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Bangladesh lacks any satellites of its own.

The three satellite ground stations, located in


Betbunia, Talibabad, and Mohakhali, are used to receive feeds from other satellites.
Bangladesh Space Research and Remote Sensing Organisation (SPARRSO), a
Government agency under the ministry of defence[1] provides storm predictions and early
warnings using feeds from NASA and NOAA's satellites. The warnings are usually given
in a scale of 10, with the number 10th being given for the deadliest storms.

A detailed programme for storm prevention has been taken by the Government following
the cyclone of 1991. A Comprehensive Cyclone Preparedness Programme (CPP) is
jointly planned, operated, and managed by the Ministry of Disaster Management and
Relief and the Bangladesh Red Crescent Society, and a volunteer force of more than
32,000 are trained to help in warning and evacuation in the coastal areas.[2] Around 2,500
cyclone shelters have been constructed in the coastal regions. The shelters are built on
elevated platforms, and serve the dual role of schools or community centers during
normal weather. In Patenga, Chittagong, the coast has been heavily protected with
concrete levees. Also, an afforestation has been initiated in the coastal regions to create a
green belt.

Cyclones are a product of heat and moisture. They can last up to 24 hours. Once a
cyclone has hit any place they place is destroyed and all supplies for food and water will
be gone. People can die because the water has toxic waste in it so the get warnings before
the cyclone has hit. Also they have a supply kit so they are ready when a cyclone hits
them. Low pressure is the main weather associated with cyclones.

Bangladesh, due to its unique geographic location, suffers from devastating


tropical cyclones frequently. The funnel-shaped northern portion of the Bay of
Bengal causes tidal bores when cyclones make landfall, and thousands of people
living in the coastal areas are affected. Some of the most devastating natural
disasters in recorded history with high casualties were tropical cyclones that hit
the region now forming Bangladesh. Among them, the 1970 Bhola cyclone alone
claimed more than 500,000 lives.

A detailed programme for storm prevention has been taken by the Government
following the cyclone of 1991. A Comprehensive Cyclone Preparedness
Programme (CPP) is jointly planned, operated, and managed by the Ministry of
Disaster Management and Relief and the Bangladesh Red Crescent Society, and
a volunteer force of more than 32,000 are trained to help in warning and
evacuation in the coastal areas. Around 2,500 cyclone shelters have been
constructed in the coastal regions. The shelters are built on elevated platforms,
and serve the dual role of schools or community centers during normal weather.
In Patenga, Chittagong, the coast has been heavily protected with concrete
levees. Also, an afforestation has been initiated in the coastal regions to create a
green belt.

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Losses due to natural and man-made disasters will continue to increase because of our
continuing population growth and the increase of the concentration of growth in
vulnerable areas such as coastal regions, flood plains, and seismically active zones. As a
result, more lives will be lost, more property will be destroyed, and the social and
economic fabric of disaster-prone communities will be disrupted. But this does not have
to be so. The global scope of disasters requires that we coordinate our efforts for their
mitigation on an international basis. Advances in the science and technology of hazard
mitigation now provide the means to reduce significantly losses from natural hazards. But
we have to commit ourselves to understanding these hazards better and to applying
techniques that reduce our vulnerability. We need to explore the feasibility of concerted
scientific and engineering efforts in reducing the loss of life and property through
programs of public education and of effective early warning systems. The development
of early warning systems with an adequate array of monitoring instruments for the
purpose of collecting necessary data and information for disaster evaluation, is necessary
for establishing relative potential risks. Public educational efforts and rapid
communication networks are needed for transmitting information on potential disaster
risks and for warning purposes in order to save lives and minimize damage to property

The time has come to bring the full force of scientific and technological advances to the
reduction of human tragedy and economic losses from natural and man-made disasters.
We must take an integrated approach to disaster reduction, bringing new emphasis to
research on disasters, on pre-disaster planning, on preparedness, and on disaster
prevention, while we sustain our post-disaster relief capabilities. Our humanitarian efforts
must be broadened to include disaster education and preparedness of the public as well as
early warning systems in which people at risk receive, understand, and act upon the
warning information conveyed.

The Government of Bangladesh has given emphasis and priority to develop the weather
forecasting system using satellite imageries and computer methods. So, now cyclone warning
signals can be given and disseminated to the community/vulnerable people at the earliest time, by
radio, television and information media at frequent intervals in the event that a cyclone strikes.
Bangladesh has already established a set up of Disaster Management Bureau to co-ordinate
disaster management through national to local level to pursue the objectives of the IDNDR to
develop disaster awareness. A success has been achieved during the last May 19, 1997 cyclone
time, which was of similar intensity as the May 25, 1985 cyclone which had killed 11,069

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persons. But this time - due to early warning system and taking proper precautionary measures -
only 127 people died