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SNAKE OS for Str8132-Based NAS

USER MANUAL

Snake OS version 1.0.0 (20091027)

Authors:

Douglas Gazineu
Jarko Papalitsas
José Maciel
Miguel Moreto

Date: March 16th, 2010


Table of contents
Table of contents ........................................................................... 2
1. Updating Firmware .................................................................... 4
1.1. Compatible devices .................................................................. 4
1.2. Starting NAS ........................................................................... 4
1.3. Updating firmware ................................................................... 5
1.3.1. Files needed ...................................................................... 5
1.3.2. Caution ............................................................................. 5
1.3.3. Selecting file ...................................................................... 5
1.4. Starting new NAS firmware ....................................................... 5
2. Web Interface ............................................................................ 6
2.1. Connecting and login ................................................................ 6
2.2. My NAS .................................................................................. 6
2.3. Device .................................................................................... 6
2.3.1. Hostname.......................................................................... 6
2.3.2. Admin ............................................................................... 7
2.3.3. LAN Settings ...................................................................... 7
2.3.3.1. IP Address ................................................................... 7
2.3.3.2. MAC address ................................................................ 7
2.3.4. Web Interface .................................................................... 7
2.3.5. Time ................................................................................. 7
2.4. Disks...................................................................................... 8
2.4.1. Diskname .......................................................................... 8
2.4.2. Format.............................................................................. 8
2.4.3. Partition ............................................................................ 8
2.5. Services ................................................................................. 9
2.5.1 DDNS ................................................................................ 9
2.5.2. FTP................................................................................... 9
2.5.3. Samba ............................................................................ 10
2.5.4. SSH/SFTP........................................................................ 11
2.5.5. Swapfile .......................................................................... 11
2.5.6. Transmission ................................................................... 11
2.6 Sharing ................................................................................. 12
2.6.1. Printers ........................................................................... 13
2.6.1.1 Installing the printer in your operational system............... 13
Windows XP machine ............................................................ 13
Windows 7 RC ..................................................................... 14
2.6.2. Users .............................................................................. 14
2.6.3. Shares ............................................................................ 15
2.7. System................................................................................. 15
2.7.1. Status .......................................................................... 16
2.7.2. Log .............................................................................. 16
2.7.3. Monitor ........................................................................ 16
2.7.4. Config .......................................................................... 16
2.7.5. Firmware ...................................................................... 16
2.8. Transmission ......................................................................... 16
3. SSH .......................................................................................... 17
3.1. SSH clients ........................................................................... 17
3.2. Accessing NAS ....................................................................... 17
Appendix A - FAQ ......................................................................... 17
Appendix B - Troubleshooting ...................................................... 18
Appendix C - How To set up a serial interface .............................. 18
C.1. Hardware setup ..................................................................... 19
C.2. Software setup using Windows XP ............................................ 21
1. Updating Firmware
1.1. Compatible devices
The current version of SNAKE OS was tested to be compatible with the following devices:
- WLXKJ-652 (Manufacturer: FUKBOON)
- NS-K330 (Manufacturer: Kintec)

1.2. Starting NAS


After connecting your NAS it will start and the power LED will turn on. Open a web
browser and enter "http://NAS" into the address field in the browser, where "NAS" is the
name of your NAS.

Alternatively will may enter ip address. If there is a DHCP SERVER existed in the LAN,
the LAN Server will get the IP address automatically from the DHCP SERVER when start-
up. If there is no DHCP SERVER existed in the LAN, the LAN Server will start up with the
default IP address 192.168.0.240 and provide the DHCP service with fixed IP addresses
range from 192.168.0.1 to 192.168.0.239.

A login screen will be shown, then you have to enter default user and password.
user: admin
password: admin

Web interface will be shown like follows:


1.3. Updating firmware
Select 'Tools' menu and click 'Upgrade firmware'. It will let you do NAS Firmware
Update.

1.3.1. Files needed

Now you need to have 'SNAKE OS' files saved in your PC. Two files are available in
updating package:
a) snakeos-release-date-type.bin, image file.
b) snakeos-release-date-type.md5, only to checksum purpose.
Where:
RELEASE: Beta, or Release name and version (beta3 / GreenV1 / NajaV2... etc)
DATE: Date of compilation
TYPE: from-original or from-snake. "FROM-ORIGINAL" is the right one to be installed
from original firmware. "FROM-SNAKE" can be installed only from Snake OS starting in
Beta2.

1.3.2. Caution

Before upgrading system firmware, back up all disk data on the LAN Server to avoid any
potential data loss during system update. Make sure you have an USB device connected
to your NAS.

If you are installing Snake OS for the first time take care when choosing the right
file. In this case you must use "FROM-ORIGINAL" file, otherwise you will brick your
device.

System update may take some seconds to several minutes to complete depending on
the network connection status. Please wait patiently and don't power off the device.

1.3.3. Selecting file

Click the 'Browse…' button to select the correct firmware image for system update. Now
select the desired bin file and start updating and click 'Update' to update the firmware
automatically.

1.4. Starting new NAS firmware


After updating your NAS firmware you are able to connect to SNAKE OS.

If you have changed your IP address before updating you need to remember it was
changed to default, the same as described in section 1.1. You may need change your
network settings to change your IP address to the same network that NAS.

Once you have done it, you can start NAS web interface as described in the following
sections.
2. Web Interface
2.1. Connecting and login
When connecting to the device first time, device has been set to use static IP of
192.168.0.240. To get started, open up your favorite web browser (Mozilla Firefox,
Internet Explorer, etc.) and to the address bar enter the IP address of your NAS (default
192.168.0.240).

You should now see a login dialog. The dialog consists of two entries. To the first enter
your user name and to the second enter your password. If your device has just been
updated to Snake OS, the default user name is admin and password snake. If everything
went fine, you should now see a page with a menu and information about your system.

2.2. My NAS
This is the page you'll see shortly after login. The page contains a summary of your
system and a button which will allow you to reboot your NAS.

Here are brief explanations for each line:


• Kernel version: Shows current Linux kernel version and variation. Kernel is
responsible for things like I/O management, memory management, device
controlling, etc. Snake OS uses currently Linux kernel version 2.6.16 gazineu
variation.
• NAS version: Shows current firmware version of your NAS.
• Storage Name: Basically your hostname. For more information, see 2.3.1.
• LAN IP Address: IP address of your NAS. It's assigned by DHCP or by Static IP
configuration. Default IP has been set 192.168.0.240 (static).
• LAN MAC Address: Basically it is the hardware ID of the NAS' network card.
Snake OS is able to change it though.
• Physical RAM: How much there's device's internal memory total/free. Makes
device run faster by storing temporary data here.
• Swapfile: “Extra RAM”. A file on a mass memory device which will be used if no
more RAM is available. Disadvantages compared to RAM are slower read/write
time and shortening Flash drives' lifespan.
• Uptime: How long it is from the previous boot.

2.3. Device
This section has all the settings related to the base operation of the NAS

2.3.1. Hostname

This is the place to change your NAS hostname. Hostname is a unique name that is
given to all network devices. It is your choice how you'll name your device but you
shouldn't use the same name on two or more devices. There are also some other
restrictions that apply but more on that see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/
Hostname#Restrictions_on_valid_host_names.
2.3.2. Admin

Place to change passwords for the web interface, SSH and Transmission. It is required
you to type the password twice to avoid typing mistakes.

2.3.3. LAN Settings

There are the basic settings to get your NAS connected to the Internet

2.3.3.1. IP Address

This is the place where it is possible to change IP address and DNS settings of the
device. You should be aware that wrong settings here may disconnect your NAS from the
Internet.

For starters you should decide whether you want to configure all your settings
automatically or set them manually. If you decide to use automatic configuration for all
settings, you should go for DHCP by ticking 'Use DHCP Address' and also 'Use DHCP for
DNS'. This configuration should be fine on most of the users but it also has its own
downsides. When using DHCP, your router may sometimes forget configured leases and
that way it may assign a totally new IP for your NAS.

There is also a way to do a half-automatic configuration where only IP, Subnet Mask and
Default Gateway are configured automatically. You'll need to configure your DNS settings
manually. If you're going to do this setup, tick IP settings by 'Use DHCP Address' and
untick 'Use DHCP for DNS'. Now you can follow instructions on next paragraph but skip
manual IP settings part.

The third option is to manually set all the settings. Type a static IP address, netmask
and default gateway according your network configuration. You can read more about
subnets in some websites like http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Subnetwork. Default IP
address is 192.168.0.240 and netmask 255.255.255.0, but your may want to change it
according to your network configuration. Probably default gateway is the computer or
router that is used to connect to the internet. Type its IP address in 'gateway'.

Set DNS server and local DNS domain. DNS servers are used to resolve names on the
web, that may be same as default gateway or another one. If you have doubt about
network settings, ask to you network administrator.

2.3.3.2. MAC address

It is possible to change MAC address of the NAS here. You don't need to change this on
normal circumstances.

2.3.4. Web Interface

In this section you can change the default port used to access the NAS web interface.
The default port is the 80 (http default).

2.3.5. Time

Settings to change time on your NAS are placed here. You may want to select time zone
of your area and also set time either manually or by NTP (Network Time Protocol)
"Internet time".
2.4. Disks
This section contains settings related to the mass storage devices attached to your NAS.

2.4.1. Diskname

In this screen you can assign a name to each one of your disks (or partitions).

The column "Partition" shows the device ID detected by Snake OS. In the field "Mount
Name" you can type the a name for your disk (or partition). To save this, click on "Save"
button. You can also delete a name by clicking on "Remove".

2.4.2. Format

This screen lets you to format a device disk or partition. The device will be formatted as
ext3.

2.4.3. Partition

You can choose mount or umount disks. When you insert a new disk, its automatically
mounted. It's important to umount every unit before to remove it from NAS device.

When sda is mounted, for example, it's possible to locate it in the following path:
/usb/sda1 (first partition). If you set a diskname, then you will find the partition under
/usb/diskname where "diskname" corresponds to the name you have given, as in 2.4.1.

This path can be accessed through SSH, as will be shown in Chapter 3.


2.5. Services
In this section you can change the settings about your NAS services.

2.5.1 DDNS

DDNS is shortened from Dynamic Domain Name System and it allows you to set a
memorable subdomain for your external and dynamic IP. Practically this means you can
access your NAS (or other device depending on your NAT settings) outside your subnet
without remembering your external IP ie you can use snake.dynamicdns.com instead of
42.42.42.42.

To get started you need to register an account on some of the listed DDNS service
providers. After that fill in the details:

Alias: Type your dynamic domain name here

Username: Type your DDNS service username here

Password: Type your DDNS service password here

<SOMEONE SHOULD REVIEW THIS AS IM NOT SURE ABOUT THE LABELS>

2.5.2. FTP

This service enables sending and receiving files through File Transfer Protocol.

The following option can be set in this screen:


• Anonymous FTP folder: is the root location where users will have access to send
and receives files;
• FTP enable checkbox: This option will enable or disable ftp service;
• Allow Anonymous: Setting this checkbox you will grant access to anonymous
users in your ftp server;
• Anonymous Can Write: Check this to give write permission to the anonymous
users;
• Only Anonymous: Check this box to permit only anonymous users to your ftp
server. This way, the users created in the Sharing/Users section will not have
access to the ftp server.

Just below there is a label that shows service status. Four buttons can be used to apply
configuration, start, stop or restart the ftp service.

Many applications (client) can be used to connect to your NAS through FTP service. If
you are using Windows, you can download FileZilla (http://filezilla-project.org) or use
your favorite browser. Try to type the following address at Firefox or IE address bar:
ftp://192.168.0.240 (using default IP address).

2.5.3. Samba

Samba is a suite of programs that enables interoperability (including file sharing)


between a linux distribution (Snake OS in this case) and Windows.

The checkbox "Samba enabled" lets you enable or disable the Samba service. You can
also change the following options:
• Samba domain/workgroup. Insert here your network domain or workgroup. If
you are using Windows XP you can find workgroup name by right clicking in 'My
Computer' and selecting 'Properties'. Change to 'Computer Name' tab and look at
'Workgroup'.
• Samba security mode. Choose if you prefer anonymous login or by user. Users
settings will be shown in section 2.6.1.

It's also possible to see samba running status and the action buttons: Apply, Start, Stop,
Restart.

2.5.4. SSH/SFTP

It's possible to start, stop and restart SSH service through this section. It's also permite
you to recreate keys. These keys are used to encode data and ensure the privacy over
the web.

2.5.5. Swapfile

The device doesn't have much RAM, so creating a swap file is very useful to improve
NAS performance. In this page it's possible to:
• Start swap file usage (checkbox);
• Select disk to write swap file to;
• Check status (active or not);
• Apply changes;
• Stop using swap file;
• Delete file.

2.5.6. Transmission

This is the configuration page for your BitTorrent client. BitTorrent (BT) is a P2P network
protocol. The BT client available in SnakeOS is the Transmission. You can check
Transmission web site for more details: http://www.transmissionbt.com/

In this section you can configure the Transmission BT client. This is the screen with
Transmission options:
Using the "Current torrent folder" field you can set the folder were the downloaded files
will be saved. You can also enable or disable the transmission service using the
"Transmission enable" check box.

You can also limit the download and upload speeds by enabling the fields "Speed Up"
and "Speed Down".

One useful setting is the alternate time speed limit. By checking "Enable Alternate Time"
you can define an alternate speed limit for upload and download. These alternate speeds
will be used during the alternate time interval defined by "Alternate Time Begin" and
"Alternate Time End" fields. You can also enable the alternate time in specific week days.
You can play with these limits in order to reduce them during the time you are using
your internet connection for other things.

The buttons let you apply the settings, start, stop and restart the service.

You can open Transmission home page by clicking in the link "Transmission" using Snake
OS web interface or typing IP address followed by port number 9091 (i.e.
http://192.168.0.240:9091).

Transmission and other configuration options will be explained in a further section.

2.6 Sharing
In this section you can: view shared printers; select which folders will be shared; select
which users will have reading and writing privileges on it. Users and folders here are
related to Samba service (see details at section 2.5.2).
2.6.1. Printers

This screen permits you to list which printers are shared, showing name, device and TCP
port.

2.6.1.1 Installing the printer in your operational system

After connecting your printer(s) with the NAS you have to configure your computer(s) in
order to use your shared(s) printer(s). This section show how you should proceed to
install your printer.

Windows XP machine

Adding a new printer:

1) Click on windows "Start" menu, point to "Settings" and select "Printers and Faxes";
2) On the left bar of "Printers and Faxes" windows click on "Add printer";
3) The "Add Printer Wizard" will show up;
4) Click "Next", select "Local printer". Make shure that "Automatically detect and
install my Plug and Play printer" is not selected. Click "Next";
5) On this screen, select "Create a new port", highlight the Standard TCP/IP Port at
the pull-down menu;
6) The "Add Standard TCP/IP Printer Port Wizard" window will then appear. Click
"Next";
7) Type in the IP address assigned to the NAS in the "Printer Name or IP Address"
box, Click "Next". The "Port Name" field will automatically be filled in. Click "Next";
8) The "Additional port information" screen will appear. Select "Custom", click
"Settings" button, and click "Next";
9) In the "Configure Standard TCP/IP Port Monitor" window, select "RAW" protocol
and specify the necessary port number (9100, 9101 for second printer, etc). You can
verify this number in the SNAKE OS web interface at "RAW TCP port" field of the shared
printer(s);
10) Click "Ok" to close the "Configure Standard TCP/IP Port Monitor" window and
"Next" on the "Add Standard TCP/IP Printer Port Wizard" window;
11) Click "Finish" to end the wizard;
12) Select the appropriate printer manufacturer and printer type in the list. If the
desired printer is not on the list, click "Have Disk" and insert the printer driver disk that
came with your printer to install the printer drivers. Click "Next";
13) Type in a new Printer name or leave it in default, and click "Next" button;
14) In the last step you can print a test page. Click "Next" and "Finish".

Modifying an existing printer:

You can modify an existing (installed) printer. You should change the port that the
printer is using to a TCP/IP printer port, like the procedure stated above. This resumed
procedure was taken from http://www.dd-wrt.com/wiki/index.php/
Printer_Sharing#Workstation_setup:

1) Find your printer in Control Panel - Printers etc. and open the properties page for
it.
2) Select the Ports tab.
3) Click Add Port and choose Standard TCP/IP printer port and click New Port
4) Enter you router's IP address (normally 192.168.1.1) and click Next
5) Set Device type to custom and click settings.
6) Make sure RAW is selected and specify the necessary port number (normally 9100,
9101 for second printer, etc) and click OK
7) Click Next and Finish and Close
8) Make sure the newly created port is selected for your printer and click OK

Windows 7 RC

Thanks to Dcirne to provide these steps.

Adding a new printer:

1) Click on windows "Start" menu, point to "Printers and Devices";


2) Choose "Add printer";
3) Select "Add network, wireless or bluetooth Printer";
4) Select "Desired printer is not listed";
5) Mark "Add printer using TCP/IP Address or hostname";
6) Choose "TCP/IP Device" and type IP address of the NAS;
7) Uncheck "Check printer and automatically choose the driver to use";
8) At "Device Type", choose "Custom" and click "Config";
9) Choose raw protocol, enter correct port number (default is 9100, which is also the
NAS' default port for 1st printer);
10) Click "OK" and Click "Advance";
11) Now choose the printer driver from the list install it with "Have disk" option;
12) Choose a printer name and whether to share it or not;
13) Check if the just installed printer will be the default one;
14) Print a test page if you want.

2.6.2. Users

When selecting 'Users' the following options will be displayed:


New: Click here to add a new user, which will have rights to access a certain folder.
Edit: Click here to modify options about the user selected on the list.
Remove: Click here to remove the user selected on the list.

2.6.3. Shares

In section 2.5.3 samba service was started and security mode was selected. Now you
will select which folders will be seen by which users (if you have choosen 'User and
Password Required').

Type some description for sharing in 'Share Name'. Then click in 'Shared Folder' text box
to browse some location which this sharing will point to. In next field, select if this folder
will be writable. Allowed user is the users that have rights to access the 'shared folder'
you just selected.

2.7. System
This menu has some options about system status and configuration.
2.7.1. Status

Select this item to view system status. Kernel version, NAS version, IP address, MAC
address, RAM, swapfile and uptime.

2.7.2. Log

In this screen you can view the system log since the device has booted. The listing here
is equivalent with the output of a "dmesg" command issue at linux command terminal.

2.7.3. Monitor

This function is very useful to know how much physical memory, swapfile and cpu
processing is being used by system.

2.7.4. Config

Some actions require that system configuration be saved, like password changes, torrent
client options and other settings. After changing options like these, click in save button.
To reset settings to default, just click in "Set default" button.

2.7.5. Firmware

Here you can update firmware used in your NAS. It's possible to use Snake OS or any
other, just like you did to update from original firmware to Snake OS.
Snake OS has a special version beside original firmware format. It's a smaller and safer
to update version, as said in section 1.3.1. Click in 'browse' button, select a firmware file
(full or safer version) and clic 'Go' to start updating. It can take several minutes.

2.8. Transmission
This links opens a BitTorrent client Transmission in a new window.
Transmission administrative interface runs by default on port 9091.
The port used by default for file sharing is TCP port 51413.
3. SSH
SSH (Secure shell connection) is a kind of a remote access protocol to control your NAS
remotely from a command line. It is recommend that only advanced users will use this
approach to control their devices since it is possible to harm proper operation of the
device here.

3.1. SSH clients


Before going any further on SSH you should determine the SSH client of your choice. If
you are using Microsoft Windows as your operating system it is preferable to use PuTTY
as your SSH client. It is the most popular client for Windows systems.

In Linux side you may use utility named 'ssh'. For example in Ubuntu Linux you can
install the package 'openssh-client' which will do the job. For usage instructions, see
next chapter.

3.2. Accessing NAS


Once you have installed your favorite SSH client, you have to configure it to be able to
access the NAS. You will need to know the IP address (default is 192.168.0.240) and
SSH port (default is 22) of your NAS.

On Linux side, open up your favorite terminal emulator and run ssh utility by typing:

ssh 192.168.0.240 -l root

You should use IP of your NAS!

Appendix A - FAQ
Q: Will it work with my internet provider (like Velox, Virtua, Speed and others)?
A: Yes. It doesn't matter what provider you have, it's necessary NAS be configured like
any
other computer. Look at section 2.3.3 to see more information about LAN settings.

Q: Which binaries can I download or compile to use with these NAS models?
A: You need to have linux ARM binaries.The processor is compatible with armv4t
instructions.

Q: My NAS will stop freezing when I install snake OS?


A: Original firmware has some problems related to CPU usage that causes freezing. This
problem
was solved in Snake OS.

Q: What is the importance of using swapfile?


A: When system memory is full it will be necessary to use swapfile when applications
need more
memory. When using swapfile you ensure memory requests will not be denied to
applications (like Transmission). If an application tries to allocate more memory than the
system have, your device can stop applications or freeze. A swapfile minimizes this risk.

Q: Is it possible to use USB hub?


A: Yes, you can use a USB hub and have more flash drivers connected to it.

Q: Does Snake OS support NTFS?


A: Yes, Snake OS supports NTFS for reading and writing. However, it could be a better
performance if you use ext3 or other Linux native file system.

Q: How can I know the version installed?


A: In the web admin interface, go to System -> Status, it will show OS version as "NAS
Version".

Appendix B - Troubleshooting
B.1. I've just updated to Snake OS but now my system doesn't start.
Check if the system led start. If not, you will have to make a serial connection to debug.
Refer to appendix.
If the system led start, it may have a cabling problem or your computer is not on the
same network as NAS. Refer to LAN Address section for info on how to setup your
network.

B.2. My system stop starting suddenly.


Try to disconnect it from network and power and check if the system led start when
restarted.

B.3. I can't see my NAS at Windows Network.


Provided your system is working and accessible by web admin interface, check Samba
workgroup settings, and if you are running SNAKE OS beta3, at least.

B.4. I can't access my NAS when I type its IP address at Windows, like \\192.168.0.240
It may have a cabling problem or your computer is not on the same network as NAS.
Refer to LAN Address section for info on how to setup your network.
Check if Samba service is started.
Check if you have user and password created on your device. When in samba "User and
Password Mode", the computer only show NAS shares if authenticated.

B.5. I can't update firmware because Snake OS says binary file is invalid
File may be corrupted. Try to download it again.
Check if you are running the correct firmware image. Refer to Updating firmware section
for details.

Appendix C - How To set up a serial


interface
This how to will help you to set up a serial connection with the NAS 652. This method is
based on the information taken from DealExtreme NAS google group:
http://groups.google.com/group/dealextreme-nas-?hl=en
C.1. Hardware setup
The first thing you have to do is open the NAS in order to find the serial connection pins.
This picture taken from the group’s files area shows where the pins are and their
functions.

You will need to connect the pins GND, Tx and Rx to a TTL serial cable. This means that
the voltages used to transmit the information will be 0 volts to represent bit zero and 5
volts to bit one. You MUST NOT connect a RS232 serial cable directly. The RS232
standard interface uses a voltage range between +5 and +15 volts to represent bit zero
and -5 to -15 volts to bit one. This RS232 voltages will burn your NAS.

So, you have basically two options:


1) Use a serial cable that uses TTL voltage levels;
2) Build a RS232 to TTL level converter. This is a simple circuit based on the well
known and easy to find chip MAX232. You can easily find a circuit like this in web.
For example: http://pinouts.ru/Converters/rs232-TTL_cable_pinout.shtml

If you choose the option 1, the easiest one, you will find a suitable cable in dealextreme,
like the one posted by JG on 2009 May 4:
http://www.dealextreme.com/details.dx/sku.13638
This cable is used for Nokia cellphones. It is basically a USB to serial converter without
the MAX232 chip to convert the voltage levels to RS232.

The picture below shows this cable. In this picture, the cable end that would connect
with the cell phone was cut off and changed by a female pin connector (like those ones
used to connect the front panel leds in a PC motherboard). In the NAS board holes the
male pins was soldered.

This is a closer look at the usb connector end:

As can be seen from the above picture the pins names are labeled on the circuit board.
So, you just have to connect the Tx wire (green one in this picture) with the with the Tx
hole in the NAS circuit board. The same applies to Rx (blue wire) and GND (white wire).
That is all the hardware you will need to connect your nas on an usb port of your PC.
C.2. Software setup using Windows XP
After plunging the usb-serial cable, your computer will automatically install a new COM
port. In my case it was COM3. Firstly, you should verify what port was created in your
case. To do this, right click on “My computer” on desktop or windows explorer. Click on
“Properties” and choose the tab “Hardware”. Click on the device manager button.

A list of all your hardware devices will show up. Expand the “Ports (COM and LPT)” to
see all the ports you have available. The port created when you attached the usb cable
should be there like something as “Prolific USB to serial converter (COM4)”. In this
example it was created the serial port COM number 4. This port number may change
depending on the usb port that you connect the adapter.

Now you have to set up the connection. In windows you can use the Hyper Terminal
program. You will find it on StarMenu/Acessories/Communications.

Open Hyper Terminal. If you have not used it before, it will ask you some informations
about your contry code and phone area code. Cancel this (press cancel, yes and ok) and
you will get something like this (the windows used to obtain these screenshots was in
Portuguese language):

Give a name for your new connection and press OK. You can cancel again if it asks the
country and area code. After that you will see something like this:
Choose the port that was assigned to your usb cable and press ok.

On port configurations you have to fill the fields with the serial connection parameters or
the NAS chipset, that are:
Bits per second: 38400
Data bits: 8
Parity: None
Stop bits: 1

The flow control field you can leave it with the default value.

Press OK and your connection is done.


Now you have just to connect the serial cable on NAS and turn it on. You will see on
Hyper Terminal screen the boot and kernel messages. You can press any key during the
uboot start up to have the uboot terminal.