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5S is a method for organizing a workplace, especially a shared workplace (like a shop floor or an office space), and
keeping it organized.
The key targets of 5S are workplace morale and efficiency. The assertion of 5S is, by assigning everything a location, time
is not wasted by looking for things.



 

 Jreates a clean, uncluttered and efficient work environment.


 xliminates the waste associated with clutter and disorganization.
 ncovers hidden problems.
 Jontributes to a safer work environment.
 Jreates a tone of enthusiasm, optimism and ownership among those involved.
 ¦rovides a great image to portray to visitors (customers).
 ½osters the teamwork and discipline needed to make other improvements in the workplace.

O


1. 
(ᢛℂ)  

Going through all the tools, materials, etc., in the plant and work area and keeping only essential items. xverything else
is stored or discarded.

2. 
 (ᢛ㗐) 
 
 


½ocuses on efficiency. When we translate this to "Straighten or Set in Order", it sounds like more sorting or sweeping,
but the intent is to arrange the tools, equipment and parts in a manner that promotes work flow. ½or example, tools and
equipment should be kept where they will be used (i.e. straighten the flow path), and the process should be set in an
order that maximizes efficiency.

3. 
 (ÿ )

 

Systematic Jleaning or the need to keep the workplace clean as well as neat. Daily activity at the end of each shift, the
work area is cleaned up and everything is restored to its place, making it easy to know what goes where and to know
when everything is where it should be are essential here. The key point is that maintaining cleanliness should be part of
the daily work - not an occasional activity initiated when things get too messy.

4. 

(ÿ)  

Standardized work practices or operating in a consistent and standardized fashion. xveryone knows exactly what his or
her responsibilities are to keep above 3S's.

5.  
( )  

Refers to maintaining and reviewing standards. Once the previous 4S's have been established they become the new way
to operate. Maintain the focus on this new way of operating, and do not allow a gradual decline back to the old ways of
operating.
½   
 
 

What is a ½ishbone Diagram?
 åt is a valuable technique, created by Dr Kaoru åshikawa for analyzing the cause of a problem in a structured way.
 åt helps you to sort out and make sense of the relationships between the various possible causes that may lie
behind a problem.
 Most problems do not have a single cause, and a fishbone diagram helps you to group causes into common
themes or categories, so that you can decide what needs to be done to deal effectively with each.

¦urpose
 The major purpose of the ½ishbone Diagram is to act as a first step in problem solving by generating a
comprehensive list of possible causes.
 åt can lead to immediate identification of major causes and point to the potential remedial actions or, failing
this, it may indicate the best potential areas for further exploration and analysis.
 At a minimum, preparing a ½ishbone Diagram will lead to greater understanding of the problem.

¦rocedure
1. ådentify the problem. Jreateaproblemstatement;
2. ådentify the major factorsinvolved;
The 8 ¦ s¦rice, ¦romotion, ¦eople, ¦rocesses, ¦lace / ¦lant, ¦olicies, ¦rocedures & ¦roduct (or Service)
1. Brainstorm the possible causes;
2. Analyze and finalåzeyourfishbonediagram;

½ishbone Diagram


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