JOURNAL

C M Y K
Clarks Summit, Pa. MAY 11 TO MAY 17, 2011 50¢ Serving the Greater Abington Community since 1947
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An edition of The Times Leader
THE ABINGTON
2
8
7
2
5
1
* Annual Percentage Yield (APY) is accurate as of
this publication date and may be changed without
prior notice. $5.00 minimum to open account.
MEMBER FDIC.
www.northpennbank.com 587-5705
How Does
Your Bank
Compare?
651 Northern Blvd., Chinchilla
0.75%
MEMBER FDIC
Statement Savings Account
*APY
Run for the Roses benefits
Voluntary Action Center in
Scranton. See Page A3.
WAVERLY
Eye on the prize
Photos from area college and
high school graduations will
appear in the June 22 edition.
CLARKS SUMMIT
Baptist Bible commencement
Abington Arts Council hosts
second month of walking art
tour. See Page A3.
CLARKS SUMMIT
Second Friday arrives
School hosts annual student art
exhibit. See Page C5.
CLARKS SUMMIT
Art at Newton Ransom
ArtsEtc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A11
Calendar. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A2
Classified. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .B1
Crosswords. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A9
Obituaries. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A6
School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A6, C5
Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C1
INSIDE
Eston Wilson Lake
stocked with rainbow
trout and ready for the
season. See Page A7.
GONE
Fishing
There are fewcandidates inthe 2011pri-
maryelectionhopingtobe part of the Clarks
GreenBoroughCouncil for the upcoming
term.
Marnie O’DeaPalmer
Marnie O’Dea Palmer helda seat onthe
Clarks GreenBoroughcouncil for12years,
beginninginNovember1995. She chose not
torunfor re-
electionin
2007, but de-
cidedtoreturn
inDecember of 2010, after the resignationof
PatrickConaboyleft a vacancy.
She submittedher resume andwas votedin
unanimously. Nowthat her termis comingto
a close, she has decidedtorunfor the seat
again.
Inadditiontoher time onthe council,
O’Dea Palmer saidshe brings withher more
thanfive years as a legislative assistant at the
Pennsylvania House of Representatives and
experience as a manager of Lackawanna
County’s Office of Environmental Sustain-
ability.
KeithWilliams
Alifelongresident of the borough, Keith
Williams graduatedfromAbingtonHeights
HighSchool andholds a bachelor’s degree in
communications fromKing’s College and
2011PRIMARY ELECTION
Four seek
positions in
Clarks Green
BY DON MCGLYNN
Abington Journal Reporter
See Clarks Green, Page 8
INSIDE: Meet the candidates
in other local races, 8A
CLARKSSUMMIT-
Gretchen Eagen, public
issues co-chair for the Abing-
ton Heights Civic League, is
looking for help fromthe
Clarks Summit community.
She seeks information and
photos fromfamilies and
friends of deceased Clarks
Summit veterans with the aim
to honor themin the upcom-
ing Clarks Summit Memorial
Day parade May 30.
Eagen is working on behalf
of The Abington Heights
Civic League, along with
Senior Cadette Troop 557, to
create a float to honor “Veter-
ans through Time” at the pa-
rade.
“We chose the ‘Veterans
through Time’ theme in keep-
ing with the (Clarks Summit)
Centennial and want to recog-
nize and honor deceased vet-
erans through the years that
have served, supported and
some who died for our coun-
try,” said Eagen. “VFWCom-
mander Steuart Bailey has
helped to identify many veter-
ans fromour area who have
served in wars during this
time.”
Anyone with information or
photos to share of the de-
ceased veterans is asked to
contact Eagen at 570.585.8180
or e-mail geagen@yahoo.com
as soon as possible so the
league can prepare the float
for the parade.
The list of deceased veter-
ans to be honored includes:
WWII: Jerome Gillgallon,
Army Air Force, SGT, DOD
Dec. 19, 1998; WilliamChes-
sick, U.S. Navy, V-6, DOD
Dec. 25, 2007; Leo Burke,
U.S. Army, SGT, DODApril
11, 2010; AndrewMartino,
U.S. Army, Corporal, DOD
march19, 2010; and Charles
Horvath, U.S. Marines, Cor-
poral, DODFeb. 13, 2005.
Korean War: Robert Mor-
gan, U.S. Army, T-5, DOD
June10, 2005; WilliamDunn,
U.S. Marines, Private, DOD
June 3, 2001; James Michael
Eagen Jr., U.S. Air Force, Staff
Sergeant, DODJune 20, 2008.
VietnamWar: Robert
Kromko, former VFWCom-
mander, U.S. Marines, Corpo-
ral, DODFeb. 15, 2010; Ger-
ald Kowlaski, U.S. Air Force,
SGT, DODJan. 17, 2011; Da-
vid Parker, U.S. Marine Corp.,
killed in action; Richard Lee
Wescott, U.S. Marine Corp.,
killed in action.
Operation “Enduring
Freedom”: IRAQ: L/CPL
Dennis Veater, USMC, killed
in action.
Afghanistan: L/CPLLarry
Johnson, USMC, killed in
action.
‘Veterans Through Time’
BY JOAN MEAD-MATSUI
Abington Journal Correspondent
DALTON- If you want to be
the best you need to beat the
best. And this summer Greg
Gondella hopes to do just that.
The Dalton resident has been
selected to compete in the10th
Annual Teva Mountain Games,
a celebration of adventure
sports, and arts and music, that
will take place in Vail, Colo.,
June 2 to 5.
The event pits professional
and amateur athletes from
around the world against one
another, to compete in eight
different sports and 24 dis-
ciplines for more than $10,000
in prize money.
SUBMITTED PHOTO
Dalton resident Greg Gondella, 30, has been chosen to compete in the
10th Annual Teva Mountain Games in Vail, Colo., June 2 to 5.
‘X-Stream’
challenge
Dalton fly fisherman heads to Colorado
BY DON MCGLYNN
dmcglynn@theabingtonjournal.com
See X-Stream, Page 7
S
tudents at Lackawanna Trail Jr./Sr. High
School attended their prom May 6 at the
Radisson in Scranton. For more images of
the evening, see Page A6.
ABINGTON JOURNAL/ALICE STUFFLE
Senior Robert Cummings at right, joins in a group dance.
Seniors Vanessa Noble, Chelsea Cucura and Natalie
Horrocks
Light up
the night
RANSOMTWP. - A fatal crash oc-
curred Monday night, May 9, shortly
after 5 p.m. on Dark Region Road in
Ransom Township. A 22 -month -old
child, Cole T. Hazelton, was pronounced
dead at the scene, according to Penn-
sylvania State Police at Dunmore.
“I was in the shower, and I came run-
ning out. I thought a car blew up in the
yard,” Paula Minchak who lives two
houses down from where the crash oc-
curred, said Tuesday.
The crash took place at approximately
5:14 p.m. when a Ford Focus struck a
Jeep that was allegedly stopped on the
road, according to a report by Trooper
Richard Bozym. The Ford overturned
onto its driver side, hitting a tree on the
embankment. The Jeep turned side-
ways and burst into flames, according
Ransom crash claims child
Police: Operator, passenger
not licensed to operate a
motor vehicle at time of
incident.
BY SHAUNA MCNALLY
Abington Journal Reporter
See Crash, Page 7
May 10, 1962 – ‘Don’t Knock
The Twist’ with Chubby
Checker and ‘3 Stooges
Meet Hercules’ were playing
at the Comerford Theater in
Clarks Summit.
May 10, 1962 - W.T. Grant Co. in
Clarks Summit ran an ad for Moth-
er’s Day that read, “Gifts for your
Queen. Grant’s everyday low prices
let you treat Mom royally without
straining your budget.”
May13, 1965 - The Clarks Summit Police Depart-
ment issued a notice that read: “Important:
Depot Street Posted One-Way. Depot Street,
which is the diagonal street fromState Street to
Winola Road, diverging at the Tennant Building
for one way traffic coming fromWinola Road.”
C M Y K
PAGE 2A www.theabingtonjournal.com The Abington Journal♦Clarks Summit, PA WEDNESDAY, MAY11, 2011
YOUR COMMUNITY
211 S. State St., CLARKS SUMMIT, PA 18411 • 570-587-1148
NEWS@THEABINGTONJOURNAL.COM
EDITOR KRISTIE GRIER CERUTI
585-1604 / kgrier@theabingtonjournal.com
STAFF WRITERS AND PHOTOGRAPHERS
SHAUNA MCNALLY
585-1606 / smcnally@theabingtonjournal.com
ROBERT TOMKAVAGE
585-1600 / rtomkavage@theabingtonjournal.com
DON MCGLYNN
585-1601 / dmcglynn@theabingtonjournal.com
RETAIL ADVERTISING ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES
T’SHAIYA STEPHENSON
585-1602 / tstephenson@timesleader.com
KAREN FISCUS
558-0845 / kfiscus@timesleader.com
CLASSIFIED ADVISOR
LINDA BYRNES
970-7189 / lbyrnes@timesleader.com
COVERAGE AREA: The Abington Journal, a weekly community newspaper
that is part of the Wilkes-Barre Publishing Company in Wilkes-Barre, PA, covers
the “Abingtons” area of Lackawanna and Wyoming counties. This includes but
is not limited to Clarks Summit, Clarks Green, South Abington, Newton, Ran-
som, Glenburn, Dalton, La Plume, Factoryville, Waverly, Tunkhannock and the
Abington Heights, Lackawanna Trail and Lakeland school districts.
Our circulation hovers between 2,000 and 3,000 readers. We try to get to as
many events as possible, but staff and space limitations make it impossible to
cover everything. If you have news about your family, town or organization,
please send it to us and we’ll do our best to publish it. Photographs (with
captions) are welcome.
CORRECTIONS, clarifications: The Abington Journal will correct errors of
fact or clarify any misunderstandings created by a story. Call 587-1148. Have a
story idea? Please call. We’d like to hear about it. Letters: The Abington Journal
prints all letters, which have local interest. Send letters to: Editor, The Abington
Journal, 211 S. State St., Clarks Summit, PA 18411. All letters must be signed
and include a phone number where we can reach the author. Editor reserves
the right to edit or reject any item submitted. Deadline is noon, Friday prior to
publication. Want a photo that has appeared? We can provide color prints of
photos taken by our staff. Prices: 8x10 - $25; 5x7 - $12. Call, mail in, or stop by
to order.
CIRCULATION
Orders for subscription received by Friday at noon will begin the following
week. See box at right for subscription prices. Local subscriptions should arrive
Wednesdays. Please inform us of damage or delay. Call 587-1148. The Abing-
ton Journal (USPS 542-460), 211 S. State St., PO Box 277, Clarks Summit, PA
18411. Published weekly by Wilkes Barre Publishing Company, 211S. State St.,
Clarks Summit, PA, 18411. $20 per year, in Lackawanna and Wyoming counties
(PA); $24 elsewhere in PA and additional offices. Periodicals postage paid at
Clarks Summit, PA, 18411, and at additional offices.
ISSN. NO. 1931-8871, VOL. 85, ISSUE NO. 19
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Abington Journal, 211 South
State St., Clarks Summit, PA 18411.
©COPYRIGHT 2009: Entire contents copyrighted. All rights reserved. No
part of this publication may be reproduced by any means without the express
written consent of the publisher.
ADVERTISING
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING DEADLINE: Mondays at 10 a.m.
DISPLAY ADVERTISING DEADLINE: Thursday at 5 p.m.
CALL 587-1148 (Thursday at noon if proof required.)
We have a variety of rates and programs to suit your advertising needs. The
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THE ABINGTON
JOURNAL
The Lourdesmont 26th annual invitational golf tournament will be held May 16 at Glen Oak Country Club in Waverly. Proceeds
benefit the Mission of the Sisters of the Good Shepherd at Lourdesmont Youth & Family Services, 1327 Wyoming Ave., Scranton.
Established in 1889, Lourdesmont provides a continuum of community-based therapeutic services to teens and their families
throughout northeastern Pennsylvania. This year’s tournament is dedicated in memory of the late Bruce Schoenberg from Brucelli
Advertising.
Shown above from left: Chairman Greg Misterman, Michael O’Brien, Nick Polito, Sr. Monica Nowak (R.G.S.), Vince Russinello and
Cynde Dodge
For further information, contact Cynde Dodge at 570.702.8360 or cdodge@lourdesmont.org.
Annual Lourdesmont Golf
Tournament set for May 16
REMINDERS
Overeaters Anonymous meet-
ings, First Presbyterian Church,
201 Stone Ave., Clarks Summit,
weekly, Mon. and Wed., 7 p.m.;
Tue. and Thu., 9:30 a.m. and
Sun., 4 p.m. Info: 570.587.4313.
DAILY EVENTS
May 11: Wyoming County
Chamber of Commerce lun-
cheon, at the Fireplace Restau-
rant at 11:45 a.m. Richard
Smith, Vice President of Land
for Carrizo Oil & Gas, Inc. will
discuss Carrizo’s operations in
northeastern Pennsylvania with
the natural-gas production in-
dustry. Cost: Members free (one
per business); non-members
$10. Info: reservations at
570.836.7755 or e-mail Robin
atrobin@wyccc.com
May 12: Civil Arts War Road
Show, runs to May 16 at the
Everhart Museum of Natural
History, Science and Art. Open
to the public May 13-15. Info:
570.346.7186 or via email at
general.information@everhart-
museum.org.
May 13: Cocktails and Cui-
sine, a Cultural Experience
from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the
Greater Scranton Chamber of
Commerce, Mulberry Street,
Scranton. Cost: $25, alumni and
friends association members;
$35 for general public. Info:
Nicole Barber at 342.7711 or
www.leadershiplackawanna-
.com.
Health and Wellness Fair,
from10 a.m. until 2 p.m. at
Abington Heights High School
for students and employees.
Info: Professionals interested in
participating can contact event
coordinator Beth Stone at
570.585.5304 or
stoneb@ahsd.org
Live entertainment at Bellis-
samo Pizzeria & Saluti Bar, 223
Northern Blvd., Chinchilla.
Hyde Park. Info: Sheila McDo-
nough 604.4355.
Lyme Disease Awareness
Month gathering, 6 p.m in the
Tunkhannock Public Library.
You are invited by joint spon-
sors
the Endless Mountains Lyme
Support Group and the Endless
Mountains Nature Center to
meet and exchange experiences
with other members of the
community. Info:
Paul570.836.7708.
May 14: Indoor/Outdoor
Flea Market: Sponsored by St.
Mary’s Altar Society of St.
Michael’s Orthodox Church in
Jermyn. At St. Michael’s Cen-
ter, 403 Delaware Street, Jer-
myn from 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. Cost:
$15 for one table, $25 for two
tables. Drop off dates: May 11,
12, and 13 from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m.
at Hall. Info: reservations call
Ann at 570.876.0257.
Friends of Dalton Library
host Second annual Herb and
Perennial Festival, from10:30
a.m. to 1 p.m. For details con-
tact Janet Geeza at
570.563.2014 or jgeeza@al-
bright.org.
Vineyards by the Viaduct
Wine Festival, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.
at Nicholson Fire Co. Carnival
Grounds off Route 92 next to
the Little League Field. Eight
local wineries, four craft and
food vendors. Cost: presale $15,
at door $20. Tickets available at
Peoples Neighborhood Bank.
10th annual Whole Road of
Yard Sales, from 8 a.m. to 3
p.m. at 610 North Turnpike
Road, Dalton. Hosted by the
Women of The Dalton United
Methodist Church. It will go for
about two miles. Held rain or
shine. Info: 563.1248.
The Comm’s Chalk Walk,
from10 a.m. to 12 p.m. at the
Waverly Community House.
Held in conjunction with the
Waverly Waddle 5K Walk/Run.
People can purchase the side-
walk blocks at a suggested
donation of $10 per block. Pro-
ceeds will benefit the Play-
ground Project. Info: www.wa-
verlycomm.org or call Melinda
at 586.8191 ext. 5.
Walk to Cure Juvenile Dia-
betes, 10 a.m. registration 9:30
a.m. at the Endless Mountains
Riding Trail, starting at
Pump’n’Pantry parking lot, Rt.
706, Montrose PA. 3.5 mile
walk to benefit Juvenile Dia-
betes Research Foundation.
Info: 570.289.2062.
National Association of Let-
ter Carriers 19th annual food
drive. Leave a non-perishable
food item by your mailbox to be
picked up or bring it to the post
office. Donations are distrib-
uted locally. Info: 586.0316
Foraging for Food, at Laca-
wac, departing at 10 a.m. from
the Coulter Visitor’s Center at
Lacawac Sanctuary in Lake
Ariel. Cost: $7 for public, $5 for
members, under 9 yrs is free.
Info: 689.9494 or email in-
fo@Lacawac.org.
Join Fidelity Bank’s Green
team to make Scranton pretty,
plant flowers, meet Sammy-
saves-a-lot mascot. Coloring,
face painting and sidewalk
drawing from11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
at 338 N. Washington Ave.,
Scranton. Info: leslie@scran-
tontomorrow.org.
Waverly Elementary PTA
Rummage Sale, from 9 a.m. to 2
p.m. Info: 587.2289.
May 15: Rotary Club of the
Abingtons Pasta Dinner from
12:30 to 5 p.m. at the Abington
Heights High School Cafeteria.
Cost: adult,$8; Children under
12, $4. Take-outs available. All
proceeds benefit Abington little
League, Marley’s Mission and
Abington Area Youth initiatives.
For tickets call 570.947.2705.
“Hospitality a la Russe” held
by St. Tikhon’s Seminary Cen-
tury Association featuring tradi-
tional Russian Cuisine and The
Kauriga Balalaika Orchestra.
Begins at 3:30 p.m. at St. Ni-
cholas Russian Orthodox
Church, Bethlehem. Trans-
portation provided from St.
John’s Russian Orthodox Cathe-
dral, Mayfield and from Holy
Trinity Church Orthodox
Church in Wilkes-Barre. Reser-
vations must be made by May
8. Cost: adults $40, children
under 12 $10. Info: Mary Ser-
nak for reservations at 876.5855
for the Scranton/Carbondale
area.
All- you –can- eat Breakfast
Buffet, at Clarks Summit Fire
Co., 321 Bedford St., Clarks
Summit, from 8:30 a.m. to
Greater Scranton Chamber of
Commerce, 222 Mulberry
Street, Scranton. Cost: $20 for
current Leadership Lackawanna
Alumni and Friends Associ-
ation and Chamber members,
$25 for the general public. Reg-
ister or info: 342.7711.
SBDC Offers Food Safety
Certification, The University of
Scranton Small Business Devel-
opment Center (SBDC) will
offer a ServSafe® Certification
from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Info or to
register 800.829.7232 or
www.scrantonsbdc.com
May 19: St. Joseph’s Center
Auxiliary 50th Anniversary of
the Annual Summer Festival: At
the Radisson Lackawanna Sta-
tion Hotel in downtown Scran-
ton from 6 to 9:30 p.m. Light
fare and a cash bar are included
with the registration fee of $35
per person. Info: Katie Wein-
schenk at 570.963.1290 or
kweinschenk@stjosephscen-
ter.org.
May 20: The Justus Fire
Company Spring Wine Tasting
Fundraiser from 6 to 10 p.m.
Info: Tickets can be obtained by
calling the Justus Volunteer Fire
Company at 570.587.4545 or by
contacting a company member
or through
www.JFC28Fire.com. Tickets
can be purchased at the door.
Attendees must be 21 or older.
Food by Cangiano’s Italian
Specialties. Maiolatesi Wine
Cellars is located at 210 Green
Grove Road, Scott Township.
The Oxygen Project, runs for
15 weeks to get people to quit
smoking. Any smoker ages 18
to 34 is eligible. E-mail drei-
fler@lunginfo.org with ques-
tions or to find out how to sign
up.
12:30 p.m. Cost: Adults ,$7;
children 10 and under, $4. Info:
570.586.9656.
Cub Scout Pack 175 Pancake
Breakfast, at the Dalton United
Methodist Church in Dalton,
from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Cost:
Adults $7; children 10 and un-
der, $4.
March of Dimes March for
Babies, Registration at 9 a.m.,
walk at 10 a.m. at Mohegan Sun
at Pocono Downs, 1280 High-
way 315 Blvd., Wilkes-Barre.
Info: 808.3248
May 16:Palette Pals class
from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. in the art
room of Forest City Regional.
Info: Paul at 570.586.3472 or
Martha at 785.3978.
St Joseph’s Senior Social
Club regular meeting at St.
Rocco’s school auditorium.
Lourdesment 26th Annual
Invitational Golf Tournament, at
Glen Oak Country Club in
Waverly. Proceeds benefit the
Mission of the Sisters of the
Good Sheppard at Lourdesmont
Youth and Family Services.
Info: Cynde Dodge at
cdodge@lourdesmont.org or
702.8360.
May 17: Clifford United
Methodist Church, Main Street,
Clifford, Chicken-n-Biscuit or
ham dinner from 4 to 6 p.m.
Take-out or dine-in. Cost:
$7.95..
May 18: Leadership Lacka-
wanna and Shannon Senne-
felder, president of White Swans
Consulting, presents “Effective
Communication for Your Pro-
fessional Success”. This work-
shop is centered on results-
based communication and will
be held in the boardroom of The
COMMUNITY
CALENDAR
On May 14, the public is
invited to help the National
Association of Letter Carriers
“Stamp Out Hunger” by par-
ticipating in their 19th annual
food drive. To donate, leave a
non-perishable food item near
your mailbox and a letter car-
rier will pick it up as he or she
makes normal deliveries. Food
or a donation can also be
dropped off at a local post
office. Last year, more than
77 million pounds of food was
collected nationwide. All
donations are distributed lo-
cally to help those in the local
neighborhood.
Those with questions or
interested in volunteering,
contact Brain Tucker at
570.586.0316.
‘Stamp out Hunger’
Editor,
Since 2009, the Tunkhan-
nock Area High School has
held an “All Night Party”
following the graduation
ceremony for all graduating
seniors who wish to attend.
This lock- in at the high
school is intended to be a
fun, final night with fellow
graduates, celebrating the
time we spent together and
how far we’ve come, in addi-
tion to keeping all students
safe throughout the night.
We are asking that the com-
munity help support this
important event with a dona-
tion to help offset expenses.
Generous contributions will
help cover our $8,000 needed
budget to host the event, as
well as the cost of providing
safe entertainment to all
students during the evening.
Following graduation in
2008, three students were
killed in a high speed acci-
dent. Two were Tunkhannock
Area seniors who had re-
ceived their diplomas only
hours before; the third was a
junior at Elk Lake High
School. A fourth student,
also from Tunkhannock Ar-
ea, was critically injured.
None of the students were
wearing seat belts. Due to
this tragic incident, the Tunk-
hannock Area School Dis-
trict and student body cre-
ated the “All Night Party” as
a way to keep students safe.
Upon the graduation cere-
mony, the approximately 280
graduates will be given the
opportunity to participate in
the following activities:
laser tag, traveling magi-
cian, hypnotist, rock climb-
ing wall, DJ, pool party, in-
flatable obstacle course, food
and prizes and many other
activities!
Please respond with your
donation of support by June
6. The event will be held on
June 17 in the Tunkhannock
Area High School. In ex-
change for their generosity,
donors will be listed by do-
nation amount in the gradua-
tion program. Attendance is
expected to exceed 1,500. In
addition, a group photo will
be taken with donors of
$1,000 or more and forward-
ed to the media. For more
information, please contact
Class Advisor Angie Burke
at the Tunkhannock Area
High School at 570.
836.8241 or an-
gie.burke@tasd.net.
Thank you in advance for
your interest in supporting
Tunkhannock Area High
School in its efforts for keep-
ing the Class of 2011 safe.
Rachel A. Dispenza
Class of 2011 Treasurer
Tunkhannock Area High
School
LETTERS
TO THE EDITOR
C M Y K
WEDNESDAY, MAY11, 2011 THE ABINGTON JOURNAL♦CLARKS SUMMIT, PA WWW.THEABINGTONJOURNAL.COM PAGE 3A
Run for the Roses bene-
fit was hosted by the Vol-
untary Action Center of
Scranton May 7 at Wa-
verly Country Club. At the
fifth annual event hosted
in a Kentucky Derby
theme, attendees were able
to bid for rescue horses
from Liberty Reins Ranch,
Harveys Lake.
The non-profit Volun-
tary Action Center oper-
ates Retired and Senior
Volunteer Program and the
Christmas Holiday Bu-
reau, among other pro-
grams.
ABINGTON JOURNAL/DANIELLE ANTONELLO-SMOLLEY
Cheryl Willis, volunteer of Liberty Reins Ranch, shown with Chico, 18-year-old therapy horse.
Carol Chisdak, Clarks Summit; Elaine Shepard, Clarks Summit;
Michelle Valvano, Clarks Summit; and Sara Levy, Scranton.
Maura Swatkowski, Dalton,
and Elizabeth Chiorazzi,
Scranton.
Taking the reins
Monica Cordoba, New York, N.Y.; Michelle Mendykowski, Bos-
ton and Michele Calvey, Clarks Summit.
Kelsey Mitchell of Liberty Reins Ranch with 8-year-old Innticer,
grandson to triple-crown winner, Secretariat, at Waverly Coun-
try Club Saturday.
Paul Walsh, Clifford, and
Marissa Murnin, Clarks Green.
C.J. and Loryn Copley of
Clarks Summit.
CLARKSSUMMIT- The
AmericanCancer Society
Relayfor Life of the Abingtons
is onlythree anda half weeks
away. Time is runningout to
register. If teams wouldlike to
signup, the Relaycommittee
asks that theydoit as soonas
possible at www.relayforlife-
.org. Individuals canalsodo-
nate anytime upuntil the Relay,
June 4to5. The teams are com-
prisedmostlyof highschool
students, but anyone inthe
communitycanparticipate.
The Relayfor Life hostedat
the AbingtonHeights High
School is a 24-hour event.
Senior AbingtonHeights Stu-
dent, Alexa Julianhas been
involvedwiththe Relayfor Life
for twoyears. Last year Julian
was incharge of recruitment,
andthis year is more involved
withthe Luminaria committee.
The Luminaria committee
puts candles aroundthe trackto
honor those whohave survived
the fight against cancer and
those whose lives were cut
short byit. There is a suggested
donationof $10.
“It’s just sucha goodcause
that impacts somanypeople,
soI hope a lot of people come
out tosupport it,” saidJulian.
Juliansells Luminaria after
mass at her church, Our Lady
of the Snows, because a lot of
students fromAbington
Heights attend.
Eachteamhas from8to15
people. Eachpersonpays $10
tosignup, andis supposedto
raise $100bythe dayof the
Relay. However, Juliansaid
that her team, whichis the
committee team, tries toraise
a lot more. Last year, Julian
was captainof her team.
This event if close toJu-
lian’s heart because her
grandfather facedlungcan-
cer andher grandmother
facedbreast cancer. Her
familyattends the event, and
her sister, Olivia, whois a
freshmanat Abington
Heights, has beenona team
since sixthgrade.
“It’s anamazingevent.
People have the power to
change lives withtheir mon-
eywhile havingfun, andit’s a
chance toremember those
close tous,” saidJulian.
RELAY FOR LIFE OF THE ABINGTONS: JUNE 4, 5
From left are Haley Weinberger,
Marisa Gretz, Abigail Sebastian, and
Alexa Julian at the 2010 Relay.
Student lights the way
BY SHAUNA MCNALLY
Smcnally@theabingtonjournal.com
What: 2011 Relay for Life of
the Abingtons. Relay for Life
is an overnight event to help
raise money for cancer
research. All donations
benefit The American Cancer
Society. There are several
teams formed and members
take turns walking the high
school track at all times
during the event.
When: June 4 to 5, 2011
Where: Abington Heights
High School track.
Info: Visit
http://www.relayforlife.org to
start a team or call
1.800.ACS.2345
SCOTTTWP. - The first Justus
Volunteer Fire Company wine
tasting fundraiser, which was
held in September 2010, went so
well that the company is hosting
another May 20. Tickets are
$20, and people must be 21to
enter. Included in the ticket price
are12 wine tastings, two glasses
of wine, food, one raffle ticket
and entertainment by Chris
Gratz. The proceeds will be
used to buy equipment for the
fire company and assist with
renovations.
The fundraiser will take place
at Maiolatesi Wine Cellar on
Green Grove Road, Scott Town-
ship from6 until 10 p.m. catered
by Cangiano’s Italian Special-
ties. The menu includes London
broil; grilled chicken; pulled
pork sandwiches; penne with
vodka sauce; antipasto salad;
Caesar salad; corn on the cob;
cheese-and -cracker platters and
a chocolate fountain featuring
strawberries, apples, marsh-
mallows, grahamcrackers,
pretzels and creampuffs.
Fire Chief James Sanko said,
“We didn’t expect it to go over
as big as it did last year. We just
wanted everyone to have a good
time, and they did. They had a
lot of fun, and we raised about
$1,700.”
Sanko has been with the com-
pany for 18 years, and this is his
fourth one as the chief. He
helped put the first wine tasting
fundraiser together as well.
There were about 150 people at
that one, so nowSanko hopes to
top that with about 200.
The food will be set up buffet
style, and people will be able to
visit six tables and sample a
different wine at each one. The
fire company and Maiolatesi
will choose the six wines, rang-
ing fromvery sweet to very dry.
Then guests will choose any two
wines and receive full glasses.
Bottles and cases of wine will
also be available to purchase.
The fire company is going to
host another wine tasting in
September, with tickets avail-
able for purchase at the May 20
event.
There will be12 raffle bas-
kets, door prizes and a 50/50 at
the fundraiser. Some prizes
donated include: a propane grill,
a Carhartt basket, coupon books
for the Finger Lakes Wineries in
NewYork and a gift certificate
for dinner for two at Six East
Restaurant and Diner.
The Justus Fire Company has
six or seven confirmed spon-
sors, but need more before the
event. Abronze sponsorship is
$25, which includes a name or
business posted at the event; a
silver sponsorship is $50 and
includes a name or business
posted and announced at the
event; and a gold sponsorship is
$100 and includes a name or
business posted and announced
at the event, limited advertising
after the event and two compli-
mentary tickets. Sanko said the
fire company wants to thank
everyone who has already do-
nated food, products or funds.
“This, along with the wine
tasting in September, are the
only fundraisers the company is
doing this year, so we really
need your help,” said Joseph
Wasko, one of the trustees of the
wine tasting fundraiser. “We’re
looking for everyone to come
out and support the men and
women who serve the commu-
nity.”
Purchasing tickets in advance
is recommended. People can
purchase tickets Mondays from
7 to 9 p.m. at the Justus Fire
Company, 159 Fieldstone Drive,
Scott Township; online at
www.JFC28fire.com, by calling
570.587.4545 or by contacting
any member of the company.
Tickets are also being sold at
Maiolatesi Winery as well. For
more information, visit
www.JFC28fire.com.
Sipping in
support
Event benefits Justus Volunteer Fire Company
BY SHAUNA MCNALLY
Smcnally@theabingtonjournal.com
SUBMITTED PHOTO
Justus Volunteer Fire Company
will host a wine tasting fundraiser
May 20. Tickets, $20, are avail-
able.
RANSOMTWP.- Those in
attendance at the Ransom
Township Supervisors meeting
May 2 had much to say about
water runoff and garbage clea-
nup throughout the township .
To take care of the water prob-
lem, Township Supervisor Da-
vid Bird explained that the su-
pervisors are planning pipe
work on Sekol Avenue and hope
to have it bid out by June. Bird
said that it is too large a job to do
themselves, and it would take at
least half the summer.
“Water’s everywhere, and
these jobs are too much because
our guys are way too spread
out,” said Bird.
They are also considering a
project on Evergreen Drive, but
Bird said there is a lot to look
into first.
Both roads have been dam-
aged during the years. However,
before the township can repair
the roads, it needs to resolve the
water problem.
Bird explained, “To address
the problem, we want to add
catch basins and pipes in the
ditches by the roads to redirect
the water.”
Referring to the bridge on
Evergreen Road, township resi-
dent Howard Felker asked, “Are
there any plans for the water to
be diverted up there at the
bridge?”
Supervisor Chairman Joe
Esposito said that they are going
to install two ditches there.
However, the township has to
await dry weather. Bird ex-
plained the ground can’t be
matted and seeded while wet.
Resident Lenay Blackwell
asked if the garbage at the top of
the mountain on RansomRoad
can be cleaned up. The township
explained that last time they
tried to clean residents com-
plained because it is a state road
and they felt Ransomequipment
should not be used . Esposito
said he spoke with State Rep.
Sid Michaels, and Michaels said
he would look into options .
Mary Jane Namatka ad-
dressed the supervisors about
her newneighbor throwing
“junk” . Namatka lives at the top
of RansomRoad, and said her
neighbor is throwing old tires,
lumber and other items every-
where, which leads to animal
presence.
“We can’t even put the gar-
bage out,” said Namatka. “Last
week I put the garbage out, and
10 minutes later, we looked and
the garbage was all torn apart.
We never had this, and we’ve
lived here almost 40 years.”
“They need some kind of an
ordinance to stop these people
fromdoing this,” said Frank
Namatka, Mary Jane’s husband.
“They can’t let people come in
fromall over the place and make
a mess.”
According to Mary Jane Na-
matka, the zoning officer visited
once. Supervisors said they plan
to send the zoning officer again,
and the neighboring resident
will be cited if no cleanup action
is taken within about 15 days.
The township had a road
cleanup April 29, 30. In other
business, the township received
a check for $24,096.70 from
Alliance Landfill for the host
fee payment for the first quarter
of 2011. The township also re-
ceived notification fromPenn-
DOTthat the department in-
tends to submit an application to
DEPfor a permit for their Pipe
Replacement Project on Main
Street.
RansomTownship Super-
visors are seeking Emergency
Management Personnel. Those
interested are asked to contact
any of the supervisors.
The next regular Ransom
Township Supervisor meeting
will be June 6 at Mount Dewey
Community Hall.
Runoff,
garbage
discussed
in Ransom
BY SHAUNA MCNALLY
Abington Journal Reporter
Sunday, May 15, is the
date for the annual Rotary
Club of the Abingtons pasta
dinner, which will served
from12:30 to 5 p.m., at the
Abington Heights High
School cafeteria in Clarks
Summit. Takeouts will also
be available. Chef Joseph
Schiavone and son Sal will
be making their homemade
special recipe sauce. Salad,
dessert and beverages will
round out the meal. Dinners
will be served by Rotarians
and some young people in
the Abingtons. All proceeds
made from this dinner will
benefit area youth programs
in the Abingtons, as well as
Marley’s Mission and
Abington Little League.
Tickets are available from
any Abington Rotarian; any
Marley’s Mission or Abing-
ton Little League member;
or by calling 570.947.2705.
The price is $8 for adults
and $4 for children under
12.
Shown: Rotarians Dave
Griffin, tickets, Trip Crow-
ley, president, and Joe Pag-
nani, chair, get ready for the
event.
Shown: Rotarians Dave Griffin, tickets, Trip Crowley, president, and
Joe Pagnani, chair, get ready for the event.
Big bite for charity
C M Y K
PAGE 4A www.theabingtonjournal.com The Abington Journal♦Clarks Summit, PA WEDNESDAY, MAY11, 2011
DALTON - The Friends of
the Dalton Library volunteer
group is hosting the Herb and
Perennial Festival, which will
benefit the Dalton Communi-
ty Library. The event will take
place at the Dalton Fire Hall
on South Turnpike Road in
Dalton May 14 from10 a.m.
to 1 p.m.
“Come one, come all,” said
Janet Geeza, the Dalton Com-
munity Library program coor-
dinator and co-chair of this
years Herb and Perennial Fes-
tival. “Get your herb gardens
growing.”
The Friends group hosted
an event like this last year,
except it included only herbs.
This year the group decided to
include some perennials. Pe-
rennials are plants that live for
more than two years, unlike
annuals or biennials, which
die in shorter time periods.
Perennials typically grow and
bloom during the spring and
summer, then return again the
following spring.
The Friends group orga-
nizes volunteer work for the
library, such as cleaning
around the library, planting
flowers, hosting fundraisers
together and more. Mary Hart
is the president of the group.
This year, Susan Jennings
volunteered to be co-chair of
the festival with Geeza.
Geeza said, “It was a lot of
work doing it all by myself.
I’m glad Susan volunteered to
help me this year. It makes the
load a lot lighter.”
There is a committee of
about 10 to 12 people helping
Jennings and Geeza assemble
the Herb and Perennial Festiv-
al.
At 10 a.m. when the festival
begins, people will be invited
to mingle and buy herbs and
perennials. There will also be
complimentary drinks and
herb-related snacks. Some of
the food will include muffins
and bread. The drinks are
coffee, hot tea, iced tea and
lemonade. Admission will
also be free and cost to buy
herbs is $2.50, and perennials
$5.
Herbs and perennials for
sale at the event will include:
basil, mint, cilantro, rosemary,
parsley, chives, oregano,
thyme, pineapple, sage, lemon
verbena, lavender, lovage.
There will also be about 12
raffle baskets with herb- and
garden-related items in them
which have been donated. The
raffle tickets are $.50. All
baskets are currently set up at
the library and will be until
the day of the festival. Visitors
can go while the library is
open and purchase tickets at
the circulation table to put in
the baskets
Most were donated by
members of the Friends
group. However, one was
donated by the Board of
Trustees of the Dalton Com-
munity Library, and one from
Creekside Gardens in Tunk-
hannock.
Last year, the Friends group
raised more than $700 from
the Herb Festival. They were
very happy, but this year they
hope to surpass it.
Geeza said, “It’s more orga-
nized this year. Last year, half
of the members bought herbs
and half grew them them-
selves, so everyone was com-
ing in with herbs that were
completely different sizes, but
this year Gerry and Len Janus
went to an herb show in York
and we purchased all the herbs
from there, so they can be
more uniform in size.”
Geeza also explained that
the selection and variety has
increased this year, and herbs
are all professionally grown.
Gerry and Len Janus will
speak at the event. They cou-
ple formerly owned Vileniki
Herb Farm in Scott Township
and will offer a PowerPoint
presentation on growing and
using herbs at 10:30 a.m. At 1
p.m., the basket drawing will
take place.
“I’m excited,” said Geeza.
“It should be a good time, and
the library really benefits from
it, so hopefully a lot of people
will be able to stop by, at least
for a little while.”
ABINGTON JOURNAL/SHAUNA MCNALLY
From left, front row are: Helen Stec, Bonnie Flynn, Len Janus, Gerry
Janus. Back: Mary Ann Ketchur, Susan Jennings, Eileen Szymanski,
Janet Geeza.
Ready, set, grow those gardens
BY SHAUNA MCNALLY
Abington Journal Reporter
MatthewFitzgeraldFlynn,
executive director of the Scran-
tonCultural Center at the Ma-
sonic Temple, passedawayat
home onMay4, accordingto
the ScrantonCultural Center
staff. He was 57years old.
“Ineverythinghe did, Matt
was a welcoming, embracing
person,” saidJohnCardoni,
facility/technical director at the
ScrantonCultural Center anda
close friendof Flynn. “Matt
reallyestablishedthe ‘openarms
policy’ here, whichallowed
members of the general public
totour andlearnabout the build-
ingtoa level that is not normally
foundat places like this.
AScrantonnative, Flynnhad
spent 11years onthe Boardof
Directors for the ScrantonCul-
tural Center andhadbeenserv-
ingas executive director for the
past three-and-a-half years. On
the Mondaybefore his passing,
he was honoredas a Paul Harris
Fellowbythe RotaryClubof
Scranton.
“Matt wouldalways tell you
that the greatest honors inhis
life were his familyfirst, andthis
buildingsecond,” Cardoni said.
“This was his dreamjob.
Flynnwas alsoveryinvolved
withthe Lackawanna County
Librarysystem. He servedon
the boardsince1985. He was
president a fewdifferent times
andheldother offices. He was
appointedtothe Governor’s
AdvisoryCouncil inLibrary
Development byGovernor
Robert Caseyin1988, where he
servedas president for 20years.
“He receiveda Certificate of
Merit fromthe PALibraryAs-
sociation,” saidMaryGarm,
Administrator of the Lackawan-
na CountyLibrarySystem.
“There are veryfewlibrary
trustees whohave beenhonored
that way, soit’s a bigdeal that he
was.”
GarmworkedwithFlynn
since 2003, but she knewhim
previous tothat. Accordingto
Garm, Flynnalsohada handin
buildingthe libraries inClarks
Summit, Carbondale, Peckville
andTaylor.
“Matt lovedreadingandli-
braries,” saidGarm. “He be-
lievedtheyare veryimportant in
societyandthat theyhave a
significant impact onpeople. He
was a remarkable manwhohad
a great intellect. Youcouldbring
upanysubject tohimandhe
wouldhave informationonit
andsomethingtosayabout it.”
Flynnis survivedbyhis wife
of 32years, the former Cathe-
rine Kerrigan, andtheir three
children.
Cultural
Center
director
Flynn dies
BY GO LACKAWANNA AND
ABINGTON JOURNAL STAFFS
T
he Sant’ Andrea Society hosted a black-and-
white charity masked ball to relive the origi-
nal, which was hosted by Truman Capote in
1966 at the Plaza Hotel in New York City. The
local event was hosted April 30 at the Country
Club of Scranton, Morgan Highway, Clarks Sum-
mit.
ABINGTON JOURNAL/JOANNA SHUMAKER
Ruth Lenahan, President of the Sant’ Andrea Society and Tracy
Doherty, Chairperson for the event.
Event planner Paul Black-
ledge.
Shown, from left, Father Bernard McIlheeny SJ, George Lynett, Patti Lynett, Father Thomas
Roach SJ.
Behind the mask
ABINGTON JOURNAL/JOANNA SHUMAKER
At left, Laura
Marion, Michael
Marion, Sharon
Lynett and
Darron Fadden.
Above, Maura
Gavin in her
mask at the ball.
Above left, Dr.
Sarkus and Ida
Kechejian.
WAVERLY- Danielle Carpen-
ter, chair of the upcoming an-
nual Waverly Waddle 5KWalk
Run, invites everyone to walk,
waddle or run their way to the
finish line in support of the
Waverly Community House
May14. The course will begin
and end at the Commlocated at
1115 N. Abington Rd. in Wa-
verly.
Registration will be held from
8 a.m. to 8:45 a.m. on the back
lawn of the Commwith the
Waddle to begin at 9 a.m. The
Waddle will be held rain or
shine.
According to Carpenter,
“Ninety-one runners and walk-
ers participated in last year’s
Waddle, in spite of the rain.”
She added, “It’s a run/walk.
We have families that take their
children in strollers. It’s for
anybody.”
Registration includes a num-
ber, Fast Finishes.net Chrono-
mix-verified time and eligibility
awards.
The fees are $12 for adults and
$6 for participants12 years and
younger if they register by May
11. After May11and on the day
of the race, registration fees are
$15 for adults and $8 for partici-
pants12 and younger. Family
registration (i.e., registration for
a family of four) is $30 in ad-
vance and $35 on race day.
Medals will be given in the
following categories: First Over-
all Male and Female Runners,
First Overall Male and Female
Walkers; First and Second Run-
ner in age groups 50+, 40-49,
30-39, 19-29, 13-18 and12 and
younger.
Allied Glass Industries Inc.,
the Committee to Re-Elect Jim
Gibbons District Judge, Com-
munity Medical Center, Endless
Mountains Water, Elk Moun-
tain, Kane Is Able, Dr. Nat E.
Levinson, Penn Security Bank,
PNCBank, Rite-Temp, Scran-
ton Dodge Chrysler Jeep, Scran-
ton Orthopaedic Specialists,
Strickland Chiropractic and
Walker &Walker/Michael D.
Walker, Esq. are major sponsors
for the race. Area businesses
donating goods or services for
the event include the National
Running Center, Endless Moun-
tains Water, Waverly Deli and
Weis Market.
A“Junior Waddle,” or a fun
run for children 8 years old and
younger, will take place imme-
diately following The Waddle
on the back lawn. There is no
registration fee for the Junior
Waddle and all participants will
receive a ribbon.
Carpenter said, “We call it
(the Junior Waddle) a fun run
because we get a lot of little
kids.”
AChalk Walk will also be
held in conjunction with the
Waverly Waddle from10 a.m. to
12 p.m. For a suggested dona-
tion of $10, chalk artists can
purchase a square of sidewalk
around the Commto decorate.
Register in advance or on the
day of the Waddle.
The Chalk Walk is the brain-
child of Commspecial events
coordinator Melinda Ames.
She said, “For the playground
project, we were trying to do
different fundraising ideas to
incorporate different target
audiences and include all of the
members of the community. My
kids love to go outside and play
with sidewalk chalk. They could
stay outside for hours and deco-
rate the whole neighborhood
with sidewalk chalk. I thought it
was something simple for the
kids to do. We’re going to start at
the playground and we’re going
to go up and around the front of
the building doing the inside
sidewalk to keep the kids away
fromthe street. We’ll also have a
lemonade stand and face paint-
ing.”
Sponsorships are available
and all proceeds will benefit the
playground project.
Visit waverlycomm.org for
more information and a regis-
tration formor call
570.586.8191, ext. 2.
Comm fun
Waddle, Walk in Waverly
BY JOAN MEAD-MATSUI
Abington Journal Correspondent
ABINGTON JOURNAL/JOAN MEAD-MATSUI
Danielle Carpenter, chair of the
upcoming annual Waverly Waddle
5K Walk Run, invites everyone to
support the Waverly Community
House May 14.
A Chalk Walk will
also be held in
conjunction with
the Waverly Wad-
dle from 10 a.m.
to 12 p.m.
C M Y K
WEDNESDAY, MAY11, 2011 THE ABINGTON JOURNAL♦CLARKS SUMMIT, PA WWW.THEABINGTONJOURNAL.COM PAGE 5A
The installation of the 2011-2012 Board of Trustees for the Abington Community Library was hosted May 2.
Board members and officers are shown above, front row, from left: Bernie Harding, Frank Santoriello, President;
Mary Jo Kelly, Treasurer; Robin Domenico, Vice President; Penny Musto, Secretary. Back row: Robert Sheils III,
Jean Marie Decker, Janet T. McCabe, Rebecca Roberts, John D’Elia, Barry Kaplan, Leela Baikadi, Leah Ducato
Rudolph, MLIS.
Absent from photo are: Pudge Adcroft, Charles Dougherty, Melissa Jones, Edward J. Klovensky, Gail McGrew and
Abby Peck.
ABINGTON JOURNAL/DANIELLE ANTONELLO-SMOLLEY
Library welcomes board
Clarks Summit Senior Living, 950 Morgan Hwy. will hold a
Senior Forum “Simplifying Your Senior Life Issues” May 14 from
noon to 5 p.m. They will offer free classes open to all from fi-
nancial planning, healthcare, learn tips from experts for making
the most of retirement. Enjoy light refreshments and visit booths
to pick up even more valuable information on long term planning.
For reservations call 587.4700.
Shown at a planning meeting held with members who will
sponsor the event: seated, Sue Chapin, Clarks Summit Senior
Living. Standing, from left: Rick Peters, ERA One Source Realty;
James Kresge, Abington Financial and Ken Stewart At-Home
Quality Care.
Simplifying Issues forum at
Clarks Summit Senior Living
SOUTH ABINGTON TWP.
– According to Giles Stanton
at a meeting May 3, South
Abington Township officials
have spent the past several
months trying to convince
members of the Abington
Regional Wastewater Author-
ity, formally the Clarks Sum-
mit-South Abington Township
Joint Sewer Authority, to get
requests for proposals through
the draft act 537 plan, and a
bidding proposal for the engi-
neering work.
Township Manager David
O’Neill said the borough was
presented with the draft two
months ago. He was asked to
obtain information from other
sewer authorities.
“I reached out to Scranton
Sewer Authority Executive
Director Eugene Barrett and
he gave me all the information
that pertained to Scranton,”
O’Neill said. “Eighteen to 24
months ago the Scranton Sew-
er Authority was at the same
point that our joint sewer au-
thority is at. Members of the
board of the Scranton Sewer
Authority decided to go for a
request for qualifications.
They received qualifications
from11 engineering firms.
Scranton identified six firms
that were equally qualified to
do the next step which is pro-
ject design.”
O’Neill thinks the Abington
Regional Wastewater Author-
ity should send out for re-
quests for proposals similar to
how the Scranton/Dunmore
Sewer Authority did just
months ago.
“We have a template in
front of us,” O’Neill said. “We
have six firms in front of us.
We can take the letter we have
from Scranton and just change
a couple words for the request
for proposal, and probably
have a bid proposal in three,
possibly four weeks.”
O’Neill encouraged resi-
dents at the meeting to ask the
Joint Sewer Authority to grant
a request for proposals.
“Nobody is saying Gannett
Fleming, the firm that wrote
up the original plan which
would cost an estimated $30
million, shouldn’t get the
work, but let’s make them
earn it by making them do
what is best for the residents
of Clarks Green, South
Abington Twp. and Clarks
Summit,” he said. “We’ll nev-
er know if there was a poten-
tial for savings unless the
request for proposals are
done.”
Stanton added that it’s im-
portant to take caution with
the project.
“Once we make a decision,
there is no going back,” he
said. “We don’t really care
who gets the engineering or
construction job. We just want
to make sure we get the best,
most experienced person at a
competitive price.
“If there is a possibility of
saving millions of dollars by
bidding it out and getting the
best engineering firms that
means a big deal to our rate
payers,” he said. “If you refuse
to go out and look that says
you don’t really care about the
residents. We’re simply saying
please take a look at the other
alternatives
Stanton said he believes the
township will have to approve
the Act 537 plan if it is passed
at the next meeting.
“I think we’ll have to,” he
said. “I don’t know all the
legalities of it, but I don’t
think we can hold it up any
more.”
The Abington Regional
Wastewater Authority was
scheduled to have a special
meeting to possibly vote on
the matter May 5, but it had to
be rescheduled to May 11 at
7:30 p.m. at the Joint Sewer
Authority Board Meeting
Room, the regularly scheduled
date and time, because the
authority failed advertise the
first event as a special meet-
ing.
S. Abington
discusses
sewer plan
options
BY ROB TOMKAVAGE
Abington Journal Reporter
CLARKSSUMMIT- The first
items on the agenda at the May
4 meeting of the Clarks Summit
Borough Council meeting were
three request fromthe Arts
Council of the Abingtons. Char-
les Charlesworth, co-chair of
the art council, was not able to
attend the meeting, but he called
Virginia Kehoe, Borough Man-
ager prior, to state the art coun-
cil requests.
The group seeks to paint
footprints on the ground from
Angels Galeria, 208 Depot St.
to Everything Natural, 426 S.
State St for the “Second Fri-
days” Art Walk. “Second Fri-
days” began in April. On the
second Friday of every month,
approximately ten venues each
host an artist to display their
work. The Arts Council of the
Abingtons will put temporary
markers each month to desig-
nate the locations of artwork.
The arts council wants to use
permanent paint. The Borough
council said the only problem
they have is the permanent
nature of the paint. They want
the arts council to use some-
thing temporary. Kehoe plans to
address the arts council about
the paint.
The arts council also request-
ed the Borough enforce the
crosswalk law. When pedestri-
ans are trying to cross the street
in the crosswalk, drivers are
supposed to yield.
Police Chief Lou Vitale, said,
“In the past we have put signs
up in the middle of the road and
they were hit and smashed. We
also tried putting themon the
side of the road once, but we
had one stolen.”
Vitale said that during the
“Second Fridays” events they
will have an extra officer on
foot patrol to help enforce the
law. Vitale explained that if
drivers do not followthe cross-
walk lawthey are subject to
about a $110 fine and two points
on their license. Kehoe said that
she will place a message on the
bulletin board in the Borough
office about the law.
The Borough council agreed
to signs on the side of the road
again to help enforce this law.
Lastly, the arts council asked if
the Borough could close Depot
Street for the Depot Street Arts
and Wine Festival. In the past
the Borough has allowed for the
closing of half a block of Spring
Street but not Depot Street.
The Borough Council said
that they will allowthe arts
council to close Depot St. for
the festival, but businesses and
neighbors must sign off.
Bob Naegele, professional
engineer, was at the meeting to
speak about the Borough’s
stormwater situation and the
requirements for the MS4 per-
mit. MS4 is a programthat DEP
has put in place to develop and
implement a stormwater man-
agement program.
Naegele said that the council
needs to be pro-active so that
they do not end up owing mon-
ey a fewyears down the line.
The 537 sewer plan was dis-
cussed. The plan addresses
biologic nutrient removal and
wet weather flowchallenges
presented to the Joint Sewer
Authority Waste Water Treat-
ment Plan. Council accepted the
plan with a contingency from
the Planning Commission.
Joe Guzek volunteered to
finish Tony O’Dell’s termon
the Sewer Authority until the
end of the year. The Borough
council accepted.
The council also decided
allowresidents to make sewer
payments using credit cards
over the phone.
The next regular Clarks Sum-
mit Borough Council meeting is
June1.
Arts
council
addresses
borough
BY SHAUNA MCNALLY
Smcnally@theabingtonjournal.com
ABINGTONS- According
to Tom Hill, owner of State
Street Grill in Clarks Sum-
mit, those who attend the
upcoming Kick-Off Summer
BBQ May 24, 5:30 to 7:30
p.m., to benefit the Abington
Area Community Park, will
find many favorite backyard
cookout foods.
Hill said, “The menu will
be similar to a backyard coo-
kout with hamburgers, hot
dogs and some cold salads. It
will be a great night to raise
awareness and recognize
some of its (the park’s) spe-
cial features such as the pro-
posed handicapped acces-
sible pathways.”
The kickoff will be held
outside, or inside in the event
of rain. Tickets are $20 and
include grilled food, salads, a
complimentary drink and a
raffle ticket.
All proceeds from the fun-
draiser sponsored by State
Street Grill will be used to
match grant dollars for part
of an ongoing project to
create handicapped parking
and the pathways between
the parking area, the hand-
icapped accessible play-
ground and restrooms in the
upper level of the park.
Hill said, “As a local busi-
ness in the community, I feel
fortunate to be able to help
support our community ac-
tivities. I really like how the
park has been evolving over
the years and wanted to be
part of it even if it is at a
small scale.
Abington Area Communi-
ty Park is located on PA
Route 307 at the intersection
of Winola Road and West
Grove Street in S. Abington
Township and bordered by
the Clarks Summit State
Hospital and the Scranton
Country Club. The park is
situated on approximately
100acresand is managed by
the Abington Area Joint
Recreation Board AAJRB, “a
non-profit, intergovernmen-
tal agency.”The AAJRB “is
comprised of representatives
from five municipalities:
Clarks Green Borough,
Clarks Summit, Glenburn,
South Abington and Waverly
Townships.”
Pre-purchased tickets are
required for the kickoff and a
limited number are available
at the Clarks Green Borough
Building, located at 104 N.
Abington Rd., Clarks Green
from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Mon-
day through Friday or email
board@aajrb.com. Tickets
will be available until May
19.
The Abington Journal is a
media sponsor for the event.
State Street host BBQ
Benefit to raise funds for
Abington Area Community Park
handicapped accessibility.
BY JOAN MEAD-MATSUI
Abington Journal Correspondent
What: Fundraiser for
Abington Area Community
Park’s
Handicapped-Accessible
paved pathways.
Where: Kick-Off Summer
BBQ at State Street Grill,
Clarks Summit
When: May 24, 5:30 to 7:30
p.m.
Cost: $20 includes grilled
food, salads, drink and a
raffle ticket.
Info: Pre-purchased tickets
required by May 19, available
at: Clarks Green Borough
Building, Monday through
Friday, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. or
email board@aajrb.com.
Children are getting ready to roll up their little sleeves, don tiny
aprons and let their paint and creative juices flow with an event
hosted by Monogram Muse in Clarks Summit called “Rock This
Town!” The evening of family fun will be held May 13 from 4 to 6
p.m. at the shop’s new location at 105 Claremont Avenue during the
Second Friday Clarks Summit Art Walk. Monogram Muse will supply
the paint and rocks and children will supply the imagination. The
event is free. Owner Francene Pisano Dudziec, an artist, is looking
forward to seeing the kids’ creations. “We’re suggesting they paint
silly faces and leave the rocks around town for ‘Smiles Around the
Summit’,” she said. “We’re hoping it will brighten someone’s day
when they discover the rock art along their travels.” Children will
also have a chance to meet artist Tara Crum, a private art instructor
in the Abington community. Monogram Muse hosts the event at its
new Claremont Avenue location. For details , call Francene Pisano
Dudziec at 570.585.0772, email monogrammuse@yahoo.com.
‘Rock This Town’ May 13
C M Y K
PAGE 6A www.theabingtonjournal.com The Abington Journal♦Clarks Summit, PA WEDNESDAY, MAY11, 2011
CLARKS SUMMIT - Main-
taining a standard with fewer
resources. This is the challenge
that the Abington Heights
School District will face dur-
ing the 2011-12 school year.
The school board listened to
two presentations centered
around next year’s budget dur-
ing its monthly work session
May 4.
The school board approved a
preliminary budget earlier this
year with a proposed tax in-
crease of 1.4 percent. If every-
thing had remained the same,
that would have balanced the
budget.
Problems arose when it was
reported that Gov. Tom Cor-
bett’s proposed budget, if
passed, will reduce subsidy to
schools by 10 percent.
“To Abington Heights, this
resulted in a loss of $1 mil-
lion,” said Superintendent Mi-
chael Mahon.
The school district reacted
and is currently considering
cuts of two librarian positions,
two computer teachers, a Latin
teacher, a science teacher, an
English teacher, two transition-
al first grade teachers, a spe-
cial education teacher and two
elementary school teachers to
make up for the loss.
“In spite of these cuts, the
preliminary budget has an op-
erational deficit of about
$800,000, our fund reserve
will be used to balance this
budget,” said Mahon.
“We have to be committed to
say that operational expenses
must be in line with operation-
al revenues, or we are simply
passing our problem on to the
next superintendent and the
next board. We will use our
reserves to provide time, and
it’s a luxury that we have be-
cause we have saved so well,
as our expenses come into
alignment with our revenue.”
Looking for ways to save
money, and put expenses in
line with revenue, Mahon out-
lined where the district spends
its money.
Currently, the school district
is spending 72 percent of its
budget on employee costs such
as salaries, benefits, health
care and pension, and 27 per-
cent on its buildings, grounds,
operational costs, transporta-
tion, furniture, books, supplies,
classroom technology, curric-
ular and extracurricular.
“The (27) percent, Dr. Ma-
hon has worked extremely hard
on,” school board President
Cathy Hardaway said of Ma-
hon’s effort to make cuts. “I
will tell you we have heard
presentation after presentation
over the last six years of differ-
ent efficiencies in the school
district that we have changed
to, and have saved us money.”
“Now is the time to address
the (72) percent.”
The district is currently ne-
gotiating the teachers’ con-
tract, and Hardaway said the
board had issued a proposal to
the teachers’ union requesting
a one-year salary freeze.
“In light of the governor’s
budget, over 200 school dis-
tricts have agreed, between the
union and the board, to freez-
es,” said Hardaway.
The proposal would keep the
teachers’ salaries in 2011-12
where they were in 2010-11,
with no increase for years of
service or for credits obtained.
Hardaway said the average
raise for 2009 was 4.999 per-
cent due to these two factors
and 5.25 percent in 2010.
Reimbursement for credits
taken during this term of the
contract would also be set at
$0 and payments will not be
deferred to future years.
The teachers union did not
accept this proposal, and nego-
tiations will continue.
The board will meet again
for its monthly meeting May
18.
Board eyes
salary freeze;
union says no
BY DON MCGLYNN
dmcglynn@theabingtonjournal.com
The Lackawanna
Trail Jr./Sr. High
School Prom was
held May 6 at the
Radisson in Scran-
ton. The theme for
the event was “A
Night in Paris.”
Queen was Flo-
rence Nash and
King was Aaron
Barbolish.
ABINGTON JOURNAL/ALICE STUFFLE
Alexa Rzucidlo, Casey Rich, Dalton Weist and Emily Scappatura.
Stephanie Cobb and Sarah Langan.
Queen Flo-
rence Nash
and King
Aaron Bar-
bolish.
‘A Night
in PARIS’
Applications are be-
ing accepted for the
Leadership Lackawan-
na Class of 2012. Con-
sidered northeastern
Pennsylvania’s premier
leadership and profes-
sional development
program for emerging
professionals, this
marks the program’s
30th year.
Leadership Lacka-
wanna fosters the de-
velopment of communi-
ty leaders by providing
participants with lead-
ership, interpersonal
and managerial skills
and an enhanced under-
standing of the issues
and topics relevant to
the greater Scranton
area through monthly
sessions. In addition to
the sessions, class
members participate in
group projects to en-
hance their leadership
skills and foster team-
work. Since inception,
Leadership Lackawan-
na has graduated more
than 900 community
leaders.
The program is open
to candidates who ei-
ther live or work in
Lackawanna County.
Class size is limited.
Full and partial schol-
arships are available on
a limited basis to qual-
if ied candidates. Tui-
tion is $1,200 and class-
es start in September.
To learn more about
the program and enroll-
ment, visit leadershi-
plackawanna.com. For
more information, con-
tact program adminis-
trator, Nicole Barber at
570.342.7711 or nbar-
ber@scrantoncham-
ber.com.
Leadership Lackawanna
application deadline
extended to May 13
Candidates for Lackawan-
na Trail School Board in-
clude: Jane U. Richards,
Joseph J. Strauch, David A.
Thorne, Michael Mould,
Carol Vail Selwood and
Mark V. Lombardi. Five
positions are available.
Region 1
David Thorne
A father of four, Thorne
has been employed as an
equipment operator for the
Clarks Sum-
mit Borough
for the past
22 years.
Active in
his local fire
company for
28 years, he
has also
earned Eagle
Scout rank through Troop
160.
If elected he said he will
bring the experience he
earned while serving on
Abington Heights School
Board from 2002 to 2005.
“While active in local
organizations, I have served
on various finance boards. I
have learned firsthand the
need to stay within a tight
budget while meeting the
needs of the organization.
We all must live within our
means and government is
no different,” said Thorne.
Joseph J. Strauch, BBA,
CCP, CDP, FLMI
A father of
three,
Strauch feels
his 46 years
of Profes-
sional Busi-
ness Manage-
ment, Tech-
nology and
Systems
Analysis ex-
perience will
benefit him if elected.
“During my years in Met-
Life’s Information Tech-
nology positions, I learned
effective ways to employ
computer techniques to
better manage organization-
al needs. It is my intention
to use these to help Trail
identify better courses of
action and make better de-
cisions.”
Jane Richards
A Nicholson resident,
with four great-grandchil-
dren enrolled in the district,
Jane Richards is looking
for re-election to the board.
A former Lackawanna
Trail Elementary School
nurse, Richards won her
seat on the board in 2003,
and is hoping to keep it and
help with the anticipated
tough times.
“At this time the board
has an almost insurmount-
able task to keep our pro-
gram in task and continue
to give our children the
opportunities they so de-
serve while dealing with
the proposed governor’s
budget cuts. I can only
promise to do my very best
for everyone.”
L A C K A W A N N A T R A I L S C H O O L B O A R D
Six vie for five spots
David Thorne Joseph J.
Strauch
Howard
Jacoby Jr., 88,
Clarks Sum-
mit, died Sat-
urday, May 7,
in Northeast
PA (Mercy)
Hospice. His wife, the late
Dorothy H. Jacoby, died in
2004.
Born April 6, 1923 in Clarks
Summit, he was the son of the
late Howard and Martha Ro-
senkrans Jacoby. He was a
lifelong resident of Clarks
Summit and a 1941 graduate of
Clarks Summit High School.
Howard was a millwright by
trade and had worked in the
area for 40 years. He was an
employee at Acker Drill,
James Brothers and U.S. Tex-
tiles. In addition, he was a
member of Carpenters Local
Union 1645.
Howard was a member of
Countryside Community
Church, Newton Twp., and
Waverly Lodge 301 Free &
Accepted Masons, and he was
a former member of Abington
Memorial VFW Post 7069,
Clarks Summit.
The family extends special
thanks for the care given by the
staff at Northeast PA Hospice
and Dr. Stephen Jaditz.
Surviving are two sons, Ho-
ward Jacoby III and wife Jean,
Factoryville; and Ivan Bruce
Jacoby and wife Chris, Clarks
Summit; five daughters, Linda
K. Smith and husband War-
ren, West Pittston; Brenda
Pardue and husband John,
Newton Twp.; Debra Lee
Kovall, Clarks Summit; Iona
Hice and husband, John, Fac-
toryville; and Sandra Jacoby,
Scranton; a sister, Iona Ro-
berts, Hartford, Conn.; 20
grandchildren and 17 great-
grandchildren.
He was preceded in death by
a sister, Corrine Summerhill; a
son-in-law, Thomas Russell
Kovall; and grandson, Thomas
R. Kovall II.
Services will be held at the
convenience of the family
from Jennings-Calvey Funeral
and Cremation Services Inc.,
111 Colburn Ave., Clarks Sum-
mit, by the Rev. Jean-Pierre
Duncan. Interment, Newton
Cemetery, Newton Twp.
Memorial contributions may
be made to Countryside Com-
munity Church, 14001 Church
Hill, Clarks Summit 18411, or
Northeast PA Hospice, 746
Jefferson Ave., Scranton
18510.
For details or to send an
online condolence, visit
www.jenningscalvey.com.
Howard Jacoby Jr.
May 7, 2011
OBITUARY
Virginia
D. Hricenak,
75, Newton
Twp., died
Sunday
morning,
May 8, at
the VNA Hospice Unit at
the Community Medical
Center. She was the wid-
ow of Michael J. Hrice-
nak who died in 2009.
Born in Scranton, she
was the daughter of the
late Byron and Dorothy
Gramps Snyder. She was
known for her prize- win-
ning needlepoint, as well
as her love of crossword
puzzles and word games.
Virginia loved to collect
antiques, especially carni-
val glass and antique fur-
niture. She was proud of
her vast teddy bear col-
lection and her library of
books she had accumu-
lated. Mostly she should
be remembered as a de-
voted, friend, wife and
mother.
Surviving are a daughter
Melissa Hricenak, and a
family friend Russell El-
gin, Mill City; four sons,
David and his wife Pat,
Tennessee, Byron, Mill
City, James, Mill City,
and Keith, Michigan; a
brother, Charles Synder,
Fleetville; five grandchil-
dren Laura, Greg, Kristen,
Michael, and Joseph ; a
great- grand -daughter,
Kadence Bucksbee.
The funeral will be held
May 12 at 5 p.m. at the
Lawrence E. Young Fu-
neral Home, 418 S. State
St., Clarks Summit with
services by the Rev.
James Rugg, pastor of
Mill City Assembly of
God. Interment will be
private at the convenience
of the family.
Friends may call on
Thursday evening from 4
to 7 p.m. For directions
or to send an online con-
dolence, visit www.law-
renceeyoungfuneralhome-
.com .
Virginia D. Hricenak
May 8, 2011
C M Y K
WEDNESDAY, MAY11, 2011 THE ABINGTON JOURNAL♦CLARKS SUMMIT, PA WWW.THEABINGTONJOURNAL.COM PAGE 7A
PASTADINNERSET
Pasta Joe Pagnani an-
nounced the annual pasta din-
ner will be held May 15, at the
Abington Heights High School
cafeteria. Dine in and take-out
will both be available from
12:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. Proceeds
will benefit projects of Rotary
as well as Abington Little
League and Marley’s Mission,
both also selling tickets. Tick-
ets will be available from any
Rotary Club of the Abingtons
member and at the door. Those
looking to make arrangements
to pick up tickets ahead of
time may call Joe at
570.585.0339 or Leah at the
library 570.587.3440.
WELCOME BACK!
We re-welcome Pastor
Mark Stuenzi of the Parker
Hill Church back into the Ro-
tary fold. Mark lives in Clarks
Summit with his wife, Debbie,
and daughters Leah and Oli-
via. Welcome back, Mark!
INTERACT CLUB
NEWS
Rotarian Stephanie West-
ington reports: “The club did a
fundraiser for the Humane
Society. They collected dona-
tions from the Abbey Ridge,
Royal Oaks, Deerfield and
Skyline residential develop-
ments. They are also working
on a fundraiser for the Wom-
en’s Resource Center (WRC);
they are collecting donations
for items on the WRC wish
list. The next two weekends
they have groups volunteering
at the St. Francis of Assisi
Soup Kitchen. We applaud our
Interact Club for all their ser-
vice work!”
YOUTHLEADERSHIP
AWARDWINNER
Abington Heights sopho-
more Chloe Maloney, 16,
South Abington, was recently
chosen as the recipient of a
scholarship through the Rotary
Club of the Abingtons to at-
tend the Rotary Youth Lead-
ership Award Conference. This
year the conference will be
held from July 10 to July 14, at
Keystone College. The confer-
ence is for high school students
completing their sophomore
year who have shown lead-
ership potential in their home,
school and community. Con-
gratulations, Chloe!
EXCHANGE STUDENT
NANNASOERSEON
Nanna of Denmark reports:
“My older sister (Laerke) ar-
rived the 13th of April and left
again Saturday the 23th. It was
really good seeing her again. It
made me realize how much I
actually have missed her and
everyone at home. I can with-
out a doubt say that she is one
of my best friends. It was her
first time in the U.S. While she
was here, we got to travel to
New Jersey and New York
City. It was all really exciting
and she had a blast. Having her
visit also made me realize that
I’m now thinking in English. I
had no idea.
“Saturday, May 7, I went to a
Rotary Awards Banquet in
Wilkes-Barre, which most of
the outbound and inbound
exchange student also will be
attending. I’m so excited to see
all of the exchange students
from district 7410 again.
“I sat down yesterday and
thought about my time in the
U.S. I feel like I came last
month, not nine months ago.
The time has flown by. I can’t
believe I only have three
months left to go. Thank you
everybody for support and tons
of amazing memories!”
EXCHANGE STUDENT
FROMVENEZUELA
Kevin Murray reports: “Not
too much is new. The summer
season is upon us here in Vene-
zuela with temperatures reac-
hing the 90s and lots of rain.
Nothing major has happened
here lately. Next week I will be
attending the District Confer-
ence of Rotary and then head-
ing off with the other exchange
students to tour Venezuela: just
search “Angle Falls, Margarita
Island,” or “Los Roques” in
Google to get a feel for what
we are about to experience. We
will also be going to Brazil. It
should be a great experience
and I am greatly looking for-
ward to it. Thanks to everyone
back home who has given me
this amazing opportunity.”
JOINROTARY. BE IN-
VOLVED.
Come to any regular meeting
held at the Inn at Nichols Vil-
lage, Thursdays at 12:10 p.m.
to find out more or call Leah
Ducato Rudolph at
570.586.0864. Follow Rotary
Club of the Abingtons on
Facebook too.
Rotary Club
of the Abingtons
With
Leah Ducato Rudolph
Pasta Dinner May 15
Leah Ducato Rudolph is the publicity
chairman of the Rotary Club of The
Abingtons. She may be reached at
570.587.3440 or lrudolph@al-
bright.org.
Interact members spend time volunteering at the Humane Society.
Volunteers, kneeling, from left, are: Will Swisher, Chris Swisher, Jaimee
Kester and Megan Cunningham.
For those dreamingof
beingoutdoors fishingrod
inhandandcatchingthat
bigtrout or bass, it maybe
time toheadtoAbington
Area CommunityPark’s
EstonWilsonLake. The
fishare waiting.
AccordingtoRob
Wnuk, Pa. FishandBoat
CommissionArea 4Fish-
eries Manager, “We stock
EstonWilsonLake with
rainbowtrout. The lake
receives twostockings of
rainbows eachyear.” ”
For more information
regardingfishingand
other activities at the
AbingtonArea Communi-
tyPark, visit http://
www.aajrb.com.
ABINGTON JOURNAL/JOAN MEAD-MATSUI
Stephen, Benjamin and Cindy Lefchak of Scranton, shown
above from left, enjoy an afternoon of fishing at the Abing-
ton Area Community Park.
Four-year-old
Madeline
O’Dell of
Clarks
Summit is
shown with
her fishing
pole.
Making a
SPLASH
Gondella, 30, has been cho-
sen to compete in the fly fishing
portion of the games, the “2 Fly
X-Stream” presented by Maui
Jim.
“It’s three rounds total,” said
Gondella.
“Your first round is a casting
accuracy and distance round. If
you make it past that you make
it to the second round of casting
accuracy, and then the top eight
people fromthe first round and
second round will go on to fish
in either the Colorado, or two
other rivers in Colorado, for the
third round.”
Gondella began fly fishing at
the age of six, taught by his
uncle, the late Butch Skapyak.
Aformer pro-amateur snow-
boarder, Gondella eventually
became a professional fly fish-
ing guide after injuries forced
himto leave snowboarding.
Over the years, he has partici-
pated in a number of fly fishing
competitions, but this will be
his first appearance at the Teva
Mountain Games.
“I’ve known about it for a
long time, and it just happened
that I actually got an email
fromthemto see if I’d like to
register to compete…and I
talked to my sponsors (Fly-
tooth Flyline, www.flytooth-
.net; Kast Gear, www.kast-
gear.com; Loon Outdoors,
www.loonoutdoors.com; Rise
Fishing Company, www.risef-
ishing.com; Down River De-
sign Drift Boats, www.downri-
verdesignco.com; Mountain
Khakis, www.mountaink-
hakis.com; Sweet Grass Rods
(Bamboo Rods), www.sweet-
grassrods.com; WilliamJo-
seph, www.williamjoseph.net)
about it, and they said, ‘Yeah,
go for it.’ ”
In preparation for the
games, Gondella has been
doing his homework, studying
videos online to get an idea of
what is in store for him.
He said according to what
he has seen in last year’s vid-
eos, the first round of the event
was fairly basic, but then be-
came slightly more difficult in
the second round when con-
testants were asked to hit five
targets, while standing on a
bridge over Gore Creek in
Vail.
Last year’s fifth target was a
steel cutout of Costa Del Mar’s
logo, a giant “C.” The target
was hanging fromthe opposite
bridge, and those competing
had to cast through it.
“Just that difference in being
elevated and casting down
really changes things. When
you’re in the river…every-
thing’s on flat ground, so it’s a
straightforward casting, but
nowyou’re casting at an angle.
It really changes a lot of the
aspects of what you have to do
to make it work,” explained
Gondella.
In an effort to be ready,
Gondella said he’s been at
home practicing four to five
hours each day.
“I knowthat all the targets
they use are 30-inch circles, so
I’ve basically been going out
in my yard and making18 to
30-inch circles, different in-
crements, and making sure I
can hit them,” said Gondella.
This is one of two competi-
tions in which Gondella will
be participating this summer;
the other is the Hardy Cup
August 6, at the Catskill Fly
Fishing Center and Museum
in Roscoe, N.Y.
For more information on the
Teva Mountain Games, visit
http://www.tevamountain-
games.com/summer.
For more information on
Gondella’s fly fishing guide
service, HookJawOutfitters,
visit http://www.face-
book.com/pages/HookJaw-
Outfitters.
Gondella and his wife Kara
Falcone Gondella, are raising
their 9-year-old son, Luke,
who also loves fly fishing.
SUBMITTED PHOTO
In preparation for the games, Dalton fly fishing guide Greg Gondella
has been doing his homework and studying videos online.
X-STREAM
Continued from Page 1
At a meeting of the Clarks Summit Centen-
nial Celebration committee held May 3 at the
Clarks Summit Borough Building, plans were
discussed for the 2nd Annual “Forever
Young” Memorial Kids’ Fishing Derby which
is in the works for June 11 at the Abington
Area Community Park.
Linda Young established the event in mem-
ory of her late husband, Lawrence E. “Bud”
Young and his love for fishing.
The fishing derby will provide an opportu-
nity for area children, 16 years old and young-
er to enjoy a late spring old fashioned fishing
derby. A special “Bud Award” will be given to
the child who catches a fish closest to 13
inches. This year’s special prize is a 19-inch
television donated by Kennedy Distributing.
There will be no extended pre-registration
this year. Pre-Registration and a parent’s sig-
nature are required to participate in the fish-
ing derby. Registration for the derby will be
held in the evening on June 3 at Family Fun
Night at Abington Heights Middle School or
at the Abington Community Library two
weeks prior to the eventDonations are being
accepted to defray the cost of the event which
is free of charge to children.
For more information regarding fishing der-
by rules and regulations, visit www.abington-
parks.com.
ABINGTON JOURNAL/JOAN MEAD-MATSUI
Shown are organizers of the event, Annette Barosi
Kalwaytis, Clarks Summit Centennial Finance Com-
mittee Chair; Clyde Rosencrance, Family Fun Day
Chair; Linda Young, Fishing Derby Chair and Vice
Chairman, Family Fun Day; and Ellen Beechko,
Co-Chair Family Fun Day Food Vendors and Finance.
Memorial derby June 11
BY JOAN MEAD-MATSUI
Abington Journal Correspondent
to police.
Minchak said that the
child’s mother and the other
person in the Jeep, got out of
the vehicle and tried to get
into the back seat to rescue
the child, but then the car
exploded again.
“The momwas screaming
‘My baby’s in the car.’ Then
when it exploded again she
just started screaming. I
can’t even imagine that
mother’s thought…,” said
Minchak, in tears.
According to police, oc-
cupants in the Jeep were
AndrewCarullo of Scran-
ton, 25, who was driving;
Ashley Jennifer Hazelton of
Scranton, 21, and her child,
Cole T. Hazelton. Carullo
and Ashley Jennifer Hazel-
ton received severe burns,
and they were life-flighted
fromCommunity Medical
Center in Scranton to the
Lehigh Valley Medical Cen-
ter.
According to the police
report, preliminary results
showthat the operator and
passenger of the Jeep were
not licensed to operate a
motor vehicle at the time of
the crash.
In the Ford were driver
David Ranakoski, of Scran-
ton, 17, Patrick Molnar, of
Scranton, 18, two juvenile
males , and one juvenile
female whose names were
not released by police. They
were transported to Com-
munity Medical Center with
minor injuries.
According to Minchak,
Tony DeCicco, a Newton
RansomFire Lieutenant
who lives near where the
crash occurred, attempted to
save the child without suc-
cess.
Minchak added, “It’s just a
sad day for everyone around
here. I hope something gets
done to this road so that it
doesn’t happen again.”
Minchak said people drive
too fast on Dark Region
Road. Much of Dark Region
Road only has enough room
for one car, according to
Minchak, who said she
thinks it should be limited to
one-way traffic and pa-
trolled better.
An investigation by Penn-
sylvania state police is on-
going.
CRASH
Continued from Page 1
ABINGTON JOURNAL/SHAUNA MCNALLY
Site on Dark Region Road
where a Monday crash claimed
the life of a Scranton toddler.
C M Y K
PAGE 8A www.theabingtonjournal.com The Abington Journal♦Clarks Summit, PA WEDNESDAY, MAY11, 2011
SCRANTON – Two candidates for the
office of commissioner were quick to dis-
miss what they felt was an ill-conceived
connection between their record of service
and a pair of former majority commission-
ers at a League of Women Voters of Lack-
awanna County debate May 10.
William T. Jones II, South Abington
Township resident and auditor, mentioned
perceived ties between opposing candi-
dates Patrick O’Malley and Bruce Small-
acombe and the former administration
headed by Robert Cordaro and A.J. Mun-
chak in answers to several questions.
In closing remarks following an hour-
long debate, both aimed to clear the air.
“I was hired because during the flood of
2003, we had a massive flood,” said
Smallacombe, the three-term mayor of
Jermyn and former director of the county’s
Roads and Bridges Department.” “I
dredged the creek from the Lackawanna
River to the top of the borough. I did not
know Mr. Munchak before I was hired,
and I had only met Mr. Cordaro once.”
“I worked for three administrations. I’ve
been through three sets of majority com-
missioners,” said O’Malley, a banquet
manager for Fiorelli’s, Scranton School
Board vice president and former correc-
tions officer.
That clarification aside, each of the
Republicans in the May 17 primary of-
fered their often similar plans on a va-
riety of topics Thursday.
In addressing the financial needs of
the county, Smallacombe said leaders
need to get back to basics and “spend
on necessities and not on things that
we’d just like to have.” Jones suggested
a close monitoring of the countywide
purchasing program and stated he would
take a $10,000 pay cut if elected to
“lead by example.”
O’Malley said the county must seek
to renew a partnership with the federal
government to house federal inmates in
the county, which would also inject $1.5
to $3 million into the county budget.
Each said reassessment is a crucial
part of bringing the county’s budget in
check.
“We can’t put the burden on hard-
working middle class families or small
businesses,” O’Malley warned, adding
that he would seek assistance from U.S.
Reps. Lou Barletta and Tom Marino “to
find alternative funds and grants” to
complete the county’s reassessment ef-
fort.
LACKAWANNA COUNTY COMMISSIONERS DEBATES
GOP candidates clarify past positions
BY CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES
CHUGHES@GOLACKAWANNA.COM
master’s in
human re-
sources ad-
ministration
fromThe
University of
Scranton. He
is an adjunct
faculty mem-
ber there.
Williams is running for
Clarks Green Borough council
for the first time.
He has served the borough
in the past as a member of the
Clarks Green Shade Tree
Commission.
He was also a community
organizer for the Northeast
Pennsylvania Center for Inde-
pendent Living, a non-profit
organization serving people
with disabilities in16 counties.
“I amprepared to work with
council to guarantee that you
have access to quality services,
including sewers, refuse and
recycling, properly maintained
roads. It would be a privilege
to give back to Clarks Green,
which has given me so much,”
wrote Williams.
Lynne Earley
AClarks Green resident
since 1990, and an Abington
Heights High School and Mil-
lersville University graduate,
Lynne Earley holds a master’s
degree fromDrexel University.
She is seeking her second
termon the Clarks Green Bor-
ough council.
During her first termsaid
she opposed the removal of the
refuse contract fromthe bor-
ough’s operating budget,
fought to low-
er taxes to
offset some of
this cost to the
borough’s
residents, and
earlier this
year voted to
carry that
savings into
the 2011budget.
Earley said she also feels
that in regard to the sewer
modernization plan, she has
been very vigilant on behalf of
taxpayers.
Barry C. Phillips
Even though he is looking to
serve his first termas a mem-
ber of Clarks Green Borough
council, Phillips is no stranger
to local politics. In the early
1990s, he served on a joint
Clarks Summit-Clarks Green
committee to establish recy-
cling in the community.
Aretired teacher, who has
taught at the high school and
college level, Phillips said now
that he nowhas more free time
and is hoping to use it by help-
ing the community.
“I aminterested in providing
stable and thoughtful lead-
ership in meeting the needs of
the community. Toward this
end, I have endeavored to
recruit other interested com-
munity members to run froma
bi-partisan perspective.
Thoughtful, stability is more
important to me than party
affiliation,” wrote Phillips.
C L A R K S G R E E N B O R O U G H
CLARKS GREEN
Continued from Page 1
Lynne Earley
Keith Williams
SCRANTON – The seven Democrats vying
for the office of Lackawanna County Com-
missioner met May 4 for a debate presented
by the League of Women Voters (LWV) of
Lackawanna County.
Moderated by LWV president Andrea Mul-
rine, the round-robin question-and-answer
session allowed between one- and two-minute
responses on topics like social services, fiscal
stability, promises to voters and more.
The candidates expressed their concerns
regarding the county’s fiscal health while the
only sitting commissioner in the race made it
clear that the county is out of cash and some
proposed financial plans are nothing but mis-
information.
“Anybody up here who says they’re going to
lower taxes is either lying to you or they’re
absolutely clueless,” said Commissioner Co-
rey O’Brien, of Moosic, said, as he blamed
the “crippled” finances on debt that more than
doubled during the Robert Cordaro-A.J. Mun-
chak administration. “Taxes are not going
down in Lackawanna County anytime soon.”
O’Brien is running in the primary with
Blakely mayor Jeanette Acciare-Mariani of
Peckville.
Former State Rep. Jim Wansacz of Old
Forge and Scranton school director Brian
Jeffers of Scranton, the endorsed candidates
in the race, have built a campaign on job cre-
ation as the primary way to inject new reve-
nue into the county.
Both Jeffers and Scranton resident Eliza-
beth Randol, the former county chief of staff
and policy director for the Pennsylvania Trea-
sury, criticized the current administration for
filling budget gaps with the sale of county
assets.
On reassessment, Pennsylvania State Coop-
erative Extension educator Tom McHugh of
South Abington Township cited the “wildly
fluctuating” assessments that were completed
in Luzerne County as a reason to cautiously
approach the effort.
Foxko Real Estate co-owner Tom Fox of
South Abington Township said, “I worry
about the elderly, and I worry about those on
fixed income. I think we can come up with an
abatement on their taxes until the house is
sold or transferred.”
McHugh said he would work with the
County Commissioners Association of Penn-
sylvania to seek a moratorium on Marcellus
Shale drilling for natural gas in the county.
Wansacz and Jeffers hope funds from a pro-
posed impact fee could be used to train con-
servation officers to protect the county’s wa-
tersheds.
Fox said he outright opposes shale drilling.
Dems paint dire picture of finances
BY CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES
CHUGHES@GOLACKAWANNA.COM
Running for Newton
Township Supervisor are
Kevin Carr (R), James
Norton (D)
Kevin
Carr, a 43
-year New-
ton resident
runs Scran-
ton Label, .
He wrote
“I want to
give back
to my com-
munity that
has been so
good to me
and repre-
sent all the
people of
Newton
Township.
Let me as-
sure you that I am not a
one issue candidate rep-
resenting a few people. I
will give thoughtful con-
sideration to all residents.
My goal as supervisor is
to keep an open mind,
listen and learn from the
people I represent.”
James J. Norton writes
that his vision for New-
ton Township is to “pre-
serve the agricultural
character of this township
for all of us. I would also
like to keep the status
quo of the past Super-
visors of no tax increases
and work diligently on
maintaining township
roads. .”
N E W T O N T W P .
James J.
Norton
Kevin Carr
money saving cooperation
and communication. Hla-
vaty is also concerned
about the impending
monthly sewer bill and
energy efficiency.
Michele Duchnik is
running for Scott Town-
ship Supervisor on the
Democratic ticket. She
said she plans to reduce
the debt and keep taxes
where they are. She cited
that she did not raise
taxes while in office
from 2006-2009. Two
other areas she is con-
cerned with are the sew-
er project and the condi-
tion of the roads. She
said, “The roads that
have been damaged by
the sewer project should
not be the responsibility
of the taxpayers.” She
also has plans for on-lot
management
In Scott Township,
seeking the position of
Auditor is Lester Clark.
Running for the Super-
visor posi-
tion are
Edward R.
Hlavaty(R),
Michele
Duchnik(D),
Stanley
Stracham
(D).
Edward
R. Hlavaty,
a lifelong resident and
full- time employee of
Scott Township is run-
ning for Township Super-
visor. He writes, “As a
township taxpayer and
employee, I see a lot of
waste and red tape daily.
Taxpayers can no longer
afford a $2.7 million
dollar budget run at two
monthly meetings.”
He is aiming for more
S C O T T T W P .
Edward R.
Hlavaty
Twocandidates are inthe
runningfor RansomTownship
Supervisor andtwofor auditor.
SUPERVISOR
William“Bud”Brownhas
announcedhe is runningfor
Supervisor of RansomTown-
ship. Brownhas livedinthe
RansomTownshiparea for the
past 55years andis nowretired,
after 34years inthe Building
Contractingbusiness.
AccordingtoBrown, over the
past 25years he has servedon
the PlanningCommission, was
chairmanof our ZoningHear-
ingBoardandChairmanof the
VacancyBoard. For the past 15
years, he has beenone of two
inspectors at Alliance Landfill
for RansomTownship.
He saidhe wouldlike tosee
the townshipdebt free andto
finda waytopayoff its $1.5
millionloan, without raising
taxes or usingour emergency
fundsothat the area’s children
andgrandchildrenwon’t be
burdenedwiththis large debt.
“I will always keepthe people
inour townshipfirst andfore-
most andnot buckle under to
outside pressures,” saidBrown.
Incumbent Joe Espositois
runningfor Supervisor of Ran-
somTownship. He has beenin
office for about 20years. Cur-
rentlyhe is the Supervisor
Chairman, but he has also
servedas Vice Chairmanand
RoadMaster.
Espositosaidhe is most
proudof a fewdifferent things
he helpedaccomplishwhile in
office.
“I helpedwiththe contract
we nowhave withAlliance
Landfill. Alsowe have done a
goodjobwithpavingandmain-
tainingthe road, andI hada
handinbuildingthe newtown-
shipbuilding,” saidEsposito.
Espositostated“Mygoal if
I’melectedis tokeepthe town-
shipinthe conditionthat its
residents have become accus-
tomedto.”
Espositoalsospoke about a
master planthe supervisors
have todevelopa recreational
area that is about 560acres. The
area where theyare planningto
dothis is right off of Main
Street.
AUDITOR
Runningfor Auditor are Kirk
Zeiss andJosephSnyder.
JosephSnyder has servedas
auditor of RansomTwp. for the
past sixyears andsaidhe would
like tocontinue toserve the
township.
R A N S O M T W P .
Seeking the position of
Lackawanna County coroner
are Democratic candidates
Patrick O’Hora, Christopher J.
Patrick, Tim Rowland and
Republican candidate Frank
Adamo.
Patrick O’Hora (D)
A licensed
funeral direc-
tor, working
for several
different funer-
al homes
throughout
Lackawanna
County over
the past 14
years, with an associate’s de-
gree in business adminis-
tration from Lackawanna
College, O’Hora feels he has
acquired the experience that
will be valuable in the position
of coroner.
“I believe the coroner’s
office needs to be a proactive
office, not just a reactive of-
fice. As coroner, I have a
greater partnering role with
Lackawanna County Suicide
Prevention Task Force and
other organizations,” said
O’Hora.
Christopher J. Patrick(D)
A graduate of Luzerne
County
Community
College, and
American
Academy
McAllister
Institute of
Funeral
Service in
New York
City, Patrick has been a licens-
ed funeral director, working at
several funeral homes, in the
State of Pennsylvania since
1987. If elected, Patrick said
he “will serve the people of
Lackawanna County with
professionalism, dedication
and compassion. “It would be
my privilege to serve as the
Lackawanna County Coroner.”
TimRowland (D)
Tim Rowland has been the
primary on-call death investi-
gator in Lackawanna County
since 2003, investigating more
than 1,000 deaths, and partici-
pating in
more than
500 autop-
sies. He
served as the
Deputy Cor-
oner for the
last eight
years, and is
currently Lackawanna County
Coroner, filling the unexpired
term of Joe Brennan, who
retired at the end of last year.
“I know what this job is all
about. I’ve lived it between my
duties as Deputy Coroner and
now as your Coroner,” said
Rowland. “You never know
when that unfortunate call is
going to come, whether it’s a
holiday or at 3 a.m., but you
must respond immediately. . .”
Frank Adamo (R )
Frank Adamo graduated
from Lackawanna College and
Simmons School of Mortuary
Science, Syracuse, N.Y. He
has served as a licensed funer-
al director
the past 25
years, ma-
naging
several
funeral
homes
throughout
Lackawan-
na, Luzerne
and Wayne Counties.
“I believe my years of expe-
rience, dedication to the pro-
fession and family values
make me the best choice in
these very difficult times. ,”
said Adamo.
C O R O N E R
Patrick O’Hora
Tim Rowland
Christopher J.
Patrick
Frank Adamo
South Abington Township
Supervisor
Mark Dougherty
South Abington Township
Tax Collector
Scott Thrope
Thomas Sunick
La Plume Township
Auditor
Clyde Ellsworth
La Plume Township
Supervisor
Thomas Dickinson
Dalton Borough
Council
William Brandt
Lorraine Daniels
Waverly Township
Auditor
Sharon Whitaker
Waverly Township
Supervisor
Ronald Whitaker
O T H E R R A C E S
A number of new candi-
dates are looking to join the
Lakeland School District
Board as directors this year.
Region 1
John Brennan
Greg Kopa
A business owner of
Technology Analysis Cor-
poration, with two children
attending Lakeland Ele-
mentary School, Greg Kopa
is looking to
enter his first
term on the
school board.
“I am running
for school
board because
I want to help
provide a
successful
educational experience for
your children and mine. ,”
said Kopa.
Stanley Rzucidlo
Henry Stachura
Henry Stachura said that
while he is
new to the
political are-
na, he is well
seasoned in
the operation
of public
schools, hav-
ing taught
locally for
more than 37
years. “These are challeng-
ing times in public educa-
tion and I think I have what
it takes to weather the
storm. ,” said Stachura.
Region 2
John Uram
John Yanochik
Region 3
Richard H.
Koruszko
Richard H.
Koruszko, a
tax profes-
sional and
supervisor at
H&R Block,
is looking to
be re-elected .
“Lakeland
is debt-free
and financially sound, while
providing academic excel-
lence. I want to continue our
progress,”
said Korusz-
ko.
Paul Lem-
oncelli
Casey Pa-
tuk
A resident
of Justus
Casey Patuk
is looking to be voted in to
his first term on the Lake-
land School Board.
“ I believe we need board
members who will be acces-
sible daily who have knowl-
edge of what is happening
in our district,” said Patuk.
Stanley Stracham III
L A K E L A N D
S C H O O L
B O A R D
Richard H.
Koruszko
Henry
Stachura
Greg Kopa
Casey Patuk
C M Y K
WEDNESDAY, MAY11, 2011 THE ABINGTON JOURNAL♦CLARKS SUMMIT, PA PAGE 9A
CROSSWORDS
ANSWERS ON PAGE C4
The Griffin Pond
Animal Shelter, 967
Griffin Pond Rd.,
Clarks Summit, is
open for the adop-
tion of pets from
noon to 4:30 p.m.,
daily. Wish list items
are always appre-
ciated, including
kitty litter and cat
food, Timothy hay,
Carefresh or Aspen
bedding for small
animals and any
type of donation.
Adopt a cage at the
Griffin Pond Animal Shel-
ter for one month and
your $20 donation will go
toward care and feeding
of the animal in that cage
for the month you choose.
A card will be placed on
the cage identifying the
sponsor for that month.
Send the following
Adopt-a-Cage informa-
tion, including name,
address, city, state and
zip, phone number,
sponsor month, choice
of dog, cat or small
animal cage and how you
would like your sponsor
card to appear, along
with $20 for each cage
to The Griffin Pond Animal
Shelter, 967 Griffin Pond
Rd., Clarks Summit, PA 1841
1.
My name is ... Eva
Name: Eva
Age: 4 years old
Breed: German Shepherd mix
About me: I’m friendly, energetic, bond
strongly with owner. I have separation anxiety,
like cats
but chase them.
Cost: $130.
Attorney Daniel Munley, Clarks
Summit, obtained a $1.9 million
jury verdict on behalf of a Wayne
County couple. Mike Dolph suf-
fered severe injuries that ultimately
resulted in a belowknee amputa-
tion. The accident occurred when
16-year-old Austin Smith while
driving his mother’s car was pass-
ing vehicles on a two-lane country
road in a no passing zone at an
excessive speed, hitting the Dolph
vehicle head-on. The Dolph’s son,
Sean, suffered a fracture of his left
leg. He was represented by Mi-
chael Gallacher of the lawfirm
Roth and Dempsey, P.C.
Atoxicology report revealed
that the teenage driver had a high
blood alcohol level. After the ver-
dict, Munley said, “We are grateful
the jury representing Wayne
County chose to fully compensate
Mr. and Mrs. Dolph. This verdict
is a victory for all who drive in
Wayne County. It says drinking
and driving will not be tolerated.”
Munley is a trial attorney and
partner in the lawfirmof Munley,
Munley &Cartwright, P.C.
Jury returns $1.9 million verdict
The Scranton Women’s Organization for Referral Networking (SWORN) is sponsoring “SWORN
Presents an Evening with EOTC.” This is a cocktail party to raise funds to help keep programs in place
at the new EOTC center opening soon on 7th Avenue in Scranton.
Bonnie Perugini, event chairperson, has worked with the organization in the past and shared with
SWORN members the importance of the programs. The event will be held June 2, from 5:30 to 7:30
p.m. at Nichols Village Inn & Spa. Tickets are $25 for SWORN members, EOTC and include appetiz-
ers, an iced tea station and a signature cocktail. A cash bar and basket raffle will also be available.
For details, call Liz Bertocki at 570.220.2728.
From left: SWORN planning committee members Kristi Layland, Barbara Garrett, Georgette Fetcho, Bonnie Perugini,
event chairperson; Liz Bertocki, SWORN president; Jane Mallonee, Ann Kessler, Rochelle Choquette and Elaine She-
pard.
SWORN presents ‘Evening With EOTC’
C M Y K
PAGE 10A www.theabingtonjournal.com The Abington Journal♦Clarks Summit, PA WEDNESDAY, MAY11, 2011
2
8
5
4
4
9
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Saturday, May 14th 11am–5pm
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Village Shopping Center Route 29 South Tunkhannock, PA
COME FOR THE WINGS! COME FOR THEWINE!
STAY FOR A FULL DAY OF FUN!
NEPA
Wine Country
An NEPA Wine Country Event
Info: www.NEPAwinecountry.com or 570.836.5253
Starlite Playhouse Wing Cook-off Several Pennsylvania Wineries
GET YOUR TICKETS IN ADVANCE & SAVE!
First 1,000 guests receive commemorative wine glass.
“Thanks for helping make
our first year a success!”
Voted Best New Business
Located in Downtown Clarks Summit
404 South State St. Clarks Summit, PA 18411
570-586-DELI
(3354)
Specializing in superior quality bread
containing no preservatives.
How well do you know the streets where you live?
The Abington Journal puts your powers of observa-
tion to the test with our new contest, “Pieces of the
Abingtons.” Every other week within the paper,
we’ll feature a photograph of a landmark, architec-
tural structure or other local item in public view in
the Abingtons. We’ll ask you to submit a guess as to
where the photo was taken and what is featured in
the photo. Then
we’ll enter each
correct answer in a
drawing to win a
$10 gift certificate
from Lynn’s Hall-
mark in Clarks
Summit. We’ll
notify you if you
win, and we’ll print
the winning contes-
tant and answer in
an upcoming issue
of The Abington
Journal with the
next contest photo.
Winner #96: Kathy Shumbres of Clarks Summit
Answer #96: Oliver Price and Rhodes Building
“Pieces of the Abingtons” contest
rules:
1. Identify correct location of Photo #97, at left.
2. Submit your entry by contest deadline on Fri-
day, May 20, 2011
3. Entry must include the correct location and/or
description of the “Piece of the Abingtons” featured
in the current week’s photo.
4. Entry should include your name, address, con-
tact number (not for publication) and correct answer
and be sent to: The Abington Journal, 211S. State
Street, Clarks Summit PA18411 or news@theabing-
tonjournal.com
5. Contestants can only win once in a 90-day peri-
od.
Pieces of the Abingtons
Sponsored by:
ABINGTON JOURNAL/NATALIE MENNICUCCI
April is a month usually
associated with the arrival of
spring and all the joys that
come with it. However, it was
quite the opposite for Troop
160; the poor weather caused
our popular shooting trip to
be postponed until further
notice.
Before we could even go on
the trip, each Scout had to
attend two safety meetings
each that described the proper
techniques to fire accurately
and safely. The trip is always
held at Stann’s Grove. We
shot .22 caliber rifle cartridg-
es and 12-gauge shotgun
shells. Hopefully we will be
able to have the trip in May.
This month we also planned
for summer camp at Goose
Pond Boy Scout Reservation.
At one of our weekly meet-
ings, Scouts pay for the trip
and figure out which merit
badges they would be taking.
Every Scout applies for four
merit badges and one lunch at
either noon or 1 p.m.
We are also planning to go
on a 45-mile canoe trip down
the Delaware River in May.
We start at Narrowsburg,
N.Y., and end at Matamoras,
Pa. To go on this trip, each
Scout must have the rank of
first class, be going into the
ninth grade and have passed
the Goose Pond’s swimmer’s
test. Some younger Scouts
may be able to attend with an
adult and the trip leader’s
permission. We will be taking
our gear with us and will stay
overnight along the river.
For the canoe trip to work
properly, every Scout needs to
listen to his leader and follow
instructions. This will keep
everybody safe. Remember:
A Scout is obedient.
Scouting Scene
With
Tyler VanGorder
Summer camping trip planned
Tyler VanGorder has the rank of Life
in Boy Scout Troop 160 from Clarks
Summit. He is a ninth grade student
at Abington Heights High School. For
more information, visit
troop160bsa.org.
This month Scouts planned for
summer camp at Goose Pond Boy
Scout Reservation.
On May 14 from11a.m. to 1
p.m. at 338 N. Washington
Ave., Scranton, Fidelity and
The Green Team invite the
public to help to beautify the
city of Scranton and also to
teach kids in their children’s
savings program about being
“green.”
Fidelity Bank, partnering
with Scranton Tomorrow and
EarthBox, invites the public to
plant flowers, meet mascot
Sammy-Saves-a-Lot and take
part in coloring, face painting
and sidewalk drawing. There
will be snacks and giveaways
for the whole family.
Every child that opens a
new Green Team Savings
account will receive a free
piggy bank.
Fidelity invites public to
plant flowers Saturday
C M Y K
WEDNESDAY, MAY11, 2011 THE ABINGTON JOURNAL♦CLARKS SUMMIT, PA WWW.THEABINGTONJOURNAL.COM PAGE11A
ArtsEtc...
I can only describe last
week’s production of “Peter and
the Wolf ” as magical, delight-
ful and fun. Kudos to the Die-
trich Children’s Theatre. They
definitely brought Sergei Pro-
kofiev’s children’s symphony to
life on the Dietrich stage. It was
great to see so many children
and families in the audience,
and I just loved to see the little
ones in the audience respond to
the show. They readily helped
Peter pronounce all of Russian
names of his animal friends kot
(cat), ytka pronounced oot
kuh(duck), etc. Plus, you could
really see the impact the show’s
music had on the children.
If your children would like to
explore other Russian tales and
stories that relate to “Peter and
the Wolf,” we invite you to visit
the Tunkhannock Public Li-
brary. In addition to funding
this year’s children’s theatre
project at the Dietrich, the
Pennsylvania Humanities
Council has provided monies to
the Tunkhannock Public Li-
brary to purchase books that
relate to each children’s theatre
production. So, I encourage you
to visit the library and check
out some amazing books!
Based on the fun we had with
“Peter and the Wolf,” I amal-
ready looking forward to the
Dietrich Children’s Theatre’s
next production. On Tunk-
hannock’s Founders’ Day, join
us for “Coyote: ATrickster Tale
fromthe Southwest” at the
Dietrich. This play will take us
out west as a coyote learns to
fly. Coyote has a nose for trou-
ble and a zest for greatness. A
group of singing and dancing
crows decide to have some fun
convincing himhe can soar
through the sky with them. But
what happens when Coyote
changes fromgrateful to boast-
ful? We will find out when the
crows decide to teach hima
lesson. Once again, we will be
hosting three performances.
The first showis June 24 at 10
a.m., and the two remaining
shows will be June 25 at 11a.m.
and1:30 p.m. Admission is
free. We hope to see you there.
Tickets are available by calling
the Dietrich at 570.996.1500 or
at the door while they last.
In addition to children’s the-
atre, the Dietrich’s Radio Play-
ers will be transporting us back
to those golden days of radio
for an evening of live radio
plays next week. Come out and
experience “the theatre of the
mind” May17 at 7 p.m. at the
theater. This time around the
group, under the direction of
Valerie Paulus, will be perform-
ing “My Man Godfrey” and a
comical episode of My Friend
Irma. I always get a kick out of
the old-time commercials that
MORE THAN
MOVIES
Dietrich Theater
Erica Rogler
See Dietrich , Page 15
Visual Arts
“Art Show and Sale”
more than 100 original
paintings by Anita Am-
brose, at Summit Frame-
works, 111 North Abington
Rd. Clarks Green, thru
Thanksgiving. Info:
570.587.0162.
Performing
Arts
Lackawanna Trail High
School Concerts, The
Lackawanna Trail High
School Music Department
has announced their con-
cert schedule for May. All
concerts will be held in the
high school auditorium.
May 12: Junior High Con-
cert 7 p.m.; May 13: Jazz
Band Concert 7 p.m. and
May 25: Senior High Band
Concert 7 p.m.
Modern Buddhism:
Meditation for a Modern
Way of Life, Thursdays, to
July 21, 7 to 8:30 p.m. at
Waverly Community
House, 1115 North Abing-
ton Road, Waverly. These
classes offer simple, practi-
cal, and inspiring teachings
and meditation techniques
for solving difficulties in
our daily life. With Budd-
hist teacher Barb Stein.
Cost: $10 general/$5 se-
niors and students. Info:
www.kadampanewyork.or-
gor call 845-856-9000.
“The Wedding Singer,”
presented by the Music Box
Repertory Company at the
Music Box Dinner Play-
house, 196 Hughes St,
Swoyersville, 12 to 15, and
19 to 22, Thursdays through
Saturdays: 8 p.m., Sundays
at 3 p.m. Buffet dinner is
served 90 minutes before
curtain. Tickets are now on
sale for dinner and show
and show-only. Info:
570.283.2195 or
800.698.PLAY.
Mommy and Me Natu-
rally—Outdoors, River-
side Park: Meet at the first
parking area past the gym,
May 11 from 9:15 am to
10:15 am. Pretend, sing, lis-
ten to a story, make a craft,
and play. Program is espe-
cially designed for children
from 2 1/2-to-4-year-old
children and a favorite adult
to explore and learn togeth-
er. Cost: free. Info:
570.836.3835 or email to
reserve your spot.
Cinderella presented by
the Hanover Area Drama
Club, May 13, 7 p.m. Info:
emccormick@hanovera-
rea.net.
“Jubilee,” the Wyoming
Seminary Dance Company
annual performance, May
13 and 14, 8 p.m. in the
Buckingham Performing
Arts Center, North Sprague
Ave., Kingston. Info:
570.270.2190.
Mammoth Follies, May
13, 10 a.m. at The Scranton
Cultural Center at the Ma-
sonic Temple, 420 North
Washington Ave. Cost: $7.
Info: www.scrantoncultu-
ralcenter.org.
“I Ought to be in Pic-
tures,” May 15 at 3 pm:
Electric Theatre Company
presents an all New York
cast ina stagedreadingof “I
Ought to be in Pictures” by
Neil Simon, a play about a
young woman’s reunion
with her father after many
years apart; directed by Ed
Chemaly. Cost: free. Info:
570.558.1515 or www.elec-
trictheatre.org.
Dietrich Theater Radio
Players Performance, The
Dietrich Theater, Tunkhan-
nock, May 17, 7 p.m. Pre-
sented by Dietrich Theater
Radio Players. Cost: Free.
Info: 570.996.1500 for de-
tails.
The Wyoming Semina-
ry Wind Ensemble and
Jazz Ensemble programof
big band music May 17 at 7
p.m. in the Buckingham
Performing Arts Center,
North Sprague Ave., King-
ston. Info: 570.270.2190.
Cost: Free.
Arts, Crafts
and More
Mixed Media for Kids,
The Dietrich Theater,
Tunkhannock. Preschool
Art: Thursdays from11:00 -
11:45 a.m. Series: 2: May 5,
12, 19, 26. Mommy & Me:
Fridays from 11:00 - 11:45
a.m. May 6, 13, 20, 27. Ag-
es 6to12: Fridays from4:00
- 5:30 p.m. Series 2: May 6,
13, 20, 27. Instructors:
Steve and Amy Colley.
Cost: $35 per series. Ex-
plore the arts through a va-
riety of media as you create
pottery, sculpture, draw-
ings, paintings and collage
masterpieces. Info:
570.996.1500 to register.
Quilting for Kids, The
Dietrich Theater, Tunkhan-
nock. Wednesdays through
July 20 from 3:30 p.m. -
5:00 p.m. For ages 6 and up.
Instructors: Terry Keller,
Peggy Lane & Ingrid Ro-
gler. Cost: $6 per class. No
experience is required. All
materials will be provided.
Info: 570.996.1500 to regis-
ter.
Intergenerational
Quilting, for ages13andup
at The Dietrich Theater,
Tunkhannock. Wednesdays
through July 20 from 6:00
p.m. - 7:30p.m. Instructors:
Terry Keller, Peggy Lane
and Ingrid Rogler. Cost: $6
per class. Learn early
American quilting tech-
niques as you make a dou-
ble pinwheel quilt. See how
you can create movement
through the useof light and
dark materials. We’ll show
you how fabric choices can
yield quilted treasures. All
materials will be provided.
Info: 570.996.1500 to regis-
ter.
Last week’s winner:
Richards Family
of South Abington
Last week’s answer:
Dwayne Johnson
H
ighway 81 Revisited is a
music website with a
name that pays homage
to the Bob Dylan album,
“Highway 61 Revisited.” Much like
the interstate highway 81,
www.highway81revisited.com re-
ceives a fair amount of local traffic,
according to the man behind the
blog, Mike Lello. “The people com-
ing to the site are more likely to read
about a local band, such as Tigers
Jaw, than a review of the new Foo
Fighters album that could be read
anywhere,” said founder Lello. “Lo-
cal artists do not really have a media
outlet like national artists do.”
The Scranton resident added,
“These are things I wanted to do
and do my way. I’m delivering what
people want, and website hits back
that up. The local stuff has proven
popular so far.”
The site, which Lello said he had
wanted to do for awhile, has been a
trial and error process. Highway 81
Revisited started as a Wordpress
blog. Lello’s friend Bill Orner, who
runs Prairie Queen Records, a local
record company, redesigned the blog
it as its own webpage.
“The site is not anything that is
not being done elsewhere, and it
may not be as big or interesting, but
it’s unique within the area,” said
Lello. “I modeled it after sites out-
side of northeastern Pennsylvania
such as Philebrity a similar Philadel-
phia-based page.”
Others have offered help in mak-
ing Lello’s goal a reality. Lello cred-
ited Brian Langan, formerly of local
band The Sw!ms, as the designer of
the site’s owl logo.
“I wanted an owl and he made an
awesome one. It’s helped us brand
ourselves to spread word about site,”
Lello said.
Social media sites, such as Face-
book and Twitter, have also been
helpful, according to Lello.
“Things are going better than I
thought they would. I get mostly
direct traffic (people coming straight
to the site). I have many repeat vis-
itors. Facebook is the number two
source of traffic through “likes” and
Twitter has helped as well.”
PHOTO SUBMITTED
Mike Quinn, pictured above, will be performing at the Highway 81 Revisited launch party May 14, at The Bog, 341 Adams
Ave., Scranton
Music journey begins
BY RAFAEL PIMENTEL
Abington Journal Correspondent
PHOTO/JASON RIEDMILLER
Highway 81 Revisited founder Mike Lello cited one of his reasons for investing in
the website: ‘Local artists do not really have a media outlet like national artists
do.’
See revisited , Page 14
Contestants can only win once in a 60-day period.
What sport does Paul Giamatti’s character coach in "Win Win"?
C M Y K
PAGE 12A www.theabingtonjournal.com The Abington Journal♦Clarks Summit, PA WEDNESDAY, MAY11, 2011
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UNIVERSITY OF SCRANTON
BOYS’ BASKETBALL DAY CAMPS
$185 Includes Camp T-shirt,
Basketball & Lunch Daily
Visit www.scranton.edu, click on athletics, then icon for Summer Camps for more information
or to register on line or contact Carl Danzig at 941-7252
Session I: Monday, June 20 - Friday, June 24
Session II: Monday, Aug. 15-Fri., Aug. 19
8:30 am - 3:00 pm
Ages 8-15 • Long Center
(570)836-1022 www.dietrichtheater.com
Movies for week of 5/13/11- 5/19/11
Fri: 1:10, 4:00, 6:45, 9:30
Sat: 1:10, 4:00, 6:45, 9:30
Sun: 1:10, 4:00, 6:45
Mon, Tues. &Thurs, 6:45
Wed: 12:05&6:45
PG-13
PG-13
Fri: 1:15, 4:10, 6:50, 9:25
Sat: 1:15, 4:10, 6:50, 9:25
Sun: 1:15, 4:10&6:50
Mon, Tues. &Thurs, 6:50
Wed: 12:00&6:50
G
PG-13
R
PG
Fri &Sat: 1:20&5:55
Sun, Mon. &Thurs: 5:55
Wed: 12:15&5:55
Fri &Sat: 3:45&8:20
Sun, Mon, Wed. &Thurs: 8:20
Fri, Sat, &Sun: 1:00&6:00
Mon, Tues, Wed, Thurs: 6:00
Fri, Sat, &Sun: 3:15&8:10
Mon, Tues. &Thurs: 8:10
Wed: 12:10&8:10
Guitar music fromthe rain forests of Brazil!
An all Brazilian guitar programentitled
"Gritos d' Alma"(Cries of the Soul). Featuring
music of Brazil's most celebrated composers,
Heitor Villa-Lobos and João Pernambuco.
Come and enjoy this vibrant glimpse into the
Brazilian soul through classical guitar.
CALL 996-1500 for ticket information
COSTA DRUGS
Summit Square, Clarks Summit
Permanent Hours:
Monday - Friday 8 a.m. - 7 p.m.
Saturday 8 a.m. - 4 p.m. • Sunday 8 a.m. - 1 p.m.
We guarantee accuracy • Computerized
Prescription Filling • Patient Profile
We honor all major prescription
plans including CVS, Caremark,
Medco, Aetna, Geisinger and
Express Scripts
587-4717
Winner, Cup of Cofee
“Thanks, to all our customers.”
- Kevin Snow, Store Manager
& Team
Stop in this summer for some
of our new drinks.
Brady Associates
500 SR 29S. Tunkhannock, PA
www.erabradyrealtors.com
Email - erabrady@epix.net
570-836-3848
“UNLOCKING THE DOORS
TO HOME OWNERSHIP”
Sunday, May 15
th
• 1-3PM
Learn the process of buying a house in
today’s challenging market
Q &Awith the Professionals
CALLOR EMAILTO REGISTER TODAY
FREE EDUCATIONAL
SEMNIAR
form and being creative”.
Additionally, Marcinko has
performed for both President
Bush and President Clinton, as
well as been able to tour, travel
and record around the world.
“I’ve had the opportunity to
perform and record with a
multitude of incredible artists,
it’s been very exciting,” he
added.
“I like other things too, but
this I what I do,” he said. He
added that one of his favorite
he has been interested in music
his whole life. “I started play-
ing around with instruments
when I was about 3 years old,
and then I took lessons in piano
and drums, and played in the
school bands,” he said. He then
began playing the drums for
events like weddings, when he
was in high school.
“It’s my hobby, my passion,
it’s what I’m about and it’s
important to my system of
events,” said Marcinko. “It’s all
I have ever done. Music has
been a mainstay of my whole
life. You try and grow and
grow and master it and get
better at it. You always seek
new knowledge,” he added.
Marcinko said his favorite
parts of performing are “the
new opportunities, the ability to
play in front of new audiences,
taking chances with the music,
doing something unexpected
and taking liberties with the art
CLARKS SUMMIT- The
Abington Community Library
will host Marko Marcinko and
the Latin Jazz Quartet May 14,
from1 to 3 p.m.
The performance, which is
free and open to the public, is a
part of the library’s free “Sec-
ond Saturdays at the Library”
series.
“It will be a nice and intimate
jazz performance. After we
play, we will open the floor up
for any questions, so it will be
educational as well. I would
encourage people to attend to
find out why we do what we do
and how we put it together,”
said Marcinko. Additionally,
trumpeter Nate Birkey will be
joining the quartet for this per-
formance.
Marcinko has been perform-
ing professionally since he was
14 years old. However, he said
parts of traveling is sampling
all the different foods around
the world.
Marcinko is also the founder
of PA Jazz Alliance(PAJA), a
non-profit that provides music
education. “I formed PAJA a
few years ago, because I want-
ed to bring better jazz educa-
tion to northeastern Pennsylva-
nia. I wanted to give the public
opportunities to witness and
experience great and authentic
music. We have been at that for
years in this area,” he said.
PAJA runs a jazz camp for
students at Keystone College
every July, as well as the Scran-
ton Jazz Festival.
The library is located at 1200
West Grove Street, Clarks
Summit, PA18411. For more
information, they can be reac-
hed at 570.587.3440. Free
coffee will be served at the
event, compliments of Krispy
Kreme Clarks Summit.
Drummer brings his passion to ACL
The Abington Community Library will host Marko Marcinko, shown
above, and the Latin Jazz Quartet May 14, from 1 to 3 p.m.
BY KELLY LEIGHTON
Abington Journal Correspondent
What: “Second
Saturdays” featuring
Marko Marcinko and
the Latin Jazz Quartet
Where: The Abington
Community Library
When: Saturday, May
14, 1 to 3 p.m.
Cost: Free
Info: 570.587.3440
her support for her son, and
with an understanding of what
“don’t ask, don’t tell is and
the whole history, knowing
what happening back in 1993
when it was instituted as a law
and also as policy…I was so
impacted by her talking about
her son and what she was
saying, I wanted to explore
what happened to people who
were discharged under “don’t
ask, don’t tell,” in terms of
looking at a group of people
who are discriminated against
and what all that meant. More
so, I started thinking not in
terms of don’t ask don’t tell
but what is the history of ho-
mophobia in the military.
What is interesting to me is
the effects that all of this had
on people’s lives – what their
experiences were and what
happened to them because of
that. That’s how this devel-
oped into this project,” said
Cianni.
“Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” is a
policy restricting United
States military personnel from
efforts to discriminate or ha-
rass closeted homosexual or
bisexual service members or
applicants, while barring
those who are openly gay,
lesbian or bisexual from mil-
itary service.”
Cianni has been photo-
graphing and interviewing gay
and lesbian service members
including both veterans and
active duty personnel ranging
from recent enlistees to a
91-year-old World War II
veteran. To date, he has in-
terviewed 70 individuals pri-
marily on the East and West
Coasts and hopes to conduct a
total of 150 to 200 interviews.
Photographing them in their
own personal space “was
Old Forge native and pho-
tographer Vincent Cianni’s
“Gays in the Military Project:
How America Thanked Me,”
project began as a result of a
November 2009 interview he
listened to on a public radio
station while working in his
studio in Newburgh, N.Y.
Cianni said, “In 2009 while
I was working in my studio in
Newburgh, N.Y. and listening
to the public radio station, I
heard an interview with a
mother of a young private that
was stationed in Iraq and oust-
ed by one of his platoon mates
and subsequently discharged
under “don’t ask, don’t tell.”
The interview he was listen-
ing to was that of the mother
of Pvt. Nathanael Bodon.
“It was a powerful interview
and the way the mother spoke
of her son and spoke about
important to me because the
issue of homosexuality in the
military was an issue of per-
sonal privacy, over and above
civil and human rights is-
sues…”
According to Cianni, more
than 14,000 people have been
discharged from1993 to 2011
when the “don’t ask, don’t
tell” bill was repealed and that
does not take into account the
thousands who chose not to
go into the military because of
that.
“These discharges range
from dishonorable discharge
to honorable discharge for
homosexual conduct to just
strictly an honorable discharge
after reaching some kind of
agreement. It was tied to the
idea of identity and disclosure
for those who were still active
duty,” said Cianni.
Once the project is complet-
ed, his interviews and pho-
tographs will be archived at
the “Rare Book, Manuscript
and Special Collections Li-
brary at Duke University” and
will be exhibited as a multi-
media exhibition in 2012 and
eventually a publication.
He noted the project is not
only a photographic project,
but first and foremost a his-
torical record and a place to
experience people’s stories.
For more information, visit
vincentcianni.com.
Visual journey
SUBMITTED PHOTO
Old Forge native and photographer Vincent Cianni is currently working
on ‘Gays in the Military Project: How America Thanked Me.’
Vincent Cianni
Photographer Vincent Cianni
currently working on ‘Gays in
the Military Project: How
America Thanked Me’
BY JOAN MEAD-MATSUI
Abington Journal Correspondent
C M Y K
WEDNESDAY, MAY11, 2011 THE ABINGTON JOURNAL♦CLARKS SUMMIT, PA WWW.THEABINGTONJOURNAL.COM PAGE13A
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United M ethod is t
R eligious S ervice C alendar
Ca ll Ta ra At970- 7374 To Ad vertis e
W AVER LY UNITED
M ETHO DIS T CHUR CH
105 Chu rch S treet
S u n d ayW orship 10:30 a.m .
Nu rseryAvailab le
Bib le S tu d yS an ctu aryHan d icap ed
Accessib le
Rev. Barb ara S n yd er
(570) 586- 8166
All Are W elcom e!
b sn yd er@su su m c.org
O UR LADY O F THE S NO W S
S t. Ben ed ict
S ATUR DAY VIGIL M AS S ES
4 p .m . S t. Ben ed ict
5 p .m . Ou rL ad yofthe S n ows
6:30 p .m . Ou rL ad yofthe S n ows
S UNDAY
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S ATUR DAYS
3:00 p .m . S t. Ben ed ict
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(570) 586- 1741
Ca tholic
Luthera n
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On Election Day - May 17
Democrats
Vote
Patty Lawler
for
Council
Clarks Summit Borough
Republicans
Patty Lawler
Write In
It would be an honor to represent all of you.
Paid for by the candidate.
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Abington Audiology & Balance Center
604 South State St., Clarks Summit, PA
(570)587-EARS(3277)
“It is so sunny
out today!”
“Who found a
needle in the
hay?!”
Winners of the Abington Community Library’s spring
2011 creative writing contest for boys and girls were an-
nounced recently. Taryn Comegys was in first place for
non-fiction, and Cara LaBelle for poetry, both in the first
and second grade level. For the third and fourth grade
level, Sarah Razzaq was the winner for fiction Three win-
ners represented in fifth and sixth grade were Elisabeth
Johnson (fiction), Ryan Burke (non-fiction) and Siena
Rainey (poetry). Each winner received a certificate of
participation and a gift card to be redeemed at Borders
All other participants were awarded certificates from the
library to honor them for entering the contest.
Baseball Biography
The Penguin Lives series of biographies continues to
feature concise looks at famous men and women in di-
verse fields, written by authors of renown.
One of the latest in the series is “Branch Rickey” by
best-selling author and Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter,
Jimmy Breslin, who provides a lively portrait of Rickey
and his times in a brief 147 pages of text. In 1947, Rickey,
as president and general manager of the Brooklyn Dodg-
ers, defied racism on and off the field to bring Jackie
Robinson into the major leagues, changing the sport for-
ever. Breslin brings to life the days when baseball
emerged as the national pastime and Branch Rickey re-
made a sport and dreamed of remaking a country.
New Fiction for Adults
“The Neighbors are Watching” by Debra Ginsberg. Set
against the backdrop of the deadly 2007 wildfires that
forced the evacuation of half a million San Diego resi-
dents, this new novel examines the dark side of suburbia
and the truths that lurk behind closed doors. The neigh-
bors on Fuller Court tend to keep to themselves but when
a troubled teenager disappears in the aftermath of the
wildfire evacuation, the residents must band together to
find her before all of their carefully constructed decep-
tions come unraveled.
“Past Tense” by Catherine Aird. It seems that Josephine
Short was a woman with a secret or two. When Janet Wa-
kefield gets a call from the Berebury Nursing home to tell
her that her husband Bill’s great aunt has passed away,
she’s stunned to learn that Josephine had been living near-
by for years without a word. Then, a young man ap-
proaches her at the funeral and introduces himself as Jo-
sephine’s grandson, a perplexing revelation since there
had been no word in the family of a son, much less a
grandson. Then, the local Detective Inspector and his
constable are assigned to look into a mysterious break-in
at Berebury Nursing Home. The target: Josephine Short’s
former room.
“Pack of Lies” by Laura Ann Gilman. Bonita Torres, a
recent college graduate, signs on as an investigator with
the Private Unaffiliated Paranormal Investigations team of
New York, and is working to gain acceptance into the
Cosa Nostradamus, the magical community that isn’t
quick to give up its secrets even to fellow members.
LIBRARY NEWS
The Abington Community Library is located at 1200 W. Grove St., Clarks
Summit. Visit our website, www.lclshome.org/abington to register online
for events or call the library at (570) 587-3440.
Don’t have a library card? Register for one at http://www.lclshome.org/
libraryinfo/library_card_reg.asp.
BY MARY ANN MCGRATH
Clarks Summit struck
gold with the bringing
about of Second Fridays.
Second Fridays was origi-
nally started at Angels
Galeria located on Depot
St. in Clarks Summit.
The gallery featured a
different artist’s work the
second Friday of each
month and extended the
store hours for that day
to host a reception for
that artist.
Charles Charlesworth,
whose wife owns Angels
Galeria, said, "We make
a fortune that day. It’s
our biggest moneymaker,
and it keeps people com-
ing back."
Charlesworth decided to
set up the Arts Council
of the Abingtons to ex-
pand Second Fridays to
other businesses. Charles
Sandercock of Summit
Frameworks offered to be
co-chair of the council
with Charlesworth. On
the second Friday of ev-
ery month, about ten
businesses in Clarks
Summit feature artwork
from local artists and
visitors to town can trav-
el around to view all of
the galleries and purchase
some artwork if they
choose.
The first Clarks Sum-
mit Second Fridays took
place April 8. Sandercock
said it was a big success.
Charlesworth and Sand-
ercock approach busi-
nesses and ask if they
would like to be part of
the event. The locations
either choose the artist or
the council provides them
with one. The next Sec-
ond Fridays will be held
May 13. All take place
from 5 to 8 p.m.
This month’s event will
include State Street Grill,
114 S. State St., showing
various artists; Angels
Galeria, 208 Depot St.,
showing Rosangela de-
Freitas and Al Pierce;
210 Depot St., showing
Selena Cherkoski (Art
Photography) and Shane
McGeehan/Laurie Otto
(Digital Photography);
Sunrise Cafe, 212 Depot
St., showing Sharon Cos-
tello (Oils) and Joe Kub-
ic (Pottery Artist); S.
State Street Borough Hall
Bldg, 304 S. State St.,
showing Centennial Com-
mission Vintage Pho-
tographs, Mary Richards
(Oils) and Anita Ambrose
(Acrylics); 400 S. State
Street, showing collages
by Alexandra and a Mar-
tial Arts Demonstration;
Bet’a Bread, 402 S. State
St., showing Joe Kluck
(Pastels); Everything Nat-
ural, 426 S. State St.,
showing Art Photography
by Chris Esslinge; Sole
to Soul, 535 S. State St.,
showing various artists,
blown glass, jewelry, dig-
ital photography; Mono-
gram Muse, 105 Clar-
emont Ave., showing Tara
Crum (Oils).
Anita Ambrose, whose
artwork will be displayed
at the Clarks Summit
Borough building has
been painting for 25
years and supporting her-
self with her art for 18
years. She and her hus-
band, Jim Ambrose own
a company called “Art by
Anita.” He is the manag-
er and she is the artist.
“I love it. It’s the way
we make a living, but it
doesn’t feel like work at
all. I get paid for doing
what I love. What more
can I ask for?” said An-
ita. Ambrose.
All of Anita Ambrose’s
paintings are original
acrylics.
“What you’re seeing is
what you get,” she said.
The couple lives in
New Milford. Anita got
involved with Second
Fridays through Sand-
ercock because she has a
block of artwork featured
at his store, Summit
Frameworks. After the
showing on May 13, all
of her work is going to
go to Summit Frame-
works. She will have
about 75 pieces.
She said, “I have a lot
of customers already, but
hopefully this helps me
get even more.”
Sandercock said that
after this month’s Second
Friday, some locations
will keep their artist’s
work up for a month, but
some will take it down
that day. Charlesworth
and Sandercock are al-
ways seeking businesses
and people to participate
in Second Fridays .
For more information
on the event, sponsoring
the event, showing art-
work or having a location
included call Angels Ga-
leria at 570.586.3363 or
Summit Frameworks at
570.587.0162.
Art event set for May 13
BY SHAUNA MCNALLY
Abington Journal Reporter
SUBMITTED PHOTO
The artwork of Anita Ambrose, shown above, will be on display at the Clarks Summit Borough building on
State Street during Second Fridays.
C M Y K
PAGE 14A www.theabingtonjournal.com The Abington Journal♦Clarks Summit, PA WEDNESDAY, MAY11, 2011
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SCRANTON- The Actors
Circle will close its season
starting May 13, with a staging
of “Heaven Can Wait” at the
Providence Playhouse.
Written by Harry Segall, the
1938 comedy tells the story of
Joe Pendleton, a 23-year-old
New Jersey boxer who is col-
lected by heaven 60 years be-
fore his time.
As a result of the mistake,
Joe is allowed to come back to
earth in the body of a recently
murdered, crooked banker. His
host body’s wife and secretary
are still bent on finishing him
off. He falls in love with a
young woman and hopes to
resume his boxing career.
“I love the message of the
play. When I went through the
play for the first time, I
thought it was a really great
story,” said Ashley Michaels,
who plays Julia Farnsworth,
the cheating wife of Joe’s new
body.
Michaels is one member of
“Heaven Can Wait’s” cast of
almost 20 actors.
She said that the cast size is
a little larger than usual for a
community production, but the
extra bodies have added some-
thing to the rehearsal process.
“It’s been fun, because there
are so many different energies
and ideas for blocking and
gags. There’s always some-
thing developing,” said Mi-
chaels.
As director, Cathy Rist
Strauch is in charge helping
guide all of these developing
ideas.
After taking part in Commu-
nity Theater for years, she said
she wasn’t intimidated by the
play’s large cast size, and chose
it because of the quality of the
work and her confidence in the
area’s acting talent.
“I knew it was possible,
because I knew the people
were out there. I had someone
in mind for most of the roles,”
said Strauch.
“And, everyone’s wonderful
in all their parts.”
Strauch said that not every-
one she had in mind came out
to audition, but that she did
manage to put together a stellar
cast, led by Saverio Amendola
playing the lead role of Joe
Pendleton.
“He just finished his first
show with Actors Circle, doing
‘Dial M for Murder.’ When I
first saw him when I took pho-
tos for that show, I knew he
was just what I wanted for my
Joe,” said Strauch.
Amendola played the part of
Max in “Dial M for Murder,”
one of the main roles in the
play, but not as large as the part
of Joe in “Heaven Can Wait,”
who is in almost every scene
of the play.
With a part that large, much
of the play’s success rests on
Amendola’s shoulders. A large
responsibility that he feels his
past experience has left him
ready to handle.
“I played Christ in a Passion
Play at Saint Mary’s Center
(Scranton). I don’t think there’s
ever a bigger part than that,”
said Amendola.
“That experience gave me
the confidence to do this.”
Strauch said Amendola has
been doing a great job in re-
hearsals, something he credits
to the talented cast around him.
“They say the key to good
acting is in the other person.
When the other person is play-
ing their part really well, it
allows you to do your part
really well,” explained Amen-
dola.
“Everyone’s doing a really
great job, and I think audi-
ences are really going to love
it.”
In addition to Amendola and
Michaels, the cast includes JP
McGowan, William Zeranski,
Dante, Andrew Gruden, Daivd
Hunisch, Laura McGowan,
Lisa Marie Chokola, Dorina
Amendola, Cherie Amendola,
Christine Clark, Jacqui Carini,
Art Walsh, Lou Bisignani,
John McInerney, Bill Mecca,
Jeff Ginsberg andErin Abbott.
The show will begin with a
preview performance on
Thursday, May 12 at 8 p.m.,
followed by regular perform-
ances Friday through Saturday,
May 13 to 15 and 20 to 22.
Fridays and Saturdays per-
formances begin at 8 p.m.,
Sundays at 2 p.m., at Providen-
ce Playhouse, 1256 Providence
Rd., Scranton.
Tickets are $12 general, $10
seniors, and $8 students. Pre-
view night tickets are $8 gen-
eral and seniors, and $6 stu-
dents. For more information
call 570.342.9707 or visit
www.actorscircle.org
A.C. closes season with
‘Heaven Can Wait’
BY DON MCGLYNN
dmcglynn@theabingtonjournal.com
SUBMITTED PHOTO
The cast of ‘Heaven Can Wait,’ shown above, seated, from left, Andrew
Gruden, Ashley Michaels, Laura McGowan, standing, Bill Mecca, Dante,
Cherie Amendola, Dorina Amendola, Lisa Marie Chokola, William Zeran-
ski, JP McGowan and Saverio Amendola, rehearsing for their May 13
opening night.
Once Highway 81 Revisited
was ready to be presented to
the public, Lello decided he
wanted to throw a party to
publicize the blog. Orner,
whom Lello calls his de facto
webmaster, helped plan the
party. He lined up Prairie
Queen Record artists Mike
Quinn of And The Money-
notes and Okay Paddy fame
and Pappy from Cabinet to
perform at the launch event,
which will also feature These
United States, a band that has
played larger national music
festivals including Lollapaloo-
za.
The launch party is sched-
uled for 8 p.m., May 14, at The
Bog, 341 Adams Ave., Scran-
ton
There is a $5 cover charge.
Chances to win tickets to the
Drive-By Truckers concert at
the F.M. Kirby Center as well
as upcoming shows presented
by Get Cryptic and Prairie
Queen Records CDs will be
available.
“I am really happy about the
artists on the bill,” said Lello.
“They are perfect artists for
event like this. They are differ-
ent artists—something for
everyone and the kind of thing
I would go to. The national act
paired with two local acts is
representative of what we do at
Highway 81 Revisited.”
The party is the first music
event that Highway 81 Revisit-
ed is creating. However, the
site has been involved with
local shows before.
“We were involved as spon-
sors for a few ongoing shows,
such as Record Store Day at
Joe Nardone’s Gallery of
Sound in Wilkes-Barre featur-
ing Miz and Title Fight, and
we’ve worked with Eric Davis
of Get Cryptic, a booking
company.”
Lello said he plans to add
more content, an e-mail news-
letter, recurring features, a
label and venue spotlight and
more multimedia to the site in
upcoming months.
Highway 81 Revisited can
be reached at www.high-
way81revisited.com, on Face-
book at http://www.face-
book.com/pages/Highway-81-
Revisited/167966533254979
or by searching for Highway
81 Revisited, or on Twitter at
http://twitter.com/#!/High-
way81Rvstd.
REVISITED
Continued from Page 11
C M Y K
WEDNESDAY, MAY11, 2011 THE ABINGTON JOURNAL♦CLARKS SUMMIT, PA WWW.THEABINGTONJOURNAL.COM PAGE15A
Elect
TOMBROGAN
Abington Heights
School Director At Large
• Independent Thinker
Who Shares Our Values
• Maintain Excellence
In Education
• Retired Educator and
Tennis Coach
• He Cares About Our Children
• Fiscal Responsibility
Paid for by Committee to elect TomBrogan
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they incorporate into each
show. Plus, I love the fantastic
live sound effects that Bob
Kulowadds to each perform-
ance. Admission is free, and we
will have light refreshments
following the show. For more
details, call us at 570.996.1500.
Coming up this weekend, the
Dietrich will be filled with
classical guitar music. Join us
for the all-Brazilian program
“Gritos d’ Alma” (Cries of the
Soul) performed by classical
guitarist Jay Steveskey. He will
be featuring the works of Bra-
zil’s most celebrated composer,
Heitor Villa-Lobos and his
contemporary and close friend,
Joao Pernambuco. Join us for
an afternoon of vibrant, rhyth-
mic music that gives us a
glimpse into the Brazilian soul.
Tickets are $10 each and can be
purchased at the door or re-
served in advance by calling
570.996.1500.
Oh, and just a reminder, visit
our website www.dietrichthea-
ter.comfor a complete listing of
summer camps, classes and
events. There is something for
everyone.
As you can see, the Dietrich
is so much more than the mo-
vies!
DIETRICH
Continued from Page 11
The miracle of its web has
placed the spider at the center
of creativity myths from Egypt
and Africa, to Japan, pre-colo-
nial North and South America,
India and Greece. It is a Greek
myth about the gifted weaver
Arachne, transformed into a
spider by the goddess Athena,
which has inspired the new
play by Scranton artist Alicia
Grega.
“Avenging Arachne: a Nem-
esister Fable” is not set in that
ancient world, however, but in
the modern fictional metropo-
lis of New Lydia. In it, ambi-
tious designer, Arachne Ogle-
tree is hired to work for the
Valburg Agency by her Oprah-
level idol Athena Valburg,
only to find creative innova-
tion the least of her job’s chal-
lenges. Will her relationship
with the too-good-to-be-true
Nico Ambrosia survive her
success? Can she trust Athe-
na’s charming, but elusive,
assistant Bradley Noone? Is
she a workaholic? Is she an
alcoholic? Who does she real-
ly want to be?
A chorus of three women –
Charity, Hope, and Grace --
comments on the play as it
evolves while also portraying
the members of Arachne’s
Stitch ‘n Bitch group (stitchn-
bitch.org), restaurant waiters,
corporate clients and more. In
applying Arachne’s story to
the climate of contemporary
America, Grega challenges
our notions of creativity, gen-
der, and power, juxtaposing
corporate culture with the
“handmade rebellion.”
The Jason Miller Play-
wrights’ Project will present a
free staged reading of the play
at The Olde Brick Theatre in
Scranton May 18 at 7 p.m.
under the direction of Sarah
Stachura Regan. Admission is
free of charge, although dona-
tions will be solicited to help
offset the cost of refreshments
and actor stipends. Audience
members will also be asked to
complete a short feedback
form.
The ensemble cast features
performances by local profes-
sionals Katie Bower, Roya
Fahmy, Timothy McDermott,
Laura McGowan, Stephen
Pauley, and Tonyehn Verkitus.
Musicians Mark Montella and
Jason Smeltzer will provide
live musical accompaniment.
The Olde Brick Theatre is
located through the rear en-
trance at 126 W. Market St., on
the second floor of the Pocius-
Building just off Providence
Square in North Scranton.
Visit www.SubverseAphro-
desia.com/Arachne.aspx for
more information or call
570.344.3656.
Writers’ work at Olde Brick Theatre
“Avenging Arachne: a Nemesister Fable” cast shown, from left, Ste-
phen Pauley, Tim McDermott, Katie Bower, Roya Fahmy, Tonyehn Verki-
tus and Laura McGowan.
The Civil War Road
Show, a traveling exhibit
examining Pennsylvania’s
role during this historic
period, will be parked out-
side the Everhart Museum
in Scranton’s Nay Aug
Park three days, May 13 to
15.
Visitors will have the
opportunity to experience
this new exhibit which
will be traveling the state
for the next four years,
stopping in each of the 67
counties of our Common-
wealth.
In the event of severe
weather, the CWRS may
open late and/or close
early. All programs associ-
ated with the Civil War
Road Show are free and
open to the public. Unless
otherwise indicated, reser-
vations are not required.
For more information on
the Civil War Road Show,
visit www.pacivil-
war150.com.
Civil War Road Show at Everhart
PHOTO SUBMITTED
The Civil War Road Show will be at the Everhart Museum May 13 to 15.
Experience the music
and culture of the rain
forests of Brazil May 15
at 3 p.m at the Dietrich
Theater in downtown
Tunkhannock.
Classical guitarist Jay
Steveskey will present an
all-Brazilian guitar pro-
gram entitled “Gritos d’
Alma” (Cries of the
Soul).
The concert will feature
the music of Brazil’s most
celebrated composer, Hei-
tor Villa-Lobos (1883 –
1959) and his contempo-
rary and close friend,
Joao Pernambuco (1883 –
1947).
Steveskey is active as a
soloist, chamber musician
and teacher. He has been
featured on WVIA-FM
and Scranton Today TV, is
founder and president of
the Classical Guitar So-
ciety of Northeastern
Pennsylvania and runs the
Fiddle Lake Classical
Guitar School in Susque-
hanna County. Tickets to
the show are $10 each
and can be purchased at
the door or by calling the
Dietrich at 570.996.1500.
Dietrich welcomes guitar
music from Rain Forests
Jay Steveskey, shown above, will
perform at the Dietrich Theater
May 15.
C M Y K
PAGE 16A www.theabingtonjournal.com The Abington Journal♦Clarks Summit, PA WEDNESDAY, MAY11, 2011
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WEDNESDAY MAY 11, 2011 Abington Journal PAGE 1 B
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200 Auctions
300 Personal Services
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600 Financial
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800 Pets & Animals
900 Real Estate
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REGISTERED PLUMBING & HEATING SPECIALISTS
Serving Abingtons over 25 years Gas & Oil • 24 Hour Service
313 Leach Hill Road., Clarks Summit • 587-1401
GLASS SERVICES
We do it all!
Auto • Commercial • Residental
WYOMING AVENUE & NEW STREET
346-0777
WELL DRILLING
VAN FLEET DRILLING CO., INC.
Rotary Drilling • Goulds Pumps
Sales • Service • Installation
FREE ESTIMATES
563-1776 Dalton
•WELLS
•PUMP REPAIR
•FILTERS
•PUMPS
•WATER SOFTENERS
•SULFUR REMOVAL
COMPLETE WATER SYSTEMS
ROUTES 6-11 • DALTON, PA 18414
563-1123
“TELL YOUR WATER PROBLEMS TO CRESSWELL”
REPAIRS
Route 107, Lake Sheridn
(10 Miles from Clarks Summit)
9:00-5:00 Mon-Fri • 8:00-3:30 Sat
945-5379
Sales & Service
MTD Products, Briggs & Stratton,
Husqvarna, Tecumseh, Poulan, Kohler,
White, Mantis, Oregon, Echo, Muray
Small Engine Service
CLARK’ S SHARP-ALL
retaylor.com 570-586-7270
CLARKS SUMMIT, PA
Custom Furniture, Woodworking,
Carpentry, Design/Build,
Specializing in small unique projects
GUTTER REPAIR & CLEANING
Pat Regan Gutter Cleaning
All Winter Long
“Te Right Way” Cleaned, Flushed and Minor Repairs
CALL BEFORE YOU REPLACE THEM
Call Pat Regan • 383-1991 • No Answer, Leave Message
CABINETS touched-up,
painted, restored, W/G.
Fiberglass and Steel Doors
Wood-Grained.
Bob Bachman: 570-815-8411, Throop
~ Over 30 Years Experience ~
www.Wood-Grain.com
CABINETS
& DOORS
HOUSE CLEANING
HOUSE CLEAN NG
2 Cleaners $15 per hour each
Minimum 4 Hours
Excellent
References
Immediate
Opening
On Tuesdays THERESA
570-254-6880
LORETTA
570-281-9096
PET SERVICES
ABINGTON PROFESSIONAL PETSITTING
www.clarkssummitpetsitters.com
Call Margaret For A Free Meet & Greet WithYour Pet
570-587-5467
In Home Pet Care Reasonable Rates
Over 10Years Experience
MASONRY
Masonry by
Jon Thomas
Brick • Stone • Block
Specializing in Repair Work.
Small Jobs Welcome.
Service & a Smile
Since 1972
Free Estimates & Consultations
Office: 570-586-3702
Cell: 570-606-8182
PA: 079869
LANDSCAPING
Tired of Paying Too Much For Lawn Care???
I WILL BEAT ANY PRICE!!!
FREE ESTIMATES!!! CALL TODAY!!!
570-760-8264 - ASK FOR ALAN
• Lawn Care • Spring & Fall Cleanup & Removal
• Landscaping • Shrub Trimming & Pruning
PROFESSIONAL SERVICES OFFERED:
• Mowing • Shrub Trimming
• Planting • Leaf Raking
570-909-8641
Reasonable Rates
Reliable, Experienced Service
Call For Free Estimate
AIR CONDITIONING
& HEATING
A/C & Heat
Pumps
AJS Mechanical
Services, LLC
Dalton, PA
570-468-0190
Ductless
WILL CLEANHOUSES
in Clarks Summit, Mid Valley
& Carbondale Areas
570-282-7076
100
ANNOUNCEMENTS
110 Lost
LOST DOG: White
Bicha-Poo wearing
purple collar with
tags. Comes to
“Molly”. Last seen
around Francis
Slocum State Park
4/30. If found,
Please call
570-639-0909 or
570-814-9123
135 Legals/
Public Notices
ESTATE NOTICE
RE: ESTATE OF
MARGARET MALE
Letters of Adminis-
tration having been
granted, all persons
having claims or
demands against
the estate of the
decedent shall
make them known
and present them,
and all persons
indebted to the
decedent shall
make payment
thereof without
delay to Mark Male,
23 Spartina Cove
Way, S. Kingstown,
RI 02879, or to
Mattes & Mattes,
P.C., 324 N. Wash-
ington Ave., Scran-
ton, PA 18503
135 Legals/
Public Notices
LEGAL NOTICES
The Abington
Journal is a
newspaper of
general circula-
tion and meets
the require-
ments by
Newspaper
Advertising Act
45 Pa.C.S.A.
Section 301.
DEADLINE:
Mondays at 4 pm
for current week
Deadline varies
during holiday
weeks
RATE:
$1.00 line/$12.
per inch
For information or
questions
regarding legal
notices
you may call
Marti Peznowski
570-970-7371
or email to:
mpeznowski@
timesleader.com
or fax to
570-831-7312
or mail to
The Times Leader
15 N. Main Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18711
Wanna make a
speedy sale? Place
your ad today 570-
829-7130.
135 Legals/
Public Notices
ESTATE NOTICE
Estate of Conrad Z.
Mayeski, Late of
Jefferson Township,
Lackawanna Coun-
ty, PA (died March
19, 2011).
Notice is hereby
given that Letter of
Administration in the
above estate have
been issued to
Michael Mayeski,
Administrator. Cred-
itors shall present
their claims and
debtors shall make
payment to Michael
Mayeski, Adminis-
trator, or Mattise &
Kelly, P.C., Attor-
neys, 108 N. Wash-
ington Ave., Suite
400, Scranton, PA
18407
P. Timothy Kelly,
Esq.
Attorney for Estate
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
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LEGAL NOTICE
ALL AMERICAN
SELF-STORAGE, 101
Clam House Rd,
Scranton, Pa. will
offer for sale the
property of Wilma
Brown, Unit #611.
Personal and
household items.
Date: 5/14/11
Time: 11:00 AM
Location: Above -
570-969-9522
135 Legals/
Public Notices
ESTATE NOTICE
Notice is hereby
given that Letters of
Administration c.t.a.
have been granted
in the Estate of
JANE NICOLAIS,
late of 103 Somers
Street, Dunmore,
PA 18512, Lack-
awanna County,
Pennsylvania (died
February 25, 2011).
All persons indebt-
ed to the Estate are
requested to make
payment, and those
having claims or
demands are to
present same, with-
out delay, to the
Administrator,
Donato Nicolais, or
to Stanley W.
Kennedy, Attorney
for the Estate, 521
Delaware Avenue,
Olyphant, Pa 18447.
ESTATE NOTICE
Letters have been
granted on the
Estate of Joseph P.
Lukus, late of
Clarks Summit,
Lackawanna Coun-
ty, PA, (died
2/4/2011), to Mari-
anne Lukus, Admin-
istratrix, Elizabeth
Schneider, Esq.,
Attorney for the
Estate, 102 Stur-
bridge Road, Clarks
Summit, PA 18411.
All persons having
claims against the
estate are request-
ed to present them
in writing and all
persons indebted to
the estate to make
payment to it in
care of the Attorney
noted above.
150 Special Notices
ADOPT
We can give your
infant love and
security, you can
help make us a
family. Expenses
paid. Please call
Denise & Howard
1-877-676-1660.
ADOPT: Adoring
Mom, Dad, Big
Brother would like
to share a lifetime
of hugs & kisses
in our loving home
with a newborn.
Please Call
Lynda & Dennis
888-688-1422
Expenses Paid
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
P PA AYING $500 YING $500
MINIMUM
DRIVEN IN
Full size 4 wheel
drive trucks
ALSO PAYING TOP $$$
for heavy equip-
ment, backhoes,
dump trucks,
bull dozers
HAPPY TRAILS
TRUCK SALES
570-760-2035
542-2277
6am to 8pm
150 Special Notices
PP&L
CUSTOMERS...
Save money each
month on your resi-
dential or business
electricity and help
the environment by
switching to GREEN
energy. Nothing to
buy, same reliable
energy, no con-
tracts,cancel any-
time, no cancella-
tion fees, receive
one bill.
For details call toll
free 855-256-4454
lynnbythelake@
hotmail.com
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
310 Attorney
Services
Free Bankruptcy
Consultation
Payment plans.
Carol Baltimore
570-822-1959
FREE CONSULTATION
for all legal matters
Attorney Ron Wilson
570-822-2345
360 Instruction &
Training
ATTEND COLLEGE
ONLINE from home.
*Medical *Business
*Paralegal* Comput-
ers *Criminal Jus-
tice. Job placement
assistance. Com-
puter available.
Financial Aid if quali-
fied. Call
888-220-3984
www .
CenturaOnline.com
CAN YOU DIG IT?
Heavy equipment
school. 3 week
training program.
Backhoes, Bulldoz-
ers, Trackhoes.
Local job placement
assistance. Start
digging dirt now!
866-362-6497
380 Travel
W WOULD OULD Y YOU OU LIKE LIKE
TO TO GO GO TO TO NY? NY?
Call us to make
your reservation!
570-824-2228
570-793-1769
YANKEES SPECIAL
Yanks vs Boston
Sunday, 5/15 @ 8pm
Section 212
$126.00 ticket/bus
1-800-432-8069
380 Travel
YANKEES TRIP
TO CINCINNATI
June 20, 21 and 22
(Monday, Tuesday,
Wednesday)
Catch the Yankees
take on the Reds at
The Great American
Ballpark in Cincin-
nati, Ohio
Trip Includes:
*Round trip bus
transportation
*Beer, soda & food
on the bus
*Great box level
seats to two games
(Mon & Tues night)
*Hotel accommoda-
tions at the Millenni-
um Hotel. Just three
blocks from stadium
and walking dis-
tance from Cincin-
nati Zoo and other
downtown attrac-
tions
Price: $350
Call 570-287-9701
for more info.
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
406 ATVs/Dune
Buggies
QUARTER MIDGET
RACE CAR
76 inch Bull Rider,
Honda 120 motor,
Kirkey seat,
new brake system,
A-Main feature wins
Asphalt/Dirt,
Many Extras,
Value $6,000,
Sell for $2,999
Call (570) 954-2749
Selling your
Camper?
Place an ad and
find a new owner.
570-829-7130
409 Autos under
$5000
CADILLAC `94
DEVILLE SEDAN
94,000 miles,
automatic, front
wheel drive, 4
door, air condi-
tioning, air bags,
all power, cruise
control, leather
interior, $3,300.
570-394-9004
412 Autos for Sale
ACURA `08 RDX
Good Condition.
53,000 miles.
AWD, Full Power,
AM/FM, CD
Changer, Blue
Tooth, XM Radio,
Leather Interior
& Sunroof
$20,000
(570) 814-8398
Call after 9:30 a.m.
09 Impala LS $11,995
08Taurus SEL $12,995
09JEEP PATRIOT $12,995
08 DODGE RAM $12,995
04 BLAZER 4X4 $7,995
04FREESTAR 60K $6,995
Full Notary Service
Tags & Title Transfers
BEN’S AUTO SALES
RT 309 W-BTwp.
Near Wegman’s
570-822-7359
Boat? Car? Truck?
Motorcycle? Air-
plane? Whatever it
is, sell it with a
Classified ad.
570-829-7130
BMW `07 328xi
Black with black
interior. Heated
seats. Back up &
navigation sys-
tems. New tires &
brakes. Sunroof.
Garage kept. Many
extras! 46,000
Miles.
Asking $19,500.
570-825-8888 or
626-297-0155
Call Anytime!
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
PAGE 2 B Abington Journal WEDNESDAY MAY 11, 2011
468 Auto Parts
457 Wanted to Buy
Auto
468 Auto Parts
457 Wanted to Buy
Auto
$$$ HIGHEST PRICE PAID $$$
FOR JUNK
VEHICLES
PICKED UP
570-876-1010
570-346-7673
BUYING JUNK VEHICLES
$300 and Up
$125 extra if driven,
pulled or pushed in.
NOBODY Pays More
570-760-2035
Monday thru Saturday 6 am-9 pm
Sunday 8 am - 68 pm
250 General Auction 250 General Auction
412 Autos for Sale
BMW `93 325 IC
Convertible,
Metallic Green
Exterior & Tan
Interior, 5 Speed
Transmission,
Heated Seats. 2nd
Owner, 66k Miles.
Excellent Condition,
Garage Kept,
Excellent Gas
Mileage. Carfax
available. Price
reduced $7,995
or trade for SUV or
other. Beautiful /
Fun Car.
570-388-6669
CADILLAC ‘06 STS
AWD, 6 cylinder, Sil-
ver, 52,600 miles,
sunroof, heated
seats, Bose sound
system, 6 CD
changer, satellite
radio, Onstar, park-
ing assist, remote
keyless entry, elec-
tronic keyless igni-
tion, & more!
$17,600
570-881-2775
CHEVROLET ‘06
CORVETTE
CONVERTIBLE
Silver beauty, 1
Owner, Museum
quality. 4,900
miles, 6 speed. All
possible options
including Naviga-
tion, Power top.
New, paid $62,000
Must sell $45,900
570-299-9370
CHRYSLER ‘06
300C HEMI
Light green, 18,000
miles, loaded,
leather, wood trim,
$24,000.
570-222-4960
leave message
CHRYSLER `02
PT CRUISER
Inferno Red, flame
design. Chrome
wheels. 47,000
miles, one owner.
Looks and runs
great. New inspec-
tion. $5,800
Call (570) 472-1854
CHRYSLER `07 300
55,600 miles, auto-
matic, 4 door, anti-
lock brakes, air con-
ditioning, air bags,
all power, AM/FM
radio, CD player,
new new brakes.
$10,900.
570-760-6983
FORD `04 MUSTANG
Mach I, 40th
ANNIVERSARY EDITION
V8, Auto, 1,200
miles, all options,
show room condi-
tion. Call for info.
Asking $24,995
Serious inquiries
only. 570-636-3151
FORD `07 MUSTANG
63,000 highway
miles, silver, runs
great, $11,500.
negotiable.
570-479-2482
FORD `07
MUSTANG GT
Premium package,
silver, black leather
interior, 5 speed
manual. 20,000
miles. $18,900
(570) 868-3832
HYUNDAI `04
TIBURON GT
Blue, 5 speed
manual, CD, Air,
factory alarm,
power windows &
locks. 38K.
$7,500 negotiable.
Call 570-540-6236
412 Autos for Sale
FORD ‘02 MUSTANG
GT CONVERTIBLE
Red with black
top. 6,500 miles.
One Owner.
Excellent Condi-
tion. $18,500
570-760-5833
LEXUS `95 ES 300
Beautiful, mint
condition. Grey with
leather interior. 2
owners.New brakes
rotors & shocks.
Ice cold AC. Fully
loaded. 112K.
Asking $4,900
(347) 452-3650
Mountain Top
MAZDA `04 RX-8
Hunter Green,
80,000 miles.
New brakes &
rotors. New
alignment. Two
new rear tires.
No accidents.
PRICE REDUCED
$8,000 or best
offer. For more
information, call
(570) 332-4213
MERCEDES `95 SL 500
Convertible. Low
mileage. Hard top
included. Leather
interior. Excellent
condition, fully
loaded. $11,000.
Call 619-884-2266
or 570-696-1271
Rare, Exclusive
Opportunity To
Own...
‘26 FORD
MODEL T
Panel Delivery
100 point
Concours quality
restoration. Red
with black fend-
ers. Never Driven.
0 miles on
restoration.
RARE!
$40,000
$38,000
$36,500
2002 BMW 745i
The Flagship of
the Fleet
New - $87,000
Midnight Emerald
with beige leather
interior. 61K miles.
Mint condition.
Loaded. Garage
Kept. Navigation
Stunning,
Must Sell!
$20,000
$18,600
1993 CADILLAC
ALANTE
2 Door
Convertible
Exquisite Candy
Apple Red black
soft top. 13,000
original miles. All
available options,
including gold
alloy wheels.
Garage Kept. 1
owner. Final
Model Year.
Gorgeous
Automobile!
$31,000
$29,900
$27,900
From an Exotic,
Private Collection
Call 570-650-0278
412 Autos for Sale
MERCEDES-BENZ `01
C-240
Loaded, automatic,
AC, heated leather
seats, 4 door.
$4,700
Call 570-388-6535
MERCEDES-BENZ `05
240C
4Matic, V6 - Gray,
77K highway miles,
Excellent condition,
dealer serviced. Sun
roof, heated seats.
$15,500. Call
570-288-3916
MERCEDES-BENZ `95
SL 500
Convertible, with
removable hard
top, dark Blue,
camel interior,
Summer Driving
Only, Garage Kept.
Very Good
Condition, No
Accidents. Classy
Car. Price
Reduced!
$13,995
or trade for
SUV or other.
570-388-6669
MINI COOPER `08
Clubman. Black &
White. Sunroof. 30K
miles. Leather inte-
rior, fully loaded. 6
speed. Excellent
condition. 40 MPG.
$20,500. Call
570-262-8811
PONTIAC ‘69 FIREBIRD 400
CONVERTIBLE
Blue/white top &
white interior.
Recent document-
ed frame-off
restoration. Over
$31,000 invested.
will sell $21,500.
570-335-3127
PORSCHE `02 BOXSTER S
Great convertible,
black top, 6 speed
manual transmis-
sion, carbon fiber
dash, leather interi-
or, front & rear
trunk, fast & agile.
$18,000 or best
offer. Call
570-262-2478
SUBARU `02
IMPREZA WRX
Low mileage,
57,000 miles, 5
speed, all-wheel
drive, 4 door, anti-
lock brakes, air
conditioning, air
bags, power locks,
power windows,
power mirrors,
cruise control,
AM/FM radio, CD
changer, rear
defroster, new Blitz
Stainless Exhaust,
AEM Cold Air
Intake, TURBOXS
Blowoff Valve &
Boost Control.
$10,500.
(201) 704-8640
Call before
7:30 pm
TOYOTA `06
AVALON
New tires, new
brakes, Inspected
March 4, AC,
AVPS, Fully
loaded, 18,000
mile bumper to
bumper warranty.
90,000 miles.
$12,900.
(570) 881-3712
TOYOTA `93 MR2
T-top, 5 speed.
AM/FM/CD, AC,
power antenna.
New tires. No rust.
Great condition.
$5,000
(570) 708-0269
after 6:00PM
415 Autos-Antique
& Classic
CADILLAC `80 COUPE
DEVILLE
Excellent condition,
$3,000 located in
Hazleton.
570-454-1945 or
561-573-4114
CHEVROLET `68 C10
New 350 motor and
new transmission.
REDUCED TO
$5,000 FIRM
(570) 906-1771
415 Autos-Antique
& Classic
CHEVROLET `72
CHEVELLE
Two door hard top.
307 Motor. Needs
work. Comes with
additional 400 small
block & many parts.
$5,000. Serious
inquires only.
(570) 836-2574
CHEVROLET `76
PICKUP
Very Good
Condition!
Low miles!
$7500. FIRM
570-905-7389
Ask for Lee
CORVETTES
WANTED
1953-1972
Any Condition!
Courteous, Fast
Professional Buyer.
Licensed & Bonded
corvettebuyer.com
1-800-850-3656
FORD `52
COUNTRY SEDAN
CUSTOM LINE
STATION WAGON
V8, automatic,
8 passenger,
3rd seat, good
condition, 2nd
owner. $9,500.
570-579-3517
FORD `66
Mustang Coupe.
Pearl white, pony
interior. Pristine
condition. 26K
miles. $17,000 or
best offer.
(570) 817-6768
LINCOLN `88
TOWN CAR
61,000 original
miles, garage kept,
triple black, leather
interior, carriage
roof, factory wire
wheels, loaded,
excellent condition.
$5,500. Call
Mike 570-237-7660
MAZDA `88 RX-7
CONVERTIBLE
1 owner, garage
kept, 65k original
miles, black with
grey leather interior,
all original & never
seen snow. $8,900.
Call 570-237-5119
MERCEDES BENZ
`74 450 SE
SOLID CAR!
Interior perfect,
exterior very good.
Runs great! New
tires, 68K original
miles.
$5,500 FIRM.
570-905-7389
Ask for Lee
MERCEDES-BENZ `73
450SL
Convertible with
removable hard top,
power windows, AM
/FM radio with cas-
sette player, CD
player, automatic, 4
new tires. Cham-
pagne exterior; Ital-
ian red leather inte-
rior inside. Garage
kept, excellent con-
dition. $31,000. Call
825-6272
OLDSMOBILE `68
DELMONT
DRASTICALLY
REDUCED!!
This model only
produced in 1967
& 1968. All
original 45,000
miles, Color
Burgundy, cloth
& vinyl interior,
350 rocket
engine, 2nd
owner. Fender
skirts, always
garaged. Trophy
winner at shows.
Serious inquiries
only, $7,500.
570-690-0727
WANTED: PONTIAC
`78 FIREBIRD
Formula 400
Berkshire Green,
Originally purchased
at Bradley-Lawless
in Scranton. Car
was last seen in
Abington-Scranton
area. Finder’s fee
paid if car is found
and purchased. Call
John with any info
(570) 760-3440
421 Boats &
Marinas
CUSTOM
CREST 15’
Fiberglass
boat with
trailer. Out-
board propul-
sion. Includes:
2 motors
Erinmade,
“Lark II series”
PRICE
REDUCED!
$2,400
NEGOTI ABLE
570-417-3940
427 Commercial
Trucks &
Equipment
CHEVY ‘08 3500
HD DUMP TRUCK
2WD, automatic.
Only 12,000 miles.
Vehicle in like
new condition.
$19,000.
570-288-4322
EQUIPMENT TRAILER
Brand new 2010
tandem axle, 4
wheel electric
brakes, 20’ long
total, 7 x 16 oak
deck, fold up ramps
with knees, remov-
able fenders for
oversized loads,
powder coat paint
for rust protection,
2 5/16 hitch
coupler, tongue
jack, side pockets,
brake away switch,
battery, 7 pole
RV plugs, title &
more!! Priced for
quick sale. $2,995
386-334-7448
FORD ‘99 E350
BUCKET VAN
Triton V8. 2 speed
boom; 92,000miles;
$9999 or best price.
Great condition. Call
570-675-3384 or
570574-7002
439 Motorcycles
HARLEY DAVIDSON
` 06 SOFTTAIL
NIGHTTRAIN
Dark gray metallic,
new rr tire &
brakes, many
extras. $10,900
(570) 592-4982
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘10
SPORTSTER 1200
A MUST SEE!
Custom Paint.
Only driven under
10 miles!! Asking
$8,900 or best
offer. For info,
call 570-864-2543
or 215-379-1375
Q-LINK LEGACY `09
250 automatic. Gun
metal gray. MP3
player. $3,000.
Great first motorcy-
cle. 570-696-1156
SUZUKI `07 C50T
CRUISER
EXCELLENT
CONDITION
Windshield, Bags,
Floorboards,V&H
Pipes, White
walls,Garage Kept.
6K Miles $5,200
(570) 430-0357
SUZUKI ‘04
GSXR 1000CC
Less than 1,000
miles. Team colors
with matching hel-
met & jacket. Fend-
er eliminator kit.
Scorpion exhaust.
$6,000.
Call Dave after 5
pm 570-825-0394
439 Motorcycles
SUZUKI ‘04
GSXR 1000CC
Less than 1,000
miles. Team colors
with matching hel-
met & jacket. Fend-
er eliminator kit.
Scorpion exhaust.
$6,000.
Call Dave after 5
pm 570-825-0394
YAMAHA `04 V-STAR
1100 Custom. 5800
miles, light bar,
cobra exhaust,
windshield, many
extras, must sell.
$4,900. Call
570-301-3433
YAMAHA `97 VIRAGO
750cc. 8,000 miles,
saddlebags, wind-
shield, back rest,
Black & Pearl,
Excellent Condition.
Must See. Asking
$2,499. Call after 4.
570-823-9376
YAMAHA ‘07 650 V-STAR
Matted black finish.
Mint condition. New
tires, inspected,
fully serviced &
ready to ride. Wind-
shield & sissy bar.
Low miles & garage
kept. $4800. or best
offer. 570-762-5158
YAMAHA` 08 R1
BEAUTIFUL BIKE
Perfect condition.
3700 miles, new
rear tire, undertail
kit, cover. Price
negotiable $7,600
570-852-9072
442 RVs & Campers
FLAGSTAFF `08
CLASSIC
Super Lite Fifth
Wheel. LCD/DVD
flat screen TV, fire-
place, heated mat-
tress, ceiling fan,
Hide-a-Bed sofa,
outside speakers &
grill, 2 sliders,
aluminum wheels,
water purifier,
awning, microwave
oven, tinted safety
glass windows,
raised panel fridge
& many acces-
sories & options.
Excellent condition,
$22,500.
570-868-6986
SUNLINE `06 SOLARIS
Travel Trailer. 29’,
mint condition, 1
slide out a/c-heat.
Stove, microwave,
fridge, shower
inside & out. Many
more extras.
Reduced. $13,500.
Call 570-842-6735
SUNLITE CAMPER
22 ft. 3 rear bunks,
center bathroom,
kitchen, sofa bed.
Air, Fully self con-
tained. Sleeps 6.
New tires, fridge
awning. $4500.
215-322-9845
TRAVEL TRAILER 33 ft
Rear queen master
bedroom, Walk
thru bathroom.
Center kitchen +
dinette bed. Front
extra large living
room + sofa bed.
Big View windows.
Air, awning, sleeps
6, very clean, will
deliver. Located in
Benton, Pa. $4,900.
215-694-7497
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
BUICK `05
RENDEZVOUS CX
AWD, Fully
loaded, 1 owner,
18,000 miles. 6
cylinder. New
inspection, tires
& brakes. Like
new, inside & out.
$16,900. Call
(570) 540-0975
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
CHEVR0LET`02
EXPRESS
CONVERSION
VAN
Loaded. Low
miles. Excellent
condition.
$18,900
570-674-3901
CHEVROLET `05
TRAILBLAZER LT
Black/Grey. 18,000
miles. Well
equipped. Includes
On-Star, tow pack-
age, roof rack,
running boards,
remote starter,
extended warranty.
$16,000
(570) 825-7251
CHEVROLET `06
SILVERADO 1500
4X4 pickup, extend-
ed cab, 6 1/2 ft.
box, automatic.
Pewter. 48,000
miles. Excellent
condition. $15,000
Negotiable
(570) 954-7461
CHEVROLET `09
EQUINOX LS
Low mileage, 15000
miles, automatic,
all-wheel drive, 4
door, anti-lock
brakes, air condi-
tioning, air bags,
power locks, power
windows, power
mirrors, cruise con-
trol, AM/FM radio,
cassette player, CD
player, keyless
entry, rear de-
froster, rear wind-
shield wiper, tinted
windows. $17,500.
(570) 954-9333
Call after 9:00 a.m.
CHEVY `05 EQUINOX
LT (premium pack-
age), 3.4L, 47,000
miles. All wheel
drive, power moon-
roof, windows, locks
& seats. Leather
interior, 6 cd chang-
er, rear folding
seats, keyless entry,
onstar, roof rack,
running boards,
garage kept.
$14,750.
570-362-1910
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
CHEVY `94 GLADIATOR
Custom Van. 67K
miles. Interior has
oak wood trim, car-
peting, storage
areas, TV, rear seat
convertible to dou-
ble bed, curtains.
Seats 7. Power win-
dows & seats. Cus-
tom lighting on ceil-
ing. New exhaust
system. New rear
tires. Recently
inspected. Excellent
condition. $4,200 or
best offer. Call
570-655-0530
DODGE `10
GRAND CARAVAN
Only 17k miles.
Fully loaded.
Excellent condi-
tion. Factory &
extended war-
ranty. $17,995
(570) 690-2806
DODGE `94 DAKOTA
with cap. 1 owner,
garage kept, very
good condition.
Many extras includ-
ing lift & back seat.
29 MPG gas.
$4,000
or best offer
(570) 868-0944
DODGE `97 RAM
1500 LARAMIE MARK 3
82,000 miles, auto-
matic, chrome step
up and mirrors &
leather interior.
Good Condition.
Drums Area.
$4,500
401-524-9763
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
FORD `04 EXPLORER
SUV, V6, 4x4, auto-
matic, 85,000 miles
Black Beauty.
Garage kept.
Must sell.
$8,700
(570) 883-2754
FORD `99 E250
Wheelchair Van
78,250 miles. Fully
serviced, new bat-
tery, tires & rods.
Seats 6 or 3 wheel-
chairs. Braun Millen-
nium lift with
remote. Walk up
door. Front & rear
A/C. Power locks &
windows. Excellent
condition. $9,500.
570-237-6375
GMC `99
SUBURBAN
Champagne
exterior,
leather interior,
power windows
& locks, 4 wheel
drive. $4,850.
Call for
condition and
known issues.
570-362-4080
HONDA `10
ODYSSEY
Special Edition.
Maroon, Fully
loaded. Leather
seats. TV/DVD,
navigation, sun roof
plus many other
extras. 3rd seat .
Only 1,900 Miles.
Brand New.
Asking $37,000
(570) 328-0850
INTERNATIONAL ‘95
DUMP TRUCK
Refurbished, rebuilt
engine, transmis-
sion replaced.
Rear-end removed
and relubed. Brand
new 10’ dump. PA
state inspected.
$12,900/best offer.
570-594-1496
JEEP `00
WRANGLER
TJ, Black with grey
interior. 4 cylinder,
5-speed manual
transmission. CD
player, hardtop, full
doors, sound bar.
4” Skyjacker
Suspension lift with
steering stabilizer.
Like new BF
Goodrich 35’s with
Full size spare. Only
85,000 miles.
$6,999
(570) 301-7221
JEEP `02 GRAND
CHEROKEE LAREDO
Triple black, eco-
nomical 6 cylinder.
4x4 select drive.
CD, remote door
opener, power win-
dows & locks,
cruise, tilt wheel.
108k highway miles.
Garage kept. Super
clean inside and out.
No rust. Sale price
$6,895. Scranton.
570-466-2771
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
JEEP `07
WRANGLER X
4x4, stick shift, soft
top. Red exterior,
well maintained,
garage kept. 11,500
miles, one owner.
AC, CD player,
cruise control.
Tow package with
cargo carrier.
Excellent condition.
$18,700
Call 570-822-9680
KIA `02 SEDONA
EX, Van, Sunroof.
61,000 miles.
Loaded. Good
condition.
$5000 or best offer.
570-606-7654
MITSUBISHI `95
MONTERO SR 4WD
177,102 miles, auto-
matic, four wheel
drive, 4 door, anti-
lock brakes, air con-
ditioning, air bags,
power locks, power
windows, power
mirrors, power
seats, cruise con-
trol, AM/FM radio,
cassette player, CD
changer, leather
interior, sun roof,
rear defroster, rear
windshield wiper,
new Passed inspec-
tion, new battery.
$2,500
(570) 868-1100
Call after 2:00 p.m.
SUZUKI `07 XL-7
56,000 miles,
automatic,
all-wheel drive,
4 door, air condi-
tioning, all power,
CD player, leather
interior, tinted
windows, custom
wheels, $13,000
Call 570-829-8753
Before 5:00 p.m.
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
TOYOTA `06
TACOMA ACCESS CAB
78000 miles,
5 speed, four
wheel drive, new
Matching Fiber-
glass cap, $16,000
(570)472-9091
Call after 4:30 p.m.
TRACTOR
TRAILERS
FREIGHTLINER
’97 MIDROOF
475 CAT & 10
speed transmission.
$12,000
FREIGHTLINER
’99 CONDO
430 Detroit, Super
10 transmission.
Asking $15,000.
‘ 88 FRUEHAUF 45’
with sides. All
aluminum, spread
axle. $6,500.
2 storage trailers.
570-814-4790
TRUCKS FOR SALE
Ford, GMC,
International-Prices
starting at $2,295.
Box Truck, Cab &
Chassis available.
Call U-haul
570-822-5536
518 Customer
Support/Client Care
LUBRICATION
DISTRIBUTOR
HAS OPENING FOR
CUSTOMER SERVICE
PERSONNEL
Craft Oil Corpora-
tion is looking for a
p r o f e s s i o n a l
with excellent cus-
tomer service skills.
This is a telephone
intensive position
and requires
strong oral commu-
nication and com-
puter skills.
Applicants must be
dependable, highly
motivated and good
at multi-tasking.
Minimum 3 years
experience in cus-
tomer service.
We offer a competi-
tive starting rate
and full benefit
package including
comprehensive
health benefits and
401k.
Send resume to:
Craft Oil
Corporation
Attn: Human
Resource Dept.
P.O. Box 5066
Avoca, PA 18641
Or Email:
jmcginty@
craftoilcorp.com
No Phone Calls
Please. EOE
522 Education/
Training
MUSIC INSTRUCTORS
WANTED:
Busy local music
studio seeking to
enhance staff.
Instructors wanted
who specialize in
guitar, violin/strings,
voice, piano and
bass. Music degree
preferred/5 years
(minimum) teaching
experience
required. Apply to:
cicc@ptd.net or
CICC, PO Box 103
Tunkhannock, PA
18657
527 Food Services/
Hospitality
DELI CLERKS
Gerrity’s Supermar-
kets is now hiring
Part Time Deli
Clerks. Looking for
dependable and
customer oriented
individuals. Sales
Commission Bonus.
Apply at:
2020 Wyoming Ave.
Wyoming; or
801 Wyoming Ave.
West Pittston, or at:
www.gerritys.com
542 Logistics/
Transportation
DIESEL/TRUCK
MECHANIC - A. Duie
Pyle is growing!
Seeking experi-
enced mechanics
for Wilkes-Barre,
York & West
Chester, PA & Allen-
town, PA. Excellent
benefits w/ low cost
to employee.
www.aduiepyle.com
Charity 610-350-
0419
DRIVER - Reefer
Team Lessee. Aver-
age $1.03/mile
(+fuel surcharge).
Paid CDL training
available & benefits.
Call Prime Today!
800-277-0212
www.primeinc.com
DRIVER - Save up to
$.32/gal using our
Fuel Discount Net-
work! Looking for
small fleet owners
or owner operators.
Earn $2/mi!
866-970-2778
Looking for Work?
Tell Employers with
a Classified Ad.
570-829-7130
Find Something?
Lose Something?
Get it back where it
belongs
with a Lost/Found ad!
570-829-7130
WEDNESDAY MAY 11, 2011 Abington Journal PAGE 3 B
Tax and tags extra. 1.9% Financing is only available on Certified Pre-Owned Vehicles. “BUY FOR” prices are based on 72 month (*66, 63, 60, 48, and 36 months for selected vehicles) with $2,500
down (cash or trade). Photos of vehicles are for illustration purposes only. Coccia Ford is not responsible for any typographical errors. No Security Deposit Necessary. See dealer for details.
CALL NOW 823-8888 CALL NOW 823-8888
1-800-817-FORD 1-800-817-FORD
Overlooking Mohegan Sun Overlooking Mohegan Sun
577 East Main St., Plains 577 East Main St., Plains
Just Minutes from Scranton or W-B Just Minutes from Scranton or W-B
2008 CADILLAC CTS4 AWD
AU1514- Pwr. Heated Leather Seats,
ABS, Cruise, CD, Memory Seat, OnStar,
Parking Sensors, Satellite Radio
AU1277 -Fog Lights, Keyless
Entry, Traction Control,
Pwr. Seat, Cruise, Sliding
Rear Window, ABS, CD
14K
MILES!
AU9511 - Cruise Control,
Pwr. Seat, Keyless Entry, Fog
Lights, AM/FM/CD, PL, PW
VISIT US AT WWW.COCCIACARS.COM
2010 CHEVY SILVERADO 1500 CREW LT Z71 4X4
Most with CD, ABS, Keyless
Entry, Cruise Control, Tow
Pkg., PL, Pwr. Windows
TO CHOOSE
FROM
2008 FORD F-150 XLT SUPERCAB 4X4
AU1434- CD, ABS, Keyless Entry,
Cruise, PDL, PW, PM, Running
Boards, Sliding Rear Window
2008 FORD F-150 XLT 4X4
Most with CD, Cruise, ABS,
Keyless Entry, Running Boards,
Traction Control PM, PL, PW
TO CHOOSE FROM
2010 E-350 XLTs
STARTINGAT
AU1299- CD, ABS, Keyless
Entry, Cruise, PL, PW, PM
2009 TOYOTA TACOMA ACCESS CAB 4X4
AU1363- CD, Keyless Entry, ABS,
Cruise Control, Pwr. Driver’s Seat
2006 CHEVY SILVERADO 1500
Z71 CREW CAB 4X4
2007 DODGE DAKOTA SLT SUPER CAB 4X4
AU1114- CD, ABS, Keyless Entry, Traction Control, TowPkg., Roof Rack, Rear AC,
Moonroof, Pwr. Leather Heated/Cooled Seats, Climate
Control, Cruise, Navigation Sys., Pwr. Liftgate, Running
Boards, 3rd RowSeat, Touch Screen, Parking Sensors
2007 EXPEDITION LIMITED 4X4
AU1473- Navigation Sys., ABS, Pwr. Leather
Heated Seats, CD, Fog Lights, Keyless Entry,
Roof Rack, Climate Control, Moonroof,
TowPkg., Running Boards, 3rd RowSeat
28K MILES!
2008 MOUNTAINEER PREMIER AWD
AU1042- CD, Satellite Radio, Prem. Sound, ABS, Fog Lights, Keyless Entry, Traction
Control, Roof Rack, Pwr. Leather Heated Seats, Moonroof, Cruise, Navigation Sys.,
DVDPlayer, 3rd RowSeat, OnStar, Climate
Control, Prem. Wheels, Touch Screen, Pwr. Liftgate
2007 CADILLAC SRX4 AWD
Climate Control, 6 Disc CD, Prem
Wheels, Parking Sensors, Pwr. Liftgate,
Keyless Entry, Traction Control, Pwr.
Leather Heated Seats, Moonroof, Cruise TO CHOOSE FROM
08-09 EDGE LIMITED AWD
STARTINGAT
AU1436- Navigation Sys., CD, Traction Control, Keyless Entry, TowPkg.,
Cruise, Pwr. Leather Heated Seats,Moonroof,
Running Boards, Satellite Radio, 3rd Row
Seat, Parking Sensors, Climate Control
2008 MOUNTAINEER PREMIER AWD
AU1482- CD, Keyless Entry, Traction
Control, Cruise, Pwr. Leather Seats,
Rear AC, Running Boards, 3rd RowSeat
2008 EXPLORER EDDIE BAUER 4X4
AU1348- CD, Fog Lights, Cruise,
Keyless Entry, Pwr. Leather Seats,
Roof Rack, 3rd RowSeat, ABS
2007 EXPLORER EDDIE BAUER 4X4
Most with Cruise, Privacy Glass, Keyless
Entry, Traction Control, Side Airbags,
Some with Parking Sensors, 6 Disc
CD, Moonroof, Heated Seats, ABS
TO CHOOSE FROM 07-08 EDGE SE/SEL AWD
STARTINGAT
AM/FM/CD, ABS, Keyless
Entry, Pwr. Door Locks, Pwr.
Windows, Cruise Control
2008 CHEVY EQUINOX LT
AU1398- CD, OnStar, ABS, Fog Lights, Keyless
Entry, Traction Control, Roof Rack, Rear
Wipers, Privacy Glass, Cruise, PDL, PW, PM
63
MOS.
2007 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER LS 4X4
AU1038- 6 Disc CD, Fog Lights, Rear Defogger,
Traction Cont., Pwr. Leather Heat/Cool Seats,
Moonroof, Cruise, Climate Cont., PremWheels,
Keyless Entry, Parking Sensors, Satellite Radio
2009 LINCOLN MKZ AWD
AU1558- CD, ABS, Keyless Entry
w/Keypad, Cruise, Pwr. Leather
Heated Seats, Moonroof,
Climate Control, Memory Seat
2006 LINCOLN ZEPHYR
60
MOS.
AU1467- AM/FMRadio, ABS,
Keyless Entry, Traction Control,
Cruise Control, PL, PM
2005 CHEVY CAVALIER LS
AU9705- CD, ABS, Keyless Entry,
Rear Defogger, Cruise, Roof Rack
72
MOS.
2008 MAZDA TRIBUTE 4X4
FREE STATE INSPECTION AS LONG AS YOU OWN THE CAR!
2010 TOWNCAR SIGNATURE LIMITED
TO CHOOSE FROM
Pwr. Heated Leather Seats, 6 Disc
CD, ABS, Keyless Entry, Parking
Sensors, Satellite Radio, Heated
Mirrors, Traction Control, Cruise,
Memory Seat, Climate Control
2007 LINCOLN MKX AWD
AU1079- Pwr. Heated Leather
Seats, ABS, Parking Sensors,
Keyless Entry Cruise, Traction
Control, Dual Zone Climate Control
2008 LINCOLN NAVIGATOR AWD
AU1045- Reverse Camera, Running Boards, Navigation System, Parking
Sensors, Video Sys., Touch Screen, 3rd RowSeat, PremiumWheels, Power
Liftgate, Pwr. Leather Heat/ Cool Front Seats, PremiumSound, 6 Disc CD,
ABS,Keyless Entry, TowPkg.,
Moonroof, Roof Rack,
Rear A/C, DVDPlayer, Pwr.
Adjustable Pedals, Cruise
2008 LINCOLN MKX AWD
TO CHOOSE FROM
2007 LINCOLN MARK LT
ELITE CREW CAB 4X4
AU1490- Moonroof, Pwr. Heated
Leather Seats, Memory Seat,
Navigation Sys., 6 Disc CD, Satellite
Radio, Running Boards, Pwr.
Adjustable Pedals, Parking Sensors
STARTING AT
AU1387- 6 Disc CD, ABS, Traction Control,
Pwr. Leather Heated Seats, Moonroof,
Roof Rack, TowPkg., Cruise, 3rd Seat,
Running Boards, Pwr. Adjustable Pedals
18K MILES!
2008 MOUNTAINEER PREMIER AWD
AU1545- SYNC, 6 Disc CD, Keyless Entry, Dual
Climate Control, Parking Sensors, Traction
Control, Pwr. Leather Heated Seats,
Moonroof, Satellite Radio, Memory Seat
2010 EDGE LIMITED 4X4
18K
MILES!
AU1531- CD, ABS, Traction
Control, Heated Seats,
Cruise Control, PL, PM, PW
2007 HYUNDAI ENTOURAGE GLS
AU1435- Air, Keyless Entry,
ABS, AM/FM/CD, Pwr.
Windows, Pwr. Locks
2008 FOCUS SE
72
MOS.
Most with Moonroof, Memory Seat,
Navigation System, 6 Disc CD,
Satellite Radio, Keyless Entry with
Keypad, Parking Sensors, Front AC
Seats, Pwr. Liftgate, PremiumWheels
AU1484- Cruise Control,
Keyless Entry, AM/FM/CD,
Traction Control, Air
2007 SATURN AURA XE
72
MOS.
AU1432- Coupe, Air, ABS,
Keyless Entry, CD, Pwr.
Windows, Pwr. Locks
2009 FOCUS SE
72
MOS.
AU1576- Air, CD, Cruise
Control, Keyless Entry,
Pwr. Windows, Pwr. Locks
2009 HYUNDAI SONATA GLS
72
MOS.
AU1571- Air, Pwr. Seat, ABS,
Moonroof, Keyless Entry with
Keypad, 6 Disc CD, Rear Spoiler
2008 FUSION SE
AU1317 - Leather Seats,
CD, Keyless Entry, PL,
Cruise, Moonroof, PW, PM
30KMILES! 2009 CHEVY MALIBU LTZ
AU1202- Air, Pwr. Seat, Keyless
Entry w/Keypad, CD, Leather
Seats, Traction Control, ABS
2010 GRAND MARQUIS LS 10KMILES!
AU1553- Moonroof, Rear A/C, Pwr. Leather
Heated Seats, Keyless Entry, Navigation
System, DVDPlayer, Memory Seat, CD,
Running Boards, Remote Start, 3rd Seat
2007 CHEVY TAHOE LTZ 4X4
AU1585- Moonroof, Pwr. Heat/Cool Leather
Seats, DVDPlayer, Navigation Sys., CD,
Reverse Camera, SYNC, Parking Sensors, 3rd
Seat, Running Boards, Rear Heated Seats
8600 MILES!
2010 EXPEDITION EDDIE BAUER KING RANCH 4X4
AU1531- CD, ABS, Traction
Control, Heated Seats,
Cruise Control, PL, PM, PW
2007 HYUNDAI ENTOURAGE GLS
AU1577- Air, Pwr. Seat, ABS,
Keyless Entry, CD, 3rd RowSeat
2009 CHRYSLER TOWN &
COUNTRY TOURING VAN
AU1584- Air Conditioning,
Pwr. Heated Seat, Keyless Entry,
AM/FM/CD, Moonroof
2008 HONDA RIDGELINE RTL 4X4
PAGE 4 B Abington Journal WEDNESDAY MAY 11, 2011
*ALL PRICES PLUS TAX, TAG, & TITLE. FINANCING AVAILABLE WITH APPROVED CREDIT. PRIOR SALES EXCLUDED. DEALER NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS. WARRANTY ON SELECT MAKES AND MODELS. SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS. UNITS MAY BE SOLD PRIOR TO PRINTING.
OFFERS EXPIRE 05/31/11.
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K11833A
P14809B
K11889A
H26380A
L11157A
K11898A
M7824A
CH5396A
T27950A
H26310A
K11906A
C3411B
DP15253
H25638A
H26362A
CH5394A
H26363B
T27451A
A10764A
K11632B
H26441A
H26053A
B9027B
CH5398A
H25899A
J4484A
KP15216
H26096A
P15214
T27498A
TP15235
J4558A
H25664A
K11916A
T27987A
M7758A
TP15207
T27788A
D0194A
J4567A
A10725A
H26118A
T27677A
H26325B
KP15262
J4539A
T27196A
L11063A
JP15132
H26246A
H26177A
P15213
T27622A
T27346A
J4513A
T27979A
J4502A
T27602B
T27158B
H26455A
T27984A
H25760A
H26122A
H26370A
T27415A
DP15244
DP15245
KP15261
H25977A
H26104A
H26073A
H26162A
T27878A
T27706A
CP15135
H25934B
H26183B
T27805A
H26328A
H25563A
A10710B
H26353A
T27985A
BS0324A
H26184A
T27960A
L11180A
H25961A
T27075A
KP15215
H26340A
BP15177A
T27791A
H26233A
H26065B
JP15250
T27946A
P15254
T27682A
J4562A
K11924A
M7823A
J4420A
AP15222A
H26186A
K11830A
T27820A
H26389A
T27892A
JP15255
H25917A
H25918A
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2008
2009
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2010
2010
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2007
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2009
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2010
2008
2007
2007
2004
2008
2007
2006
2008
2008
2005
2008
2009
2011
2006
2007
2007
2008
2008
2008
2008
2009
2008
2009
2008
2008
2008
2010
2007
2006
2007
2008
2008
2008
2008
2008
Hyundai....
Mercury...
Hyundai....
Mitsubishi
Chevrolet.
Hyundai....
Ford...........
VW.............
Chrysler....
Jeep..........
Chevrolet.
Ford...........
Hyundai....
Toyota.......
Honda.......
Ford...........
Ford...........
Toyota.......
Ford...........
Toyota.......
Honda.......
Honda.......
Jeep..........
Chrysler....
Nissan.......
Honda.......
Hyundai....
Honda.......
Nissan.......
Toyota.......
Toyota.......
Chevrolet.
Honda.......
Hyundai....
Honda.......
Mitsubishi
Toyota.......
Toyota.......
Mitsubishi
Jeep..........
Toyota.......
Honda.......
Toyota.......
Honda.......
Hyundai....
Jeep..........
Toyota.......
Lexus........
Jeep..........
Honda.......
Mercury...
Nissan.......
Toyota.......
Toyota.......
Jeep..........
Toyota.......
Jeep..........
Ford...........
Toyota.......
Jeep..........
Chevrolet.
Honda.......
Honda.......
Toyota.......
Dodge.......
Dodge.......
Dodge.......
Hyundai....
Honda.......
Honda.......
Honda.......
Honda.......
Toyota.......
Toyota.......
Chrysler....
Jeep..........
Honda.......
GMC..........
Honda.......
Honda.......
Toyota.......
Toyota.......
Toyota.......
MB.............
Honda.......
Toyota.......
Lexus........
Honda.......
VW.............
Hyundai....
Lexus........
Honda.......
Toyota.......
Ford...........
Hyundai....
Jeep..........
Mazda.......
Subaru......
Honda.......
Jeep..........
Honda.......
Honda.......
Honda.......
Honda.......
Honda.......
Toyota.......
Toyota.......
Honda.......
Ford...........
Jeep..........
Toyota.......
Honda.......
4dr Sdn GLS Manual .........................
4dr Sdn 2.3........................................
4dr Sdn GT Auto................................
4dr 4WD XLS.....................................
2dr Cpe LS.........................................
4dr GLS 4WD Auto 2.7L V6...............
2dr Cpe S...........................................
2dr 2.5L Manual ................................
4dr Wgn Touring................................
4dr Laredo 4WD................................
FWD 4dr LT........................................
4dr Supercab 4.0L XLT FX4 4WD ......
4dr GLS 4WD 3.5L Auto....................
4dr Sdn I4 Auto LE.............................
4dr Man LX........................................
2dr Cpe Standard ..............................
2dr Cpe SE.........................................
4dr Sdn XL.........................................
4dr Sdn I4 SE FWD............................
4dr Auto.............................................
2dr AT EX...........................................
4WD 4dr AT EX..................................
4WD 4dr Sport ..................................
4dr Sdn Touring FWD........................
4WD 4dr Auto S................................
2dr AT EX...........................................
...........................................................
4dr Auto LX........................................
...........................................................
4dr Sdn I4 Auto LE.............................
4dr Sdn I4 Auto LE.............................
Ext Cab 143.5” WB 4WD LS .............
4dr Auto EX .......................................
4dr Sdn V6 Auto SE...........................
2dr Auto LX........................................
4WD 4dr XLS.....................................
4dr Sdn I4 Auto LE.............................
4dr Sdn I4 Auto LE.............................
AWD 4dr LS.......................................
4WD 4dr Laredo................................
4dr Sdn I4 Auto LE.............................
4dr I4 Auto EX ...................................
4WD 4dr 4-cyl Limited ......................
4dr Auto LX........................................
...........................................................
4WD 4dr Sport ..................................
4WD 4dr 4-cyl ...................................
4dr Sdn..............................................
4WD 4dr Sport ..................................
4WD 5dr LX.......................................
4WD 4dr V6.......................................
...........................................................
4dr Sdn I4 Auto LE.............................
4dr Sdn I4 Auto LE.............................
4WD 4dr Sport ..................................
4dr Base 4-cyl 4WD..........................
4WD 4dr Limited...............................
Supercab 133” XLT 4WD...................
4dr Sdn I4 Auto LE.............................
4WD 4dr Sport ..................................
4dr Sdn LTZ........................................
4dr I4 Auto EX ...................................
4dr I4 Auto EX-L PZEV.......................
5dr HB................................................
AWD 4dr SXT....................................
4dr Sdn SXT.......................................
4dr Sdn SXT.......................................
...........................................................
4WD 5dr EX-L....................................
4WD 5dr EX-L....................................
4dr V6 Auto EX-L...............................
4dr I4 Auto LX....................................
4dr V6 4WD Limited w/3rd Row.......
Dbl 4.7L V8 5-Spd AT SR5.................
4dr Sdn 300C RWD...........................
4WD 4dr Laredo................................
4WD 5dr Auto LX ..............................
4WD 4dr SLE1...................................
4WD 5dr EX.......................................
4WD 5dr EX.......................................
4dr SR5 V8 Auto 4WD.......................
4WD 4dr 4-cyl 4-Spd AT....................
5dr 7-Passenger Van LE AWD...........
4dr Luxury Sdn 3.0L 4MATIC.............
4WD 5dr EX.......................................
4WD 4dr 4-cyl 4-Spd AT Ltd..............
4dr Sdn..............................................
4WD 5dr EX-L....................................
4dr Wgn SE .......................................
4dr Sdn 2.4L Auto GLS......................
4dr Sdn..............................................
4WD 5dr EX-L....................................
4WD 4dr 4-cyl Sport..........................
2dr Conv Deluxe................................
AWD 4dr Auto GLS ...........................
4WD 4dr Sport ..................................
2dr Conv PRHT Auto Touring.............
...........................................................
4WD 5dr Auto EX..............................
4WD 4dr Sport ..................................
4dr I4 Auto EX-L ................................
4WD 5dr Auto EX..............................
4WD 5dr EX-L w/Navi.......................
4WD 5dr LX.......................................
4WD 4dr EX.......................................
4dr Sdn Limited.................................
4WD 4dr V6 Limited..........................
4WD 4dr VP.......................................
4WD 4dr V6 Auto XLT .......................
4WD 4dr Sport ..................................
4WD 4dr 4-cyl 4-Spd AT....................
4WD 4dr VP.......................................
Elantra.........
Milan...........
Elantra.........
Montero Sport
Monte Carlo
Santa Fe......
Focus...........
New Beetle .
PT Cruiser...
GrandChero
HHR.............
Ranger ........
Santa Fe......
Camry .........
Civic ............
Mustang......
Focus...........
Avalon.........
Fusion .........
RAV4 ...........
Civic ............
Element.......
Compass.....
Sebring .......
Xterra..........
Civic ............
Sonata.........
Civic ............
Altima .........
Camry .........
Camry .........
Silverado1500
Civic ............
Sonata.........
Civic ............
Outlander....
Camry .........
Camry .........
Endeavor ....
GrandChero
Camry .........
Accord.........
RAV4 ...........
Civic ............
Elantra.........
Liberty.........
RAV4 ...........
ES 330.........
Liberty.........
CR-V............
Mariner .......
Altima .........
Camry .........
Camry .........
Liberty.........
RAV4 ...........
Liberty.........
F-150............
Camry .........
Liberty.........
Impala.........
Accord.........
Accord.........
Prius............
Journey.......
Avenger ......
Avenger ......
Sonata.........
CR-V............
CR-V............
Accord.........
Accord.........
Highlander..
Tundra 4WD
300-Series...
GrandChero
Element.......
Envoy..........
CR-V............
CR-V............
4Runner ......
RAV4 ...........
Sienna.........
C-Class........
CR-V............
RAV4 ...........
ES 330.........
CR-V............
Routan ........
Sonata.........
ES 330.........
CR-V............
RAV4 ...........
Mustang......
Santa Fe......
Liberty.........
MX-5 Miata.
Impreza.......
Element.......
Liberty.........
Accord.........
Element.......
CR-V............
CR-V............
Pilot .............
Avalon.........
RAV4 ...........
Pilot .............
Escape.........
Liberty.........
RAV4 ...........
Pilot .............
39,969
68,535
69,910
59,367
52,039
85,649
45,966
40,542
24,802
70,722
53,997
47,594
49,819
44,326
74,285
46,467
39,233
42,738
42,427
65,594
15,556
56,262
59,732
18,008
65,037
35,244
26,861
15,617
37,675
12,394
32,059
79,104
45,456
29,542
19,143
40,232
23,755
23,987
41,089
47,201
39,412
20,651
56,948
22,078
17,927
28,610
68,325
54,703
29,605
28,571
23,676
35,986
24,930
34,098
27,749
39,878
46,140
69,185
47,026
38,583
45,302
21,693
24,073
34,843
53,116
17,470
18,141
22,548
47,834
35,158
32,845
11,925
64,266
71,440
39,233
37,770
21,274
44,468
19,479
27,940
50,988
19,811
54,187
67,649
30,341
45,750
44,762
46,876
21,595
14,767
50,341
44,842
47,276
33,367
48,539
29,691
19,680
35,279
57,462
36,052
42,487
41,915
48,864
10,326
39,473
56,998
47,581
35,088
23,870
32,636
41,865
32,721
MILES
MILES
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MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
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MILES
MILES
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MILES
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$8,989
$9,989
$9,995
$10,489
$10,989
$11,489
$11,989
$11,995
$12,989
$12,995
$13,489
$13,489
$13,989
$14,100
$14,489
$14,489
$14,489
$14,800
$14,989
$14,989
$14,999
$15,200
$15,489
$15,999
$16,489
$16,499
$16,995
$16,999
$17,095
$17,395
$17,395
$17,489
$17,499
$17,979
$17,979
$17,995
$17,995
$17,995
$17,995
$17,995
$17,999
$18,295
$18,295
$18,499
$18,499
$18,795
$18,989
$18,995
$18,995
$18,995
$18,995
$18,995
$18,995
$18,995
$18,995
$18,995
$18,999
$18,999
$18,999
$18,999
$18,999
$19,095
$19,195
$19,479
$19,499
$19,499
$19,499
$19,499
$19,795
$19,895
$19,965
$19,979
$19,989
$19,995
$19,995
$19,995
$19,995
$19,995
$19,995
$19,995
$19,995
$19,995
$19,999
$19,999
$20,295
$20,479
$20,489
$20,499
$20,499
$20,499
$20,499
$20,499
$20,499
$20,499
$20,499
$20,499
$20,499
$20,499
$20,499
$20,499
$20,499
$20,499
$20,900
$20,979
$20,995
$20,995
$20,995
$20,995
$20,999
$20,999
$20,999
$21,479
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P15243
B9041A
CP15266
DP15265
J4543A
T27642A
H26263A
P15164
CP15175
H25980A
H26326A
T27123A
H25661A
TP15236
A10687A
H26295A
DP15246
A10766A
K11794A
JP15256
B9055A
H25556A
H26123A
T27703A
H26324A
AP15205
T27867A
DP15200
H26332A
H26377A
D0282A
H26115A
CP15249
J4551A
DP15178
BP15068
T27376A
T27738A
P15179
T27976A
A10664A
H26099A
L11033B
L11140A
B8782B
L11148B
L11174B
A10740A
T27626A
A10695A
T27392A
K11896A
L11203A
H26453A
H26106A
A10548A
T27895A
T27694A
L11034A
H24986A
AP15259
AP15258
L11127A
L11108A
L11156A
T27909A
H26381A
L11175A
H26120A
T27776A
LP15225
T27531A
A10768A
JP15232
S0675A
BP15057A
JP15248
T27983A
M7813A
C3432A
BS0325
T27569A
L11017A
L11126A
AP15239
T27961A
A10750A
AP15242
A10755A
H26402A
L11125A
AP15260
L11178A
BP15119
L11186A
TP15218
BP15102
BP15153
BP15121
BP15152
C3390A
T27847A
A10688A
P15127
L11183A
BP14656
T27671A
L11205A
L10953B
H26002A
LP15237
B9034A
2008
2006
2008
2009
2007
2008
2007
2007
2010
2008
2007
2008
2009
2008
2007
2008
2010
2007
2008
2008
2007
2008
2008
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2008
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2010
2010
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2006
2008
2010
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2010
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2010
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2010
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2010
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2010
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2010
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2011
2010
2010
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2010
2011
2009
2008
2008
2010
2007
2008
2009
2008
2009
2009
2009
2008
2009
2010
2007
2008
2008
2008
2009
2010
2008
2008
2007
2008
2008
2010
2010
2010
2009
2010
Nissan.......
MB.............
Chrysler....
Dodge.......
Jeep..........
Honda.......
Honda.......
Cadillac.....
Chrysler....
Honda.......
Honda.......
Toyota.......
Honda.......
Toyota.......
Acura........
Honda.......
Dodge.......
Toyota.......
Jeep..........
Jeep..........
Toyota.......
Honda.......
Honda.......
Honda.......
Honda.......
Acura........
Ford...........
Dodge.......
Honda.......
Honda.......
Dodge.......
Honda.......
Chrysler....
Honda.......
Dodge.......
MB.............
Toyota.......
Toyota.......
Chevrolet.
Nissan.......
Lexus........
Honda.......
Cadillac.....
Lexus........
Chevrolet.
Lexus........
Lexus........
Infiniti .......
Dodge.......
Lincoln......
Toyota.......
Honda.......
Toyota.......
Chevrolet.
Ford...........
Chevrolet.
Lincoln......
Toyota.......
Lexus........
Honda.......
Acura........
Acura........
Lexus........
Lexus........
Lexus........
Chevrolet.
Ford...........
Lexus........
Nissan.......
Toyota.......
Lexus........
Toyota.......
GMC..........
Jeep..........
Chevrolet.
Volvo.........
Jeep..........
Toyota.......
Chevrolet.
Cadillac.....
MB.............
Chevrolet.
Lexus........
Lexus........
Acura........
Toyota.......
Acura........
Acura........
Nissan.......
Acura........
Lexus........
Acura........
Lexus........
MB.............
Lexus........
Audi ..........
MB.............
MB.............
MB.............
MB.............
BMW.........
Toyota.......
Lexus........
Cadillac.....
Lexus........
MB.............
Toyota.......
Lexus........
MB.............
BMW.........
Lexus........
MB.............
4dr Sdn V6 CVT 3.5 SE......................
4dr Luxury Sdn 3.0L 4MATIC.............
4dr Wgn Touring................................
AWD 4dr SXT....................................
4WD 4dr Limited...............................
4WD 4dr EX.......................................
4WD 5dr EX-L....................................
4dr Sdn Luxury I.................................
4dr Wgn Touring................................
4WD 5dr EX.......................................
4WD 4dr EXL.....................................
4WD 4dr 4-cyl 4-Spd AT Ltd..............
4dr V6 Auto EX-L...............................
4dr Sdn..............................................
AWD 4dr............................................
4WD 4dr EX.......................................
4dr Wgn SXT.....................................
4WD 4dr 4-cyl Limited ......................
4WD 4dr Limited...............................
4WD 4dr Laredo................................
4WD 4dr Auto ...................................
4WD 4dr SE.......................................
4WD 4dr SE.......................................
4WD 4dr SE.......................................
5dr EX................................................
4dr Sdn Auto .....................................
4WD 4dr XLT .....................................
4WD Crew Cab Bighorn/Lonestar.....
4WD 5dr EX.......................................
4WD 4dr SE.......................................
4dr Mega Cab 160.5 4WD SLT..........
4WD 4dr EX-L....................................
4dr Wgn Touring................................
4WD 4dr SE.......................................
4WD Crew Cab Bighorn/Lonestar.....
4dr Sdn Sport 3.5L 4MATIC...............
Dbl 5.7L V8 6-Spd AT SR5.................
Dbl 5.7L V8 6-Spd AT Grade..............
4WD Ext Cab 143.5” LT.....................
4WD Crew Cab SWB Auto SE ..........
4dr Sdn..............................................
4WD Crew Cab RTL w/Lthr...............
AWD 4dr V6 ......................................
4dr Sdn..............................................
4WD Ext Cab 143.5” LS ....................
4dr Sport Sdn Auto............................
4dr Sport Sdn Auto AWD..................
4dr Auto G35x AWD..........................
4WD Quad Cab 140.5” SLT...............
AWD 4dr............................................
4WD 4dr 4-cyl 4-Spd AT Ltd..............
4WD 4dr EX.......................................
4dr Sdn Limited.................................
4WD Ext Cab 134.0” Work Truck *Ltd Avail*....
4WD SuperCab 158” FX4..................
4WD Ext Cab 143.5” LTZ...................
AWD 4dr............................................
Dbl 5.7L V8 6-Spd AT Grade..............
4dr Sdn..............................................
5dr EX-L w/RES.................................
...........................................................
...........................................................
4dr Sdn..............................................
4dr Sdn..............................................
4dr Sdn..............................................
4WD Ext Cab 143.5” LT w/1LT..........
4WD SuperCab 145” STX .................
4dr Sdn..............................................
4WD 4dr V6 LE..................................
5dr 7-Pass Van XLE Ltd AWD............
4dr Sdn..............................................
4WD 4dr V6 Base..............................
AWD 4dr SLT1...................................
4WD 4dr Laredo................................
4WD Crew Cab 143.5” LS.................
4dr Wgn w/Snrf ................................
4WD 4dr Laredo................................
5dr 7-Pass Van XLE FWD ..................
4WD Ext Cab 143.5” LT.....................
AWD 4dr V6 ......................................
4dr Sdn 3.0L Sport 4MATIC...............
4WD Ext Cab 143.5” LT.....................
AWD 4dr............................................
AWD 4dr............................................
4dr Sdn Auto Type-S .........................
4WD 4dr V6 SE..................................
4WD 4dr Sport Pkg............................
4dr Sdn Auto Type-S .........................
AWD 4dr LE.......................................
4WD 4dr Tech Pkg.............................
AWD 4dr............................................
4dr Sdn 2WD Tech ............................
AWD 4dr............................................
4dr 3.5L 4MATIC................................
AWD 4dr............................................
2dr Cpe Man quattro 2.0L Premium Plus..
4MATIC 4dr 4.7L................................
4MATIC 4dr 3.5L................................
4dr 3.5L 4MATIC................................
4MATIC 4dr 3.5L................................
AWD 4dr 30i......................................
4WD 4dr V6 Limited..........................
4WD 4dr ............................................
AWD 4dr............................................
4dr Sdn..............................................
4dr Sdn Luxury 3.5L 4MATIC.............
4WD 4dr LV8 6-Spd AT Ltd................
AWD 4dr............................................
4MATIC 4dr 3.5L................................
AWD 4dr 30i......................................
4dr Sdn AWD ....................................
4MATIC 4dr 5.5L................................
Altima .........
C-Class........
T&C.............
Journey.......
GrandChero
Pilot .............
CR-V............
DTS .............
T&C.............
CR-V............
Pilot .............
RAV4 ...........
Accord.........
CamryHybrid
RDX.............
Pilot .............
GrandCaravan
RAV4 ...........
Commander
GrandChero
FJ Cruiser....
Pilot .............
Pilot .............
Pilot .............
Odyssey......
TL ................
Escape.........
Dakota.........
CR-V............
Pilot .............
Ram 2500....
Pilot .............
T&C.............
Pilot .............
Dakota.........
E-Class ........
Tundra 4WD
Tundra 4WD
Silverado1500
Frontier .......
ES 350.........
Ridgeline.....
SRX.............
ES 350.........
Silverado1500
IS 350 ..........
IS 250 ..........
G35..............
Ram 1500....
MKX............
RAV4 ...........
Pilot .............
Avalon.........
Silverado1500
SD F-250 ......
Silverado1500
MKX............
Tundra 4WD
ES 350.........
Odyssey......
TSX .............
TL ................
ES 350.........
ES 350.........
ES 350.........
Slvrado2500HD
F-150............
ES 350.........
Pathfinder ...
Sienna.........
ES 350.........
Highlander..
Acadia.........
GrandChero
Silverado1500
XC70............
GrandChero
Sienna.........
Silverado1500
SRX.............
C-Class........
Silverado1500
RX 350.........
RX 350.........
TL ................
Highlander..
MDX............
TL ................
Murano.......
MDX............
RX 350.........
TL ................
RX 350.........
R-Class........
RX 350.........
A5................
GL-Class ......
M-Class.......
R-Class........
M-Class.......
X3................
4Runner ......
GX 470 ........
Escalade......
LS 460 .........
E-Class ........
Sequoia.......
RX 350.........
R-Class........
X5................
LS 460 .........
GL-Class ......
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
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MILES
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MILES
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MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
$21,499
$21,499
$21,499
$21,499
$21,875
$21,900
$21,979
$21,995
$21,995
$21,995
$21,995
$21,995
$21,995
$21,995
$21,999
$22,275
$22,479
$22,479
$22,499
$22,499
$22,595
$22,895
$22,900
$22,995
$22,995
$22,999
$22,999
$23,400
$23,479
$23,499
$23,499
$23,499
$23,499
$23,499
$23,595
$23,995
$23,995
$24,600
$24,995
$24,995
$24,999
$25,995
$25,995
$25,995
$25,995
$26,479
$26,499
$26,499
$26,995
$26,995
$26,995
$27,479
$27,499
$27,499
$27,499
$27,995
$27,995
$27,995
$28,479
$28,479
$28,479
$28,479
$28,979
$28,995
$29,479
$29,499
$29,499
$29,499
$29,995
$29,995
$29,995
$29,995
$29,995
$30,495
$30,499
$30,499
$30,979
$31,479
$31,499
$31,499
$31,895
$31,995
$31,995
$31,995
$31,995
$32,195
$32,479
$32,479
$33,499
$33,979
$34,479
$34,479
$34,979
$34,995
$34,995
$35,499
$35,995
$35,995
$36,479
$36,995
$37,499
$38,995
$39,950
$39,995
$40,479
$41,479
$42,495
$43,479
$44,995
$45,995
$49,479
$77,479
36,106
52,454
39,080
34,365
52,552
35,013
31,772
31,363
17,933
32,684
51,202
26,864
28,975
18,465
46,680
32,049
26,204
34,442
60,084
42,709
42,948
34,157
38,604
45,038
14,805
29,753
30,966
13,123
7,690
50,648
61,835
54,276
24,665
51,573
12,321
29,145
62,285
41,984
21,185
19,582
42,416
20,439
35,319
18,908
6,691
46,809
46,239
24,760
37,344
31,903
9,438
27,032
24,654
11,684
51,841
34,286
29,326
35,571
31,761
33,322
44,097
25,908
26,270
15,751
29,967
19,269
6,866
33,950
9,592
38,265
22,761
15,950
29,863
15,821
4,275
34,206
14,422
21,439
13,714
29,357
13,001
1,932
30,245
30,174
21,301
18,492
42,029
38,182
16,333
36,667
24,613
34,321
34,832
25,472
30,806
31,765
29,502
25,172
31,982
24,282
11,080
15,603
19,709
32,520
26,277
35,036
15,288
5,905
14,493
21,554
25,773
14,023
Pre-Owned Superstore 14 Brands p Pre-Owned Sup 14 Brands
180 models 20 MPG or Better
46 models 30 MPG or Better
7 models 40 MPG or Better
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Call 1.866.807.9004
MotorWorld Drive, Just Off Interstate 81, Wilkes-Barre
Cc|| ¡e|| Free 1·8óó·807·º004 º MeIerWer|d Drìve 1usI O|| |nIersIcIe 81, Wì|kes·8crre
SHOP 24/7 @ MOTORWORLDGROUP.COM SALES HOURS MON – FRI: 9AM-8PM SAT: 9AM-5PM SUN: OPEN FOR OUTDOOR BROWSING NOON-5PM
WEDNESDAY MAY 11, 2011 Abington Journal PAGE 5 B
548 Medical/Health 548 Medical/Health
There’s No Place
Like the Jewish Home…
The Jewish Home of Eastern PA, a leader in
long-term care, has an immediate need to fill the
following positions:
• RN Supervisor 3rd shift
o 3-5 years long term care experience preferred
o BSN and Supervisory experience preferred
• RN Unit Manager
o Proven management and leadership skills
o Experience working with dementia residents
helpful
o BSN required
o 3-5 years long term care experience strongly
preferred
Outstanding benefit package available including
fully paid family health insurance. Every
other weekend and rotating holidays required.
If you are a compassionate, professional RN
who can help enhance the lives of our residents,
please apply by sending your resume to the
email address below or apply in person at:
The Jewish Home of Eastern PA
1101 Vine Street, Scranton, PA 18510
Telephone: (570) 344-6177 ext. 140
Fax: (570) 344-9610
Email: sstrunk@frontier.com
The Jewish Home of Eastern PA is an
Equal Opportunity Employer.
The Meadows Nursing
and Rehabilitation Center
Positions Available
CNA’s CNA’s
7-3 Shift
Part Time (5-9 days bi-weekly)
with benefits
11-7 Shift
Part Time (5-9 days bi-weekly)
with benefits
CNA’s can apply on line at:
https://home.eease.com/recruit/?id=296360
* Individualized orientation program.
* Competitive starting rates
* Vacation, Holiday and Personal Days
* Tuition Reimbursement
* Health insurance and Pension Plan
* Child Day Care on premises
Meadows Nursing & Rehabilitation Center
55 West Center Hill Road, Dallas PA 18612
Meadowshr@hotmail.com
e.o.e.
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
W YOM IN G A V E . E
X
P
W
A
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8
1
From Cla rks S um m it/S c ra n ton
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From W ilke s -Ba rre to S c ra n ton
E xpre s s wa y8 Bloc ks on
W yom in g A ve n ue
C adillac C ertified
C adillac C ertified
$
28,998
BL A C K ,BL A C K L E A THE R ,
S UN R OOF ,A M /F M /C D ,
ON S TA R ,A L L W HE E L
D R IVE ,XM ,BE A UTY !
2008 -2010 CTS
by Ca dilla c
Tim e L e ft On W a r r a n ty 5/31/20 14
M ile s L e ft o n W a r r a n ty 71,0 71
A c tu a l M ile s o n C TS 28,929
10
TO CHOOS E FROM
172 172
POIN T POIN T
CHECK CHECK
S P E CIA L
RE DUCE D
$
28,998
R E D F IR E /C A S HM E R E ,
BOS E ,L E A THE R ,
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ON S TA R ,A W D
2008 STS AW D
by Ca dilla c
Tim e L e ft On W a r r a n ty 12/27/20 13
M ile s L e ft o n W a r r a n ty 79,253
A c tu a l M ile s o n S TS 20 ,747
3
TO CHOOS E FROM
1.9 % 1.9 %
FIN AN CIN G FIN AN CIN G
AV AILAB LE AV AILAB LE S P E CIA L
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$
28,998
#1240 1,W HITE
D IA M ON D /L E A THE R ,
A W D ,UL TR A VIE W
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HE A TE D S E A TS ,
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2008 SRX AW D
by Ca dilla c
Tim e L e ft On W a r r a n ty 1/11/20 14
M ile s L e ft o n W a r r a n ty 69,0 0 2
A c tu a l M ile s o n S R X 30 ,998
4
TO CHOOS E FROM
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$
43,998
S UN R OOF ,N A VIG A TION ,
22” C HR OM E W HE E L S ,
E N TE R TA IN M E N T
S Y S TE M ,M E M OR Y
S E TTIN G S ,HE A TE D
S E A TS ,A M /F M ,6 D IS C C D
2008 ESCALADE AW D
by Ca dilla c
Tim e L e ft On W a r r a n ty 8/20 /20 13
M ile s L e ft o n W a r r a n ty 72,442
A c tu a l M ile s o n E s c a la de 27,558
3 3
PAYM EN TS PAYM EN TS
ON G M ON G M
S P E CIA L
RE DUCE D
CAD IL L AC CERTIF ICATION
6YEAR/ 100,000M IL ES L IM ITED W ARRANTY •24HOUR ROAD S ID E AS S IS TANCE •COURTES Y TRANS P ORTATION •$0D ED UCTIBL E •ONS TAR
3M ONTH TRIAL •D IRECTIONS & CONNECTIONS •XM RAD IO 3M ONTHS •172P OINT INS P ECTION AND RE- COND ITIONING P ROCES S
P R E-O W NED
SA LES EVENT
G eneralM otors
W illP ay Y our First
3P A Y M ENTS
up to $500 per paym ent
plus 1.9% A P R
M US T BE APPROVE D BY AL L Y BANK S ,A, OR B T IE R 1.9% F INANCING F OR 36 M ONT HS & 3.9% UP T O 60 M ONT HS . *M US T F INANCE T HRU AL L Y BANK S ,A OR B T IE R W / APPROVE D CRE DIT .
R.J. BURN E
1205-1209 Wyoming Avenue, Scranton
(570)342-0107
1-888-880-6537
www.rjb urn e .c om
Mon-Thurs 9-8 • Sat 9-4
R EM AIN D ER OF R EM AIN D ER OF
6 YR /10 0 ,0 0 0 M I 6 YR /10 0 ,0 0 0 M I
LIM ITED LIM ITED
W AR R AN TY W AR R AN TY
2008 DTS
by Ca dilla c
BL A C K /BL A C K L E A THE R ,S UN R OOF ,
C HR OM E W HE E L S ,XM ,ON S TA R ,
HE A TE D & C OOL E D S E A TS ,M E M OR Y
S E TTIN G S & M UC H M OR E !
Tim e L e ft On W a r r a n ty 1/31/20 14
M ile s L e ft o n W a r r a n ty 73,244
A c tu a l M ile s o n D TS 26,756
$
29,998
OV ER OV ER
$5 4 ,0 0 0 $5 4 ,0 0 0
N EW N EW
RE DUCE D
542 Logistics/
Transportation
542 Logistics/
Transportation
542 Logistics/
Transportation
2
7
8
2
7
8
Every
Thursday
in May
XLC Services, LLC (Logistics) is
seeking experienced forklift
operators & Inexperienced candidates
with great employment history to
work at their Mehoopany, PA
location. The following skills are
necessary for these positions:
• High School Diploma/GED
• Computer Skills
• Valid Driver’s License
• Criminal Background Check
• Pass Pre-employment Drug Screen
& Physical
• Part-time position for experienced
driver only.
All full-time positions come with the
following benefts:
medical, 8 paid holidays, 401k after
1 year, and paid vacation. Pay increase
based on skill development.
Interested Applicants can Apply Online!
www.XLCServices.com or Call 888-382-4078
10:00 am - 4:00 pm
Tunkhannock
Library
542 Logistics/
Transportation
DRIVER - Two Cent
Pay Raise now
offered for new driv-
ers! Plus 2 day ori-
entation, high miles,
excellent equip-
ment, dry van and
flatbed freight! $500
Sign-On Bonus for
Flatbed. CDL-A,
6mo. OTR
888-801-5295
DRIVER: Many
Choices - Part-time,
full-time, casual,
express lanes, dry
van, refrigerated.
Weekly or daily pay.
Local orientation.
CDL-A, 3 months
recent experience
required. 800-414-
9569 www.drive
knight.com
DRIVERS - Experi-
enced OTR Drivers.
Up to $4,000
BONUS. $3,500
Sign-On CASH and
$500 LAPTOP or
GPS. Up to $.50 per
mile. Regional
Lanes/ Home Week-
ly. 888-463-3962. 6
Mo OTR Exp. & Cur-
rent CDL
www.usatruck.jobs.
eoe m/f/h/v
DRIVERS - NE
Regional Runs! 35-
52cpm, steady
work, quality home
time, great equip-
ment, excellent
benefits. CDL-1, 6
months experience
required.
888-445-1886
www.mtrk.com
DRIVERS - No Expe-
rience - No Prob-
lem. 100% Paid CDL
Training. Immediate
Benefits. 20/10 pro-
gram. Trainers Earn
up to $.49 per mile!
CRST VAN EXPEDIT-
ED 800-326-2778
www.JoinCRST.com
DRIVERS 2011 PAY
RAISE. Up to $.52
per mile. Home
weekends! Excel-
lent benefits! New
Equipment! HEART-
LAND EXPRESS
1-800-441-4953
www.heartlandex-
press.com
551 Other
INTERNATIONAL
Cultural Exchange
Representative:
Earn supplemental
income placing and
supervising high
school exchange
students. Volunteer
host families also
needed. Promote
world peace! 1-866-
Go-AFICE or
www.afice.org
REAL ESTATE
APPRAISERS: certi-
fied with minimum 5
years experience &
ACI knowledge to
cover Eastern PA
Fax resume 800-
675-9392 or call
800-477-5187
551 Other
AIRLINES ARE HIR-
ING! Train for high
paying Aviation
Maintenance Car
eer. FAA approved
program. Financial
aid if qualified -
Housing available.
CALL Aviation Insti-
tute of Maintenan
ce. 888-834-9715
569 Security/
Protective Services
SECURITY
Full-Time Security
positions available
in Mehoopany.
Nights & weekends
a must. Must have a
valid/clean driver’s
license for at least 3
years to date & be
able to pass a pre-
employment drug
test. Benefits are
available & uniforms
are provided. Please
apply online at
https://jobs.nana.
com/careersnms/
Careers.aspx
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
600
FINANCIAL
610 Business
Opportunities
CREATIVE & EXCITING
Paint your own
pottery studio
franchise. Low start
up & local training.
POKE-A-NOSE
POTTERY
Inspiration is Within
Call Jason
570-730-7855 or
email: pnpfranchise
@yahoo.com
JAN-PRO
COMMERCIAL
CLEANING
OF NEPA
Be Your Own
Boss Work Full or
Part time
Accounts available
NOW throughout
Wilkes Barre,
Scranton,
and Hazleton.
We guarantee
$5,000 to
$200,000
in annual billing.
Small investment
We’re ready -
Are you?
For more info
Call 570-824-5774
Janproofnepa.com
630 Money To Loan
“We can erase
your bad credit -
100% GUARAN-
TEED.” Attorneys
for the Federal
Trade Commission
say they’ve never
seen a legitimate
credit repair opera-
tion. No one can
legally remove
accurate and timely
information from
your credit report.
It’s a process that
starts with you and
involves time and a
conscious effort to
pay your debts.
Learn about manag-
ing credit and debt
at ftc. gov/credit. A
message from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
700
MERCHANDISE
708 Antiques &
Collectibles
AUTO PARTS. 1930-
1931 Model “A” Ford
Parts for sale. Many
parts, too many to
list. Call for list.
$1000 for all.
570-655-0607
Leave message.
COKE COOLER.
Classic gas station
model from 40’-50’s
Westinghouse com-
pressor. Good con-
dition. $295, all
offers considered.
Jake 570-829-7859
COLLECTIBLE Sea-
gram’s Mirror – 1908
Stanley Cup $50.
Call Mark at 570-
301-3484 or Allison
at 631-6635.
COLLECTIBLE:
1963 Topps Mike
Ditka Football Card-
Great Shape-Make
an offer. $50.00
570-824-1180
COLLECTIBLES:
1972 Topps Jonny
Unitas-Crisp and
MT-Picture Perfect
$20.00.
570-824-1180
FOOTBALL CARDS.
Philadelphia Eagles.
127 cards, $10.
MUST SELL
570-313-5214
LP’S, 78’S, 45’S
From 40’S, 50’S,
60’S & 70’S
$1 each. 829-2411
NEON SIGN - Elec-
tric, Camel sign, 30
years old, $200.
570-829-2411
QUARTERS. 3
Washington. 1936-
D, 37-D, 39-D. $70
570-287-4135
708 Antiques &
Collectibles
YEARBOOKS:
Coughlin H.S. 1926,
1928, 1932, 1937,
1940, 1961, 1963,
1942, 1943, 1944,
1949. G.A.R. H.S.
1934, 1935, 1936,
1937, 1945, 1946,
1951, 1955, 1956,
1957, 1961, 1965,
1966, 1970, 1980,
1985, 2005, 2006.
Meyers H.S. 1935,
1936, 1937, 1938,
1942, 1943, 1944,
1945, 1946, 1960,
1974, 1975, 1976,
1977. Kingston H.S.
1938, 1939, 1940,
1944, 1948, 1949.
Plymouth H.S. 1930,
1931, 1932, 1933,
1938, 1943, 1944,
1959, 1960.
Hanover H.S. 1951,
1952, 1953, 1954,
1960. West Pittston
H.S. Annual 1925,
1926, 1927, 1928,
1931, 1932, 1959.
Luzerne H.S. 1951,
1952, 1956, 1957,
1959. Berwick H.S.
1952, 1953, 1956,
1957, 1958, 1960,
1967, 1968, 1969
,1970. Lehman H.S.
1973, 1974, 1976,
1978, 1980. Nanti-
coke Area H.S.
1976, 2008. Dallas
H.S. 1966, 1967,
1968. Bishop Hoban
H.S. 1972, 1973,
1974, 1975. West
Side Central
Catholic H.S. 1965 -
1974, 1980, 1981.
Westmoreland H.S.
1952, 1953 - 1954
G.A.R. H.S. 1972,
1973, 1974, 1975,
1976 Pittston H.S.
1936, 1951, 1954,
1963 Pittston Hospi-
tal School of Nurs-
ing, J.O.Y. of 1957,
1959 West Pittston
H.S. 1950, 1954,
1955, 1956, 1960
Hazleton H.S. 1938,
1939, 1940, 1941,
1942, 1943, 1945,
1948, 1949, 1950,
1953, 1954, 1955,
1956, 1957, 1959,
1960, 1961, 1962,
1964 Hazle Twp H.S.
1951, 1952
570-825-4721
710 Appliances
DRYER. GE Electric.
White, 6 cycle,
heavy duty. Excel-
lent condition. $130.
570-881-2384
MICROWAVE: GE, all
options, with
turntable, excellent
condition. $40.
REFRIGERATOR,
small college size,
good condition $40/
570-675-4383
REFRIGERATOR,
Kenmore, white
side by side with ice
and water in door.
Excellent condition
$450. Call
570-654-3135 or
570-760-5519
WASHER AND
DRYER. Extra large
capacity, white, like
new. $100 each.
570-814-5689
710 Appliances
GENE’S
RECONDITIONED
APPLIANCES
60 Day Warranty
Monday-Friday
8:00PM-5:00PM
Saturday
8:00AM-11:00AM
Gateway
Shopping Center
Kingston, PA
(570) 819-1966
REFRIGERATOR.
Kenmore, Almond.
21.6 cf, ice maker,
filtered water.
Excellent condition.
$300. AIR CONDI-
TIONER. Whirlpool,
6000 BTU, energy
efficient. $80
570-868-6018
REFRIGERATOR:
FRIGIDARE
PROFESSIONAL
Stainless Steel 27.8
3 door. Top of the
line purchase
09/2010 for $2500
asking $1800.00.
570-313-1328
WASHER. Maytag.
Fabric-matic. Heavy
duty, extra large
capacity top loader.
25 1/2” wide. White.
Good condition.
$325
570-885-1338
WASHER/DRYER.
Whirlpool,electric.
Excellent, $350.
REFRIGERATOR,
Roper, 18.2 cu ft.
Excellent. $200.
570-474-5188
712 Baby Items
BASINET, for baby,
blue & white, excel-
lent condition. $50.;
BABY BATHTUB
$10; BABY SWING,
Oraco $40. Call
570-829-2599
BASSINET: With
canopy, mobile,
music, vibration.
Storage area under-
neath. Light green/
cream pattern for
boy or girl. Excellent
conditions. Extra
sheets, mattress
pad included. $40.
570-855-9221
CRIB, convertible,
complete. $350 or
best offer
570-474-0614
716 Building
Materials
DOOR. Interior
swing door with 15
glass panes from
top to bottom.
Mounting hardware
includes. 80x31 1/2.
Make offer
570-466-6481
716 Building
Materials
CEILING FAN
white, very good
condition $15.
Anderson window-
36”w X 38”H double
hung, grills & screen
included, very good
condition. $75. or
best offer. Interior
Door - 24 X 80
stained. Pre Hung.
$15. Bi Fold Doors
60” stained. $30.
Door Slab - 18” $10.
570-814-8010
DOORS: (2) sliding
closet doors, 24x80
wood with natural
finish $40. DOOR (1)
30x80 natural finish.
$40. Excellent con-
dition. 675-4383
GLASS DOOR. 3
way glass door for
bath tub. $25
570-331-8183
720 Cemetery
Plots/Lots
ST. NICHOLAS’
CEMETERY,
SHAVERTOWN
6 Plots. Can be
divided. Near
Entrance. $550
each. Call
570-675-9991
726 Clothing
CLOTHING. Great
Buys! Girls, like new.
Sizes 10-12. Large
box $25, Size 14
$25 box. Misses
women’s, Medium
$20, X-large $25.
570-474-6028
JACKET - Mens
Brown Leather
Jacket. Medium.
Long. Good Condi-
tion. $10. 675-0920
JACKETS. Leather.
Boys black size 14.
Genuine Italian
stone. $25 each.
570-868-6018
WOMEN’S size 3X -
4x clothing including
pants and tops,
some with new
tags. $5 for new
and $2 for slightly
used. Great for
gifts. Size 20W
mauve evening
dress for $10. Excel-
lent condition. Call
between 10 am &
9pm. 570-288-9936
730 Computer
Equipment &
Software
COMPUTER SYS-
TEM COMPAQ XP
PRO SP3, Includes
mouse, keyboard,
monitor. Still a year
left on warranty.
$75. 570-457-6610
COMPUTER:
HP Compaq
DC7700 Dual Core
Tower. 3.4GHZ
CPU. 1.25GB DDR2
Ram. Windows 7.
Delivery. $85.
570-905-2895
732 Exercise
Equipment
EXERCISE BIKE, Vita
Master with odome-
ter and speedome-
ter, $30. WEIGHT
BENCH, barbell with
60lbs in weights.
$30 570-824-0591
EXERCISE
MACHINE. Cross
Bow Legend. Very
good condition.
Sacrifice $200.
570-788-2388
742 Furnaces &
Heaters
COAL STOVE: Eng-
lander. 27-3000
heats approximately
2600-2800 square
feet. Burns chestnut
coal. Firebrick-lined,
built in blower sys-
tem, large glass
viewing area, 6” top
or rear exhaust, 610
lbs. Must pick up.
$500. 570-497-4132
HEATER: Timberline
vent-free propane
gas heater with fire-
log. Wall mounted.
15,000 to 25,000
BTUs, sells for $250
asking $99. Excel-
lent condition.
570-328-5611
570-328-5506
OIL: Home heating
oil. Approximately
150+ gallons. Must
remove from tanks.
$2.00 a gallon
Located in Jermyn.
570-877-3861
744 Furniture &
Accessories
ARMOIRE. For com-
puter. Excellent
condition. $100
570-256-7208
BAR. Hardwood,
rock maple, liquor
cabinet w/lock, cop-
per insert top, 2
barstools, 4 1/2’
long. Excellent like
new condition, great
for entertaining.
Must see, awe-
some, smoke free
home. $600
570-693-0884
BEDROOM SET
4 piece Basset,
white, dresser with
3 drawers, desk
with matching chair
& lighted bookshelf,
single bed with con-
vertible canopy.
Excellent condition.
$350. 287-8711.
BEDROOM SET:
(4 pieces) including
headboard, night-
stand, mirror and
dresser, oak. full
size. $450.00.
570-262-0938
BEDROOM SET:
Four piece solid oak
bedroom set pur-
chased at Ashley
Furniture approxi-
mately 4 years ago
for $2,800. In excel-
lent condition, like
new. $900. Call
after 4 p.m.
570-466-3169
744 Furniture &
Accessories
CHAIR. Large reclin-
er. Dark maroon,
soft leather. Like
new. $200
570-457-3541
COFFEE TABLE AND
END TABLE: Oak
with glass top
excellent condition
$40.00.
570-208-3888
DAY BED white
wicker Henry Link
with trundle, desk,
chair, mirror, night
stand, 6 draw
dresser, removable
bookcase, ward-
robe, magazine
stand $500. or call
for individual prices
570-498-0977
DESK, Computer
corner desk
Gray,light oak,
excellent condition.
$75 570-868-6018
DESK: O’Sullivan
Corner Work-center
5.5’x5’.5 finished in
pine laminate, in
excellent condition,
sells for $250. ask-
ing $99. E-mail
photo available. Call
570-328-5611 or
570-328-5506
KITCHEN SET. High
quality, table 36x60
with 4 heavy duty
chairs. Excellent
$165. 878-2849
KI TCHEN TABLE,
small, oak. Sides
fold down. $50. Call
(570) 829-2599
LIVING ROOM SET.
3 piece. Couch and
2 chairs. Covered
and rarely used.
$100. ROCKER,
platform, $25
After 5 735-8542
LIVING ROOM SET.
Couch, 2 matching
swivel rockers and
Ottoman. $350
570-474-5188
LOVESEAT &
OTTOMAN solid
sand colored cush-
ioned, excellent
shape $200.
570/824-7807 or
570-545-7006
PANTRY/CABINET:
6 1/2ft tall, 3ft wide
with shelves and
lots of storage
space. White with
light wood trim.
Excellent condition.
$50. 570-855-9221
PATIO SET: Green
and White in color-
Needs umbrella-
Good Shape-Please
make an offer
$150.00.
570-824-1180
ROCKER with
Ottoman. $75 or
best offer.
570-474-0614
ROCKER. Maple. 6
months old. $30
570-824-2571
SOFA. Green sec-
tional w/sleeper and
recliner. $100
570-417-9280
752 Landscaping &
Gardening
Bruce’s
Lawn Service
See our ad under
Call An Expert
1165 Lawn Care
CHIPPER, shredder,
mulcher, bagger.
Craftsman 5 HP. 3
cutting stages. Very
good condition.
$325. 675-4383
CONCRETE scal-
loped grey edging
24” straight and 17”
curved. total 40 +/-
pieces. Grey $1.00.
570-735-4186
756 Medical
Equipment
POWER CHAIR -
Jazzy Select,
$700 or best offer
ALSO, regular
wheelchair, with
extra weight sup-
port. $100. Call for
more details
570-829-2411
POWER CHAIR:
Jazzy. With leg sup-
ports. Red, comes
with charger. May
need a new battery.
$350.00.
570-331-0632
WHEELCHAIR. Trac-
er IV by Invacare.
Heavy duty, extra
wide, 450 lbs seat,
18” deep x 24” wide
back 18” high. $400
cash only.
570-288-9936
between 10am-9pm
758 Miscellaneous
AB-DOER In box
never opened, $70.
VCR Magnovox with
all hookups, on
screen display
record & timer $20.
DVD player $15.
570-822-8957
ALUMINUM CAP:
Black. For 6 foot
truck bed. $200.00.
570-283-5142
AQUARIUM: 30 gal-
lon. With all needed
accessories $50.
570-829-1541
BACK PACK. Hiking,
navy canvas, $40,
Pic n’ Play, for child.
$40. 570-675-4383
BARREL,
wooden.
53 gallon.
Excellent
condition $195.
570-876-3830
BATHROOM SINK
SET: Gerber white
porcelain bathroom
sink with mirror and
medicine cabinet.
Matching set. $80.
570-331-8183
BLU TOOTH used 12
volt $50. 12 volt
travel cooler $35. 12
volt refrigerator
$35. Jack LaLanne
power juicer $50.
Sharp SF 7320 copy
machine. $150
570-675-7024
758 Miscellaneous
BUMPER rear
chrome 88-98
Chevy/GMC fullsize
pickup. Mint condi-
tion $200. Tailgate
88-98 cChevy full-
size pickup, no rust
or dents. Good con-
dition. $75. Call
after 3pm 655-3197
CANES & WALKING
STICKS - Uniquely
made from the roots
of Slippery Elm
trees. Over 16 avail-
able. $4 & 5 each.
Call 570-735-2081.
CASH BUYER for
Pre 1980 Comic
Books, Toys, Sports,
ANYTHING. Will
travel to you. Call
Brian 800-473-2407
CHOCOLATE SET -
Rose Theme. 5
piece. Small Repair.
$20. Dinnerware - 8
place setting. Royal
Staffordshire Ameri-
can Legend. With
extras. $100.
570-675-0920
CLEATS, Armour
size 11, $25. Softball
cleats, Nike, size 9
$20, Truck cap
$275, Boiler, oil,
$100, Traffic signals,
$50, 570-760-4830
COFFEE MAKER.
Restaurant style, 2
pot Bunn Pour O
Matic. $80. PUMP,
windshield, for Jeep
Wrangler, $50
570-709-2926
DECORATING
ITEMS. Large
assortment of sun-
flower. $.50 to $10.
570-301-8515
DISHES. 2 sets of
china, Service for
12. $100. Yellow set,
service for 8, $40
570-824-2571
FENCING, white
picket style, 4 ft X
8 ft., approx 10-15.
FREE OF CHARGE.
Call (570) 829-1278
FIREPLACE, elec-
tric, built in heater,
$300, TRAVEL
CASE, Golf club,
$10.WIRING, 250”
roll 12/3, $50
570-675-7024
GARAGE SALE
ITEMS. LUGGAGE
RACK, for top of car,
$40. ENTERTAIN-
MENT CENTER, oak
with glass doors,
$40. CHAIR, rock-
ing, wood, $15
570-868-8449
HUTCH, Mahogany.
$50. STOVE, Camp-
ing, $30. LANTERN,
camping $25
570-287-8092
IRONING BOARD
$8; WAFFLE
MAKER $10; (2)
LAMPS, $15 each;
ITALIAN POTTERY
$30 for all.
Call 570-829-2599
LAMPS. stand up
$25 each. ‘89
Chevy S10 truck
bedliner. $40,
SPOILER, for ‘00
Chevy Cavalier. $10,
CARB, 4 barrel from
running Chevy
motor. $50/ TV, GE,
28”, works good,
needs remote. $90
570-740-1246
RELIGIOUS ITEMS -
Hand made
Rosaries, $5. Pope
John Paul II Memori-
blia. 570-829-2411
SLEEPING BAGS. 3
childrens’. $7.50
570-474-6028
TIRES. Various
sizes. $145 to $240.
Call for details
570-969-1481
TIRES: Four (4)
Good tread.
255/70/R16 $100.00
570-824-7015
TRAILER HITCH with
hardware, fits 2005-
2008 Escape, Mer-
cury Mariner, Mazda
Tribute $110 or best
offer. 570-466-1214
TRAIN SET. HO with
box. Diesel, $75.
SAW, Black & Deck-
er circular, $18,
CLOCK, wall, 31 day,
1970’s.$30, TOOL
BOX, small, $20
570-735-1589
TRUCK BOX. Kobalt
aluminum. Fits small
truck. $85
Call Mark at
570-829-1478
762 Musical
Instruments
CLARINETTE 42,
solid state 3 piece,
stereo, phono &
eight track stereo
tape player with
speakers. Albums &
tapes available. $50
(570) 735-6167
762 Musical
Instruments
DIGITAL PIANO
Roland RP-101-MH
Digital Piano with
cabinet and bench.
Excellent condition -
hardly used.
Paid $2400 $1500.
570-417-1734
PIANO
Beautiful Story &
Clark console piano
with matching
bench. Excellent
condition. $750.
Call 570-287-8711
PIANO/SPINET
brown, great for
students $75.
570-417-9280
766 Office
Equipment
PRINTER, Fax, Copi-
er, Scanner. 4 in 1
HP Series 2200.
Excellent condition
$50. 570-675-4383
770 Photo
Equipment
BACK UP CAMERA
12 volt, used $50.
570-675-7024
MANFROTTO
MONO-POD.
Model 681B. Excel-
lent condition. $50
or best offer.
570-788-2388
772 Pools & Spas
LADDER: “A” Frame
for above ground
pool. Purchased last
year for $180. Sell
for $100. Optional
conversion kit $15.
570-574-2149
POOL: 15’ metal
frame pool, with lad-
der, filter pump and
more, 42” high.
Used 1 year. $170.
(570) 655-4915
SWIMMING POOL:
24ft round, 4ft
deep. Plains. YOU
dismantle and
remove. Pump/filter
not included. $350.
570-823-2958
774 Restaurant
Equipment
MIXER. Hobart,
20 quart. Excellent
condition. $850
570-288-5571
774 Restaurant
Equipment
RESTAURANT
EQUIPMENT,
8x12 walk in
cooler $2300;
8x8x10 walk
in freezer $3800;
Pizza oven with
stones $2000;
Stainless steel
kitchen hood
$3000; Stainless
steel pizza oven
hood $4000;
bread pan rack
$100; 2 soup
warmers for $100;
2 door sandwich
prep table $500.
All equipment is
sold as is. For
more info, call
570-847-0873
RESTAURANT
EQUIPMENT,
Somerset Dough
Sheeter, Model
CAR-100. Only
1 available. $1,500
Call for more info
570-498-3616
RESTAURANT
EQUIPMENT,
SOMERSET TURN
OVER MACHINE -
model SPM45,
$500; ALSO, Bunn
Pour Over Coffee
Machine, Model #
STF15, $225
For more info, call
570-498-3616
RESTAURANT
EQUIPMENT,
AMERICAN EAGLE
MIXER, 20 quart
mixer, Model
AE-20, with timer
and guard, $1300.
ALSO, Bev Air 2
door refrigerator/
sandwich prep
table, Model
SP48-12, $1300.
Call 570-498-3616
for more details.
776 Sporting Goods
BACKBOARD,
Basketball, fiber-
glass with rim and
net. $25.
570-824-0591
BICYCLE. Boy’s 20”
Pacific DS2, 6
speed. $30. Boy’s
20” Magna Excitor,
21 speed. $40
570-868-6018
BOWLING BALL: 8lb
blue marble with
beige & blue case,
$30. 570-829-4776
PAGE 6 B Abington Journal WEDNESDAY MAY 11, 2011
WEDNESDAY MAY 11, 2011 Abington Journal PAGE 7 B
906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale
906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale
2
8
7
1
8
4
25 Year Pin Recipients
M
ary Ann Thompson and Sherri M
iller
Left to Right: Mary Ann Thompson,
Maureen Edwards, Sherri Miller
Rookie of the Year Award Recipient • Judy Cerra
Left to Right: Maureen Edwards, Judy Cerra with Prudential Preferred
Properties, Bob Vanston Owner Prudential Preffered Properties
Rookie of the Year Award Recipient • Lori Jewitt
Left to Right: Rhea Simms, Owner Lewith and Freeman Real Estate,
Maureen Edwards and Lori Jewett with Lewith and Freeman
REALTOR
®
of the Year Award Recipient
M
arion Gatto
Left to Right: Marion Gatto, with Lewith and
Freeman Real Estate and Maureen Edwards
Scholarship Winners
Left to Right: Judy Cerra, Angie Boettcher, Kim
Skumanick, Lynn Ydoyga, Maureen Edwards
and Meghan Livingston
Left to Right: Kim Skumanick, PAR Treasurer,
Marion Gatto REALTOR of the Year and
Maureen Edwards 2011 GSBR President
Affiliate of the Year Award Recipient
Barbara Moody with Mortgage Network
342-4115 • www.nasserrealestate.com • 587-5155
Nasser
REAL ESTATE INC.
Since 1950
DALTON $169,900
Beautifully updated 3 bedroom, 1.5 bath home with Whirlpool appli-
ances, pellet stove, extra large living roomand stone patio. Aspringfed
stream and landscaping compliment the 1.3 acres. MLS #11-1307
S. ABINGTON TWP. $165,000
This 4+ bedroom home boasts character throughout and has updates
everywhere. Features include a wrap-around deck, modern kitchen/bath
and a freplace. MLS #11-1290
776 Sporting Goods
BOWLING BALL:
NEW 16 pound
Brunswick Groove
Blue/burgundy. This
ball is new in the
box $15.00.
570-829-2695
CAMO HUNTING-
BLIND. Portable For
single person. $50
570-829-1541
GOLF EQUIPMENT.
Clubs, cart. 13 vari-
ous irons, woods,
etc plus other items.
$50. 72 golf balls,
$10, 2 bags of tees,
$3. 570-474-6028
PALOMINO 1988
COLT POP UP
STOVE COOLER
CONVERTOR, good
tires, new springs
$950. 693-0140
PING PONG TABLE:
Regulation size with
net. Folds up in mid-
dle, on wheels. Very
good condition.
$180.
570-574-8766
780 Televisions/
Accessories
TELEVISION:
Toshiba. 56 inch Hi
Def, DLP Projection
Model 56MX195.
Stand included.
Needs Lamp Bulb
$100.00.
570-443-7527
TV: Sony 27” Trini-
tron color with $75.
Mintek DVD Player
$15
570-829-4776
782 Tickets
TICKETS:
Glee Concert,
2 tickets, June 8,
Floor. 4-Row 2 Wells
Fargo Center,
Philadelphia. $250.
570-690-6003
786 Toys & Games
GAME TABLE SET.
10 in 1. Pool, hockey
basketball, etc.
Approximately 4x6
$45. 570-868-6018
786 Toys & Games
LITTLE TIKES. Work
bench with some
tools, Dollhouse
with furniture and
dolls, Slide. $10
each 570-474-0154
788 Stereo/TV/
Electronics
TELEVISION: Sony
65” Projection TV.
Excellent Condition.
$250 or best offer
and you can come
and get it!
570-287-7162
To place your
ad Call Toll Free
1-800-427-8649
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
BUYING SPORT CARDS
Pay Cash for
baseball, football,
basketball, hockey
& non-sports. Sets,
singles & wax.
570-212-0398
800
PETS & ANIMALS
810 Cats
CAT - Female Calico
free to a good
home. 5 years old,
spayed & litter
trained. Needs a
loving home ASAP.
Also free kittens.
570-762-1015
815 Dogs
PAWS
TO CONSIDER....
ENHANCE
YOUR PET
CLASSIFIED
AD ONLINE
Call 829-7130
Place your pet ad
and provide us your
email address
This will create a
seller account
online and login
information will be
emailed to you from
gadzoo.com
“The World of Pets
Unleashed”
You can then use
your account to
enhance your online
ad. Post up to 6
captioned photos
of your pet
Expand your text to
include more
information, include
your contact
information such
as e-mail, address
phone number and
or website.
ALASKAN
MALAMUTE PUPPY
AKC RARE Red &
white, 1 female,
shots & wormed,
$450 each. Call
570-477-3398
815 Dogs
AMERICAN
BULLDOGS
NKC registered.
Both parents
show champions.
White with eye
patches. $800 and
up. 570-430-8420
CHIHUAHUA PUPPIES
Home raised. 1st
shots & wormed.
Short & longhair.
$400 each. Call
570-991-0160
GERMAN SHEPHERD PUPS
AKC shots, wormed
www.mountain
hauskennels.com
570-746-1689
GOLDENDOODLE PUPPIES
looking for good
home. Family raised
and socialized. Vet
check and vaccina-
tions. Parents are
ACA registered.
Tootsie Roll (the
mother) is our family
pet. $500.
570-837-1980 Cell
570-713-8170
ITALIAN CANE CORSO
Mastiff Puppies
Registered and
ready to go! Parents
on premises. Blue &
blue fawn.
Vet Checked
570-617-4880
ITALIAN MASTIFF/
CANE CORSO
PUPPIES
Ready to go. All
Shots & Wormed.
$500 or best offer.
Call (570) 991-5457
POMERANIAN PUPPIES
Parents on premises
Shots Current. $500.
570-401-1838
815 Dogs
PUREBRED TEACUP
CHIHUAHUA PUPS
2 females, 3 males
8 weeks old. $500
(570) 371-3035
SHILOH
SHEPHERD
Rare breed. Male,
white plush coated.
19 months old,
excellent tempera-
ment. $800
570-288-5571
835 Pets-
Miscellaneous
CHINCHILLA. With
cage. 4 ft. high.
$100 570-417-9280
845 Pet Supplies
FISH TANK,
30 gallon. Includes
everything you
would need. With
wooden stand. $100
Call (570) 762-1015
REPTILE TANK. 10
gallon, wire mesh
lid, heat lamp, cave
and pond. $20
570-474-0154
900
REAL ESTATE
FOR SALE
906 Homes for Sale
Having trouble
paying your mort-
gage? Falling
behind on your
payments? You
may get mail from
people who promise
to forestall your
foreclosure for a fee
in advance. Report
them to the Federal
Trade Commission,
the nation’s con-
sumer protection
agency. Call 1-877-
FTC-HELP or click
on ftc.gov. A mes-
sage from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
906 Homes for Sale
Mountaintop
Unbelievable VALUE!
14 Oaklawn Ave,
Mountain top PA
18707 cape cod, 3
bedrooms, 2 bath-
rooms, dining room,
office/study, family
room, finished
basement, .38 acre,
deck. At Your Ser-
vice Realty Inc. Lisa
Poholek $85,450
Call (570)902-9983
PARDEESVILLE
738 PARDEESVILLE RD
CORNER LOT
Single family built
in 2005. 2.5 baths,
two story with
attached garage.
Oil furnace with
central air. 90 x
140 corner lot.
Kitchen with cen-
ter cooking island,
dining room,
raised ceiling with
glass door entry &
hardwood floor.
Carpeting thru out
home. Tiled
kitchen and bath.
Kitchen appli-
ances included.
NICELY PRICED
$219,900
(570) 233-1993
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
WEST WYOMING
TOY TOWN SECTION
148 Stites Street
CHARMING
BUNGALOW
$74,500
650 sq. ft.
On corner lot with
2 car garage.
2 bedrooms, 1 bath,
walk up attic & full
heated basement,
hardwood floors
with three season
room. Freshly paint-
ed & move in condi-
tion. 570-446-3254
906 Homes for Sale
WEST WYOMING
HOME FOR SALE
545 5th Street
Manor, ranch, sin-
gle family, 3 bed-
rooms, 2 bath-
rooms, double car
attached garage,
eat-in kitchen, din-
ing room, living
room, fireplace,
forced air furnace,
central air, unfin-
ished basement,
82x150 lot size and
spacious, deck.
Great location.
Nice yard. Perfect
neighborhood.
Must see.
$219,000 Call
(570)885-4900
before 9:00 p.m. to
set an appointment
WILKES-BARRE
Affordable
Newly built 3
bedroom home.
20-year
no-interest
mortgage.
Must meet
Wyoming Valley
Habitat for
Humanity
eligibility
requirements.
Inquire at
570-820-8002
909 Income &
Commercial
Properties
PITTSTON
5 UNIT MULTI FAMILY
2 Buildings.
4 Car garage.
Prime location with
over 6,000 sf.
3 New furnaces in
last 2 years.
New roof in ‘08.
Separate utilities.
Close to churches,
parks & town.
Fully rented -
gross income
over $25,000!!
$169,000 OBO
570-563-1261
912 Lots & Acreage
JENKINS TOWNSHIP
New Section in
Highland Hills,
Charles Place
Open!
Four 1+ acre lots
available. Call
570-498-9244
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
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with classified!
NYS LAND ONE
TIME SALE: 10
acres, Salmon River
area $19,995. 7
acres with new
cabin $29,995. 5
acres Hickory Ridge
$12,995. 97 acres
surrounding state
forest $119,995. 7
acres Trout stream
$29,995. 14 acres
Southern Tier
$24,995. 5 acres
Big River $39,995. 7
acres Little Falls
$19,995. Over 100
new properties
offered! Terms or
cash discounts! Call
Christmas & Associ-
ates 800-229-7843
or visit www.Lan-
dandCamps.com
915 Manufactured
Homes
ASHLEY PARK
Laurel Run & San
Souci Parks, Like
new, several to
choose from,
Financing&Warranty,
facebook.com/
MobileOne.Sales
Call (570)250-2890
924 Out of State
Properties
SMYRNA,
DELAWARE - Active
Adult Community
(55 Plus) in beauti-
ful, historic Smyrna,
Delaware. New Sin-
gle Home Develop-
ment near beaches
and bay areas. Pur-
chase prices from
$99,900. Call 302-
659-5800. Visit
www.bonayre
homes.com
938 Apartments/
Furnished
WILKES-BARRE
Charming, Victorian
2 bedroom 3rd floor
apartment. 70% fur-
nished. 34 West
Ross St. View at
houpthouse.com
Most utilities includ-
ed with rent. His-
toric building is non
smoking and pet
free. Base rent:
$700. Security & Ref-
erences required.
Call Vince:
570-762-1453
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
AVOCA
3 rooms, wall to wall
carpeting, appli-
ances, coin-op laun-
dry, off street park-
ing, security. No
pets. $410/month
(570) 655-1606
CARBONDALE
Large, partially fur-
nished 1 bedroom,
all utilities included.
$750 / month. Call
570-267-0855
DALLAS
2 apartments
Modern 1st floor 2
bedroom apartment
& large 2nd floor 3
bedroom apart-
ment. Washer &
dryer. Gas heat. Off
street parking. No
pets. $600 - $690.
Call Joe
570-881-2517
DALLAS
Short term or
month to month as
needed. 2 bed-
room, completely
furnished apartment
in beautiful area.
Includes all appli-
ances, utilities,
cookware, dishes
etc. Carport includ-
ed. $800 month.
570-675-2486
EXETER
TOWNHOUSE
Wildflower Village
Like NEW!. 3 bed-
room, 1.5 bath, liv-
ing room, large din-
ing/kitchen area,
patio. $695/mo pus
utilities. No Pets
570-696-4393
PERFECTLY
CHARMING
FORTY FORT -
SECOND FLOOR,
Immaculate 4
rooms with appli-
ances, laundry,
porch, parking.
Management pro-
vided, 2 YEAR
SAME RENT $465 +
UTILITIES, NO
PETS/SMOKING/
EMPLOYMENT
APPLICATION
REQUIRED.
AMERICA REALTY
570-288-1422
AMERICA
REALTY
QUALITY COLONIAL
FORTY FORT -
FIRST FLOOR
DUPLEX. UNIQUE
$595 + UTILITIES.
Cook’s kitchen with
built-ins, formal din-
ing room, front/rear
enclosed porches,
custom window
coverings. TWO
YEAR SAME RENT,
NO PETS/SMOK-
ING/EMPLOYMENT
APPLICATION
Managed
AMERICA REALTY
570-288-1422
HUGHESTOWN
4 Room/2 bedroom,
wall to wall carpet,
appliances, wash-
er/dryer hookup, off
street parking,
security, no pets.
$470.570-655-1606
KINGSTON
143 E. Bennett St.
High end, ultra mod-
ern, fireplace, bar &
fully equipped kit-
chen. BBQ deck, off
street parking, cen-
tral air, powder
room, huge master
bedroom. 2nd floor,
washer & dryer,
double sink design-
er bathroom . 3rd
floor 2nd bedroom
or office & powder
room $775 + utili-
ties. (570) 881-4993
KINGSTON
72 E. 72 E. W Walnut alnut St. St.
2nd floor, located in
quiet neighborhood.
Kitchen, living
room, dining room,
sun room, bath-
room. 2 large and 1
small bedrooms,
lots of closets, built
in linen, built in
hutch, hardwood
and carpeted
floors, fireplace,
storage room, yard,
w/d hookup and
new stove. Heat
and hot water incl.
Available May 1. 1
yr. lease + security
$900/month
570-406-1411
PAGE 8 B Abington Journal WEDNESDAY MAY 11, 2011
906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale
SUNDAY, MAY 15
TH
2203 Jackson St., Scranton
Prudential Preferred Properties
829 Electric St., Scranton
Prestige Realty Group
500 Spring Run Ln., Madison Twp.
RE/MAX Home Team
Dir: Main to a right on Jackson, go to end. MLS#11-675
Dir: North Blakely St. In Dunmore By Post Offce & High Rise Turn Onto Electric
St. Follow All The Way Down Until Almost The End Property Is On The Right
Corner See Prestige Realty Sign. MLS#11-768
Dir: I380S Moscow Exit 22 L on 690/Church St L 690/ Market St R on Brook
St R on Haas Pond Rd L on Major Rd to Spring Run lane, up hill on right.
MLS#11-1919
1-2:30PM
1-3PM
1-4PM
$115,000
$140,000
$239,900
9 Collins Ave., Jefferson Twp.
Coldwell Banker Town & Country Properties
RR2 Box 259 Highland Dr., Dalton
Coldwell Banker Town & Country Properties
709 Linden St., Clarks Summit
Prudential Preferred Properties
Dir: Rt 348 to Cortez Road to Maplewood Road, take 1st left onto Collins Ave,
home on left, sign in front. MLS#11-1658
Dir: Route 307 from Clarks Summit. After passing Shultzville Deli go straight
onto Creek Hollow Rd. Mile to right turn at Dickinson Rd then half mile to left
on Highland Drive. House on left. MLS#11-1570
Dir: Through Clarks Summit, up South State St, Turn right onto E Grove St,
take frst right onto Linden St, past high school stadium, house is on left.
MLS#11-972
1-2:30PM
1-3PM
1-2:30PM
$89,900
$129,900
$195,000
102 Garwood Dr., Scranton
Coldwell Banker Town & Country Properties
509 Scott St., South Abington
Coldwell Banker Town & Country Properties
101 Beech Ln., Elmhurst
Coldwell Banker Town & Country Properties
Dir: Located in Pennwood section of South Scranton. Herbert Street to Pen-
nwood leading to Garwood. MLS#11-693
Dir: Layton Road to Right On Hill Street. Left on Scott Road, 3rd home on left.
MLS#11-1495
Dir: From Scranton, Route 435 to Rt. 590, left onto Buckingham, proceed uphill
and turn left onto Beech Lane....house on right, on corner of Beech Lane and
Buckingham. MLS#11-770
1-3PM
1-2:30PM
1-3PM
$129,000
$169,900
$296,400
Open House Directory
Te Greater Scranton Board of REALTORS
®
, Inc.
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
944 Commercial
Properties
944 Commercial
Properties
NEWPORT TWP.
PRIME APARTMENTS STILL AVAILABLE!
ST. STANISLAUS APARTMENTS
141 Old Newport Rd., Newport Twp.
Affordable, Accessible 1, 2 & 3
Bedroom Apartments
Income Eligibility* Required.
Rents: $455-$656 plus electric
(*Maximum Incomes vary according to household size)
• High Efficiency Heat/Air Conditioning
• Newer Appliances • Laundry Rooms
• Community Room • Private Parking
• Rent Includes Water, Sewer & Refuse
For more info or to apply, please call:
570-733-2010
TDD: 800-654-5984
Apply Today!
Great, Convenient
Location!
IN THE HEART OF WILKES-BARRE
Immediate Occupancy!!
MARTIN D. POPKY APARTMENTS
61 E. Northampton St.
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18701
• Affordable Senior Apartments
• Income Eligibility Required
• Utilities Included! • Low cable rates;
• New appliances; laundry on site;
• Activities!
• Curb side Public Transportation
Please call 570-825-8594
TDD/TTY 800-654-5984
PROVINCIAL TOWER - S. MAIN
Great Commercial Store Front,
& Inside Suites Available
Steps from New Intermodal Hub
& Public Parking
FREE RENT - Call For Details Today!
570-829-1573
Starting at $650
utilities included
WILKES-BARRE
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
KINGSTON
Charming 2 bed-
room, 2nd floor
apartment, features
a fireplace, built-in
bookcases, large
living room, dining
room, eat-in kitchen,
sun room & much
more! $525 + utili-
ties. Available
June 1. Please call
570-714-8568
KINGSTON
E. WALNUT ST.
Light, bright, 1st
floor, 2 bedrooms,
elevator, carpet-
ed, Security
system. Garage.
Extra storage &
cable TV included.
Laundry facilities.
Heat & hot water
furnished. Fine
neighborhood.
Convenient to bus
& stores. No
pets. References.
Security. Lease.
No smokers
please. $840.
570-287-0900
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
KINGSTON
EXECUTIVE STYLE
2nd floor apart-
ment in beautiful
home. For lease,
available immedi-
ately, 2 bedrooms,
1 bathroom, all
appliances provid-
ed, washer/dryer
on premises, off-
street parking, no
pets. Beautifully
maintained with liv-
ing room, dining
room, and base-
ment with plenty of
storage. $1,000.00
+ first, last, utilities
& security. Call
570-709-2481
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
KINGST KINGSTON ON
A A GREA GREAT T PLACE!!! PLACE!!!
LIKE NEW!! LIKE NEW!!
2 bedroom
apartment in
great neighbor-
hood. 2nd floor.
Includes new
kitchen (with new
stove, dishwash-
er & microwave)
& bath w/washer
dryer hookup.
Hardwood
throughout with
ceramic tile in
kitchen and bath.
$695/mo + utili-
ties and security.
No Pets, refer-
ences required.
Call Scott
(570) 823-2431
Ext. 137
LARKSVILLE
Very clean 1st floor.
2 bedrooms. Heat
included. $500/ per
month. Call (570)
696-2357
NANTICOKE
353 East Ridge St
1 person apartment.
1st floor. Heat,
water, sewage &
garbage included.
All appliances &
parking. $540/
month. Call
570-301-3170
PLAINS
3 BEDROOM, 1.5
bath, laundry area,
new carpets/floor-
ing, quiet area,
$625/mo + heat
and electric. 2 BED-
ROOM, 2nd floor,
off street parking,
large living space.
$425/mo + utilities.
No pets or smoking
in either.
570-820-8822
PLYMOUTH
Available May 15th
1 bedroom, 2nd
floor, modern bath,
water included. No
pets. $400/month
+ security. Call
570-575-2868
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
WILKES-BARRE
Handicap equipped.
Large 2 bedroom.
Includes electric lift,
oversized doors,
large sit in shower.
Appliances. Heat,
hot water & much
more. Available
immediately. Refer-
ences requested.
Call (570) 417-3299
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
WILKES-BARRE
Mayflower
Crossing
Apartments
570.822.3968
- Light & bright
open floor plans
- All major
appliances included
- Pets welcome*
- Close to everything
- 24 hour emergency
maintenance
- Short term
leases available
Call TODAY For
AVAILABILITY!!
www.mayflower
crossing.com
Certain Restrictions
Apply*
WILKES-BARRE
264 Academy St
2 bedrooms, newly
renovated building.
Washer & dryer.
$600/per month
includes heat, hot
water and parking.
646-712-1286
570-328-9896
570-855-4744
WILKES-BARRE
Available June 1st
Large 2 bedroom,
2nd floor. deck,
screened porch,
gas heat. No pets.
$500/month + utili-
ties, security &
references. Call
570-881-8979 or
570-650-3008
WILKES-BARRE SOUTH
SECURE BUILDINGS
1 & 2 bedroom
apartments.
Laundry facility. Off
street parking avail-
able. Starting at
$440. 570-332-5723
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
WILKES-BARRE
lst floor. Convenient
location. 2 bed-
room, living room,
modern kitchen,
wall to wall carpet.
Washer/dryer
hookups. Large
fenced yard. Heat,
hot water, lease,
security & refer-
ences. No Pets.
$585/per month,
Call (570)822-4302
WILKES-BARRE
West River St.
Large 2, 3, & 4
bedroom apart-
ments. Heat & hot
water included. Bal-
cony. Off street
parking. Washer
dyer hookup. Pets
OK. $855 - $950.
Call 570-237-0124
944 Commercial
Properties
OFFICE, RETAIL OR
WAREHOUSE SPACE
WILKES-BARRE
Starting at
$300.00/month.
First month free.
570-829-0897
950 Half Doubles
EDWARDSVILLE
Recently remodeled
large Victorian half
double. 3 bed-
rooms. Walk-out
basement. Private
yard. Porch swing.
Washer dryer
hookup. $700. Call
570-237-0124
KINGSTON
Newly renovated. 2
bedroom. Base-
ment, attic, yard.
$500 + utilities,
security & lease.
Call 570-287-5491
KINGSTON
Spacious 3 bed-
room, 1 1/2 baths.
large eat-in kitchen,
carpeted, finished
attic, parking, no
pets. $675 + utili-
ties, security, lease.
570-288-2867
leave message
LARKSVILLE
3 bedroom, 1 bath
half double, Freshly
cleaned & painted.
Tenant pays all utili-
ties including sewer.
$550 plus security.
Call (570) 332-5723
950 Half Doubles
NANTICOKE
55 Loomis St
3 bedroom, wall
to wall carpet,
full basement &
attic, stove,
fridge & water
included. No
pets. $630
plus security
570-814-1356
WILKES-BARRE
178 Charles St
Available Now!
2 bedroom, 1.5
bath, Townhouse
style. No Section 8.
$550/month + utili-
ties. References &
security required.
Call 570-301-2785
953Houses for Rent
BACK MOUNTAIN
2 bedroom, 2 bath
home in beautiful
rural setting next to
Friedman Farms.
$1,100 monthly. Call
570-822-2992
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
3 bedroom single
family. 1 1/2 baths.
Driveway, yard, nice
area. $800 + utilities
Call 570-332-5723
HUNLOCK CREEK
Retreat. 3 bed-
room home. 2
baths. Hardwood
floors. 1 car
attached garage. 3
car detached
garage. Pool, hot
tup & appliances
included. $950 +
utilities. Available
Immediately. Call
386-873-1879
NANTICOKE
3 bedrooms, 1 1/2
bath single. 1st floor
laundry. Many
extras. All new,
inside and out. Rent
to own. Owner
financing available.
570-817-0601
Leave message
with phone number
NANTICOKE
Desirable
Lexington Village
Nanticoke, PA
Many ranch style
homes. 2 bedrooms
2 Free Months With
A 2 Year Lease
$795 + electric
SQUARE FOOT
RE MANAGEMENT
866-873-0478
953Houses for Rent
WILKES-BARRE
MONARCH RENTALS
3 bedrooms,
all appliances
provided.
Call 570-822-7039
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
WILKES-BARRE
Whole house for
rent. $1300/per
month, utilities
included, Call
845-224-9151
971 Vacation &
Resort Properties
NORTH WILD-
WOOD, NJ Floren-
tine Motel. Beach/
Boardwalk block,
heated pools, effi-
ciency/motel units,
refrigerator, eleva-
tor. Color brochure /
specials. 609-522-
4075 Department
104 www.floren-
tinemotel.com
OCEAN CITY .
MARYLAND. Best
selection of afford-
able rentals. Full/
partial weeks. Call
for FREE brochure.
Open daily. Holiday
Real Estate. 1-800-
638-2102. Online
reservations:
www.holidayoc.com
ORANGE
HICKORY GROVE
CAMPGROUND
Camp sites
available!
Shaded. Show-
ers, flush toilets,
water & electric.
Lake fishing,
canoeing, biking
& golf.
20 minutes from
Wilkes-Barre.
570-639-5478
or 570-371-9770
SPRUCE CREEK, PA
30 minutes from
PSU. 300 ft. + of
exclusive fishing,
hunting, 8+ acres,
log cabin, oil heat,
out buildings, pond.
$775,000.
By appointment.
Call (717) 919-9222
WILDWOOD CREST
Ocean front, on
the Beach. 1 bed-
room Condo, pool.
5/6-6/23 $1,250/
week. 06/24 - 9/9
$1,550/week
570-693-3525
1000
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
1057Construction &
Building
GARAGE DOOR
Sales, service,
installation &
repair.
FULLY INSURED
HIC# 065008
CALL JOE
(570)606-7489
(570)735-8551
1129 Gutter
Repair & Cleaning
GUTTER 2 GO, INC.
PA#067136- Fully
Licensed & Insured.
We install custom
seamless rain
gutters & leaf
protection systems.
CALL US TODAY ABOUT
OUR 10% OFF WHOLE
HOUSE DISCOUNT!
570-561-2328
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
1165 Lawn Care
BRUCE’S LAWNSERVICE
Established 1988.
Fully insured.
Free estimates.
(570) 746-2087 or
(570) 721-2746
1204 Painting &
Wallpaper
A.B.C. Professional
Painting
36 Yrs Experience
We Specialize In
New Construction
Residential
Repaints
Comm./Industrial
All Insurance
Claims
Apartments
Interior/Exterior
Spray,Brush, Rolls
WallpaperRemoval
Cabinet Refinish-
ing
Drywall/Finishing
Power Washing
Deck Specialist
Handy Man
FREE ESTIMATES
Larry Neer
570-606-9638
of Times Leader
readers read
the Classified
section.
Call 829-7130
to place your ad.
91
%
What Do
You Have
To Sell
Today?
*2008 Pulse Research
ONLYONE LEADER. ONL NNNNLL NNNNL NLYONE NNNNNNNNNNNNNN LEA LE LE LE LE LE LE LE LE E LE LLE EEE DER DD .
timesleader.com
Let the Community
Know!
Place your Classified
Ad TODAY!
570-829-7130
WEDNESDAY MAY 11, 2011 Abington Journal PAGE 9 B
C M Y K
PAGE 10B www.theabingtonjournal.com The Abington Journal♦Clarks Summit, PA WEDNESDAY, MAY11, 2011
2
6
5
8
2
6
A CENTENNIAL PHOTO CONTEST
A Look Back
:
Clarks Summit
1911-2011
A Look Back
:
Clarks Summit
1911-2011
Each winner will be
entered in a random
drawing to win the
grand prizes of:
$
100
and one
Complete Custom
Frame Job Valued
at $200!
from
Summit Frameworks.
Winner anounced Aug. 24.
Stroll the streets of yesteryear and help celebrate the
borough’s centennial (1911-2011). The Abington Journal
is sponsoring a Clarks Summit Centennial photo contest
throughout 2011. Share your vintage photograph of a
newsworthy event, historical landmark, local neighborhood,
intersection, house of worship,
business or any photo you feel
will offer a glimpse of the past.
One winning photo will be selected
each week to publish in The
Abington Journal.
theabingtonjournal.com
Please enclose a self-addressed, stamped envelope if
you would like your photo returned. Or you can pick up
your photo at our office at 211 South State Street in
Clarks Summit. Photos will be held through the end of
the contest, August 2011. We will gladly scan your photo
entries at our office Wednesday through Friday from
9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
NAME ________________________________________ PHONE ________________________
ADDRESS ___________________________________________________________________
DESCRIPTION OF PHOTO CONTENTS
(approx. date/year photo was taken, identification of people, locations, etc)
________________________________________________
________________________________________________
th bi t j l
To enter, send your photo along with this form to:
“Centennial Photo Contest,” 211 State St., Clarks Summit,
PA 18411 or e-mail your scanned photo with the information
below to tstephenson@theabingtonjournal.com.
C E N T E N N I A L
PHOTO
CONTEST
2
7
6
0
0
1
BBQ
sUMMer
k
i
c
k
-
o
f
f
A Fundraiser Hosted by State Street Grill
for Abington Area Community Park’s
Handicapped Accessible Paved Paths
5:30 to 7:30 PM - Outside (inside for rain)
Tuesday May 24th
Grilled Food, Salads,
Drink & Raffle
Basket Ticket
$
2
0
includes:
Pre-purchase tickets by May 19 at Clarks Green Boro Bldg.
or email board@aajrb.com for ticket delivery.
114 S. State St., Clarks Summit
MEDIA SPONSOR
Todd Dixon, 49 years of age, married to Denette Dixon. I was born and raised in the
Abingtons. I graduated from the Abington Heights school district and currently own Dixon
Automotive, a very successful business of more than 50 years. I grew up in a working class
family with the knowledge that you don’t spend more than you earn.
Purchasing the family business from my father in 1986 made me even more aware of the
fnancial situations that surrounded me. In 2005 I successfully relocated Dixon Automotive
fromWest Scranton to my hometown here in the Abingtons. During the transition, there
were numerous diffcult encounters with the Clarks Summit Borough management. During
the years that have followed, there have been many more experiences that have been, at very least, a frustrating disappointment.
It has been my personal and business experience that council currently lacks the fundamentals of basic organization in complet-
ing daily required decision making. In my opinion, a borough is nothing more than a business that is funded with taxpayer’s money.
Choosing successful business people to organize the daily workings and borough spending has proven to be successful.
I have no political agenda, however I do have one goal: To work for the people of Clarks Summit Borough and provide sound
decisions on their behalf.
I would like to encourage the local homeowners and taxpayers to attend borough meetings and to be more involved in the daily
issues that borough council members face.To further assist taxpayers, I would like to provide, at no charge, a copy of the borough’s
budget so you can see in black and white how your money is being distributed. I feel that in doing this, informed opinions of cost
reductions can become a reality and not a skeleton in the Borough’s closet. It all begins with the basics: knowledge, determination,
and the ability to follow through to achieve an outcome that is in the best interest of the Borough’s taxpayers, homeowners, family
members, and business owners.
This is a wonderful town, a town of hard working, friendly people.You deserve the respect of having your hard earnings used to
effectively better the borough and not be treated with such disregard.When you vote, vote Todd Dixon for the betterment of our
great Borough.
Vote Todd Dixon 2011 • Working for the people
VOTE TODD DIXON 2011
Paid For By The Candidate
C M Y K
SPORTS
Clarks Summit, Pa. MAY 11 TO MAY 17, 2011 50¢
SCRANTON – The Abing-
ton Heights girls’ track team
turned to its youngsters to
keep an old streak alive.
Freshman Isabelle Clauss
and sophomore Kelsey
O’Donnell were among the
leaders May 5, when the
Lady Comets won the Class
AAA championship in the
Jordan Relays for the fifth
straight time and the seventh
time in the last eight years.
“We have a very young
group of girls with very big
shoes to fill based on our
last four years,” Abington
Heights coach Frank Passetti
said. “We had sophomores
and freshmen all over the
track. They really held up
well to the pressure and
gave it all they have.”
The Lady Comets turned
to 13 girls to form the six
relay teams needed in the
unique event. Of that group,
four were sophomores and
four were freshmen.
O’Donnell and Clauss
joined senior Sarah Gronsky
as those to contribute to
three different relay lineups.
Abington Heights followed
up the Lackawanna Track
Conference Division 1 title
that it won earlier in the
week by posting the highest
point total at the 56th an-
nual meet at Memorial Sta-
dium.
The Lady Comets com-
piled 50 of a possible 60
points. Elk Lake swept the
Class AA titles with 48
points in girls and 45 in
boys. Valley View won the
Class AAA boys’ champion-
ship with 45 points.
Clauss and Gronsky were
part of the winning 400 re-
lay team as well as the sec-
ond-place 1200 medley and
1600 relay.
O’Donnell joined them on
the 400 relay and 1200 me-
dley while also contributing
to the third-place 1600 me-
dley.
Elisia Cadman, Stephanie
Lalos, freshman Erin Jaeger,
freshman Missy Burke and
Tessa McMinn were all part
of two relay teams.
Cadman completed the
winning 400 relay.
Lalos and Jaeger joined
sophomore Taylor Ross and
Jess McMinn to form the
winning 3200 relay.
Ross, Jess McMinn, Mag-
gie Fruehan, sophomore
Alex Chapman and freshman
Jen Burke were on one team
ABINGTON JOURNAL PHOTOS/STEPHANIE WALKOWSKI
Stephanie Lalos, shown above, was a part of the Lady Comets’ winning 3200
relay team.
Winning with youth
AHHS sophomores and freshmen
shine in Jordan Relays
BY TOMROBINSON
Abington Journal Correspondent
Shauna McGraw, shown at left, com-
peted for Lakeland at the Jordan
Relays May 5.
See Relays , Page 4
SOUTH ABINGTON TWP. - Since
1968 the co-directors of the Pace Setter
Athletic Club have run basketball
leagues, clinics and summer camps and
will continue their program into the
summer of 2011.
Dom Falduto and Ron Ulias have run
the organization’s operations for 42
years for the benefit of grade school
kids.
“Both leagues are composed of nu-
merous Abington area boys and girls
along with youngsters and teams from
surrounding communities,” Falduto
said.
Falduto and Ulias got involved with
the Pace Setter Athletic Club during
high school. They were area athletes
See Pace Setters , Page 2
Working
hard in
the off
season
Pace Setters Athletic Club gears up for
summer basketball leagues
BY JOE BARESS
Abington Journal Correspondent
CLARKS SUMMIT- Scranton High
School remained undefeated on the
season defeating Abington Heights
High School 11-6 on May 9.
Starting pitcher Joe McCarthy pro-
vided an RBI single to give Scranton
a 1-0 lead in the top of the first.
McCarthy allowed four runs and
three hits during his four innings on
the mound.
The Comets continued their hot
hitting in the first inning when Dan
Pisanchyn delivered an RBI single
and Derek Kraack-Bird hit a three-
run home run to give Abington
Heights an early 4-1 lead.
Scranton’s Tim Fisch drove in a run
in the top of the second after John
Pizur singled.
After a scoreless third inning,
Scranton struck for two runs in the
top of the fourth to pull within one
run of the lead. Fisch drove in a run
and McCarthy added his second RBI
of the game on a groundout.
A big turning point in the game
came in the bottom of the fourth.
After McCarthy walked the bases
loaded, Jeff Roba was caught leading
off third base to end the inning.
“We have a little bit of a play in,”
Abington Heights head coach Bill
Zalewski said. “We hope that it
works out for us. In this instance, it
didn’t really work out. It’s a coaching
See COMETS , Page 2
ABINGTON JOURNAL/ STEPHANIE WALKOWSKI
Zack Klein makes it to second base in the
Comets game against Scranton.
Knights
outlast
Comets
BY ROB TOMKAVAGE
rtomkavage@theabingtonjournal.com
Baseball
Abington Heights Little
League
VFW defeated Nealon Law
Office 5-4. Contributing for
Nealon Law Office – Nick
Dende had two singles; Eric
Brickel and Matt Hughes each
had one single and one home
run. Contributing for VFW –
Ben Vale had two two-run
homeruns. Winning pitcher
for VFW was Pat Kelly.
Nealon Law Office defeated
Shamus Foundation 5 – 0.
Contributing for Shamus
Foundation: Matt Mecca had
three hits including a double.
Contributing for Nealon Law
Office:Matt Pacyna had his
first Little League hit, Ryan
Harvey had a double and a
triple, Matt Hughes had two
homeruns. Winning pitcher
was Ryan Harvey with 12-
strickouts.
South Abington Police de-
feated Orlando Foods 8-3.
Contributing for South Abing-
ton Police: winning pitcher
Jake Swank had a home run,
as did Zach Smith, Kyle
Burke had a double. Contrib-
uting for Orlando Foods:
Ryan Eckersley and Corey
Justave each had a double.
Nealon Law Office defeated
South Abington Police 4-0.
Contributing for South Abing-
ton Police: Ryan Davis had a
double. Contributing for Nea-
lon Law Office: Eric Brickel
had a one-run homerun; Matt
Hughes had four hits includ-
ing a 2-run homerun. Winning
pitcher was Matt Hughes with
10-strikeouts.
The Benefits Group defeat-
ed South Abington Police 7-3.
Contributing for the Benefits
Group: winning pitcher Tom-
my Rothenberger with seven
strikeouts and Shane Colleran
who had a home run. Contrib-
uting for South Abington
Police: Dan Munley who had
a double, Ryan Burke had
three hits and Jake Swank had
two.
GR Noto defeated Sha-
mus13-12. Contributing for the
GR Noto: Winning Pitcher
Nick Kerekas had five strike-
outs and a home run. Contrib-
uting for Shamus: Thomas
Stone had a home run
Softball
12U Valley Petunia Girls
Softball League.
See Box Scores, Page 2
Community
Box Scores
CLARKS SUMMIT-
When the Abington
Heights High School girls’
softball team was struggling
defensively, head coach
John Kelly decided to make
some changes to his infield.
Joetta Hashem moved from
first base to third, Katie
Stevens moved back to first
base after catching last
season and Kiana Sladicki
moved from third base to
catcher.
“The girls were all in
favor of doing it,” Kelly
said. “They all took it in
stride putting the team first,
and are doing a good job. I
think it says a lot about
them, we try to make it so
it’s not an individual game
like some other sports. You
have to be willing to do
what is best for the team.
They moved and nobody
complained. Two of them
are seniors, they could have
very easily been down or
complained about it, but
they haven’t said a word.”
Katie Stevens, a senior,
started at first base as a
sophomore before moving
behind the plate last season
at the request of her coach.
She ended up being select-
ed to the all-region team as
a catcher, but was still will-
ing to make the move back
to first.
“When you get comfort-
able at one position it’s hard
to go away from it, but it’s
for the better of the team,
and in the end that’s what is
the most important. You
don’t win a game individu-
ally, it’s the team together.”
Stevens added that she
thinks the bond the team
shares is a big reason there
was no bickering about the
position changes.
“I think this year we’re
the closest that we’ve ever
been,” she said. “I feel like
the seniors can connect
with the underclassmen,
and the underclassmen
respect the seniors because
we have that relationship
with them.”
Hashem, also a senior,
had played third base for
much of her softball career,
so the move wasn’t much of
an adjustment for her.
“I kind of knew some-
thing was gonna happen
because we were strug-
gling,” she said. “I’ll do
whatever is best for the
team. Wherever he (Kelly)
tells me to go, I’ll try it out.
I’ve always played third
base up until last year. I like
first base a lot, but I’m
really comfortable at third
because I have played it so
much.”
Hashem thinks the up-
perclassmen set a good
example for the younger
girls to follow.
“I think our seniors are
very positive and always
seem to look at the bright
side of things,” she said.
The move was more of an
adjustment for Kiana Slad-
icki who has been a catcher
her entire career.
“I’ve always caught for
my summer travel time and
want to go to college to
catch,” she said. “They
asked me to play third base
because they didn’t have
anyone, I said sure I’ll start
wherever.”
The sophomore was
thrilled when Kelly told her
she would be moving back
to her regular spot.
“I was real excited,” she
said. “I was jumping up and
down.”
The leadership of the
seniors has already started
to rub off on Sladicki.
“We follow them and do
whatever they do,” she said.
“We try to follow in their
footsteps. We want to pick
up the team when they
graduate, and look up to
them as leaders.”
The Lady Comets (5-4)
will travel to Honesdale
High School on May 12 at
4:30.
Lady Comets demonstrate team-first attitude
BY ROB TOMKAVAGE
rtomkavage@theabingtonjournal.com
ABINGTON JOURNAL /ROB TOMKAVAGE
Kiana Sladicki, catcher, Joetta Hashem, third base and Katie
Stevens, first base, shown above from left, are members of the
Abington Heights softball team.
C M Y K
PAGE 2C www.theabingtonjournal.com The Abington Journal♦Clarks Summit, PA WEDNESDAY, MAY11, 2011
The Medicine Shoppe de-
feated Gerrity’s 9-3. Winning
pitcher Kristen Davis had 12
Strikeouts teammates Emily
Scarfo had a triple, Marissa
Lewis had two hits, Candice
Haas and Amber Potrzuski
each had one hit for Gerrity’s.
The Medicine Shoppe de-
feated Kanton Reality 14-1.
Winning pitcher Emily Maho-
ney had seven strikeouts,
Kristen Davis had a double,
Courtney Wrobel had a triple,
and Grace Perechinsky had a
home run.
The Medicine Shoppe de-
feated Banko North 8-5. Win-
ning pitcher Kristen Davis had
nine strikeouts, teammate
Grace Perechinsky had a dou-
ble and a triple. Kelly Hiller
had a double for Banko North.
Blaum Law Offices defeat-
ed Dunmore Equipment 16-4
MacKenzie Duffy had a three
hit game Angela D’Amato
and Cassie Toth had a two hit
game Lauren Olevnik for
Banko North.
The Medicine Shoppe de-
feated Kobal Fredrickson
12-3. Winning pitcher Kristen
Davis had 10 Strikeouts, team-
mate Grace Perechinsky had a
double and homerun.
Harris Agency defeated
Bitty Bills 2-1. Winning pitch-
er Paige Harris 14 strikeouts.
Harris Agency defeated
Quality Construction 10-3.
Winning pitcher was Ilissa
Hamilton
Blaums Law Office defeat-
ed TLC Eye Care 11-1
Kaylee DeMatteo & Lauren
Olevnik combined for the
win.
Bowling
Midvalley Printing leads
with 441/2 over Hometow-
nAnimal Hospital with 41.
High bowlers were Becky
Decker 249 Series 656, Lisa
Scango 203.
High team scratch game
Idle Hours Lanes 787, Scratch
Series Mid Valley Printing
2250.
Greg Wall Golf Schools and
Hometown Animal Hospital-
won all 4 games.
Cross Country
Catholic Cross Country
League Week 3
Marian Catholic vs St. Ma-
ry’s Dunmore vs St Clair/St
Paul @ Nay Aug
JV Girls
SCSP 20 vs Marian 35
SCSP 18 vs SMS 37
SMS 32 vs Marian 23
Katie Naughton, Marian;
Anna Brier, SCSP; Erin Bar-
rett, SCSP; Julia Sirotnak,
SMS; Stephanie Healey,
SCSP; Lily Mulligan, SCSP;
Elizabeth Egan, SCSP; Sadie
Petty, Marian; Rachel Kerr,
SCSP; Anna Boles, SCSP.
JV BOYS
SCSP 20 vs Marian 35
SCSP 15 vs SMS 40
SMS 40 vs MArian 15
Dan Kuzdro, Marian, Frank
Adamo, SCSP; Kerry Lyons,
SCSP; Dean Sweeney, SCSP;
Tommy Doherty, SCSP; Jake
Brown, SCSP; Conor Walsh,
SCSP; Paul Abdalla, SCSP;
Patrick Kane, Marian; Peter
Burke SCSP
Varsity Girls
SCSP 17 vs Marian 38
SCSP 15 vs SMS 40
SMS 40 vs Marian 15
Nina Erhard, SCSP; Tess
Kearns, SCSP; Kate Paterson,
SCSP; Alyssa Alfono, Mar-
ian; Lexi Yeager, SCSP; Julia
Kerr, SCSP; Lexi Notarianni,
SCSP; Brianna Price, Marian;
Abby Schroth, Marian; Abbie
Sebastianelli, Marian;
Varsity Boys
SCSP 37 vs Marian 18
Marian 16 vs SMS 39 (2
runners)
SMS 37 (2 runners) vs
SCSP 18
Justin Belardi, Marian; Ja-
cob Mineo, Marian; Kevin
Sompel, Marian; Patrick Cos-
grove, SCSP; Mike Terrerri,
Marian; Hugh Doherty, SCSP;
Jack Shean, SMS; DanBurke,
Marian; Tyler Saar, Marian;
Adam Walsh Marian
BOX SCORES
Continued from Page 1
FACTORYVILLE- Senior
Mason Mecke has been a
valuable member of the Li-
ons’ lineup this season, ac-
cording to head coach Todd
Peters
“He’s been hitting the ball
very well for us,” Peters said.
“He’s been driving in runs and
getting on base consistently.”
Mecke, 18, has been playing
baseball since he was just four
years old.
“My dad had always played
so he got me into it, and it
was really fun,” he said.
The Nicholson resident
enjoys battling with pitchers
and the thrill of connecting
with the baseball.
“I just like to hit,” Mecke
said.
Peters thinks Mecke is just
as valuable on defense as he
is with his bat, and has no-
ticed him really take control
of the team this season.
“He plays shortstop which
is a big anchor position in the
infield,” Peters said. “He’s
also showed leadership skills
this year. This is his second
year starting on varsity. He’s
put the time in, and is really
starting to put things together.
He’s done a good job keeping
the team on track and focused,
along with the other captains.
Mecke tries to let his ac-
tions on and off the field
serve as a guide for his team-
mates.
“I just try to lead by exam-
ple,” he said. “It’s better for
the younger kids to see what
the older kids are doing and
learn from it.”
The senior credits the time
he spends practicing during
the off season for his im-
proved fielding.
“I work a lot with my dad
during the winter and that has
helped me to make a better
throw from left side to first
base,” he said.
Although Peters has helped
the senior with certain parts
of his game, he goes to his
father for most baseball ad-
vice.
“Mainly I just look to my
dad for a lot of advice,”
Mecke said. “Coach will give
me pointers here or there, but
he seems to understand and
let’s me do my own thing.”
Peters believes Mecke and
his teammates have a chance
to have a special season be-
cause of the leadership the
veterans provide.
“We would love to be in the
mix for a league champion-
ship at the end of the season,”
he said. “The captains have
been doing a good job keep-
ing the younger guys on task.
As a team everything we talk
about is staying focused.
We’ve had some close games
and we’ve hung in there. In
the past, for one reason or
another we wouldn’t win
those games. This year they
want to win those games, they
want it a little more, that
comes with being a little more
mature and gaining experi-
ence.
Mecke shared similar goals
and is confident this team has
the right attitude to finish the
season on a positive note.
“We’re shooting for a
league championship, then a
district championship and
hopefully to get far in states,”
he said. “We have a really
good team with a lot of good
players and a strong rotation.”
Mason is the son of Ernest
and Theresa Mecke. He plans
on attending Kutztown Uni-
versity for two years, before
transferring to Penn State
University to study mechani-
cal engineering.
LTHS senior an ‘anchor’
of the Lions’ attack
PHOTO COURTESY ALICE STUFFLE
Senior Mason Mecke has been a valuable member of the Lions’ lineup
this season, according to head coach Todd Peters
BY ROB TOMKAVAGE
rtomkavage@theabingtonjournal.com
call, one I’ll think about
tonight, but you just go with
it.”
The Knights (10-0) scored
two more runs in the fifth.
Matt Harte lined a RBI sin-
gle and Fisch doubled in
another run. Fisch recorded
four hits and drove in three
runs to key Scranton’s ef-
fort.
“Timmy’s a great baseball
player,” Scranton head coach
Jamie Higgins said. “He’s a
great hitter, and for a little
guy he’s got power. That
double was a big hit for us.”
Comets starting pitcher
Dan Pisanchyn gave up six
runs and 11 hits over five
innings, before being re-
placed by Jerry Burke.
Scranton continued their
offensive attack with two
runs in the sixth and three in
the seventh stretching their
lead to 11-4. The Comets
tried to rally back in the
bottom of the seventh. Zach
Klein, who had three hits,
delivered an RBI single and
Kraack-Bird added a sacri-
fice fly, but Mike Miller got
pinch-hitter Dante Pasqual-
ichio to pop out to end the
game.
Scranton’s coach was
pleased to come out with a
win against a Comets team
that won their last three
games.
“Abington is a very tough
team,” Higgins said. “In
fact, their probably the hot-
test team in the area having
scored 53 runs last week. It
was a tough task for our
guys to come to their home
field. I thought after giving
up that three-run homer in
the first inning we kind of
settled down. It wasn’t easy,
we battled through six more
innings, but our kids played
really well today.”
Despite the loss, coach
Zalewski was satisfied with
his team’s effort
“The whole lineup from
top to bottom has been
swinging the bats,” Zalewski
added. “I’ve got to be hon-
est, I never feel like we’re
out of a ballgame.”
Abington Heights (5-5)
will travel to Honesdale
High School on May 12 at
4:30 p.m.
COMETS
Continued from Page 1
and saw the athletic club as an
opportunity to stay in touch
with the sport they love.
“Ron is one of the top play-
ers in a generation in NEPA,”
Falduto said. “He is also a
nationally known and respect-
ed basketball clinician.”
The boys’ and girls’ leagues
will kick off in June and con-
tinue throughout the summer
into August. Participants in
the leagues will span from
grades five to eight. The boys
will play at South Abington
Park on Sunday afternoons.
“Last year we conducted a
most successful fifth and sixth
grade boys’ league at South
Abington Outdoor Park,”
Falduto said.
The girls will play at the
Waverly Community Center.
Falduto’s favorite part of the
summer leagues is being able
to provide an opportunity for
hundreds of kids to play bas-
ketball.
“We have these leagues to
tap into the high interest level
of youth basketball for boys
and girls, provide proper in-
struction and organization of
professional programs and
improve the quality of play of
local athletes,” Falduto said.
Some participants in the
Pace Setter program over the
42 years include collegiate
players Bob Sura (Florida
State), Dave Popson (North
Carolina), Larry Koretz (La-
Salle), Bob Bamford (Col-
gate), Bob Antonelli (St.
John’s), Steve Keating (Syra-
cuse) and T. J. McNulty (Penn
State). Sura and Popson even-
tually moved on to the NBA.
For more information on
Pace Setter basketball pro-
grams for the summer, call
570.347.7018 or e-mail pace-
setterbasketball@verizon.net.
PACE SETTERS
Continued from Page 1
University of Scranton
sophomore Tim McGurrin
was selected as a first-team
Landmark Conference
men’s tennis all-star in both
singles and doubles.
Freshman David Teres
earned the same all-star
status and was selected as
the conference Rookie of
the Year in voting by the
head coaches.
McGurrin, a Clarks Sum-
mit resident, was 6-0 in the
conference at number-two
singles and teamed with
Teres to go 5-1 in the con-
ference at number-one dou-
bles.
Seniors Carl Caceres was
selected for the fourth
straight year, earning a spot
on the second team as a
singles player.
C.S.
resident a
first- team
selection
The Scranton Tennis
Club located at 1029 Mor-
gan Highway, Clarks Sum-
mit will host its annual
Open House May 21 from
11 a.m to 3 p.m.
This event is free and
open to the public.
There will be food, open
courts and information
about the benefits of join-
ing the club.
For more information,
visit www.scrantontennis-
club.com or call
570.587.1018.
Scranton
Tennis Club
open house
May 21
The Abington Junior Come-
ts will hold football and
cheerleading sign ups May 11
from 6 to 8 p.m. and May 14,
10 a.m. to noon at the Abing-
ton Heights High School Field
House located at the end of
Beynon St at far end of high
school.
Age Requirements: C Team
- minimum age is 7 years old
by Aug. 31 maximum age is
10 years old if born on or after
May 1.
B Team- minimum age - 10
years old if born before May 1
for football; Aug. 31 for
cheerleading, maximum age
12 years old if born on or after
May 1for football; Aug 31 for
cheerleading.
A Team -minimum age -12
years old if born before May 1
for football; Aug 31for cheer-
leading, maximum age 14
years old if born on or after
Feb 1 for football; Aug. 31for
cheerleading.
Practices will be held Mon-
day, Tuesday, Wednesday, and
Thursday until the first game.
Practice will begin the week
of July 22. After the first
game, practice will be Tues-
day, Wednesday, and Thurs-
day.
Those who have not played
or cheered for Junior Comets
in the past need to bring a
copy of their birth certificate
and a recent photo.
For more information visit,
www.abingtonjuniorcomet-
s.com or call 570.561.9336.
Junior Comets hold signups
Dr. Matthew Grimaldi, Di-
rector of Athletics at Keystone
College, La Plume has an-
nounced the hiring of Keith
Moore as the College’s new
men’s soccer coach.
Moore takes over the pro-
gram following the December
departure of former head
coach Chad Prince.
“We are thrilled that Keith
has decided to join the Keys-
tone athletic department,”
stated Dr. Grimaldi. “He
brings with him the experi-
ence of a student-athlete from
his playing days, as well as a
wealth of knowledge from his
time in the professional
ranks.”
Keystone College names
men’s soccer coach
Dick’s Sporting Goods is
hosting the PGA Cham-
pions Tour the week of June
20 to 26 in Endicott, N.Y.
with 100 percent of ticket
sales to be donated to the
work of the American Lung
Association.
Purchasing a weekly tick-
et booklet for $35 each
helps further the mission of
the American Lung Associ-
ation in the community
while gaining entry into a
premier golf experience.
To purchase tickets today,
visit www.dsgopentfc.com,
click on the Purchase Now
button and, during the or-
dering process, make sure
to select The American
Lung Association from the
drop-down menu of options.
For more information,
call the American Lung
Association at
570.823.2212.
Dicks Sporting
Goods hosts
PGA Tour
TAYLOR – A split vote
from the Riverside School
Board May 9 reflected in the
reaction from the overflow
crowd in attendance, named
former West Scranton High
School and East Stroudsburg
University standout Evan
Prall as the district’s new
head football coach.
The 5-3 vote was met with
boos and jeers from some in
the audience who immedi-
ately left the meeting.
Prall said he was excited
for the appointment and was
undeterred by the reaction.
“Being a head football
coach is something that I’ve
wanted to do. It’s one of the
reasons why I got into edu-
cation. I’m personally
thrilled,” Prall said. “I under-
stand where the kids are
coming from. It’s been a
tough few months for them.
I’m going to ensure that the
kids and the program have as
much success as they can.”
The decision ends a ques-
tionable time for the Vik-
ings, who were defeated by
Clairton, 36-30, in the De-
cember PIAA Class A cham-
pionship while under the
direction of former head
coach Harry Armstrong.
Armstrong resigned in
March amid allegations that
Board President Timothy
Lavelle offered him a full-
time position in the district
in exchange for his political
support for certain other
board members.
The District Attorney’s
office announced Monday
that they would not pursue
charges against Lavelle in
relation to the alleged bribe.
Riverside High School names new head football coach
BY CHRIS HUGHES
chughes@golackawanna.com
C M Y K
WEDNESDAY, MAY11, 2011 THE ABINGTON JOURNAL♦CLARKS SUMMIT, PA WWW.THEABINGTONJOURNAL.COM PAGE 3C
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C M Y K
PAGE 4C www.theabingtonjournal.com The Abington Journal♦Clarks Summit, PA WEDNESDAY, MAY11, 2011
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each.
The Lady Comets won
the two events, took sec-
ond in three and finished
third in the 1600 medley
after being mistakenly
placed in an early heat
with slower competition.
The Abington Heights
boys finished tied for
fifth out of 11 Class AAA
teams.
Lakeland was third and
Lackawanna Trail seventh
out of 10 Class AA girls’
teams.
The Lady Chiefs fin-
ished second in the 400
relay and 1600 medley.
Lackawanna Trail was
eighth and Lakeland tied
for 10th out of 11 Class
AA boys’ teams.
RELAYS
Continued from Page 1
PHOTO/STEPHANIE WALKOWSKI
Mollie Seigle competed for Lacka-
wanna Trail at the Jordan Relays.
Crossword answers from
Page A9
C M Y K
WEDNESDAY, MAY11, 2011 THE ABINGTON JOURNAL♦CLARKS SUMMIT, PA WWW.THEABINGTONJOURNAL.COM PAGE 5C
“Spring Artwork at Newton-Ransom Elemen-
tary” was the theme of this year’s annual art
show, which was held in conjunction with an ice
cream social at Newton-Ransom Elementary
School April 28. The art of 286 students was
exhibited.
According to Dena Maciak, who coordinated
the art show, along with fellow art teacher, Amy
Kishel, “Projects were created throughout the
course of the year with students having art only
once a week. Teachers pick a few days, during
class time, for the students to pick their favorite
art pieces. They are the pieces of art work that is
presented on the night of the show.”
The mediums presented in the show include
drawing with pencil, markers, and crayons;
sculpture with clay, model magic, and paper and
painting with tempra and water color paints.
ABINGTON JOURNAL/JOAN MEAD-MATSUI
Sandi, Santino, Giovanni and Jim Giacometti of Clarks
Summit at the art show.
.
Annual art
FACTORYVILLE -Stu-
dents from the Recycling
Club of Lackawanna Trail
High School stayed green
by planting trees at the
Clinton Township and
Factoryville Borough Park
April 29 for Factoryville’s
Arbor Day. It was origi-
nally scheduled for April
28, but was postponed
due to heavy rain.
On a much clearer April
29, The Recycling Club,
along with school princi-
pal John Rushefski, assist-
ant principal Tania Skot-
leski, vice-president of
Factoryville borough
council Tom Davis, and
director of community
development Liz Ratch-
ford, spread mulch to
make a rain garden, in
front of the soccer park
and planted trees there.
They also planted in front
of the green parking lot.
“We enjoy saving the
world one tree at a time,”
said Trail senior Sarah
Langan.
“It’s a great way to give
back especially with
friends. It’s a lot of fun.
God gave us a great day
to do it,” said senior Al-
icia Breita .
Ratchford gave the stu-
dents educational lessons
about planting trees. She
taught them to use water
bags around newly planted
trees and the purpose of
them. “I also taught them
that the green parking lot
is made of recycled plas-
tic,” she said.
Each year, a different
group plants trees for Ar-
bor Day. Last year, the
Girl Scouts planted in
front of local Factoryville
homes. The year before
that, the Boy Scouts
planted trees across the
street from Ray’s Market.
“We thought this year
would be a good year for
the Recycling Club be-
cause they are conscious
of what’s going on in the
environment,” said Skot-
leski.
Lackawanna Trail Recy-
cling Club works to keep
the school clean. Emily
Mattes, senior and club
organizer, helps the stu-
dents to recycle bottles at
the high school. They
rinse bottles in the cafete-
ria every day after school,
and put them in recycling
bins, which they empty at
least once a month.
“The kids put a lot of
time into it,” said Deb
Joyce, the club’s moder-
ator. This year, the club
expanded to about 20 stu-
dents. “We’re pretty much
a huge family,” said Brei-
ta.
“It’s a lot nicer that
more kids got involved,”
said Joyce. Joyce also
mentioned that on the last
day of school after an
early dismissal they will
sponsor a paper pick-up
day, in which they will
clean lockers and empty
all the recycling bins. “It
will be the biggest clea-
nup of them all.”
Tom Davis read aloud a
proclamation stating that
Factoryville’s Arbor Day
is officially April 29 this
year. “I think it’s great,”
he said.
The Recycling Club was
happy to do this project
of planting trees at the
Clinton Township and
Factoryville Borough Park.
“They work hard with-
out asking for any
praise,” said Rushefski.
Arbor Day branches out to Trail’s Recycling Club
BY BEN FREDA
Abington Journal Correspondent
ABINGTON JOURNAL/ALICE STUFFLE
Kelly DeBree works on planting during the Arbor Day event.
Lackawanna Trail Elementary
Center Principal Jeff Gregory an-
nounced the third quarter honor roll
for fifth and sixth grade. Students
obtaining honor roll status were:
Fifth Grade: Rachel Aschen-
brenner, Trent Ashley, Austin Auke-
ma, Samantha Benjamin, Emma
Collins, Laura Collins, Timothy Cole,
Karley Cresswell, Heidi Davis and
Allison Decker.
Also listed were: Lydia Dunckle,
Courtney Dwyer, Andrew Faist,
Connor Ferguson, Marleah Filan,
Autumn Hendershot, Griffin Holmes,
Owen Hyde, Alaina Jones and
Shawn Jones.
David Klinges, Alexandra Kwiat-
kowski, Brooke Lamberti, Carolyn
Mack, Lili Martin, Heaven McEll-
henney, Allison Melnikoff, Ryan
Mercer and Samantha Morgan.
Christopher Mulvey, Zachary
Oulton, Laurelann Penn, Brianna
Pensak, Kathleen Rodenbach, Ryan
Schur, Ami Sohns, Mikayla Stuenzi,
Nicholas VanFleet and Thomas
Vokes.
Jacob Wescott, Breanna Wood
and Jessica Zajac.
Sixth Grade: Travis Ankoff,
Lauren Baldwin, Matthew Bergey,
Anthony Berrios, Kelly Bird, Cas-
sandra Brown, Ashleigh Clarke, Mary
Clough, Natalie Cocchini and Ruth-
anna Danowski.
Also listed were: Colin Domnick,
Gregory Ellsworth, Jaclyn Fusik,
Grace Gallagher, Marty Gatto, Noah
Hawthorne, Andrew Huertas, Tho-
mas Huffsmith, Matthew Kinback
and Joseph Kubilus.
Taylor Lauzon, Madison Lee,
Alyssa Lezinsky, Mara Lord, Marlena
Mohyla, Mikayla Nelson, Ethan Os-
wald, Mikayla Otto, Nicholas Paw-
lukovich and Madisyn Peoples.
Hunter Reynolds, Elizabeth Ro-
denbach, Rachael Rosengrant, Alli-
son Strauch, John Thomas, Robert
Titus, Brenden Tobin, Anna Tor-
rence, Emily Van Fleet, Sabrina
VonAhrens and Sarah Weisenfluh.
HONOR ROLL
Lackawanna Trail High School
Principal John Rushefski announced
the third quarter honor roll for the
Lackawanna Trail Jr./Sr. High
School.
TwelfthGradeHighHon-
ors: David Boslough, Jennifer
Brown, Sara Choplosky, Justin
Clarke, Stephanie Cobb, Melissa
Corby, Rachel Corby, Alayna Craig-
Lucas, Chelsea Cucura and Danielle
Dobitsch.
Also listed were: Lauren Ells-
worth, Brandon Foster, Kayla Grun-
za, Tanner Holmes, Natalie Horrocks,
Alyssa Huffsmith, Sarah Johnson,
Samantha Jones, Michael Kilmer
and Aaron Kovalich.
Sarah Langan, Meghan Leonard,
Melaina McCracken, Lynette
McWhorter, Mason Mecke, Alexander
Miller, Julie Molinaro, Brittney
Morse, Myranda Myers and Alicia
Reid.
Jordan Rose, Alyssa Sunseri,
Naomi Watkins and Shawn Wilsey.
TwelfthGradeHonors:
Rachel Ameigh, Casey Chamberlin,
Joshua Cook, Zachary Curran, An-
drewDietrick, Robert Hanyon, Jason
Konopka, Hannah Lewandowski,
Emma Peters, Marisa Scappatura,
Anthony Sorak and Kayla Wilkins.
EleventhGradeHigh
Honors: Gabrielle Bellanco, Bruce
Benko, Marissa Booth, Alyssa Buntz,
Tori Carpenter, Collin Chermak,
Ashley Chuck, Anthony Colo, Laura
Cox and Garrett Craig-Lucas.
Also listed were: Ruth Cummings,
Caitlin Joyce, Jennifer Keller, Peter
Lengel, Erica Lewis, Louanne Mack,
Alyssa Mallory, Kimberly Martin,
Jason Morse and Jesse Morvan.
Jamie Reese, Taylor Reynolds,
MatthewRynkiewicz, Alexa Rzucidlo,
Cameron Savage, Emily Scappatura,
Jacqueline Sharp, Megan Stec,
Amanda Stone and Cecilia Strauch.
Casey Streich, Nicholas Sujkowski,
Nicholas Thorne, Molly VanDuzer,
Benjamin Williams and Graham
Williams.
EleventhGradeHonors:
Alicia Breita, Brandi Chilson, William
Gerrity, Dylan Grunza, Zachary
Kongvold, Jennifer Lauzon, Mahalia
Mailey, AndrewO’Brien, Kirsty Otto
and Natasha Pacholec.
Also listed were: Brian Palaskas,
Shantelle Prebola, Mackenzie Ro-
siak, Stephanie Sheridan, Emily
Stuenzi, Lyle Sweppenheiser, Josh-
ua Symuleski, Zachary Traver, Chris-
tina Warren and Joseph Wilga.
TenthGradeHighHonors:
Kyle Arnold, Alicen Backus, Isaac
Barbolish, Bridget Benko, Jessica
Bowman, Colleen Brace, David
Brown, Michael Chermak, Miranda
Cobb and Kevin Crawford.
Also listed were: Cameron Crock,
Morgan Curran, Courtney Ditchey,
Keirnan Dougherty, Patrick Dunlea-
vy, Victoria Ellsworth, Aliza Fur-
neaux, Amanda Hirschler, Meredith
Horwatt and MatthewHuertas.
Lydia Lamhauge, Mason Lengel,
Taryn Maleski, Molly Mattes, Benja-
min McLaughlin, Dalton Mecke, Peter
Murazzi, Ilyssa Myers, Shea Myers
and Mikaela Noble.
Sean Noone, Shannon O’Malley,
Richard Pollock, Daniel Richards,
Victor Rosa, Brianna Smarkusky,
Gabrielle Sunseri, Anna Sweppen-
heiser, Anthony Urban and Zachary
Wetzel.
TenthGradeHonors: Mat-
thewDecker, Leyna Faundez, Jo-
seph Howard, Emily Huffsmith,
Kayley Kavetski, Tane Law, Kodi
Rozanski, Heather Scala, Jordan
Wallen, Devin Walsh and Evelyn
Woodcock.
NinthGradeHighHonors:
David Beichler, Lindsay Bergey,
Sarah Botscheller, Trista Carpenter,
Devon Clarke, Sara Cobb, Olivia
Cooper, MatthewFlynn, Mackenzie
Gardner, Madeline Giardina and
Victoria Hegedty.
Also listed were: Julianna Jarna-
gin, Shannon Jones, Brian Kearney,
WilliamLee, Amanda Madans, Lind-
sey Price, Jessica Remick, Nicole
Rosa, Phillip Sawicki and Katie Sei-
gle.
Staci Srebro, Lauren Stanton,
Janine Strauch, Christopher Stutz-
man and David Wyman.
NinthGradeHonors: Jacob
Adcroft, Alexa Backus, Shelby Croas-
dale, Ryan Dill, Timothy Griffin,
Madeline Jenkins, Richard Kordish,
John Kwiatkowski, Dillon Miner and
Ashley Purdy.
Also listed were: Julie Scappat-
ura, Frank Sheposh, Chelsy Stuble,
Morgan Telesk and Dylan Walsh.
EighthGradeHighHon-
ors: Nathaniel Barbolish, Kasey
Buck, Kerrigan Buck, Rachel Clark,
MatthewCole, Hunter Crook, Morgan
Ditchey, LiamDougherty, Vanessa
Ellsworth, MatthewFarrell, Jacob
Hayduk, Jericho Hendershot, Aidan
Holmes, Kelsey Hopkins, Rachel
Johnson, Shania Kane, Jody Lengel,
Maddie Lengel, Daria Lewandowski,
Lauryn Maleski, Victor Mallory,
Nicole Martin, Taryn Matti, Dana
Miller, Nicholas Miller, Marissa Pas-
saniti, Logan Phillips, Cooper Rosiak,
Tyler Rzucidlo, Evan Sandercock,
Taylor Selwood, Amanda Stutzman,
Deanna Warren, Grace Wetzel, Seth
Williams and Kaylah Woodcock.
EighthGradeHonors:
Jonathan Bowman, Chancey Bra-
dley, Mary Cosminski, Michael De-
Bree, Ross Fauquier, Melissa Grimm,
Neil Harvey, Russell Lauzon, Ab-
dessamii Lebdaoui and Kristen
Miller.
Also listed were: Michael Pond,
Gabriel Sorak, Allison Stuenzi and
Gabrielle Truesdale.
SeventhGradeHighHon-
ors: Robert Buck, Jacob Furneaux,
Breanna Halter, Eric Holmes, El-
izabeth Huggler, Carli Kalinoski,
Anna Kane, Amanda Kinback, Evan
Kongvold and Jordan Laytos.
Also listed were: Bethany Mudge,
Trent Phillips, Wynn Phillips, Austin
Pringle, Nicholas Rolka, Melissa
Russell, Steven Scioscia, Alyssa
Sohns, Cal Srebro, Cody Stuenzi and
Damian Surridge.
SeventhGradeHonors:
Courtney Carpenter, Samantha
Cobb, Kathleen Fricke, Matthew
Kwiatkowski, Kayla Lorino, Phillip
Mattes, Emily Purdy, Joannah Spa-
dine and Gabriella Thursto
HONOR ROLL
Jordan White (11th Grade) and Matthew Thompson (12th Grade), Abington
Heights High School students enrolled at the Career Technology Center (CTC),
have won Gold Medals at District Competition and participated in the Skills
USA State Competition in Hershey. White received the Gold Medal in Computer
Numerical Control Milling. Thompson received a Gold Medal in Computer
Numerical Control Turning in the Skills USA Competition and has enlisted with
the United States Marine Corps.Johanna Santoriello (12th Grade) earned a Gold
Medal in the CTC Skills USA Contest in Pastry Arts. She has been inducted into
the National Technical Honor Society and is employed by Euro Café. She has
been accepted to attend the Culinary Institute of America, where she will con-
tinue her studies in the fall.Donald Jones (11th Grade) was a Silver Medalist at
District level in the Skills USA Contest at CTC in technical drafting. Dan Barnett
(12th Grade) has been named a Student of the Month at Career Technology
Center of Lackawanna County. Dan does volunteer work, restoring locomotives
at Steamtown National Historical Site. Shown, from left, are: Johanna Santo-
riello, Matthew Thompson, Daniel Barnett, Donald Jones and Jordan White.
A.H. students earn career awards
Dean of Wyoming
Seminary Middle
School, Mary T. Ko-
lessar, has announced
the Greater Abington
area students named
to the Academic High
Honor Roll for the
second trimester of
the 2010-2011 academic
year.
High Honor Roll:
Grade 7: Gokulan
Gnanendran, Clarks
Summit; Emily Peairs,
Clarks Summit.
Grade 8: Ruhani
Aulakh, Waverly; Mary
Lundin, Clarks Summit;
Katherine Rogers,
Clarks Summit.
HONOR
ROLL
The morning may have started off dreary but blue skies prevailed for Team CMC – both literally and
figuratively – during a recent American Heart Association Heart Walk at Nay Aug Park.
For starters, the local hospital set a record for the most registered walkers in the events ten-year history:
811 to be exact.
CMC was cited for healthy lunch choices in the cafeteria, on-site exercise classes including Zumba, part-
nerships with area fitness centers, the development of a Community Walking Trail at the Mall at Steam-
town, and for being the only hospital in Lackawanna County that has a dedicated Community Health Educa-
tion and Wellness Department.
By the event’s wrap-up party, Team CMC had learned that fellow member Mark Arzie of Lakeland School
District, had been declared the first-place winner of the morning’s 5K race .
Lakeland student wins 5K race
C M Y K
PAGE 6C www.theabingtonjournal.com The Abington Journal♦Clarks Summit, PA WEDNESDAY, MAY11, 2011
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