `04
BEETLE
CONVERTIBLE
Blue. AM/FM cas-
sette. Air. Automat-
ic. Power roof, win-
dows, locks &
doors. Boot cover
for top. 22k. Excel-
lent condition.
Garage kept.
Reduced
$14,000
570-822-1976
Leave Message
VW `05 JETTA
Silver with black
interior. Auto. Sun-
roof. All options.
Excellent condition.
1 owner. 33K miles.
Asking $12,800. Call
570-693-2129
Leave Message
VW ‘07 BEETLE
Leather Interior,
Alloys, Moon Roof
$13,840
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
415 Autos-Antique
& Classic
CADILLAC `80
COUPE DEVILLE
Excellent condition,
$3,000 located in
Hazleton.
570-454-1945 or
561-573-4114
CHEVROLET `68 C10
New 350 motor and
new transmission.
REDUCED TO
$5,000 FIRM
(570) 906-1771
CHEVROLET `69 NOVA
SS clone. 350
engine, 290 Horse-
power. 10 bolt posi-
rear. PowerGlide
transmission. Power
disc brake kit. Over
$20,000 invested,
sacrifice at $8,500.
(Wilkes-Barre)
Call 732-397-8030
CHEVROLET `72
CHEVELLE
Two door hard top.
307 Motor. Needs
work. Comes with
additional 400 small
block & many parts.
$5,000. Serious
inquires only.
(570) 836-2574
CHEVROLET `76
PICKUP
Very Good
Condition!
Low miles!
$7500. FIRM
570-905-7389
Ask for Lee
CHEVROLET `79
CORVETTE L-48
All Corvette options,
all original, new
Good Year tires,
new mufflers, just
tuned. 46,000 miles.
$6,500 or best
offer 570-262-2845
or 570-239-6969
CHEVY `68 CAMARO
SS
396 automatic, 400
transmission, clean
interior, runs good,
71K, garage kept,
custom paint, Fire
Hawk tires, Krager
wheels, well
maintained.
$23,900
Negotiable
570-693-2742
CHEVY`75 CAMARO
350 V8. Original
owner. Automatic
transmission. Rare -
tuxedo silver / black
vinyl top with black
naugahyde interior.
Never damaged.
$6,000. Call
570-489-6937
CHRYSLER `49
WINDSOR
Silver / gray, 4 door
sedan. 6 cylinder
flathead, fluid drive.
45,000 original
miles. Just like new!
REDUCED $15,000
Call Jim:
570-654-2257
CORVETTES
WANTED
1953-1972
Any Condition!
Courteous, Fast
Professional Buyer.
Licensed & Bonded
corvettebuyer.com
1-800-850-3656
FORD `52
COUNTRY SEDAN
CUSTOM LINE
STATION WAGON
V8, automatic,
8 passenger,
3rd seat, good
condition, 2nd
owner. $9,500.
570-579-3517
FORD `66
Mustang Coupe.
Pearl white, pony
interior. Pristine
condition. 26K
miles. $17,000 or
best offer.
(570) 817-6768
LINCOLN `66
CONTINENTAL
4 door,
Convertible, 460
cu. engine, 67,000
miles, 1 owner
since `69. Teal
green / white
leather, restorable,
$2,500 570-287-
5775 / 332-1048
415 Autos-Antique
& Classic
LINCOLN `88
TOWN CAR
61,000 original
miles, garage kept,
triple black, leather
interior, carriage
roof, factory wire
wheels, loaded,
excellent condition.
$5,500. Call
Mike 570-237-7660
MAZDA `88 RX-7
CONVERTIBLE
1 owner, garage
kept, 65k original
miles, black with
grey leather interior,
all original & never
seen snow. $8,900.
Call 570-237-5119
MERCEDES-BENZ `73
450SL
Convertible with
removable hard top,
power windows, AM
/FM radio with cas-
sette player, CD
player, automatic, 4
new tires. Cham-
pagne exterior; Ital-
ian red leather inte-
rior inside. Garage
kept, excellent con-
dition. $31,000. Call
825-6272
MERCEDES-BENZ `88
420 SEL
Silver with red
leather interior.
Every option.
Garage kept, show-
room condition.
$7,000.
(570) 417-9200
OLDSMOBILE `68
DELMONT
DRASTICALLY
REDUCED!!
This model only
produced in 1967
& 1968. All
original 45,000
miles, Color
Burgundy, cloth
& vinyl interior,
350 rocket
engine, 2nd
owner. Fender
skirts, always
garaged. Trophy
winner at shows.
Serious inquiries
only, $7,500.
570-690-0727
PONTIAC `68
CATALINA
400 engine. 2
barrel carburetor.
Yellow with black
roof and white wall
tires. Black interior.
$4,995. Call
(570) 696-3513
PONTIAC 1937
Fully restored near
original. New paint,
new interior, new
wiring, custom tint-
ed glass, new motor
& transmission.
Spare motor &
trans. 16” wide
white walls car in
excellent condition
in storage for 2
years. $14,000 or
best offer. Serious
inquiries ONLY.
Call 570-574-1923
VW CLASSIC `72
KARMANN GHIA
Restoration
Vehicle. Family
owned, garage
kept, good shape.
Needs some
interior work, new
seats, needs
carburetor work.
Only 58,000 miles.
Asking $12,000.
serious inquiries
only! Call
570-343-2296
WANTED: PONTIAC
`78 FIREBIRD
Formula 400
Berkshire Green,
Originally purchased
at Bradley-Lawless
in Scranton. Car
was last seen in
Abington-Scranton
area. Finder’s fee
paid if car is found
and purchased. Call
John with any info
(570) 760-3440
421 Boats &
Marinas
CUSTOM
CREST 15’
Fiberglass
boat with
trailer. Out-
board propul-
sion. Includes:
2 motors
Erinmade,
“Lark II series”
PRICE
REDUCED!
$2,400
NEGOTI ABLE
570-417-3940
STARCRAFT ‘80
16’ DEEP V
‘90 Evinrude out-
board 70hp with tilt
& trim— ‘92 EZ
loader trailer. With
‘00 Tracker Series
60lbs foot pedal, 2
downriggers, stor-
ages, gallon tanks,
2 fish finders and
more. MUST SEE.
Make Best Offer.
Call 866-320-6368
after 5pm.
427 Commercial
Trucks &
Equipment
CHEVY ‘08 3500
HD DUMP TRUCK
2WD, automatic.
Only 12,000 miles.
Vehicle in like
new condition.
$21,900.
570-288-4322
427 Commercial
Trucks &
Equipment
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY
C-3500 CHEVY
Food Truck with
new motor -
50,000. Excellent
condition. All stain-
less steel body.
Call Jack at
570-881-5825
or Rich at
570-357-8319
DUMP TRAILER ‘05
10 yards, 4 ton limit,
very good condi-
tion. Asking $3,900
Also, E-350. Cheap
For more info, call
973-906-8404
FORD ‘99 E350
BUCKET VAN
Triton V8. 2 speed
boom; 92,000miles;
$9999 or best price.
Great condition. Call
570-675-3384 or
570574-7002
439 Motorcycles
HARLEY ‘01
DAVIDSON
Electra Glide, Ultra
Classic, many
chrome acces-
sories, 13k miles,
Metallic Emerald
Green. Garage
kept, like new
condition. Includes
Harley cover.
$12,900
570-718-6769
570-709-4937
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘05
SCREAMING EAGLE
V-ROD
Orange & Black.
Used as a show
bike. Never abused.
480 miles. Excellent
condition. Asking
$20,000 or best
offer. Call
570-876-4034
HARLEY DAVIDSON
` 06 SOFTTAIL
NIGHTTRAIN
Dark gray metallic,
new rr tire &
brakes, many
extras. $10,900
(570) 592-4982
HARLEY DAVIDSON `01
Road King 19,000
miles, new tires, lots
of extra chrome.
Like New. $12,900.
Call 570-639-1989
or 570-760-1023
HARLEY DAVIDSON `03
100th Anniversary
Edition Deuce.
Garage kept. 1
owner. 1900 miles.
Tons of chrome.
$38,000 invested. A
must see. Asking
$20,000. Call
570-706-6156
HARLEY DAVIDSON
01’ SPORTSTER
883 cubic inch
motor, Paco rigid
frame, extended &
raked. Low miles.
$6,000 or best
offer.(973) 271-1030
HARLEY DAVIDSON
‘03 DYNA WIDE GLIDE
Golden Anniversary.
Silver/Black. New
Tires. Extras. Excel-
lent Condition.
19,000 miles
$12,000 negotiable
570-639-2539
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘04
SOFT TAIL DEUCE
LIMITED EDITION.
Radical paint, only
200 produced,
Rhinehardt pipes,
lots of chrome.
Beautiful bike!
Asking $9,500
or best offer.
570-474-0154
To place your
ad call...829-7130
HARLEY DAVIDSON
‘10 SPORTSTER 1200
A MUST SEE!
Custom Paint.
Only driven under
10 miles!! Asking
$8,900 or best
offer. For info,
call 570-864-2543
or 215-379-1375
HARLEY DAVIDSON
2006 NIGHTTRAIN
SPECIAL EDITION
#35 of 50 Made
$10,000 in acces-
sories including a
custom made seat.
Exotic paint set,
Alien Spider Candy
Blue. Excellent con-
dition. All Documen-
tation. 1,400 Asking
$25,000 or best
offer. Call
570-876-4034
HARLEY DAVIDSON
‘92 ULTRA CLASSIC
Many extras,
Garage kept,
2 tone blue.
17,600 miles.
REDUCED PRICE
$8,400
Lehman area.
(570) 760-5937
KAWASAKI ‘05
NINJA 500R. 3300
miles. Orange.
Garage kept. His &
hers helmets. Must
sell. $2400
570-760-3599
570-825-3711
439 Motorcycles
KAWASAKI
`08 NINJA
250 cc, blue, like
new, under 1,000
miles. Great starter
bike. $2,800 Seri-
ous inquiries only.
Call 570-331-4777
KAWASAKI `10
CONCOURS 14
Sport/Touring with
ABS/traction
control, showroom
new, 400 miles,
metallic blue, 6 year
warranty included.
$12,000.
570-331-3674
KAWASAKI ‘ 99 ZX6R
600CC,
Muzzy Exhaust.
Great condition.
Asking $3,100
CALL FRANK
570-301-7221
theadvertisinguy
@gmail.com
SUZUKI `07 C50T
CRUISER
EXCELLENT
CONDITION
Windshield, Bags,
Floorboards,V&H
Pipes, White
walls,Garage Kept.
6K Miles $5,200
(570) 430-0357
SUZUKI ‘04
GSXR 1000CC
Less than 1,000
miles. Team colors
with matching hel-
met & jacket. Fend-
er eliminator kit.
Scorpion exhaust.
$6,000.
Call Dave after 5
pm 570-825-0394
SUZUKI ‘77
GS 750
Needs work.
$1,500
or best offer
570-822-2508
SUZUKI 97 GSXR 600
Blue & White,
smoked wind
screen. Great bike,
runs great. Helmet
& kevlar racing
gloves included.
$2995. Call for info
(570) 881-5011
TRIUMPH ‘02 SPEED
TRIPLE 955 CC
7,000 miles. Very
fast. Needs nothing.
Blue, never
dropped. Excellent
condition. $4,200
Negotiable.
(570) 970-0564
Let the Community
Know!
Place your Classified
Ad TODAY!
570-829-7130
YAMAHA `04 V-STAR
1100 Custom. 5800
miles, light bar,
cobra exhaust,
windshield, many
extras, must sell.
$4,900. Call
570-301-3433
YAMAHA `97 VIRAGO
750cc. 8,000 miles,
saddlebags, wind-
shield, back rest,
Black & Pearl,
Excellent Condition.
Must See. Asking
$2,499. Call after 4.
570-823-9376
YAMAHA ‘1975 80
Antique. Very good
condition. Must see.
Low milage. Road
title. Asking $1,260
Call (570) 825-5810
Leave Message
YAMAHA` 08 R1
BEAUTIFUL BIKE
Perfect condition.
3700 miles, new
rear tire, undertail
kit, cover. Price
negotiable $7,800
570-852-9072
442 RVs & Campers
DUTCHMAN 96’
5TH WHEEL
with slideout & sun
room built on. Set
up on permanent
site in Wapwallopen.
Comes with many
extras. $7,000.
(570) 829-1419 or
(570) 991-2135
442 RVs & Campers
FLAGSTAFF `08
CLASSIC
Super Lite Fifth
Wheel. LCD/DVD
flat screen TV, fire-
place, heated mat-
tress, ceiling fan,
Hide-a-Bed sofa,
outside speakers &
grill, 2 sliders,
aluminum wheels,
water purifier,
awning, microwave
oven, tinted safety
glass windows,
raised panel fridge
& many acces-
sories & options.
Excellent condition,
$22,500.
570-868-6986
NEWMAR 36’
MOUNTAIN AIRE
5th wheel, 2 large
slides, new
condition, loaded
with accessories.
Ford Dually diesel
truck with hitch
also available.
570-455-6796
90’ SUNLINE CAMPER
JUST REDUCED!
35 ft. Well kept. On
campground on the
Susquehanna River
near great fishing.
Attached 12X22”
carpeted room.
Brick heater,
covered by metal
roof with large
breezeway. Shed &
many extras includ-
ed. Call for more
information.
(570) 237-7076
SUNLINE `06 SOLARIS
Travel Trailer. 29’,
mint condition, 1
slide out a/c-heat.
Stove, microwave,
fridge, shower
inside & out. Many
more extras.
Reduced. $13,500.
Call 570-842-6735
SUNLITE CAMPER
22 ft. 3 rear bunks,
center bathroom,
kitchen, sofa bed.
Air, Fully self con-
tained. Sleeps 6.
New tires, fridge
awning. $4500.
215-322-9845
TRAVEL TRAILER 33 ft
Rear queen master
bedroom, Walk
thru bathroom.
Center kitchen +
dinette bed. Front
extra large living
room + sofa bed.
Big View windows.
Air, awning, sleeps
6, very clean, will
deliver. Located in
Benton, Pa. $4,900.
215-694-7497
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
2008 TOYOTA
MATRIX
1 Owner
$13880
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
BUICK `05
RENDEZVOUS CX
AWD, Fully
loaded, 1 owner,
18,000 miles. 6
cylinder. New
inspection, tires
& brakes. Like
new, inside & out.
$16,900. Call
(570) 540-0975
CHEVR0LET`02
EXPRESS
CONVERSION
VAN
Loaded. Low
miles. Excellent
condition.
$18,900
570-674-3901
CHEVROLET `05
AVALANCHE
Dark red with tan
leather interior.
LT Z71 package.
Sunroof. 82,000
miles. Must See!
Asking $18,000
(570) 362-4143
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
CHEVROLET `05 SIL-
VERADO LT Z71
Extended cab,
automatic. Black
with grey leather
interior. Heated
seats. 59,000
miles. New Michelin
tires. $16,500
(570) 477-3297
CHEVROLET `05
TRAILBLAZER LT
Black/Grey. 18,000
miles. Well
equipped. Includes
On-Star, tow pack-
age, roof rack,
running boards,
remote starter,
extended warranty.
$16,000
(570) 825-7251
CHEVROLET `06
SILVERADO 1500
4X4 pickup, extend-
ed cab, 6 1/2 ft.
box, automatic.
Pewter. 48,000
miles. Excellent
condition. $15,000
Negotiable
(570) 954-7461
CHEVROLET `09
EQUINOX LS
Low mileage, 15000
miles, automatic,
all-wheel drive, 4
door, anti-lock
brakes, air condi-
tioning, air bags,
power locks, power
windows, power
mirrors, cruise con-
trol, AM/FM radio,
cassette player, CD
player, keyless
entry, rear de-
froster, rear wind-
shield wiper, tinted
windows. $17,500.
(570) 954-9333
Call after 9:00 a.m.
CHEVROLET `10
SILVERADO 1500
Extended Cab V71
Package 4x4. Bed-
liner. V-8. Red.
Remote start. 6,300
miles $27,000
negotiable
(570) 639-2539
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
CHEVROLET `97
SILVERADO
with Western plow.
4WD, Automatic.
Loaded with
options. Bedliner.
55,000 miles.
$9,200. Call
(570) 868-6503
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
CHEVY `04 EXPRESS
2500
Series. 6.0 Litre V8.
Heavy Duty version.
Excellent cargo van.
85K miles. Excellent
condition. $8,700
570-829-4548 or
570-417-5991
CHEVY `05 EQUINOX
LT (premium pack-
age), 3.4L, 47,000
miles. All wheel
drive, power moon-
roof, windows, locks
& seats. Leather
interior, 6 cd chang-
er, rear folding
seats, keyless entry,
onstar, roof rack,
running boards,
garage kept.
$14,750.
570-362-1910
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
CHEVY `10 SILVERADO
4 Door Crew Cab
LTZ. 4 wheel drive.
Excellent condition,
low mileage.
$35,500. Call
570-655-2689
Selling your
Camper?
Place an ad and
find a new owner.
570-829-7130
CHEVY `94 GLADIATOR
Custom Van. 67K
miles. Interior has
oak wood trim, car-
peting, storage
areas, TV, rear seat
convertible to dou-
ble bed, curtains.
Seats 7. Power win-
dows & seats. Cus-
tom lighting on ceil-
ing. New exhaust
system. New rear
tires. Recently
inspected. Excellent
condition. $4,200 or
best offer. Call
570-655-0530
CHRYSLER `07 PACIFICA
Silver. Only 83K
miles. All wheel
drive, 4.0L V6. All
Power. A/C. Loaded.
Must Sell. $11,995 or
best offer. Call
570-417-7937
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com FRIDAY, MAY 6, 2011 PAGE 5C
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
CHEVY ‘07
TRAILBLAZER LT
On-Star, Leather.
Satellite Radio.
$14,990
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
CHEVY`05 TRAILBLAZER
REDUCED!!!
ASKING $9,999
JUST REDUCED!
SAVE MONEY! GET
READY FOR THE
WINTER! Don’t pay
dealer prices! White
with grey interior.
Looks and runs like
it just came off the
lot. Four Door, 4
wheel drive, 84,900
miles, new tires,
tow package, anti
lock brakes, driver
and passenger
airbags, power
windows, power
mirrors, power
locks, rear window
defroster and
wiper, privacy tint,
air conditioner,
cruise control. CD,
keyless entry and
much more.
Call
570-332-4999
DODGE `00 RAM
1500 QUAD CAB
4X4, V8 automatic.
New tires & brakes.
Fully loaded. Lea-
ther interior. Many
extras. Must see.
Excellent condition.
(570) 970-9351
DODGE `04
RAM 1500
Too many extras to
list. Low Mileage.
$10,000
(570)709-2125
DODGE `10
GRAND CARAVAN
Only 17k miles.
Fully loaded.
Excellent condi-
tion. Factory &
extended war-
ranty. $17,995
(570) 690-2806
DODGE `94 DAKOTA
with cap. 1 owner,
garage kept, very
good condition.
Many extras includ-
ing lift & back seat.
29 MPG gas.
$4,000
or best offer
(570) 868-0944
DODGE `97 RAM
1500 LARAMIE MARK 3
82,000 miles, auto-
matic, chrome step
up and mirrors &
leather interior.
Good Condition.
Drums Area.
$4,500
401-524-9763
DODGE `99 RAM
1500 CLUB CAB
Good condition.
Runs great. New
tires. Asking $4,000
or best offer.
(570) 239-3950
FORD `04 EXPLORER
SUV, V6, 4x4, auto-
matic, 85,000 miles
Black Beauty.
Garage kept.
Must sell.
$8,700
(570) 883-2754
FORD `05 WHEEL
CHAIR LIFT VAN
Seating capacity for
7 plus 2 wheel
chairs. 140,000
miles. Great condi-
tion. Asking $7,000.
For more details,
Call 570-589-9181
FORD `97 DIESEL
Cummins engine,
8-L. 49,049
miles. 33,000
gross wt. 6,649
light wt. $19,500
Must see!
(570) 829-5886
FORD `99 E250
Wheelchair Van
78,250 miles. Fully
serviced, new bat-
tery, tires & rods.
Seats 6 or 3 wheel-
chairs. Braun Millen-
nium lift with
remote. Walk up
door. Front & rear
A/C. Power locks &
windows. Excellent
condition. $9,500.
570-237-6375
FORD ‘68 BRONCO
302 V8 engine.
3-speed on the
floor transmission.
34X9.50 swamper
tires. Racing seats,
roll cage.
$9,500
For more pics or
information, call
(570) 301-7221
advertisinguy
@gmail.com
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
GMC `99
SUBURBAN
Champagne
exterior,
leather interior,
power windows
& locks, 4 wheel
drive. $4,850.
Call for
condition and
known issues.
570-362-4080
HONDA `02 CR-V
EX. Silver. Loaded. 1
owner, very clean,
meticulously main-
tained. 123,000
highway miles.
$7,500
570-646-3334 or
570-762-3294
HONDA `10
ODYSSEY
Special Edition.
Maroon, Fully
loaded. Leather
seats. TV/DVD,
navigation, sun roof
plus many other
extras. 3rd seat .
Only 1,900 Miles.
Brand New.
Asking $37,000
(570) 328-0850
HUMMER ‘05 H2
Yellow with black
leather interior.
Front & rear heated
seats. Many chrome
accessories. $28,500
or best offer. Call
(570) 788-9826 or
(570) 956-8547
Leave Message
INTERNATIONAL ‘95
DUMP TRUCK
Refurbished, rebuilt
engine, transmis-
sion replaced.
Rear-end removed
and relubed. Brand
new 10’ dump. PA
state inspected.
$12,900/best offer.
570-594-1496
JEEP `00
WRANGLER
TJ, Black with grey
interior. 4 cylinder,
5-speed manual
transmission. CD
player, hardtop, full
doors, sound bar.
4” Skyjacker
Suspension lift with
steering stabilizer.
Like new BF
Goodrich 35’s with
Full size spare. Only
85,000 miles.
$6,999
(570) 301-7221
JEEP `02 GRAND
CHEROKEE LAREDO
Triple black, eco-
nomical 6 cylinder.
4x4 select drive.
CD, remote door
opener, power win-
dows & locks,
cruise, tilt wheel.
108k highway miles.
Garage kept. Super
clean inside and out.
No rust. Sale price
$6,895. Scranton.
570-466-2771
JEEP `02 LIBERTY
Blue/grey, new
rebuilt engine with
warranty, new
tires & brakes,
4,000 miles.
$5,900 or
best offer.
570-814-2125
JEEP `02
Wrangler Sport
Hard / soft top,
remote start,
garage kept. 6
cylinder, auto.
$10,000
570-430-1396 or
570-655-5156
Line up a place to live
in classified!
JEEP `06
COMMANDER 4X4
Lockers, V-8. Heat-
ed leather. All
power. Navigation,
Satellite, Blue tooth,
3rd row, More.
69,000
highway miles.
$14,900. Call
(570) 855-3657
JEEP `07
WRANGLER X
4x4, stick shift, soft
top. Red exterior,
well maintained,
garage kept. 11,500
miles, one owner.
AC, CD player,
cruise control.
Tow package with
cargo carrier.
Excellent condition.
$18,700
Call 570-822-9680
JEEP `89 GRAND
CHEROKEE LAREDO
White 74,330
miles, $5,000
fully loaded, eco-
nomical 6 cylinder,
clean, garage
kept, great condi-
tion. $5,000.
570-288-9843
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
JEEP ‘02 WRANGLER
Low Miles
$14,850
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
JEEP ‘06
COMMANDER
4WD, Only 38K
$15,990
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
KIA `02 SEDONA
EX, Van, Sunroof.
61,000 miles.
Loaded. Good
condition.
$5000 or best offer.
570-606-7654
LEXUS `06 GX 470
Cypress Pearl with
ivory leather interi-
or. Well maintained,
garage kept. All
service records.
Brand new tires.
All options including
premium audio
package, rear
climate control,
adjustable suspen-
sion, towing pack-
age, rear spoiler,
Lexus bug guard.
42,750 miles.
$28,950
(570) 237-1082
LEXUS `96 LX 450
Full time 4WD, Pearl
white with like new
leather ivory interi-
or. Silver trim.
Garage kept. Excel-
lent condition.
84,000 miles, Ask-
ing $10,750
570-654-3076 or
570-498-0005
MERCEDES-BENZ
`99 ML 320
Sunroof, new tires,
115,930 miles
MUST SELL
$7,200 OBO
(570)760-0511
MITSUBISHI `95
MONTERO SR 4WD
177,102 miles, auto-
matic, four wheel
drive, 4 door, anti-
lock brakes, air con-
ditioning, air bags,
power locks, power
windows, power
mirrors, power
seats, cruise con-
trol, AM/FM radio,
cassette player, CD
changer, leather
interior, sun roof,
rear defroster, rear
windshield wiper,
new Passed inspec-
tion, new battery.
$2,500
(570) 868-1100
Call after 2:00 p.m.
MITSUBISHI `97
15’ CUBE VAN
Cab over, 4 cylinder
diesel engine.
Rebuilt automatic
transmission. Very
good rubber. All
around good
condition inside
& out. Well
maintained.
Ready to work.
PRICE REDUCED!
$6,195 or
best offer
Call 570-650-3500
Ask for Carmen
PONTIAC `04
MONTANA
95,000 miles, well
maintained. Excell-
ent overall condi-
tion. Keyless entry,
built in baby seat,
dual climate con-
trol. Rear air. Seats
7. Recent inspec-
tion & tires. KBB
over $6300. Asking
$5,000 firm. Call
(570) 417-9884
SUZUKI `07 XL-7
56,000 miles,
automatic,
all-wheel drive,
4 door, air condi-
tioning, all power,
CD player, leather
interior, tinted
windows, custom
wheels, $13,000
Call 570-829-8753
Before 5:00 p.m.
TOYOTA ‘04
SIENNA XLE
DVD, leather
moonroof
$14,968
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
VOLVO `08 XC90
Fully loaded, moon
roof, leather, heat-
ed seats, electric
locks, excellent
condition. New
tires, new brakes
and rotors. 52,000
miles highway
$26,500/ best offer.
570-779-4325
570-417-2010 till 5
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
TRACTOR
TRAILERS
FREIGHTLINER
’97 MIDROOF
475 CAT & 10
speed transmission.
$12,000
FREIGHTLINER
’99 CONDO
430 Detroit, Super
10 transmission.
Asking $15,000.
‘ 88 FRUEHAUF 45’
with sides. All
aluminum, spread
axle. $6,500.
2 storage trailers.
570-814-4790
TRUCKS FOR SALE
Ford, GMC,
International-Prices
starting at $2,295.
Box Truck, Cab &
Chassis available.
Call U-haul
570-822-5536
457 Wanted to Buy
Auto
ALL
JUNK
CAR &
TRUCKS
WANTED
Highest Prices
Paid In Cash!!!
FREE
REMOVAL
Call V&G
Anytime
288-8995
506 Administrative/
Clerical
ANSWERING SERVICE
Seeks one part time
position. Evenings
and weekends.
570-208-7705
SECRETARIAL
POSITION
Professional firm in
Scranton seeks reli-
able part to full-time
secretary with good
people and organi-
zation skills. Must
be proficient with
Microsoft Word,
Excel and Power-
Point. Photoshop
knowledge a plus.
Starting $10-$12/
hour based on
experience. Full
healthcare benefits
& paid vacation.
Please fax resume
to Nina Ciarla at
570-207-9305 or
email to: nciarla@
facilitydesignltd.com
509 Building/
Construction/
Skilled Trades
CARPENTER
Experienced.
Full time position.
Please forward
resume to:
employment@
ruckno.com or send
to: PO Box 1227
Kingston, Pa 18704
515 Creative/Design
EMBROIDER
Part time, Week-
days. No experi-
ence necessary.
Work requires
standing. Call Karen
at 570-283-0229.
518 Customer
Support/Client Care
CUSTOMER SERVICE
REPRESENTATIVES
Will train reliable,
friendly and
dependable person.
Call 570-822-7730
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
LUBRICATION
DISTRIBUTOR
HAS OPENING FOR
CUSTOMER SERVICE
PERSONNEL
Craft Oil Corpora-
tion is looking for a
p r o f e s s i o n a l
with excellent cus-
tomer service skills.
This is a telephone
intensive position
and requires
strong oral commu-
nication and com-
puter skills.
Applicants must be
dependable, highly
motivated and good
at multi-tasking.
Minimum 3 years
experience in cus-
tomer service.
We offer a competi-
tive starting rate
and full benefit
package including
comprehensive
health benefits and
401k.
Send resume to:
Craft Oil
Corporation
Attn: Human
Resource Dept.
P.O. Box 5066
Avoca, PA 18641
Or Email:
jmcginty@
craftoilcorp.com
No Phone Calls
Please. EOE
522 Education/
Training
LUZERNE COUNTY
COMMUNITY
COLLEGE
POSITION
OPENINGS
Luzerne County
Community College
invites applications
for the following
positions:
FT MICROBIOLOGY/
BIOLOGY LAB ASSISTANT
Please send a cover
letter and resume to
Luzerne County
Community College,
John Thomas Sed-
lak, Dean of Human
Resources,
Attention: Human
Resources Dept.,
1333 S. Prospect St,
Nanticoke, PA
18634-3899 or e-
mail hr@luzerne.edu
no later than Friday,
May 13, 2011. No
phone inquires
please.
For additional infor-
mation on these
positions, please
visit our web site at
(www.luzerne.edu).
Equal Opportunity
Employer. Candi-
dates representing
all aspects of diver-
sity are encouraged
to apply.
527 Food Services/
Hospitality
DELI CLERKS
Gerrity’s Supermar-
kets is now hiring
Part Time Deli
Clerks. Looking for
dependable and
customer oriented
individuals. Sales
Commission Bonus.
Apply at:
2020 Wyoming Ave.
Wyoming; or
801 Wyoming Ave.
West Pittston, or at:
www.gerritys.com
Harveys Lake
BAR SERVERS
AND COOKS
Experience
preferred but not
necessary.
Servers must be
18 or older.
Apply in person.
NO PHONE CALLS
538 Janitorial/
Cleaning
JANITORIAL/
MAINTENANCE
Full Time.
Apartment building
in Pittston. Position
requires basic
plumbing, electrical,
carpentry & apart-
ment prep skills,
janitorial & ground
maintenance. 24
hour emergency
response.
QUALIFIED
PERSONS PLEASE
CALL 570-602-1684
For Application
or fax resume to
570- 602-1685
542 Logistics/
Transportation
DISPATCHER
PART TIME
The Luzerne County
Transportation
Authority is seeking
a part time Dis-
patcher. The candi-
date must have the
ability to communi-
cate properly with
employees & LCTA’s
transit riders. Must
also be familiar with
two-way radio com-
munication system
and basic computer
skills. Position will
be “as needed”.
Hours of operation
are 4:30AM–
7:00PM, Monday
through Friday and
8:00AM—6:00PM
on Saturdays.
The LCTA adheres
to a strict drug and
alcohol policy regu-
lated by the Federal
Transit Administra-
tion (FTA). The suc-
cessful candidate
must pass a pre-
employment drug &
alcohol screening.
The LCTA is an
equal opportunity
employer & offers a
competitive salary.
You must apply at:
The Luzerne County
Transportation
Authority
315 Northampton St
Kingston, PA 18704
DRIVERS
CONTRACT DRIVERS
Put your vehicle to
work part-time and
earn extra income
delivering packages
to nursing homes.
Great supplemental
income. Great tax
benefits. Great
Company to work
for! Fuel-Surcharge
Protection as fuel
costs rise. Routes
are round-trip from
Wilkes-Barre, PA.
You must have a
winning attitude,
appearance, and a
fuel-efficient cargo
van or car.
Call 800-818-7958
for a personal
interview!
www.scriptfleet.com
542 Logistics/
Transportation
DRIVERS
Well established
distribution compa-
ny seeks Full-Time
(40 plus hours per
week) drivers. Valid
Class A CDL, mini-
mum 5 years all-
season driving
experience, clean
driving record, and
no DUIs are a must.
Flatbed experience
helpful. Drivers are
assigned dedicated
weekly runs and
regional travel
including some
overnights in sleep-
er. Positions require
some moderate to
heavy lifting, good
communication
skills, attention to
detail, commitment,
punctuality. Posi-
tions include com-
petitive compensa-
tion and benefits
package. Please
send resume to:
c/o Times Leader
Box 2540
15 N. Main Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18711-0250
GET ON THE
ROAD TO
SUCCESS!
McLane, a
$28 billion supply
chain services
leader, is looking
for qualified
Class A Drivers to
become part of
our valued team.
McLane’s
uniformed drivers
are well recog-
nized and trusted
throughout
the U.S. for their
knowledge,
accuracy, and
professionalism.
Do you have
what it takes
to help drive
our team?
CLASS A
DRIVERS
• Earn more
money with more
at-home time
• “We’re here to
stay” –as a
McLane team-
mate, you’ll be
working in a
stable, secure
environment
• Multi-stop
deliveries prima-
rily located in
Pennsylvania and
New Jersey
• Great pay and
benefits -
$55,000 to
$60,000 in the
first year;
medical, dental,
vision, life and
401(k)
Requirements:
• HS diploma or
GED
• Two years driving
experience
• Clean driving
record and great
customer service
skills
Find out more or
apply to become a
valued Teammate
by contacting:
John Hart,
McLane People
Department by
phone:
(570) 330-8400,
or email: jfhart@
mclaneco.com.
EOE, M/F/D/V
Eastern Penn Sup-
ply (EPSCO) is seek-
ing a qualified indi-
vidual for Ware-
house/Local Deliv-
ery driver for our
Wilkes-Barre Coal
St. location. Must be
self motivated, have
a clean driving
record, be organ-
ized, computer liter-
ate & have the abili-
ty to work in a fast
paced environment.
We offer:
• A full time position
• Competitive hourly
wage
• Full benefit
package including:
• Family Health Care
• 401k
• Life insurance
• Dental/Vision
• Vacation time
based on longevity/
Holiday pay/ Sick/
Personal.
Qualified persons
are encouraged to
apply in person to:
Eastern Penn
Electric Supply
Attn: Marc Malvizzi
395 Coal Street
Wilkes-Barre, Pa
18702
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
ROLLBACK DRIVERS
Opening for
Rollback Drivers.
First & Second Shifts
Must Have Good
Driving Record. We
Offer Top Wages &
Benefits Package.
Apply in Person
Falzone’s Towing
Service, Inc.
271 N. Sherman St.,
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18702
570-823-2100
545 Marketing/
Product
PART-TIME MARKETING
In search of a
dynamic person
with great commu-
nication skills and
ability to multi-task.
The successful can-
didate will be punc-
tual, organized, reli-
able, creative, con-
scientious, and per-
sonable. Must have
prior marketing
experience. Must
be a self-starter
with reliable trans-
portation. Computer
skills a must. Will-
ingness to work
Saturdays a must.
Positive attitude and
high energy a must.
Fax resume to
570-822-3446. No
phone calls please.
548 Medical/Health
CAREGIVER
Part Time in-home
care for female
adult in Dallas. Must
reside nearby.
Bathing required.
Call 570-675-2539.
DENTAL ASSISTANT
Back Mountain
Office is looking for
enthusiastic Full
Time Dental Assis-
tant. Must be organ-
ized, people person,
with excellent com-
munication skills. If
you are interested in
joining our friendly
team, please send
resume to:
Dr. David Spring
661 N. Memorial Hwy
Dallas, PA 18612
DIETARY AIDES
Healthcare Services
Group at Highland
Manor Nursing and
Rehabilitation Center
is currently accept-
ing applications for
part time Dietary
Aides. Also hiring Full
& Part time House-
keeping & Laundry
Aides. Apply in per-
son Monday - Friday
between the hours
of 9am-4pm at:
750 Schooley Ave.
Exeter, PA 18643
FT ELECTIVE SURGERY
COUNSELOR
We need a friendly,
outgoing, enthusias-
tic person who will
be conscientious in
scheduling and edu-
cating patients on
their elective sur-
gery options. If you
consistently strive
to do high quality
work efficiently
while providing
friendly service, we
want you to become
part of our team.
Extensive on the job
training will be pro-
vided.
APPLY ONLINE:
www.icare
specialists.com
SUBMIT RESUME:
HR Dept.
703 Rutter Ave.
Kingston, PA 18704
Fax: 570-287-2434
* OPTI CAL *
•Machine
Operator
•Lens Coating
Benefits for full
time employees.
SEND RESUME OR
APPLY IN PERSON
Monday-Friday
8:30a - 6pm to:
Luzerne Optical
180 N. Wilkes-
Barre Blvd.
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18702
RNS, LPNS, CNAS
Full Time, Part Time,
and Per Diem.
All shifts available.
SOCIAL WORKER
Part Time
UNIT MANAGER
FULL TIME RN
LTC Experience
Preferred.
Apply in person to:
Mountain Top
Senior Care and
Rehabilitation
Center
185 S. Mountain Blvd
Mountain Top, PA.
18707
(570) 474-6377
557 Project/
Program
Management
ASSISTANT
MANAGER TRAINEE
3 people needed to
assist manager.
Duties will include
recruiting, training &
marketing. Will train.
Call Mr. Scott
(570)288-4532
E.O.E
566 Sales/Retail/
Business
Development
DOOR TO DOOR SALES
Local company is
seeking individuals
for door to door
sales. Must be out-
going, self motivat-
ed & flexible. Please
email resume to:
reliablesales@
ptd.net
INSIDE SALES
Wholesale Distribu-
tor seeks an inside
salesperson. HVAC
experience a plus.
Pre-drug test.
Apply in person at
Sid Harvey
Industries
1052 Hanover St.
Sugar Notch
566 Sales/Retail/
Business
Development
INDEPENDENT
INSURANCE AGENCY
Local Insurance
Agency is looking to
hire a Commercial
Lines Customer
Service Agent to
handle existing book
of business. At
least (3) to 5 years
experience is pre-
ferred, position
available in our
Wilkes-Barre office.
Salary commensu-
rate with experi-
ence, Benefit Pack-
age includes, Health
Benefits, Life Insur-
ance, 20 day PTO
Time & 401k plan.
Please forward
resume to:
Eastern
Insurance Group
Attn: Renee Valenti,
613 Baltimore Drive,
Wilkes-Barre, Pa.
18702.
SALES
Can you sell ADS?
For Commission
ONLY? Get a
performance
DRAW, and PAID
Training!!!
Email your great
resume: careers@
adsonaglass.com
Swift Kennedy &
Assoc. specializes
in Group Employee
Benefits Plans and
has an opening in
our Wilkes-Barre
office. Candidate
must have prior
group sales experi-
ence and be
licensed to sell
insurance. Compen-
sation is based on
experience. Send
resume to jerry@
swiftkennedy.com
573 Warehouse
ASSISTANT
WAREHOUSE
SUPERVISOR
Plant seeking can-
didate with strong
leadership, organi-
zation and com-
munication skills.
Will work hands-
on to direct and
manage staff for
busy high volume
Logistics depart-
ment. Must have
previous supervi-
sory experience in
a warehouse facil-
ity including all
function of ship-
ping/receiving/
inventory, union
and ISO experi-
ence a plus. Com-
puter literate, abil-
ity to multi-task,
meet deadlines,
attention to detail
a must. Schedule
will be every other
weekend commit-
ment. Full time
with competitive
wage and bene-
fits. Qualified can-
didates please for-
ward resume
WITH SALARY
REQUIREMENTS a
must to:
AEP Industries,
Inc.
Attn: Human
Resources
20 Elmwood Ave.
Mountaintop, PA
18707
Fax 570-474-9257
email:
Lynottm@
aepinc.com
We are a drug-
free workplace
EOE
600
FINANCIAL
610 Business
Opportunities
BEER & LIQUOR
LICENSE FOR SALE
For More Info, Call
570-824-7041
BEER DISTRIBUTOR
License available
with option to lease
building or sold
separately.
570-954-1284
CREATIVE & EXCITING
Paint your own
pottery studio
franchise. Low start
up & local training.
POKE-A-NOSE
POTTERY
Inspiration is Within
Call Jason
570-730-7855 or
email: pnpfranchise
@yahoo.com
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
DRIVE-SHAFT
FABRICATER
Willing to train. Will
sell stock or equip-
ment seperately.
For more info, call
(570) 823-0245
Liquor License
Luzerne County
Priced to sell
Cordora
Business Network
570-287-7013
RESTAURANT FOR SALE
Inside Church Hill
Mall, high traffic
area. Established 15
years. RENT IS
FREE. Serious
inquiries call
570-582-5208
610 Business
Opportunities
JAN-PRO
COMMERCIAL
CLEANING
OF NEPA
Be Your Own
Boss Work Full or
Part time
Accounts available
NOW throughout
Wilkes Barre,
Scranton,
and Hazleton.
We guarantee
$5,000 to
$200,000
in annual billing.
Small investment
We’re ready -
Are you?
For more info
Call 570-824-5774
Janproofnepa.com
630 Money To Loan
“We can erase
your bad credit -
100% GUARAN-
TEED.” Attorneys
for the Federal
Trade Commission
say they’ve never
seen a legitimate
credit repair opera-
tion. No one can
legally remove
accurate and timely
information from
your credit report.
It’s a process that
starts with you and
involves time and a
conscious effort to
pay your debts.
Learn about manag-
ing credit and debt
at ftc. gov/credit. A
message from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
Job Seekers are
looking here!
Where's your ad?
570-829-7130 and
ask for an employ-
ment specialist
700
MERCHANDISE
702 Air
Conditioners
AIR CONDITIONER
$40
570-740-1246
AIR CONDITIONER
portable, 10,000
BTU, G.E., excellent
condition. Asking
$150. 829-6417
708 Antiques &
Collectibles
$ ANTIQUES BUYING $
Old Toys, model kits,
Bikes, dolls, old gun
Mining Items, trains
&Musical Instruments,
Hess. 474-9544
BARBIE DOLL: 1997
Mattel Hallmark
Special Edition Bar-
bie Doll. Fair
Valentint; 12” tall;
Pink & Torquoise
1870’s dress. New
in box $20.735-0191
COLLECTIBLE Sea-
gram’s Mirror – 1908
Stanley Cup $50.
Call Mark at 570-
301-3484 or Allison
at 631-6635.
COLLECTIBLE:
1963 Topps Mike
Ditka Football Card-
Great Shape-Make
an offer. $50.00
570-824-1180
DINING ROOM SET
1949 Leuis Burg
Chair and Furniture
Company
Mahogany dining
room set consisting
of rectangle drop
leaf table with
swirled legs,
4 padded chairs,
hutch with 8 draw-
ers, corner cabinet
with glass top and
bottom drawer,
telephone stand
with swirled legs.
All in very good
condition.
$1200. or best offer
570-239-7846
DOLL very old
grandmother’s doll
1930’s or earlier,
slight worn spot,
cloth body filled with
shavings $65. 1937
brass Mickey
Mouse belt buckle
$20. Rawcliffe Petal
1991 yellow bubble
fairy #2904 of 9500
$15. Barbie wearing
cowgirl outfit, 1966
$30. Vintage camel
salt & pepper shak-
ers, handmade from
Israeli Olive Wood
1950’s selling on
Ebay for $75 asking
$25. Call 570-474-
2756 between
8:30am & 8:3-0 pm
PIANO. Ericsson
upright from 1885.
Needs tuning and
some minor repairs.
$200. 868-6613
PICTURES: Pittston
St. Johns pictures of
the school fire of
1960 copies & some
originals. also, the
1964 St. Johns year
book. both for $20.
Add also King’ col-
lege year book of
1980. $20. BOOKS
on 5 great women
of our times”Jack &
Jackie” A portrait of
an American mar-
riage in the Kennedy
family. “Living His-
tory” a book on
Hillary Clinton.
“Going Rogue” A
amazing life of
Sarah Palin. “My
Turn” Memoirs of
Nancy Reagan. “A
Secret Life of Mari-
lyn Monroe” $10.
each. 655- 9474
email bing
1124.1@netzero.com
708 Antiques &
Collectibles
YEARBOOKS:
Coughlin H.S. 1926,
1928, 1932, 1937,
1940, 1961, 1963,
1942, 1943, 1944,
1949. G.A.R. H.S.
1934, 1935, 1936,
1937, 1945, 1946,
1951, 1955, 1956,
1957, 1961, 1965,
1966, 1970, 1980,
1985, 2005, 2006.
Meyers H.S. 1935,
1936, 1937, 1938,
1942, 1943, 1944,
1945, 1946, 1960,
1974, 1975, 1976,
1977. Kingston H.S.
1938, 1939, 1940,
1944, 1948, 1949.
Plymouth H.S. 1930,
1931, 1932, 1933,
1938, 1943, 1944,
1959, 1960.
Hanover H.S. 1951,
1952, 1953, 1954,
1960. West Pittston
H.S. Annual 1925,
1926, 1927, 1928,
1931, 1932, 1959.
Luzerne H.S. 1951,
1952, 1956, 1957,
1959. Berwick H.S.
1952, 1953, 1956,
1957, 1958, 1960,
1967, 1968, 1969
,1970. Lehman H.S.
1973, 1974, 1976,
1978, 1980. Nanti-
coke Area H.S.
1976, 2008. Dallas
H.S. 1966, 1967,
1968. Bishop Hoban
H.S. 1972, 1973,
1974, 1975. West
Side Central
Catholic H.S. 1965 -
1974, 1980, 1981.
Westmoreland H.S.
1952, 1953 - 1954
G.A.R. H.S. 1972,
1973, 1974, 1975,
1976 Pittston H.S.
1936, 1951, 1954,
1963 Pittston Hospi-
tal School of Nurs-
ing, J.O.Y. of 1957,
1959 West Pittston
H.S. 1950, 1954,
1955, 1956, 1960
Hazleton H.S. 1938,
1939, 1940, 1941,
1942, 1943, 1945,
1948, 1949, 1950,
1953, 1954, 1955,
1956, 1957, 1959,
1960, 1961, 1962,
1964 Hazle Twp H.S.
1951, 1952
570-825-4721
710 Appliances
A P P L I A N C E
PA R T S E T C .
Used appliances.
Parts for all brands.
223 George Ave.
Wilkes-Barre
570-820-8162
GENE’S
RECONDITIONED
APPLIANCES
60 Day Warranty
Monday-Friday
8:00PM-5:00PM
Saturday
8:00AM-11:00AM
Gateway
Shopping Center
Kingston, PA
(570) 819-1966
MICROWAVE: GE, all
options, with
turntable, excellent
condition. $40.
REFRIGERATOR,
small college size,
good condition $40/
570-675-4383
MIXER. Hobart,
20 quart. Excellent
condition. $850
570-288-5571
RANGE/STOVE,
Kenmore Elite, gas,
black, excellent
condition, asking
$200. 262-4866
REFRIGERATOR,
Kenmore, white
side by side with ice
and water in door.
Excellent condition
$450. Call
570-654-3135 or
570-760-5519
STOVE, electric,
bisque, Amana,
good condition
$100. 288-9940
STOVE/RANGE
electric, beige $80.
REFRIGERATOR
medium size, white
$75. WASHER $75.
DRYER, gas $80.
570-704-8134
WASHER AND
DRYER. Extra large
capacity, white, like
new. $100 each.
570-814-5689
WASHER. Maytag.
Fabric-matic. Heavy
duty, extra large
capacity top loader.
25 1/2” wide. White.
Good condition.
$325
570-885-1338
WASHER/DRYER.
Whirlpool,electric.
Excellent, $350.
REFRIGERATOR,
Roper, 18.2 cu ft.
Excellent. $200.
570-474-5188
WASHING
MACHINE. Like new.
Front loader. Very
nice. 24” wide.
Many cycles includ-
ing hand wash &
heavy duty. $325.
570-817-0409
Why Spend
Hundreds on
New or Used
Appliances?
Most problems
with your appli-
ances are usually
simple and inex-
pensive to fix!
Save your hard
earned money, Let
us take a look at it
first!
30 years in
the business.
East Main
Appliances
570-735-8271
Nanticoke
712 Baby Items
BASINET, for baby,
blue & white, excel-
lent condition. $50.;
BABY BATHTUB
$10; BABY SWING,
Oraco $40. Call
570-829-2599
Job Seekers are
looking here!
Where's your ad?
570-829-7130 and
ask for an employ-
ment specialist
PAGE 6C FRIDAY, MAY 6, 2011 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
712 Baby Items
BABY ITEMS: New-
born swing $50.
Childcraft crib $75.
Childcraft oak 4
drawer chest $50.
Oak dresser combo
changing table
$100. Newborn-12
month clothing - girl
$5. each
570-825-0569
BASSINET: With
canopy, mobile,
music, vibration.
Storage area under-
neath. Light green/
cream pattern for
boy or girl. Excellent
conditions. Extra
sheets, mattress
pad included. $40.
570-855-9221
UMBRELLA
STROLLER New
condition $7.
570-779-9791
714 Bridal Items
WEDDING GOWN
package REDUCED.
New, tags on, ivory
strapless, size 10,
ivory strapless,
beautiful bead work,
veil beaded to
match & slip. Paid
$600 asking $125.
570-287-3505
716 Building
Materials
DOOR. 36”x80”
solid wood, 6 panel.
Exterior or interior.
Natural oak finish,
right or left with
hardware. $200.
Call 570-735-8730
or 570-332-8094
DOORS 2 used Lar-
son storm doors
30” & 36” white.
$50 each. 570-417-
4188 leave mes-
sage
DOORS: (2) sliding
closet doors, 24x80
wood with natural
finish $50. DOOR (1)
30x80 natural finish.
$40. Excellent con-
dition. 675-4383
GLASS DOOR. 3
way glass door for
bath tub. $25
570-331-8183
SINKS: 2 new
Arlington double
bowl sinks with
slight imperfection
(almond). $30. or
best offer. For
details 457-6380
WINDOWS Re-
placement new 1-
16”x27.5” & 1-
18”x27” white vinyl
double hung insulat-
ed glass 1/2 screen
$65. each. (2)
16”x16” concrete
chimney caps $10.
each.
570-735-7658
720 Cemetery
Plots/Lots
CEMETERY PLOTS
(3) together.
Maple Lawn
Section of
Dennison
Cemetery.
Section ML.
$550 each.
610-939-0194
CEMETERY PLOTS
Plymouth National
Cemetery in
Wyoming. 6 Plots.
$450 each. Call
570-825-3666
OAKLAWN CEMETERY
4 grave sites,
fabulous location.
Purchased 20 years
ago. $2,450
610-838-7727
726 Clothing
BABY GIRLS clothes
(0-18 months) tons
of outfits, like new
$150. Maternity
clothes, over 20
pieces $40.
570-212-2347
CLOTHING
women’s size large
& extra large con-
sisting of pants,
tops, jackets, shoes
size 9, over 35
items. Good condi-
tion. $35. 655-1808
CLOTHING. Great
Buys! Girls, like new.
Sizes 10-12. Large
box $25, Size 14
$25 box. Misses
women’s, Medium
$20, X-large $25.
570-474-6028
GOWNS: Jessica
McLintock, laven-
der, full skirt netting,
bodice, spaghetti
straps, matching
wrap, size 9/10
$30. After Six, soft
blue, floor-length A-
line skirt with lining,
fitted top, spaghetti
straps, empire waist
line, size 16. $30.
570-814-9845
JACKET - Mens
Brown Leather
Jacket. Medium.
Long. Good Condi-
tion. $10. 675-0920
PURSES (2) Vera
Bradley assorted
purses $20 each.
570-693-2612
728 Commercial/
Industrial
Equipment
GENERATOR Honda
EB 2500 $400
570-674-7034
730 Computer
Equipment &
Software
COMPUTER SYS-
TEM COMPAQ XP
PRO SP3, Includes
mouse, keyboard,
monitor. Still a year
left on warranty.
$75. 570-457-6610
DESK. Computer
Desk $50. Call 735-
8730 or 332-8094
732 Exercise
Equipment
EXERCISE BIKE:
“Half Price” Nordic-
track exercise bike.
16 levels. Like new.
$125. 204-4449
742 Furnaces &
Heaters
COAL STOVE: Eng-
lander. 27-3000
heats approximately
2600-2800 square
feet. Burns chestnut
coal. Firebrick-lined,
built in blower sys-
tem, large glass
viewing area, 6” top
or rear exhaust, 610
lbs. Must pick up.
$500. 570-497-4132
FIREPLACE. Brick
front electric. 6’
wide. $50 or best
offer. 570-288-3233
HEATER: Timberline
vent-free propane
gas heater with fire-
log. Wall mounted.
15,000 to 25,000
BTUs, sells for $250
asking $99. Excel-
lent condition.
570-328-5611
570-328-5506
OIL: Home heating
oil. Approximately
150+ gallons. Must
remove from tanks.
$2.00 a gallon
Located in Jermyn.
570-877-3861
744 Furniture &
Accessories
ANTIQUE FIRESIDE
CHAIRS (2) $50.
each.
570-674-2644
ARMOIRE over-
sized, solid pine
wood, country
french design, 3
shelves, beautifully
carved wood doors,
striking showcase
piece for bedroom
or family room.
$200. 690-8009
ARMOIRE. For com-
puter. Excellent
condition. $100
570-256-7208
BEDROOM SET
4 piece Basset,
white, dresser with
3 drawers, desk
with matching chair
& lighted bookshelf,
single bed with con-
vertible canopy.
Excellent condition.
$350. 287-8711.
BEDROOM SET
5 piece, complete,
dark wood, like new
queen size, 7 ft.
dresser with double
mirror. Asking
$599. 655-5404
BEDROOM SET mis-
sion oak wood twin
size complete &
cabinet never used!
$175. 905-5602
BEDROOM SET
Rustic, dark wood,
twin captain’s bed,
dresser with mirror,
chest of drawers,
desk with hutch &
chair, very good
condition $300.
negotiable. LOFT
BED Custom Built.
Light oak, very solid,
built-in desk with 2
drawers & over-
head light, shelves
& 5 drawers, excel-
lent condition. $400
negotiable.
570-868-6613
BEDROOM SET:
Four piece solid oak
bedroom set pur-
chased at Ashley
Furniture approxi-
mately 4 years ago
for $2,800. In excel-
lent condition, like
new. $900. Call
after 4 p.m.
570-466-3169
CEDAR CHEST, light
maple $75. FLOOR
LAMPS brass with 5
fixtures $25. Pine
shelf $10. Swag -
grapes & wine bot-
tles $10.
570-693-2612
COMPUTER DESK,
with hutch, good
condition $50.
CEDAR CHEST with
cushion seat, $150.
TEA CART, oak. $65
570-655-0952
CURIO CABINET:
solid oak, three
glass shelves and
two lights for display
$200. Bridal Pre-
cious Moment knick
knacks $5 to $35.
Hunter green couch
reclines on both
sides, drawer in
center bottom and
hidden pull out table
with cup holders
$150. 570-704-8117
DAY BED white
wicker Henry Link
with trundle, desk,
chair, mirror, night
stand, 6 draw
dresser, removable
bookcase, ward-
robe, magazine
stand $500. or call
for individual prices
570-498-0977
DESK secretary with
hutch, new in box
$95. 288-9940
DESK, Secretary
drop down top 3
drawers, pecan fin-
ish, excellent condi-
tion. $100. 287-2517
DESK: O’Sullivan
Corner Work-center
5.5’x5’.5 finished in
pine laminate, in
excellent condition,
sells for $250. ask-
ing $99. E-mail
photo available. Call
570-328-5611 or
570-328-5506
DINETTE SET: round
top on pedestal bot-
tom, with 4 match-
ing chairs in solid
maple. Mint Condi-
tion Less than one
year old. Four cush-
ions included. $175.
570-288-5835
DRESSER 5 drawer
oak, very good con-
dition $50.
570-878-2849
ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER. Cherry,
real wood. 57” wide.
$20. 570-674-2985
GOLDEN LIFT
CHAIR, weight
capacity 375 lbs.
Medium brown,
never used, $450.
Call 570-388-6044
KI TCHEN TABLE,
small, oak. Sides
fold down. $50. Call
(570) 829-2599
744 Furniture &
Accessories
KITCHEN SET beige
marble top, octagon
shape, pedestal
base, 4 captain
chairs all on wheels,
gorgeous. Paid
$1300 sell for $300.
Moving must sell.
570-675-4085 cell
570-406-7719
LAMP - Parlor stand
up lamp. Very good
condition. Grey
metal color. $25.
570-740-1246
LIVING ROOM SET.
Couch, 2 matching
swivel rockers and
Ottoman. $350
570-474-5188
LOVESEAT &
OTTOMAN solid
sand colored cush-
ioned, excellent
shape $200.
570/824-7807 or
570-545-7006
AFFORDABLE
MATTRESS SALE
We Beat All
Competitors Prices!
Mattress Guy
Twin sets: $149
Full sets: $169
Queen sets: $189
All New
American Made
570-288-1898
MIRROR large full
size wall mirror 30”
x 52” great for salon
or gym $50. or best
offer. 570-905-5602
MIRRORS: 2 mirrors
that fit on dressers.
$50 for both.
570-313-5213
PANTRY/CABINET:
6 1/2ft tall, 3ft wide
with shelves and
lots of storage
space. White with
light wood trim.
Excellent condition.
$50. 570-855-9221
PATIO SET: 7 piece
white, rectangle
table, new cushions
that are 1 year old
$250. 883-5640
SOFA TABLE: 48”
medium shade of
wood, $40. Childs
wood high back
bench with cut out
hearts on sides and
back, $15. 3 light
green metal
planters, hook on
top of deck railing,
24” long, $12. for
all. 570-301-8515
SOFA. Green sec-
tional w/sleeper and
recliner. $100
570-417-9280
752 Landscaping &
Gardening
1st Choice
Landscaping
See our ad in the
Call an Expert sec-
tion under Category
1165 - Lawn Care
BITTO
LANDSCAPING &
LAWN SERVICE
See Our Ad In The
Call An Expert
Section 1162
Bruce’s
Lawn Service
See our ad under
Call An Expert
1165 Lawn Care
CHIPPER, shredder,
mulcher, bagger.
Craftsman 5 HP. 3
cutting stages. Very
good condition.
$325. 675-4383
COUNTRY GENTLEMAN
TOTAL YARD CARE
See our ad under
Call An Expert
1162 Landscaping
& Gardening
Keller’s Lawn Care
See our ad under
Call An Expert
1162 Landscape &
Garden
LAWN & SHRUB
MAINTENANCE.
See our ad under
1165 Lawn Care in
Call an Expert.
Lawn Maintenance
See our ad under
Call An Expert
1165 Lawn Care
LAWN MOWER -
Yard machine, 5.75
H.P., 22” cut,
mulches, high
wheeled, good con-
dition. $85.
570-881-7116
LAWNMOWER
Craftsman /Honda
motor includes bag
not self propelled,
new blade runs
good $150. after
3pm 655-3197
MOWER
Craftsman 6.75 hp,
self propelled bag-
ging mower, key
start, fully services
$165. 878-2849
NEED YOUR
LAWN CUT
OR TRIMMED?
See the ad for
Cole’s Lawn Care
Call An Expert
Section 1165
Patrick & Deb’s
Lawn Care
See our ad under
Call An Expert
1162 Landscape &
Garden
Peter’s Lawncare
See our ad under
Call an Expert
1165 Lawn Care
PLUG AERATOR
Brand =AGRI-FAB
purchased at Sears.
Used less than 6
times. Maximum
added weight = 140
lbs. Purchase price
approximately $162.
sell $100.
570-735-3438
754 Machinery &
Equipment
HAULMARK ‘07 TRAIL-
ER 6’X14’
Like new with
electric brakes,
new tires and
reinforced tongue.
$2700.
570-239-5457
756 Medical
Equipment
BED. Craftmatic
Adjustable. $500 or
best offer.
570-288-3894
570-650-6434
LIFT CHAIR. Pride.
Elegance series
Model 550. 3 posi-
tion, 375 lb capacity.
Marine blue, less
than 2 years old.
$175. 954-9883
POWER CHAIR:
Jazzy. With leg sup-
ports. Red, comes
with charger. May
need a new battery.
$350.00.
570-331-0632
758 Miscellaneous
AIR CONDITIONER:
5000 btu energy
savor ac works
great, $40. AM/
FM/CassettE & cd
player boom box
$25. Lexmar color
printer new in the
box $20. DVD/VCR
combo with all hook
ups $40. DVD player
with all hook ups
$15. AB-DOER exer-
cise machine new in
box, never openend
a $150. value for
only $70. Dell flat
screen 16” monitor
with keyboard,
mouse all hookups,
wires and cd users
guide all for only
$40. call
570-262-3273
ALUMINUM CAP:
Black. For 6 foot
truck bed. $200.00.
570-283-5142
AQUARIUM: 30 gal-
lon. With all needed
accessories $50.
570-829-1541
BARREL,
wooden.
53 gallon.
Excellent
condition $195.
570-876-3830
BATHROOM SINK
SET: Gerber white
porcelain bathroom
sink with mirror and
medicine cabinet.
Matching set. $80.
570-331-8183
BEAUTY SALON
two chairs beige
color hydraulic lift &
swivel $50 each
570-905-5602
BEDLINER: 89
Chevy S10 truck
bedliner, standard
cab $30. 2000
Chevy Cavalier LS
rear trunk spoiler,
black $10. Four
barrel carb running
from Chevy motor
$50. 3 suitcases in
excellent shape
$40. 570-740-1246
BEER MEISER Dans-
by, holds 1/4 keg.
$225. 283-2047
CANES & WALKING
STICKS - Uniquely
made from the roots
of Slippery Elm
trees. Over 16 avail-
able. $4 & 5 each.
Call 570-735-2081.
CEILING FAN
white, very good
condition $15.
Anderson window-
36”w X38”H double
hung, grills & screen
included, very good
condition. $75. or
best offer. 826-1702
CHILTON & Motor
Manuals for auto/
truck repair, ranging
from 1960 to 1980.
each $12. Truck
door for 1973-1980
passenger side
Dodge Pickup new,
never used. $100.
Pinto trailer hook for
dump truck. $40.
Radiator for 1950/
54 model Chevy
truck. $75. Tail
Lights, new, for
Ford dump or box
truck, brackets
included. 2 for $25.
570-823-6829
CHOCOLATE SET -
Rose Theme. 5
piece. Small Repair.
$20. Dinnerware - 8
place setting. Royal
Staffordshire Ameri-
can Legend. With
extras. $100.
570-675-0920
COFFEE MAKER.
Restaurant style, 2
pot Bunn Pour O
Matic. $80. PUMP,
windshield, for Jeep
Wrangler, $50
570-709-2926
DISHES Apple dish-
es 12 place setting
with salt/pepper
shakers, butter dish
and matching canis-
ter set $25. Call
570-631-6635 9am-
5:30pm or 570-283-
5958 After 5:30.
GARAGE SALE
ITEMS. LUGGAGE
RACK, for top of car,
$40. ENTERTAIN-
MENT CENTER, oak
with glass doors,
$40. CHAIR, rock-
ing, wood, $15
570-868-8449
HUTCH, Mahogany.
$50. STOVE, Camp-
ing, $30. LANTERN,
camping $25
570-287-8092
IRONING BOARD
$8; WAFFLE
MAKER $10; (2)
LAMPS, $15 each;
ITALIAN POTTERY
$30 for all.
Call 570-829-2599
LAWN ORNAMENT
cement yard donkey
with flower cart 3’
x3” planter for flow-
ers. sell for $90.
ATTIC CLEANED
OUT !!! many, many
items ( over 100 ! )
christmas decora-
tions, candles, flow-
ers. lamps, suitcas-
es all for $ 75. call
570-735-2081
SEWI NG FABRI CS
Lots of Them
WALLPAPER
1,000’s of patterns
WALLPAPER & BLIND
WAREHOUSE
30 Forrest St.,
Wilkes-Barre, PA
570-970-6683
758 Miscellaneous
SHOES - Capezio,
tan, size 8W, new in
box/never worn,
$25. 570-675-6377
SLEEPING BAGS. 3
childrens’. $7.50
570-474-6028
STEAMER: Large.
On Wheels. $50.
570-313-5213
TIRES -4 Dayton
Timberline P255/
70/R16 good tread
$150. 570-824-7015
TIRES. Various
sizes. $145 to $240.
Call for details
570-969-1481
TIRES: Four (4)
Good tread.
255/70/R16 $100.00
570-824-7015
TRAILER HITCH with
hardware, fits 2005-
2008 Escape, Mer-
cury Mariner, Mazda
Tribute $110 or best
offer. 570-466-1214
TRUCK BOX. Kobalt
aluminum. Fits small
truck. $85
Call Mark at
570-829-1478
VACUUM Bissell
wide cleaning path,
all attachments,
powerforce, bag-
less turbo, 12 amps
MZX1MUM $45. One
portable Pronto 2 in
1 Electrolux with
charger & stand
$20. 570-735-8730
or 570-332-8094
760 Monuments &
Lots
GRAVE LOT
Near baby land at
Memorial Shine in
Carverton.
$400. Call
570-287-6327
762 Musical
Instruments
DIGITAL PIANO
Roland RP-101-MH
Digital Piano with
cabinet and bench.
Excellent condition -
hardly used.
Paid $2400 $1500.
570-417-1734
DRUM SET 5 piece
Maxx $100.
570-674-2644
PIANO Baldwin con-
sole with matching
bench $995. tuned
a440 almost mint,
hardly used, excel-
lent, delivered.
call 570-474-6362
PIANO
Beautiful Story &
Clark console piano
with matching
bench. Excellent
condition. $750.
Call 570-287-8711
PIANO KEYBOARD
Casio WK-200 76-
key piano keyboard.
Over 500 different
sounds/tones. In
excellent condition.
Comes with every-
thing you need,
bench, stand, sus-
tain pedal.$200
or best offer.
570-824-1114
Line up a place to live
in classified!
PIANO/SPINET
brown, great for
students $75.
570-417-9280
766 Office
Equipment
PRINTER, Fax, Copi-
er, Scanner. 4 in 1
HP Series 2200.
Excellent condition
$50. 570-675-4383
772 Pools & Spas
LADDER: “A” Frame
for above ground
pool. Purchased last
year for $180. Sell
for $100. Optional
conversion kit $15.
570-574-2149
POOL 4’x15’ above
ground pool $600.
includes heavy duty
ladder, large filter,
solar cover, all
accessories.
570-779-2079
POOL: 4.5 ft. deep,
21 ft. round above
ground pool; like
new, new motor,
pump, & sand filter.
Maintenance
accessories & deck
included. $500
570-690-8009
SWIMMING POOL:
24ft round, 4ft
deep. Plains. YOU
dismantle and
remove. Pump/filter
not included. $350.
570-823-2958
774 Restaurant
Equipment
RESTAURANT
EQUIPMENT,
8x12 walk in
cooler $2300;
8x8x10 walk
in freezer $3800;
Pizza oven with
stones $2000;
Stainless steel
kitchen hood
$3000; Stainless
steel pizza oven
hood $4000;
bread pan rack
$100; 2 soup
warmers for $100;
2 door sandwich
prep table $500.
All equipment is
sold as is. For
more info, call
570-847-0873
RESTAURANT
EQUIPMENT,
Somerset Dough
Sheeter, Model
CAR-100. Only
1 available. $1,500
Call for more info
570-498-3616
RESTAURANT
EQUIPMENT,
SOMERSET TURN
OVER MACHINE -
model SPM45,
$500; ALSO, Bunn
Pour Over Coffee
Machine, Model #
STF15, $225
For more info, call
570-498-3616
774 Restaurant
Equipment
RESTAURANT
EQUIPMENT,
AMERICAN EAGLE
MIXER, 20 quart
mixer, Model
AE-20, with timer
and guard, $1300.
ALSO, Bev Air 2
door refrigerator/
sandwich prep
table, Model
SP48-12, $1300.
Call 570-498-3616
for more details.
776 Sporting Goods
08 LOWE 14 Foot
Aluminum Boat.
Hand Galvanized
Trailer. 40 pd Thrust
Electric Motor.
$900. 570-675-3171
BASEBALL
EQUIPMENT:USED.
CATCHERS MITT,
youth, Rawlings
new $25. Men’s
Nike tan catchers
Mitt, used $15.
Youth Pro Nike
catcher leg guards,
used $10. Youth
Louisville Slugger
outfielders glove,
used $10. Omaha
Little League bat
(gold), used $15.
Call 570-868-6134
BASKETBALL
HOOP, portable.
great condition.
paid $150 asking
$60. price nego-
tiable. 814-4064
BICYCLE: 26”
Sears ladies 3
speed bicycle, in
very good condition,
helmet included.
$35. 570-696-1703
BOWLING BALL:
NEW 16 pound
Brunswick Groove
Blue/burgundy. This
ball is new in the
box $15.00.
570-829-2695
CAMO HUNTING-
BLIND. Portable For
single person. $50
570-829-1541
CROSS BOW by
Weider (over 65
exercises) $75.
570-654-2396
FISHING ROD &
REEL great shape
$20. 570-704-8134
GOLF BAG, Precise
professional, black/
navy standup bag,
putter tube, ball
holder, 6 pockets in
excellent condition.
$25. 570-696-1267.
GOLF CART BAG,
Mizuno, brand new
$50. PSE Com-
pound bow with soft
case, excellent con-
dition $50. 50lb.
automatic deer
feeder $20. Bow
Flex XLT with lat bar
& leg extension, all
cables, bars, and
instructions includ-
ed $200. Sit up
bench with leg hold-
er $20. Outdoor sun
shelter 9x13 $25.
570-212-2347
GOLF CLUBS Arnold
Palmer irons, 2 thru
9, good condition
$50. BACKPACK,
hiking, large, navy,
excellent condition
$50. 570-675-4383
GOLF CLUBS
men’s left-handed
complete set taylor
- made driver #3, 4,
5 fairway metals #3
adams hybrid
adams graphite
irons #5 wedge put-
ter $100. 655-1582
GOLF EQUIPMENT.
Clubs, cart. 13 vari-
ous irons, woods,
etc plus other items.
$50. 72 golf balls,
$10, 2 bags of tees,
$3. 570-474-6028
HELMETS one XL
red, Surround ATV
helmet $50. One
XXL Camo-Surround
ATV helmet $50.
One large black
vector sport ATV
helmet $25.
570-735-7742
PAINT BALL GUNS:
Piranha BMW
00547; Brass Eagle
Eradicator with
tank, $100 or best
offer. Call
570-654-6345
PALOMINO 1988
COLT POP UP
STOVE COOLER
CONVERTOR, good
tires, new springs
$950. 693-0140
POOL TABLE
antique solid slate
with everything
included business
type excellent con-
dition $950.
570-208-3888
780 Televisions/
Accessories
TELEVISION: GE.
28” works good,
needs remote $90.
570-740-1246
TV Curtis 13.3” LCD
A/V, HDMI and VGA
inputs, remote, like
new in box. $50.
570-833-2598
TV: Sony 27” Trini-
tron color with
Sauder entertain-
ment center meas-
ures 55h x 22w, 51 l
$100. Mintek DVD
Player $15
570-829-4776
784 Tools
BUFFER Coleman
Powermate new in
box. $20.
570-288-9940
RETROFIT LASER
GUIDE for most 10”
miter saws, works
great! $12.
call 570-696-1267
786 Toys & Games
FOOSBALL TABLE
$75
570-674-2644
Too many baby
toys?
Pass them on, sell
them with an ad!
570-829-7130
LITTLE TYKES play
house good condi-
tion $175. 704-8117
786 Toys & Games
LITTLE TIKES PARTY
KITCHEN SET. Good
condition, lot’s of
plates & dishes.
$25. Thomas the
Train Table & Train
set, wooden rail-
way, tracks & train.
Excellent condition.
$75. 570-274-4058
XBOX-360. Guitar
hero guitar $15.
XBOX 360 cordless
racing wheel & ped-
als $25.
570-693-2612
788 Stereo/TV/
Electronics
BLU-RAY disc player
sony model bdp-
650 blu-ray disc
player, wifi for bd-
live & auto updates,
remote, like new, in
box. $75. Toshiba
model DVR-670
DVD recorder/hifi
vcr, two-way dub-
bing, remote, like
new in box. $75
570-833-2598
792 Video
Equipment
DVD PLAYER Toshi-
ba all region, model
sd-590. Plays dvd”s
from any country.
Remote. Like new in
box $50. 833-2598
794 Video Game
Systems/Games
XBOX 360 250gb
slim system. Holiday
bundle. $199. Eric
609-433-5660 (in
Wilkes-Barre)
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
Mr. Baseball, buying
all sports cards and
memorabilia.
203-557-0856
The Vi deo
Game St or e
28 S. Main W.B.
Open Mon- Sat,
12pm – 6pm
570-822-9929 /
570-941-9908
$$ CASH PAID $$
VI DE O GAME S &
S YS TE MS
Highest $$ Paid
Guaranteed
Buying all video
games &
systems. PS1 & 2,
Xbox, Nintendo,
Atari, Coleco,
Sega, Mattel,
Gameboy,
Vectrex etc.
DVD’s, VHS & CDs
& Pre 90’s toys,
The Video
Game Store
1150 S. Main
Scranton
Mon - Sat,
12pm – 6pm
570-822-9929
VITO’S
&
GINO’S
Wanted:
Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Highest
Prices
Paid!!
FREE
PICKUP
288-8995
WANTED
JEWELRY
WILKES BARREGOLD
( 570) 991- 7448
( 570) 48GOLD8
1092 Highway 315 Blvd
( Pl aza 315)
315N . 3 mi l es af t er
Mot orwol d
Mon- Sat
10am - 8pm
Cl osed Sundays
Highest Cash Pay
Outs Guaranteed
We Pay At Least
78% of the London
Fix Market Price
for All Gold Jewelry
Visit us at
WilkesBarreGold.com
Or email us at
wilkesbarregold@
yahoo.com
WANTED: Free or
very cheap televi-
sion for woman in
nursing home with-
out one. Approx.
20” screen thats in
good working con-
dition. Call
(570) 654-3291
800
PETS & ANIMALS
810 Cats
CAT - Female Calico
free to a good
home. 5 years old,
spayed & litter
trained. Needs a
loving home ASAP.
Also free kittens.
570-762-1015
CATS & KI TTENS
12 weeks & up.
Shots, neutered,
VALLEY CAT RESCUE
824-4172, 9-9 only.
815 Dogs
PAWS
TO CONSIDER....
ENHANCE
YOUR PET
CLASSIFIED
AD ONLINE
Call 829-7130
Place your pet ad
and provide us your
email address
This will create a
seller account
online and login
information will be
emailed to you from
gadzoo.com
“The World of Pets
Unleashed”
You can then use
your account to
enhance your online
ad. Post up to 6
captioned photos
of your pet
Expand your text to
include more
information, include
your contact
information such
as e-mail, address
phone number and
or website.
AKC ALASKAN
MALAMUTE PUPPIES!
Very beautiful,
excellent blood-
lines. Family raised.
1st shots, wormed.
$625 each.
Call 570-374-2190
or 570-259-8503
AKC DOBERMAN
PUPPIES
Black/Rust, 5
males, Parents OFA
certified. VWD
cleared, thyroid
done, Ready 5/28.
$600. Approved
homes only. For info
(570) 974-1047
AKC GREAT
PYRENEES PUPS
Both parents calm,
well mannered &
loving. Raised with
children. 1st shots,
wormed, heath
guarantee. $500.
(570) 937-4154
COCKER SPANIEL
PUPPY FOR SALE
3 months old, with
papers. All shots &
records. Crate
trained. Comes with
crate & all supplies.
$600 or best offer.
(570) 212-2335
DOBERMAN PUPPIES
AKC Puppies.
Black & rust. Veteri-
narian checked.
Tails, due claws &
shots done.
Ready May 10.
570-739-4674
ENGLISH SETTER
PUPPIES
Registered. Vet
checked, $350
Ready to go.
570-443-9189
GERMAN SHEPHERD
PUPPIES, AKC
Shepherds By Fanti
25 Yrs. Experience
Family Raised
Black/Tan,
Black/Red. M/F
Hasenborn-Arminus
570-825-5597
570-239-5498
GERMAN SHEPHERD PUPS
AKC shots, wormed
www.mountain
hauskennels.com
570-746-1689
GOLDEN RETRIEVER
& LAB PUPPIES
Yellow $350. Black
$250. Wormed.
570-836-1090
GOLDENDOODLE PUPPIES
looking for good
home. Family raised
and socialized. Vet
check and vaccina-
tions. Parents are
ACA registered.
Tootsie Roll (the
mother) is our family
pet. $500.
570-837-1980 Cell
570-713-8170
ITALIAN CANE CORSO
Mastiff Puppies
Registered and
ready to go! Parents
on premises. Blue &
blue fawn.
Vet Checked
570-617-4880
POMERANIAN PUPPIES
Parents on premises
Shots Current. $500.
570-401-1838
POMERANIANS
AKC, 16 weeks, All
Shots & wormed.
Vet checked.
$275
570-864-2643
PUPPIES
Chihuahuas, Poms,
Dachshunds,
Beagles, Shih Tzus,
Bostons, Maltese,
Toy Fox, Puggles,
Westies, Labs &
more!
570-453-6900 or
570-764-2578
SHIH TZU PUPPY
AKC registered
White in color, 5
months old, all
shots,$550, moving
must sell. 954-4656
SHILOH
SHEPHERD
Rare breed. Male,
white plush coated.
19 months old,
excellent tempera-
ment. $800
570-288-5571
S ST T. B . BERNARD ERNARD P PUP UP
ACA. 1 Female.
Wormed & shots
$500
570-274-5099
835 Pets-
Miscellaneous
CHAMELEON cage
(new) with all
accessories. $45.
Call 570-631-6635
9am-5:30pm or
570-283-5958 After
5:30.
CHINCHILLA. With
cage. 4 ft. high.
$100 570-417-9280
To place your
ad call...829-7130
SNAKE red tail BOA,
with cage $250.
Python with cage
$275. 570-704-8134
840 Pet Services
WOOF WOOF PAW SPA
Hunlock Creek, PA
Now accepting
spring appoint-
ments. Full service
salon. In home
grooming - call for
rate. Mention this
ad for 10%.
570-592-8968
We’re on Facebook!
845 Pet Supplies
FISH TANK,
30 gallon. Includes
everything you
would need. With
wooden stand. $100
Call (570) 762-1015
PET CARRIER, Pet-
mate Pet Taxi
Deluxe, small size,
18” L x 10” H x 10”
W, heavy duty plas-
tic shell with latches
to lift off top, side
ventilation, metal
pinch latch door for
easy opening,
excellent $10. 570-
709-3146 in Laflin.
900
REAL ESTATE
FOR SALE
906 Homes for Sale
Having trouble
paying your mort-
gage? Falling
behind on your
payments? You
may get mail from
people who promise
to forestall your
foreclosure for a fee
in advance. Report
them to the Federal
Trade Commission,
the nation’s con-
sumer protection
agency. Call 1-877-
FTC-HELP or click
on ftc.gov. A mes-
sage from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
ASHLEY
29 Brown St.
Solid 2 story home
with 3 bedrooms,
1.5 baths, vinyl
sided, large carport
and fenced yard.
Convenient loca-
tion. Home needs
updating by
great potential.
For more informa-
tion visit www.
atlasrealtyinc.com
$79,900
MLS 11-74
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
AVOCA
REDUCED!
314 Packer St.
Newly remodeled 3
bedroom home with
1st floor master, 1.5
baths, detached
garage, all new sid-
ing , windows, shin-
gles, water heater,
kitchen and bath-
rooms. A must
see house!
$109,900
MLS 11-73
Call Tom
570-262-7716
BACK MOUNTAIN
NEW LISTING!
573 Coon Rd.
One of a kind
property set on 6
acres. Charm
galore in this
Victorian Style
home. New kitchen
& remodeled baths
-Butler kitchen 14x8
(Indoor kidney
shape pool & spa
area that measures
approx. 2,400 sq.ft.
not included in
square footage.
Wine cellar in
basement.
$525,000
MLS# 11-81
Call Geri
570-862-7432
570-696-0888
LEWITH & FREEMAN
REAL ESTATE
570-696-3801
DURYEA
Blueberry Hill.
3 bedroom ranch.
Large lot with pool.
Lease To Buy. For
more details, call
(570) 655-8118
906 Homes for Sale
BEAR CREEK
333 Beaupland
10-1770
Living room has
awesome woodland
views and you will
enjoy the steam/
sauna. Lake and
tennis rights avail-
able with Associa-
tion membership.
(membership
optional). Minutes
from the Pocono's
and 2 hours to
Philadelphia or New
York. $349,000
Maria Huggler
CLASSIC
PROPERTIES
570-587-7000
BERWICK
1419 First Ave
2 story 4 bedroom,
2 bath. 2,244 sq ft.
$55,900.
MLS 11-521
570-696-2468
BLAKESLEE
37 Chestnut Road
(Old Farm Estates)
Custom built solid
brick 4 bedroom,
3.5 baths Colonial
style home with an
open floor plan on
1+ acre lot in the
Poconos. A few of
the amenities
include central A/C.
2 Master bedrooms
each with bath
room and fireplace,
ultramodern
kitchen, hardwood
floors throughout,
cathedral ceiling
and 2 car garage.
MLS #11-653
$469,900
Call Kim
570-466-3338
BLAKESLEE
64 N. Mountain Dr
Stunning 2 story
with 2 master bed-
room suites, over-
sized rooms, 4 bed-
rooms, 3.5 baths,
deck, neutral col-
ors, great location.
All measurements
are approximate.
Just Reduced
$185,000
570-696-2468
COURTDALE
Enjoy this Great
Courtdale Cape with
Striking kitchen, 3
bedrooms, patio,
driveway & more.
$109,900. Call Pat
570-885-4165
Coldwell Banker
Gerald L. Busch
Real Estate, Inc.
DALLAS
119 Midland Drive
Custom Built Ranch
Home -The ranch
home is IN
DEMAND! This one
offers everything
you are looking for!
Plenty of space for
in-law quarters, 4
bedrooms, cherry
kitchen, sunroom,
recreation room
with 12 seat oak
bar. This home
includes an
attached 2 car
garage plus a
detached custom
garage that can fit
up to 12 cars or
boat storage, only 5
miles to beautiful
Harveys Lake - 1 yr
Home Warranty.
All this on 4 ACRES
of serenity in the
heart of Dallas
$419,000
MLS #11-155
Call Tracy Zarola
570-574-6465
570-696-0723
LEWITH & FREEMAN
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com FRIDAY, MAY 6, 2011 PAGE 7C
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5
Add to route
140 S Grant Street,
Wilkes-Barre
GARAGE & YARD
SALES
The listed Garage Sales below can
be located on our new, interactive
Garage Sale map at timesleader.com.
Create your route and print out
your own turn-by-turn directions
to each local sale.
COURTDALE
Courtdale United
Methodist Church
225 Courtdale Ave.,
Thursday & Friday
May 5 & May 6
9 am to 8 pm
Saturday, May 7
9 am-1 pm
Saturday is bag day
DALLAS
& CRAFTS
15 Foster St.
behind CVS Drugs
Saturday, May 7
9am - 3 pm
Inside & out, rain or
shine! Lunch avail-
able, Welsh cookies
DALLAS
119 Jackson Street
Saturday May 7th
8:00AM - 1:00PM
Contents of upscale
home. Lots of good
stuff. CHEAP!
DALLAS
27 Hamilton Road
Haddonfield Hills
Household, women
& teen clothing.
Dolls, toys, Korg
electric piano, Bar-
bie's, Polly Pockets
all excellent condi-
tion. Golf clubs,
bowling balls & 27’
above ground pool.
Friday & Saturday
9am-1pm
DALLAS
310 A Overbrook Rd
Saturday 9-2
Men’s American
Eagle Shorts,
Children's Clothing
and Toys, Purses,
Washer and Dryer,
and Many
Household Items
DALLAS
45 Maplewood Ave.
(Off Huntsville Rd)
Saturday, May 7th
9 am to 2 pm
Furniture, designer
clothes, rugs.
Something For
Everyone
DALLAS
ELM CREST
Birch Street
Saturday May 7th
8:00AM to 2:00PM
Kids clothes, house
hold items, shaker
cupboard, changing
table,camping gear,
& much more.
DALLAS
Saturday Only
8AM-2PM
62 Country Club Rd.
Everything for
baby, girls clothing,
infant to 3T, infant
and toddler toys
washer/dryer and
more
Find Something?
Lose Something?
Get it back where it
belongs
with a Lost/Found ad!
570-829-7130
EDWARDSVILLE
100 Savage St
Longaburger, cloth-
ing, nurse uniforms,
collectables, baby
& kid stuff, house-
hold items. If you
want it - we have it!
Friday & Saturday
9am-2pm
EXETER
FOX MEADOWS
Turn on Schooley &
follow signs.
Saturday, May 7th
8 am to 1 pm
Children's items,
Furniture, house-
hold, bikes, & much
much more.
PLUS Free Items!!
FALLS
277-2351 Rt. 292
Saturday May 7th
9:00AM -4:00PM
Clothes, videos,
kitchen items,
plumbing supplies,
Xmas decorations ,
baby items,
collectibles & more.
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
27 Tryba Lane
Hanover Green
Clothes, baby
items, crib, toys,
bikes, household,
Rock Band DJ Hero
and More!
Saturday May 7; 8-2
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
47 Highland Dr.
May 6, 7, 8. Friday,
8-5; Saturday,
8-1; Sunday, 9-12.
Take S. Main to
Knox to Highland.
Huge sale!
Too much to list!
HANOVER TWP
Betsy Ross Drive &
108 Red Coat Lane
Liberty Hills
Saturday May 7th
7:00AM - 3:00PM
Fishing, designer
clothes, shoes &
western boots,
auto, XMas, cds
tvs, vcr, tv stands,
exercise, sewing
machine, ceramics,
household & more
HUNLOCK CREEK
127 Old Tavern Rd
Toys, odds and
ends & much more!
Saturday, May 7
Starting at 9am
Kingston
167 N. Dawes Ave
Saturday May 7th
9:00AM - 2:00PM
Household items,
miscellaneous items
& much more!
SWOYERSVILLE
355 Kossack St.
(off Main St.)
Saturday, May 7
9am -1pm
Wide selection
KINGSTON
261 Pringle Street
Saturday, 8am-5pm
Multi-Family. New
merchandise. Kid’s
clothes. French
doors, gameboy,
PS2 games, hot tub,
household, Steelers
Jerseys, furniture &
much more!
BEAUMONT
May 7 & May 8
10AM - 5 PM
Rooster collect-
ibles, garden &
outdoor items,
stained glass,
Victorian furniture,
primitives, pottery
& much more.
1103 Old Hwy. Rd
Directions: turn at
Kunkle corners
from Route 309,
right at Saab
Dealer, 1 mile on
blacktop.
570-675-3447
BIG RED BARN BIG RED BARN
Antiques &
Fabulous
Junque
LARKSVILLE
360 Vine St
Dining room & other
furniture, refrigera-
tor, washer, gas
stove & other
house hold items!
ALL CONTENTS
MUST GO!
Saturday 8am-3pm
LUZERNE
67 Seebold St.
off of Bennett St.
Toys, Tools, House-
hold items, Piano,
Wishing Wells, Bird
Houses, Records,
Clothes, Shoes,
Jewelry, Avon &
more! EARLY BIRDS
WELCOME!
Saturday 7am-3pm
LUZERNE
LUZERNE
CRITERIUM
(Bike Race)
nepacycling.com
Sunday, June 12
12:00PM - 7:00PM
Call Karen For Info
(570) 287-4333
VENDORS
WANTED
Mountain Top
56 Valley View Dr.
Saturday May 7th
8:00AM - 2:00PM
Boys & girls clothes
toys, ceiling fans,
outdoor lighting,
household & more.
MOUNTAIN TOP
Saturday May 7th
8:00AM - 2:00PM
1010 Aspen Drive
Laurel Lakes VIllage
(Take I-81, Exit 159)
Too Many Items
To List, Everything
Priced To Sell
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
MOUNTAINTOP
100 Brookfield Way
(Maplewood)
Saturday, May 7st
9 am to 12 pm
Boys clothes,
household items,
toys, books,
women’s small &
large clothes,
shoes. Something
For Everyone!!
MOUNTAINTOP
721 Ice House Dr.
Nuangola Rd to Ice
Harvest to Ice
House Dr.
Something for
everyone!
Saturday, May 7
8am-2pm
NANTICOKE
1333 S. PROSPECT
STREET
13TH ANNUAL
LCCC ALUMNI
ASSOCIATION
FLEA MARKET &
COLLECTIBLES
SHOW
SATURDAY
MAY 7
8AM TO 2 PM
MORE THAN
60 VENDORS
Free Admission
Free Parking
NANTICOKE
279 East Grand St
Fishing Equipment,
Antiques & much
much more!
RAIN OR SHINE. EARLY
BIRDS WELCOME
Friday & Saturday
8am-2pm
NANTICOKE
302 ESPY STREET
May 7th @
8 am - 12 pm
Household items,
toys, clothes, much
more.May 7th 8am
SHAVERTOWN
106 Village Dr.
Saturday, May 7th
9:00am to 1:00 pm
Lots of beautiful
things for Mom &
Prom, plus luggage
bedding, books,
loads of household
items & more
INDOOR
SALE
WEST PITTSTON
30+ Family Sale
Saturday May 7
8 am to 3 pm
Trinity Church
220 Montgomery
Avenue
More Vendors
Welcome. $10
Space. Must RSVP
570-654-3261
WILKES-BARRE
381 Park Avenue
Sat. May 7, 9AM-3
Household items,
linens, clothing &
more. Something
for everyone!
WILKES-BARRE
24 Miner Street
Saturday: 5/7
9AM -2PM
Many books, boys
(newborn to 3T)
baby items/clothes,
electronics, apt
microwave, dinner-
ware, knick knacks,
ceramics, kids
games/puzzles,
dresses, women’s
shoes, collectibles.
WILKES-BARRE
315 Moyallen St.
Saturday, May 7th
9:00am - 2:00pm
Chain saw, mower,
generator, yard
tools, electronics,
household, skin
care products,rugs
vaccuums, clothes,
dehumidifier,
wheels & tires, etc.
WILKES-BARRE
52 Mallery Place
Saturday May 7th
9:00AM - 2:00PM
Infant & toddler
toys & clothes,
household, holiday
decor & more!
WILKES-BARRE
71 S Sherman St
Puritan
Congregational
Church
Furniture, seasonal,
toys, books, cloth-
ing & house wares
Friday, May 6 9-3
Saturday, May 7 9-2
1/2 PRICE SATURDAY
WILKES-BARRE
906 S. Main St.
SA SATURDA TURDAY Y, MA , MAY Y 7TH 7TH
8:00-4:00 8:00-4:00
Directions: South
of Blackman St.
Entire contents of
nice older home.
Furniture including
beautiful sofas,
bedroom furniture,
glassware, kitchen-
ware, jewelry,
very large antique
ornate frame, beer
can collection,
linens, holiday
decorations,
Maytag washer
and dryer,lots
of hand tools,
lots of electrician
supplies, lawn
and garden,
Craftsman
lawn tractor
and much more.
CREDIT CARDS
ACCEPTED!
Sale by Cook &
Cook Estate
Liquidators
www.cookand
cookestate
liquidators.com
WILKES-BARRE
Barney Farms
88 Reliance Drive,
Sat. 5/7/11, 9-2pm
Coordinating Love-
seat/Chairs, coffee
table/end table set,
lamps, formal wing
chairs, wall decor,
PS2 gaming station/
games, children's
books, VCR tapes,
bookshelves, ping
pong table, antique
dining room table/
chairs/server, car-
pet cleaner, girl's
bedding, assorted
build-a-bears &
accessories,
assorted crystal/
glassware
Line up a place to live
in classified!
WILKES-BARRE
FLEA MARKET
VENDORS
WANTED
MAY 21, 9-3
Dan Flood PTO
FLEA MARKET &
CAR CRUISE.
706-0622/472-1943
WILKES-BARRE NORTH
St. Luke’s United
Church of Christ
Corner of 471 N.
Main St. /
Hollenback Ave.
Saturday, May 7
9am - 6pm
Monday, May 9
9am - 6pm
Half-Price Day
Tuesday, May 10
9am - 2pm
Bag Day
Homemade Food /
Refreshments!
WILKES-BARRE SOUTH
73 Amherst Avenue
(Off Old River Rd)
Saturday, May 7
8am - 1pm
Lots of toys & chil-
dren’s items. Cloth-
ing (including little
girl’s juniors and
boys size 6). Video
games, Household,
Books, Collectibles
& much more!
WILKES-BARRE TWP.
Saturday 9am-4pm
230 Pulaski St
Take Shannon St off
E. Northampton and
proceed to Pulaski.
Contents of resi-
dence to include 2
great living room
suites, fancy lamps,
exquisite tables &
cario stand, kitchen
set, hutch, loads of
new items still in
boxes, glassware,
xmas items, tons of
linen and clothing -
hats, purses, new
shoes, costume
jewlry and so much
more!
BUYING
US/FOREIGN
COINS &
CURRENCY
HIGHEST
PREMIUMS FOR
SILVER DOLLARS
& BETTER ITEMS
GOLD &
SILVER
JEWELRY &
WATCHES
ALL TYPES
OF STERLING
SILVER
Old Postcards &
Local Photo’s,
Lead Soldiers &
Old Toys, Mining
& Military Stuff,
Old Crocks, Jugs
& Bottles, China
& Glassware,
Local Advertising
STAMPS
PAYING
RECORD
CA$H
PRICES
HERITAGE
GALLERIES
DALLAS, PA
Across from
Dallas Agway
on Rt. 415
Look for blue
& white signs
Tues-Sat, 10-5
570-674-2646
ADVERTISE YOUR GARAGE SALE WITH THE TIMES LEADER! CALL 829-7130.
You’ll get a position on our online garage sales map, a listing in The Times Leader
and timsleader.com Classifieds, a rain date guarantee, nine days of advertising for
your left over items, a sign, stickers, a FREE McDonald’s breakfast and more! R
Job Seekers are
looking here!
Where's your ad?
570-829-7130 and
ask for an employ-
ment specialist
906 Homes for Sale
DALLAS
211 Hillside One
NEW PRICE!
Enjoy the comforts
& amenities of living
in a beautifully
maintained town-
house, 3/4 Bed-
rooms, family room
with fireplace out to
deck. Bright & airy
kitchen, finished
lower level, Tennis,
Golf & Swimming
are yours to enjoy
& relax. Mainte-
nance free living.
$224,900
MLS# 10-1221
Call Geri
570-696-0888
570-696-3801
LEWITH & FREEMAN
DALLAS AREA
Conveniently
located just off
Dallas Highway on
1.25 wooded acres.
Currently duplex or
convert to single,
good condition.
$117,500.
Negotiable
570-287-5775
or 570-332-1048
DALLAS
New construction
on 1 acre lot.
2500 sq. ft.
2 story, 4 or 5
bedrooms, 2.5
bath, Great room
with cathedral
ceiling, fire place,
dual zone gas heat
& central air,
2 car garage,
REDUCED Now!!
NOW $284,900.
Call 570-675-4805
DALLAS
NEW LISTING!
Secluded on a hill
but part of High
Point Acres. 2 story
Colonial, 4 bed-
rooms, 2.5 baths.
Large family room
with fireplace and
sliding door to
screened porch. 2
car garage. Central
AC. Wooded lot.
$275,000.
11-1077
Besecker Realty
570-675-3611
DALLAS
PRICE REDUCED!
19 Circle Drive
Spacious floor plan
- Hardwood floors
throughout -
Recently remodeled
kitchen & master
bath - Sunroom
heated -
Overlooking a
beautiful waterfall.
$237,000
MLS# 10-4354
Call Geri
570-696-0888
570-696-3801
LEWITH & FREEMAN
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
DALLAS
Reduced Price!
3 bedroom ranch,
refinished hard-
wood floors. Stone
fireplace and living
room. Newer deck,
roof & heat. Close
to Dallas schools. In
New Goss Manor.
$149,900.
10-2787
Besecker Realty
570-675-3611
DUPONT
Quality 3 bedroom
ranch home on
large lot. Family
room with cathedral
ceiling, gas fire-
place, 2 car
garage. Access to
flagstone patio from
family room and
master bedroom.
Above ground pool
with deck.
$165,000
MLS# 10-2905
Call Arlene Warunek
570-650-4169
Smith Hourigan
Group
(570) 696-1195
906 Homes for Sale
DUPONT
Single family home
for sale in quiet
neighborhood-
Beautiful 2400 Sq.
Ft. with 6 bedroom,
2 full baths, 2 story
home, fully air con-
ditioned, oil & gas
heat, renovated
kitchen, full unfin-
ished basement, 2
enclosed porches,
15 x 20 deck with
power awning
cover – generous
size lot, off street
parking, first floor
washer & dryer.
All appliances
included.
JUST REDUCED
$168,000
Call 570-421-0587
or Rodite@enter.net
use “Dupont Home”
in email subject
line.
EDWARDSVILLE
9 Laurel Street
Ranch with newer
roof, newer win-
dows, 100 amp
service, & main-
tained furnace. Cur-
rently rented, this
property would
make a nice invest-
ment. MLS# 11-1108
$30,000
Call Stacey L
Lauer Mobile:
570-262-1158
EXETER
527 Cherry Drive
End unit in very nice
condition on a quiet
street. Good room
sizes, full unfinished
basement, rear
deck, attached
one car garage.
$173,500
MLS #11-1254
Call Tracy Zarola
570-574-6465
570-696-0723
LEWITH & FREEMAN
FORTY FORT
151 Fort Street
Recently remodeled
3 bedroom home, 2
baths, all new
amenities, lots of
closet space, nice
corner lot with off
street parking,
garage, new car-
pet, windows &
door. Gas heat.
$129,900.00
Call (570) 852-9142
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
FORTY FORT
300 River Street
A unique architec-
tural design high-
lights this 3 bed-
room with first floor
family room. Built-
ins. Great curb
appeal and loaded
with character. Gas
heat. Newer roof.
Nice lot. Many
extras. $114,900.
List #11-1275. Ask
for Bob Kopec.
Humford Realty
570-822-5126
FORTY FORT
65 West
Pettebone St.
Beautiful remod-
eled home in nice
neighborhood. 4
bed, 3 bath, new
carpeting new
kitchen, stainless
appliances.
A must see.
PRICE REDUCED
$169,500
Leave Message
570-881-8493
906 Homes for Sale
FORTY FORT
GREAT DEAL!
NEW PRICE
1509 Wyoming Ave.
Freshly painted and
insulated, immacu-
late and sitting on
almost half an acre
this 3 bedroom 1.5
bath home can be
yours. Features
include a modern
kitchen, central
A/C. laundry room,
office and free
standing fireplace.
All appliances
included. Just move
right in! For more
details and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-604
$177,900
Call Kim
570-466-3338
FORTY FORT
Great starter home
in nice neighbor-
hood. 2 story, 2
bedroom, 1 bath.
Dining room, living
room, kitchen.
Large fenced yard.
Car port & detached
2 car garage.
$79,900
Call (570) 954-4074
or (570) 906-7614
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
315 Countrywood Dr
Pristine 3 bedroom
home boasts large
eat-in kitchen with
french door to patio,
formal dining room,
hardwood floors, tile
in kitchen and
baths, master bed-
room with walk-in
closet and master
bath with soaking
tub. Over-sized 2
car garage, con-
crete driveway.
Additional lot avail-
able for $35000.
MLS 11-1149
$259,000
Michael Slacktish
570-760-4961
CENTURY 21
SIGNATURE
PROPERTIES
570-675-5100
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
Reduced!
Bi-Level. 1,750 sq ft.
3 bedrooms, 2
baths, 1 car garage.
New carpeting,
paint, etc. Large lot.
Asking $112,500.
Deremer Realty
570-477-1149
HANOVER TWP
112 Regal Street
2 family.
Renovated bath
& kitchen, low
taxes, new
boiler, 50 x 150,
over sized
Garage,
$84,000. Call
570-825-7588
or 718-360-7283
HANOVER TWP.
8 Diamond Ave.
Loads of space in
this modernized tra-
ditional home. 3rd
floor is a large bed-
room with walk-in
closet. Modern
kitchen, family room
addition, deck over-
looking large corner
lot. Not just a
starter home but a
home to stay
in and grow! For
more informaton
and photos visit
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS #11-622
$127,900
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
906 Homes for Sale
HANOVER TWP.
94 Ferry Road
Nice vinyl sided 2
story situated on a
great corner fenced
lot in Hanover Twp.
2 bedrooms, 2
modern baths,
additional finished
space in basement
for 2 more bed-
rooms or
office/playrooms.
Attached 2 car
garage connected
by a 9x20 breeze-
way which could be
a great entertaining
area! Above ground
pool, gas fireplace,
gas heat, newer
roof and “All Dri”
system installed in
basement.
MLS #11-626
$119,900
Mark R. Mason
570-331-0982
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
HANOVER TWP.
Buttonwood
581-583
Plymouth St.
Perfect for owner
occupied. Well
maintained, bright &
spacious two family.
Each identical unit
has Approx. (1300
sq ft.) with 3 bed-
rooms, bath, large
living & dining
rooms & eat in
kitchen. Clean neu-
tral décor with wall
to wall carpet
throughout. Newer
roof & tilt-in win-
dows. Each side
has a full attic &
basement with
washer & dryer
hook-ups. Gas
heat. 581 side has a
private fenced rear
yard & was rented
for $695 Month &
now vacant . 583
side rents for $600
Month with a long
time tenant.
Separate utilities.
$98,750
MLS# 11-1293
973-476-1499
HANOVER TWP.
Buttonwood
Rutter Street
Handyman Special
1 1/2 story single
home on a nice lot.
Fix up or tear down.
Lot is 50’x120’ and
would be an attrac-
tive home site.
Asking
$12,500
Call Jim for details
Towne & Country
Real Estate Co.
570-735-8932 or
570-542-5708
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
HANOVER TWP.
LIBERTY HILLS
Reduced!
Beautiful 2 bed-
room home with loft
area that can easily
be converted to a
3rd bedroom. This
home has 2.5
baths, security sys-
tem, whole house
entertainment sys-
tem with speakers
in every room and
outside. Great mod-
ern kitchen. 2 car
garage, skylights,
huge deck and
patio. There is a
huge walkout base-
ment that is rough
plumbed for a bath-
room. Too much to
list here, this house
is a must see.
MLS #10-4589
$350,000
Call John Polifka
570-704-6846
Antonik and
Associates
570-735-7494
HANOVER TWP.
Well located
in Hanover Twp.
just off the San
Souci Highway.
Newer kitchens,
large baths & 3
bedrooms each.
Both sides are
presently occupied.
Call for appointment
$79,300
MLS# 10-4598
Call Vieve Zaroda
(570) 474-6307
Ext. 2772
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-474-6307
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
PAGE 8C FRIDAY, MAY 6, 2011 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
906 Homes for Sale
HARDING
310 Lockville Rd.
SERENITY
Enjoy the serenity
of country living in
this beautiful 2
story home on 2.23
acres surrounded
by nature the prop-
erty has it’s own
private driveway.
Great entertaining
inside & out! 3 car
garage plus 2 car
detached. A MUST
SEE! MLS#11-831
$279,900
call Nancy
570-237-0752
HARVEYS LAKE
Lakeside property
with low taxes.
View of lake, lake
access, public boat
launch across
street.
$99,000
MLS# 10-234
Call Cindy
570-690-2689
www.cindykingre.com
570-675-4400
JENKINS
HIGHLAND HILLS
Stylish Bi-Level, 3
bedrooms, granite,
stainless appli-
ances, heated in
ground pool.
$219,900 Call
570-655-8034
JENKINS TWP
REDUCED!
1717 River Road
Compact 2 story
home with 3 bed-
rooms, 1st floor
bath with laundry,
large kitchen. Park-
ing in rear with
alley access.
$39,900
MLS 11-99
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
JENKINS TWP.
23 Mead St.
Newly remodeled 2
story on a corner
lot with fenced in
yard and 2 car
garage. 4 bed-
rooms, 1 bath,
1,660 sq. ft. For
more information
and photos visit
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
$89,900
MLS 10-3684
Call Bill
570-362-4158
JENKINS TWP.
250 Susquehan-
nock Drive
Immaculate Cape
Cod home features
1st floor master
suite with office and
3/4 bath. 2nd floor
has 2 large bed-
rooms with walk in
closets and adjoin-
ing bath. 1st floor
laundry and 1/2
bath, modern
kitchen with bam-
boo floors, living
room with stone
fireplace. 2 tier
deck overlooks
above ground pool,
ready for summer
fun! For more infor-
mation and photos,
please visit
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS #11-657
$299,000
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
906 Homes for Sale
JENKINS TWP./
INKERMAN
45 Main St.
Own this home for
less than $400 a
month! Large 3
bedroom home with
formal dining room,
off street parking
and large yard. For
more information
and photos, log
onto www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS#09-2449
$64,900
Call Charles
KINGSTON
129 S. Dawes Ave.
4 bedroom, 1 bath,
large enclosed
porch with brick
fireplace. 2 car
garage, central air,
on a double lot in a
very desirable
neighborhood.
Close to schools
and park & recre-
ation, walking dis-
tance to downtown
Wilkes-Barre. Great
family neighbor-
hood. Carpet
allowance will be
considered.
$159,900
MLS #11-1434
Call Tom
570-262-7716
KINGSTON
163 Poplar St.
Nice 2 1/2 story
home with original
woodwork. Corner
lot in quiet neigh-
borhood. Roof 9
years old. Hard-
wood floors in good
condition. Ductless
AC and new 100
amp wiring
MLS #11-625
$89,000
Donald Crossin
570-288-0770
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
KINGSTON
21 Thomas Lane
Lovely home in
immaculate move-in
condition. Soak in
the hot tub or relax
by the pond! W/D
hookup on 1st flr,
coal stove in base-
ment, oversized
shower in Master
bath, large back
yard. Additional Off
Street Parking for 2
cars in rear. Proper-
ty has 2 sheds.
$149,000
MLS# 11-380
Call Toni Davis
570-714-6132
570-287-1196
SMITH HOURIGAN
KINGSTON
New Listing
Located within 1
block of elementary
school & neighbor-
hood park this spa-
cious 4 bedrooms
offers 1450 sq. ft of
living space with
1.75 baths, walk up
attic, and partially
finished basement.
Extras include gas
fireplace, an in-
ground pool with
fenced yard, new
gas furnace, hard-
wood floors &
more. Call Ann
Marie to schedule a
showing.
$114,900
Ann Marie Chopick
570-760-6769
BELL REAL ESTATE
(570) 288-6654
906 Homes for Sale
KINGSTON TWP.
PRICE REDUCED
8 Circle Drive
Only one lucky fami-
ly will be able to
make this home
their own! Beautiful-
ly kept Ranch with
2 car garage, new
bath, partially fin-
ished basement, 3
season room,
almost 1 acre in
Dallas School Dis-
trict. Home Warran-
cy included. For
more information
and photos visit our
website at
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS #11-370
$174,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
VM 101
LAFLIN
7 Hickorywood Dr.
Wonderful 4 bed-
room Ranch with
sweeping views of
the valley. Master
bedroom with walk-
in closet and bath,
ultra modern eat-in
kitchen with granite
counters and cherry
cabinets with large
island and stainless
steel appliances. 2
car garage, full
unfinished base-
ment with
walk-out to yard.
For more informa-
tion and photos visit
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS #10-4060
$269,900
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
LAKE SILKWORTH
Brand new ranch
50 yards from lake.
Double lot, 3 bed-
room, two bath,
laundry room. Full
basement, with
insulation &
sheetrock.
New well
MLS#:09-4746
$143,900
Call John Nicodem
Classic
Properties
570-718-4959
LAKE SILKWORTH
Year round lake
house. New roof,
gutters, siding,
doors, windows,
kitchen, bathroom,
appliances, heating
& cooling system,
carport & Decks.
2 bedrooms, one
bath, deeded lake
access with shared
dock.
MLS: 09-4484
$97,000
Call John Nicodem
Classic
Properties
570-718-4959
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
LARKSVILLE
111 Falcon Drive
Brand new since
2004, 3 bedrooms,
2 baths, central air,
2 car garage, shed,
6 car driveway.
Roof, kitchen, fur-
nace, a/c unit and
master bath all
replaced. Modern
kitchen with granite
island, tile floors,
maple cabinets.
Fireplace in family
room, large closets,
modern baths.
Stamped concrete
patio. For more
information and
photos visit
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS #11-1166
$279,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
906 Homes for Sale
LARKSVILLE
45 First Street W.
Fantastic Foreclo-
sure! Just the room
you need at a price
you can afford. Nice
home with off-street
parking on a quiet
dead end street. A
modern kitchen with
hardwood floors. A
great backyard for
summer fun. Terrific
potential. $75,090
MLS 11-676
570-696-2468
LUZERNE
271 Charles St.
Very nice 3 bed-
room 1.5 bath home
with detached 1 car
garage. Home has
replacement win-
dows, new carpet,
fresh paint and
remodeled bath-
rooms. This is a
must see in a nice
neighborhood,.
MLS 11-442
$99,000
Call John Polifka
570-704-6846
Antonik &
Associates, Inc.
570-735-7494
Line up a place to live
in classified!
LUZERNE
73 Parry St.
Recently renovated
3 bedroom, 1.5 bath
home on a large lot
in great location.
Steps away from
the Back Mountain
trail. Features a
wrap around porch,
hardwood floors
downstairs, new
wall-to-wall carpet-
ing upstairs. 2nd
floor laundry, brand
new bathrooms,
large walk in closet
and spacious yard.
Move in condition!
MLS 11-220
$114,900
Mark R. Mason
570-331-0982
Crossin Real
Estate
570-288-0770
MOUNTAIN TOP
310 Deer Run Drive
Spacious 11 year
old 2 story built by
Hallmark Homes
sits on 1 acre lot.
Formal living rooms
& dining rooms, eat
in kitchen with
island. Family room
with 11 foot ceiling
& fireplace. Office
on 1st floor.
Screened porch off
kitchen overlooks
in ground pool.
Large master suite
with 3 closets,
private bath with
whirlpool, separate
shower, double
vanity & radiant
heated tile floor.
3 car garage.
Finished rec room
in lower level.
Home Warranty.
NEW PRICE
$395,000
MLS# 10-938
Call Linda
(570) 956-0584
Coldwell Banker
Rundle Real Estate
570-474-2340
MOUNTAIN TOP
460 S. Mtn
Blvd.
Large well cared
for home! 4 bed-
rooms, lots of
storage. Enjoy
your summer in
your own 18x36,
in-ground, solar
heated pool,
complete with
diving board and
slide. Pool house
with bar and room
for a poker table!
Large L-shaped
deck. Don't worry
about the price of
gas, enjoy a stay-
cation all summer
long! Family room
with gas fireplace.
4 zone, efficient,
gas hot water,
baseboard heat.
Hardwood floors.
Huge eat-in
kitchen with large,
movable island.
Large, private
yard. Replace-
ment windows.
Home warranty
included.
$224,000
MLS# 11-382
Call Michael Pinko
(570) 899-3865
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-474-6307
906 Homes for Sale
MOUNTAIN TOP
6 Merganser Ct
In Forest Pointe
NEW LISTING
Attractive Fine
Line Home
''Charleston'' floor
plan. Stacked
stone, masonry,
wood burning fire-
place in family
room, brick
accents on front.
Upgraded appli-
ances. 2nd floor
laundry. Large
master bath with
whirlpool tub.
Large yard.
$265,000
MLS# 11-1264
Call Michael Pinko
(570) 899-3865
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-474-6307
MOUNTAIN TOP
Bow Creek Manor
Meticulously main-
tained 4 bedroom, 3
1/2 bath two story
on almost 1 acre.
Master bedroom
suite. 2 family
rooms. 2 fireplaces.
Office/den. Large
deck overlooking a
private wooded
yard. 3 car garage.
$365,000.
Bob Kopec
Humford Realty
570-822-5126
Mountaintop
Unbelievable VALUE!
14 Oaklawn Ave,
Mountain top PA
18707 cape cod, 3
bedrooms, 2 bath-
rooms, dining room,
office/study, family
room, finished
basement, .38 acre,
deck. At Your Ser-
vice Realty Inc. Lisa
Poholek $85,450
Call (570)902-9983
NANTICOKE
111 E. Grand St.
One half double
block. 3 bedrooms,
plaster walls,
aluminum siding
& nice yard.
Affordable @
$34,900
Call Jim Krushka
Towne & Country
Real Estate Co.
570-735-8932 or
570-542-5708
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
NANTICOKE
153 Espy St
Beautiful Home
Completely remod-
eled Inside & Out.
An absolute must
see property! New
electrical, plumbing,
roof, wall to wall
carpeting, windows,
interior & exterior
doors, new oak
kitchen with tile
floor, hardwood
staircase, all new
light fixtures, new
hot water heater
& baseboard
heating units.
MLS# 10-4137 Call
570-696-2468
NANTICOKE
330 State Street
Very spacious
3 story home
with nice size
rooms & many
recent updates.
$2,000 seller
assist available.
PRICE REDUCED
$93,000
MLS# 09-3712
Call Lynda
(570) 696-5418
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-696-1195
906 Homes for Sale
NANTICOKE
47 West Field St.
Great 7 room, 3
bedroom 1/2 double
with beautiful
woodwork,
hardwood under
carpeting, large
bedroom closets,
walk up, gas heat,
large linen closet,
plenty of storage.
Low taxes. $33,900
MLS #10-4619
Call Patricia Lunski
570-735-7494
x304 or
570-814-6671
ANTONIK &
ASSOCIATES, INC.
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
NANTICOKE
68 Tilbury Avenue
Well maintained
ranch in Tilbury
Terrace. 2 bedroom
home with hard-
wood floors, 1 bath.
Eat in kitchen.
Large “L” shaped
living/dining room.
Full basement,
partially finished.
Sunroom in back
off kitchen. 3 car
detached garage.
PRICE REDUCED
NOW $130,500!!
MLS# 10-1703
Call Linda
(570) 956-0584
Coldwell Banker
Rundle Real Estate
570-474-2340
NANTICOKE
HOME FOR SALE
Single home, 3
bedrooms, eat-in
kitchen, electric
heat, unfinished
basement, deck.
Extremely well-
maintained two-
story, 7 rooms, 3
bedrooms, 2.5
baths, eat in
kitchen, very large
dining/living room
combination, den,
front porch , deck,
and nice size yard;
electric heat; safe
neighborhood;
move-in condition
for the right buyer;
no realtors or bro-
kers; $132,999. call
570-878-2424
after 10:00 a.m.
NANTICOKE
PENDING
233 Honey Pot St.
2 bedroom, 1 bath,
1/2 double with
replacement win-
dows, carport,
newer roofs and a
nice yard on a quiet
Cul-de-sac.
MLS#11-1139.
$19,900
Call John
570-704-6846
Antonik &
Associates, Inc.
570-735-7494
NANTICOKE
W. Green St.
Nice 2 bedroom
Ranch syle home,
gas heat, finished
basement, vinyl sid-
ing, deck. Move in
Condition.
Affordable @
$89,500
Call Jim
Towne & Country
Real Estate Co.
570-735-8932 or
570-542-5708
OLD FORGE
317 Charles St.
Bring Your Hammer
& Paint Brush &
Make This Your
Home! Large single
with 4 bedrooms,
bath, side enclosed
porch, newer
furnace, deck and
3 car detached
garage. Looking for
a reasonable offer.
Priced at: $89,900
MLS# 10-2409
Call Theresa
Vacendak, CRS, GRI
570-650-5872
CENTRAL
REAL ESTATE
(570) 822-1133
906 Homes for Sale
PARDEESVILLE
738 PARDEESVILLE RD
CORNER LOT
Single family built
in 2005. 2.5 baths,
two story with
attached garage.
Oil furnace with
central air. 90 x
140 corner lot.
Kitchen with cen-
ter cooking island,
dining room,
raised ceiling with
glass door entry &
hardwood floor.
Carpeting thru out
home. Tiled
kitchen and bath.
Kitchen appli-
ances included.
NICELY PRICED
$219,900
(570) 233-1993
PITTSTON
107 Johnson St.
4 bedroom Ranch
home with hard-
wood floors, large
room sizes, gas
heat and central air,
garage and carport.
Nice home, corner
lot, large unfinished
basement. For
more information
and photos visit
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-1209
$129,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
PITTSTON
3 bedroom, 1 bath,
semi modern
kitchen with stove
and fridge. Nice
yard, one car
garage.
Priced to sell.
MLS 11-1298
$59,900
Call Lu-Ann
570-602-9280
PITTSTON
52 W. Columbus
Ave. Large 2 story
home with balcony
off master bedroom
showing views of
the valley. A great
place to see the
fireworks! Full bath
plus 3/4 bath, eat in
kitchen, enclosed
porch, first floor
laundry. Corner low
maintenance lot.
For more informa-
tion and photos visit
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-930
$115,000
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
PITTSTON TWP.
120 Parnell St.
Classic Ranch in
great location. 3
bedroom, 3 baths,
high quality
throughout. 3 sea-
son porch over
looking private rear
yard. Owners says
sell and lowers
price to
$219,900. For
more information
and photos please
visit our website at
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS #10-2817
Call Charlie for
your private
showing.
VM 101
906 Homes for Sale
PITTSTON TWP.
PRICE REDUCED
40 Gain St.
Be the first occu-
pants of this newly
constructed Ranch
home on a low traf-
fic street. All you
could ask for is
already here, 3
bedrooms, 2 baths,
hardwood and tile
floors with granite
and stainless steel
kitchen, gas fire-
place, central air, 2
car garage and
rear patio and full
basement. For
more information
and photos, log
onto www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS #10-3676
$219,900
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
PLAINS
1610 Westminster Rd
PRICE REDUCED!
Gorgeous estate
like property with
log home plus 2
story garage on 1
acres with many
outdoor features.
Garage.
MLS# 11-319
$325,000
Call Charles
PLAINS
20 Nittany Lane
Convenience! Loca-
tion! Easy Living!
This home has it all.
3 floors of living
space w/hardwood
floors and gas fire-
place in living room.
Open floor plan,
lower level family
room w/laundry and
3/4 bath. 3 bed-
rooms w/2 full
baths on upper
level. Deck and
patio for outdoor
living! 2 zone heat,
central a/c, inter-
com and stereo
plus central vac
system, 2 car
garage. What more
could you want?
MLS #11-782
$199,900
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
PLAINS
Absolute Must
See River Ridge
Townhouse!
264 Burke Street
No maintenance
fees. Many
upgrades. Move in
condition. 2,000 sq.
ft. Berber, ceramic
tile & hardwood.
2 bedroom, 2.5
baths. All appli-
ances, washer
& dryer & window
treatments includ-
ed. Walk in closet.
No units in front of
or behind. 1 car
garage. Very
private. Near all
interstates.
REDUCED TO
$179,900
Call 570-829-3162
PLAINS TWP
For Sale By Owner
Plains Township
Mill Creek Acres
4 Lan Creek Rd
Close to Mohegan
Sun & Geisinger, 4
Bedrooms, 3 Baths,
Fireplace, 2 Car
Garage. Excellent
Condition. All Appli-
ances Included.
Large yard.
Go To
www.plainsre.com
for details.
Asking $219,900
Call 570-817-1228
for showing
PLYMOUTH
401 W. Shawnee Ave
Beautifully redone 4
bedroom, 2 bath bi-
level with garage on
cozy corner lot near
Valley West High
School. New Paint,
Carpeting, Appli-
ances & more.
$139,900. Call
570-706-5496
906 Homes for Sale
PLYMOUTH
Be your own boss!
Long time Furniture
store includes
showroom, invento-
ry, 8 room brick res-
idence + 4 car
garage. Only
$225,000. Call Pat
570-885-4165
Coldwell Banker
Gerald L. Busch
Real Estate, Inc.
PLYMOUTH
Townhouse with
5 rooms, 2 bed-
rooms, 1.5 baths.
Kitchen, stove,
refrigerator &
dishwasher, wall
to wall carpeting,
covered patio,
assigned parking
space, convenient
location.
REDUCED PRICE
$55,000
MLS# 10-1062
Call Kathie
(570) 288-6654
BELL REAL ESTATE
Looking to buy a
home?
Place an ad here
and let the
sellers know!
570-829-7130
SCRANTON
103 Arnold Avenue
AFFORDABLE PRICE
Cape Cod with 1st
floor master bed-
room, 3 season
porch, attached
garage. MLS#
10-1069 $84,900
call Nancy
570-237-0752
SCRANTON
1738 Sumner Ave N
MultiFamily...Duplex
(Up & Down). In
need of TLC.
MLS# 11-730
$ 33,000
Jill Shaver Hunter
Office: (570) 328-
0306 for more
information today!
SCRANTON
341 Lincoln St. N,
Investment proper-
ty, double with very
nice size back yard.
Access to off street
parking from rear
alley. MLS# 11-1116
WOW! $26,000
Call Stacey L Lauer
570-262-1158
Today for an
appointment.
SCRANTON
416 Prospect Ave
NEW ON THE MARKET!
MultiFamily...4 UNIT
PROPERTY. Great
for investors!
MLS# 11-1217
WOW! $ 25,000
Call Jill Shaver
Hunter Office :
(570) 328-0306
SCRANTON
608 Webster St.
2 unit property,
good location,
needs work.
$24,900
570-696-2468
906 Homes for Sale
SCRANTON
802 Hampton St.
*Buyer to pay $75
doc fee at closing,
offers/contracts are
not binding until the
entire agreement is
signed (ratified) by
all parties. *If you
have not received
an offer response
w/in 72 business
hours, you may call
877-885-1624 &
leave a message
identifying the prop-
erty address, your
name, phone # &
email, & you will
receive a prompt
response.
$15,000
570-696-2468
SHAVERTOWN
304 Vista Dr
Owner financing
available. Beautifully
remodeled home,
new cabinets, gran-
ite countertops,
ceramic tile floor in
kitchen, pantry,
large master bed-
room with 2 walk-in
closets and study,
corner lot, partially
enclosed yard with
vinyl fencing, deck
with gazebo.
$289,900
MLS 10-1123
570-696-2468
SHAVERTOWN
375 Greenpond Rd.
Well kept Ranch in
Midway Manor with
7 rooms, 3 bed-
rooms, 2 baths, 2
car garage, newer
furnace.
MLS #10-4474
$162,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
SHAVERTOWN
PRICE REDUCED!
Move right into this
3 Bedroom,1 3/4
Bath Split level on a
cul de sac in Sutton
Hills. Modern eat in
kitchen, oak cabi-
nets, Living room,
wood, Fireplace
with new Stainless
Steel liner, Lower
Level family room,
laundry, Bath.
Private back yard,
deck, garage. New
roof, lifetime leaf-
less gutters, drive-
way expanded,
shelving in garage.
Quiet, private, Lake
Lehman schools.
$169,900
MLS# 10-2545
Call Sue Barre
570-696-5417
SMITH HOURIGAN
570-696-1195
Find Something?
Lose Something?
Get it back where it
belongs
with a Lost/Found ad!
570-829-7130
SHAVERTOWN
380 Lantern Hill Rd
Stunning describes
this impressive 2
story with views
from every room.
Architectural design
which features
gourmet kitchen
with granite tops.
Office with built-ins.
Finished lower level
with 2nd kitchen.
Family room with
French doors out to
rear yard. 4 car
garage. $ 775,000
MLS# 11-1241
Call Geri
570-696-0888
570-696-3801
LEWITH & FREEMAN
Selling
Your Car?
We’ll run your ad until
the vehicle is sold.
Call Classified
829-7130
ad until
s sold.
fifieedd
00
Find the car
you want
in your own
backyard.
t
i
m
e
s
l
e
a
d
e
r
a
u
t
o
s
.
c
o
m
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com FRIDAY, MAY 6, 2011 PAGE 9C
906 Homes for Sale
SHICKSHINNY
OWNER SAYS: “SELL!”
Spectacular sunlit
great room with
floor to ceiling
stone fireplace &
vaulted ceiling adds
to the charm of this
11 year young 3-4
bedrooms, 2 story
situated on almost
an acre of tranquili-
ty with fenced
above ground pool,
rocking chair porch
and a mountain
view – there’s a
formal dining room
& large living room,
2.5 Baths, new
Kitchen with dining
area & a master
suite complete with
laundry room, walk
in closet & master
bath with jetted tub
& shower and an
oversize 2 car
gar – Priced Under
Market Value
@$189,900!
MLS #10-906
Don’t delay, call
Pat today at
570-714-6114 or
570-287-1196
CENTURY 21 SMITH
HOURIGAN GROUP
SPRING BROOK TWP
6 Williams St.
Great value for the
price on quiet
street which is
closed to all main
roads is a must
see. Also comes
with home
warranty.
MLS 10-3210
$157,900
Thomas Bourgeois
516-507-9403
CLASSIC
PROPERTIES
570-842-9988
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
SWEET VALLEY
101 Lakeview Drive
Lovely lake commu-
nity features com-
munity lake rights &
pavilion. Cozy home
with native stone
fireplace, rocking
chair front porch
and newer kitchen.
MLS# 11-1353.
$74,900! Call Tracy
570-696-2468
SWEET VALLEY
REDUCED!!
Nice doublewide
with 2 bedrooms, 2
baths, kitchen, living
room, dining room,
laundry room, 3
season porch & 2
car built in garage
sitting on 1.47 pri-
vate acres.
$99,900
Five Mountains
Realty
570-542-2141
SWOYERSVILLE
3 for 1. That’s what
you will get when
you purchase this 3
unit, 2 unit &
Garage. Bring your
tools. Asking
$59,900. Call Pat
570-885-4165
Coldwell Banker
Gerald L. Busch
Real Estate, Inc.
SWOYERSVILLE
Investors Wanted!
Stone front 2 bed-
room, 2 story on
nice lot. Open 1st
floor with nice eat-in
kitchen. 2nd floor
needs tlc. Gas heat.
Space Heaters.
$32,000. Call Pat
570-885-4165
Coldwell Banker
Gerald L. Busch
Real Estate, Inc.
THORNHURST
2 or 3 bedroom
home in Country
Club Estates. 1.5
bath with lots of
storage space.
For info & pics,
1061fairway.
weebly.com
Call 570-472-3032
906 Homes for Sale
TRUCKSVILLE
172 SPRI NG GARDEN ST.
NEW ON THE
MARKET! Cozy up
in this lovely cape
cod. Charming inte-
rior, nice size deck,
fenced rear yard,
shed, rec room in
basement, utility
room, & workshop.
Attic is also partially
finished w/pull
down & many pos-
sibilities to add
more space. Paved
driveway & parking
for 6 cars, this is
not just a driveby.
MLS# 11-1363
$ 109,900
call Stacey L Lauer
Mobile: 570-262-
1158 for an appoint-
ment today!!
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
WANAMIE
950 Center St.
Unique Property.
Well maintained 2
story. 10 years old.
Privacy galore.
3.5 acres. Pole
Barn 30 x 56 for
storage of equip-
ment, cars or
boats. A must
see property.
$289,000
MLS# 10-3799
Call Geri
570-696-0888
570-696-3801
LEWITH & FREEMAN
570-288-9371
WEST PITTSTON
322 SALEM ST.
Great 1/2 double
located in nice
West Pittston loca-
tion. 3 bedrooms,
new carpet. Vertical
blinds with all appli-
ances. Screened in
porch and yard. For
more information
and photos visit
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS#10-1535
$59,000
Charlie VM 101
WEST WYOMING
438 Tripp St
SUNDAY
1:00PM-3:00PM
Completely remod-
eled home with
everything new.
New kitchen, baths,
bedrooms, tile
floors, hardwoods,
granite countertops,
all new stainless
steel appliances,
refrigerator, stove,
microwave, dish-
washer, free stand-
ing shower, tub for
two, huge deck,
large yard, excellent
neighborhood
$154,900 (835.00 /
30years/ 5%)
570-654-1490
WEST WYOMING
HOME FOR SALE
545 5th Street
Manor, ranch, sin-
gle family, 3 bed-
rooms, 2 bath-
rooms, double car
attached garage,
eat-in kitchen, din-
ing room, living
room, fireplace,
forced air furnace,
central air, unfin-
ished basement,
82x150 lot size and
spacious, deck.
Great location.
Nice yard. Perfect
neighborhood.
Must see.
$219,000 Call
(570)885-4900
before 9:00 p.m. to
set an appointment
906 Homes for Sale
WEST WYOMING
Nice 3 bedroom
Ranch home in
good condition.
Hardwood floors,
family room & office
in basement.
$124,900
MLS #11-169
Call Toni Ranieli
570-237-1032
570-288-1444
WEST WYOMING
TOY TOWN SECTION
148 Stites Street
CHARMING
BUNGALOW
$74,500
650 sq. ft.
On corner lot with
2 car garage.
2 bedrooms, 1 bath,
walk up attic & full
heated basement,
hardwood floors
with three season
room. Freshly paint-
ed & move in condi-
tion. 570-446-3254
WILKES-BARRE
241 Dana Street
Spacious 3
bedroom, 1.5 baths
with textured
ceilings, updated
kitchen, all appli-
ances including
dishwasher, tiled
bath with whirlpool
tub, 2nd floor
laundry room.
Replacement
windows.
$80,000
MLS# 11-88
Call Arlene Warunek
570-650-4169
Smith Hourigan
Group
(570) 696-1195
WILKES-BARRE
387-389 North
Hampton St.
Three Unit. Great
Location. Great
Income. Tenants
pay all utilities.
Good condition.
$95,000
Call (616) 379-1165
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
WILKES-BARRE
455 S. Main St.
Charming traditional
home. Four bed-
room, very large liv-
ing room, finished
attic, beautiful
woodwork, French
doors & fenced in
back yard.
MLS # 11-1117
$75,000
George Sailus
(570) 407-4300
TRADEMARK
REALTORS
WILKES-BARRE
57 Fulton Street
3 bedrooms, 1 bath
home in Wilkes-
Barre. This is a Fan-
nie Mae HomePath
Property. All meas-
urements are
approx. Buyer to
pay full transfer tax.
Inspections for Buy-
ers knowledge only.
Fannie Mae ''First-
Look'' property,
investment offers
will not be consid-
ered for the first 15
days of listing.
Please see
www.homepath.com
for details.
$14,900
MLS #11-695
570-696-2468
WILKES-BARRE
73 Richard Street
3 Bedroom, 1 Bath
Traditional in Very
Good Condition.
Open Layout. Off
Street Parking, Yard
& Shed. Many
Updates.
Asking $47,900
Call 570-762-1537
for showing
906 Homes for Sale
WILKES-BARRE
Affordable
Newly built 3
bedroom home.
20-year
no-interest
mortgage.
Must meet
Wyoming Valley
Habitat for
Humanity
eligibility
requirements.
Inquire at
570-820-8002
WILKES-BARRE
Large Modern Bi
Level. Newly
remodeled, hard-
wood floors, 2 story
addition. Deck,
garage, large
fenced yard. Quiet
neighborhood. Extra
amenities. $190,000
Call 570-814-5948
WILKES-BARRE
Large well kept 6
bedroom home in
quiet neighborhood.
Off street parking,
good size back
yard. Owner very
motivated to sell.
MLS 10-3668
$79,900
Call Don Crossin
570-288-0770
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
WILKES-BARRE
REDUCED
116 Amber Lane
Very nice Bi-level
home with 2-3 bed-
rooms, open floor
plan, built in
garage, driveway,
on corner lot.
Lower level family
room with pellet
stove. Move in
condition home.
For more informa-
tion and photos visit
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
$95,000
MLS 10-4538
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
WILKES-BARRE
Start Your Real
Estate Business
Here! 4 unit with
separate utilities.
Some off street
parking. $125,000.
To get started,
Call Pat
570-885-4165
Coldwell Banker
Gerald L. Busch
Real Estate, Inc.
WILKES-BARRE
Tudor Style - 12 unit
with lots of separate
utilities! Some off
street parking. Few
blocks to college.
$300,000. Call Pat
570-885-4165
Coldwell Banker
Gerald L. Busch
Real Estate, Inc.
Job Seekers are
looking here!
Where's your ad?
570-829-7130 and
ask for an employ-
ment specialist
WYOMING
520 Beverly Rd.
HARD WORK DOES
PAY - Open floor
plan accentuates
this 4 bedroom,
3.5 bath home in
Dallas School
District. Family
room with wood
burning fireplace,
deck of kitchen,
dining room. Huge
lower level ready
to be finished.
2 car garage.
PRICE REDUCED
$175,900
Call Theresa
Vacendak, CRS, GRI
570-650-5872
CENTRAL
REAL ESTATE
(570) 822-1133
906 Homes for Sale
WYOMING
530 Dennison Ave.
REDUCED
Great 3 bedroom
Cape Cod with
charm & character,
1 3/4 baths, nice
yard. MLS#
10-342 $139,900
call Nancy
570-237-0752
YATESVILLE
20 Osborne Drive
Buy a newer 2
story in the growing
Willow View Devel-
opment. This home
has 3 bedrooms,
2.5 baths, formal
dining and sitting
room, family room
with wood burning
fireplace, finished
room in lower level,
electric heat and
central air. 2 car
garage, level lot.
NEW REDUCED
PRICE.
MLS 10-2379
$246,000
Call Lu-Ann
570-602-9280
YATESVILLE
PRICE REDUCED
12 Reid st.
Spacious Bi-level
home in semi-pri-
vate location with
private back yard. 3
season room. Gas
fireplace in lower
level family room. 4
bedrooms, garage.
For more informtion
and photos visit
wwww.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 10-4740
$159,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
VM 101
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
YATESVILLE
REDUCED!
61 Pittston Ave.
Stately brick Ranch
in private location.
Large room sizes,
fireplace, central
A/C. Includes
extra lot. For more
information and
photos visit
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS #10-3512
PRICE REDUCED
$198,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
VM 101
909 Income &
Commercial
Properties
AVOCA
25 St. Mary’s St.
3,443 sq. ft.
masonry commer-
cial building with
warehouse/office
and 2 apartments
with separate elec-
tric and heat. Per-
fect for contractors
or anyone with stor-
age needs. For
more information
and photos log onto
www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
Reduced to
$89,000
MLS #10-3872
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
VM 101
909 Income &
Commercial
Properties
EDWARDSVILLE
173-175 Zerby Ave.
Great income prop-
erty with additional
garage space
(34x38) room for 3
cars to rent! Live in
one half and have
your mortgage paid
by the other!
$12,000+ potential
income!
MLS # 11-1111
$64,900
Call John Shelley
570-288-0770
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
22 W. Germania St
This 6,600 sq. ft.
concrete block
building has multiple
uses. 5 offices &
kitchenette. Over
5,800 sq. ft.. ware-
house space (high
ceilings). 2 over-
head doors.
$95,500
MLS 10-1326
Bob Kopec
HUMFORD
REALTY
570-822-5126
Let the Community
Know!
Place your Classified
Ad TODAY!
570-829-7130
HANOVER TWP.
86 Main Street
Light Hearted Old
Timer in developing
South Main ST.
corridor, adjacent
to paring lot and
within view of Public
Square and Movie
Theatre. Three
story historic build-
ing features 10'
ceilings, rubber
roof, gas hw
BB...Located in the
heart of Wilkes-
Barre's historic dis-
trict 1 block from
Public Square were
yesterday meets
today.
REDUCED $310,000
570-696-2468
JENKINS TOWNSHIP
May Street
Former Parrish
Center Hall with
kitchen & parking.
For more informa-
tion and photos visit
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS#08-2954
$179,900
Call Charlie
LARKSVILLE
462 W. State St.
Lower End Pizza!
Established prof-
itable business for
sale. Restaurant,
bar, game room,
separate dining
room. Parking for
35 cars. Turnkey
operation. Addition-
al parking lot
included.
$225,000
Call Jay Crossin
Ext. 23
Crossin Real
Estate
570-288-0770
MOOSIC
530 Rocky Glen Rd.
Industrial property
in a convenient
location! Many pos-
sibilities for busi-
ness, 3,000 sq ft of
warehouse/work
space. 1,000 sq ft
of office space.
Perfect for tractor/
trailer repair stor-
age, repo car, boat
or RV storage. 220
ft of road frontage,
perfect for car
sales on 2 plus
acres. Close to 81,
turnpike and air-
port. MLS# 11-847
$ 499,900
Call Brenda Suder
332-8924.
909 Income &
Commercial
Properties
NANTICOKE
FOR SALE
MULTI-UNIT
PROPERTY
Available immedi-
ately. Commercial
property has 2
apartments and
large office area,
lots of storage, multi
“bay” heated
garage, large yard,
ample off street
parking; all units
rented; Close to Rt
81 and Cross Valley
expressway; off-
street parking. Seri-
ous inquiries only.
No brokers/real
estate agents!
$189,999 Call
(570) 878-2424
after 10:00 a.m.
PITTSTON
1011-1015 Oak St
Available 2 buildings
on site. #1011 is a 2
story office building
with approximately
3800 square feet.
#1015 is a single
story building with
approximately 3000
square feet.
$489,000
MLS# 11-445
Call Pat Guzzy
570-407-2480
570-586-1111
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
PITTSTON
144 S. Main St.
Busy downtown
location, perfect for
your business. Be a
part of the Down-
town Revitalization.
Located across
from the Tomato
Festival lot, current-
ly has a 3 story
building on the
property. When
removed, would
leave a 30x120
building lot that
backs on Wharf
Street.REDUCED
MLS 10-2742
$14,900
Call Lu-Ann
570-602-9280
PITTSTON
5 UNIT MULTI FAMILY
2 Buildings.
4 Car garage.
Prime location with
over 6,000 sf.
3 New furnaces in
last 2 years.
New roof in ‘08.
Separate utilities.
Close to churches,
parks & town.
Fully rented -
gross income
over $25,000!!
$169,000 OBO
570-563-1261
PITTSTON
2 Unit through
8 Unit apartments
for sale in the
Greter Pittston
area. Call
570-655-1606
PLAINS TWP.
LAND!
HIGHWAY 315
2 acres of commer-
cial land. 165 front
feet. Driveway
access permit and
lot drainage in
place. WIll build to
suit tenant or avail-
able for land lease.
For more informa-
tion and photos visit
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-17
Price Negotiable
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
VM 101
WEST WYOMING
331 Holden St
10-847
Many possibilities
for this building. 40 +
parking spaces, 5
offices, 3 baths and
warehouse.
$425,000
Maria Huggler
CLASSIC
PROPERTIES
570-587-7000
WILKES-BARRE
Commercial
Property 1 block
from Courthouse,
College & Hospital.
Needs Renovation.
N. River Road
$18,500.
Call 570-991-7571
909 Income &
Commercial
Properties
WYOMING
PRICE REDUCED!
285 Wyoming Ave.
First floor currently
used as a shop,
could be offices,
etc. Prime location,
corner lot, full base-
ment. 2nd floor is 3
bedroom apartment
plus 3 car garage
and parking for
6 cars. For more
information and
photos go to
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS #10-4339
$174,900
Call Charlie
VM 101
912 Lots & Acreage
DURYEA
44.59 ACRES
Industrial Site. Rail
served with all
utilities. KOZ
approved. For more
information and
photos visit
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
$2,395,000
MLS#10-669
Call Charlie
FRANKLINTOWNSHIP
53.52 prime acres
located in the
Dallas School Dis-
trict. MLS#11-1150
$549,000
Maribeth Jones
office: 696-2600
direct: 696-6565
GOULDSBORO
902 Layman Lane
Wooded lot in Big
Bass Lake. Current
perc on file. Priced
below cost, sell
says bring all offers.
MLS#10-3564. Low
price $10,000
Thomas Bourgeois
516-507-9403
CLASSIC
PROPERTIES
570-842-9988
JENKINS TOWNSHIP
New Section in
Highland Hills,
Charles Place
Open!
Four 1+ acre lots
available. Call
570-498-9244
MOUNTAIN TOP
200 Kirby
Beautiful piece of
property located in
a nice area waiting
to be built on. Most-
ly wooded. Water,
sewer and gas are
adjacent. Going
towards Mountain-
top left onto Kirby
Ave just past Grey-
stone Manor.
$59,000
MLS 11-429
570-696-2468
PRICES REDUCED
EARTH
CONSERVANCY
LAND FOR SALE
46+/- Acres
Hanover Twp.,
$89,000
10+/- Acres
Hanover Twp.,
$69,000
28+/- Acres
Fairview Twp.,
$85,000
61+/- Acres
Nuangola
$125,000
40+/- Acres
Newport Twp.
$180,000
32 +/- Acres
Wilkes-Barre Twp.
See additional Land
for Sale at
www. earth
conservancy.org
570-823-3445
915 Manufactured
Homes
ASHLEY PARK
Laurel Run & San
Souci Parks, Like
new, several to
choose from,
Financing&Warranty,
facebook.com/
MobileOne.Sales
Call (570)250-2890
930 Wanted to Buy
Real Estate
WE BUY HOMES
Any Situation
570-956-2385
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
AVOCA
3 rooms, wall to wall
carpeting, appli-
ances, coin-op laun-
dry, off street park-
ing, security. No
pets. $410/month
(570) 655-1606
BACK MOUNTAIN
3 large 1 bedroom
apts, 3 kitchens
with appliances, 3
baths. Apts. have
access to one
another. No lease.
$795 for all 3 apts
($265 per apt.)
Convenient to all
colleges and gas
drilling areas.
Call for more info
570-696-1866
BEAR CREEK
New furnished 3
room apartment
Includes water, sep-
tic & most of the
heat. No smoking &
no pets. $750/
month. + security,
references. Could
be unfurnished. Call
(570) 954-1200
DALLAS
2 apartments
Modern 1st floor 2
bedroom apartment
& large 2nd floor 3
bedroom apart-
ment. Washer &
dryer. Gas heat. Off
street parking. No
pets. $600 - $690.
Call Joe
570-881-2517
DALLAS
PRISTINE 2
BEDROOM. APT.
Available June 1st
Taking applications
now. $700/month. +
security. Includes
appliances, sewer
& trash. No smok-
ing & no pets!! Off
Street Parking,
References &
background check
required. Call
570-675-8627
leave message
Need to rent that
Vacation property?
Place an ad and
get started!
570-829-7130
DALLAS
Short term or
month to month as
needed. 2 bed-
room, completely
furnished apartment
in beautiful area.
Includes all appli-
ances, utilities,
cookware, dishes
etc. Carport includ-
ed. $800 month.
570-675-2486
DALLAS TWP
CONDO FOR LEASE:
$1,800. 2 bedroom/
2 Bath. Call Us to
discuss our great
Amenity & Mainte-
nance program!
Call 570-674-5278
Dallas, Pa.
MEADOWS
APARTMENTS
220 Lake St.
Housing for the
elderly & mobility
impaired; all utilities
included. Federally
subsidized program.
Extremely low
income persons
encouraged to
apply. Income less
than $11,900.
570-675-6936,
8 am-4 pm, Mon-Fri.
EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY
HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE
DURYEA
Modern 2 bedroom,
2nd floor. Quiet
location. Appliances
& garbage included.
Off street parking.
No pets. $485 +
security. Call
570-479-1203
EXETER
1st floor, 2 bedroom,
eat in kitchen,
enclosed heated
porch. Large refin-
ished basement. 1
car carport. Gas
heat. Central air.
$700 + utilities &
security. Will consid-
er reduced rent for
maintenance work.
Call 570-760-6277
PERFECTLY
CHARMING
FORTY FORT -
SECOND FLOOR,
Immaculate 4
rooms with appli-
ances, laundry,
porch, parking.
Management pro-
vided, 2 YEAR
SAME RENT $465 +
UTILITIES, NO
PETS/SMOKING/
EMPLOYMENT
APPLICATION
REQUIRED.
AMERICA REALTY
570-288-1422
AMERICA
REALTY
QUALITY COLONIAL
FORTY FORT -
FIRST FLOOR
DUPLEX. UNIQUE
$595 + UTILITIES.
Cook’s kitchen with
built-ins, formal din-
ing room, front/rear
enclosed porches,
custom window
coverings. TWO
YEAR SAME RENT,
NO PETS/SMOK-
ING/EMPLOYMENT
APPLICATION
Managed
AMERICA REALTY
570-288-1422
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
HUGHESTOWN
4 Room/2 bedroom,
wall to wall carpet,
appliances, wash-
er/dryer hookup, off
street parking,
security, no pets.
$470.570-655-1606
JENKINS TWP./PITTSTON
2nd floor, newly
renovated, 2 bed-
rooms, carpet, nice
yard, easy parking.
Small Pets okay.
Heat/Water includ-
ed. $650/month.
Credit check & ref-
erences required.
Cell (917) 753-8192
To place your
ad call...829-7130
KINGSTON
1 bedroom, $425
month plus electric
& security.
Now available.
Call 570-829-0847
KINGSTON
168 S. MAPLE AVE
Carriage house
apartment, com-
pletely remodeled,
five large rooms
with 2-bedrooms,
bath with separate
tub and shower.
1300SF. 1-car
garage in private
location. Central
A/C. MLS#11-895
$1,000/Month
plus utilities
Ted Poggi
283-9100 x25
KINGSTON
2 bedroom, second
floor, off street
parking, stove &
refrigerator.
No Pets.
$520./month
Includes water
(570) 779-1684
KINGSTON
2 bedroom. $675/
month. Includes gas
heat. Security & ref-
erences required
No pets. Call
570-288-4200
KINGSTON
3rd floor studio
apartment. $475 a
month. Around 500
sq ft. Ready to rent,
Just painted. Tenant
only pays Garbage/
Cable. No Pets.
Call 1-877-531-3100
ext 104 Muriel or
email muriel@dipa
oloproperties.com
KINGST KINGSTON ON
A A GREA GREAT T PLACE!!! PLACE!!!
LIKE NEW!! LIKE NEW!!
2 bedroom
apartment in
great neighbor-
hood. 2nd floor.
Includes new
kitchen (with new
stove, dishwash-
er & microwave)
& bath w/washer
dryer hookup.
Hardwood
throughout with
ceramic tile in
kitchen and bath.
$695/mo + utili-
ties and security.
No Pets, refer-
ences required.
Call Scott
(570) 823-2431
Ext. 137
KINGSTON
E. WALNUT ST.
Light, bright, 1st
floor, 2 bedrooms,
elevator, carpet-
ed, Security
system. Garage.
Extra storage &
cable TV included.
Laundry facilities.
Heat & hot water
furnished. Fine
neighborhood.
Convenient to bus
& stores. No
pets. References.
Security. Lease.
No smokers
please. $840.
570-287-0900
KINGSTON
Pringle St.
2 bedroom, 2nd
floor. $595 + utilities
ASHLEY - 2 apts.
Ashley St.
2 bedroom, 1st floor
$595 + utilities.
2 bedroom, 2nd
floor, $550 + utilities
SHAVERTOWN
Roushey St.
2 bedroom, 2nd
floor. $595 + utilities
PLAINS
Carey St.
3 bedroom, 1/2
double. $795/mo.
+ utilities. For info,
(570) 814-9700
KINGSTON
SDK GREEN
ACRES HOMES
11 Holiday Drive
Kingston
“A Place To
Call Home”
Spacious 1, 2 & 3
Bedroom Apts
3 Bedroom
Townhomes
Gas heat included
FREE
24hr on-site Gym
Community Room
Swimming Pool
Maintenance FREE
Controlled Access
Patio/Balcony
and much more...
Call Today
or stop by
for a tour!
Now Offering
Move In Specials
570-288-9019
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
Let the Community
Know!
Place your Classified
Ad TODAY!
570-829-7130
Looking for Work?
Tell Employers with
a Classified Ad.
570-829-7130
PAGE 10C FRIDAY, MAY 6, 2011 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
944 Commercial
Properties
944 Commercial
Properties
962 Rooms 962 Rooms
971 Vacation &
Resort Properties
971 Vacation &
Resort Properties
2
8
1
1
0
3
EAST
MOUNTAIN
APARTMENTS
The good life...
close at hand
• 1 & 2 Bedroom Apts.
• Total Air-Conditioning
• Washer & Dryer
• Community Building
• Spa & Pools
• Hi-Tech Fitness Center
• Tennis & Basketball Courts
• Private Entrances
Monday - Friday 9-5
Saturday 9-1
680 Wildflower Drive
Plains, PA 18702
www.EastMountainApt.com
email:EMA@The ManorGroup.com
• 1,2 & 3 Bedroom Apts.
• Total Air-Conditioning
• Gas Heat & HW Included
• Swim Club, Heated Pools
• Hi-Tech Fitness Center
• Shopping Shuttle
• Full -Size Washer & Dryer
• Private Entrances
Regions Best
Address
200 Gateway Drive
Edwardsville, PA 18704
288-6300 822-4444
www.GatewayManorApt.com
email:GA@The ManorGroup.com
Monday - Friday 9-5
Saturday 9-1
Monday - Friday 9-5
Saturday 9-1
Monday - Friday 9-5
Saturday 9-1
IN THE HEART OF WILKES-BARRE
Immediate Occupancy!!
MARTIN D. POPKY APARTMENTS
61 E. Northampton St.
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18701
• Affordable Senior Apartments
• Income Eligibility Required
• Utilities Included! • Low cable rates;
• New appliances; laundry on site;
• Activities!
• Curb side Public Transportation
Please call 570-825-8594
TDD/TTY 800-654-5984
CEDAR
VILLAGE
Apartment
Homes
Ask About Our
Holiday Specials!
$250 Off 1st Months Rent,
& $250 Off Security
Deposit With Good Credit.
1 bedroom starting @ $690
F e a t u r i n g :
‹ Washer & Dryer
‹ Central Air
‹ Fitness Center
‹ Swimming Pool
‹ Easy Access to
I-81
Mon – Fri. 9 –5
44 Eagle Court
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18706 (Off Route 309)
570-823-8400
cedarvillage@
affiliatedmgmt.com
M ond a y - Frid a y 9 -5
Sa tu rd a y 1 0-2
W IL KE SW OOD
822-27 1 1
w w w .liv ea tw ilk esw ood .com
1 Bedroom Sta rting
a t$675.00
• Includes gas heat,
w ater,sew er & trash
• C onvenient to allm ajor
highw ays & public
transportation
• Fitness center & pool
• P atio/B alconies
• P et friendly*
• O nline rentalpaym ents
• Flexible lease term s
APARTM E NTS
*RestrictionsAp p ly
PROVINCIAL TOWER - S. MAIN
Great Commercial Store Front,
& Inside Suites Available
Steps from New Intermodal Hub
& Public Parking
FREE RENT - Call For Details Today!
570-829-1573
Starting at $650
utilities included
WILKES-BARRE
Rooms starting at
Daily $39.99 + tax
Weekly $169.99 + tax
Microwave
Refrigerator
WiFi
HBO
(570) 823-8027
www.casinocountrysideinn.com
info@casinocountrysideinn.com
Bear Creek Township
C
o
u
n
t
r
y
s
i
d
e
I
n
n
C
a
s
i
n
o
BLACK LAKE, NY
NEED A VACATION?
Come relax and enjoy
great fishing & tranquility
at it’s finest.
Housekeeping cottages
on the water with all the
amenities of home.
(315) 375-8962
www.blacklake4fish.com
daveroll@blacklakemarine.com
906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale
OFFICENTERS - Pierce St., Kingston
Professional Office Rentals
Full Service Leases • Custom Design • Renovations • Various Size Suites Available
Medical, Legal, Commercial • Utilities • Parking • Janitorial
Full Time Maintenance Staff Available
For Rental Information Call: 1-570-287-1161
180WELLES STREET
- Up to 179,908 SI avaiIabIe
- WeII-suited for manufacturing, distribution,
omce and commerciaI/retaiI enterprises
- Wet & dry sprinkIer systems
- Oñ-street parking for 170 vehicIes
- Convenient to PubIic Square, Cross VaIIey
£xpressway (Rt. 309) and Interstate 81
WWW.MERICLE.COM • 570.823.1100 • MERICLE@MERICLE.COM
- 30,000 SI to 204,122 SI avaiIabIe
- (24) Ioading doors and one (1) drive-in door
- 16' to 26' ceiIing cIear height
- Wet sprinkIer system
- AmpIe on-site traiIer storage
- Very affordabIe rents
- ImmediateIy off £xit 4 of S.R. 309
Accessible Affordable Available
350 N. PENNSYLVANIAAVE.
✓ ✓ ✓
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
LARKSVILLE
Very clean, 1st floor
3 Bedroom with
modern bath and
kitchen. New floor-
ing, large closets.
Off Street Parking,
fenced yard. Water
& garbage included.
Tenant pays electric
& gas service.
$575/month. No
pets. One year
lease.
570-760-5573
MOUNTAIN TOP
1 Bedroom apart-
ments for elderly,
disabled. Rents
based on 30% of
ADJ gross income.
Handicap Accessi-
ble. Equal Housing
Opportunity. TTY711
or 570-474-5010
This institution is an
equal opportunity
provider &
employer.
MOUNTAIN TOP
WOODBRYN
1 & 2 Bedroom,
available
immediately, No
pets. Rents based
on income start
at $395 & $430.
Handicap Accessi-
ble. Equal Housing
Opportunity.
Call 570-474-5010
TTY711
This institution is an
equal opportunity
provider and
employer.
NANTICOKE
1st floor, 1 bedroom.
Heat, water,
garbage & sewage
included. Off street
parking. All appli-
ances included.
$530 + security.
Call 570-406-5221
NANTICOKE
353 East Ridge St
1 person apartment.
1st floor. Heat,
water, sewage &
garbage included.
All appliances &
parking. $540/
month. Call
570-301-3170
NANTICOKE
Modern 3 room,
wall to wall carpet,
washer/dryer
hookup, fridge &
range. Water
sewer, garbage&
off street parking
included. $430/mo.
No pets. Call
570-735-3479
NANTICOKE
Spacious 1st floor, 1
bedroom apartment.
Hardwood floors.
Full kitchen. Large
front porch. No
pets. $450 + utilities.
Water, sewer &
trash included. Call
570-262-5399
NANTICOKE
Spacious 2 bed-
room apartment.
Wall to wall carpet,
coin operated laun-
dry on premises,
Garbage & sewer
included. $600/mo.
+ security. Credit
check & references
required. Call
Monica Lessard
570-287-1196
Ext. 3182
PARSONS
2nd floor, 2 bed-
rooms, washer,
dryer, fridge, stove
& heat included.
$685/month +
security. Call
570-332-9355
PARSONS
Newly renovated 1st
floor, 1 bedroom.
Nice neighborhood.
Appliances includ-
ed. Washer/dryer
hookup. No pets.
Security & lease.
$435/month + all
utilities. Call
570-690-3086
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
PITTSTON
2nd floor, 2 bed-
room, new win-
dows, recently
painted. Tile & wall
to wall, laundry
hookup. Gas heat &
hot water. $475 +
security & utilities.
Call (570) 417-2063
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
PITTSTON
Large half double, 3
bedrooms, 1.5
baths, kitchen,
dining & living room.
Includes sewer,
trash, refrigerator
and range.
$650 + utilities.
Call Bernie
888-244-2714
PLYMOUTH
2 bedroom apt.
Heat, water, stove
& fridge included.
Near bus stop.
$500/mo.
No smoking or
pets. Security &
references
required. Call
(570) 592-2902
PLYMOUTH
Available May 15th
1 bedroom, 2nd
floor, modern bath,
water included. No
pets. $400/month
+ security. Call
570-575-2868
PLYMOUTH
Nice, recently reno-
vated 1st floor 1
bedroom. Stove &
Fridge included.
$500 + electric &
garbage. Lease,
security, references
Call for appointment
and application.
570-417-0088
SHEATOWN
Beautiful 1st floor, 2
1/2 bedroom. Stove
and fridge. Large
kitchen, on-site
laundry room. Off
street parking. $600
+ Cooking Gas &
Electric, security,
lease & background
check. Call
570-417-0088
for appointment
WILKES-BARRE
Handicap equipped.
Large 2 bedroom.
Includes electric lift,
oversized doors,
large sit in shower.
Appliances. Heat,
hot water & much
more. Available
immediately. Refer-
ences requested.
Call (570) 417-3299
SUGAR NOTCH
675 Main St
2 bedroom, 1 bath,
1st floor rear, elec-
tric heat, stove
included. No pets.
$450/month +
utilities & security.
Call 570-371-2030
West Pittston, Pa.
GARDEN VILLAGE
APARTMENTS
221 Fremont St.
Housing for the
elderly & mobility
impaired; all utilities
included. Federally
subsidized
program. Extremely
low income persons
encouraged to
apply. Income less
than $11,900.
570-655-6555,
8 am-4 pm,
Monday-Friday.
EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY
HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
WILKES-BARRE
Mayflower
Crossing
Apartments
570.822.3968
- Light & bright
open floor plans
- All major
appliances included
- Pets welcome*
- Close to everything
- 24 hour emergency
maintenance
- Short term
leases available
Call TODAY For
AVAILABILITY!!
www.mayflower
crossing.com
Certain Restrictions
Apply*
WILKES-BARRE /
KINGSTON
Efficiency 1 & 2
bedrooms. Includes
all utilities, parking,
laundry. No pets.
From $390.
Lease, security
& references.
570-970-0847
WILKES-BARRE
1 Bedroom, 1st floor
apartment. Wash-
er/dryer hookup.
Off street parking.
Wall to wall carpet.
No Pets.
$375/month +
utilities & security.
(570) 822-7657
WILKES-BARRE
2 bedroom apart-
ment. Excellent
condition, large
storage area. $650/
month includes
heat, water &
sewage. No pets.
Security &
references required
570-283-3887
WILKES-BARRE
2 bedrooms apt.
2nd floor, stove,
fridge, fenced in
yard, $500 + gas,
electric & water.
570-417-0088 for
appointment &
application.
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
WILKES-BARRE
264 Academy St
2 bedrooms, newly
renovated building.
Washer & dryer.
$600/per month
includes heat, hot
water and parking.
646-712-1286
570-328-9896
570-855-4744
WILKES-BARRE
3 bedrooms, gas
heat with washer/
dryer hookup. $525
+ security & utilities.
No pets. Credit/
background check.
Call (570) 262-9645
WILKES-BARRE
447 S. Franklin St.
MUST MUST SEE! SEE!
1 bedroom, study,
off street parking,
laundry. Includes
heat and hot water,
Hardwood floors
and appliances.
Trash removal.
$575/per month,
Call (570) 821-5599
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
WILKES-BARRE
APARTMENTS
FOR RENT!
425 South Franklin
Street. For lease.
Available immedi-
ately, washer/dryer
on premises, no
pets. We have stu-
dio, 1, 2 bedroom
apts. On site park-
ing. Fridge, stove
provided. We have a
24/7 security cam-
era presence and all
doors are electroni-
cally locked. $450-
650/per month,
water & sewer paid,
One month/security
deposit. Call (570)
793-6377 after
10:00 a.m. to set an
appointment or
email shlomo_voola
@yahoo.com.
wilkesliving.com
WILKES-BARRE
Barney Street
3rd floor, 2-3 bed-
room attic style
apartment. Eat in
kitchen, private
entrance. Includes
hot water & free
laundry. Pets ok.
$450 / month. Secu-
rity, references.
570-237-0124
WILKES-BARRE
Clean, 2 bedroom,
2nd floor duplex.
Stove, hookups,
parking, yard. No
pets/no smoking.
$475 + utilities.
Call 570-868-4444
WILKES-BARRE
Close to Kings,
Wilkes & Downtown.
Efficiency, 1, 2 & 3
bedrooms. Heat &
hot water included.
No pets, non-smok-
ing. $410 to $950. 1
year lease & securi-
ty. 570-825-2427
WILKES-BARRE
LAFAYETTE GARDENS
SAVE MONEY THIS YEAR!
113 Edison St.
Quiet neighborhood.
2 bedroom apart-
ments available for
immediate occu-
pancy. Heat & hot
water included. $625
Call Aileen at
570-822-7944
Formerly The
Travel Lodge
497 Kidder St.,
Wilkes-Barre
Rooms Starting
at:
Daily $44.99 +
tax
Weekly $189.99
+ tax
Microwave,
Refrigerator,
WiFi, HBO
570-823-8881
www.Wilkes
BarreLodge.com
WILKES-BARRE WILKES-BARRE
LODGE LODGE
WILKES-BARRE
Scott Street
2nd floor, 5 rooms,
heat & hot water
furnished. Stove,
fridge, off-street
parking, no pets.
$400/month + secu-
rity & references.
Call 570-696-3381
Wilkes-Barre SOUTH
Charming 2 bed-
room, 2nd floor,
duplex, 1 1/2 baths,
laundry room, wall
to wall, stove &
refrigerator. Heat &
Water included.
$575
Call 570-824-4904
Looking to buy a
home?
Place an ad here
and let the
sellers know!
570-829-7130
WILKES-BARRE SOUTH
SECURE BUILDINGS
1 & 2 bedroom
apartments.
Laundry facility. Off
street parking avail-
able. Starting at
$440. 570-332-5723
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
WILKES-BARRE
Š1 & 2 bedrooms
ŠLaundry facility
ŠStove, fridge
ŠSecure building
ŠCommunity
Rooms.
ŠElevator
Š2 fully handicap
accessible apts.
also available
RECENTLY RENOVATED
Call Christy
570-417-0088
FRANKLIN GARDENS
SENIOR LIVING
WILKES-BARRE
West River St.
Large 3-4 bedroom
apartments. Heat &
hot water included.
Balcony. Off street
parking. Washer
dyer hookup. Pets
OK. Call 570-237-0124
Wilkes-Barre
Wilkes University
Campus
Studio up to 4 bed-
room. From $400.
All utilities included.
570-826-1934
Wilkes-Barre
Š2 bedroom
single,
exceptional
Nanticoke
Š2 bedroom,
large, water
included
Pittston
ŠLarge 1
bedroom water
included
Plymouth
Š3 bedroom half
double
Wilkes-Barre
Š1 bedroom,
water included
Š2 bedroom,
water included
Wyoming
Š3 bedroom
exceptional
Old Forge
Š2 bedroom
exceptional
water included
McDermott &
McDermott
Real Estate
Inc. Property
Management
570-821-1650
(direct line)
Mon-Fri. 8-7pm
Sat. 8-noon
WYOMING
BLANDINA
APARTMENTS
Deluxe 1 & 2 bed-
room. Wall to Wall
carpet. Some utili-
ties by tenant. No
pets. Non-smoking.
Elderly community.
Quiet, safe. Off
street parking. Call
570-693-2850
944 Commercial
Properties
COMMERCIAL COMMERCIAL
RET RETAIL AIL SP SPACE ACE
800 to 2400 sq. ft.
available starting at
$750/month
Established
Wilkes-Barre
Shopping
Center
973-265-4234
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
DOLPHIN PLAZA
Rte. 315
2,000 SF
Office / Retail
Next to Gymboree
4,500 SF Office
Showroom,
Warehouse
Loading Dock
4 Acres touching
I81 will build to suit.
Call 570-829-1206
DURYEA
Up to 7,500 SF
Warehouse.
Includes offices and
baths. 20’ ceilings.
3 overhead doors
with loading dock.
Much paved off
street parking.
Reduced to
$800-$2,100/mo.
Call 570-885-5919
COMMERCIAL SPACE
KINGSTON FOR RENT
620 Market St.
Newly Renovated
Prime Space.
1,250 sq. ft.,
Near Kingston
Corners. Great
location for retail or
business office.
Easy Access and
parking. Call Cliff
570-760-3427
OFFICE SPACE
18 Pierce St
Kingston, PA
Available Immedi-
ately, Off street
parking. Security
required. 3 room
Suite $300/month,
includes utilities.
570-690-0564
570-823-7564
944 Commercial
Properties
OFFICE SPACE
239 SCHUYLER AVE,
KINGSTON
2,050 sf office
space. 2nd floor.
Modern, four sep-
arate offices,
large reception
area, break room,
conference room,
private bathroom.
$795 month
+ utilities
Call 706-5628
OFFICE SPACE
West Pittston
Wyoming Ave.
High traffic location.
Office space with
Character. 885 sq.
ft. Great for busi-
ness, retail or spa.
Rent includes heat
& water. Call for
more details at
570-655-9325
OFFICE SPACE
Wyoming 900 Sf.
Utilities included.
Approx 21.5’x40’
$900/month
570-430-4396
OFFICE, RETAIL OR
WAREHOUSE SPACE
WILKES-BARRE
Starting at
$300.00/month.
First month free.
570-829-0897
PAD WITH DRIVE THRU
Available on
busy corner.
2500 sq. ft.
Wilkes-Barre
973-879-4730
PITTSTON
328 Kennedy Blvd.
Modern medical
space, labor &
industry approved,
ADA throughout, 2
doctor offices plus
4 exam rooms, xray
and reception and
breakrooms. Could
be used for any
business purpose.
Will remodel to suit.
For lease
$2,200/MO.
Also available for
sale
MLS #11-751
$595,000
Call Charlie
VM 101
PLAINS TWP
7 PETHICK DRIVE
OFF RTE. 315
1200 & 700 SF
Office Available.
Reasonable.
570-760-1513
RETAIL SPACE
EXETER
$675. per month
For appointment &
further information
call 570-237-6070
315 PLAZA
1750 & 3200 SF
Retail / Office
Space Available
570-829-1206
WAREHOUSE/LIGHT
MANUFACTURING
OFFICE SPACE
PITTSTON
Main St.
12,000 sq. ft. build-
ing in downtown
location. Ware-
house with light
manufacturing.
Building with some
office space. Entire
building for lease or
will sub-divide.
MLS #10-1074
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
VM 101
Wyoming
Office/retail. 800
Sq. feet. Recently
remodeled.
Great Location.
$500/month
+ utilities. Water &
sewer included.
Call 714-7272
947 Garages
GARAGE SPACE
2,500 sf. Zoned
Commercially in
Kingston. Two
over head garage
& entrance
doors. Private
bath. Located on
private road.
Gas Heat.
$875/month +
utilities, security
& references.
570-706-5628
950 Half Doubles
EDWARDSVILLE
Recently remodeled
large Victorian half
double. 3 bed-
rooms. Walk-out
basement. Private
yard. Porch swing.
Washer dryer
hookup. $700. Call
570-237-0124
KINGSTON
NEWLY RENOVATED
1st floor. 3 bed-
rooms, 1.5 baths,
new carpet, wash-
er/dryer hook-up,
dishwasher. $650 +
utilities. Call
570-814-3838
950 Half Doubles
KINGSTON
Newly renovated. 2
bedroom. Base-
ment, attic, yard.
$500 + utilities,
security & lease.
Call 570-287-5491
KINGSTON
Park Place
Beautiful, 3 bed-
room, 3 floors,
garage, hardwood
floors, full basement
Back yard. $950 +
utilities & security.
Call (570) 762-2878
LARKSVILLE
3 bedroom, 1 bath
half double, Freshly
cleaned & painted.
Tenant pays all utili-
ties including sewer.
$550 plus security.
Call (570) 332-5723
NANTICOKE
55 Loomis St
3 bedroom, wall
to wall carpet,
full basement &
attic, stove,
fridge & water
included. No
pets. $630
plus security
570-814-1356
Need a Roommate?
Place an ad and
find one here!
570-829-7130
PLYMOUTH
Large 1/2 double, off
street parking &
yard. 2 bedrooms, 1
1/2 baths, $575 +
security. Utilities by
tenant. Call
570-690-6289
SUGAR NOTCH
3 bedrooms, quiet
street, yard. Fresh
paint. $525/month
+ utilities, lease,
security. No pets.
Call 570-332-1216
or 570-592-1328
WILKES-BARRE
178 Charles St
Available Now!
2 bedroom, 1.5
bath, Townhouse
style. No Section 8.
$550/month + utili-
ties. References &
security required.
Call 570-301-2785
WILKES-BARRE/SOUTH
Sunny 3 bedroom,
1/2 double, painted,
w/w carpet, yard,
washer/dryer hook-
up, basement,
stove, refrigerator.
No Pets. Non
Smokers. Credit
check/references.
$525/month + 1 1/2
months security
(201) 232-8328
953Houses for Rent
BACK MOUNTAIN
2 bedroom, 2 bath
home in beautiful
rural setting next to
Friedman Farms.
$1,100 monthly. Call
570-822-2992
BEAR CREEK VILLAGE
Beautiful 2 story
4 bedroom home
for rent situated on
4 wooded acres.
Garage, shed,
$1,200. All utilities
by tenant. Security
& references
required. Small pets
ok. (570) 690-3094
DUPONT
Large completely
remodeled 2 bed-
room styled town-
house. Stove &
fridge included.
Private interior
attic & basement
access. Washer/
dryer hookup. Heat
included. Nice yard.
$750. No pets.
570-479-6722
953Houses for Rent
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
3 bedroom single
family. 1 1/2 baths.
Driveway, yard, nice
area. $800 + utilities
Call 570-332-5723
HARVEY’S LAKE
2 bedroom home.
All appliances,
water, sewer & trash.
NO PETS. Security
and lease.
570-762-6792
HUNLOCK CREEK
Retreat. 3 bed-
room home. 2
baths. Hardwood
floors. 1 car
attached garage. 3
car detached
garage. Pool, hot
tup & appliances
included. $950 +
utilities. Available
Immediately. Call
386-873-1879
KINGSTON
46 Zerby Ave
Sunday 1pm-3pm
Lease with option
to buy, completely
remodeled, mint,
turn key condition,
3 bedrooms, 1.5
baths, large
closets, with
hardwoods, carpet
& tile floors, new
kitchen and baths,
gas heat, shed,
large yard.
$134,000, seller
will pay closing
costs, $5000 down
and monthly
payments are
$995/month.
WALSH
REAL ESTATE
570-654-1490
KINGSTON
54 Krych St.
Single: 3 bed-
room, 1.5 bath,
gas heat, wall to
wall, kitchen with
stove & refrigera-
tor. Quiet street.
No pets. Not Sec-
tion 8 approved.
$675/mo.
570-288-6009
LUZERNE
6 room single family
home, gas heat.
Fenced yard. $600 +
utilities & security.
Call (570) 650-4628
MOUNTAINTOP
2 Bedroom
Cottage in quiet
setting. $875 +
utilities, security,
application & lease.
570-592-1241
MOUNT MOUNTAINT AINTOP OP
4 bedrooms, 3
baths, living room,
dining room, study,
large finished base-
ment, 2 fireplaces, ,
3/ season room,
2car garage, shed,
fenced in yard with
nice patio in quiet
neighborhood cen-
trally located to
shopping and
schools. All Appli-
ances included.
$1,300 / per month +
utilities. Security
deposit rental appli-
cation & references
required. Call
(570)-575-2293
or email:
selenasnyder@
yahoo.com
953Houses for Rent
MOUNTAINTOP
HOUSE FOR RENT
Bowcreek, available
immediately, 5 bed-
rooms, 3 bath-
rooms, stove pro-
vided, washer/dryer
hookup, double car
attached garage, no
pets. Bonus second
Master bedroom,
Great room with sky
lights, Study room,
Modern Kitchen
with Granite counter
tops, large Deck,
$1900 /per month,
plus utilities, One
month rent/security
deposit. Call (570)
406-0231 before
9:00 p.m. to set an
appointment or
email leamonvin
@yahoo.com.
MOUNTAINTOP
MIDDLEBURG
3 bedrooms, 1.5
baths, small modu-
lar. Washer/dryer
hookups. Full base-
ment, 1 car garage,
paved driveway, big
yard, shed. Crest-
wood School Dis-
trict. $600 month
plus 1st month, last
month & security.
Includes water &
sewer.
570-474-0388
NANTICOKE
3 bedrooms, 1 1/2
bath single. 1st floor
laundry. Many
extras. All new,
inside and out. Rent
to own. Owner
financing available.
570-817-0601
Leave message
with phone number
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
NANTICOKE
Desirable
Lexington Village
Nanticoke, PA
Many ranch style
homes. 2 bedrooms
2 Free Months With
A 2 Year Lease
$795 + electric
SQUARE FOOT RE
MANAGEMENT
866-873-0478
953Houses for Rent
NANTICOKE
HANOVER SECTION
Small single family
home, 2 bedrooms,
all appliances pro-
vided, no pets,
Sewer and Garbage
Paid. $525 plus
security/per month
Call (570)793-3412
NANTICOKE/WEST
Single family, 2 bed-
room home. 1.5
baths, modern
kitchen with appli-
ances, yard, partial-
ly fenced in. Off
street parking. Next
to park & bus stop.
Includes sewer &
garbage.
$600.00 + utilities
No pets. Security &
references required
Call 570-735-8544
SHAVERTOWN
IMMACULATE
2 bedroom Cape
Cod with eat-in
kitchen, hardwood
floors, gas heat,
detached garage.
$950 month + utili-
ties & security
deposit.
570-675-3178
WILKES-BARRE
MONARCH RENTALS
3 bedrooms,
all appliances
provided.
Call 570-822-7039
WILKES-BARRE
Parsons
143 Stucker Ave.
3 Bedroom 1-1/2
Bath. 1,900 square
foot Modern Home
in Great Neighbor-
hood. Includes all
Appliances. Large
fenced in yard with
deck & shed. Off
Street Parking. No
smokers / pets.
$875 / month + utili-
ties. Security, Cred-
it Check & Refer-
ences Required.
570-332-6003
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
WILKES-BARRE
Riverside Dr.
Stately brick, 4
bedroom, 2 bath &
2 half bath home.
Hardwood floors,
spacious rooms,
beautiful patio,
all appliances
included. $1,600/
month + utilities.
MLS#10-2290
570-696-3801
Call Margy
570-696-0891
WILKES-BARRE
Whole house for
rent. $1300/per
month, utilities
included, Call
845-224-9151
959 Mobile Homes
PLAINS
For sale, older 2
bedroom, 1 bath
mobile home with
AC. Located in
Heather Highlands.
$6,500/best offer.
Call (570) 735-0477
962 Rooms
KINGSTON HOUSE
Nice, clean
furnished room,
starting at $315.
Efficiency at $435
month furnished
with all utilities
included. Off
street parking.
570-718-0331
Plymouth
Share home with
couple. Furnished
private room, wash-
er/dryer, off street
parking & cable TV
$325/mo; $85/wkly
(570) 472-1535
Wanna make a
speedy sale? Place
your ad today 570-
829-7130.
Let the Community
Know!
Place your Classified
Ad TODAY!
570-829-7130
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com FRIDAY, MAY 6, 2011 PAGE 11C
CALL
AN EXPERT
Professional Services Directory
CALL
AN EXPERT
1012 Alterations/
Tailoring
Pattern Making,
Grading, Markers
Freelance service
can make patterns
from your specs or
samples and trans-
mit patterns and
markers worldwide.
Any Lines - Fast
Service
“FRONT STREET
APPAREL SERVICES”
For more
information contact
John Vezzuto at
570-441-4140
skyhawk36@
verizon.net
1015 Appliance
Service
KIRBY
VACUUMS
WHOLESALE
PRICES
Sales, service,
supplies.
Over 30 years
experience
570-709-7222
LEN HOSEY
Appliance Service
Washer/Dryer
Range/Dishwasher.
Whirlpool, Maytag,
Kitchenaid & Roper
287-7973
1024 Building &
Remodeling
ALL OLDER HOMES
SPECIALIST
825-4268.
Remodel / repair,
Interior painting &
drywall install
Look for the
BIA symbol
of quality
For information
on BIA
membership
call 287-3331
or go to
www.bianepa.com
Building or
Remodeling?
DAVE JOHNSON
Expert Bathroom
Remodeling, Whole
House Renovations,
Interior & Exterior
Carpentry. Kitchens
and Basements
Licensed &Insured
570-819-0681
DA DAVID A JONES VID A JONES
BUILDING &
REMODELING
Additions, garages,
sheds, kitchens,
bathrooms, tile
floor, finished
basements, decks,
siding, roofing,
windows, doors,
custom built oak
stairs & trim.
Licensed & insured.
No job too small.
570-256-7567 or
570-332-0933
PA #0001719
Driveways, Side-
walks, Stone Work
All top Masonry.
Bahram, 855-8405
NICHOLS CONSTRUCTION
All Types Of Work
New or Remodeling
Licensed & Insured
Free Estimates
570-406-6044
Northeast
Contracting Group
Decks, Roofs, Sid-
ing, Masonry,
Driveways, Patios,
Additions, Garages,
Kitchens, Baths, etc
(570) 338-2269
Shedlarski Construction
Home improvement
specialist, Licensed,
insured, PA
registered.Kitchens,
baths, vinyl
siding & railings,
replacement
windows & doors,
additions, garages,
all phases of home
renovations.
570-287-4067
WWW.CHESHIRE
CONSTRUCTIONSERVICES.COM
Kitchens, Baths,
Finish Basements,
Decks, Porches
Handyman Jobs.
570-357-8631
1039 Chimney
Service
A-1 ABLE CHIMNEY
Rebuild & Repair
Chimneys. All
types of Masonry.
Liners Installed,
Brick & Block,
Roofs & Gutters.
Licensed &
Insured
570-735-2257
COZY HEARTH
CHIMNEY
Chimney Cleaning,
Rebuilding, Repair,
Stainless Steel Lin-
ing, Parging, Stuc-
co, Caps, Etc.
Free Estimates
Licensed & Insured
1-888-680-7990
1042 Cleaning &
Maintainence
Looking for
someone Reliable &
Dependable to
clean your home?
SAME PERSON
EVERY TIME!
(570) 793-0776
Residential /
Commercial
Cleaning by Lisa.
Pet Sitting also
available. Call Today!
570-690-4640 or
570-696-4792
1054 Concrete &
Masonry
D. Pugh
Concrete
All phases of
masonry &
concrete. Small
jobs welcome.
Senior discount,
Free estimates
Licensed & Insured
288-1701/655-3505
GMD MASONRY
All types of All types of
concrete, concrete,
masonry and masonry and
stucco stucco
Licensed/Insured
Free Estimates
570-451-0701
gmdmasonry.com
WYOMING
VALLEY
MASONRY
Concrete, stucco,
foundations,
pavers, retaining
wall systems,
dryvit, flagstone,
brick work. Senior
Citizen Discount.
570-287-4144
570-760-0551
1057Construction &
Building
GARAGE DOOR
Sales, service,
installation &
repair.
FULLY INSURED
HIC# 065008
CALL JOE
(570)606-7489
(570)735-8551
1078 Dry Wall
MIKE SCIBEK DRYWALL
Hanging & finishing,
design ceilings.
Free estimates.
Licensed & Insured.
570-331-2355
MIRRA DRYWALL
Hanging & Finishing
Drywall Repair
Textured Ceilings
Licensed & Insured
Free Estimates
(570) 675-3378
1084 Electrical
DNF ELECTRIC
Affordable &
Reasonable Rates
No Job Too Small.
Licensed & insured.
Free estimates.
570-574-6213
570-574-7195
ECONOLECTRIC
All Phases
Electrical work
No Job
Too Small.
Residential &
Commercial
Free Estimates
Licensed-Insured
PA032422
(570) 602-7840
GRULA ELECTRIC LLC
Licensed, Insured,
No job too small.
570-829-4077
1084 Electrical
SLEBODA ELECTRIC
Master electrician
Licensed & Insured
Bucket truck to 40’
8 6 8 - 4 4 6 9
1093 Excavating
All Types Of
Excavating,
Demolition &
Concrete Work
Large & Small Jobs
FREE ESTIMATES
(570) 760-1497
1105 Floor Covering
Installation
CARPET REPAIR &
INSTALLATION
Vinyl & wood.
Certified, Insured.
570-283-1341
HARDWOOD FLOOR
REFINISHING &
INSTALLATION
Recoat your hard-
wood floors starting
at $1. A SQ. FT.
For free estimate
call 570-793-4994
1129 Gutter
Repair & Cleaning
GUTTER 2 GO, INC.
PA#067136- Fully
Licensed & Insured.
We install custom
seamless rain
gutters & leaf
protection systems.
CALL US TODAY ABOUT
OUR 10% OFF WHOLE
HOUSE DISCOUNT!
570-561-2328
GUTTERS CLEANED & REPAIRED
Window Cleaning.
Regulars, storms,
etc. Pressure
washing, decks,
docks, houses,Free
estimates. Insured.
(570) 288-6794
1132 Handyman
Services
ALL
MAINTENANCE
We Fix It
Electrical,
Plumbing,
Handymen,
Painting
Carpet Repair
& Installation
All Types
Of Repairs
570-814-9365
DO IT ALL HANDYMAN
Painting, drywall,
plumbing & all types
of home repairs,
also office cleaning
available.
570-829-5318
1135 Hauling &
Trucking
A A C L E A N I N G
A1 Always hauling,
cleaning attics, cellar,
garage, one piece or
whole Estate, also
available 10 &20 yard
dumpsters.655-0695
592-1813or287-8302
AAA CLEANING
A1 GENERAL HAULING
Cleaning attics,
cellars, garages.
Demolitions, Roofing
&Tree Removal.
FreeEst. 779-0918or
542-5821; 814-8299
A.S.A.P Hauling
Estate Cleanouts,
Attics, Cellars,
Garages, Fire &
Flood Damage.
Free Estimates,
Same Day
Service!
570-822-4582
ACTION HAULING
You Call Today,
Job Gets Done
The Same Day!!
Cleaning Houses,
Garages, Yards, etc
Call Mike,
570-826-1883 570-826-1883
CASTAWAY
HAULING JUNK
REMOVAL
823-3788 / 817-0395
Line up a place to live
in classified!
1135 Hauling &
Trucking
AFFORDABLE
JUNK REMOVAL
Cleanups/Cleanouts
Large or Small Jobs
FREE ESTIMATES
(570) 814-4631
ALL KINDS OF
HAULING & JUNK
REMOVAL
Estate Cleanouts
TREE/SHRUB TREE/SHRUB
REMOV REMOVAL AL
Free Estimates
24 HOUR
SERVICE
570-823-1811
570-239-0484
Charlie’ Charlie’s s Hauling Hauling
Residential &
Commercial,
Licensed & Insured.
Free estimates.
Whole estates, yard
waste, construction
Spring cleanup.
570-266-0360 or
570-829-0140
S & S TOWING
& GARBAGE
REMOVAL
Free estimates.
Clean out attics,
basements, estates
We buy junk cars
too! 570-472-2392
WILL HAUL ANYTHING
Clean cellars,
attics, yards &
metal removal.
Call John
570-735-3330
1162 Landscaping/
Garden
BASIL FRANTZ LAWN
& GARDEN SERVICE
Residential &
Commercial
Shrub Trimming &
Mulching. Junk
Removal. Free Est.
(570) 855-2409 or
(570) 675-3517
BITTO
LANDSCAPING &
LAWN SERVICE
Over 25 years
experience,
landscape designs,
retaining walls,
pavers, patios,
decks, walkways,
ponds, lighting,
seeding, mulch, etc
Free Estimates.
570-288-5177
Power rake your
yard, dethatching
aeration, shrubbery
trimming & spring
clean ups.
570-639-2711
Free estimates.
COUNTRY GENTLEMAN
TOTAL YARD CARE
Lawns-Shrubs -
Tilling-Mulch.
Senior Discount.
Free Estimates
Family Owned
570-287-3852
GARDEN TILLIN
570-709-1021
KELLER’S LAWN CARE
Mowing, mulching,
Spring cleanup,
gravel & trimming.
Commercial
& Residential.
570-332-7016
MOWING, TRIMMING
EDGING, SHRUBS
& HEDGES.
LAWN CARE.
FULLY INSURED
Residential & Com-
mercial
FREE ESTIMATES
570-814-0327
Rainbow
Landscaping
& Lawn Service
Spring & Fall
Cleanups. Trimming,
mulching, complete
landscape installa-
tion. Lic. & Insured.
Call 570-674-2418
To place your
ad Call Toll Free
1-800-427-8649
1162 Landscaping/
Garden
Patrick & Deb’ Patrick & Deb’s s
Landscaping Landscaping
Landscaping, basic
handy man, house
cleaning & help
moving. We even
do inside painting.
Any salvageable
items can be picked
up for free.
Free estimates.
Call 570-793-4232
Or 570-793-4773
QUALITY LAWN
& LANDSCAPE
Spring Clean Ups,
Mulching, Grass
Cutting,Fertilization,
Tree & Shrub
Maintenance &
Installation
Experienced,
Affordable, Reliable
Free Estimates
(570) 592-4847
(570) 885-1488
Spike & Gorilla’s
Lawn Care & Out-
door Maintenance
We do it all!
Lawn Care - Summer
packages available,
concrete patios,
tree trimming &
removal. Custom
dog Kennels.
570-702-2497
1165 Lawn Care
1ST Choice
Landscaping Com-
plete Lawn Mainte-
nance, Landscaping,
Junk Removal.
Free Estimates.
570-288-0552
BRUCE’S LAWNSERVICE
Established 1988.
Fully insured.
Free estimates.
(570) 746-2087 or
(570) 721-2746
COLE LAWN CARE
Will Mow &
Trim Your Lawn
For What You
Can Afford
FREE ESTIMATES
(570) 991-8474
Lawn & Shrub
Maintenance
Residential &
Commercial
Best rate guaran-
teed - Call Today!
570-283-5984
PETER’S LA PETER’S LAWNCARE WNCARE
Reliable service &
reasonable rates!
570-829-5444
570-332-4199
PORTANOVA’S LAWN
CARE Weekly & Bi-
Weekly Lawn Cut-
ting, Landscaping.
Reasonable rates.
Now accepting new
customers. Call
570-650-3985
RAINERI’S LAWN
CARE & SHRUBS
Lawns Trimmed &
Edged, Hedges Cut,
Mulch & More
Free Estimates
570-825-2779
570-954-2302
Reliable Lawncare
Stonework, mulch,
lawn work & more.
Senior Discounts.
Free Estimates
(570)357-1786
1189 Miscellaneous
Service
VITO’S
&
GINO’S
Wanted:
Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Highest
Prices
Paid!!
FREE PICKUP
288-8995
1195 Movers
BestDarnMovers
Moving Helpers
Call for Free Quote.
We make moving easy.
BDMhel pers. com
570-852-9243
Line up a place to live
in classified!
1204 Painting &
Wallpaper
A & N PAINTING
Airplane Quality at
Submarine Prices!
Interior/Exterior,
pressure washing,
decks & siding.
Commercial/Resi-
dential. Over 17
years experience!
Free estimates.
Licensed & Insured
570-820-7832
A + CLASSICAL
Int./Ext. Experts!
Aluminum, Wood
& Deck Staining
Free Estimates
Licensed-Insured
30 Years
Experience
Book Now &
Receive 10% Off
570-283-5714
A.B.C. Professional
Painting
36 Yrs Experience
We Specialize In
New Construction
Residential
Repaints
Comm./Industrial
All Insurance
Claims
Apartments
Interior/Exterior
Spray,Brush, Rolls
WallpaperRemoval
Cabinet Refinish-
ing
Drywall/Finishing
Power Washing
Deck Specialist
Handy Man
FREE ESTIMATES
Larry Neer
570-606-9638
DAVID WAYNE
PAINTING
Call About
Interior/Exterior
Specials, Drywall
& Wallpaper
570-762-6889
JASON SIMMS PAINTING
Interior/Exterior
Power Washing
Free Estimates
20 Yrs. Experience
Insured
(570) 947-2777
M. PARALI S PAI NTI NG
Int/ Ext. painting,
Power washing.
Professional work
at affordable rates.
Free estimates.
570-288-0733
PRECISION PAINTING &
POWER WASHING
Interior & Exterior
Painting, Masonry
& Decks.
Residential
& Commercial
570-338-2269
Serra Painting
Book Now For
Spring & Save. All
Work Guaranteed
Satisfaction.
30 Yrs. Experience
Powerwash & Paint
Vinyl, Wood, Stucco
Aluminum.
Free Estimates
You Can’t Lose!
570-822-3943
1213 Paving &
Excavating
EDWARD’S ALL COUNTY
PAVING & SEAL COATING
3 Generations of
experience.
Celebrating 76
years of Pride &
Tradition!
CALL NOW & Get
The 1st Seal Coat-
ing FREE with
signed contract.
Licensed and
Insured.
Free estimates.
570-474-6329
Lic.# PA021520
Mountain Top
PAVING & SEAL
COATING
Patching, Sealing,
Residential/Comm.
Licensed Bonded
Insured
570-868-8375
To place your
ad Call Toll Free
1-800-427-8649
1249 Remodeling &
Repairs
D & D
REMODELING
From decks and
kitchens to roofs,
and baths, etc.
WE DO
IT ALL!!!!!!!
CALL US FOR CALL US FOR
ALL OF YOUR ALL OF YOUR
INTERIOR AND INTERIOR AND
EXTERIOR EXTERIOR
REMODELING REMODELING
NEEDS NEEDS
570-406-9387
Licensed/Insured
YOU’VE TRIED
THE REST NOW
CALL THE
BEST!!!
Russ Keener
Construction
All types Int./Ext.
Remodeling.
Porches & Decks
Windows & Doors
Free Estimates.
PA Lic #: 079549
570-336-6958
1252 Roofing &
Siding
J&F ROOFING
SPECIALISTS
All types of roofing.
Repairs & Installation
25 Years Experience
Licensed / Insured
Free Estimates
Reliable Service
570-855-4259
J.R.V. ROOFING
570-824-6381
Roof Repairs & New
Roofs. Shingle, Slate,
Hot Built Up, Rubber,
Gutters & Chimney
Repairs. Year Round.
Licensed/Insured
ŠFREE EstimatesŠ
Jim Harden
570-288-6709
New Roofs &
Repairs, Shingles,
Rubber, Slate,
Gutters, Chimney
Repairs. Credit
Cards accepted.
FREE ESTIMATES!
Licensed-Insured
EMERGENCIES
Mister “V” Mister “V”
Constr Construction uction
Year Round
Roof Specialist
Specializing In
All Types of
Roofs, Siding,
Chimneys
& Roof Repairs
Low Prices
Free Estimates
Licensed
& Insured
28 Years
Experience
570-829-5133
SPRING
ROOFING
Special $1.29 s/f
Licensed, insured,
fast service
570-735-0846
1297 Tree Care
GASHI AND SONS
TREE SERVICE
AND STUMP
REMOVAL.
Fully Insured.
570-693-1875
1336 Window
Cleaning
Professional
Window Cleaning
& More.
Gutters, carpet,
pressure washing.
Residential/com-
mercial. Ins./bond-
ed. Free est.
570-283-9840
1339 Window
Service
SHADES, UNLTD.
Repair & Cleaning
of Draperies,
Shades, Blinds &
Fabric Awnings.
Free Estimates
Email: repairs@
shadesunltd.com
(570) 379-1234
Let the Community
Know!
Place your Classified
Ad TODAY!
570-829-7130
PLACE
YOUR
OWN
CLASSIFIED
AD
ONLINE!
IT’S FAST AND EASY!
PLUS, YOUR AD WILL
RUN FREE FOR ITEMS
PRICED UNDER $1000.
GO TO “CLASSIFIED ADS”
AND CLICK ON
“PLACE YOUR AD.”
Our online system will let you place
Announcements, Automotive Listings,
Merchandise, Pets & Animals, Real
Estate and Garage Sales.
Customize the way your ad looks
and then find it in the next day’s
edition of The Times Leader, in our
weekly newspapers and online at
timesleader.com.
NUMBER
ONE
AUDITED
NEWSPAPER
IN LUZERNE COUNTY
– AUDIT BUREAU OF CIRCULATIONS (ABC)
*Your ad will appear in the next day’s paper if placed online
before 4 p.m. Mon. through Thurs. Place on Friday before
1 p.m. for Saturday’s paper and before 4 p.m.
Our online system will let you place
Announcements, Automotive Listings, gg
965 Roommate
Wanted
DALLAS
Fully Furnished.
Remodeled
upstairs. All utilities
included. $400/mo
570-814-2141
To place your
ad Call Toll Free
1-800-427-8649
971 Vacation &
Resort Properties
FLORIDA
Boca Raton
Beautiful 5 room
home with Pool.
Fully furnished. On
canal lot. $600
weekly. If interest-
ed, write to:
120 Wagner St.
Moosic, PA 18507
971 Vacation &
Resort Properties
ORANGE
HICKORY GROVE
CAMPGROUND
Camp sites
available!
Shaded. Show-
ers, flush toilets,
water & electric.
Lake fishing,
canoeing, biking
& golf.
20 minutes from
Wilkes-Barre.
570-639-5478
or 570-371-9770
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
971 Vacation &
Resort Properties
SPRUCE CREEK, PA
30 minutes from
PSU. 300 ft. + of
exclusive fishing,
hunting, 8+ acres,
log cabin, oil heat,
out buildings, pond.
$775,000.
By appointment.
Call (717) 919-9222
It's that time again!
Rent out your
apartment
with the Classifieds
570-829-7130
WILDWOOD CREST
Ocean front, on the
Beach. 1 bedroom
Condo, pool.
5/6-6/23 $1,250/
week. 06/24 - 9/9
$1,550/week
Call 570-693-3525
Selling Your Car?
We’ll run your ad until the vehicle is sold
Call Classified at 829-7130
F U N N I E S FRIDAY, MAY 6, 2011 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
SALLY FORTH
CLASSIC PEANUTS
STONE SOUP
BLONDIE
BEETLE BAILEY
THATABABY
FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE
GET FUZZY
CLOSE TO HOME
ARGYLE SWEATER
B.C.
PICKLES
PARDON MY PLANET
MARMADUKE HERMAN
DRABBLE
GARFIELD
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM
TUNDRA