JOURNAL OF COMPUTING, VOLUME 3, ISSUE 4, APRIL 2011, ISSN 2151-9617

HTTPS://SITES.GOOGLE.COM/SITE/JOURNALOFCOMPUTING/
WWW.JOURNALOFCOMPUTING.ORG 155
LMS and RLS Channel Estimation Algorithms
for LTE-Advanced

Saqib Saleem
1
, Qamar-ul-Islam

Abstract: For increased data rate and reduced latency for 4G radio communication standards, ITU made proposals for LTE-Advanced in 2009.
To achieve Release-10 targets, made by 3
rd
Generation Partnership Project (3GPP), channel state information at the transmitter is a pre-
requisite. In this paper, analysis of Least Mean Square (LMS) and Recursive Least Square (RLS) channel estimation techniques, using a priori
channel statistics, is drawn for different Channel Impulse Response samples and channel taps for LTE-Advanced system. The effect of different
parameters involved in these adaptive filters is also optimized. MATLAB simulations are used to compare their performance, in terms of Mean
Square Error and Symbol Error Rate, and the complexity in terms of computational time.

Keywords: LTE-Advanced, LMS, LSE, RLS, LMMSE, DM-RS, PUCCH, PUSCH

——————————

——————————

1. INTRODUCTION
To  lower  the  capital  expenses  (CAPEX)  and  Operating 
Expenses  (OPEX)  of  the  future  broadband  wireless 
network,  3GPP  proposed  to  ITU  that  the  capabilities  of 
mobile systems in LTE Release‐10 and beyond should go 
beyond IMT‐2000, named as IMT‐Advanced [1]. In LTE‐
Advanced  the  requirement  of  high  data  rate  of  1Gbps 
for  DL  and  500  Mbps  for  UL  and  high  spectrum 
efficiency of 30 bps/Hz for DL and 15 bps/Hz for UL can 
be  achieved  by  employing  high  order  MIMO  (4 × 4), 
wider  transmission  bandwidth,  adaptive  modulation 
and  coding  (AMC),  advanced  channel  coding,  by  using 
LDPC  convolutional  codes,  and  multihop  transmission 
[2].   
At  radio  bearer,  the  key  technologies  used  are  OFDMA 
and  SC‐FDMA,  which  are  used  in  a  hybrid  form  and 
both  utilize  OFDM  technology  as  a  basis.  The  larger 
bandwidth  requirement  of  70  MHz  can  be  achieved  by 
using  both  symmetric  and  asymmetric  carrier 
aggregation  as  proposed  in  Release‐10  [3].  For  high 
spectral  efficiency,  UL  transmissions  rely  on  channel 
reciprocity,  for  which  beam‐forming,  SU‐MIMO  and 
MU‐MIMO  techniques  are  used.  In  this  technique  the 
transmitter, enhanced NodeB (eNB), gets the  
 
knowledge of channel by processing a sounding  
reference  signal  from  UE.  For  DL,  user  specific 
demodulation  reference  signals  (DM‐RS)  and  cell‐
specific  reference  signals  are  proposed.  Channel  State 
Information (CSI) can also be achieved through PUCCH  
and PUSCH for DL transmission. Adaptive equalization 
is  required  in  case  of  time‐dispersive  and  multi‐path 
fading  channel  for  reliable  communication  [4].  For  this 
purpose reference signals are transmitted in place of the 
unknown  transmitted  data.  Iterative  receivers  for  4G 
mobile  standards  performing  joint  detection  and 
decoding  are  proposed  for  high  performance  gain  [5]. 
For  these  iterative  receivers,  adaptive  filtering 
techniques  are  most  suitable  as  compared  to  LSE  and 
LMMSE  [6].  LMS  and  RLS  algorithms  can  be  used  for 
wiener‐based channel estimation, which may or may not 
require  the  second  order  statistics  of  the  channel  and 
noise  [7].  To  the  best  knowledge  of  the  authors,  first 
time  adaptive  filters  using  channel  statistics  are 
investigated in this paper. Effect of varying step‐size on 
performance  and  complexity  is  also  presented.  We  also 
show  that  how  these  adaptive  algorithms  can  be 
optimized by taking filter length and multi‐path channel 
taps into consideration. 
The rest of the paper is organized as: Section II describes 
the physical layer aspects of LTE‐Advanced according to 
Release‐10,  in  section  III  different  channel  estimation 
algorithms are discussed and their simulation results are 
shown  in  Section  IV  and  the  last  section  draws  the 
conclusion. 



————————————————
 Saqib Saleem is a student of MS Wireless Communication Engineering of
Department of Communication System Engineering at Institute of Space
Technology, Islamabad, Pakistan.

 Dr. Qamar-ul-Islam is Head of Department (HoD) of the Department of
Communication System Engineering at Institute of Space Technology,
Islamabad, Pakistan.


JOURNAL OF COMPUTING, VOLUME 3, ISSUE 4, APRIL 2011, ISSN 2151-9617
HTTPS://SITES.GOOGLE.COM/SITE/JOURNALOFCOMPUTING/
WWW.JOURNALOFCOMPUTING.ORG 156
2. SYSTEM DESCRIPTION
2.1 Frame Structure
According to Release‐10, in LTE‐Advanced two types of 
radio  frames  are  used  for  UL  and  DL  transmissions: 
Generic frame structure and Alternative frame structure. 
Generic  radio  frame,  which  can  be  used  both  for  TDD 
and  FDD  transmissions,  consist  of  20  sub‐frames  of 
length  T
xJ
= 153óû × T
x
while alternative radio frame, 
which is applied to only TDD transmissions, consist of 2 
half‐frames,  each  of  length    T
xJ
= 153óûû × T
x
.  Each 
half‐frame  consist  of  seven  sub‐frames.  In  both  cases 
each sub‐frame consist of 72 < N
BW
< 2û48 subcarriers 
and the number of OFDM symbols, N
xymh
, are given in 
Table 1. 

TABLE 1
NUMBER OF OFDM SYMBOLS PER SUB-FRAME
Configuration
symb
N
Generic frame
structure
Alternative frame
structure
Normal cyclic prefix 7 9
Extended cyclic prefix 6 8

Physical  layer  uses  two  types  of  DL  signals:  Reference 
signals  and  Synchronization  signals.  One  reference 
signal is transmitted per antenna. DL transmit antennas 
can  be  1,2  or  4.  The  2‐dimensional  reference  signal 
sequence is generated according to  
 
r
m,n
= r
m,n
OS
× r
m,n
PRS
 
 
Where  r
m,n
OS
  is  2‐dimensional  orthogonal  sequence  and 
r
m,n
PRS
  is  2‐dimensional  pseudo‐random  sequence.  The 
mapping  of  DL  reference  signals  for  generic  frame 
structure is shown in Figure 1 
For  LTE‐Advanced  according  to  Release  9,  two  DL 
reference  signals  are  used:  Reference  signal  for  PDSCH 
demodulation  and  reference  signal  for  Channel  State 
Information  (CSI)  estimation,  which  is  cell  specific, 
sparse  in time/frequency and punctured into data of the 
radio sub‐frame.   
 
2.2 OFDM Signal
The continuous‐time signal in OFDM symbol is given by 
x
|
(t) = ` a
k,|
e
2ak
NT
x
(t-N
CP,|
T
x
)
N
BW
¡2
k=-N
BW
 
 
For  û < t < (N
CP,|
+ N)T
x
 
where the value of N
CP,|
 is given in Table 2  

Fig.1. Mapping of Reference Signals for Generic Frame Structure
[2]

TABLE 2
OFDM PARAMETERS FOR FRAME STRUCTURE
Generic Frame Structure Alternative Frame Structure
Cyclic prefix length Cyclic prefix length
Normal CP
0 for 160  l
6 ,..., 1 for 144  l
8 ,..., 0 for 224  l
Extended CP
5 ,..., 0 for 512  l 7 ,..., 0 for 512  l

2.3 OFDM System Model
Fundamental  steps  carried  out  in  an  OFDM  system  are 
shown  in  Figure  2.  To  make  ISI  free  communication,  a 
wideband signal of bandwidth B is converted into L flat‐
fading  sub‐carriers.  Then  all  these sub‐carriers  are 
transmitted  over  one  radio  channel  by  performing  IFFT 
operation.  To  make  sub‐carriers  orthogonal  to  each 
other  CP  of  appropriate  length  is  added.  At  receiver 
side,  first  CP  is  discarded  and  then  FFT  operation  is 
performed  on  the  received  symbols,  resulting  in  the 
following form [8] 
 
Y
|
= H
|
X
|
+6
|
+ N
|
 
 
Where  subscript  |  shows  the  corresponding  sub‐carrier. 
6
|
 is ICI component given by [8] 

6
|
= ``X(n)H
m
(n -|)e
-j2anm¡N
M-1
m=1
N-1
n=û
n=|



JOURNAL OF COMPUTING, VOLUME 3, ISSUE 4, APRIL 2011, ISSN 2151-9617
HTTPS://SITES.GOOGLE.COM/SITE/JOURNALOFCOMPUTING/
WWW.JOURNALOFCOMPUTING.ORG 157

Fig. 2. OFDM System Model


Where  M   is  total  number  of  multipaths. N
|
  shows 
AWGN with zero mean and o
2
variance. ICI component 
is more prominent in high mobility conditions.  

2.4 Channel Model
The channel impulse response can be described as [9] 
g(t, z) = `A
|
(t)e
-j2aJ
c
z
|
e
-j2aJ
D
z
|
6(z - z
|
)
L-1
|=û

 
where  A
|
(t) is  path  gain  that  undergoes  the  multipath 
Rayleigh  fading  and  is  described  by  the  following 
exponential function [10] 
 
F||A
|
(t)|
2
] = e
z
|
o

 
Where  z
|
is  multipath  delay  time  and  o is  the  power 
delay constant. 
In  frequency  domain,  Channel  Frequency  Response  is 
[11] 
H|m, n] = `a
|
g
|
(mN
FFT
+ N
CP
)e
-j2a∆Jz
|
L-1
|=û

Where ∆J is the spacing between sub‐carriers. 

3. CHANNEL ESTIMATION
3.1 RLS Channel Estimation
To  implement  LSE  as  adaptive  filtering,  the  desired 
output  and  the  past  data  values  are  required  at  each 
iteration  but  in  RLS  algorithm,  which  is  based  on  LS 
estimate  of  co‐efficients  w¯(n - 1)  at  iteration  n -1,  to 
estimate  the  co‐efficients  at  iteration  n  only  new  data 
values are required  [12]. 
At iteration n, the optimal filter co‐efficients w¯|n] results 
in the minimization of the following function 
 
 
 
F|n] = `B|n, k]|w¯
T
|n]H
´
RLS
|k]|
2
n
k=û

 
Where  û < B|n, k] < 1  is  the weighting  factor,  which  is 
commonly of the following exponential form 
 
B|n, k] = 2
n-k
 
 
Where 2 is less than but should be close to 1. 
The necessary steps carried out in RLS algorithm are 
 
1‐ Correlation matrix  R
´
gg
 is updated by 
 
R
´
gg
|n] = 2R
´
gg
|n -1] + H
´
RLS
|n]H
´
H
RLS
|n]
 
2‐ Adaptation gain is given by 

R
´
gg
|n]k|n] = H
´
RLS
|n]
 
3‐ A priori error is given by 
 
F|n] = H
´
LS
|n] - W
¯
T
|n - 1]H
´
RLS
|n]
 
4‐ The conversion factor is given by 
 
u|n] = 1 -k|n]H
´
RLS
|n]
 
5‐ A posteriori error becomes 
 
s|n] = u|n]F|n]
 
6‐ The updated co‐efficients are given by 
 
W
¯
T
|n - 1] = W
¯
T
|n -1] + k|n -1]F
-
|n] 
 
After iteration n, the estimated channel is given by 
JOURNAL OF COMPUTING, VOLUME 3, ISSUE 4, APRIL 2011, ISSN 2151-9617
HTTPS://SITES.GOOGLE.COM/SITE/JOURNALOFCOMPUTING/
WWW.JOURNALOFCOMPUTING.ORG 158
H
´
RLS
|n] = `W
¯
|m]
M-1
m=û
H
´
RLS
|n - m]
 
Where M is the length of RLS filter. 
The gain vector k|n] is given by 
k|n] =
O|n - 1]H
´
LS
|n]
2 + H
´
RLS
|n]O|n - 1]H
´
RLS
|n]

And  
O|n] =
1
2
(I - k|n]H
´
RLS
|n]P|n -1])
The initialization parameters are  
 
O|û] = |H
´
RLS
|û]. H
´
RLS
|û] + 6I]
-1

and  
k|û] = O|û]H
´
RLS
|û] =
1
|H
´
RLS
|û]|
2
+ 6
. H
´
LS
|û]
 
Where H
´
RLS
|û] is found by LSE  
Where 6 is the regularization parameter. In conventional 
RLS algorithms, the whole reference signals are assigned 
equal  forgetting  factor  value  and  the  parameters  are 
2 = û. 9  and  6 = û. 1.  For  comb‐pilot  mode,  two‐step 
forgetting  factor  value  is  assigned  such  that  the  low 
forgetting factor value is used for the first few reference 
signals  to  make  communication  more  dependent  on 
channel information while high forgetting factor value is 
assigned  to  the  remaining  reference  signals  to  make  the 
communication dependent on the statistical information 
of the channel response [13]. 

3.2 LMS Channel Estimation
To  avoid  the  matrix  inversion,  involved  in  LSE  and 
LMMSE  [6],  LMS  algorithm  can  be  used  to  solve 
Wiener‐Holf  equation,  which  may  or  may  not  require 
statistical a priori information of the channel and data.  
A summary of LMS algorithm is given as follows 
 
1‐ First  estimate  the  channel,  H
´
LS
  by  using  LSE 
technique.     
2‐ Filtering gives 
 
 H
´
LMS
|n] = W
¯
H
|n]H
´
LS
|n]
 
Where 
  
H
´
LS
|n] = |H
´
LS
|n] H
´
LS
|n -1] …H
´
LS
|n - 1 +M]]
 
Where M is the length of LMS filter. 
 
 
3‐ Error Vector 
 
  F|n] = H
´
LS
|n] -H
´
LMS
|n] 
 
4‐ Co‐efficient Updating 
 
w¯|n + 1] = w¯|n] + uH
´
LS
|n]F
-
|n]
 
Where u is the step‐size parameter. 
5‐ Weight error vector is given by 
 
e|n] = w|n] - w¯|n]
 
The performance of LMS algorithm is expressed in form 
of Mean Square Error (MSE), defined as 
 
D(n) = Tr|k(n)]
Where  k(n) = F|e(n)e
-
(n)] 
F|. ]  is the expectation operator. 
 
In wireless communication, the step‐size parameter is of 
small  value.  It  is  proved  in  [14]  that  for  the  stability  of 
LMS algorithm, the optimal adaptation constant value is 
u
upt
= m|n {1,
3
2
.u
|
3
]
Where  
u
|
= (2aI
|
)
2
P
o
h
2
o
n
2

 
I
|
  is  Doppler  Spread  of  |
th
  channel  tap,  P  is  number  of 
reference signals and 
o

2
o
n
2
is SNR value. 
u = û results  in  slow  co‐efficient  updating  but  better 
channel  estimation  while  u = 1 is  fast  channel  tracking 
algorithm  with  poor  estimation  because  in  this  case  
H
´
LMS
|n +1] ÷ H
´
LMS
|n]|14]. 

3.3 Leaky-LMS Channel Estimation
Under  fast  fading  conditions,  there  may  be  the 
possibility  of  no  convergence  even  for  large  n  which 
results  in  the  unstabilization  of  the  LMS  algorithms.  To 
force  this  un‐damped  mode  to  zero,  a  leakage  co‐
efficient  is  introduced  which  gives  the  following 
adaptation [15] 
 
w¯|n +1] = (1 - 2uy)w¯|n] +2uH
´
LS
|n]F
-
|n] 
 
Where  û < y < 1. 
 
 

JOURNAL OF COMPUTING, VOLUME 3, ISSUE 4, APRIL 2011, ISSN 2151-9617
HTTPS://SITES.GOOGLE.COM/SITE/JOURNALOFCOMPUTING/
WWW.JOURNALOFCOMPUTING.ORG 159
3.4 Normalized LMS Channel Estimation
For  minimum  disturbance  in  adaptation  of  co‐efficients 
the following technique is employed [15] 
 
w¯|n +1] = w¯|n] +
u
s +|H
´
LS
|
2
H
´
LS
|n]F
-
|n] 
 
Where  s is  only  used  for  the  numerical  problems.  This 
approach  results  in  time‐varying  step‐size  LMS 
algorithms, whose convergence rate is faster than LMS. 

3.5 x|gn -LMS Channel Estimation
For  less  complex  hardware  implementation,  x|gnum 
function is utilized in LMS such that [15] 
 
w¯|n +1] = w¯|n] +
2u x|gn(H
´
LS
|n]F
-
|n])
s +|H
´
LS
|
2
 

3.6 Linearly Constrained LMS Channel Estimation
To  make  estimation  technique  more  optimized,  some 
constraints  are  taken  into  consideration,  for  which  we 
have [15] 
w¯|n +1] = w¯
i
|n] +
a - cw¯|n]
c
T
c

Where 

i
|n] = w¯|n] + 2uF|n]H
´
LS
|n]  
 
c is a constant vector. 

3.7 Self-Correcting LMS Channel Estimation
The  performance  of  LMS  can  be  improved  by 
comparing the ideal channel with the estimated channel 
that  is  closer  and  closer  to  the  ideal  channel.  The 
estimated channel at |
th
 iteration is [15] 
 
H
´
|+1
|n] = H
´
|
|n]w¯
|+1
|n] 
 
This  technique  can  be  implemented  by  employing  any 
LMS algorithms discussed above.  

4. SIMULATION RESULTS
In  this  paper,  the  performance  and  complexity  of  the 
proposed  algorithms  is  carried  out  by  using  MATLAB 
Monte‐Carlo  Simulations  in  64‐tap  Rayleigh  fading 
channel. The remaining system parameters, according to 
Release‐10, are given in Table.3.  
Figure 3 shows the performance comparison of LS, LMS 
and  RLS.  It  is clear  from  Figure  3  that  RLS  outperforms 
both LS and LMS for whole range of SNR values. RLS is 
better  than  LMS  not  only  in  performance  but  also  in 
complexity  as  shown  in  Table.4.  LMS  and  RLS  take 
more  computational  time  to  converge  due  to  the 
requirement  of  the  second  order  channel  statistics  used 
in this paper, which are not required for simple LS. 

TABLE 3
SYSTEM PARAMETERS
Parameters
Frame Structure Generic
Reference Signals CAZAC
Bandwidth 70 MHz
Carrier Frequency 2 GHz
FFT Size 2048
Modulation QPSK
Power Spectral Density Jake’s Model
Multipath PDP EVA

TABLE 4
COMPARISON OF LS, LMS AND RLS
5000 Simulations
(mSec)
1 OFDM
Symbol
(nSec)
1 Bit
(nSec)
LS 0.34 5.24 2.62
LMS 1.9 29.68 14.84
RLS 1.8 28.12 14.06

Fig.3. MSE v/s SNR for LS, LMS and RLS Estimators

In LMS, the initial estimated channel can be taken either 
by  LS  or  LMMSE.  Figure  4  shows  that  at  low  SNR 
values  LMS,  utilizing  LMMSE  as  initial  estimated 
channel,  demonstrates  better  performance  than  LS‐LMS 
while  at  higher  SNR,  the  performance  remains  almost 
same  and  only  complexity  increases  in  case  of  LMMSE‐
LMS.  MSE  comparison  between  LS,  LMS  and  its 
different variants is shown in Figure 5. LMS and Leaky‐
LMS  show  almost  same  performance  for  all  operating 
SNR values. At low SNR values, the performance of self‐
correcting LMS degrades but at high SNR it approaches 
to LMS but has 15% more complexity. NLMS and x|gn‐
LMS  demonstrates  better  behavior  at  low  SNR  but 
5 10 15 20 25
10
-310
10
-308
10
-306
10
-304
10
-302
10
-300
SNR (dB)
M
S
E
Plot of MSE vs SNR for LS,LMS and RLS Estimator


LS
LMS
RLS
JOURNAL OF COMPUTING, VOLUME 3, ISSUE 4, APRIL 2011, ISSN 2151-9617
HTTPS://SITES.GOOGLE.COM/SITE/JOURNALOFCOMPUTING/
WWW.JOURNALOFCOMPUTING.ORG 160
advantage  in  case  of  x|gn‐LMS  is  in  form  of  reduced 
complexity.  No  doubt  the  performance  of  constrained 
LMS  is  degraded  but  the  computational  time  remains 
same  for  all  values  of  the  step‐size.  Table.5  shows  that 
the  effect  of  changing  step‐size  is  most  prominent  in 
case  of  LMS  only  and  for  other  techniques  the  effect  is 
not so much significant.

Fig.4. MSE v/s SNR for LS-LMS and LMMSE-LMS Estimators


Fig.5. MSE v/s SNR for LMS Estimators

TABLE 5
COMPUTATIONAL TIME FOR DIFFERENT LMS
ALGORITHMS
µ =0.1
(mSec)
µ =0.5
(mSec)
µ =0.9
(mSec)
LMS 9.8 9.7 9.6
Leaky-LMS 10.5 9.8 9.6
sign-LMS 10.5 9.8 9.8
NLMS 19.1 19.2 19.2
Norm-sign-LMS 19 19 19.1
Constrained-LMS 13.2 13.2 13.2
Self-correcting LMS 11.3 10.2 10.1
In  Leaky‐LMS,  x|gn‐LMS  and  self‐correcting  LMS  the 
complexity reduces when changing step‐size from 0.1 to 
0.5  while  further  increase  of  step‐size  has  no  effect  on 
complexity. The effect of different values of step‐size for 
LMS  is  shown  in  Figure  6.  It  is  clear  from  Figure  6  that 
there is a wide gap of performance for step‐size 0.1 and 
0.5  while  further  increment  in  step‐size  does  not  affect 
the  performance  significantly.  The  computational  time 
for different step‐size values is shown in Table 6. 
 

Fig.6. MSE v/s SNR for LMS for different Step-Size Values

TABLE 6
COMPUTATIONAL TIME OF LMS FOR DIFFERENT
STEP-SIZE VALUES
µ 1000 Simulations
(mSec)
0.1 2.6
0.5 2
0.9 1.8

Symbol  Error  Rate  for  different  LMS  techniques  is 
demonstrated in Figure 7 and SER for different step‐size 
values  is  shown  in  Figure  8.  MSE  of  LMS  for  different 
channel  taps  is  shown  in  Figure  9.  As  we  go  on 
increasing the number of channel taps, the performance 
also  improves  but  this  comes  at  high  computational 
complexity  as  shown  in  Table.7.  From  Table.7  it  is  clear 
that by increasing channel taps from 4 to 10, complexity 
increases  approximately  15%  and  for  20  channel  taps, 
complexity  increases  32%  for  1000  independent 
simulations. The performance of LMS for different filter 
lengths  is  shown  in  Figure  10.  Less  channel  impulse 
response  samples  show  better  performance  because  of 
high  energy  concentration  while  greater  number  of  CIR 
samples  not  only  degrades  the  performance  but  also 
increases the estimator’s complexity. Table.7 shows that 
complexity  increase  33%  by  increasing  CIR  samples 
from  2  to  5  and  10  CIR  samples  also  results  in  same 
increment of computational time. 
5 10 15 20 25
10
-130
10
-125
10
-120
10
-115
10
-110
10
-105
SNR (dB)
M
S
E
Plot of MSE v/s SNR for LS-LMS and LMMSE-LMS Estimator


LS-LMS
LMMSE-LMS
5 10 15 20 25
10
-20
10
-15
10
-10
10
-5
10
0
10
5
SNR (dB)
M
S
E
PLOT OF SNR V/S MSE FOR AN OFDM SYSTEM using LMS ESTIMATOR


LSE
LMS
LeakyLMS
Sign LMS
NLMS
Constrained LMS
Selfcorrecting LMS
5 10 15 20 25
10
-150
10
-100
10
-50
10
0
SNR (dB)
M
S
E
Plot of SNR v/s MSE for LMS Estimator


LS
LMS mu=0.5
LMS mu=0.1
LMS mu=0.9
JOURNAL OF COMPUTING, VOLUME 3, ISSUE 4, APRIL 2011, ISSN 2151-9617
HTTPS://SITES.GOOGLE.COM/SITE/JOURNALOFCOMPUTING/
WWW.JOURNALOFCOMPUTING.ORG 161
MSE  behavior  of  Leaky‐LMS  for  different  leakage  co‐
efficients  is  shown  in  Figure  11,  which  demonstrates 
that  by  increasing  the  leakage  co‐efficient  the 
performance  degrades  for  low  SNR  while  there  is  no 
effect  on  performance  for  high  SNR  values.  Figure  12 
shows  the  effect  of  value  of  constant  term  s  added  in 
NLMS.  By  increasing  this  small  constant  to  a  certain 
value  the  performance  improves  but  by  increasing 
further, the performance degrades. 
 

Fig.7. SER v/s MSE for different LMS Estimators

TABLE 7
COMPLEXITY COMPARISON OF LMS
1000
Simulations
(mSec)
1 OFDM
Symbol
(nSec)
1 Bit
(nSec)
CIR Samples 2 1.66 25.93 13
5 2.2 34.37 17.2
10 2.32 36.25 18.2
4 1.92 30 15
Channel Taps 10 2.32 36.25 18.2
20 2.52 40 20

Table 8
COMPLEXITY COMPARISON OF RLS
1000 Simulations
(µSec)
1 OFDM
Symbol
(pSec)
1 Bit
(nSec)
CIR Samples 2 51.78 8.09 4.045
5 52.78 8.25 4.125
10 55.65 8.7 4.35
4 468.97 7320 3660
Channel Taps 10 476.20 7500 3750
20 538.1 8400 4200

Fig.8. SER v/s SNR for LMS for different Step-Size values

Fig.9. MSE v/s SNR for LMS for different Channel Taps

Fig.10. MSE v/s SNR for LMS for different CIR Samples
5 10 15 20 25 30
0.1
0.15
0.2
0.25
0.3
0.35
0.4
0.45
0.5
0.55
0.6
SNR (dB)
S
y
m
b
o
l

E
r
r
o
r

R
a
t
e
Plot of SER vs SNR for LMS Estimators


NLMS
LMS
Leaky LMS
Constrained LMS
5 10 15 20 25 30
0.46
0.47
0.48
0.49
0.5
0.51
0.52
SNR (dB)
S
y
m
b
o
l

E
r
r
o
r

R
a
t
e
Plot of SER vs SNR of LMS Estimator for different mu


mu=0.5
mu=0.1
mu=0.9
5 10 15 20 25
10
-170
10
-160
10
-150
10
-140
10
-130
10
-120
10
-110
SNR (dB)
M
S
E
MSE v/s SNR for different Channel Taps for LMS Estimator


Channel Taps=4
Channel Taps=10
Channel Taps=20
5 10 15 20 25
10
-120
10
-100
10
-80
10
-60
10
-40
SNR (dB)
M
S
E
PLOT OF SNR V/S MSE FOR AN OFDM SYSTEM using LMS ESTIMATOR


CIR=2
CIR=5
CIR=10
JOURNAL OF COMPUTING, VOLUME 3, ISSUE 4, APRIL 2011, ISSN 2151-9617
HTTPS://SITES.GOOGLE.COM/SITE/JOURNALOFCOMPUTING/
WWW.JOURNALOFCOMPUTING.ORG 162

Fig.11. MSE v/s SNR for Leaky-LMS for different Leakage Co-
efficients


Fig.12. MSE v/s SNR for NLMS for s different values


For RLS, MSE as a function of CIR samples for different 
SNR  values  is  shown  in  Figure  13.  Performance  will  be 
better for less CIR samples and for high SNR values. The 
effect  of  CIR  samples  is  dominant  only  for  low  SNR 
values  as  for  high  CIR  samples,  performance  remains 
same  for  all  SNR  values  while  complexity  goes  on 
increasing,  as  shown  in  Table.8.  2%  more  time  is 
required  for  5  CIR  samples  in  place  of  2  CIR  samples 
while  it  becomes  8%  for  10  CIR  samples.  Overall  effect 
of  SNR  and  CIR  samples  on  MSE  for  RLS  is  shown  in 
Figure  14.  In  Figure  15,  it  is  shown  that  performance 
improves significantly for increasing channel taps up‐to 
10 but further increment does not improve performance 
and  only  increases  computational  time  as  shown  in 
Table.8.  The  combined  effect  of  SNR  and  channel  taps 
on MSE for RLS is shown in Figure 16.    
Fig.13. MSE v/s CIR Samples for RLS


Fig.14. MSE v/s SNR v/s CIR Samples for RLS



Fig.15. MSE v/s Channel Taps for RLS Estimator
10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24
10
105
10
110
10
115
SNR (dB)
M
S
E
Plot of MSE vs SNR of Leaky-LMS Estimator for different Leakage Co-efficient


Leakge Coefficient=0.1
Leakge Coefficient=0.9
Leakge Coefficient=0.5
6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24
10
-5
SNR (dB)
M
S
E
Plot of MSE vs SNR of NLMS for different Constant Term Values


Constant Term=1
Constant Term=0.5
Constant Term=0.15
Constant Term=2
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
0
0.002
0.004
0.006
0.008
0.01
0.012
0.014
0.016
0.018
0.02
MSE v/s CIR Samples for RLS Estimator
CIR Samples
M
S
E


SNR =5 dB
SNR =10 dB
SNR =15 dB
SNR =20 dB
SNR =25 dB
0
20
40
60
80
5
10
15
20
25
0
1
2
3
4
x 10
-3
CIR Samples
MSE v/s SNR v/s CIR Samples for RLS EStimator
SNR
M
S
E
0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70
0.01
0.02
0.03
0.04
0.05
0.06
0.07
0.08
MSE v/s Channel Taps for RLS Estimator
Channel Taps
M
S
E


SNR =5 dB
SNR =10 dB
SNR =15 dB
SNR =20 dB
SNR =25 dB
JOURNAL OF COMPUTING, VOLUME 3, ISSUE 4, APRIL 2011, ISSN 2151-9617
HTTPS://SITES.GOOGLE.COM/SITE/JOURNALOFCOMPUTING/
WWW.JOURNALOFCOMPUTING.ORG 163

Fig.16. MSE v/s SNR v/s Channel Taps for RLS Estimator


5. CONCLUSION
In  this  paper,  two  adaptive  channel  estimation 
algorithms  are  optimized  based  on  the  channel  filter 
length  and  number  of  multi‐path  channel  taps.  Among 
LMS techniques, Leaky‐LMS is proposed both for better 
performance  and  less  complexity,  by  using  small  value 
of  leakage  co‐efficient.  We  note  that  the  performance  of 
RLS  is  better  than  conventional  estimators,  LS  and 
LMMSE,  but  its  complexity  is  large  due  to  the 
requirement  of  apriori  knowledge  of  the  channel.  For 
wireless  communication  such  as  LTE‐Advanced,  a 
compromise  between  performance  and  complexity  can 
be  achieved  by  using  a  channel  filter  of  length  2‐3  CIR 
samples  and  1‐6  channel  taps  for  RLS  but  for  LMS 
channel  taps  should  be  more,  for  example  15‐20,  for 
better performance. 
 
REFERENCES
[1] 3GPP  TS  36.211  v.8.5.0,  “Physical  Channels  and 
Modulation”, 2008 
[2]  3GPP  TS  36.814  v.9.0.0,  “Further  Advancements  for  E‐
UTRA Physical Layer Aspects”, 2009   
[3] 3GPP Release 10 v.0.0.6, “Overview of Release 10”, 2010 
[4] Saqib  Saleem,  Qamar‐ul‐Islam,  ”Optimization  of  LSE 
and  LMMSE  Channel  Estimation  Algorithms  based  on 
CIR  Samples  and  Channel  Taps”,  IJCSI  International 
Journal of Computer Science Issues Vol. 8 Issue.1,pp.437‐443, 
January 2011 
[5]  Jongsoo  Choi,  Martin  Bouchard  and  Ter  Hin 
Yeap,”Adaptive  Filtering‐Based  Iterative  Channel 
Estimation for MIMO Wireless Communication”, 0‐7803‐
8834‐8, IEEE 2005 
[6] Saqib  Saleem,  Qamar‐ul‐Islam,  ”Performance  and 
Complexity  Comparison  of  Channel  Estimation  
Algorithms  for  OFDM  System”,  IJECS  International 
Journal  of  Electrical  and  Computer  Sciences,  Vol.  11  ,  No.02, 
pp.6‐12, April 2011 
[7] Yongming  Liang,  Hanwen  Luo,  Jianguo 
Huan,”Adaptive  RLS  Channel  Estimation  in  MIMO 
OFDM Systems”, 0‐7803‐9538, IEEE 2005 
[8] Soeg  Geun  Kang,  Min  Ha  and  Eon  Kyeong  Joo,  “A 
comparative  Investigation  on  Channel  Estimation 
Algorithms for OFDM in Mobile Communication”, IEEE 
Transactions on Broadcasting, Vol. 49, No. 2, June 2003.  
[9] Hideo  Lobayashi  and  Kazuo  Mori,  “  Proposal  of  OFDM 
Channel  Estimation  Method  using  Discrete  Cosine 
Transform”, IEEE 2004 
[10] Yen‐Hui  Yeh,  Sau‐Gee  Chen,”DCT‐based  Channel 
Estimation  for  OFDM  Systems”,  IEEE  Communication 
Society 2004 
[11] Andreas  Ibing,  Konstantinos  Manolakis,  “ 
Synchronization Tracking for Cooperative MIMO‐OFDM 
with Propagation Delay Differences”, IEEE ISWCS 2008 
[12] M.A.Mohammadi,M.Ardabilipour,”Performance 
Comparison  of  RLS  and  LMS  Channel  Estimation 
Techniques  with  Optimum  Training  Sequences  for 
MIMO‐OFDM Systems”, 978‐1‐4244‐1980‐7, IEEE 2008   
[13] Yongming  Liang,Hanwen  Luo,”Adaptive  RLS  Channel 
Estimation  in  MIMO‐OFDM  Systems”,  Proceedings  of 
ISCIT, 2005 
[14] Dieter  Schafhuber,Markus  Rupp,”Adaptive 
Identification  and  Tracking  of  Doubly  Selective  Fading 
Channels  for  Wireless  MIMO‐OFDM  Systems”,  4
th
  IEEE 
Worshop  on  Signal  Processing  Advances  in  Wireless 
Communications, 2003 
[15] Alexandar  D.Poularikas,  “Adaptive  Filtering  Primer  with 
MATLAB” Taylor & Francis. 

0
20
40
60
80
0
10
20
30
0
0.02
0.04
0.06
0.08
Channel Taps
MSE v/s SNR v/s Channel Taps for RLS EStimator
SNR
M
S
E

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful