African American African Studies

s s de ote s clu N or In hor cat t du Au o E t

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Books for Course Adoption
GEOFFREY CANADA
on his personal history of violence on her new book, twenty years after

ANITA HILL

CARLOTTA WALLS LaNIER
on being one of the Little Rock Nine

on the promise and power of education on ending Africa’s human rights crisis

WES MOORE

JOHN PRENDERGAST

REBECCA SKLOOT
on science, religion, race, and class
Also, introducing:

CONTENTS
F E AT U R E T I T L E S BOOKS BY MAYA ANGELOU ........................................................2–3 FIST STICK KNIFE GUN By Geoffrey Canada ..................................4–5 OPEN CITY By Teju Cole ..................................................................6–7 THREE DAYS BEFORE THE SHOOTING . . . By Ralph Ellison ........8–9 THE SHACKLED CONTINENT By Robert Guest ..........................10–11 REIMAGINING EQUALITY By Anita Hill ....................................12–13 STRENGTH IN WHAT REMAINS By Tracy Kidder ......................14–15 THE KING LEGACY By Martin Luther King, Jr. ............................16–17 A MIGHTY LONG WAY By Carlotta Walls LaNier ........................18–19 SAVIORS AND SURVIVORS By Mahmood Mamdani ................20–21 THE OTHER WES MOORE By Wes Moore ..................................22–23 THE ENOUGH MOMENT By John Prendergast with Don Cheadle ..................................24–25 THE IMMORTAL LIFE OF HENRIETTA LACKS By Rebecca Skloot ..................................................................26–27 SWEET LAND OF LIBERTY By Thomas J. Sugrue ......................28–29 THE WARMTH OF OTHER SUNS By Isabel Wilkerson ................30–31 FOR BEGINNERS® SERIES ..........................................................32–33 SU B J E C T C AT E G OR I E S African American History, Politics, and Culture ..................................34 Anthology and Reference ..................................................................35 Biographies, Autobiographies and Memoirs ......................................35 Hip Hop, Sports, and Popular Culture..................................................37 History, Politics, and Society ..............................................................38 Literature and Fiction ........................................................................40 Order Form............................................................................................43 Index ..................................................................................................44

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H igh lig h ts
thRee daYs BeFoRe the shooting . . .
the unfinished second novel By Ralph Ellison
Edited by John F. Callahan and Adam Bradley Page 8

A new scholarly edition—with mostly never-before-seen material—of the final work of fiction by one of America’s greatest writers, available for the first time in trade paperback.
“[A] vastly ambitious informing allegory, an allegory made rich, as in Invisible Man, with the sensory details of which Ellison was such a master.” —The New York Review of Books

the shackled continent
Page 10

Power, corruption, and african lives By Robert Guest
In this lively, engaging, and, ultimately hopeful book, Robert Guest, former Africa editor for the Economist, provides a persuasive look into the persistent problems of modern Africa and offers some possible solutions.
“Astute and clever . . . [Guest has] an extremely strong and rationalist grasp of the present, and travels with the classical economists David Ricardo and Adam Smith as inspiration. The Shackled Continent is a lively and provocative read.” —RW Johnson, Sunday Times

stRide towaRd FReedom
the montgomery story By Martin Luther King, Jr.
Introduction by Clayborne Carson Page 17

Dr. King described his book as “the chronicle of fifty thousand Negroes who took to heart the principles of nonviolence, who learned to fight for their rights with the weapon of love, and who, in the process, acquired a new estimate of their own human worth.”
“Martin Luther King’s early words return to us today with enormous power, as profoundly true, as wise and inspiring, now as when he wrote them fifty years ago.” —Howard Zinn

saVioRs and suRViVoRs
darfur, Politics, and the war on terror By Mahmood Mamdani
Winner, Choice Magazine Outstanding Academic Title

Page 20

From the author of the highly praised Good Muslim, Bad Muslim, here is the first analysis of the crisis in Darfur that considers the events of the last few years within the broad context of the history of Sudan, as well as examines the efficacy of the world’s response to the crisis. Incisive and authoritative, Saviors and Survivors will radically alter our understanding of the crisis in Darfur.
“[Mamdani] has written a learned book that reintroduces history into the discussion of the Darfur crisis . . . an important book.” —The New York Times

the immoRtal liFe oF henRietta lacks
By Rebecca Skloot
Selected for Common Reading at more than 60 colleges/universities

Page 26

“What is The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks really about? Science, African American culture and religion, intellectual property of human tissues, southern history, medical ethics, civil rights, the overselling of medical advances? . . . The book’s broad scope would make it ideal for an institution-wide freshman year reading program.” —David J. Kroll, Professor and Chair, Pharmaceutical Sciences, North Carolina Central University

the waRmth oF otheR suns
the epic story of america’s great migration By Isabel Wilkerson
Winner, 2010 National Book Critics Circle Award for Nonfiction; A Booklist Top 10 Black History Nonfiction Book

“ . . . [A] massive and masterly account of the Great Migration. . . . Based on more than a thousand interviews, written in broad imaginative strokes, this book, at 622 pages, is something of an anomaly in today’s shrinking world of nonfiction publishing: a narrative epic rigorous enough to impress all but the crankiest of scholars, yet so immensely readable. ” —The New York Times Book Review
Page 30

examination copies available—see page 43 for more details • cover art © Bettmann/corbis

MAYA ANGELOU
Poet, writer, performer, teacher and director maYa angelou was raised in Stamps, Arkansas, and then went to San Francisco. In addition to her bestselling autobiographies, beginning with I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, she has also written five poetry collections, including I Shall Not Be Moved and Shaker, Why Don’t You Sing?, as well as the celebrated poem “On the Pulse of Morning,” which she read at the inauguration of President William Jefferson Clinton. For a complete listing of other titles by Maya Angelou, go to http://tinyurl.com/4gc48c4

THE COLLECTED AUTOBIOGRAPHIES OF MAYA ANGELOU
Called “simultaneously touching and comic” by The New York Times, here is a one-volume edition of all of Maya Angelou’s celebrated and bestselling autobiographies. Includes:
• • • • • • I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings Gather Together in My Name Singin’ and Swingin’ and Gettin’ Merry Like Christmas The Heart of a Woman All God’s Children Need Traveling Shoes A Song Flung Up to Heaven

“Maya Angelou is a natural writer with an inordinate sense of life and she has written and exceptional autobiographical narrative . . . a beautiful book—an unconditionally involving memoir for our time or any time.” —The Kirkus Reviews
Modern Library | HC | 978-0-679-64325-8 | 1184pp. | $40.00/$45.00 Can. | Exam Copy: $20.00

GATHER TOGETHER IN MY NAME
Gather Together in My Name continues Maya Angelou’s personal story, begun so unforgettably in I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings. During the end of World War II and still in her teens, Maya Angelou gave birth to a son—the next few years are difficult ones as she tries to find a place in the world for herself and her child. In this second volume of her poignant autobiographical series, Maya Angelou powerfully captures the struggles and triumphs of her passionate life with dignity, wisdom, humor, and humanity.
Random House | TR | 978-0-8129-8030-1 | 224pp. | $15.00/$17.50 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00

THE HEART OF A WOMAN
The Heart of a Woman sings with Maya Angelou’s eloquent prose and is filled with unforgettable vignettes of famous people, from Billie Holiday to Malcolm X. Even more central is Maya Angelou’s chronicle of the joys and the burdens of being a black mother in America and how the son she has cherished so intensely, and worked for so devotedly, finally grows to be a man.
Random House | TR | 978-0-8129-8032-5 | 352pp. | $15.00/$17.50 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00

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I KNOW WHY THE CAGED BIRD SINGS
Angelou’s moving account of her childhood and adolescence in the Depressionera South. This is an unforgettable memoir of growing up black in the 1930s and 1940s in a tiny Arkansas town where Angelou’s grandmother’s store was the heart of the community and white people seemed as strange as aliens from another planet.
“Students [. . .] find this book plunges them into a passionate, sensitive life in the midst of troubled and sometimes brutal realities. They found Maya Angelou’s spirit and strength a wellspring of pride in womanhood. Students also experienced the book as writers themselves and learned much about the memoir craft.” —Constance Berman, Director of Professional Studies, Southern Vermont College Selected for Common Reading at Berry College, Green River Community College (Auburn, WA), Luther College, and others.
Random House | TR | 978-0-8129-8002-8 | 304pp. | $17.00/$20.00 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00 teacher’s guide available

LETTER TO MY DAUGHTER
Dedicated to the daughter she never had but sees all around her, Letter to My Daughter reveals Maya Angelou’s path to living well and living a life with meaning. Here in short spellbinding essays are glimpses of the tumultuous life that led Angelou to an exalted place in American letters and taught her lessons in compassion and fortitude.
“A slim volume packed with nourishing nuggets of wisdom. . . . Overarching each brief chapter is the vital energy of a woman taking life’s measure with every step.” —Kirkus Reviews “Sound advice, vivid memory and strong opinion. . . . What is clear is that [Maya] Angelou is, all these years later, still a charmer, still speaking her mind.” —Washington Post Book World
Random House | TR | 978-0-8129-8003-5 | 192pp. | $15.00/$18.95 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00

SINGIN’ AND SWINGIN’ AND GETTIN’ MERRY LIKE CHRISTMAS
In this third self-contained volume of her autobiography, which began with I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, Maya Angelou moves into the adult world. After a failed marriage, Maya finds herself on an adventure of a lifetime touring abroad through Italy, France, Greece, Yugoslavia, and Egypt. The exciting experience is dampened only by Maya’s nagging guilt that she has abandoned the person she loves most in life, her son, whose reentrance into her world reveals to Maya the healing power of devotion and love. Charged with Maya Angelou’s remarkable sense of life and love, Singin’ and Swingin’ and Gettin’ Merry Like Christmas is a unique celebration of the human condition—and an enthralling saga that has touched, inspired, and empowered readers worldwide.
Random House | TR | 978-0-8129-8031-8 | 320pp. | $15.00/$17.50 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00

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FIST STICK KNIFE GUN
A Personal History of Violence
By Geoffrey Canada

To view trailer and official website for the documentary Waiting for ‘Superman,’ featuring Geoffrey Canada, go to: www.WaitingForSuperman.com

A new edition, including the story of the founding of Harlem Children’s Zone ong before President Barack Obama praised his work as “an all-encompassing, all-hands-on-deck anti-poverty effort that is literally saving a generation of children” and First Lady Michelle Obama called him “one of my heroes,” Geoffrey Canada was a small, scared boy growing up in the South Bronx. His childhood world was one where “sidewalk boys” learned the codes of the block and were ranked through the rituals of fist, stick, knife, and, finally, gun.
“A more powerful depiction of the tragic life of urban children and a more compelling plea to end ‘America’s war against itself’ cannot be imagined.” —The New York Times Book Review “A slim, revealing volume that should be required reading for anyone who has ever negotiated the complicated hierarchy of ‘rep’ and revenge on city streets.” —Boston Globe Beacon Press | TR | 978-0-8070-4461-2 | 192pp. $14.00/$16.00 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00 teacher’s guide available

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New Updated Edition

Also available:

FIST STICK KNIFE GUN: A PERSONAL HISTORY OF VIOLENCE
A True Story in Black and White By Geoffrey Canada
Adapted by Jamar Nicholas In a stunning pairing, acclaimed comics creator Jamar Nicholas presents Canada’s raw and riveting account, one of the most authentic and important true stories of urban violence ever told.
“Geoffrey Canada’s realistic yet hopeful voice finds fresh expression through the comic style of Jamar Nicholas. Canada’s account of his childhood and the role that violence played in shaping his experiences provides hard-won and crucial lessons.” —Pedro A. Noguera, Peter L. Agnew Professor of Education at New York University “Jamar Nicholas is a master of his craft—his drawings are full of life and truly stunning.” —Bryan Lee O’Malley, creator of Scott Pilgrim vs. The World “I wish every city had a Geoffrey Canada.” —President Bill Clinton
Beacon Press | TR | 978-0-8070-4449-0 | 144pp. | $14.00/$16.00 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00

about the author geoFFReY canada grew up in the South Bronx. Since 1990 he has been the president and chief executive officer of Harlem Children’s Zone, an organization that offers a comprehensive range of services to over 10,000 children in a nearly 100-block area of Central Harlem. Harlem Children’s Zone has been featured on The Oprah Winfrey Show, 60 Minutes, The Today Show, Good Morning America, and Nightline, and has been recognized in The New York Times. In October 2005 Canada was named one of “America's Best Leaders” by U.S. News and World Report. He is featured in the film Waiting for ‘Superman.’
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A Message from Geoffrey Canada
When my memoir, Fist Stick Knife Gun: A Personal History of Violence, was first published in 1995, it told the story of my life growing up in the South Bronx as both a victim of violence and as a perpetrator for my own survival. Things in my neighborhood and in many neighborhoods across the country have not improved since I was young. In fact, they’ve grown worse. Violence has always been a problem, but it has never been as deadly as it is today. In 2009, the Children’s Defense Fund reported that nearly nine children and teens are killed every day as a result of gun violence. With more guns and more drugs available on the streets than ever before, what chance do kids today have of surviving, let alone thriving, in the world that has been provided for them? This year my publisher, Beacon Press, has released a revised edition of Fist Stick Knife Gun, updated to reflect some of the work that has been done over the last fifteen years. At Harlem Children’s Zone, where I am now the president and CEO, we have grown to serve nearly one hundred city blocks, reaching more than ten thousand children with free programming and support. One way that we accomplish this is by placing trained and caring adults in the middle of these underserved communities, in order to let these children know that they are not alone out there. In Fist Stick Knife Gun I describe what it was like for me to be in the middle of the violence, with nowhere to run and no one to turn to. In the years since I wrote it, I have worked to protect the children who are still trapped in that difficult place. In addition to the revised edition of my memoir, Beacon Press has also released a new graphic novel adaptation of Fist Stick Knife Gun by cartoonist and illustrator Jamar Nicholas. This new version brings the book into the twenty-first century in a fresh and exciting way. It offers a new tool for understanding the circumstances and psychology of the children who must face violence every day. The problem of youth violence cannot be solved from a distance. While I believe it is essential that people begin to understand the crisis that our children face, it is more important that they start taking steps to protect them. I hope that these two new editions of Fist Stick Knife Gun will inspire today’s students, parents, activists, and concerned citizens to take these steps. When I was in college, I was absolutely focused on one thing: how to improve the outcomes for the kinds of kids I knew growing up. I still dream of the day that we find the answer to that question.

Geoffrey Canada

Jamar nicholas and geoffrey canada at the Random house second annual author event for nYc educators

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OPEN CITY
A Novel
By Teju Cole

Website: www.TejuCole.com

“The past, if there is such a thing, is mostly empty space, great expanses of nothing, in which significant persons and events float. Nigeria was like that for me: mostly forgotten, except for those few things that I remembered with outsize intensity.” long the streets of Manhattan, a young Nigerian doctor doing his residency wanders aimlessly. The walks meet a need for Julius: they are a release from the tightly regulated mental environment of work, and they give him the opportunity to process his relationships, his recent breakup with his girlfriend, his present, his past. Though he is navigating the busy parts of town, the impression of countless faces does nothing to assuage his feelings of isolation. But it is not only a physical landscape he covers; Julius crisscrosses social territory as well, encountering people from different cultures and classes who will provide insight on his journey—which takes him to Brussels, to the Nigeria of his youth, and into the most unrecognizable facets of his own soul. A haunting novel about national identity, race, liberty, loss, dislocation, and surrender, Teju Cole’s Open City seethes with intelligence. Written in a clear, rhythmic voice that lingers, this book is a mature, profound work by an important new author who has much to say about our country and our world.
“ . . . [B]eautiful, subtle, and, finally, original. . . . Cole has made his novel as close to a diary as a novel can get, with room for reflection, autobiography, stasis, and repetition. This is extremely difficult, and many accomplished novelists would botch it, since a sure hand is needed to make the writer’s careful stitching look like a thread merely being followed for its own sake. Mysteriously, wonderfully, Cole does not botch it.” —The New Yorker “With every anecdote, with each overlap, Cole lucidly builds a compassionate and masterly work engaged more with questions than with answers regarding some of the biggest issues of our time: migration, moral accountability and our tenuous tolerance of one another’s differences. . . . Cole’s writing is assured, his ideas are well developed, and his imagery is delicious.” —The New York Times

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Random House | HC 978-1-4000-6809-8 | 272pp. $25.00/$28.95 Can. | Exam Copy: $12.50

about the author teJu cole was raised in Nigeria and came to the United States in 1992. He is a writer, photographer, and professional historian of early Netherlandish art. Open City is his first novel. He lives in New York City.
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A Message from Teju Cole

Open City is narrated by Julius, a young psychiatrist of mixed Nigerian and German heritage. The story begins in 2006 in New York City and is essentially an account of the year that follows in the life of Julius. He wanders the post-9/11 city, at times talking to strangers, and at other times he keeping to himself, but always sorting through the layers of the city’s history. This is a novel of the mind, in the modernist tradition of Virginia Woolf and W.G. Sebald. But it also owes something to James Baldwin’s essayistic freedom. Julius is a loner and he is distrustful of causes, and as we follow his life—in addition to New York, he travels briefly to Brussels, and he remembers incidents from his Nigerian childhood—we see that he is also averse to drama. Because of his mixed heritage, he was an outsider while growing up in Nigeria, and thought of as white. As an adult in America, he is identified as black. Because he belongs everywhere and nowhere, he takes in the world in an intelligent and detached way. I was raised in Lagos, Nigeria (both my parents are Nigerian), and am a professional historian of Netherlandish Art, currently working on my dissertation at Columbia University. Not long before I began to write the novel, I worked as a cataloguer at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and that experience taught me a great deal about the curating. Which objects belong with each other? How does one bring together seemingly disparate micro-narratives into a coherent whole? Open City, unlike most novels, is not plot-driven. Rather, it is propelled by the narrative voice, as James Wood pointed out in his laudatory review in The New Yorker. I hope you will consider Open City for your college-level courses. I believe that it is a challenging but accessible book, formally bold, complex and memorable. The New York Times reviewer Miguel Syjuco wrote that it “does precisely what literature should do: it brings together thoughts and beliefs, and blurs borders,” and called it “a compassionate and masterly work.” Teju Cole

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THREE DAYS BEFORE THE SHOOTING . . .
The Unfinished Second Novel
By Ralph Ellison
Edited by John F. Callahan and Adam Bradley

Now in Paperback

t his death in 1994, Ralph Ellison left behind roughly two thousand pages of his unfinished second novel, which he had spent nearly four decades writing. In 1999, Random House published Juneteenth, billed as Ellison’s second novel but in actuality only the most contained and finished portion of what Ellison labored over. Indeed, Juneteenth represented only 350 pages of those roughly 3,000 pages left behind. Three Days Before the Shooting . . . gathers together in one volume, for the first time, all the parts of that planned opus, including three major sequences never before published. Set in the frame of a deathbed vigil, the story is a multigenerational saga centered on the assassination of the controversial, race-baiting U.S. senator Adam Sunraider, who’s being tended to by “Daddy” Hickman, the elderly black jazz musician turned preacher who raised the orphan Sunraider as a light-skinned black in rural Georgia. Presented in their unexpurgated, provisional state, the narrative sequences form a deeply poetic, moving, and profoundly entertaining book, brimming with humor and tension, composed in Ellison’s magical jazz-inspired prose style and marked by his incomparable ear for vernacular speech.
“Ralph Ellison’s generosity, humor, and nimble language are, of course, on display in Juneteenth, but it is his vigorous intellect that rules the novel. A majestic narrative concept.”     —Toni Morrison

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Modern Library | TR 978-0-375-75954-3 | 1136pp. $25.00/$28.95 Can. | Exam Copy: $12.50

Also by Ralph Ellison:

THE COLLECTED ESSAYS OF RALPH ELLISON
Revised and Updated By Ralph Ellison
Edited and with an Introduction by John F. Callahan Preface by Saul Bellow Compiled, edited, and newly revised by Ralph Ellison’s literary executor, John F. Callahan, this Modern Library Paperback Classic includes posthumously discovered reviews, criticism, and interviews, as well as the essay collections Shadow and Act (1964), hailed by Robert Penn Warren as “a body of cogent and subtle commentary on the questions that focus on race,” and Going to the Territory (1986), an exploration of literature and folklore, jazz and culture, and the nature and quality of lives that black Americans lead. “Ralph Ellison,” wrote Stanley Crouch, “reached across race, religion, class and sex to make us all Americans.”
“[Ellison’s] essays never fail to be elegantly written, beautifully composed, and intellectually sophisticated.” —Los Angeles Times
Modern Library | TR | 978-0-8129-6826-2 | 904pp. | $18.00/$21.00 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00

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Excerpt from Three Days Before the Shooting . . .
Chapter One Two days before the shooting a chartered planeload of Southern Negroes swooped down upon the District of Columbia and attempted to see the Senator. They were all quite elderly: old ladies dressed in little white caps and white uniforms made of surplus nylon parachute material, and men dressed in neat but old-fashioned black suits, wearing wide-brimmed, deep-crowned panama hats which, in the Senator’s walnut-paneled reception room now, they held with a grave ceremonial air. Solemn, uncommunicative and quietly insistent, they were led by a huge, distinguished-looking old fellow who on the day of the chaotic event was to prove himself, his age notwithstanding, an extraordinarily powerful man. Tall and broad and of an easy dignity, this was the Reverend A. Z. Hickman—better known, as one of the old ladies proudly informed the Senator’s secretary, as “God’s Trombone.” This, however, was about all they were willing to explain. Forty-four in number, the women with their fans and satchels and picnic baskets, and the men carrying new blue airline take-on bags, they listened intently while Reverend Hickman did their talking. “Ma’am,” Hickman said, his voice deep and resonant as he nodded toward the door of the Senator’s private office, “you just tell the Senator that Hickman has arrived. When he hears who’s out here he’ll know that it’s important and want to see us.” “But I’ve told you that the Senator isn’t available,” the secretary said. “Just what is your business? Who are you, anyway? Are you his constituents?” “Constituents?” Suddenly the old man smiled. “No, miss,” he said, “the Senator doesn’t even have anybody like us in his state. We’re from down where we’re among the counted but not among the heard.” “Then why are you coming here?” she said. “What is your business?” “He’ll tell you, ma’am,” Hickman said. “He’ll know who we are; all you have to do is tell him that we have arrived. . . . ” The secretary, a young Mississippian, sighed. Obviously these were Southern Negroes of a type she had known all her life—and old ones; yet instead of being already in herdlike movement toward the door they were calmly waiting, as though she hadn’t said a word. And now she had a suspicion that, for all their staring eyes, she actually didn’t exist for them. They just stood there, now looking oddly like a delegation of Asians who had lost their interpreter along the way, and were trying to tell her something which she had no interest in hearing, through this old man who himself did not know the language. Suddenly they no longer seemed familiar, and a feeling of dreamlike incongruity came over her. They were so many that she could no longer see the large abstract paintings hung along the paneled wall, nor the framed facsimiles of State Documents which hung above a bust of Vice-President Calhoun. Some of the old women were calmly plying their palm-leaf fans, as though in serene defiance of the droning air conditioner. Yet she could see no trace of impertinence in their eyes, nor any of the anger which the Senator usually aroused in members of their group. Instead, they seemed resigned, like people embarked upon a difficult journey who were already far beyond the point of no return. Her uneasiness grew; then she blotted out the others by focusing her eyes narrowly upon their leader. And when she spoke again her voice took on a nervous edge.
Excerpted from Three Days Before the Shooting . . . by Ralph Ellison. Excerpted by permission of Modern Library, a division of Random House, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.

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THE SHACKLED CONTINENT
Power, Corruption, and African Lives
By Robert Guest

W
Now in Paperback

hy is Africa so poor? Robert Guest, a journalist for The Economist magazine, went on a seven-year quest to find out. He reported from the killing fields of Congo. He witnessed the collapse of Zimbabwe. He met lonely reformers, brave dissidents and powerful crooks. He talked to peasants about property rights and mobile-phone entrepreneurs who are helping the continent to leap-frog into the information age. For the world’s poorest people, economics is a matter of life and death. Yet development experts have only a hazy understanding of why some countries are rich and others poor. With wit, compassion and analytical rigor, Robert Guest examines what is holding Africa back. He concludes that bad government is the main cause of the continent’s woes: that too many people with power use it to prey on those who work for a living. Yet he sees hope: governments can change, and roughand-tumble democracy is spreading across Africa with exhilarating speed.

Smithsonian Books | TR 978-1-58834-297-3 | 288pp. $21.95/$25.95 Can. | Exam Copy: $11.00

“I doubt whether there is a better brief introduction to the travails of modern Africa and their causes.” —Anthony Daniels, Sunday Telegraph “Astute and clever . . . [Guest has] an extremely strong and rationalist grasp of the present, and travels with the classical economists David Ricardo and Adam Smith as inspiration. The Shackled Continent is a lively and provocative read.” —RW Johnson, Sunday Times “It seems odd that Robert Guest causes as much trouble as he does. The 33-year-old Africa editor of the influential Economist magazine is personable, witty [and] eminently reasonable. But [he] brings people’s blood to boiling point quicker than one can say The Shackled Continent.” —Jeremy Gordin, The Star, South Africa

about the author RoBeRt guest was The Economist magazine’s Africa editor. He has reported from nearly 70 countries, roughly half of them during his seven years covering Africa. He has won several awards, and is now The Economist’s Washington correspondent.
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A Message from Robert Guest

I once hitched a ride on a truck through a West African rain forest. The journey was supposed to take less than a day, but it took four. The dirt roads were fine so long as it didn’t rain. But we were in a rain forest, so it rained often and hard, turning our route into a swamp. A collapsed bridge slowed us down, too. The worst delays, however, were caused by police road blocks, of which we met 47. Every few miles, we’d see a couple of rusty oil drums and some barbed wire in the middle of the road, and we’d have to stop. A plump gendarme would check our axles and tail-lights and pick over our papers, hoping to find a fault he could demand a bribe to overlook. Sometimes, this took hours. The pithiest explanation of why travelers in Cameroon have to endure such mistreatment came from the policeman at road block number 31. He had invented a new rule about not carrying passengers in beer trucks. When I put it to him that the law he was citing did not, in fact, exist, he patted his holster and replied: “Do you have a gun? No. I have a gun, so I know the rules.” Africa is poor today for many reasons, including the legacy of colonialism, the frequent outbreak of civil war and the high prevalence of energy-sapping diseases. But to my mind, the biggest obstacle to African prosperity is bad governance. Those road blocks are a good illustration of how power is too often wielded on the continent: the men with the guns make the rules, and those who work for a living have to pay tribute. What Africans need is not more aid, I argue, but less predatory government. I’m always struck, when I give talks about Africa at American universities, how many young people seem to care so much about my subject. When I tell stories about war, disease and suffering, they are visibly moved. When I describe the courage and ingenuity of so many Africans I know, they are impressed. Yet what really animates them is the complex and incredibly difficult question that I try to address in my book: why is Africa so poor, and how can it become less so? It is a question that links what they read in economics textbooks with what they see on the news. It spans several disciplines, from political science to environmental studies. It involves issues they are passionate about, from AIDS to global warming. And thinking about it helps them to understand the world we all live in a little better. At least, that is my hope. Robert Guest

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11

REIMAGINING EQUALITY
Stories of Gender, Race, and the Search for Home
By Anita Hill
n 1991, Anita Hill testified at the Senate confirmation hearings of Justice Clarence Thomas. Her courageous testimony has been credited with the launch of modern-day awareness about sexual harassment. This controversial event, teeming with issues of race and gender, set Hill on the path that has established her as a public figure and scholarly authority on matters of gender, race, and class equality. In Reimagining Equality, Hill dives head first into these issues as she examines the concept of ‘home’ as the nexus of the epic struggles of women and African Americans in our nation’s history. She explores how the personal experiences of those disenfranchised by racial and gender inequality has historically informed the struggles for equality and justice. In the 19th and 20th centuries, Hill explains, American women, barred from the workplace and the polls by male chauvinist traditions, argued that their roles as the keepers of the home demanded their inclusion in the democratic decisions of this country. After emancipation, African American families dreamed of creating homes to establish themselves as fully liberated citizens. Descended from slaves and born to black farmers, Hill shares with us the stories of her own family’s quest for home from the last of her ancestors to be called slave to her own flight from small-town Oklahoma. Just as she claims that home served as the foundation of the struggle for blacks and women throughout history, these personal stories of her family serve as the link between what individuals experienced and the national story of the ongoing search for equality. Reimagining Equality will challenge our notions of history and our assumptions about the path to a just society.

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October 2011

Beacon Press | HC 978-0-8070-1437-0 | 224pp. $25.95/$29.00 Can. | Exam Copy: $13.00 Do not order before 10/4/2011.

about the author anita hill is a professor of social policy, law, and women’s studies at Brandeis University, where she teaches courses on Race and the Law and Gender Equality. After receiving her JD from Yale Law School in 1980, she worked as the attorney-advisor to Clarence Thomas at the U.S. Department of Education. In 1991, she testified at the Senate confirmation hearings of Clarence Thomas. She gained national exposure when her allegations of sexual harassment were made public. She is the author of Speaking Truth to Power, in which she wrote about her experience as a witness in the Thomas hearings. Hill has written widely on issues of race and gender in publications such as the New York Times, Newsweek, the Boston Globe, Critical Race Feminism, and others. She has appeared on Today, 60 Minutes, Meet the Press, and Face the Nation.
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A Message from Anita Hill

It’s hard to believe that almost two decades have passed since the dramatic Clarence Thomas Senate confirmation hearing that had such an impact on so many in our nation, including perhaps some of you. I’ve been very proud of the era of heightened awareness and concern about sexual harassment that followed that frankly grueling experience. I have had the privilege of meeting exceptional women and men in nearly every state in the country who seek nothing more than to end behavior, like sexual harassment, that keeps women from reaching their full potential. Some real good did emerge. And I wrote an autobiographical book that some of you may remember, Speaking Truth to Power, back in 1997. For me the positive developments of the recent past are just the beginning. Starting from the premise that a fair and just society is in everyone’s best interest, I have spent a great deal of time studying, researching, and lecturing about how important it is that we strive for full equality in our nation, no matter how difficult an achievement it may seem. I’ve been working on my new book, Reimagining Equality, that reflects my ideas about how we can begin to realize equality for women, for blacks, and, particularly, for black women. In it I look back at my ancestors, and forward, based on my experiences and discoveries since the hearing. I hope you will enjoy the stories and ideas presented here.  I wanted to publish this new book on the twentieth anniversary of the hearing—when there will be a fresh round of media and other attention—not only to shine a bright light on the accomplishments of the past twenty years but also to examine the issues that continue to trouble me and many of you. It’s my hope that this book will help a new generation to better understand and meet the challenges of remaking our society into one that might actually reach the goal of liberty and justice for all. Thank you for your support of my work, past and present, and all best wishes for a successful year. Anita Hill

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13

STRENGTH IN WHAT REMAINS
By Tracy Kidder

Website: www.TracyKidder.com To view video of Tracy Kidder’s presentation at the 2009 First-Year Experience® Conference in Orlando, FL, go to: http://tinyurl.com/yaud5t6

Finalist for the 2009 National Book Critics Circle Award
Now in Paperback

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racy Kidder, winner of the Pulitzer Prize and author of the college common reading program classic Mountains Beyond Mountains, has been described by the Baltimore Sun as the “master of the nonfiction narrative.” In this new book, Kidder gives us the superb story of a hero for our time. Deo arrives in America from Burundi in search of a new life. Having survived a civil war and genocide, and plagued by horrific dreams, he lands at JFK airport with two hundred dollars, no knowledge of the English language, and no contacts. He ekes out a precarious existence delivering groceries, living in Central Park and learning English by reading dictionaries in bookstores. Then Deo meets the strangers who will change his life, eventually pointing him in the direction of Columbia University, medical school, and a life devoted to healing. With Strength in What Remains, Kidder breaks new ground, telling an unforgettable story as he travels back with Deo over a turbulent life in search of meaning and forgiveness.

Random House | TR 978-0-8129-7761-5 | 304pp. $16.00/$19.00 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00

teacher’s guide available Selected for Common Reading at: Alvernia University, Caldwell College, Claremont McKenna College, Penn State Berks, Stanford University, Trinity College, University of Delaware, Western Michigan University, and others

“That 63-year-old Tracy Kidder may have just written his finest work—indeed, one of the truly stunning books I’ve read this year—is proof that the secret to memorable nonfiction is so often the writer’s readiness to be surprised. Deo’s experience can feel like this era’s version of the Ellis Island migration. Deo is propelled, so often, by pure will, and his victories . . . summon a feeling of restored confidence in human nature and American opportunity. Then we plunge into hell. Having only glimpses of Deo’s past, we suddenly get a full-blown portrait. Kidder’s rendering of what Deo endured and survived just before he boarded the plane for New York is one of the most powerful passages of modern nonfiction.” —Ron Suskind, The New York Times Book Review

Also by Tracy Kidder:

MOUNTAINS BEYOND MOUNTAINS
The Quest of Dr. Paul Farmer, A Man Who Would Cure the World By Tracy Kidder
An ALA Notable Book; A New York Times Notable Book

In medical school, Paul Farmer found his life’s calling: to cure infectious diseases and bring the lifesaving tools of modern medicine to those who need them most. Demonstrating a clear-eyed understanding of the interaction of politics, wealth, social systems, and disease, Tracy Kidder’s magnificent account shows how one person can make a difference in solving global health problems.
A popular Common Reading selection at over 60 colleges/universities and One City, One Book programs.
Random House | TR | 978-0-8129-7301-3 | 352pp. | $16.00/$19.00 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00 teacher’s guide available 14

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A Message from the First Year Seminar Director at the University of Delaware
Dear Colleagues, The University of Delaware chose Pulitzer Prize-winning author Tracy Kidder’s Strength in What Remains as its First Year Common Reader in 2010. Strength in What Remains is the story of Deogratias (Deo), a young medical student from the Central African nation of Burundi, who fled the ethnic violence in Burundi and genocide in Rwanda and was transported to New York City. Deo succeeded against all odds, graduating from Columbia University, and subsequently returned to Africa. A truly remarkable story of survival, despair, determination, evil, and kindness, the book was chosen by an advisory committee comprised of faculty, students, advisors, and Student Life staff who believed that it would provide a unique opportunity for students to consider issues related to that part of the world and to begin addressing questions about personal meaning, transition, and passion. The committee also felt that the book would encourage our students to consider what it means to be a global citizen. The choice proved extremely popular among the first year students, and the entire University of Delaware community engaged in a number of events related to the book. Author Tracy Kidder and the book’s hero Deo visited our campus to share their vision of hope and renewal with our freshman class. Following their visit, a graduate of the University of Delaware Honors Program spoke to the freshman class via Skype from the Village Health Works Clinic in Burundi. Discussing how she had used her Delaware experience as a bridge to help others achieve a better life in places that the rest of the world seems to have overlooked, her talk complemented Kidder and Deo’s visit. Strength in What Remains proved not only to be a popular choice, but to provide a unique opportunity for our students to learn about another part of the world and to begin to understand the complexities and interrelationships of the global landscape. Sincerely, Avron Abraham, Ph.D. Faculty Director First Year Seminar and Common Reader Program

university of delaware students line up to have books signed by deo

about the author tRacY kiddeR graduated from Harvard University, studied at the University of Iowa, and served as an army officer in Vietnam. He has won the Pulitzer Prize, the National Book Award, the Robert F. Kennedy Award, and many other literary prizes. He lives in Massachusetts and Maine.

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15

A new partnership between Beacon Press and the Estate of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
“Broadens our perception of king’s vision of social justice.” —Booklist

Books by Martin Luther King, Jr.
WHERE DO WE GO FROM HERE
Chaos or Community?
Foreword by Coretta Scott King; Introduction by Vincent Harding In 1967, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. isolated himself from the demands of the civil rights movement, rented a house in Jamaica with no telephone, and labored over his final manuscript. In this prophetic work, which has been unavailable for more than ten years, he lays out his thoughts, plans, and dreams for America’s future, including the need for better jobs, higher wages, decent housing, and quality education. With a universal message of hope that continues to resonate, King demanded an end to global suffering, asserting that humankind—for the first time—has the resources and technology to eradicate poverty.
“Martin Luther King, Jr., was one of the greatest organic intellectuals in American history. His unique ability to connect the life of the mind to the struggle for freedom is legendary, and in this book—his last grand expression of his vision—he put forward his most prophetic challenge to powers that be and his most progressive program for the wretched of the earth.” —Cornel West, professor of religion and African American studies, Princeton University, and author of Race Matters
Beacon Press | TR | 978-0-8070-0067-0 | 256pp. | $14.00/$16.00 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00

“ALL LABOR HAS DIGNITY”
Edited and Introduced by Michael K. Honey Covering all the civil rights movement highlights—Montgomery, Albany, Birmingham, Selma, Chicago, and Memphis—award-winning historian Michael K. Honey introduces and traces King’s dream of economic equality. Gathered in one volume for the first time, the majority of these speeches will be new to most readers. The collection begins with King’s lectures to unions in the 1960s and includes his addresses during his Poor People’s Campaign, culminating with his momentous “Mountaintop” speech, delivered in support of striking black sanitation workers in Memphis. Unprecedented and timely, “All Labor Has Dignity” will more fully restore our understanding of King’s lasting vision of economic justice, bringing his demand for equality right into the present.
Includes CD of Rare MLK Speeches

“Brings to life the King who from the outset of his public career insisted that ‘the evil of economic injustice’ must be combated along with racial inequality.” —Eric Foner, DeWitt Clinton Professor of History, Columbia University
Beacon Press | HC | 978-0-8070-8600-1 | 240pp. | $26.95/$31.00 Can. | Exam Copy: $13.50

about the author maRtin lutheR king, JR. (1929–1968), Nobel Peace Prize laureate and architect of the nonviolent civil rights movement, was assassinated in Memphis, Tennessee, on April 4, 1968.
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THE TRUMPET OF CONSCIENCE
Foreword by Coretta Scott King; New Foreword by Marian Wright Edelman In November and December 1967, Martin Luther King, Jr., delivered five lectures for the renowned Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Massey Lecture Series. The collection was immediately released by the CBC under the title Conscience for Change, but after King’s assassination in 1968, the book was republished as The Trumpet of Conscience. Each oration found here encompasses a distinct theme and speaks prophetically to today’s perils, addressing issues of racial equality, conscience and war, the mobilization of young people, and nonviolence.
Beacon Press | HC | 978-0-8070-0071-7 | 96pp. | $22.00/$25.00 Can. | Exam Copy: $11.00

STRIDE TOWARD FREEDOM
The Montgomery Story

CD Inside, Including “A Christmas Sermon on Peace”

Introduction by Clayborne Carson Martin Luther King, Jr.’s account of the first successful large-scale application of nonviolence resistance in America is comprehensive, revelatory, and intimate. King described his book as “the chronicle of fifty thousand Negroes who took to heart the principles of nonviolence, who learned to fight for their rights with the weapon of love, and who, in the process, acquired a new estimate of their own human worth.” It traces the phenomenal journey of a community, and shows how the twenty-eight-year-old Dr. King, with his conviction for equality and nonviolence, helped transformed the nation—and the world.
“Martin Luther King’s early words return to us today with enormous power, as profoundly true, as wise and inspiring, now as when he wrote them fifty years ago.” —Howard Zinn
Beacon Press | TR | 978-0-8070-0069-4 | 272pp. | $14.00/$14.00 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00

MLK: A Celebration in Word and Image
Introduction by Charles Johnson; Edited by Bob Adelman A striking collection of twenty-nine black-and-white images, MLK: A Celebration in Word and Image is a photobiography of one of America’s greatest figures, combined with powerful quotations by Dr. King. Compiled by renowned photojournalist Bob Adelman.
Do not order before 10/25/2011. Beacon Press | HC | 978-0-8070-0316-9 | 64pp. | $15.00/$17.00 Can. | Exam Copy: $7.50

October 2011

WHY WE CAN’T WAIT
Introduction by Dorothy Cotton In 1963, Birmingham, Alabama, was perhaps the most racially segregated city in the United States, but the campaign launched by Fred Shuttlesworth, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and others demonstrated to the world the power of nonviolent direct action. Often applauded as King’s most incisive and eloquent book, Why We Can’t Wait recounts the Birmingham campaign in vivid detail, while underscoring why 1963 was such a crucial year for the civil rights movement. King examines the history of the civil rights struggle and the tasks that future generations must accomplish to bring about full equality. The book also includes the extraordinary “Letter from Birmingham Jail,” which King wrote in April of 1963.
Beacon Press | TR | 978-0-8070-0112-7 | 256pp. | $14.00/$16.00 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00

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17

A MIGHTY LONG WAY
My Journey to Justice at Little Rock Central High School
By Carlotta Walls LaNier with Lisa Frazier Page
Foreword by President Bill Clinton

To view video of Carlotta Walls LaNier’s presentation at the 2010 First-Year Experience® Conference in Denver, CO, go to: http://tinyurl.com/27l9tfw

hen fourteen-year-old Carlotta Walls walked up the stairs of Little Rock Central High School on September 25, 1957, she and eight other black students only wanted to make it to class. But the journey of the “Little Rock Nine,” as they came to be known, would lead the nation on an even longer and much more turbulent path, one that would challenge prevailing attitudes, break down barriers, and forever change the landscape of America. Complete with compelling photographs, A Mighty Long Way shines a light on this watershed moment in civil rights history and shows that determination, fortitude, and the ability to change the world are not exclusive to a few special people, but are inherent within us all.
“Carlotta Walls LaNier’s A Mighty Long Way is a riveting account of nine brave high school students and their families in a quest for quality desegregated public education. What happened in Little Rock in 1957 resulted in America’s greatest constitutional crisis since the Civil War. Carlotta’s account of events inside and outside Little Rock Central High School should be read and studied particularly by those who now walk through doors of opportunity which Carlotta and her schoolmates first opened over 50 years ago. When I started her book, I couldn’t put it down. It is a must-read.” —James L. “Skip” Rutherford III, Dean of The University of Arkansas Clinton School of Public Service “Carlotta Walls LaNier was the youngest of the Little Rock 9 to cross the color lines, political barriers and cultural chasms that circumscribed her life. She, her family and friends paid a heavy price that burdened them even as it liberated all of us. Her memoir, which is really our memoir, provides a rare perspective on that history in the making.” —Hank Klibanoff, Pulitzer Prize-winning co-author of The Race Beat: The Press, The Civil Rights Struggle, and The Awakening of the Nation “In A Mighty Long Way, this revered American and special friend boldly tells how her high school days have evolved as the central experience of her life. I commend Carlotta for the legacy she has left and for the lessons she and her colleagues have taught us all with such nobility.” —Nancy Rousseau, Principal, Little Rock Central High School (2002–present)

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One World | TR 978-0-345-51101-0 | 336pp. $16.00/$19.00 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00 teacher’s guide available

Selected for Common Reading at: Colorado Mountain College Defiance College SUNY Potsdam University of Illinois, Springfield and others.

about the author caRlotta walls lanieR attended Michigan State University and graduated from Colorado State College—now the University of Northern Colorado, on whose board of trustees she sits. After working for the YWCA, she founded her own real estate brokerage firm, LaNier and Company. A sought-after lecturer, LaNier speaks across the country and has received the Congressional Medal of Honor and two honorary doctorate degrees. She is the mother of two children, Whitney and Brooke, and lives in Englewood, Colorado with her husband Ira.
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A Message from Carlotta Walls LaNier
Why I Wrote This Book: I started this book in earnest in January of 2006. I had in mind the upcoming 50th anniversary of our entry into Little Rock’s Central High School. This September 2007 event might have been the impetus, but it wasn’t the reason. (Besides, I sort of missed that deadline by a couple of years!) As I say in the book, I didn’t talk much about my experiences until the late 1980s, after our 30th anniversary, when the nine of us were all together again in Little Rock and Bill Clinton was governor of the state. In the years that followed, Melba told her story in Warriors Don’t Cry. Ernie had a movie about his experience, The Ernie Green Story. Mrs. Huckaby, the assistant principal, told her story, which was made into a movie called Crisis at Little Rock. Back in the 1960s, Mrs. Bates had told her story in The Long Shadow of Little Rock. So I started making my way into high school and college classrooms to tell my story. Invariably, students who knew some of these other works would assume that my story was also their story, that my story had already been represented by others. Well, that just was not the case. Each of us has a story—not greater or lesser, just different. So this is one reason: My story had not yet been told. I was the only one who could tell it. But why the long wait? Because this journey back in time was deeply painful. To revisit that period, to really find out what it all meant and how it shaped the life I have lived, took a great deal of courage I wasn’t sure that I had. Though I had friends along the way who helped me get at that story, the journey backwards—as it was over fifty years ago— was still a singular and lonely path. Quite frankly, I did not want to go there. But as with all that weighs heavy in our psyches, there are things we need to see in the light of day to understand. As the old woman said, when asked about her writing: “How do I know what I think until I see what I say?” This book is my understanding of my story. It’s out now, and I can see the light of day. Upon the book’s release, I began to talk about it with students on college campuses. My favorite moments during these visits are the question and answer sessions. On a recent visit to a campus in North Carolina, it seemed that every student was bursting with questions. Some of the African American students connected their own educational path with my journey. By doing so, they came to know their nation’s history in a more personal and real way. I also enjoy going to lunch or dinner with students; the talk becomes more intimate. I get to know who they are, and they can ask me questions that often cause me to think in new ways about my story. I would be delighted to visit your campus so your students can get to know my story, which is ultimately their story.

Carlotta Walls LaNier

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19

SAVIORS AND SURVIVORS
Darfur, Politics, and the War on Terror
By Mahmood Mamdani
Winner, Choice Magazine Outstanding Academic Title rom the author of Good Muslim, Bad Muslim comes this important book, unlike any other, that looks at the crisis in Darfur within the context of the history of Sudan and examines the world’s response to that crisis. In Saviors and Survivors, Mahmood Mamdani explains how the conflict in Darfur began as a civil war (1987–89) between nomadic and peasant tribes over fertile land in the south, triggered by a severe drought that had expanded the Sahara Desert by more than sixty miles in forty years; how British colonial officials had artificially tribalized Darfur, dividing its population into “native” and “settler” tribes and creating homelands for the former at the expense of the latter; how the war intensified in the 1990s when the Sudanese government tried unsuccessfully to address the problem by creating homelands for tribes without any. The involvement of opposition parties gave rise in 2003 to two rebel movements, leading to a brutal insurgency and a horrific counterinsurgency—but not to genocide, as the West has declared. Mamdani also explains how the Cold War exacerbated the twentyyear civil war in neighboring Chad, creating a confrontation between Libya’s Muammar al-Qaddafi (with Soviet support) and the Reagan administration (allied with France and Israel) that spilled over into Darfur and militarized the fighting. By 2003, the war involved national, regional, and global forces, including the powerful Western lobby, who now saw it as part of the War on Terror and called for a military invasion dressed up as “humanitarian intervention.” Incisive and authoritative, Saviors and Survivors will radically alter our understanding of the crisis in Darfur.
“Mahmood Mamdani . . . is one of the most penetrating analysts of African affairs. In Saviors and Survivors: Darfur, Politics, and the War on Terror, he has written a learned book that reintroduces history into the discussion of the Darfur crisis and questions the logic and even the good faith of those who seek to place it at the pinnacle of Africa’s recent troubles . . . [An] important book.” —Howard W. French, The New York Times

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Three Rivers Press | TR 978-0-385-52596-1 | 416pp. $16.00/$19.00 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00

about the author mahmood mamdani was born in Kampala, Uganda. A political scientist and anthropologist, he is Herbert Lehman Professor of Government and director of the Institute of African Studies at Columbia University. In 2001 he presented one of the nine papers at the Nobel Peace Prize Centennial Symposium.
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Excerpt from Saviors and Survivors
Introduction The Save Darfur movement claims to have learned from Rwanda. But what is the lesson of Rwanda? For many of those mobilized to save Darfur, the lesson is to rescue before it is too late, to act before seeking to understand. Though it is never explicitly stated, Rwanda is recalled as a time when we thought we needed to know more; we waited to find out, to learn the difference between Tutsi and Hutu, and why one was killing the other, but it was too late. Needing to know turned into an excuse for doing nothing. What is new about Darfur, human rights interventionists will tell you, is the realization that sometimes we must respond ethically and not wait. That time is when genocide is occurring. But how do we know it is genocide? Because we are told it is. This is why the battle for naming turns out to be all-important: Once Darfur is named as the site of genocide, people recognize something they have already seen elsewhere and conclude that what they know is enough to call for action. They need to know no more in order to act. But killing is not what defines genocide. Killing happens in war, in insurgency and counterinsurgency. It is killing with intent to eliminate an entire group—a race, for example—that is genocide. Those who prioritize knowing over doing assume that genocide is the name of a consequence, and not its context or cause. But how do we decipher “intent” except by focusing on both context and consequence? The connection between the two is the only clue to naming an action. We shall see that the violence in Darfur was driven by two issues: one local, the other national. The local grievance focused on land and had a double background; its deep background was a colonial legacy of parceling Darfur between tribes, with some given homelands and others not; its immediate background was a fourdecades-long process of drought and desertification that exacerbated the conflict between tribes with land and those without. The national context was a rebellion that brought the state into an ongoing civil (tribal) war. The conflict in Darfur began as a localized civil war (1987–89) and turned into a rebellion (beginning in 2003). That Darfur was the site of genocide was the view of one side in the civil war—the tribes with land who sought to keep out landless or land-poor tribes fleeing the advancing drought and desert. As early as the 1989 reconciliation conference in Darfur, that side was already using the language of “genocide”—and indeed “holocaust.” But that charge was made against the coalition of tribes they fought, and not against the government of Sudan. In spite of this important difference, that language has come to inform the view of those who blew the whistle—genocide—at the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum in 2004 and was translated into a unanimous resolution of both houses of the U.S Congress that year.
Excerpted from Saviors and Survivors by Mahmood Mamdani Copyright © 2009 by Mahmood Mamdani. Excerpted by permission of Doubleday Religion, a division of Random House, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.

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THE OTHER WES MOORE
One Name, Two Fates
By Wes Moore

Website: www.TheOtherWesMoore.com To view video of Wes Moore at the 2011 First-Year Experience® Conference in Atlanta, GA, go to: http://bit.ly/ixv9UH

n December 2000, The Baltimore Sun ran a short article about Wes Moore, a local student who had just received a Rhodes Scholarship. The same paper also ran a huge story about four young men who had allegedly killed a police officer in a spectacularly botched armed robbery. The police were still hunting for two of the suspects who had gone on the lam, a pair of brothers. One of the brothers was also named Wes Moore. Wes just couldn’t shake off the unsettling coincidence or his inkling that the two shared much more than space in the same newspaper. After following the story of the robbery, the manhunt, and the trial to its conclusion, he wrote a letter to the other Wes, a convicted murderer serving a life sentence without the possibility of parole. His letter tentatively asked the questions that had been haunting him: Who are you? How did this happen?
Now in Paperback

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Spiegel & Grau | TR 978-0-385-52820-7 | 272pp. $15.00/$17.00 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00

That letter led to a correspondence and relationship that lasted for several years. Over dozens of letters and prison visits, Wes discovered that the other Wes had experienced a life not unlike his own. Both had grown up in similar neighborhoods and had difficult childhoods. Both were fatherless. They’d hung out on similar corners with similar crews, and both had run into trouble with the police. At each stage of their young lives they had faced similar moments of decision, yet their choices would lead them to astonishingly different destinations. Told in dramatic alternating narratives that take readers from heart-wrenching losses to moments of surprising redemption, The Other Wes Moore tells the story of a generation of boys trying to find their way in a hostile world.
“The Other Wes Moore highlights the transformative influence of caring adults. . . . Moore vividly and powerfully describes not just the culture of the streets but how it feels to be a boy growing up in a world where violence makes you a man, school seems irrelevant, and drug dealing is a respected career choice.” —O, The Oprah Magazine “Wes Moore has not just written a compelling story, but has created a perfect case study of how and why young men can go down the wrong path—and how they can be saved. This should be required reading for anyone who is trying to understand what is happening to young men in our inner cities.” —Geoffrey Canada, President and CEO, Harlem Children’s Zone

Selected for Common Reading at: • Colleges & Universities Bay Path College (Springfield, MA) Cabrini College (Radnor, PA) California State University at Bakersfield (Bakersfield, CA) Marquette University • One City, One Book Everybody Reads (Multnomah County Library in Portland, OR) One Book, One Bakersfield (Bakersfield, CA)

about the author wes mooRe is a Rhodes Scholar and a combat veteran of the war in Afghanistan. As a White House Fellow he worked as a special assistant to Secretary Condoleezza Rice at the State Department. He was a featured speaker at the 2008 Democratic National Convention, was named one of Ebony magazine’s Top 30 Leaders Under 30 (2007), and most recently, was dubbed one of the top young business leaders in America in Crain’s New York Business. He works in New York City.
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A Message from Wes Moore
I am living proof that a support system of family, mentors, and educators is critical for success and, as such, have the most tremendous respect for those of you who give tirelessly of yourselves to improve the future of a child. I would like to humbly thank all of you for being heroes to so many of your students, for inspiring them in ways you probably cannot even fathom yet, and for teaching them character and personal responsibility in addition to academics. It is your example, your belief in them, along with the preparation you give them in the classroom, that will unlock doors of opportunity. I am a grandchild of a retired school teacher who taught in the Bronx public school system for over twenty years, the son-in-law of a New York City public elementary school teacher of over twenty years, and a proud advocate for schools and the kids they serve. I have grown up hearing the stories of redemption and disappointment, of joy and pain, and of the success and failure of so many kids who find themselves in a system that currently works for some, but doesn’t for too many others. Like a captain on the front lines in Afghanistan, you are the front-line soldiers in the most important battle our nation faces now: the battle to educate and prepare our next generation of leaders. Just as we need to mobilize leaders and resources around our battles overseas, the same must be done to help our children navigate their journeys into adulthood. We are all familiar with the disturbing statistics of low graduation and high dropout rates in our nation’s public schools. And with more than fifty percent of marriages failing in today’s society, and single-parent households the norm in many inner-city communities, children lack the guidance that the family structure once provided. I am sure we are all alarmed that, in today’s world, young men of color are more likely to be in prison than in college. For too many in our nation, particularly those who live in our most precarious areas, a broken school system serves as a precursor to entry into the juvenile justice system. But I believe this is a problem we can—and must—tackle. Studies show that students from low-income communities can and do achieve at high levels when they are given the resources and attention they deserve. And there are amazing educators and civic leaders who are already leading the charge with impressive steam. I know the fixes aren’t simple, nor are they cheap. But there are a few things to remember: The answer isn’t simply spending more money; it is to spend money wisely with a focus on the children we intend to serve. The costs of inaction are unbearably high when you consider that it costs nearly $200,000 to incarcerate someone in New York, while a recent Columbia University study shows that cutting the dropout rate in half would yield 45 billion dollars annually in both new federal tax revenues and cost savings. Promising reforms that embrace alternative teaching platforms, teacher pay systems based on performance, and the inspired 4.35 billion dollars in “Race to the Top” funds that the Obama administration has allocated are tremendous, but a national embrace of innovation and policy change is imperative. We will need fortitude and ingenuity as we embark on the education reform battle of our lifetime. The chance to raise expectations, the opportunity for our children to do better than their parents, and the need to translate the experience of young students into the dreams of a nation must now drive us all. Just as it was imperative for my fellow soldiers and I to win our fights, the same can be said for you and the work you are doing. As President Obama recently expressed, “The future belongs to the nation that best educates its citizens.” I could not agree more.

Wes Moore
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THE ENOUGH MOMENT
Fighting to End Africa’s Worst Human Rights Crimes
By John Prendergast with Don Cheadle

Website: www.EnoughProject.org To view video of John Prendergast at the 2011 First-Year Experience® Conference in Atlanta, GA, go to: http://tinyurl.com/6xuvwfw

n their follow-up to the bestselling Not On Our Watch, which brought awareness to the genocide in Sudan, human rights activist John Prendergast and Oscar-nominated actor and philanthropist Don Cheadle present The Enough Moment: Fighting to End Africa’s Worst Human Rights Crimes, an empowering look at how people’s movements and inspired policies can stop genocide, child soldier recruitment, and rape as a war weapon in Africa. As Prendergast and Cheadle describe, an “Enough Moment” is defined as that time when outrage triggers action and bystanders become “Upstanders,” or people who take action on behalf of others. They illustrate with such examples:
• a high school student in chicago started Youth united for darfur to raise awareness of genocide. • a seventy-eight-year-old retired educator in seattle founded a coalition of churches and organizations to raise awareness and funds for humanitarian relief. • a young darfurian woman founded an association of women journalists that use radios and phones to warn towns of militia groups in their area.

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Three Rivers Press | TR 978-0-307-46482-8 | 304pp. $14.99/$16.99 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00

Prendergast and Cheadle shed light on this burgeoning mass movement against human rights crimes, showing how it involves citizen activism, social networking, compassion, celebrities, and globalization. They also provide action steps for the interested citizen and interview well-known and influential people on how they have been moved to action by their Enough Moments. Interviews in The Enough Moment include: Madeleine Albright, Ann Curry, Robin Wright, Mia Farrow, and Emile Hirsch.
“An important, valuable toolkit that will inspire many.” —Kirkus Reviews

Also by John Prendergast:

UNLIKELY BROTHERS: OUR STORY OF ADVENTURE, LOSS, AND REDEMPTION
By John Prendergast and Michael Mattocks
Crown | HC | 978-0-307-46484-2 | 272pp. | $24.00/$27.00 Can. | Exam Copy: $12.00

about the authors John PRendeRgast is a human rights activist and author. He is co-founder of the Enough Project (EnoughProject.org), an initiative to end genocide and crimes against humanity. During the Clinton administration, he was involved in a number of peace processes in Africa while he was Director of African Affairs at the National Security Council and Special Advisor at the Department of State. don cheadle is an actor, film producer, philanthropist, and author. Cheadle rose to prominence for his supporting roles in the films Out of Sight, Traffic, and Ocean’s Eleven. In 2004, his lead role as Rwandan hotel manager Paul Rusesabagina in the genocide drama film Hotel Rwanda earned him an Academy Award nomination for Best Actor.
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A Message from John Prendergast
Three of the most horrible scourges facing humanity are genocide (the destruction of people based on their identity), rape as a war weapon (the deliberate destruction of women through targeted sexual violence), and child slavery (children who are forcibly recruited to become killing machines or sex slaves). All three seem overwhelming and intractable, but the reality is that there are specific and concrete solutions that can be implemented, if only there were the political and popular will to do so. Help is indeed on the way. In the last five years, a growing people’s movement has been born in the United States and other countries to stop the genocide in Darfur. Similarly, there are rapidly expanding international efforts to protect and empower the women of Eastern Congo, who are subject to sexual violence more extreme than anywhere else in the world, as well as the children of Central Africa (the Invisible Children), who have experienced the highest abduction rates in the world at the hands of the brutal Lord’s Resistance Army rebel group. Once they learn about these human rights crimes, people are eager to learn how they can make a difference. We’ve learned a lot in the last few years, from our travels around the U.S. meeting concerned citizens, about how to empower people to get involved, how to appeal to a wide cross-section of folks to demonstrate how change happens, and how the individual— working in the context of community—is at the center of change throughout history. The women’s movement, the civil rights movement, the labor movement, the environmental movement, the anti-apartheid movement—all of these were propelled in large part by passionate and dedicated individuals, often small in number at the beginning, who believed in standing up for human rights and human dignity. For the first time in history, we have a real international anti-genocide movement. We also have a growing chorus that could become a movement focused on stopping the destruction of women in the Congo. We have a non-traditional, underground phenomenon called “Invisible Children” sweeping through college campuses, dedicated to finding a solution to the child soldier phenomenon in Central Africa. Building the scale and scope of these efforts through this book and associated campaigns provides a unique and historic opportunity to help alter the course of history. The Enough Moment presents the transformative tales of what we call “Frontline Upstanders” from war zones in Africa, “Citizen Upstanders” from around the U.S., and “Famous Upstanders” from the world of celebrity, including Angelina Jolie, Ben Affleck, Madeleine Albright, Ryan Gosling, Tracy McGrady, Ann Curry, and Mariska Hargitay. The book also provides an expansive menu of action items to empower each reader to become part of the movement. These stories will be channeled into what amounts to a recruitment drive: to help build a meaningful people’s movement dedicated to ending these human rights crimes. Ultimately, all the greatest policy ideas in the world mean nothing if we don’t have a permanent constituency of people behind the ideas, demanding that our elected officials do something. The Enough Moment provides a way for readers to become part of this popular movement against mass atrocities that, if successful, could literally help change the fate of millions of people.

John Prendergast

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THE IMMORTAL LIFE OF HENRIETTA LACKS
By Rebecca Skloot

Website: www.RebeccaSkloot.com To view video of author at DePauw University’s Ubben Lecture, go to: http://tinyurl.com/24h6xux

Winner of 2010 Chicago Tribune Heartland Prize for Nonfiction Winner of 2010 Wellcome Trust Book Prize Winner of The American Association for the Advancement of Science’s Young Adult Science Book Award Selected as a Best Book of the Year by over 60 publications, including The New York Times, The New Yorker, The Washington Post and USA Today er name was Henrietta Lacks, but scientists know her as HeLa. She was a poor southern tobacco farmer who worked the same land as her slave ancestors, yet her cells—taken without her knowledge—became one of the most important tools in medicine. The first “immortal” human cells grown in culture, they were vital for developing the polio vaccine; uncovered secrets of cancer, viruses, and the effects of the atom bomb; helped lead to important advances in cloning, in vitro fertilization, and gene mapping; and have been bought and sold by the billions, with devastating consequences for her family.
Now in Paperback Broadway | TR 978-1-4000-5218-9 | 400pp. $16.00/$18.00 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00 teacher’s guide available

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Now Rebecca Skloot takes us on an extraordinary journey, from the “colored” ward of Johns Hopkins Hospital in the 1950s to stark white laboratories with freezers full of HeLa cells; from Henrietta’s small, dying hometown of Clover, Virginia—a land of wooden slave quarters, faith healings, and voodoo—to East Baltimore today, where Henrietta’s children, unable to afford health insurance, wrestle with feelings of pride, fear, and betrayal.
“What is The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks really about? Science, African American culture and religion, intellectual property of human tissues, Southern history, medical ethics, civil rights, the overselling of medical advances? . . . The book’s broad scope would make it ideal for an institution-wide freshman year reading program.” —David J. Kroll, Professor and Chair, Pharmaceutical Sciences, North Carolina Central University “Heartbreaking and powerful, unsettling yet compelling, The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks is a richly textured story of the hidden costs of scientific progress. Deftly weaving together history, journalism and biography, Rebecca Skloot’s sensitive account tells of the enduring, deeply personal sacrifice of this African American woman and her family and, at long last, restores a human face to the cell line that propelled 20th century biomedicine. A stunning illustration of how race, gender and disease intersect to produce a unique form of social vulnerability, this is a poignant, necessary and brilliant book.” —Alondra Nelson, Associate Professor of Sociology, Columbia University; Editor of Technicolor: Race, Technology And Everyday Life

Selected for Common Reading at more than 60 colleges/universities including: Fairmont State University Grand Valley State University Johns Hopkins University Marian University Morehouse School of Medicine San Diego State University Siena Heights University St. Bonaventure College University of California, Merced University of California, Santa Barbara University of Maryland University of Wisconsin Virginia Commonwealth University and the list continues to grow . . . Visit www.commonreads.com for full list

about the author ReBecca skloot has taught at the University of Memphis, New York University and the University of Pittsburgh. She has worked as a correspondent for NPR’s RadioLab and PBS’s Nova ScienceNOW, and her writing has appeared in The New York Times Magazine; O, The Oprah Magazine; Discover; Columbia Journalism Review; and elsewhere.
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A Message from Rebecca Skloot
I first learned about HeLa cells, and the woman behind them, as a teenager sitting in a freshman biology class. I knew only fragments of Henrietta’s story, but those fragments inspired me to start asking questions—about science and mortality, bioethics, and how I’d feel if my own cells were used in research. I didn’t yet know that her cells had launched a multibillion dollar industry while her children lived in poverty, or that the cells had devastating consequences for the family. Henrietta’s story captures the imagination of students in any number of disciplines, including the sciences, medicine, African American studies, sociology, philosophy, law, bioethics, journalism, and creative writing. I’ve spoken about HeLa at schools around the country, where students are transfixed by the story. I tell them that if you could pile all HeLa cells ever grown on a scale they would weigh more than one hundred Empire State Buildings, and that HeLa has been fused with mouse cells to create Henrietta-mouse hybrid cells. It’s the stuff of science fiction, but it’s true, and students love it. Combine that with the story of Henrietta’s family—a tale about science, religion, race, and class—and students’ reactions are powerful. During Q&As, the first question is usually: “Wasn’t it illegal to take her cells and use them in research without asking?” The answer is no—not in 1951, and not in 2011. Today, most Americans have their tissue on file somewhere through routine blood tests or biopsies. And since the late sixties, when testing newborns for genetic diseases became required by law, each baby born in the United States has had blood taken, and those samples are often stored and used by scientists. This means that the majority of college students in this country have tissues of their own being used in research, and neither they nor their parents likely realize it. As a college professor, I always look for books that bring together the many disparate fields that students will study throughout their careers and that allow them to explore the real-world consequences of intellectual discoveries. Other professors tell me The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks does just that, bringing together health, community, family, ethics, religion, science, storytelling, history, business, law, and humanity. Since spring 2010, I have talked about my book at more than one hundred schools nationwide. As a regular guest lecturer who’s also worked as a correspondent for radio and television, I understand the importance of being an engaging speaker, and my talks have been called “moving and engaging of both the heart and mind.” To find out more, you can visit the events page of my website at www.RebeccaSkloot.com and you can contact me through the site. As a college biology major, I couldn’t have imagined that Henrietta’s story would lead me to become a writer, or that writing this book would be a ten-year journey. There’s no telling what effect this story could have on students. I can’t wait to find out.

Rebecca Skloot

©DePauw University

©DePauw University

Rebecca skloot talks with students and signs books at dePauw university and university of alabama

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©Rebecca Skloot

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SWEET LAND OF LIBERTY
The Forgotten Struggle for Civil Rights in the North
By Thomas J. Sugrue

Website: www.TomSugrue.com

n Sweet Land of Liberty, historian Thomas J. Sugrue deftly outlines the history of the struggle for racial equality in the North—its triumphs and failures, its ironies and unexpected outcomes, opening up new ways of exploring the important—and still unfinished—history of race, rights, and politics in modern America. This first large-scale history of the struggle for civil rights in the North moves from the White House to gritty storefronts, from all-white suburbs to grim inner cities, and weaves together the stories of both well-known and obscure actors in a racial drama that sweeps from the 1920s to the present.
“Thomas Sugrue’s crisply written and massively sourced book delivers the northern half of the civil rights story with an authority that should make Sweet Land of Liberty indispensable.” —David Levering Lewis, author of a biography of The Life and Times of W.E.B. Du Bois “Thomas Sugrue’s Sweet Land of Liberty is one of the most important works on modern American history to appear in recent memory. It challenges and transforms what we think, not only about the struggle for civil rights, but more broadly about the entire course of American social and political development. It is one of those books that truly changes our historical perspective.” —Steve Hahn, author of the Pulitzer-Prize winning A Nation Under Our Feet: Black Political Struggles in the Rural South from Slavery to the Great Migration “Sweet Land of Liberty is a revelatory, daring, and ambitious book that overturns the conventional histories of America’s struggle for civil rights. In this powerful narrative, Thomas Sugrue draws compelling vignettes of the forgotten women and men who fought against the odds for racial justice in the North. He persuasively argues that what happened on the streets, churches, and courtrooms of Chicago, New York, and Los Angeles is every bit as important for understanding modern America as the oft-told histories of the Southern freedom struggle. This is one of those rare books that completely reorients our understanding of the past.” —Henry Louis Gates, Jr., Alphonse Fletcher, Jr. University Professor, Harvard University “Sugrue makes the case that understanding the role of the North in the civil rights struggle is imperative for making wise policy today.” —Hartford Courant

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Random House | TR 978-0-8129-7038-8 | 736pp. $20.00/$24.95 Can. | Exam Copy: $10.00

about the author thomas J. sugRue is an historian at the University of Pennsylvania, where he is currently Edmund J. and Louise W. Kahn Professor of History and Sociology. Sugrue’s first book, The Origins of the Urban Crisis, won the prestigious Bancroft Prize in History, the President’s Book Award of the Social Science History Association, the Philip Taft Prize in Labor History, the Urban History Association Prize for Best Book in North American Labor History, and was selected as a Choice Outstanding Book.
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Excerpt from Sweet Land of Liberty
Chapter 1 “Sweet Land of Liberty” And this will be the day—this will be the day when all of God’s children will be able to sing with new meaning: My country ’tis of thee, sweet land of liberty, of thee I sing. Land where my fathers died, land of the Pilgrim’s pride, From every mountainside, let freedom ring! And if America is to be a great nation, this must become true. And so let freedom ring from the prodigious hilltops of New Hampshire. Let freedom ring from the mighty mountains of New York. Let freedom ring from the heightening Alleghenies of Pennsylvania. Let freedom ring from the snow-capped Rockies of Colorado. Let freedom ring from the curvaceous slopes of California. But not only that: Let freedom ring from Stone Mountain of Georgia. Let freedom ring from Lookout Mountain of Tennessee. Let freedom ring from every hill and molehill of Mississippi. From every mountainside, let freedom ring. As the Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr., brought his speech at the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom to a thundering close, Anna Arnold Hedgeman sat a few feet away. It was a long-overdue moment of recognition for the sixty-four-year-old civil rights activist, though it was bittersweet. The only woman on the steering committee for the march, Hedgeman had a place of honor on the dais at the base of the Lincoln Memorial. It was only at the last minute, at her insistence, that march organizers gave a few minutes on the program to Little Rock leader Daisy Bates and “casually” introduced Rosa Parks to the crowd. Hedgeman remained unacknowledged, her presence mute testimony to the importance of decades of grassroots organizing, much of it in the North, that had brought a quarter of a million people to the greatest demonstration in the nation’s history. It is safe to say that most of the marchers gathered that hot August afternoon had no idea who she was. At a moment when the black freedom struggle was growing younger and more militant, Hedgeman was part of a largely forgotten generation of activists, women and men, black and white, religious and secular, whose lives embodied the long history of civil rights in the North. Anna Arnold Hedgeman’s journey began in the small-town Midwest at the dawn of the twentieth century, took her through the North, and brought her into the heart of a remarkable and diverse political and social movement to challenge racial inequality in America. She came of age as millions of blacks headed north in search of opportunity but faced a regime of racial proscription there that was every bit as deeply entrenched as the southern system of Jim Crow. During her lifetime of activism, she encountered grassroots school desegregation activists and angry Klansmen; black and white churchwomen committed to dialogue on race relations; poor black migrants and struggling women workers; hypocritical white liberals who mouthed their commitment to racial equality but continued to profit from it; musicians, activists, and intellectuals who created the Harlem Renaissance; black separatists dreaming of a proud black nation; and blue-collar activists committed to building an interracial labor movement. A tireless woman of political savvy and considerable charm, she worked with nearly every important civil rights activist in the first half of the twentieth century.
Excerpted from Sweet Land of Liberty by Thomas J. Sugrue Copyright © 2008 by Thomas Sugrue. Excerpted by permission of Random House Trade Paperbacks, a division of Random House, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.

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THE WARMTH OF OTHER SUNS
The Epic Story of America’s Great Migration
By Isabel Wilkerson

Website: www.IsabelWilkerson.com To hear the author speak about the book, go to: http://tinyurl.com/33yfn8c

Winner, 2010 National Book Critics Circle Award for Nonfiction A 2011 Booklist Top 10 Black History Nonfiction Book n this epic, beautifully written masterwork, Pulitzer Prize– winning author Isabel Wilkerson chronicles one of the great untold stories of American history: the decades-long migration of black citizens who fled the South for northern and western cities, in search of a better life. Profiling three lives, Wilkerson brilliantly captures each person’s first treacherous and exhausting cross-country trips by car and train and their new lives in colonies that grew into ghettos, as well as how they changed these cities with southern food, faith, and culture and improved them with discipline, drive, and hard work. Both a riveting microcosm and a major assessment, The Warmth of Other Suns is a bold, remarkable, and riveting work, a superb account of an “unrecognized immigration” within our own land. Through the breadth of its narrative, the beauty of the writing, the depth of its research, and the fullness of the people and lives portrayed herein, this book is destined to become a classic.
Random House | HC 978-0-679-44432-9 | 640pp. $30.00/$34.00 Can. | Exam Copy: $15.00 Paperback forthcoming November 2011. “[A] masterful narrative of the rich wisdom and deep courage of a great people.” —Cornel West “[A] massive and masterly account of the Great Migration. . . . Based on more than a thousand interviews, written in broad imaginative strokes, this book . . . is something of an anomaly in today’s shrinking world of nonfiction publishing: a narrative epic rigorous enough to impress all but the crankiest of scholars, yet so immensely readable.” —The New York Times Book Review “A landmark piece of nonfiction . . . sure to hold many surprises for readers of any race or experience. . . . A mesmerizing book that warrants comparison to The Promised Land, Nicholas Lemann’s study of the Great Migration’s early phase, and Common Ground, J. Anthony Lukas’s great, close-range look at racial strife in Boston. . . . [Wilkerson’s] closeness with, and profound affection for, her subjects reflect her deep immersion in their stories and allow the reader to share that connection.” —Janet Maslin, The New York Times

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about the author isaBel wilkeRson was the first black woman to win a Pulitzer Prize in journalism and the first African American to win for individual reporting. She is currently Professor of Journalism and Director of Narrative Nonfiction at Boston University. During the Great Migration, her parents journeyed from Georgia and southern Virginia to Washington, D.C., where she was born and reared. This is her first book. For video of an author Q&A, go to: http://tiny.cc/yunyg
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Excerpt from The Warmth of Other Suns
Chapter 1 Chickasaw County, Mississippi, Late October 1937 Ida Mae Brandon Gladney The night clouds were closing in on the salt licks east of the oxbow lakes along the folds in the earth beyond the Yalobusha River. The cotton was at last cleared from the field. Ida Mae tried now to get the children ready and to gather the clothes and quilts and somehow keep her mind off the churning within her. She had sold off the turkeys and doled out in secret the old stools, the wash pots, the tin tub, the bed pallets. Her husband was settling with Mr. Edd over the worth of a year’s labor, and she did not know what would come of it. None of them had been on a train before—not unless you counted the clattering local from Bacon Switch to Okolona, where, “by the time you sit down, you there,” as Ida Mae put it. None of them had been out of Mississippi. Or Chickasaw County, for that matter. There was no explaining to little James and Velma the stuffed bags and chaos and all that was at stake or why they had to put on their shoes and not cry and bring undue attention from anyone who might happen to see them leaving. Things had to look normal, like any other time they might ride into town, which was rare enough to begin with. Velma was six. She sat with her ankles crossed and three braids in her hair and did what she was told. James was too little to understand. He was three. He was upset at the commotion. Hold still now, James. Lemme put your shoes on, Ida Mae told him. James wriggled and kicked. He did not like shoes. He ran free in the field. What were these things? He did not like them on his feet. So Ida Mae let him go barefoot. Miss Theenie stood watching. One by one, her children had left her and gone up north. Sam and Cleve to Ohio. Josie to Syracuse. Irene to Milwaukee. Now the man Miss Theenie had tried to keep Ida Mae from marrying in the first place was taking her away, too. Miss Theenie had no choice but to accept it and let Ida Mae and the grandchildren go for good. Miss Theenie drew them close to her, as she always did whenever anyone was leaving. She had them bow their heads. She whispered a prayer that her daughter and her daughter’s family be protected on the long journey ahead in the Jim Crow car. “May the Lord be the first in the car,” she prayed, “and the last out.” When the time had come, Ida Mae and little James and Velma and all that they could carry were loaded into a brother-in-law’s truck, and the three of them went to meet Ida Mae’s husband at the train depot in Okolona for the night ride out of the bottomland.

Excerpted from The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America’s Great Migration by Isabel Wilkerson. Copyright © 2010 by Isabel Wilkerson. Excerpted by permission The Random House Publishing Group of Random House, Inc.  All rights reserved.

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With subjects ranging from philosophy to politics, culture studies, art, and beyond, the For Beginners® documentary comic book series presents a range of popular concepts, disciplines, and topics in an entertaining and accessible manner that respects the intelligence and intellectual curiosity of its audience.

THE BLACK HOLOCAUST FOR BEGINNERS
By S.E. Anderson
Illustrated by Cro-Maat Collective and Vanessa Holley
The Black Holocaust—from the start of the European slave trade to the Civil War—was a travesty that killed millions of people of African descent. It is also one of the most underreported major events in world history. The Black Holocaust For Beginners—part documented chronicle, part engaging narrative—answers many questions about this tragic time period.
For Beginners | TR | 978-1-934-38903-4 | 192pp. | $14.95/$21.00 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00

AFRICAN HISTORY FOR BEGINNERS
By Herb Boyd
Illustrated by Shey Wolvek-Pfister
African History For Beginners brings to life this continent of riches and wonders, and also of people often unknown or misunderstood. Explore the rich history of the continent of contrasts—discover the glory of the Pharaohs, the Towers of Zimbabwe, the cosmology of the Yoruba, and the courage of the Masai.
For Beginners | TR | 978-1-934389-18-8 | 128pp. | $14.95/$21.00 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00

BLACK HISTORY FOR BEGINNERS
By Denise Dennis
Illustrated by Susan Willmarth
Black History For Beginners covers a rich but often ignored history and chronicles the black struggle, from capture and enslavement in Africa, through the Civil Rights movement, and up to the different kinds of struggles faced by African Americans today.
For Beginners | TR | 978-1-934389-19-5 | 192pp. | $14.95/$21.00 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00

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MALCOLM X FOR BEGINNERS
By Bernard Aquina Doctor
Illustrated by Bernard Aquina Doctor
Powerful narrative and graphics tell the story of Malcolm X’s life, his journey of self-discovery, his far-reaching ideas, his martyrdom and his impact on an era. Embraced as a righteous prophet of Black power and pride, damned as the voice of violence, Malcolm X merges as a complex, brave and brilliant figure with much to teach about the struggle for dignity. Malcolm X For Beginners brings to surface little known facts about Malcolm’s life and the evolution of his ideologies and philosophies.
For Beginners | TR | 978-1-934389-04-1 | 192pp. | $14.95/$21.00 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00

BARACK OBAMA FOR BEGINNERS, UPDATED EDITION
An Essential Guide
By Bob Neer
Illustrated by Joe Lee
This is the most concise and reliable short biography available on the 44th President of the United States—from his childhood in Hawaii and Indonesia, education at Columbia and Harvard, work as a community organizer, writer, teacher, lawyer, and politician in Illinois, to his historic campaign for President. Barack Obama For Beginners keeps the focus on the man and his record— accomplishments and missteps, praise and criticism—to allow readers to gain a balanced understanding of President Obama as they follow his rise to the White House. Illustrations enliven the reading experience and highlight important details.
For Beginners | TR | 978-1-934389-44-7 | 128pp. | $12.95/$15.99 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00

BLACK WOMEN FOR BEGINNERS
By S. Pearl Sharp
Illustrated by Beverly Hawkins Hall
As warriors, healers, teachers, mothers, queens, and liberators, black women have had tremendous impact in history on issues from food to fashion, from politics to poetry. Replete with a glossary of reference terms, Black Women For Beginners chronicles the trials and triumphs of black women from antiquity to the present, reflecting with wit and humor the challenges they have faced and the fortitude and strength that has sustained them.
For Beginners | TR | 978-1-934389-20-1 | 192pp. | $14.95/$21.00 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00

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AFRICAN HISTORY, POLITICS AND CULTURE TEARS OF THE DESERT
A Memoir of Survival in Darfur
By Halima Bashir with Damien Lewis
One World | TR | 978-0-345-51046-4 | 352pp. $16.00/NCR | Exam Copy: $3.00

THE PORTRAIT OF THE NEW ANGOLA
Photographed by Francesca Galliani
Do not order before 9/13/2011.

Skira | HC | 978-88-572-0470-3 | 288pp. $90.00/$105.00 Can. | Exam Copy: $45.00

CITIZENS OF NOWHERE
From Refugee Camp to Canadian Campus
By Debi Goodwin
Doubleday Canada | HC | 978-0-385-66722-7 | 336pp. $27.95/$32.95 Can. | Exam Copy: $14.00
Do not order paperback before 6/21/2011.

FACES OF AFRICA
Thirty Years of Photography
By Carol Beckwith and Angela Fisher
National Geographic | HC | 978-1-4262-0424-1 360pp. | $16.95/$20.00 Can. | Exam Copy: $8.50

Anchor Canada | TR | 978-0-385-66723-4 | 336pp. $17.95/$19.95 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00

THE TRANSLATOR
A Memoir
By Daoud Hari
Random House | TR | 978-0-8129-7917-6 | 224pp. $13.00/$15.00 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00

SOUL OF A LION
One Woman’s Quest to Rescue Africa’s Wildlife Refugees
By Barbara Bennett Foreword by Marieta Van Der Merwe
National Geographic | HC | 978-1-4262-0654-2 320pp. | $26.00/$30.00 Can. | Exam Copy: $13.00

LIFE LAID BARE
The Survivors in Rwanda Speak
By Jean Hatzfeld Translated by Linda Coverdale
Other Press | TR | 978-1-59051-273-9 | 256pp. $14.95/$18.95 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00

THE SULTAN’S SHADOW
One Family’s Rule at the Crossroads of East and West
By Christiane Bird
Random House | HC | 978-0-345-46940-3 | 400pp. $28.00/$34.00 Can. | Exam Copy: $14.00

AFRICAN GODS
Contemporary Rituals and Beliefs
By Daniel Laine Contribution by Anne Stamm and Pierre Saulnier Introduction by Tobie Nathan
Flammarion | HC | 978-2-08-030019-5 | 192pp. $50.00/$62.00 Can. | Exam Copy: $25.00

GOD GREW TIRED OF US
A Memoir
By John Bul Dau and Michael S. Sweeney
National Geographic | TR | 978-1-4262-0212-4 | 304pp. $14.95/$21.00 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00

DINKA
Legendary Cattle Keepers of Sudan
By Angela Fisher and Carol Beckwith Foreword by Francis Deng
Rizzoli | HC | 978-0-8478-3497-6 | 224pp. $75.00/$88.00 Can. | Exam Copy: $37.50

REPLENISHING THE EARTH
Spiritual Values for Healing Ourselves and the World
By Wangari Maathai
Doubleday Religion | TR | 978-0-307-59114-2 | 208pp. $13.00/$15.00 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00

BREAKING NEWS
Contemporary Photography from the Middle East and Africa
Edited by Filippo Maggia, Claudia Fini and Francesca Lazzarini
Skira | HC | 978-88-572-0645-5 | 208pp. $55.00/$67.00 Can. | Exam Copy: $27.50

DON’T LET’S GO TO THE DOGS TONIGHT
An African Childhood
By Alexandra Fuller
Random House | TR | 978-0-375-75899-7 | 336pp. $15.00/$17.00 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00

SIX MONTHS IN SUDAN
A Young Doctor in a War-Torn Village
By James Maskalyk
Spiegel & Grau | HC | 978-0-385-52651-7 | 336pp. $25.00/NCR | Exam Copy: $12.50 34

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THE LAST RESORT
A Memoir of Mischief and Mayhem on a Family Farm in Africa
By Douglas Rogers
Three Rivers Press | TR | 978-0-307-40798-6 | 336pp. $14.00/$16.00 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00

THE WORD
Black Writers Talk About the Transformative Power of Reading and Writing
By Marita Golden
Broadway | TR | 978-0-7679-2991-2 | 224pp. $14.99/$16.99 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00

THE SLAVE TRADE
By Nigel Sadler
Shire | TR | 978-0-7478-0708-7 | 64pp. $12.95/$14.95 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00

LETTERS FROM BLACK AMERICA
Intimate Portraits of the African American Experience
Edited by Pamela Newkirk
Beacon Press | TR | 978-0-8070-0115-8 | 400pp. $18.00/$20.00 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00

WILDFLOWER
An Extraordinary Life and Mysterious Death in Africa
By Mark Seal
Random House | TR | 978-0-8129-7909-1 | 272pp. $15.00/$17.50 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00

BIOGRAPHIES, AUTOBIOGRAPHIES & MEMOIRS UNCOVERING RACE
A Black Journalist’s Story of Reporting and Reinvention
By Amy Alexander
Do not order before 10/11/2011.

YOU MUST SET FORTH AT DAWN
A Memoir
By Wole Soyinka
Random House | TR | 978-0-375-75514-9 | 528pp. $16.95/$21.95 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00

MANDELA’S WAY
Fifteen Lessons on Life, Love, and Courage
By Richard Stengel Preface by Nelson Mandela
Crown Archetype | HC | 978-0-307-46068-4 | 256pp. $23.00/$27.95 Can. | Exam Copy: $11.50

Beacon Press | HC | 978-0-8070-6100-8 | 240pp. $27.95/$32.00 Can. | Exam Copy: $14.00

CONDOLEEZZA RICE: AN AMERICAN LIFE
A Biography
By Elisabeth Bumiller
Random House | TR | 978-0-8129-7713-4 | 464pp. $17.00/$20.00 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00

SOUTH AFRICAN TOWNSHIP BARBERSHOPS & SALONS
By Simon Weller and Garth Walker
Mark Batty Publisher | HC | 978-1-935613-04-6 | 128pp. $27.95/$32.00 Can. | Exam Copy: $14.00

THE BEAUTIFUL STRUGGLE
A Father, Two Sons, and an Unlikely Road to Manhood
By Ta-Nehisi Coates
Spiegel & Grau | TR | 978-0-385-52746-0 | 240pp. $15.00/$17.00 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00

ANTHOLOGY & REFERENCE FREEDOM
Stories Celebrating the Universal Declaration of Human Rights
By Amnesty International USA
Broadway | TR | 978-0-307-58883-8 | 432pp. $16.00/NCR | Exam Copy: $3.00

VISIONS OF A BETTER WORLD
Howard Thurman’s Pilgrimage to India and the Origins of African American Nonviolence
By Quinton Dixie and Peter Eisenstadt
Do not order before 8/30/2011.

Beacon Press | HC | 978-0-8070-0045-8 | 288pp. $34.95/$40.00 Can. | Exam Copy: $17.50

HARD DRIVING
The Wendell Scott Story
By Brian Donovan
Steerforth | TR | 978-1-58642-160-1 | 328pp. $16.99/$21.99 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00

EARLY AFRICAN-AMERICAN CLASSICS
Edited by Anthony Appiah
Bantam Classics | MM | 978-0-553-21379-9 | 704pp. $7.99/$9.99 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00

MY BONDAGE AND MY FREEDOM
By Frederick Douglass Introduction by John Stauffer
Modern Library | TR | 978-0-8129-7031-9 | 384pp. $12.95/$19.95 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00

BEST AFRICAN AMERICAN ESSAYS 2010
Series Edited by Gerald Early
One World | TR | 978-0-553-38537-3 | 400pp. $16.00/$19.95 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00

BEST AFRICAN AMERICAN FICTION 2010
Series Edited by Gerald Early
One World | TR | 978-0-553-38535-9 | 336pp. $16.00/$19.95 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00

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35

NARRATIVE OF THE LIFE OF FREDERICK DOUGLASS
An American Slave
By Frederick Douglass Introduction by Henry Louis Gates, Jr.
Dell Books | MM | 978-0-440-22228-6 | 176pp. $6.99/$10.99 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00

ZAMI: A NEW SPELLING OF MY NAME
A Biomythography
By Audre Lorde
Crossing Press | TR | 978-0-89594-122-0 | 264pp. $16.99/$21.99 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00

COLOR ME BUTTERFLY
A Novel Inspired by One Family’s Journey from Tragedy to Triumph
By L. Y. Marlow
Broadway | TR | 978-0-307-71661-3 | 432pp. $15.00/$17.00 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00

NARRATIVE OF THE LIFE OF FREDERICK DOUGLASS, AN AMERICAN SLAVE & INCIDENTS IN THE LIFE OF A SLAVE GIRL
By Frederick Douglass and Harriet Jacobs Introduction by Kwame Anthony Appiah
Modern Library | TR | 978-0-679-78328-2 | 432pp. $10.95/$16.95 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00

SUPREME DISCOMFORT
The Divided Soul of Clarence Thomas
By Kevin Merida and Michael Fletcher
Broadway | TR | 978-0-7679-1636-3 | 448pp. $15.95/$18.95 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00

THE INTERESTING NARRATIVE OF THE LIFE OF OLAUDAH EQUIANO
or, Gustavus Vassa, the African
By Olaudah Equiano Edited and with Notes by Shelly Eversley Introduction by Robert Reid-Pharr
Modern Library | TR | 978-0-375-76115-7 | 336pp. $12.00/$15.00 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00

COMING OF AGE IN MISSISSIPPI
By Anne Moody
Delta | TR | 978-0-385-33781-6 | 432pp. $16.00/$19.95 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00

THE AUDACITY OF HOPE
Thoughts on Reclaiming the American Dream
By Barack Obama
Three Rivers Press | TR | 978-0-307-23770-5 | 384pp. $14.95/$19.95 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00

THE OBAMAS
The Untold Story of an African Family
By Peter Firstbrook
Crown | HC | 978-0-307-59140-1 | 352pp. $26.00/$30.00 Can. | Exam Copy: $13.00

DREAMS FROM MY FATHER
A Story of Race and Inheritance
By Barack Obama With a New Preface by the Author
Three Rivers Press | TR | 978-1-4000-8277-3 | 480pp. $14.95/$16.95 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00

THE TRAVELLER’S TREE
A Journey Through the Caribbean Islands
By Patrick Leigh Fermor Introduction by Joshua Jelly-Schapiro
NYRB Classics | TR | 978-1-59017-380-0 | 432pp. $19.95/$22.95 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00

FIERCE ANGELS
The Strong Black Woman in American Life and Culture
By Sheri Parks
One World | HC | 978-0-345-50314-5 | 272pp. $25.00/$29.95 Can. | Exam Copy: $12.50

THE FIRST EMANCIPATOR
Slavery, Religion, and the Quiet Revolution of Robert Carter
By Andrew Levy
Random House | TR | 978-0-375-76104-1 | 336pp. $15.95/$19.95 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00

A REASON TO BELIEVE
Lessons from an Improbable Life
By Governor Deval Patrick
Broadway | HC | 978-0-7679-3112-0 | 240pp. $21.99/$24.99 Can. | Exam Copy: $11.00

SISTER OUTSIDER
Essays and Speeches
By Audre Lorde Foreword by Cheryl Clarke
Crossing Press | TR | 978-1-58091-186-3 | 192pp. $16.99/$21.99 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00

36

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EXTRAORDINARY, ORDINARY PEOPLE
A Memoir of Family
By Condoleezza Rice
Crown Archetype | HC | 978-0-307-58787-9 | 352pp. $27.00/$31.00 Can. | Exam Copy: $13.50

THE AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF MALCOLM X
By Malcolm X
Ballantine Books | TR | 978-0-345-37671-8 | 544pp. $15.00/$23.00 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00 Ballantine Books | MM | 978-0-345-35068-8 | 496pp. $7.99/$10.99 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00

LE FREAK
The Life and Times of Nile Rodgers
By Nile Rodgers
Do not order before 10/18/2011.

Spiegel & Grau | HC | 978-0-385-52965-5 | 288pp. $26.00/$30.00 Can. | Exam Copy: $13.00

HIP HOP, SPORTS & POPULAR CULTURE MAJOR
A Black Athlete, a White Era, and the Fight to Be the World’s Fastest Human Being
By Todd Balf
Three Rivers Press | TR | 978-0-307-23659-3 | 320pp. $14.00/$16.00 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00

SONG FOR MY FATHERS
By Tom Sancton
Other Press | TR | 978-1-59051-376-7 | 368pp. $14.95/$17.95 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00

MAKE THE IMPOSSIBLE POSSIBLE
One Man’s Crusade to Inspire Others to Dream Bigger and Achieve the Extraordinary
By Bill Strickland and Vince Rause
Crown Business | TR | 978-0-385-52055-3 | 240pp. $14.00/$17.99 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00

AIN’T NOTHING LIKE THE REAL THING
How the Apollo Theater Shaped American Entertainment
Edited by Richard Carlin and Kinshasha Holman Conwill Foreword by Smokey Robinson
Smithsonian Books | HC | 978-1-58834-269-0 | 264pp. $35.00/$41.00 Can. | Exam Copy: $17.50

STANDING TALL
A Memoir of Tragedy and Triumph
By C. Vivian Stringer and Laura Tucker
Three Rivers Press | TR | 978-0-307-40627-9 | 304pp. $14.95/$16.95 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00

DECODED
By Jay-Z
Spiegel & Grau | HC | 978-1-4000-6892-0 | 336pp. $35.00/$40.00 Can. | Exam Copy: $17.50

A HOPE IN THE UNSEEN
An American Odyssey from the Inner City to the Ivy League
By Ron Suskind
Broadway | TR | 978-0-7679-0126-0 | 400pp. $15.99/$19.99 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00

SAY IT LOUD
An Illustrated History of the Black Athlete
By Roxanne Jones and Jessie Paolucci Foreword by Tony Dungy
ESPN | HC | 978-0-345-51589-6 | 256pp. $35.00/$40.00 Can. | Exam Copy: $17.50

STREET SHADOWS
A Memoir of Race, Rebellion, and Redemption
By Jerald Walker
Bantam | HC | 978-0-553-80755-4 | 256pp. $25.00/$29.95 Can. | Exam Copy: $12.50

BORN IN THE BRONX
A Visual Record of the Early Days of Hip Hop
Edited by Johan Kugelberg
Universe | HC | 978-0-7893-1540-3 | 208pp. $45.00/$57.00 Can. | Exam Copy: $22.50

UP FROM SLAVERY
An Autobiography
By Booker T. Washington
Modern Library | TR | 978-0-679-64014-1 | 240pp. $9.95/$14.95 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00

FORTY MILLION DOLLAR SLAVES
The Rise, Fall, and Redemption of the Black Athlete
By William C. Rhoden
Broadway | TR | 978-0-307-35314-6 | 304pp. $14.99/$16.99 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00

TOO CLOSE TO THE SUN
The Audacious Life and Times of Denys Finch Hatton
By Sara Wheeler
Random House | TR | 978-0-8129-6892-7 | 336pp. $18.00/$21.00 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00

RACEBALL
How the Major Leagues Colonized the Black and Latin Game
By Rob Ruck
Beacon Press | HC | 978-0-8070-4805-4 | 288pp. $25.95/$29.00 Can. | Exam Copy: $13.00

THURGOOD MARSHALL
American Revolutionary
By Juan Williams
Broadway | TR | 978-0-8129-3299-7 | 504pp. $16.00/$24.00 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00

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37

SHOWDOWN
JFK and the Integration of the Washington Redskins
By Thomas G. Smith
Do not order before 9/6/2011.

LIVING IN, LIVING OUT
African American Domestics in Washington, D.C., 1910–1940
By Elizabeth Clark-Lewis
Smithsonian Books | TR | 978-1-58834-286-7 | 256pp. $29.95/$35.00 Can. | Exam Copy: $15.00

Beacon Press | HC | 978-0-8070-0074-8 | 256pp. $26.95/$31.00 Can. | Exam Copy: $13.50

SATCHEL
The Life and Times of an American Legend
By Larry Tye
Random House | TR | 978-0-8129-7797-4 | 432pp. $16.00/$19.00 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00

SOUL ON ICE
By Eldridge Cleaver
Delta | TR | 978-0-385-33379-5 | 256pp. $15.00/$21.00 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00

GENDER TALK HISTORY, POLITICS AND SOCIETY NOTES OF A NATIVE SON
By James Baldwin
Beacon Press | TR | 978-0-8070-6431-3 | 192pp. $14.00/$16.00 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00

The Struggle For Women’s Equality in African American Communities
By Johnnetta Betsch Cole and Beverly Guy-Sheftall
One World | TR | 978-0-345-45413-3 | 336pp. $14.95/$22.95 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00

GHETTONATION
Dispatches from America’s Culture War
By Cora Daniels
Broadway | TR | 978-0-7679-2240-1 | 224pp. $15.00/$18.95 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00

SLAVES IN THE FAMILY
By Edward Ball
Ballantine Books | TR | 978-0-345-43105-9 | 544pp. $17.95/$23.00 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00

AT THE HANDS OF PERSONS UNKNOWN
The Lynching of Black America
By Philip Dray
Modern Library | TR | 978-0-375-75445-6 | 544pp. $16.95/$21.00 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00

THE RASTAFARIANS
Twentieth Anniversary Edition
By Leonard Barrett
Beacon Press | TR | 978-0-8070-1039-6 | 320pp. $16.00/$19.00 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00

THE SOULS OF BLACK FOLK
By W.E.B. Du Bois
Bantam Classics | MM | 978-0-553-21336-2 | 240pp. $5.95/NCR | Exam Copy: $3.00

THE ECHO FROM DEALEY PLAZA
By Abraham Bolden
Three Rivers Press | TR | 978-0-307-38202-3 | 320pp. $13.95/$15.95 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00

THE SOULS OF BLACK FOLK
By W.E.B. Du Bois Introduction by David L. Lewis
Modern Library | HC | 978-0-375-50911-7 | 320pp. $17.95/$23.00 Can. | Exam Copy: $9.00

THE LITTLE BLACK BOOK OF SUCCESS
Laws of Leadership for Black Women
By Elaine Meryl Brown, Marsha Haygood, and Rhonda Joy McLean Foreword by Angela Burt-Murray
One World | HC | 978-0-345-51848-4 | 176pp. $20.00/$24.95 Can. | Exam Copy: $10.00

HOPE FOR AFRICA
Voices from Around the World
Edited by June Eding
Hatherleigh Press | TR | 978-1-57826-308-0 | 140pp. $12.00/$14.00 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00

DUDE, WHERE’S MY BLACK STUDIES DEPARTMENT?
The Disappearance of Black Americans from U.S. Universities
By Cecil Brown
North Atlantic Books | TR | 978-1-55643-573-7 | 160pp. $15.95/$21.00 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00 38

REPRESENTATIONS OF SLAVERY
Race and Ideology in Southern Plantation Museums
By Jennifer L. Eichstedt and Stephen Small
Smithsonian Books | TR | 978-1-58834-096-2 | 312pp. $21.95/$27.95 Can. | Exam Copy: $11.00

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NOBODY TURN ME AROUND
A People’s History of the 1963 March on Washington
By Charles Euchner
Beacon Press | HC | 978-0-8070-0059-5 | 256pp. $26.95/$31.00 Can. | Exam Copy: $13.50
Do not order paperback before 7/12/2011.

VOICES OF FREEDOM
An Oral History of the Civil Rights Movement from the 1950s Through the 1980s
By Henry Hampton and Steve Fayer
Bantam | TR | 978-0-553-35232-0 | 720pp. $24.00/$34.00 Can. | Exam Copy: $12.00

Beacon Press | TR | 978-0-8070-0155-4 | 248pp. $17.00/$19.00 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00

THE BLACK BOOK
35th Anniversary Edition
Edited by Middleton A. Harris, Ernest Smith, Morris Levitt, and Roger Furman Foreword by Toni Morrison
Random House | HC | 978-1-4000-6848-7 | 224pp. $35.00/$43.00 Can. | Exam Copy: $17.50

COMPLICITY
How the North Promoted, Prolonged, and Profited from Slavery
By Anne Farrow, Joel Lang and Jenifer Frank
Ballantine Books | TR | 978-0-345-46783-6 | 304pp. $15.95/$21.00 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00

UNCOMMON GROUND
Archaeology and Early African America, 1650–1800
By Leland Ferguson
Smithsonian Books | TR | 978-1-56098-059-9 | 232pp. $24.95/$28.95 Can. | Exam Copy: $12.50

SOMALIS IN MAINE
Crossing Cultural Currents
Edited by Kim A. Huisman, Mazie Hough, Kristin M. Langellier, and Carol Nordstrom Toner
Do not order before 6/7/2011.

North Atlantic Books | TR | 978-1-55643-926-1 | 272pp. $18.95/$21.50 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00

BUFFALO SOLDIERS
African American Troops in the US Forces 1866–1945
By Ron Field and Alexander Bielakowski
Osprey | HC | 978-1-84603-343-8 | 232pp. $25.95/$30.00 Can. | Exam Copy: $13.00

THE SHAME OF THE NATION
The Restoration of Apartheid Schooling in America
By Jonathan Kozol
Broadway | TR | 978-1-4000-5245-5 | 432pp. $14.95/$21.00 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00

FINDING OPRAH’S ROOTS
Finding Your Own
By Henry Louis Gates, Jr.
Crown | HC | 978-0-307-38238-2 | 192pp. $19.95/$24.95 Can. | Exam Copy: $10.00

VOICES IN OUR BLOOD
America’s Best on the Civil Rights Movement
By Jon Meacham
Random House | TR | 978-0-375-75881-2 | 576pp. $16.95/$25.95 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00

IN SEARCH OF OUR ROOTS
How 19 Extraordinary African Americans Reclaimed Their Past
By Henry Louis Gates, Jr.
Crown | HC | 978-0-307-38240-5 | 448pp. $27.50/$32.00 Can. | Exam Copy: $13.75

THE PROTEST PSYCHOSIS
How Schizophrenia Became a Black Disease
By Jonathan Metzl
Beacon Press | TR | 978-0-8070-0127-1 | 272pp. $22.00/$25.00 Can. | Exam Copy: $11.00

HARLEM
A Century in Images
Introduction by Thelma Golden
Skira Rizzoli | HC | 978-0-8478-3335-1 | 256pp. $55.00/$65.00 Can. | Exam Copy: $27.50

THE SCURLOCK STUDIO AND BLACK WASHINGTON
Picturing the Promise
Edited by National Museum of African American History
Smithsonian Books | HC | 978-1-58834-262-1 | 224pp. $35.00/$38.00 Can. | Exam Copy: $17.50

UNTOLD GLORY
African Americans in Pursuit of Freedom, Opportunity, and Achievement
By Alan Govenar
Broadway | TR | 978-0-7679-2117-6 | 432pp. $15.95/$19.95 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00

THE CORNER
A Year in the Life of an Inner-City Neighborhood
By David Simon and Edward Burns
Broadway | TR | 978-0-7679-0031-7 | 576pp. $16.95/$25.95 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00

IMPERIUM IN IMPERIO
By Sutton Griggs Introduction by Cornel West Preface by A.J. Verdelle
Modern Library | TR | 978-0-8129-7160-6 | 208pp. $14.95/$18.95 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00

OUTCASTS UNITED
An American Town, a Refugee Team, and One Woman’s Quest to Make a Difference
By Warren St. John
Spiegel & Grau | TR | 978-0-385-52204-5 | 336pp. $15.00/$18.95 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00

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39

UNCLE TOM’S CABIN
or, Life among the Lowly
By Harriet Beecher Stowe Introduction by Jane Smiley
Modern Library | TR | 978-0-375-75693-1 | 688pp. $8.95/$12.95 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00

THEY CAME BEFORE COLUMBUS
The African Presence in Ancient America
By Ivan Van Sertima
Random House | TR | 978-0-8129-6817-0 | 336pp. $15.95/$19.95 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00

ON THE LAPS OF GODS
The Red Summer of 1919 and the Struggle for Justice That Remade a Nation
By Robert Whitaker
Three Rivers Press | TR | 978-0-307-33983-6 | 400pp. $16.00/$19.95 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00

UNCLE TOM’S CABIN
By Harriet Beecher Stowe
Bantam Classics | MM | 978-0-553-21218-1 | 544pp. $5.95/$8.95 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00

CAN WE TALK ABOUT RACE?
And Other Conversations in an Era of School Resegregation
By Beverly Tatum, Ph.D. Afterword by Theresa Perry
Beacon Press | TR | 978-0-8070-3285-5 | 168pp. $14.00/$17.00 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00

LET YOUR MOTTO BE RESISTANCE
African American Portraits
Edited by Deborah Willis
Smithsonian Books | TR | 978-1-58834-246-1 | 176pp. $19.95/$24.95 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00

INDIVISIBLE
African-Native American Lives in the Americas
Edited by Gabrielle Tayac
Smithsonian Books | TR | 978-1-58834-271-3 | 256pp. $19.95/$25.99 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00

REVIVAL
The Struggle for Survival Inside the Obama White House
By Richard Wolffe
Crown | HC | 978-0-307-71741-2 | 320pp. $26.00/$30.00 Can. | Exam Copy: $13.00

CAPTIVE PASSAGE
The Transatlantic Slave Trade and the Making of the Americas
Edited by The Mariners Museum
Smithsonian Books | TR | 978-1-58834-017-7 | 256pp. $21.95/$27.95 Can. | Exam Copy: $11.00

HOWARD ZINN ON RACE
By Howard Zinn Introduction by Cornel West
Do not order before 6/14/2011.

Seven Stories Press | TR | 978-1-60980-134-2 | 192pp. $14.00/$16.00 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00

DEATH OF INNOCENCE
The Story of the Hate Crime That Changed America
By Mamie Till-Mobley and Christopher Benson
One World | TR | 978-0-8129-7047-0 | 320pp. $16.00/$19.95 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00

LITERATURE & FICTION THE DEVIL FINDS WORK
By James Baldwin
Delta | TR | 978-0-385-33460-0 | 144pp. $11.95/$17.95 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00

SILENCING THE PAST
Power and the Production of History
By Michel-Rolph Trouillot
Beacon Press | TR | 978-0-8070-4311-0 | 216pp. $17.00/$19.00 Can. | Exam Copy: $3.00

GIOVANNI’S ROOM
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GO TELL IT ON THE MOUNTAIN
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JUST ABOVE MY HEAD
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LIFELINES
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NATIVE SONS
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CHILDREN OF THE STREET
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POEMS FOR NEW ORLEANS
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FReedom
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MERCY
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LOVE, ANGER, MADNESS
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n honor of its 50th anniversary, Amnesty International, the notable and noble human rights organization, has brought together several internationally acclaimed writers, asking them to contribute stories inspired by the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Empathetic and thought-provoking, but never didactic, the contributors present ruminations on struggles for freedom, equality, and efforts against repression and injustice. These meditations encourage an understanding of the victories that have been won and show how much more still needs to be done to ensure that the basic rights of all are respected and protected.

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TINY SUNBIRDS, FAR AWAY
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Author/Title Index
African Gods: Contemporary Rituals and Beliefs ................34 African History for Beginners............................................32 Ain’t Nothing Like the Real Thing: The Apollo Theater and American Entertainment ....................................37 Alexander, Amy ..............................................................35 “All Labor Has Dignity” ....................................................16 Amnesty International USA ......................................35, 42 Anderson, S.E. ................................................................32 Angelou, Maya ..............................................................2, 3 Appiah, Anthony, editor ..................................................35 At the Hands of Persons Unknown: The Lynching of Black America ........................................................38 Audacity of Hope, The: Thoughts on Reclaiming the American Dream ........................................................36 Autobiography of Malcolm X, The ....................................37 Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman, The ........................41 Baking Cakes in Kigali: A Novel ........................................41 Baldwin, James ..................................................38, 40, 41 Balf, Todd ........................................................................37 Ball, Edward ....................................................................38 Barack Obama For Beginners, Updated Edition: An Essential Guide......................................................33 Barrett, Leonard ..............................................................38 Bashir, Halima ................................................................34 Bayou: Vols. 1 and 2 ........................................................41 Beautiful Struggle, The: A Father, Two Sons, and an Unlikely Road to Manhood ....................................35 Beckwith, Carol ..............................................................34 Bennett, Barbara ............................................................34 Best African American Essays 2010 ..................................35 Best African American Fiction 2010 ..................................35 Bird, Christiane................................................................34 Black Book, The: 35th Anniversary Edition ........................39 Black History For Beginners ..............................................32 Black Holocaust For Beginners..........................................32 Black Poets, The ..............................................................42 Black Women For Beginners ............................................33 Blood Done Sign My Name: A True Story ..........................40 Bolden, Abraham ............................................................38 Bombingham ..................................................................41 Born in the Bronx: A Visual Record of the Early Days of Hip Hop ................................................37 Boyd, Herb ......................................................................32 Breaking News: Contemporary Photography from the Middle East and Africa..................................34 Brown, Cecil ..............................................................38, 41 Brown, Elaine Meryl ........................................................38 Bumiller, Elisabeth ..........................................................35 Butler, Octavia ................................................................41 Can We Talk about Race?: And Other Conversations in an Era of School Resegregation ..............................40 Canada, Geoffrey ..............................................................4 Captive Passage: The Transatlantic Slave Trade and the Making of the Americas ................................40 Carlin, Richard, editor......................................................37 Carter, Vincent O. ............................................................41 Chesnutt, Charles ............................................................41 Children of the Street: An Inspector Darko Dawson Mystery......................................................................42 Christianse, Yvette ..........................................................41 Citizens of Nowhere: From Refugee Camp to Canadian Campus......................................................................34 Clark-Lewis, Elizabeth ....................................................38 Cleaver, Eldridge..............................................................38 Coates, Ta-Nehisi ............................................................35 Cole, Johnnetta Betsch and Beverly Guy-Sheftall ............38 44

Cole, Teju ....................................................................6, 41 Collected Autobiographies of Maya Angelou, The ................2 Collected Essays of Ralph Ellison, The..................................8 Color Me Butterfly: A Novel Inspired by One Family’s Journey from Tragedy to Triumph ..............................36 Coming of Age in Mississippi ............................................36 Complicity: How the North Promoted, Prolonged, and Profited from Slavery ..........................................39 Condoleezza Rice: An American Life: A Biography..............35 Corner, The: A Year in the Life of an Inner-City Neighborhood............................................................39 Daniels, Cora ..................................................................38 Dark Rain: A New Orleans Story........................................41 Dau, John Bul ..................................................................34 Death of Innocence: The Story of the Hate Crime That Changed America ..............................................40 Decoded ..........................................................................37 Dennis, Denise ................................................................32 Devil Finds Work, The ......................................................40 Dinka: Legendary Cattle Keepers of Sudan ........................34 Dixie, Quinton ................................................................35 Doctor, Bernard Aquina ..................................................33 Donovan, Brian ..............................................................35 Don’t Let’s Go to the Dogs Tonight: An African Childhood..................................................34 Douglass, Frederick....................................................35, 36 Dray, Philip......................................................................38 Dreams from My Father: A Story of Race and Inheritance ..................................36 Du Bois, W.E.B. ................................................................38 Dude, Where’s My Black Studies Department?: The Disappearance of Black Americans from Our Universities..........................................................38 Early African-American Classics ........................................35 Early, Gerald, series editor ..............................................35 Echo from Dealey Plaza, The ............................................38 Eding, June, editor ..........................................................38 Eichstedt, Jennifer L. ......................................................38 Ellison, Ralph ....................................................................8 Enough Moment, The: Fighting to End Africa’s Worst Human Rights Crimes ......................................24 Equiano, Olaudah ............................................................36 Essential Writings of James Weldon Johnson, The ............41 Euchner, Charles..............................................................39 Extraordinary, Ordinary People: A Memoir of Family ........37 Faces of Africa: Thirty Years of Photography......................34 Farrow, Anne ..................................................................39 Ferguson, Leland ............................................................39 Fierce Angels: The Strong Black Woman in American Life and Culture ..........................................................36 Finding Oprah’s Roots: Finding Your Own..........................39 First Emancipator, The: Slavery, Religion, and the Quiet Revolution of Robert Carter................................36 Firstbrook, Peter..............................................................36 Fisher, Angela..................................................................34 Fist Stick Knife Gun: A Personal History of Violence..............4 Forty Million Dollar Slaves: The Rise, Fall, and Redemption of the Black Athlete ................................37 Freedom: Stories Celebrating the Universal Declaration of Human Rights ................................35, 42 Fuller, Alexandra ............................................................34 Gaines, Ernest J. ..............................................................41 Galliani, Francesca, photographer ..................................34 Gates, Henry Louis Jr. ......................................................39 Gather Together in My Name..............................................2 Gender Talk: The Struggle For Women’s Equality in African American Communities ..................................38 Ghettonation: Dispatches from America’s Culture War ......38 Giovanni’s Room ..............................................................40

Glover, Bonnie ................................................................41 Go Tell It on the Mountain ................................................40 God Grew Tired of Us: A Memoir........................................34 Going Down South: A Novel..............................................41 Golden, Marita ................................................................35 Golden, Thelma ..............................................................39 Goodwin, Debi ................................................................34 Govenar, Alan..................................................................39 Griggs, Sutton ................................................................39 Grooms, Anthony ............................................................41 Guest, Robert ..................................................................10 Hampton, Henry ............................................................39 Hard Driving: The Wendell Scott Story ..............................35 Hari, Daoud ....................................................................34 Harlem: A Century in Images ............................................39 Harris, Middleton A., editor ............................................39 Hatzfeld, Jean..................................................................34 Heart of a Woman, The ......................................................2 Hill, Anita ........................................................................12 Hodari, Askhari Johnson..................................................41 Hope for Africa: Voices from Around the World..................38 Hope in the Unseen, A: An American Odyssey from the Inner City to the Ivy League ..................................37 House Behind the Cedars, The ..........................................41 Howard Zinn on Race ......................................................40 Huisman, Kim A., editor ..................................................39 I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings........................................3 Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, The................................26 Imperium in Imperio ........................................................39 In Search of Our Roots: How 19 Extraordinary African Americans Reclaimed Their Past......................39 Incognegro ......................................................................41 IndiVisible: African-Native American Lives in the Americas ..............................................................40 Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano, The: or, Gustavus Vassa, the African ............................36 Jay-Z. ..............................................................................37 Johnson, James Weldon ..................................................41 Johnson, Mat ..................................................................41 Jones, Roxanne ..............................................................37 Just Above My Head ........................................................41 Kidder, Tracy....................................................................14 Kindred............................................................................41 King, Martin Luther Jr. ..............................................16, 17 Kozol, Jonathan ..............................................................39 Kugelberg, Johan, editor ................................................37 Laine, Daniel ..................................................................34 LaNier, Carlotta Walls ......................................................18 Last Resort, The: A Memoir of Mischief and Mayhem on a Family Farm in Africa ..........................................35 Lay that Trumpet in Our Hands ........................................41 Le Freak: The Life and Times of Nile Rodgers......................37 Leigh Fermor, Patrick ......................................................36 Let Your Motto Be Resistance: African American Portraits......................................................................40 Letter to My Daughter ........................................................3 Letters from Black America: Intimate Portraits of the African American Experience ............................35 Levy, Andrew ..................................................................36 Life and Loves of Mr. Jiveass Nigger, The............................41 Life Laid Bare: The Survivors in Rwanda Speak..................34 Lifelines: The Black Book of Proverbs ................................41 Little Black Book of Success, The: Laws of Leadership for Black Women........................................................38 Living In, Living Out: African American Domestics in Washington, D.C., 1910–1940 ..................................38 Lorde, Audre....................................................................36 Love, Anger, Madness: A Haitian Triptych..........................42

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Love, Jeremy ..................................................................41 Maathai, Wangari............................................................34 Maggia, Filippo, editor ....................................................34 Major: A Black Athlete, a White Era, and the Fight to Be the World’s Fastest Human Being ......................37 Make the Impossible Possible: One Man’s Crusade to Inspire Others to Dream Bigger and Achieve the Extraordinary ......................................................37 Malcolm X. ......................................................................37 Malcolm X For Beginners ..................................................33 Mamdani, Mahmood ......................................................20 Mandela’s Way: Fifteen Lessons on Life, Love, and Courage................................................................35 Mariners Museum, The, editor ........................................40 Marlow, L. Y. ....................................................................36 Maskalyk, James, Dr. ......................................................34 McCarthy, Susan Carol ....................................................41 Meacham, Jon ................................................................39 Mercy ..............................................................................42 Merida, Kevin..................................................................36 Metzl, Jonathan M...........................................................39 Mighty Long Way; A: My Journey to Justice at Little Rock Central High School....................................18 MLK: A Celebration in Word and Image ............................17 Moody, Anne ..................................................................36 Moore, Wes ....................................................................22 Morning Haiku ................................................................42 Mountains Beyond Mountains: The Quest of Dr. Paul Farmer, a Man Who Would Cure the World ....14 My Bondage and My Freedom ..........................................35 Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave & Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl ..................36 Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass: An American Slave..........................................................................36 National Museum of African American History, editor ....39 Native Sons......................................................................41 Neer, Bob ........................................................................33 Newkirk, Pamela, editor..................................................35 Nobody Turn Me Around: A People’s History of the 1963 March on Washington ......................................39 Notes of a Native Son ......................................................38 Obama, Barack................................................................36 Obamas, The: The Untold Story of an African Family..........36 On Black Sisters Street: A Novel ........................................42 On the Laps of Gods: The Red Summer of 1919 and the Struggle for Justice That Remade a Nation......40 Open City: A Novel ........................................................6, 41 Other Wes Moore, The: One Name, Two Fates ....................22 Outcasts United: An American Town, a Refugee Team, and One Woman’s Quest to Make a Difference ............39 Parkin, Gaile....................................................................41 Parks, Sheri ....................................................................36 Patrick, Deval, Governor ..................................................36 Poems for New Orleans ....................................................42 Portrait of the New Angola, The........................................34 Prendergast, John ..........................................................24 Protest Psychosis, The: How Schizophrenia Became a Black Disease ..........................................................39 Pym: A Novel....................................................................41 Quartey, Kwei ............................................................41, 42 Raceball: How the Major Leagues Colonized the Black and Latin Game ................................................37 Randall, Dudley, editor....................................................42 Rastafarians, The: Twentieth Anniversary Edition ............38 Reason to Believe, A: Lessons from an Improbable Life ......36 Reimagining Equality: Stories of Gender, Race, and Finding Home......................................................12 Replenishing the Earth: Spiritual Values for Healing Ourselves and the World ............................................34

Representations of Slavery: Race and Ideology in Southern Plantation Museums ..................................38 Revival: The Struggle for Survival Inside the Obama White House ..............................................................40 Rhoden, William C...........................................................37 Rice, Condoleezza............................................................37 Rodgers, Nile ..................................................................37 Rogers, Douglas ..............................................................35 Ruck, Rob ........................................................................37 Sadler, Nigel....................................................................35 Sanchez, Sonia ................................................................42 Sancton, Tom ..................................................................37 Sanders, Edward..............................................................42 Santoro, Lara ..................................................................42 Satchel: The Life and Times of an American Legend ..........38 Saviors and Survivors: Darfur, Politics, and the War on Terror ....................................................................20 Say It Loud: An Illustrated History of the Black Athlete ......37 Scurlock Studio and Black Washington, The: Picturing the Promise ................................................39 Seal, Mark ......................................................................35 Shackled Continent, The: Power, Corruption, and African Lives ..............................................................10 Shame of the Nation, The: The Restoration of Apartheid Schooling in America..................................39 Sharp, S. Pearl ................................................................33 Showdown: JFK and the Integration of the Washington Redskins ................................................38 Silencing the Past: Power and the Production of History....40 Simon, David ..................................................................39 Singin’ and Swingin’ and Gettin’ Merry Like Christmas ........3 Sister Outsider: Essays and Speeches ................................36 Six Months in Sudan: A Young Doctor in a War-Torn Village ........................................................34 Skloot, Rebecca ..............................................................26 Slave Trade, The ..............................................................35 Slaves in the Family..........................................................38 Smith, Thomas G. ............................................................38 Somalis in Maine: Crossing Cultural Currents ....................39 Song for my Fathers ........................................................37 Soul of a Lion: One Woman’s Quest to Rescue Africa’s Wildlife Refugees............................................34 Soul on Ice ......................................................................38 Souls of Black Folk, The ....................................................38 South African Township Barbershops & Salons..................35 Soyinka, Wole..................................................................35 St. John, Warren ..............................................................39 Standing Tall: A Memoir of Tragedy and Triumph ..............37 Stengel, Richard ..............................................................35 Stowe, Harriet Beecher....................................................40 Street Shadows: A Memoir of Race, Rebellion, and Redemption ........................................................37 Strength in What Remains................................................14 Strickland, Bill ................................................................37 Stride Toward Freedom: The Montgomery Story ................17 Stringer, C. Vivian ............................................................37 Such Sweet Thunder: A Novel............................................41 Sugrue, Thomas J. ..........................................................28 Sultan’s Shadow, The: One Family’s Rule at the Crossroads of East and West........................................34 Supreme Discomfort: The Divided Soul of Clarence Thomas ........................................................36 Suskind, Ron ..................................................................37 Sweeping Up Glass ..........................................................42 Sweet Land of Liberty: The Forgotten Struggle for Civil Rights in the North..............................................28 Tatum, Beverly ................................................................40 Tayac, Gabrielle, editor ....................................................40

Tears of the Desert: A Memoir of Survival in Darfur ..........34 They Came Before Columbus: The African Presence in Ancient America ....................................................40 Three Days Before the Shooting . . . ....................................8 Thurgood Marshall: American Revolutionary ....................37 Till-Mobley, Mamie ........................................................40 Tiny Sunbirds, Far Away ..................................................42 Too Close to the Sun: The Audacious Life and Times of Denys Finch Hatton ................................................37 Translator, The: A Memoir ................................................34 Traveller’s Tree, The: A Journey Through the Caribbean Islands ......................................................36 Trouillot, Michel-Rolph....................................................40 True Fires ........................................................................41 Trumpet of Conscience, The ..............................................17 Tye, Larry ........................................................................38 Tyson, Timothy B. ............................................................40 Uncle Tom’s Cabin ............................................................40 Uncle Tom’s Cabin: or, Life among the Lowly......................40 Uncommon Ground: Archaeology and Early African America, 1650–1800 ....................................39 Unconfessed ....................................................................41 Uncovering Race: A Black Journalist’s Story of Reporting and Reinvention ........................................35 Unigwe, Chika ................................................................42 Unlikely Brothers: Our Story of Adventure, Loss, and Redemption ..............................................................24 Untold Glory: African Americans in Pursuit of Freedom, Opportunity, and Achievement ..................................39 Up from Slavery: An Autobiography..................................37 Van Sertima, Ivan............................................................40 Vieux-Chauvet, Marie......................................................42 Visions of a Better World: Howard Thurman’s Pilgrimage to India and the Origins of African American Nonviolence ....................................35 Voices in Our Blood: America’s Best on the Civil Rights Movement..................................................................39 Voices of Freedom: An Oral History of the Civil Rights Movement from the 1950s Through the 1980s ............39 Walker, Jerald..................................................................37 Wall, Carolyn ..................................................................42 Warmth of Other Suns, The: The Epic Story of America’s Great Migration ..........................................30 Washington, Booker T. ....................................................37 Watson, Christie ..............................................................42 Weller, Simon..................................................................35 Wheeler, Sara..................................................................37 Where Do We Go from Here: Chaos or Community?............16 Whitaker, Robert ............................................................40 Why We Can’t Wait ..........................................................17 Wife of the Gods: A Novel..................................................41 Wildflower: An Extraordinary Life and Mysterious Death in Africa ..........................................................35 Wilkerson, Isabel ............................................................30 Williams, Juan ................................................................37 Willis, Deborah, editor ....................................................40 Wolffe, Richard................................................................40 Word, The: Black Writers Talk About the Transformative Power of Reading and Writing ....................................35 You Must Set Forth at Dawn: A Memoir ............................35 Zami: A New Spelling of My Name: A Biomythography......36 Zinn, Howard ..................................................................40

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