SmartGrid and what it means for Utility Technology Systems

Chris Knudsen Chief Architect Director, Technology Innovation Center Pacific Gas and Electric Company

Pacific Gas and Electric Company
Energy services to 15 MM people: •  5.1 MM Electric customer accounts •  4.3 MM Natural Gas accounts 70,000 square miles with diverse topography and climate zones 20,000 employees A regulated investor-owned utility

Ranked the greenest utility in the United States in 2009 and 2010
2

What is the problem we are trying to solve?
NERC 2009 Long Term Reliability Report From 2006 report

From 2009 report

  Demand response and economic slowdown has extended margins, but…   Demand projected to grow in the next three years as economy recovers
3

What are some of the specific drivers of technology?
21,000

19,000

17,000

But it Represents 10% of Total Gen or 2,200 MW

15,000

13,000

11,000

9,000

Peak Load July 25 @ 1700 hours 20,883 MWs only 51 hours

22000

21000

20000

MW

19000

7,000

18000

 

Imperative: NERC Reliability & GHG Reduction

17000

5,000

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

16000 1

Aug
11

Sep
21 31

Oct
41

Nov
51
Time

Dec
61 71 81 91

 
Peak = 2X Base Load Intermittent Renewables

Opportunities: Load Peak

Local Concentrations of DG

Local Concentrations of EVs

Imperative, Opportunities, and pragmatic challenges drives the execution of a SmartGrid
4

 

Near term, pragmatic, challenges

SmartGrid is System of Systems
   

Inter-dependent systems: New systems need to communicate across systems in a distributed way As closed loop systems are developed, system stability will be a critical factor
T rans mis s ion
&
D is tribution
Information
 Integration
and
Analytics ∙ energy
flow
“routing
tables ”/
control
 algorithms 
around
cus tomer
D R /AS /s hift

∙ ∙ ∙ ∙ ∙

Manag es 
s upply
 demand
equation (S 
±∆S )
‐(D
±∆D)=0 P rovides 
MR T U
pric ing Would
like
dynamic 
 load
c ontrol A S 
load
payments

T &D 
S ens ors /C ontrol
&
C ros s 
C orrelation
 Analytics ∙ E nergy
F low
Management ∙ O utage
 ∙ Network
vis ualiz ation
&
operation
tools O ther
Areas 
that
mus t
be
 integrated ∙ T ies 
to
G eneration ∙ E nergy
P rocurement ∙ Ancillary
S ervices

MR T U
P ricing 5
min,
1
hr,
24
hr
look
ahead IS O 
load
control
 ±∆ D P G &E 
D emand
C apacity
&
 contral
Ack
s ignals

Available
demand
 res pons e
is 
dynamic

A g g reg ate A vailable
Demand
 [MWatts ]

C E 
devices
Meter
Application
P roces s ing ∙ D is trubed
billing
proces s 
 s implified
B O 
and
data
traffic ∙ L ocal
HAN
energy
management
 s hifts 
load,
increas es 
efficiency ∙ D emand
C apacity
calculations 
 and
s ignals

Appliances L ighting HV AC P ool/
S P A V ehicle

∙ ∙ ∙ ∙

R T P 
s ig nals Manag es 
dis tributed
 demand
s ys tem C ontrols 
Utility
HA N
 ac c es s ,
A A A ,
and
 provis ioning A S 
s ig naling 
and
 c ontrol
from
demand
 s ide

P rice D emand
C ontrol S mart
Meters

HA N
 Interfac e

S olar S torage

40
T era
B ytes 
of
 dis tributed
memory >100x10^6
MIP s 
of
 dis tributed
 proces s ing
power

5

Within the next 5 to 10 years, bandwidth demand is projected to increase by an average of 300%
Applications / Operations
Grid Ops & Mgmt DMS OMS GIS EMS Asset Mgmt Dispatch Meter Data Data Warehouse Data Management AMI Headends Customer CIS / Billing Web Presentment Demand Response Network & Security Network Ops & Mgmt Security – InfoSec

Core Network

Core Network +300% Capacity

•  Fiber Optic •  Leased Lines •  Microwave

•  IP Enabled

Elec. Transmission Substation +300% Capacity

Elec. Distribution Substation +1200% Capacity
Public Leased Lines (TDM/IP)

Gas Distribution +100% Capacity
Public 3G / 4G Cellular Private Narrowband (LMR / RF MAS)

Mobile Workforce +200% Capacity Distributed Generation +120% Capacity
Private Broadband RF (RF/WiMAX/LTE)

Data Centers Call Center Ops. Center

Large Offices

Bulk Large-Med. Generation Sub

Edge Network

Bulk Generation +300% Capacity

Public Satellite

Distribution / Feeder +300% Capacity

Customer / HAN +400% Capacity

Private RF Mesh (SSN AMI)

Small Office

Small Substation

Transmission Devices

Distribution Devices

Gas Devices

Distributed Generation

Mobile Worker

Customer Premise 6

©2011 PG&E. Proprietary and Confidential.

The SmartGrid Requires a Scalable Near Real-Time IT System
Power Plants Electric Grid Customers

Natural Gas Generators

Nuclear Power Plants

Transmission Lines

Utility-scale Storage

Distributed Storage

Rooftop Solar
Smart Grid functionality restores the balance

Hydro Power Plants

Distribution Substations

Wind Farms Solar Farms / Power Plants

Plug-in Electric Vehicles

As distributed resources (generation, load) increase, electric flows on the grid become more dynamic and complex

SmartGrid is Dependant on a Common Technology Foundation
Generation Customer Trans Distribution Enterprise Aps Mobile Workers

Common Networks Integrated Security Architecture Common Information Architecture
7

Key Points to Take Away
Generation and Load are becoming more complex requiring a fundamental change in the Utility System Architecture •  More Devices, more data, more information to manage •  IP networks, layered architectures, common information models, structured compliance •  Interoperable across vendors, standards based The SmartGrid will be a long road… We cannot even begin to predict the twitter or Iphone of 2030… We can design and build a system that enables them
8

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful