Inquiries and interpretations for NACE MR0175/ISO 15156

(Updated June 22, 2010)

Foreword NACE MR0175/ISO 15156, “Petroleum and natural gas industries—Materials for use in H2S-containing environments in oil and gas production,” was first completed and published in December 2003. In 2003 the ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel was set up to maintain this widely used standard during and after publication. Since that time this panel together with NACE TG 299 and ISO TC67 WG7 have processed and accepted more than 20 proposals for amendment. Amendments made to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 are published as Technical Corrigenda or Technical Circulars the references to which are provided at the end of this document. Copies of the documents can be found via:www.iso.org/iso15156maintenance or www.nace.org These Technical Corrigenda and Technical Circulars were incorporated into the main three parts of ISO 15156, approved by the member countries of ISO/TC 67, and the 2009 version of ISO 15156 was published in October 2009. During the same period the Maintenance Panel has dealt with more than 120 inquiries for help with interpretation. The majority of these inquiries and the responses provided are reproduced below. The inquiries and responses are listed in the order of the sections of NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-1, -2, and -3 to which they refer. These responses represent a consensus of the members of the ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel and should not be construed to reflect the opinions of NACE International, its officers, directors, or members.

Notes: When an inquiry has been resolved by corrigendum or circular, the inquiry and the reference to the appropriate corrigendum or circular is provided. To allow cross reference, the references to NACE MR0175-2003 in the original questions and answers have been retained. This compendium is usually updated at least once per year and new additions to the compendium since the last edition are shown in a green font.

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General
Scope of NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 QUESTION: Some of the materials we produce are in thicknesses or diameters that fall outside the scope of MR0175. We request clarification or guidance as to how hardness testing requirements that fall outside the scope of MR0175 should be addressed. (MP INQUIRY #2003-05) ANSWER: The Maintenance Panel cannot provide interpretations that are outside the scope of MR0175. QUESTION: MR0175 is obviously written for guidance in meeting the H2S corrosion problem. Where does NACE address chloride corrosion cracking, particularly in pipe and tube materials? We are seeing more and more customer specs calling for special materials. What is the NACE opinion on best pipe/tube materials for defeating chloride corrosion cracking? (MP INQUIRY #2003-24 Q2) ANSWER: Please refer to Section 1 of NACE Standard MR0175-2003 and also to ISO 15156 Part 1 for the scope of the documents for which cracking mechanisms are considered in H2S service. QUESTION: The "Changes to NACE Standard MR0175-2003" document states the following: "MR0175 is not expected to be technically changed before it is combined with ISO 15156. ISO 15156 is in a different format, with most information provided in tables, so it will not look the same, but it will be technically equivalent." Although this statement says that the two standards will be technically equivalent, their respective sections on applicability show the following deviations: a) NACE MR0175 has a generic rule (1.4.1.1) of a H2S partial pressure above 0.0003 MPa abs, whereas NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 has no such rule. b) NACE MR0175 has a generic exception rule (1.4.2.1) of a total pressure less than 0.45 MPa abs, whereas, within NACE MR0175/ISO 15156, this is only applicable to "Flow-lines, gathering lines, field facilities and field processing plants" and "Water-handling equipment." (I assume that you are aware that MR0175/ISO 15156 Part 1 (2001) mentions 4.3 bar whereas Parts 2 and 3 (2003) mention 0.45 MPa abs). c) NACE MR0175 has a generic exception rule (1.4.2.2) for multiphase systems under certain conditions, whereas NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 has no such rule. Can you please clarify? (MP INQUIRY #2005-05) ANSWER:

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Response to Questions 1, 2a, and 3. Your interpretations of the NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 are correct. In all cases the decisions to accept differences between NACE MR0175-2003 and NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 were only taken after discussions in the ISO/TC 67/WG 7 committee charged with the preparation of the three parts of the standard. Response to Question 2b. The difference between 0.45 MPa and 4.3 bar was recognized and has been corrected in a Technical Corrigendum for ISO 15156-1, Reference 2.

QUESTION: Crude oil storage and handling facilities operating at a total absolute pressure below 0.45 MPa. My understanding of the above paragraph is that, it includes only dead oils with no gas in equilibrium. If any gas is in equilibrium with a crude (operating less than 0.45 MPa) which contains H2S more than 0.3kPa (in the gas phase), the whole system is considered as sour. I need your advice for my understanding, if correct or not? (MP INQUIRY #2009-14) ANSWER: Crude oil storage and handling facilities means that it is dead oil and H 2S/CO2 have been removed. The very low residual amount is considered negligible. This is the reason why these facilities are permitted exclusions from the standard. However, it is up to the user to check that these statements are true for the considered facilities. QUESTION: Water handling facilities (less than 0.45 MPa) I really don’t know what does it mean? It means that the possibility of corrosion is low enough to be excluded from the standard requirements? Or the consequence of the problem is minimum? Can we conclude from the above paragraph that, low pressure water handling facilities, has no gas to be released which may produce SSC or any hydrogen problems? (MP INQUIRY #2009-15) ANSWER: Water handling facilities have typically low service pressure, a near neutral pH and they usually contain trace amounts of H2S. Consequently their sour service severity is quite low. However, it is the responsibility of the user to check whether these assumptions are correct for the particular equipment considered.

Certification and Compliance to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 QUESTION: Is it the intent of NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2 that material manufacturers state on the Material Test Certificates that material conforms to the NACE standard even though no operating criteria are known? (MP INQUIRY 2006-13) ANSWER: Certification requirements are outside the scope of the standard and there are no stipulations concerning certification in NACE MR0175/ISO 15156.

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The compliance with the NACE/ISO standard of a material for use in H2S-containing environments in oil and gas can only be assessed for the material in its final product form and this may differ metallurgically from that of the material supplied by the materials manufacturer. In addition, compliance with the standard also depends on the cracking mechanisms that have to be considered. NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2, Clause 9, Annex E (Informative) and NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3, 7.2, Annex C (Informative) make some suggestions on how materials manufacturers and other suppliers might mark their materials to indicate the evaluation (testing) that they have carried out. Address for requests for interpretations of any part of NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 QUESTION: Is a NACE office available in Italy or in other European countries? (MP INQUIRY #2003-26 Q5) ANSWER: All inquiries should be transmitted to the ISO Maintenance Panel through Linda Goldberg at NACE Headquarters in Houston, Texas. The Maintenance Panel has international membership. A membership roster is attached.

NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-1
General QUESTION: With reference to Paragraph 1.10.2: Equipment manufactured with UNS N04400 and operating before the issuing of the last MR0175 edition may be replaced today with equipment manufactured with the same material, if the equipment design and environmental conditions have not been changed? If a conformity declaration to MR0175 is required for the new equipment, which edition must be declared (2003 or previous)? (MP INQUIRY #2003-26 Q2) QUESTION: For new wells and/or petroleum plants designed according to MR0175 before its last edition, but manufactured after the last edition was issued, may materials considered by the design but not listed in the new standard edition be used? If a conformity declaration to MR0175 is required for the equipment of the new well/plant, which edition must be declared (2003 or previous)? (MP INQUIRY #2003-26 Q3) QUESTION: May materials not listed in the last edition of MR0175, which have successfully passed test requirements of TM0177 and/or have demonstrated adequacy for service performances, have your declaration of conformity and be certified by the manufacturer "in conformity with NACE MR0175-2003"? (MP INQUIRY #2003-26 Q4)

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3.65% manganese and residual quantities of other elements.3.3. except those intentionally added in specific quantities for de-oxidation (usually silicon and/or aluminum) NOTE: Carbon steels used in the petroleum industry usually contain less than 0. If these data are plotted on semi-logarithmic graph paper 5 . Paragraph 3.8. Clause 1. Please see ISO 15156 for requirements to document materials performance outside the current limits. More than that. copper is not considered resistant to general corrosion but is considered in NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3. We cannot comment on conformity declarations. Clause 5 and Clause 8 QUESTION: Paragraph 1.3 carbon steel alloy of carbon and iron containing up to 2% carbon and up to 1. Table 1 The revised version of this Table is given in Reference 1. "Other Alloys" are those not covered by the definitions of carbon steel or CRA. (MP INQUIRY #2005-11) ANSWER: Yes.6 contains a definition of "corrosionresistant alloy" (CRA). (MP INQUIRY #2004-12) ANSWER: NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-1." This is taken from EFC 17. the term CRA is used together with "other alloys" making it even more confusing. The "corrosion-resistant alloys" is very general and does not specify whether or not the definition includes the Fe-based alloys or not. It reads: "alloy intended to be resistant to general and localized corrosion of oilfield environments that are corrosive to carbon steel. 4: NACE and ISO support the latest editions of their documents. For example.ANSWERS 2. Paragraph 3. This documentation may be through laboratory data or from field experience. Clause 3 QUESTION: I need your help with the definition of CRAs in Part 3 of MR0175/ISO 15156.3 contains errors in some copies of the document and should read: 3. QUESTION: Could you please confirm that NACE MR0175/ISO 15156:1: 2001.8% carbon.1 of the 2003 edition allows "interpolation" between data presented in the tables.

with respect to a particular mode of failure. Clause 6 QUESTION: My customer has some swab tanks that were manufactured in 1953. Clause 5. Qualification on the basis of laboratory testing or field experience is required to comply with the (ISO) standard. Clause 5. QUESTION: In Paragraph 1.3. Engineering approval was granted on 6 . for use in defined service conditions.8 MPa H 2S partial pressure.3. is as follows: "Qualification. The equipment user is responsible for ensuring a material is properly qualified.8. states: "Qualification. (MP INQUIRY #2003-13 Q6) ANSWER: Since the data are limited it is not appropriate to attempt interpolation in all cases.1 it is mentioned that interpolation between H 2S levels and temperature is acceptable. mathematical routine. are identical. The question is given the following conditions does this tank meet NACE MR0175? According to Section A2. Ultrasonic testing as part of a corrosion survey on the tank was performed and all was in order. this automatically qualifies the material for use at temperatures below 149°C and below 2. The problem is we cannot or have no documentation as it relates to the heat treat of the plate post welding. Interpolation can only be valid for cases in which all environmental and metallurgical limits. yet when tested the material meets the A283C requirements and the hardness are in the 120-127 HB. the tank is 84 in.8 MPa and unlimited? Does this mean that below 149°C there is no limit to the maximum partial H2S pressure? (MP INQUIRY #2003-19 Q1b) ANSWER: ISO 15156. When applying this to Table 3 (as an example) what will be the maximum partial H2S pressure at 140°C. Since graphical data are easier to use than the discrete. with respect to a particular mode of failure.1. I suggest that NACE give the data in the various tables in graphical form. in diameter and is rated for 100-psi service. Qualification of a material for application under specific conditions that are more severe than those listed in ISO 15156/NACE MR0175 is allowed. for use in defined service conditions.6 the requirement that all rolled or deformed material must be stress relieved and have a hardness of 22 HRC max. also qualifies a material for use under other service conditions that are equal to or less severe in all respects than the conditions for which qualification was carried out. The solution for this problem chosen in NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-1. Cartesian coordinates. where an interpolation is required between 2.such that the ordinate is temperature and abscissa H2S partial pressure." In this case. other than those for which a particular interpolation is being carried out. also qualifies a material for use under other service conditions that are equal to or less severe in all respects than the conditions for which qualification was carried out. much of the data plots as curves rather than straight lines making "interpolation" problematic lacking the polynomial expression for the curves obtained by a curve-fitting. along with the respective polynomial expressions for the resulting curves that enable the user to calculate pH2S for any given temperature. for the precipitationhardenable nickel-based alloys addressed in Table 3. they are made of rolled 1/2-inch plate A283C.

and the customer wants to have more current documents on the tank as it relates to its status as an ABSA pressure vessel and it's NACE MR0175. "no additional laboratory testing of pre-qualified materials selected in these ways is required. We would like you to confirm if our interpretation below is correct and if not give us the correct interpretation. If we are using materials previously included in NACE MR0175. Part 2. Clause 7 QUESTION: Base Material In accordance to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156. (MP INQUIRY #2005-08 Q1) ANSWER: 7 . Table 1 allows the equipment user to categorize equipment as a "Permitted exclusion" where the operating pressure does not exceed 0. it is not necessary to test them according to NACE TM0177 and TM0284. performance. ." In accordance to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156. is in excellent condition. NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-1. It is the responsibility of the equipment user to assess the suitability of the material and to ensure compliance with NACE MR0175 / ISO 15156.2 might not pass some of laboratory . letter "a. This tank is 52 years old. NACE Standards TM0177 and TM0284 are used to qualify new materials that are not previously included in NACE MR0175. and the mechanical data gathered can this determination be made? If so. Part 1. can these criteria be used to establish a basis for performing future work on this exact style of tank? (MP INQUIRY #2005-31) ANSWER The ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel cannot advise on the suitability of this tank for use in sour service. 3rd paragraph. Consideration of the following could contribute to any evaluation of suitability you undertake:For some equipment NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2. Item 7.45 MPa (65 psi)." In our understanding. Item B1. With all this information can a determination be made that this material in its current state is suitable as a material that qualifies as a NACE MR0175/ISO 15156compliant material? Using the long life. ." "Some carbon and low alloy steels described or listed in A.the status of the vessel as a pressure vessel under the ABSA (Alberta Boilers Safety Association).2 d) offer some guidance on the fitness for purpose evaluation of materials in existing equipment. Clause 6 and in particular 6.

2.‖ Documentation has always been required. These paragraphs in the 2003 edition required that ―The user shall verify that the environmental conditions of the field have not changed. and 9. but it is not clear what approach should be used for materials that have been in use with no problems.10.1 below.10. There has been no change in intent. 8. Clause 8 8. These paragraphs in the 2003 edition required that ―The user shall verify that the environmental conditions of the field have not changed.2 states.2 in the 2003 edition of NACE MR0175.2 in the 2003 edition of NACE MR0175. ― What kind of documentation is expected? We need to know exactly what to ask from the end user. Paragraphs 6.1 and 1. .2 QUESTION: Paragraph 1.2.10.‖ Does this statement include valves or valve components that are used within wells? (MP INQUIRY #2003-12 Q1) ANSWER: Yes. ―A material may be qualified by documented field experience‖--‖the duration of the documented field experience shall be at least two years. .0 provide a complete description of the documentation required for two years’ successful field service.2 of ISO 15156-1 provides some criteria for qualification. but documentation does not exist. (MP INQUIRY #2003-41) ANSWER: NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-1 Paragraphs 6.1. 8. There has been no change in intent.2.See response posted under ISO 15156-2.2.1. this paragraph does apply to valves and valve components used within the wells. 8. B.10. QUESTION: 8 . These paragraphs replace Paragraphs 1. ―The user may replace materials in kind for existing wells or for new wells within a given field if the design basis for the equipment has not changed. and 9.1 and 1.0 provide a complete description of the documentation required for two years’ successful field service. These paragraphs replace Paragraphs 1. 8.2 of the MR0175/ISO 15156-1 (Qualification based upon field experience). what criteria should be used? Paragraph 8. Is a letter describing the conditions for which the material qualified for the past two years enough? (MP INQUIRY #2004-05 Q1) ANSWER: NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-1 2003.‖ Documentation has always been required. QUESTION: I need some clarifications on the clause 8. QUESTION: When materials in an existing field are replaced.10.

9 . is there a way of handling those changes? (MP INQUIRY #2005-10) ANSWER: There is no such statement in NACE MR0175/ISO 15156. Where is such a statement or treatment in the December 2003 MR0175/ISO 15156? If it was left out. but it is the user’s responsibility to determine the operating conditions and select the appropriate materials.What do we (the equipment manufacturer) do with this documentation? Does it have to be filed with NACE? If yes. Paragraph 1. QUESTION: In the pre-December 2003 MR0175. c) It is not the responsibility of the equipment manufacturer to file information with NACE.10 (The Effect of Changing Requirements in MR0175 on Existing Equipment) spelled out how to handle materials that MR0175 made changes to. The equipment manufacturer can choose to retain a copy for future reference. a new version of an ISO standard is not applied retrospectively to equipment built to the previous version of the standard (in this case NACE MR0175:2003 or earlier) valid at the time of equipment construction. Paragraph 1 to support the use of a material in a plant on the basis of field experience. do we have to verify the claims or can we just provide the materials as requested by the end user? (MP INQUIRY #2004-05 Q3) ANSWER: The manufacturer can provide this information to a user. Clause 9. It would also be in the equipment user’s interest to keep copies of this documentation in their records in case they are challenged to prove they are responsible operators. New requirements in the latest version may be applied retrospectively by an equipment user or mandated for retrospective application by a regulatory authority. unless they choose to. b) The equipment user may feel that they would wish to make the decision to file the information with NACE given that this would involve their actual field conditions rather than laboratory test conditions. QUESTION: If filing with NACE is not required. It is the manufacturer’s responsibility to meet the metallurgical requirements of the appropriate alloys in NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2003. is this our responsibility? (MP INQUIRY #2004-05 Q2) ANSWER: a) The equipment user is responsible for the preparation of the required documentation (see NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-1. By convention. This may be the case because the equipment manufacturer has made the effort to compile a non-proprietary database that they believe supports the use of alloys for their equipment under the conditions documented by the process in Question One.

(MP INQUIRY #2003-12 Q2) ANSWER: NACE Standard MR0175 cannot interpret design issues. . and ASTM E 92 as alternatives to ISO 65061.16 and 3. The Maintenance Panel may only refer you to the definition of pressure-containing parts in Section 2 and the use of this definition with restrictions in Section 9. Table 1 The revised version of this Table is given in Reference 2.iso. 8.org/iso15156maintenance . ASTM E 18.2.2 and the responses to inquiries on Clause 8 in Document 02. ISO 6508-1 and ISO 6507-1 respectively see Reference 2 3. NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2 Clause 1. . Example #2: Shafts for butterfly valves that have a retaining ring holding the shaft inside the valve.1. Inquiries and Answers at the Web site .3 For the use of ASTM E 10. A. and stems. Table A. . Clause 3 3.05 psi) can be selected using A.2. bonnets. ―Those parts whose failure to function as intended would result in a release of retained fluid to the atmosphere. offer further guidance on how such changes might be handled.3. Examples are valve bodies. regardless of features that by design keep the stem intact? Example #1: Internal entry stems for ball valves that have a shoulder that rests against the body around the stem bore. and Table A.2 says SSC Resistant Steels for partial pressures equal to or above 0.2.1.‖ Are stems always defined as pressure-containing parts. www.ISO 15156-1.3 QUESTION: Sub-clause 7. 3.2.1.3.3 kPa (0. Clause 7 7. 10 .2.14 QUESTION: Definition of pressure-containing parts on page 7.2. .

2. Is there a partial pressure max limit for carbon steels? If so.3 cover L80 type 1? d) For low-alloy steels described in Section A.have been formally defined for carbon and low-alloy steels.05 psi the suggested SSC-resistant materials could be used? E.1 QUESTION: 11 .4. b) No limits of pH and Cl.limits? c) Does A.2.3.g.2. what are the cases where injection of corrosion inhibitors are required.2 of this standard.2.7 pH.2 and Table A. Metal loss corrosion. Fig. is not the subject of the standard. 7. which can be influenced by both pH and chlorides.2 is the partial pressure of H2S in the gas phase in equilibrium with the water in the production fluid. Currently a NACE TM0177 test with 100 kPa H2S.3. both for downhole casings/tubing and surface pipelines? (MP INQUIRY #2005-14) ANSWER: a) This is correct.1. and 3 cover usual conditions above 0. this grade is covered in Paragraphs A. d) NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 does not cover the use of corrosion inhibitors.1.1. Annex C gives information on how to calculate H2S partial pressure. Note 1 mentions the unknown performance of steels above 1 MPa.2. do we assume that for all partial pressures above 0. 2.3 kPa. ~2.3. The maximum partial pressure limit for carbon steels depends on many variables as noted in 15156-2 Clause 6.2.1 and A. hardness are met.2. room temperature. where is the reference in MR0175? (MP INQUIRY #2010-09) ANSWER: The partial pressure mentioned in Section 7.2 and A.a) If criteria. c) No. 50 g/L NaCl is considered to cover all normal production conditions for carbon steels.3. Any combinations of chloride concentration and in situ pH occurring in production environments are considered acceptable. The use of any kind of corrosion inhibitor is not considered to allow any relaxation of the requirements for cracking resistance of materials in sour service.. SSC-resistant materials mentioned in Table A. b) What are the acceptable pH and Cl. QUESTION: I was wondering if you could assist me in interpreting the partial pressure limitation for Carbon Steels referenced in part 2 section 7.2.2. like temperature. Regions 1.

A.3.2. There is little documented evidence that describes the SSC resistance of carbon and low alloy steels in H2S-containing environments outside the H2S limits of Fig. NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2.1. qualification for the use of a material not listed in Annex A for use in one or more of the Regions of Fig." I understand the above sentence.2. Now we would like 12 .2 also apply to low-alloy martensitic steels such as CA6NM which is in fact considered a CRA (MR0175/ISO 15156-3)? (MP INQUIRY #2004-18 Q2) ANSWER: No.05 psi) and above 1 MPa (150 psi) partial pressure H2S reflect uncertainty with respect to the measurement of H2S partial pressure (low H2S) and steels performance outside these limits (both lower and higher H 2S). 7. Please see ISO 15156-3.3. We have provided vent holes on saddle plates in accordance with ASME B31. As mentioned in Paragraph 7. We have used these saddle plates at support locations as a protective shield to pipe. 2. The Note quoted reflects this.1a).4.1 and ISO 15156-3. Clause 7.6.There is the sentence in the note 1 of Figure 1 in ISO 15156-2: "The discontinuities in the figure below 0. it does not.3 kPa (0.3 QUESTION: Seal welding of vent holes on saddle plates welded to pipe. as those expected to occur in field service. and if I will use the carbon steel and low-alloy steel in the sour service above 1 MPa (150 psi) of partial pressure of H2S.2 QUESTION: Does the MR0175/ISO 15156-2.3. 1 is a schematic definition of Regions of environmental severity with respect to SSC of carbon and low alloy steels.3. 7. Fig. 1. The equipment user must decide whether the listing of a steel in Annex A serves as an adequate guide for its behavior in H2S-containing field environments that might be more severe with respect to SSC than those represented by the SSC testing methods normally used. 6. what can I do? Should I require a special laboratory test imitating the H2S partial pressure and pH in the service for SSC of the carbon steel and low-alloy steel? Which solution can I use in the special laboratory test? NACE TM0177 A solution or the imitating solution in the service? (MP INQUIRY #2005-17) ANSWER: The following response must be seen in the context of NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2. Table A18. 1. 7. 1 is always dependent on reported field experience or laboratory testing. For qualification for a specific application all the test conditions must be at least as severe. see Annex B.2. with respect to the potential mode of failure.

Table A. If this standard is considered applicable then the seal welds must comply with the requirements of NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2. It is the responsibility of the equipment user to decide whether NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2 (the latest edition of this NACE standard) is applicable to these seal welds.to close the vent hole by seal welding after completion of saddle welding with pipe and carrying out PWHT.3 The revised texts for these sub-clauses are included in Reference 2.1 QUESTION: Ref Part 2 Figure 2 Butt Weld Survey method for Vickers Hardness Measurement.2 QUESTION: Is it acceptable to use HV 500g (microhardness) testing for NACE applications for WPS qualification? I understand that Paragraph 7. For now there is no demonstrated evidence to show that 250 Hv can be relaxed at location points 17. 7.3. i. 7. (MP INQUIRY #2005-21) ANSWER: The ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel cannot provide guidance on the acceptability of seal welding in this application.2. (MP INQUIRY #2006-08) ANSWER: Yes. 7. Permanent closing of vent hole is required to avoid corrosion in offshore conditions.2. 6. FYI.3.2 and 7..3. Kindly advise us about the acceptance of seal welding for these service conditions.3. and 19 of Part 2 Figure 2. Service is crude oil with H2S.3. 7.2.1 Grade 359 pipe material.e.3. 18 & 19.1 only provides acceptance for the Weld Cap and Root. 18. Location points 17. What is the acceptance criteria? Table A. the hardness testing was done with HV 500g on CSA Z245. Para. As the area is not exposed should the acceptance level be 275 HV 10? (MP INQUIRY #2009-04) ANSWER: Since it is not at the cap the acceptance level should be 250 HV 10 unless it is proven that it can be relaxed. 13 .3. Scope.3.2 of NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 Part 2 says that hardness testing shall normally be carried out using HV 10kg or HV 5kg. NACE MR0175 is applicable. Please see NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2.3.3 or NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3. which is our usual practice. subject to the agreement of the equipment user.3. Figure 2.3. The applicability of this standard is described in Clause 1.

1. Item A. "hardness acceptance criteria for welds.2 and ISO 15156-3. but no more than 1mm from. and thus measurements too far from the fusion boundary could be un-conservative. 6." "weld hardness acceptance criteria for steels selected using option 1 (see 7. It is important to recognize that there will be a gradient in HAZ hardness in any case. Fig.4 QUESTION: About welds. for example HV5 rather than HV10. if our welding procedure qualifications (WPSs) are qualified in accordance with NACE MR0175/ISO 15156.3.4. the fusion boundary between the weld overlay and HAZ.2. in accordance with NACE MR0175/ISO 15156.2 (Hardness testing methods for welding procedure qualification). Alternative weld hardness acceptance criteria may be established from successful SSC testing of welded samples.1. but no more than 1mm from. and 10 should be entirely within the heat-affected zone and located as close as possible to.3. Part 2.3. As stated in ISO 15156-2." Is a correct interpretation that when welding dissimilar metals such as corrosion resistant overlays on low alloy steels. 7. Part 2.3.3. 6.2.4. Item 7. hardness impressions 2.2 hardness measurements can also be carried out using a smaller indentation load.3 QUESTION: Per 7.3 as modified in NACE / ISO 15156-2:2003/Cor.1:2005(E). the phrase. 14 . in our understanding.3.3. it is not necessary to test them according to TM0177.3.3. the fusion boundary" means that the indentation should be no less than 3x the mean diagonal length of the indentation from the fusion boundary as is required for adjacent indentations in ISO 6507-1:1998? Note: ISO 6507-1:1998 is referenced by NACE/ISO 15156-2:2003 in the first paragraph of Section 7. 7.3.3.4. and in many cases this will allow compliance with the requirements of ISO 15156-2." So. (MP INQUIRY #2006-01Q2) ANSWER: The ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel cannot provide an interpretation of the ISO 65071:1998 in relation to the minimum distance of hardness indentations from the boundary between the base metal and the overlay weld.2.2.3. 6. "Using the Vickers or Rockwell 15N measurement methods. SSC testing shall be in accordance with Annex B.2.7. "as close as possible to. In all cases it is the task of the equipment user (and hence the supplier) to ensure that the hardness values measured are the most representative possible of the cracking resistance of the welded material in any sour service it is expected to experience.1) shall be as specified in A.

1.) They also provide some 15 . what kind of results will we have? Will we have a necessary or redundant results? (MP INQUIRY #2005-08Q3) ANSWER: A manufacturer may choose to qualify a welding procedure specification in accordance with ANNEX B. as it appears. We would appreciate it if you can guide in giving the other conditions if sulfur and phosphorous content are controlled in accordance with NACE.1. the results could be used -to confirm that the hardness control specified in A.2. The NACE standard leaves the option of HIC testing with the client. In accordance with the standard.19 for definition of sour service in this context. They serve as a warning to the equipment user that damage to products from some flat-rolled carbon steel types due to HIC has been common and the risk of attack must be considered when selecting such materials for sour service. if we make the test in accordance with NACE TM0177 in our WPSs that are previously qualified to conform to NACE MR0175. QUESTION: NACE MR0175 and NACE TM0177--WELDS On the other hand. (MP INQUIRY #2005-08Q2) ANSWER: Your interpretation is correct. 3.4 are not met.2. Testing welds acceptable in accordance with A.2. Clause 8 QUESTION: We are trying to interpret the NACE requirements for pressure vessel plate material. (See ISO 15156-1.We would like you to confirm whether our interpretation below is correct and if not give us the correct interpretation. Does HIC become mandatory due to non-uniformity of sulfur and phosphorous in the material due to steelmaking process even if the limit of these elements are maintained? Are there other reasons such as chloride environment? (MP INQUIRY #2005-04) ANSWER: The statements in ISO 15156-2.1. 8 "Evaluation of carbon and low-alloy steels for their resistance to HIC/SWC" are based on the extensive experience of the experts who drew up the requirements of the standard.4 is adequate to prevent sulfide stress cracking -or to define alternative weld hardness control requirements that will not lead to sulfide stress cracking when the requirements of A. This is not necessarily a redundant result depending on the anticipated service conditions and the selected test environment. the condition in which the HIC testing becomes mandatory should be based on some criteria other than H 2S partial pressure.4 is an optional activity chosen by the manufacturer to confirm resistance to cracking.

CTR.3 does not specify if the criteria apply to the single section numbers or to the averages per specimen or to the averages over a series of specimens.5 and Table B.3 if deemed necessary.2. and CSR values as criteria as ISO 15156 but in addition it mentions that averages per specimen should 16 . The overall aim of ISO 15156-2.indications of the types of flat-rolled carbon steel likely to give satisfactory resistance to HIC. for qualification purposes. Table B. For seamless products. QUESTIONS: It appears that ISO 15156-2 is ambiguous in defining the acceptance criteria for HIC testing. and CSR results to be reported for each of the three sections taken from a specimen and also as the average per specimen. testing can also be performed according to Table B. Clause 8. Could you please confirm that the intention of Section B. But what about maximum sulfur content? Do we have to apply maximum sulfur content requirement to carbon steel regardless of HIC test? (MP INQUIRY #2005-15) ANSWER: There are no requirements for the control of the chemistry of any elements to prevent HIC in NACE MR0175/ISO 15156. the HIC resistance of flat-rolled plate is uncertain then the equipment user can elect to carry out HIC testing.3 refer to NACE TM0284. The last of these was suggested recently to us. possibly for use in an application-specific environment. and CSR should be calculated and reported for each section and the average for each test specimen.3 is that the requirements of NACE TM0284 for the evaluation of test specimens should be followed and that CLR. Section B.5 and Table B. Paragraph 3. CTR. Testing is not necessary if the equipment user can document that he has evaluated the risk of HIC failure of his equipment and considers the risk acceptable. without testing. by a materials manufacturer. Testing in accordance with Annex B. QUESTION: According to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156. This TM prescribes CLR. If. Part 2. in accordance with NACE MR0175/ISO 15156:2. It is not the intention of this Clause to provide detailed information that can lead to the qualification. of HIC-resistant steels. ISO 3183-3 (the successor to API 5L) uses the same CLR.2. HIC test is not mandatory for carbon steel SMLS pipe. Paragraph 8. Clause A. Q1.2.5 is proposed as a means of qualifying the material to ISO 15156-2. Some guidance concerning acceptable sulfur levels is given in Section 8 of NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 Part 2. CTR. is to ensure that materials that give satisfactory HIC performance in sour service can be selected.

however. Are the acceptance criteria intended to apply to the test results of both single section and the average per specimen? Q3.1. I think it is common practice to apply this approach. The Maintenance Panel is unable to comment on issues that would involve an extension of the requirements of the standard. See Answer A. in coming to a qualification the CLR.1 QUESTION: 17 . Q2. If they are intended to apply to only the average per specimen.2. I do not believe that using. in addition. the referenced standard NACE TM0284 makes no mention of calculating results by averaging the results for a series of test specimens. and CSR values be calculated by averaging the results for a series of specimens? Q4. Any amendment proposal to extend the requirements for single section test results must be submitted in accordance with the requirements outlined in:01. but it does no harm either. NACE TM0284. Introduction to ISO 15156 maintenance activities (Annex C) of the web site www. as part of the overall acceptance requirements. I am of the opinion that an additional condition should be imposed for single section results or for single crack lengths. the same criteria for the average per specimen yields any useful additional information (because it is less restrictive).iso.org/iso15156maintenance. for instance. If. The referenced standard. CTR. Paragraph 8. A2.be measured against the acceptance criteria (not single section numbers). requires the (calculation and) reporting of test results for each of three sections and the average for each test specimen. what additional requirements should be placed on the results of single section results? (MP INQUIRY #2006-11) ANSWERS: A1. Yes. The application of the acceptance criteria to single section and/or the average for a specimen is subject to agreement between equipment user and the manufacturer. A4. If one decides that the acceptance criteria are to be applied to single sections. A3.2 above. Is the intention that. Any materials purchaser is free to add requirements beyond those required or made optional by the standard. Annex A A. no single crack length should exceed 5 mm.4. one decides that the acceptance criteria are to be applied only to the average per specimen.

NACE MR0175/ISO 15156.1.045% for ASTM-A216).ISO 15156 / NACE MR0175 does not mention clearly about sulfur restrictions for carbon steel forgings and castings to ASTM-A105 and ASTM-A216 respectively. Would such changes be possible? (MP INQUIRY #2007-05) ANSWER: It is outside the scope of the standard to provide information concerning the "limitations" of ASTM A 105 and ASTM A 216 in the specific form you request. Almost 75% to 90% of materials of construction would fall into these specifications.3 states: A.2. Section 8 says: Conventional forgings with sulfur levels less than 0. 3: "The majority of steels that comply with the general requirements of A." A.1.2 are not individually listed. including ASTM A 216.2. Many steels. but. these two grades are not adequately covered. For example: flanges and fittings and valves and rotating machinery casings. they refer to any carbon or low alloy steel to which the text might apply. 18 . However. These two specs are work-horse of any oil/gas processing industry.2.045%. ASTM A 216 is not covered at all.2. and castings.3 and Table A.2.025 %.1. Table A. some examples of such steels are listed in Table A.1 General. (for example: 0. however. It would be appreciated if NACE clearly makes mention of these two important materials with limitations if any clearly stated.2. Where any possible additional restrictions are mentioned (as is the case in Section 8 in relation to HIC/SWC resistance). if sulfur is limited to 0.025% and hardness to 187 HBW Castings have no additional sulfur limit other than specified in the base spec.1. As stated in A.2. Please note: In the original standards ASTM-A105 allows sulfur up to 0. for convenience.4. The paragraph A.1. The document has reference to many casting and forging grades. The above statement means ASTM A 105 forgings are acceptable. are not individually listed in NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2. Para.040% and ASTM A 216 allows sulfur up to 0.1 deals only with sulfide stress corrosion resistance. are not normally considered sensitive to HIC or SOHIC. some carbon steels are acceptable subject to the revised or additional restrictions as follows. a) Forgings produced in accordance with ASTM A 105 are acceptable if the hardness does not exceed 187 HBW.3 Carbon steels acceptable with revised or additional restrictions In addition to the restrictions of A.

If not listed in Table A.1.2. although this type of forming and cooling in still air is not listed in Paragraph A.2 QUESTION: Question No." In our understanding.1.1. It is my understanding from them that our competition (including imports).2 of NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2. ASTM A 234 Grades WPB and WPC are acceptable subject to a hardness limit of 197 HBW.2. Answer 2: Yes.2 also apply to A.1.2. A.2. materials must be assessed in the terms of the requirements given in Annex A as explained in Paragraph 7 of Part 1.3 QUESTION: Paragraph A.1.2.2. We would like you to confirm that our interpretation is correct and if not what is your position? (MP INQUIRY #2009-01) ANSWER: Table A. 1 Could you please define the word "Qualification.2 on page 17 still shows hot-rolled yet Paragraph A.2 and A.1. does not apply to the forming of butt weld fittings.2.2. ―hot rolled.2. The Maintenance Panel will consider an amendment to A.2.‖ in the view of the Maintenance Panel.1.1.1. QUESTION: Often my company is asked by customers to certify our forgings to NACE MR0175. A. 19 .2.2 only apply to sheet or plate material and as such cannot be applied to the forming of butt weld fittings? (MP INQUIRY #2004-06) ANSWER: Answer 1: The first paragraph of ISO 15156-2.2.2 of the NACE standard? --Does the term ―hot rolled‖ referred to in Paragraph A.1.3 states that ASTM A 234 grade WPB is an acceptable material.1.Table A. Again it is up to the user to decide if materials need further qualification through testing or field experience as explained in Paragraph 8. qualification is required for new materials that are not listed in Table A. My question is as follows: --Does NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2 allow the use of material ASTM A 234 grade WPB with a heat treatment as shown in ASTM A 234/A 234M-02 Section 7 Heat treatment.2.3 to make this clearer. subsection 7.2 of ISO 15156-2 gives examples of materials that can be qualified provided they comply with Paragraph A. certifies to MR0175 without normalizing and consequently we are pressured to do the same.3 is not intended to imply that the requirements of A.3.1.

ASTM A 350 Gr LF2.1. page 17.2. and L80 materials.2.300 to 2. Line pipe swage nipples and bull plugs are manufactured with materials that meet the requirements of the following specifications: 20 . Paragraph A. A.We have three presses. then air cooled in still air.2a). An exception to this statement is given in A.1.1.1. subject to A.2 to comply with this standard. but because it is a permitted exception in A. is taken to 2.2. The forgings heated by induction are heated to similar temperatures but only a portion of a bar and the flange end is forged close to shape. ASTM A 420 Gr WPL6.1.350°F and forged on a 900T or 3500T open die press in a tooling pot.3a).2. A. Please note: We acknowledge that paragraph 1 of A. Other hot-forged materials would have to be treated according to one of the five other heat-treatment conditions described in Paragraph A. My question is do we have to normalize the forgings coming from either forging process in order to certify to NACE MR0175? The problem is interpretation of NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2:2003(E). Swage Nipples and Bull Plugs are manufactured from line pipe.350°F prior to forge that this satisfies the "hot-rolled" definition.300 to 2. and Table A. (MP INQUIRY #2005-25) ANSWER: Hot-forged material does not meet the intent of NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2.2.a.2.2.3.1. tubing.1. We have contended that our products need to be subsequently followed with a normalizing cycle after being fully cooled to ambient in order to be certified to NACE and that neither of the forging processes listed above satisfies the definition of "hotrolled" process.1.3 is poorly worded. and one is with induction heaters. two are fed by gas-fired furnaces. then still air cooled to ambient. and API 5CT J55. The heat-treated condition "hot-rolled" is not clearly understood and competitors with similar processes interpret that if the entire raw material piece prior to forge.3 QUESTION: We require a determination on the acceptability of products manufactured out of materials meeting ASTM A 234 Gr WPB.2. The intent of this paragraph is to allow forgings according to ASTM A 105 to be used. N80. As a consequence.3.2.3a) free of the restrictions stated in A. Annex A. Alberta Oil Tool manufactures Swage Nipples and Bull Plugs primarily for use in the oil and gas industry. The gas heat forgings are typically heated to 2.2.2.2. and casing. Customers can order these forgings in the "as forged" or "normalized" condition per SA105.1. let's call it a mult. K55.1. ASTM A 105 material is acceptable in the "as-forged" condition not because it is equivalent to a "hot rolled" condition in A.2.

K55. 6 material is used to manufacture ASTM A 420 Gr. 6 material is used to manufacture ASTM A 420 Gr. WPB. Are fittings manufactured from API 5CT Grade L80 material acceptable for use under the scope of NACE MR0175-2003? (MP INQUIRY #2004-03) ANSWER: 21 . Are fittings manufactured from API 5CT Grade K55 material acceptable for use under the scope of NACE MR0175-2003? 6. GR. WPL6 fittings. Our initial determination is that these products fall into the scope of Section 11. B and ASTM A 333 Gr. B material is used to manufacture fittings that comply with ASTM A 234 Gr. Are fittings meeting ASTM A 350/ASME SA 350 Grade LF2 acceptable for use under the scope of NACE MR0175-2003? 4. Pipe Fittings. while ASTM A 333 Gr. This table lists many of the materials in question. Are fittings manufactured from API 5CT Grade N80 material acceptable for use under the scope of NACE MR0175-2003? 7. 1. ASTM A 105 is congruent and therefore we determined that fittings manufactured to ASTM A 350 Gr. and meet the requirements of NACE MR0275-2003. LF2 ASTM A 420/ASME SA 420 Gr. WPB ASTM A 350/ASME SA 350 Gr. ASTM A 106. B material is used to manufacture fittings that comply with ASTM A 234 Gr. Table D2. our interpretation of the entire standard is that all of the swage nipples and bull plugs that we manufacture are acceptable. LF2 are acceptable under NACE MR0275-2003. Are fittings manufactured from API 5CT Grade J55 material acceptable for use u under the scope of NACE MR0175-2003? 5.ASTM A 234/ASME SA 234 Gr. we can find no criteria for pipe fittings that are to be used in low-temperature service applications. K55. lists API 5CT Grades J55. Are fittings meeting ASTM A 234/ASME SA 234 Grade WPB acceptable for use under the scope of NACE MR0175-2003? 2. In comparison to ASTM A 350 Gr. However. and L80 as acceptable materials for tubing and casing. 6 materials for pipe. and L80. Acceptable API and ASTM Specifications for Tubular Goods. LF 2 (a low-temperature specification). Paragraph 11. while ASTM A 333 Gr. As NACE Standard MR0175-2003 does not clearly identify all the acceptable materials in one location. Are fittings meeting ASTM A 420/ASME SA 420 Grade WPL6 acceptable for use under the scope of NACE MR0175-2003? 3.5. WPL6 Tubing and casing swage nipples and bull plugs available in materials meeting API 5CT Grades J55. WPB. Please provide reasons for any products that do not comply with NACE MR0175-2003. states that fittings meeting the requirements of ASTM A 234 Grade WPB and ASTM A 105 are acceptable. Is this interpretation correct? Please have our findings confirmed by answering the following questions. N80. as well as ASTM A 106 Gr.

2. and L80 acceptable.4 as modified in NACE / ISO 15156-2:2003/Cor.2 are acceptable in the as-welded condition. hardness testing of welding procedures may be waived if agreed by the equipment user".1 of NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2 first edition. #6. #1.4 and Table A. Having met the 22 .2.1.2 with an SMYS not exceeding 360 MPa (52 ksi) are acceptable in the as welded condition. This must meet the requirements of A.1:2005(E). A.1.2.5 QUESTION: We have weld overlays (Inconel 625 filler metal with SAW process) applied to lowalloy ferritic steel valves (ASME/ASTM A 352 Gr LCC). Also see notes below. Only if Swage nipples and bull plugs are downhole tubular goods are API 5CT Grades J55. #7.2.2.1.2.1. A. The material manufactured to API N80 applies only to downhole tubular goods.2. #3.1.1 are included in Reference 2.1. #4. Is a correct interpretation that all hardness testing is being waived for tubular products with an SMYS not exceeding 52ksi in the as-welded condition if as agreed by the equipment user? (MP INQUIRY #2006-01Q1) ANSWER: No. "Tubular products with an SMYS not exceeding 360 MPa (52ksi) and listed in Table A. K55. For these products hardness testing OF WELDING PROCEDURES may be waived if agreed by the equipment user. N80.2.1. A. The material manufactured to API L80 applies only to downhole tubular goods.4 and A.API grades in Table A. Hardness tests were performed on the as-welded condition. we believe and understand that the valve does not require postweld heat treatment after the weld overlay. The steel valve is used on wet gas wellhead production platform with operating temperatures at 93°C. tubular products listed in Table A. Since the hardness results complied with the requirements of Table A.4 and Table A.1 of NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2. The material manufactured to API J55 applies only to downhhole tubular goods. #5. This must meet the requirements of A.3 of NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2 are acceptable as downhole tubular goods under the environmental temperatures if they meet the respective API requirements in NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2. operating pressure of 145 bar with vapor fraction of H2S (177 kg-mol/h) and CO2 (877 kgmol/h).1 The revised versions of A. This must meet the requirements of A. For these products.2.4 QUESTION: Per A.3. The material manufactured to API K55 applies only to downhole tubular goods. The results achieved were well below the 250 HV criteria of Table A. #2.2 and of hardness control as specified in A.

2.2.2.5 -Paragraph A. However.3 QUESTION: We need a clarification on MR0175/ISO 15156 Part 2:2003.4 states (in the third sentence): ―As welded carbon steels. A.2.4.5.2.5 b) The revised text for this sub-clause is included in Reference 2.2.1. Exceptions to this rule are named specifically in other paragraphs of Annex A. i.e.1 through A. As such we believe Paragraphs A.2. not a surface application) and that this is in error in terms of our usage.3..1. it does not exceed the lower critical temperature during application of the overlay.1.2. (b) The maximum hardness and final heat-treated condition of the base metal substrate comply with A. A.4 and A.2. Provided your weld procedure qualification complies with the hardness requirements in A.2. flowlines.5 and A.1 with a hardness limit of 22 HRC are applicable in these circumstances.1 do not require postweld heat treatment. A.1.e. for sour gas service in well testing and process use in a surface application.2 and. pipe suppliers in this region tell us that 26 HRC is acceptable in such applications.2.. Annex A.1.4 and Table A. (i.1.1.2. in the case of welded overlays. . We are a manufacturer of temporary pipe work. no postweld heat treatment is required. A.1 indicates that carbon and low alloy steels for use in any product form must comply with the requirements of A. I believe the 26 HRC limit is only applicable to material used in a downhole application as in Paragraph A.2.2..2.2 and A.2.4 Question: Is our interpretation of Paragraphs A.1. (MP INQUIRY #2005-23) ANSWER: ISO 15156-2.2.2.2. carbon manganese steels. A.2. etc.1.4 of NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2 correct based on the above-stated specific application and conditions and that the valves overlayed with Inconel 625 consumables do not require postweld heat treatment? (MP INQUIRY #2004-11) ANSWER: Paragraph A.2. are acceptable if they comply with one of the following: (a) The heattreated condition of the substrate is unchanged.1. Therefore.5 states: ―Overlays applied by thermal processes such as welding .‖ Paragraph A.2.1. and low-alloy steels that comply with the hardness requirements of Table A. 23 .1.1 which include the hardness requirement of maximum 22 HRC for the parent material.2.hardness criteria after overlay we believe that we met the requirements of the following paragraphs of NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2 first edition: -Paragraph A. . your interpretation is correct.2. etc.

1 allow other nuts and bolting materials besides the ones listed in Paragraphs 6.2.2.3. such as AISI 4130.1).3.2.2.2 and 6. Sub-clause A.2.1.2 provides examples of materials that can comply with A.2. A.1.1. Sub-clause A.2.2.1 or on the basis of field experience as described in ISO 15156-1.2.4.4 QUESTION: Are the bolting materials and nuts specified in Paragraphs 6. the only acceptable materials in compliance with MR0175-2003 for Exposed Bolting? (MP INQUIRY #2003-22 Q1) ANSWER: Bolting materials may be chosen in accordance with Sections 3 and 4 as described in MR0175-2003. These materials are referred to and specified in API Spec.2. The standard allows materials.2. QUESTION: Does Paragraph 6.4 and Table A. 8.2. Please note that ISO 15156-2 Technical Corrigendum 1 includes revised versions of A. Welds must be shown to comply with the requirements of Paragraph 7. Paragraph 6.1 that sets hardness requirements for welds.2.3 QUESTION: In reference to Table D2. respectively.2.‖ why is Pipe a separate category from Tubing and Casing? In the API 5CT specification (see Paragraph 1. including some examples of tubular products in Table A.1. 5L and other industry standards. Tubular Components).3? (MP INQUIRY #2003-22 Q2) ANSWER: Yes.3 addresses downhole components only.1.3.2.1. as well as the NACE MR0175-2003 standard.Welds in such materials shall comply with the requirements of A. in the left column titled ―For All Temperatures.2.2. Acceptable Specifications for Tubular Goods.2. A. ―casing‖ is identical to ―pipe‖ (see Sections 10 and 2. Pipe may have many intended uses and is referred to and specified in API Spec. (MP INQUIRY #2003-24 Q1) ANSWER : Casing and tubing are generally but not always intended for the completion of oil and gas wells.2.2. 5CT. to be qualified at higher hardness than 22 HRC for possible use as pipe in sour service by laboratory testing in accordance with Annex B and Table B.1.1.2 and A. in accordance with NACE Standard MR0175-2003 Sections 3 and 4.1.1.2 and 6.1.2.4 that also refers to Table A. 24 .

2." If the bolting is non-exposed in accordance with Paragraph 6. temperature. 25 . Paragraph A.4/Appendix A.1. B8RA.2 of MR0175-2003? (ASTM A 193. Are bolting and nuts.2.2.26.1. GR B8R. A 320. This paragraph does not specify just "metallurgical requirements. carbide solution treated. acceptable for use in exposed sour environments with no environmental limits with respect to chloride content.1. QUESTION: This query is about specifications of external bolting material in NACE MR0175/ISO 15156.2.4 apply to Gr. Section 6.3.1.2.4 only applies to materials in Part 2.1 of NACE MR0175-2003 Standard QUESTION: It is not clear whether or not the word "restrictions" as used in Paragraph 6. all external bolting on sour systems that is denied direct atmospheric exposure. carbide solution treated.1 of NACE MR0175-2003 includes any environmental restrictions for bolting and nuts exposed to sour gas environments. 660 flange bolting materials or only to carbon and low alloy steel bolting materials in Part 2? (MP INQUIRY #2005-09Q1) ANSWER: Paragraph A. In MR0175-2003.2. See also response to MP Inquiry #2005-09Q2 posted under ISO 15156-3. A 194.2. QUESTION: Does NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2. is considered to be in sour service because of the chance of exposure to H2S leaks. Paragraph 6. B8M) (MP INQUIRY #2003-22 Q3) ANSWER: The manufacturer is responsible for the effects of carbide solution treatment on the material properties.QUESTION: Are the following ASTM bolting materials and nuts acceptable for exposed bolting in accordance with Paragraph 6.1 requires materials to meet the requirements of Sections 3 and 4 as applicable to the base material. Gr B8. carbide solution treated. B8. partial pressure of H2S.2.45 MPa (4. This seems to be in contradiction with Paragraph 1.1. B8M. and free elemental sulfur? QUESTION: Is the answer to the above question in agreement with ISO 15156? (MP INQUIRY #2003-39) ANSWER: Paragraph 6. where a minimum total pressure of 0. then the environmental requirements are not necessary. due to insulation or flange protectors. 8RA.5 bara) is given as a minimum pressure level for sulfide stress cracking in gas. QUESTION: SUBJECT: Paragraph 6. Table A. Gr 8R. which are manufactured from wrought austenitic stainless steel materials in accordance with the applicable paragraph in Section 4 of NACE MR0175-2003.

not just shear rams.2.3.2. The equipment user is responsible for the selection of materials suitable for the intended service.2 apply only to shear rams or can they be applied to other types of rams as well? (MP INQUIRY #2004-16) ANSWER: 26 . external bolting may be considered potentially wet. A. whatever their total pressure. In NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 Part 2.2 QUESTION: The title of Paragraph A. no gas systems.‖ This section allows the use of rams made from quenched and tempered. This apparent shear ram restriction was not in previous revisions to NACE MR0175 (see 12.3. On the other hand. however. be allowed up to 26 HRC to ensure maximum hang-off capacity and for anti-extrusion purposes. low-alloy steel rams. A.2. The requirements of NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2.2.4. lowalloy steels up to a maximum hardness of 26 HRC provided the composition and heat treatment are carefully controlled and supporting SSC testing is performed. this specification is maintained for C-steel bolting but it is not extended to CRA bolting in Part 3.0003 MPa H2S. the section title would imply that only shear rams are covered by its provisions. are included in the "Permitted exclusions" listed in Column 2. Do the provisions of A. The text of this section does not limit these provisions to just shear rams.2. As shown in Table 1 of all parts of the standard.2.3.4 apply only to carbon and low-alloy steels. I have two questions about this guideline: How should I interpret the ambiguity/exception that exists in regard to minimum pressure level around external bolting? What is the current position of CRA external bolting on sour systems? Is Class 2 bolting accepted or shall it be Class 1? (MP INQUIRY #2006-09) ANSWER: The ambiguity you describe does not exist in NACE MR0175/ISO 15156.2. Cr-Mo.3 in NACE MR0175-2003 for example).2. which would lower the limit to a partial pressure of 0.External bolting is normally at a lower pressure than that. It is important to ram manufacturers as well as end users that all Cr-Mo. NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 does not address the selection of materials external to the production environment.2 in NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2 is ―Shear rams.

org/iso15156maintenance.1 and may not be used for pressure-containing parts.1 and Table A.2. Paragraph A.2. it is not mentioned in Paragraph A. This is consistent with all previous revisions of MR0175. Can we use this material for pressure-containing parts. i. A.5 QUESTION: In NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 Part 2. ductile iron ASTM A 536 is listed in Table A.4.2.2 in NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2 are not intended to be restricted to shear rams only. ductile iron ASTM A 536 is not listed in A. Should you wish..iso. The role of the Maintenance Panel is solely to ensure that NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 (the current edition of NACE MR0175) is clear in its stated requirements and is kept upto-date. elongation are similar at 415N/mm2 and 18%! (MP INQUIRY #2005-27) ANSWER: The ISO Maintenance Panel cannot advise on materials selection issues. However. but may be applied to other types of rams as well.4. My question is if our existing in-house standard of ASTM A 536 Grade 60/40/18 will comply as a direct alternative.The requirements for Cr-Mo. valve stems? (MP INQUIRY #2004-20) ANSWER: No. Annex B B.2.2. Introduction to ISO 15156 Maintenance Activities" on the Web site www.e.4. NACE Standard MR0175 accepts ferritic ductile iron to ASTM A 395.4. On the face of it tensile strength. A.1 QUESTION: Base Material 27 . the procedure to propose an amendment to the standard to include ASTM A 536 Grade 60/40/18 is described in "01.2.3 QUESTION: I have a query regarding material suitability on a recent enquiry to supply a nodular iron screw compressor. low-alloy steel rams in A.1.5 as acceptable materials for drillable packer components for sour service.2.4.3.

3rd paragraph. Item B1.2. 8.2. Our understandings are: SSC tests shall be performed in accordance with NACE Standard TM0177. Para.In accordance to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156.1 " . or SWC.2 and Annex B. Part 1. Clause 7. Item 7.2. SCC. and in Annexes B. ISO 15156-2.1 QUESTION: We have some questions about some particular points concerning the SSC (NACE Standard TM0177) and HIC (NACE Standard TM0284) tests and the requirements of NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2003. or SWC without the specification of additional requirements. NACE Standards TM0177 and TM0284 are used to qualify new materials that are not previously included in NACE MR0175." Hence. it is not necessary to test them according to NACE TM0177 and TM0284.2 might not pass some of laboratory . but more testing may be required to evaluate carbon and low alloy steels for their resistance to HIC/SWC and other forms of H2S cracking. 7 in relation to SSC of carbon and low alloy steels. Annex A. you may apply ISO 15156-1.5.2. 1 and in ISO 15156-2. Part 2. If we are using materials previously included in NACE MR0175.4 and B. The solution shall be Solution A given in TM0177 in accordance with requirements given 28 . 2 explains that carbon and low alloy steels complying with Annex A. SZC.1 a). We would like you to confirm if our interpretation below is correct and if not give us the correct interpretation. Annex B. (MP INQUIRY #2005-08 Q1) ANSWER: NACE MR0175-2003 and its earlier editions only aimed to specify materials in relation to their resistance to SSC. . "no additional laboratory testing of pre-qualified materials selected in these ways is required. For carbon and low alloy steels. . Annex A. HIC. letter "a. might not resist SOHIC.1 a). They did not specify materials in relation to their resistance to SOHIC. . These requirements are addressed in ISO 15156-2. No additional testing is required. HIC. their resistance to SSC is referred to in ISO 151561. but testing and weld qualification is recommended for cases in which HIC and SOHIC are considered a risk. 7. ." In accordance to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156. Many materials included in NACE MR0175-2003 and its earlier editions were allowed by these documents on the basis of the general rules of acceptance now given in ISO 15156-2. SZC. Para." "Some carbon and low alloy steels described or listed in A. Table B. and GHSC." In our understanding.

Our questions are: 1) What would you recommend for SSC test methods (refer to TM0177: Method A. Footnote (b) provides some guidance.6. Paragraph 4. Region 3. ISO 15156-2 Table B. such as incorporating the effects of non-ideal gas behavior.5. Part 2.1.1 states that "The partial pressure of H2S may be calculated by multiplying the system total pressure by the mole fraction of H2S in the gas. We usually understood that "CLR. Section C. or D) for: -Raw plates -Weld (to qualify a welding procedure)? In addition. for severe sour service. The duration of the test shall be 720 h in accordance with Paragraph 8. C." Does the word "may" permit other methods. UT (Method A) appears to be more adapted to test raw plate and FPB (Method B) to reveal susceptibility to SOHIC and/or SZC that occur at welds. Paragraph 3 makes clear that where no requirement is given NACE TM0284 shall be followed. we would like to know which method--A or B--is more contraingnant. to calculate partial pressure for determining material selection? (MP INQUIRY #2004-08) ANSWER: Yes. Annex C..3 is not clear regarding the acceptance criteria to be taken into account.7 of TM0177. however.1 of NACE MNR0175/ISO 15156-Part 2. What is your position? (MP INQUIRY #2005-26Q2) ANSWER: ISO 15156-2. (MP INQUIRY #2005-26Q1) ANSWER: The ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel cannot make recommendations with respect to the test method to be used in particular circumstances. then this latest test appears to be more adapted to test welds.1 of NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-Part 2. Annex C QUESTION: NACE MR0175/ISO 15156.e. CSR" to be taken into account is the average of the values measured from one test specimen as defined in NACE Standard TM0284.in Table B. B.2. Please note: Annex C as a whole is "informative" rather than "normative" and is therefore not mandatory. Table B. i. 29 .1. Test method used shall be in accordance with guideline given in Table B. B. NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2:2003 Table B.3 QUESTION: For HIC test. The test method must be acceptable to the equipment user. CTR.

on papers by J. producing a more neutral pH.L.2 of this Annex. Crolet and M.Annex D Figure D. Bonis.2 is different from the maps published by EFC 16: the pH axis seems shifted some 3/4 of pH unit upward. T and HCO3-. The maps reported were previously published on EFC 16 (not 17 as quoted) and based. He has agreed to recalculate the Figure and to provide us with a corrected version. I assume the former EFC map is correct and not the ISO. I've posted it at the ISO Maintenance users' forum. Figure D. The Maintenance Panel will publish this correction as soon as possible. Annex D (informative) of ISO 15156 Part 2 reports a procedure for in situ pH estimation based on pCO2 + pH2S.2 QUESTION: I have a request for a clarification for a possible error in Annex D of NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2 dealing with pH estimation. Can somebody confirm my assumption is correct? (MP INQUIRY #2006-16) ANSWER: The author has confirmed that you are correct and that there is an error in Figure D. However. but I had no reply. 30 . if I'm not wrong.

the term CRA is used together with "other alloys" making it even more confusing.6 contains a definition of "corrosionresistant alloy" (CRA).4. copper is not considered resistant to general corrosion but is considered in NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3. "Other Alloys" are those not covered by the definitions of carbon steel or CRA. Clause 6 6. as you have noted.NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 General QUESTION: I need your help with the definition of CRAs in Part 3 of MR0175/ISO 15156. (MP INQUIRY #2006-09) Contents The revision of the contents list to highlight "Table A.1 Pressure Containing Components--What is the definition of bonnets? What about drain plugs? (MP INQUIRY #2003-27 Q1) ANSWER: Unfortunately. It reads: "alloy intended to be resistant to general and localized corrosion of oilfield environments that are corrosive to carbon steel. A.2. QUESTION: Please see the answer included in this compendium under NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2. Therefore." This is taken from EFC 17. there are no NACE definitions for the terms you have listed.4.1 Guide to the use of the materials selection tables of Annex A" is included in Reference 3 Clause 1.2. For example. they are open to your interpretation. More than that.1 QUESTION: 31 .2. The "corrosion-resistant alloys" is very general and does not specify whether or not the definition includes the Fe-based alloys or not. Table 1 The revised version of this Table is given in Reference 3 Clause 3 QUESTION: Paragraph 9.2. Paragraph 3. (MP INQUIRY #2004-12) ANSWER: NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-1.

As we understand the standard. (MP INQUIRY #2003-06) ANSWER: NACE cannot provide assistance in specifying where to take hardness impressions and readings for this alloy or for any other alloy. the as welded condition does not meet the intent of being solution annealed and quenched. QUESTION: For the cast austenitic and duplex stainless steels there is no specific mention of a requirement for post weld heat treatment in Part 3 that discusses welding of these alloys.2.5.g. In my opinion.Our company has understood that NACE Standard MR0175 required the maximum specified hardness for austenitic stainless steels be satisfied at any location on bar stock (e.. we have declined to certify these products as compliant to the specification. or perhaps the only stainless bar producer that interprets the standard in this way. 6. for example. 316 and 316L stainless are both included in a lengthy list of materials accepted for direct exposure to sour gas.g. We would like to flame spray build up the surface with 316 or 316L stainless material and remachine to size. This is because NACE Standard MR0175-2003 is not a quality assurance document. Yet the standard does not clearly state. Inadvertently this bore was machined oversize.1 below. that meeting surface hardness is a requirement. As we intend to apply stainless to stainless for the purpose of remachining to dimension and not as a corrosion-inhibiting coating..1. at locations considered significant by the user). surface) in order to provide a predictable level of stress corrosion cracking resistance. We routinely find competitors' cold-finished stainless bar in the marketplace certified to MR0175 based on a mid-radius hardness even though the surface hardness is above the maximum permitted in the standard. We appear to be in the minority. there is a statement in the application of these alloys that they are only acceptable in the solution annealed and quench condition. but would like to clarify the hardness requirements of the MR0175 standard. However. We realize this is a long-standing issue. It is the responsibility of the alloy supplier to meet the hardness requirements and metallurgical requirements of the austenitic stainless steels in Paragraph 4.2 QUESTION: We have some 316 stainless steel housings with a large through bore machined. We understand the logic in requiring the material meet a hardness maximum at any location (e. A. Please clarify the hardness requirements of MR0175 to allow all stainless bar producers to provide a uniform product to this standard. would this process be acceptable and compliant with the NACE Standard MR0175/ISO 15156? (MP INQUIRY #2005-01) ANSWER: See response posted under ISO 15156-3. So can these alloys be used in the as welded condition? (MP INQUIRY #2009-03) ANSWER: 32 . Since cold-finished bars frequently have surface hardness values above the maximum specified in MR0175.2.

.23 note (b) as modified in NACE/ISO 15156-3:2003/Cor. In particular Paragraph 6. Now we would like to close the vent hole by seal welding after completion of saddle welding with pipe and carrying out PWHT.2.2:2005(E). Permanent closing of vent hole is required to avoid corrosion in offshore conditions.2 QUESTION: Per A.2. and without the need for explicit user approval? (MP INQUIRY #2006-01Q3) ANSWER: 33 .3. The use of other methods shall require explicit user approval.3 as modified in NACE/ISO 15156-3:2003/Cor." Per 6. NACE MR0175 is applicable. regardless of the applied stress." Per Table A.2.3. there is neither a Vickers nor Rockwell 15N acceptance criteria. "The hardness of the HAZ after welding shall not exceed the maximum hardness allowed for the base metal.These alloys can be used in the as welded condition provided they meet the requirements of Paragraph 6.6.. "Hardness testing for welding procedure qualification shall be carried out using Vickers HV 10 or HV 5 methods in accordance with ISO 6507-1 or the Rockwell 15N method in accordance with ISO 6508-1.3. Martensitic stainless steels either cast J91540 (CA6NM) or wrought S42400 or S41500 (F6NM) shall have 23 HRC maximum hardness.2. Is a correct interpretation that the acceptable hardness test method for qualification of Martensitic Stainless Steels is the Rockwell C Method.2:2005(E). ASTM E140 does not provide a hardness conversion for Martensitic Stainless Steels. "Low-carbon. Service is crude oil with H2S.2.2 of ISO 15156-3 and the corresponding Tables in Annex A. neither a Vickers nor Rockwell 15N acceptance criteria is specified for Martensitic Stainless Steels.2. We have provided vent holes on saddle plates in accordance with ASME B31. 7.2. and the hardness of the weld metal shall not exceed the maximum hardness limit of the respective alloy used for the welding consumable.2 as modified in NACE/ISO 15156-3:2003/Cor. QUESTION: Seal welding of vent holes on saddle plates welded to pipe. We have used these saddle plates at support locations as a protective shield to pipe.2:2005(E)." However. 6. i.2 indicates that welding PQRs shall include documented evidence of satisfactory cracking resistance. Kindly advise us about the acceptance of seal welding for these service conditions. (MP INQUIRY #2005-21) ANSWER: See answer given to this inquiry under ISO 15156-2.e. Furthermore.. Thus.

6.2. (MP INQUIRY #2004-09. 6 and ISO 15156-3. Para.32 of NACE MR0175/ISO 15156. Q2) ANSWER: NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 reflects the content of the 2003 edition of NACE Standard MR0175.3 QUESTION: If I want to ballot a new alloy to be used in the acceptable environments described in Table A. chloride concentration.2. they were added to the various early editions by common consent and common experience of good performance).2.No. The wording ―Any combination of temperature. Any proposal for additions/changes to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 will be subject to a ballot/approval process. See also ISO 15156-1. Q1) QUESTION: In general. The alloys were not tested to procedures laid out in later editions of NACE Standard MR0175 but instead ―grandfathered‖ into the standard (i. chloride concentration.2. which environmental test conditions should be used to qualify for ―Any combination of hydrogen sulfide. the user may establish the required conversion tables".5. . This process will continue to be used for future additions of alloys to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156. ISO 15156-3. Annex A A.e.1.34..2.1. what should the environmental test conditions be to qualify a new alloy where the ―Remarks‖ in the respective tables state ―Any combinations of temperature. Is acceptable‖ in various tables of NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 indicates that previous (early) editions of NACE documents had no environmental limits set for the alloys mentioned. The process for the addition of an alloy to later editions of MR0175 included laboratory testing under defined environmental conditions. 6 A. partial pressure H2S. and pH‖? (MP INQUIRY #2004-09.2. 2 states "The conversion of hardness readings to and from other scales is material dependent. which resulted in the environmental limitations for the alloy as listed in NACE MR0175/ISO 15156.2.3 The revised texts for these sub-clauses are included in Reference 3. No formal environmental limits were established and listed. 6. and pH‖ at 135°C (275°F) with elemental sulfur? The same question applies to Table A.1. for the tables listed in Annex A of NACE MR0175/ISO 15156.2 and 6. pH . .1 34 .

would this process be acceptable and compliant with the NACE Standard MR0175/ISO 15156? (MP INQUIRY #2005-01) ANSWER 1.5.2. A.0 If this application of flame spray is for the replacement of material that will be load bearing of tensile stresses.18. 2. then the inquiry is not currently addressed by NACE MR0175/ISO15156. Table A.23. Annex A are not interdependent.6. As we intend to apply stainless to stainless for the purpose of remachining to dimension and not as a corrosion-inhibiting coating.1. the 316 or 316L base materials are acceptable coating substrates if they conform to the metallurgical requirements of Part 3 Table A. A.2 is included in Reference 3.1. Note: The revised version of Table A.1 is included in Reference 3 QUESTION: 35 . We would like to flame spray build up the surface with 316 or 316L stainless material and remachine to size. Table A.2 (See also Reference 3). As we understand the standard. and Table A.1. which are assumed to be in the cast or wrought conditions. NACE/ISO have not been balloted with data to demonstrate that the 316 SS or 316L SS deposited flame spray coating has the same cracking resistance as the materials referenced in Part 3 Table A. As indicated in ISO 15156-3. (MP INQUIRY #2004-23) A.6 GENERAL REMARKS: The following remarks are prompted by questions related to Table A.5 when applied over carbon steels and of Part 3 Paragraph A. 316 and 316L stainless are both included in a lengthy list of materials accepted for direct exposure to sour gas. less restrictive environmental and metallurgical limits may be applied as an alternative.1.0 Flame spraying as a coating for corrosion resistance over a base material that is resistant to sulfide stress cracking is acceptable within the requirements of NACE MR0175/ISO15156 Part 2 Paragraph A.6.1 The revised version of Table A. The scopes and contents of the Tables of ISO 15156-3.1.2.QUESTION: We have some 316 stainless steel housings with a large through bore machined.2 and are used within the environmental restrictions of this table for any equipment. Inadvertently this bore was machined oversize. the Tables of Annex A fall into two groups: those for the selection of materials for "Any equipment or component" and a second group for specific named equipment or components when other. In the case of your inquiry.1.

2.1 (Row “Any equipment or component”) QUESTION: Are the bolting materials and nuts specified in Paragraphs 6.4. choke valves are also used in applications where they are not directly mounted on the Christmas tree (i. and 9. or 11.2 and 6. Paragraph 6. QUESTION: Paragraph 11.1.1.4.2 and 11.4. 9.3.6 Table A.1. 11.4.2. manifolds.2.2. respectively. can we still consider the choke valve to fall under Paragraph 9.7 speak to applications in pumps in sour service. Is this intentional? It would appear that the limitations applied to compressors would be also applicable to pumps.3.2. separators.5.2. which will provide the interpretation of NACE MR0175 Paragraphs 9.4.3.2.1. 11. which paragraph in Section 9 refers to the valve body? (MP INQUIRY #2003-04) ANSWER: See attached ISO 15156-3 Table A.2—Wellheads and Christmas trees. (MP INQUIRY #2003-20 Q2) ANSWER: It is intentional that the paragraphs you have cited apply only to compressors. 11.1 allow other nuts and bolting materials besides the ones listed in Paragraphs 6. NACE will be adopting ISO 15156 in 2003 as a technically equivalent document.2 for these applications? (MP INQUIRY #2003-02 Q1) ANSWER: Please see attached ISO 15156-3 Table A.4.1. which is titled "Compressors and Pumps. None of the material classes addressed in Paragraphs 11.1. QUESTION: Does Paragraph 6.3.3 come from the previous 2002 edition.5 both apply to choke valves? Additionally. etc. A.4 of the standard.3? (MP INQUIRY #2003-22 Q2) ANSWER: 36 . Does this paragraph include the valve bodies that are on the Christmas trees as well as other valve bodies exposed to H2S? In other words.1. NACE will be adopting ISO 15156 in 2003 as a technically equivalent document. which will provide the interpretation of NACE MR0175 Paragraph 9. the only acceptable materials in compliance with MR0175-2003 for Exposed Bolting? (MP INQUIRY #2003-22 Q1) ANSWER: Bolting materials may be chosen in accordance with Sections 3 and 4 as described in MR0175-2003.4.1.). 11.1. The other paragraphs were added as a result of the balloting process for the 2003 edition.Do Paragraphs 9.e.4.5.4.. Please see ISO 15156 Part 1 for guidance as to how to use field experience or laboratory data to qualify a material for H2S service.6. The Paragraphs 11.2 and 9." appears to not address many significant applications for pumps.2. heaters.1. QUESTION: Paragraph 9.2 and 6.

--Do you know what have been the reasons to change the limits of the allowed alloys and the allowed maximum temperature in this way? --Have there been serious problems with these materials in NACE applications in the past? (MP INQUIRY #2003-30) ANSWER: 1. This documentation may be either laboratory data or successful field experience. A.2. According to our experiences these two materials have been very common for applications that require the "NACE conformity. Please see the attached documentation. This negative suggested making the restrictions on 316 SS even more restrictive.1 and A. The austenitic stainless steels were restricted because of industry and lab failures. Table A.2 included in Reference 3 provides new guidance on the environmental limits of temperature.2 QUESTION: With the former MR0175-2000 the material 316L (bar and pipe material) and CF8M (casting material) was allowed for use for NACE applications. pH and sulfur for austenitic stainless steels in sour service. Table A. Table A. 2.1 of MR0175-2003 and is acceptable.2. QUESTION: Paragraph 4.2 The version of Table A. there was a single negative that was not withdrawn. We are not aware of having restricted the general composition of 316 SS beyond that of an industry consensus that was reviewed during the balloting process for the 2003 edition. Upon the final ballot. With the new revision (MR0175-2003) the 316L does not fulfill the new allowed limits of the chemical components any more and the allowed temperature range to use CF8M is drastically reduced (so that it has nearly no meaning anymore for the NACE applications). 316L SS is within the range as specified in Paragraph 4. ISO 15156-3. in accordance with NACE Standard MR0175-2003 Sections 3 and 4.2. It is important to emphasize that the chemical compositions for any alloy category in the 2003 edition are those of the alloys as delivered and not from the specifications.1 (Row ―Any equipment or component‖) lists the tables which may be used to select bolting materials.2. H2S. A.2.2—Austenitic Steels (say 316 SS). One of the acceptance limits for these materials is a maximum H2S partial pressure of 15 psia at a maximum of 140°F when no chlorides are present." Now we are very interested in the reasons why these two materials are (nearly) not possible with the new specification any more. chlorides.2. Can I assume that I can still use a material 37 .Yes. You may choose for a future addendum to propose new limits based on the documentation described in NACE MR0175/ISO 15156.

2. please clarify the reason for the 60°C limit in Paragraph 4. when temperature does not exceed 60°C. Paragraph 4. (MP INQUIRY #2003-23 Q2) REVISED ANSWER 2005-09-01: See revised version of Table A.) can be used at lower H2S partial pressures for temperatures above 60°C (140°F)? (MP INQUIRY #2003-08) REVISED ANSWER 2005-09-01: See revised version of Table A.2. the first sentence of Paragraph 4. Paragraph 4. QUESTION: Paragraph 4.2 is new.2: We have noted that a limit of 60°C is commonly cited with respect to chloride stress corrosion for austenitic SST in other publications. at 0. when no elemental sulfur is present.2.1 in NACE Standard MR0175-2003 for the scope of MR0175. We are not sure of the implications and use of SS in sour service according to NACE Standard MR0175-2003.2 included in Reference 3 See Paragraph 1.2. and that chloride is mentioned in Paragraph 4. Would you let us know which interpretation applies? 1.e. that the 60°C limit in Paragraph 4.1 psia H2S partial pressure with no chlorides present. i. (MP INQUIRY #2003-23 Q1) REVISED ANSWER 2005-09-01: See revised version of Table A.2 were established to provide resistance 38 . Are we correct in assuming. whereas the second sentence limits chlorides but does not have a temperature limit.. therefore.2. The environmental restrictions in Paragraph 4.2 included in Reference 3 QUESTION: In addition. etc.2 places a maximum temperature limit of 60°C on the use of austenitic stainless steel under any conditions in which MR0175 applies. for example.2. 2.2 included in Reference 3 Please see ISO 15156 Part 1 for guidance as to how to use field experience or laboratory data to qualify a material for H2S service. but without restriction on chlorides.2 does not have a limit on chlorides but does have a temperature limit.2.2.2. Could you please advise whether 300 series SS (304/316.2 is based on chloride stress corrosion concerns above 60°C when chloride concentrations above 50 mg/L are present rather than H 2S corrosion concerns? That is.2 is intended to place a limit on acceptable H 2S content under the conditions stated.from this category at a higher temperature than 140°F if the partial pressure of H 2S is lower than 15 psia? (MP INQUIRY #2003-04 Q1) REVISED ANSWER 2005-09-01: See Reference 3 QUESTION: In the past we have used 300 series SS pipes and valves in sour service.

and we have implemented NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 for design purposes. This negative suggested making the restrictions on 316 SS even more restrictive. then the environmental requirements are not necessary. and free elemental sulfur? QUESTION: Is the answer to the above question in agreement with ISO 15156? (MP INQUIRY #2003-39) ANSWER: Paragraph 6. Are bolting and nuts.2. then the sour gas will go to gas treatment units for further processing.2.2 included in Reference 3 QUESTION: We are now in the detailed engineering design phase of a sour gas refinery. (MP INQUIRY #2003-27 Q5) REVISED ANSWER 2005-09-01: See revised version of Table A.to sulfide stress cracking (SSC) and/or stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in austenitic stainless steels. QUESTION: SUBJECT: Paragraph 6. This paragraph does not specify just "metallurgical requirements. QUESTION: AISI 316: Technical justification of the temperature limitation to 60°C. my question is in sour gas treatment units in which we use austenitic stainless steel.1.2 included in Reference 3 The austenitic stainless steels were restricted because of industry and lab failures.2. Upon the final ballot. after liquid separation in slug catcher.1.1 of NACE MR0175-2003 Standard QUESTION: It is not clear whether or not the word "restrictions" as used in Paragraph 6. partial pressure of H2S.1. there was a single negative that was not withdrawn. acceptable for use in exposed sour environments with no environmental limits with respect to chloride content. NaCl (sodium chloride) will come to the refinery through three-phase flow pipeline from offshore. QUESTION: NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-Part 3: From Table A. which are manufactured from wrought austenitic stainless steel materials in accordance with the applicable paragraph in Section 4 of NACE MR0175-2003. temperature. (MP INQUIRY #2004-17) REVISED ANSWER 2005-09-01: See revised version of Table A.2 it seems that AISI 316/316L SS can no longer be used whenever the process temperature is above 60°C even if chlorides are totally absent from the environment.2 refers to chloride content in aqueous solution as mg/L. Table A.3.1 requires materials to meet the requirements of Sections 3 and 4 as applicable to the base material.1 of NACE MR0175-2003 includes any environmental restrictions for bolting and nuts exposed to sour gas environments. As this could have an enormous impact on the material selection for oil and gas processing plants." If the bolting is non-exposed in accordance with Paragraph 6. I would like to have a confirmation of the above. Please see the attached documentation. what are the criteria for the limitation of application of austenitic stainless 39 .1.

pH. pH2S. 5. austenitic stainless steel (304/316 SS) is applicable with max.1.2 included in Reference 3 "Any equipment or component" includes valve stems. This is always true throughout the document. (See ISO 15156-3. and shafts. you feel that ISO 15156-3. A. 6. These limits apply collectively. According to Para. As mentioned in ISO 15156-3. QUESTION: I have a technical query related to the latest edition of MR0175/ISO 15156 and the use of 316 stainless steel for sour service application. 40 .6 of this "Inquiries and interpretations" document. This latest edition of the standard imposes new restrictions on the use of 316 SS in environments operating above 60°C. Para. temperature of 140°F and UNS S20910 for valve stem is applicable without environmental limit.3. (MP INQUIRY #2004-21) REVISED ANSWER 2005-09-01: It is assumed in Table A. A.3 allows the use of UNS S20910 without environmental restrictions for "valve stems.2. Paragraph 2: ―The tables show the application limits with respect to temperature. A.steel? My idea is we have to comply with the first row of Table A. UNS S20910 is applicable material to valve stem.‖ See also revised version of Table A. See also "General Remarks" under ISO 15156-3. as an equipment user. including chloride content (see ISO 15156-1. The operator is responsible for determining the service conditions.1. Table A. (MP INQUIRY #2004-23 Q1) REVISED ANSWER 2005-09-01: See revised version of Table A. H2S partial pressure of 15 psi and a max. Austenitic stainless steel (304/316 SS) is applicable to valve stem material at a max. if. Over a temperature of 140°F. S.2.1) and the ISO Maintenance Panel cannot provide advice. A. Table A.) QUESTION: Would you let me know whether our interpretation is correct? NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3:2003 Para. pins. pins. Cl.2. and shafts" but not for other equipment.2 does not address your expected field conditions you have the freedom to test materials under alternative environmental limits and to use the outcome of successful tests to justify the use of a material outside the limits set in the standard. There is no means to identify the chloride content in the gas stream. H2S partial pressure of 15 psi at a max.2.2 that this is a mixed-phase environment with both a gas phase and a liquid phase. 6.1.2 included in Reference 3 However.2 states environment limits for austenitic stainless steel. temperature of 140°F.

2 The maximum acceptable H2S partial pressure shall be 100 kPa abs (15 psia) at a maximum temperature of 60°C (140°F). A.2. .0 The scope of NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 Part 3. It is the manufacturer's responsibility to determine whether the 316 SS meets the metallurgical requirements of this paragraph. Paragraph 1. do gauges that are made with 316 SS alloy steels comply with NACE Standard MR0175-2003? (MP INQUIRY #2003-18) REVISED ANSWER 2005-09-01: You have correctly cited Paragraph 4." SCC requires a tensile stress (applied and/or residual) to occur.2 of MR0175 for the general use of austenitic stainless steels.My question is can 316 SS be used above 60°C for non-stressed vessel internals or for items such as thermowells located into sour lines or vessels? I ask this because I note that the standard need not be applied to parts loaded in compression (Part 2. As a similar situation to vessel internals and thermowells. Currently this means that 316 stainless steel alloys (L.0 The Maintenance Panel cannot analyze the design of equipment.2 QUESTION: Paragraphs 4. Under the above stated conditions. The standard need not be applied for equipment not covered by this sentence. please could you advise on the use of 316 stainless steel for valve internals in a sour application. There is no provision for any of the alloys in the standard for a threshold tensile stress below which failure cannot occur.2. Sentence 1 defines the applicability of the standard. Each application is subject to the specific environmental conditions to the equipment supplier. . In addition. and no elemental sulfur.1 refer to all CRAs being used in contact with well fluids but do not necessarily include instrument or control tubing (Bourdon tubes) being used in pressure indicators as listed in Paragraph 8. etc.) containing those elements are not ruled out from their being used in gauges where the well fluid wetted parts are not exposed to fluids that do not exceed: 4.2 and 4. (MP INQUIRY #2005-03) ANSWER: 1. Table 1).4. operating above 60°C. particularly if the equipment will be used in sour service. with no restrictions on chlorides.2. including the requirement that the alloy will be "free of cold work . " 41 . the H2S partial pressure shall be less than 150 kPa abs (50 psia). in Table 1. It is up to the manufacturer and equipment user to agree whether or not the scope or any of the listed exclusions in Table 1 apply for a given design.2 including Table A. Of particular interest is the use of solid 316 SS balls for ball valves. parts loaded in compression are included among those considered to be "permitted exclusions.4. The implication may be that parts have to be stressed for SCC to be an issue.1. 2. Ti. If the chloride content is less than 50 mg/L.

--There is no exclusion for Type 316 stainless steel from the metallurgical or the environmental requirements of Paragraph 4." Fluid from the oil wells is processed in the gathering center.2 in Paragraph 8. must comply with all the requirements of NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3. These materials. The definition of the hardness testing location is outside the scope of the standard. What does the "separation" facility mean? Is "separation" the facility downstream from the separator in the gathering center? 42 . In purchasing raw material. The NACE MR0175 2003 edition will cease to exist.4.2 of MR0175-2003. According to Table A. which usually consists of flow lines. 1. The material typically has the highest hardness readings at the outer surface and lowest in the center. Table A. 2-2005 (E). which is the location where ASTM standards require the hardness measurement to be made? For 304/316 austenitic stainless steel MR0175 indicates that the hardness must be Rockwell C 22 max as long as the material was not hardened to enhance mechanical properties.2. --NACE will adopt in 2003 the ISO 15156 document as being technically equivalent to MR0175. (MP INQUIRY #2006-05) ANSWER: The Maintenance Panel cannot comment on the hardness test locations specified in ASTM standards.2 included in Reference 3. when used for sour service. See revised version of Table A. Q1. QUESTION: For round bar stock 304/316 SS material. the hardness readings reported are at mid-radius. Table A. NACE MR0175/ISO 15156.2 of NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3-2003/Cor. but hardness requirements must be met regardless of the chosen test location. separators. an environmental limit for austenitic stainless steel was added under the title of "Any equipment or components in oil and gas processing and injection facilities after separation. desalter. At this time there will be only a joint standard. The hardness on 304/316 SS round bar typically varies with radial position. does the NACE MR0175 Rockwell C 22 max hardness requirement refer to the hardness anywhere on the raw material or does it refer to the hardness measured at mid-radius. storage tanks and gas processing facilities. ASTM standards define hardness measurements for bar stock to be taken at mid-radius.2 Revised version (see Reference 3) QUESTION: I would like to have advice regarding the addenda with particular focus on Reference 3.

If not.1 for the applications defined in Paragraph 9. Q1. Does this mean that I can use UNS S20910 for valve stems in the cold-worked condition (preceded by a solution-anneal heat treatment) at 35 HRC max with no environmental restrictions? (MP INQUIRY #2003-12 Q3) ANSWER: There are no environmental restrictions for UNS S20910 permitted at the higher hardness of 35 HRC in Paragraph 9. which provides the correct 43 .iso. 2-2005 (E).4.3 QUESTION: Paragraph 4. if the temperature is less than 60°C. see answer Q1. According to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3-2003/Cor.1) The subsection you refer to was introduced to correspond to a category of equipment that was familiar to users of NACE MR0175:2003 and had been omitted in NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3. Please see the attached Table A. In case that environmental condition of a stream after separation is maximum chloride content above 50 mg/L and max H2S partial pressure below 15 psia.4. is there any technical reason for different environmental limits defined for the facilities before and after separation? (MP INQUIRY #2005-30Q1) ANSWER Q1.2) Yes.3 from ISO 15156.2. A.3.4.1 for UNS S20910 allows this material to be used in sulfur-free environments when the maximum H2S partial pressure is 15 psia to 150°F in the annealed or hot-rolled (hot/cold-worked) condition at 35 HRC maximum hardness. provided this cold working is preceded by a solution-anneal heat treatment. (MP INQUIRY #2005-30Q2) ANSWER Q2 This is addressed under the topic "FAQs" on the ISO 15156 Maintenance Web site at www.2.1) Q2.org/iso15156maintenance. and pins at a maximum hardness level of 35 HRC in the cold-worked condition. environmental limits for some materials. stems. is the austenitic stainless steel acceptable for use? 3. Q1.2. The environmental limits upstream and downstream of separation are identical. Paragraph 9. Table A.1 for UNS S20910 allows this material to be used for valve shafts. Please advise when NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 would be accordingly revised.3) No.

Table A. QUESTION We have a client that wishes us to use UNS S17400 double age-hardened stainless steel for the valve stem on some 4. and other devices. Is it correct to assume that this additionally excludes valve stems because these are specifically dealt with in Table A. want the valves to comply with API 6A material class DD and the latest version of NACE MR0175.27? (MP INQUIRY #2006-07) Answer: No.3. partial pressure of H 2S. NACE will be adopting ISO 15156 in 2003 as a technically equivalent document. less restrictive environmental and metallurgical limits may be applied as an alternative. and Table A. or can valve stems be used manufactured from UNS S17400 (in the required treated condition). 5k gate valves (basically because we have some in redundant stock and can deliver far quicker than the nickel alloy version of stem we currently use).3 does not preclude the selection of other materials for valve stems. QUESTION: SUBJECT: Paragraph 9. with an allowable partial pressure of 0. they may be selected using Table A.4 of NACE MR0175-2003 Standard QUESTION: Are shafts.1. unloaders. as they are a valve component.6 Note: The revised version of Table A. A.2 is included in Reference 3.2.2.27 subject to the environmental and metallurgical limits of this Table. In general. Where there is slight ambiguity is with the use of UNS S17400 for valves and choke components (excluding bodies and bonnets) with an allowable partial pressure of 0. Please see Table A. Table A. temperature and free elemental sulfur? QUESTION: If the answer to the former question is no. He does. however. and pins used in valves.5 psi in accordance with Table A. acceptable for use in sour environments with no environmental limits with respect to chloride content.2 apply (as opposed to compressors where in Paragraph 11. 44 .4.2.27). stems. materials for equipment or components may be chosen from Tables for "Any equipment or component" or from Tables for specific named equipment or components when other. Table A. For the specific example of UNS S17400 valve stems.1/16-in. Table A.5 psi (ref. when manufactured from austenitic stainless steel materials in accordance with Section 4 of NACE MR0175-2003.7 there are no restrictions).interpretation of this paragraph. what are the specific environmental limits? (MP INQUIRY #2003-36) ANSWER: 1) For stainless steels.3. the environmental limits of Paragraph 4.

It is the user’s responsibility to determine whether the equipment mentioned in your inquiry is directly associated with the compressor and experiences the same service environment as inferred for compressors in NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2003 Table A.4.(2) For individual alloy UNS S20910 there are no environmental restrictions if cold work and hardness are set within the restrictions of Paragraph 9. Table A. Since in Paragraph 9.2 and Table A. gate valves. A. and check valves installed on scrubbers. QUESTION: SUBJECT: Paragraph 9. stems. and process industries generally include several valves varied in type.4.3 of ISO 15156-3. such as relief valves.3.4. acceptable for use in sour environments with no environmental limits with respect to chloride content. butterfly valves. (2) For individual alloy UNS S20910 there are no environmental restrictions if cold work and hardness are set within the restrictions of Paragraph 9. temperature.4 of NACE MR0175-2003 Standard QUESTION: Are shafts. then the environmental restrictions of Paragraph 4.2 apply (as opposed to compressors where in Paragraph 11. partial pressure of H2S. stems.1 do not apply for shafts.3 of NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3. the environmental limits of Paragraph 4.2. instrumentation and piping systems. Are the body and bonnet components of valves. and pins manufactured from austenitic stainless steels in accordance with and meet the hardness and heat-treat requirements of Section 4 of MR0175-2003 acceptable for use in sour environments with no environmental limits with respect to chloride content.4. temperature and free elemental sulfur? QUESTION: Is the answer to the above question in agreement with ISO 15156? (MP INQUIRY #2003-37) ANSWER: (1) For stainless steels.6. 45 .2. partial pressure of H 2S.7 there are no restrictions).3.6 Note: The revised version of Table A. in process gas piping.1 do not apply for shafts. (MP INQUIRY #2003-35 Q1) ANSWER: The latest editions of API Standard 618 for Reciprocating compressors and API Standard 617 for Axial and Centrifugal compressors define the scope of equipment associated with the compressor environment including accessories. and pins. ball valves.1 in Table A. QUESTION: SUBJECT: Paragraph 9. and in off-skid mounted header systems and sometimes contain chokes in higher pressure scrubber drain systems. globe valves. plug valves. Since in Paragraph 9. and pins.1 of MR0175-2003 there are no environmental restrictions.4. stems.2 is included in Reference 3. then the environmental restrictions of Paragraph 4.3 of NACE MR0175-2003 Standard The packaging content of large skid-mounted gas compressors applied in the oil and gas.1 in Table A.1 of MR0175-2003 there are no environmental restrictions. and free elemental sulfur. gas processing. when manufactured from austenitic stainless steel materials in accordance with Section 4 of NACE MR0175-2003.

when manufactured from austenitic stainless steel materials in accordance with Section 4 of NACE MR0175-2003.‖ These guidelines can be applied within NACE MR0175/ ISO 151562003. See revised version of Table A. QUESTION: Are the answers to all of the above questions in agreement with ISO 15156? (MP INQUIRY #2003-35 Q5) ANSWER: Yes.3.2 included in Reference 3 b) The austenitic stainless steels were restricted because of industry and lab failures. (2) compromise the integrity of the system. 46 . QUESTIONS: I have an application where I am supplying a pipeline from a gas compressor to a turbine generator. and free elemental sulfur? (MP INQUIRY #2003-35 Q3) ANSWER: a. QUESTION: If the answer to the former question is no. partial pressure of H 2S.QUESTION: If the answer to the former question is no.) The user must determine if individual components or parts of equipment must meet the requirements of NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2003.2. b) NACE MR0175-2003 provided guidance for this applicability of the standard in Paragraph 1. what are the specific environmental limits? (MP INQUIRY #2003-35 Q4) ANSWER: The austenitic stainless steels when used outside of the compressor environment are subject to the environmental restrictions in NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2003 Table A.2. This paragraph stated that ―This standard applies to all components where failure by SSC or SCC would (1) prevent the equipment from being restored to an operating condition while continuing to contain pressure. The pipe is 10 in.2 is included in Reference 3. temperature. acceptable for use in sour environments with no environmental limits with respect to chloride content. Note: The revised version of Table A. in diameter and contains natural gas with H 2S. and/or (3) prevent the basic function of the equipment from occurring. QUESTION: Are the non-pressure-containing components of valves. what are the specific environmental limits? (MP INQUIRY #2003-35 Q2) REVISED ANSWER 2005-09-01: a) The austenitic stainless steels when used outside the compressor environment are subject to the environmental restrictions in NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2003 Table A.

instrumentation.2) are based upon industry experience with these alloys in compressors. According to the revised Table A. NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3:2003 Table A.0. 3. QUESTION: Recently I have down loaded a NACE MR0175-ISO 15156-3 Technical Circular 1 from your web. which satisfies the requirements in A. 2a) The manufacturer and user may consider documenting previous experience with pipelines in accordance with NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-1:2001 Paragraphs 8. I would like to know what table from Annex A this pipe would fall under. Note: The revised version of Table A. The material I would like to use is 304L SS. e) The Maintenance Panel cannot review individually designed equipment and pressure stations to make this interpretation.2 and 9.6 (when compared to those of NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3:2003 Table A. b) The limits on austenitic stainless steels in NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3:2003 Table A.2 is included in Reference 3.0 of NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-1:2001. b) NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-1:2001 provides minimal requirements for these issues and the user is ultimately responsible for ensuring the alloy in final fabricated form has adequate resistance to the types of cracking listed in the Scope 1.6.2.6 provides environmental and materials limits for austenitic stainless steels used in compressors.The H2S concentration is 250 ppm by volume.2. The gas is pressurized to 475 psi @152°F. and piping systems.2 applies to austenitic stainless steels used for any equipment or components. we can use austenitic stainless steel 316 up to 93 degree C. I have one simple question whether the following condition is allowed for 316SS according to the NACE MR-0175/ISO 1515 Code. c) The latest editions of API Standard 618 for Reciprocating compressors and API Standard 617 for Axial and Centrifugal compressors define the scope of equipment associated with the compressor environment including accessories. 47 . I would appreciate any guidance you can provide with this subject. (MP INQUIRY #2004-02) ANSWERS: 1a) NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3:2003 Table A. d) It is the user’s responsibility to determine if the pipe mentioned in your inquiry is directly associated with the compressor and experiences the same service environment as inferred for compressors in NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3:2003 Table A. The ISO Maintenance Panel cannot comment on the suitability of using the 304L SS materials compared to alternative alloys.

. e. calculated in situ pH equal at least to 5 and a partial pressure of H2S max of 10 kPa (1 bar). but still falls under the max hardness requirement of HRC 22. In both of these tables there is a statement "these materials shall also -.6 apply to base materials only. 5000 ppm chlorides max. Tables A.6 for this part.6 as it is used to purposely enhance the mechanical properties of the alloy by cold working." QUESTION: Part 3 of the standard for austenitic stainless steels requires a solution anneal and quench or thermal stabilization along with no cold-work intended to enhance mechanical properties. can we use 316SS for facilities? (MP INQUIRY #2008-02) ANSWER: Table A. condition. Table A4 QUESTION: 48 . We have to complete some fabrications and believe the required heat treatment will cause cracking and distortion of the part--however. QUESTION: I am requesting a clarification of intent for comments included in Tables A.2.2 and A. a welded compressor housing. The requirements for welding are given in NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3. NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3.2 & A. ¼ hard temper UNS S31600 does not comply with the conditions set out in the notes to Tables A. So just the chlorides and the temperature are not sufficient.2.-. In addition the material must comply with the requirements given at the bottom of Table A.6 in Annex A of the 2003 edition.2 and A.2 and A.When the temperature is more than 95 degree C and the chloride content is less than 4. A.2 of Tech Circular states that 316 SS can be used if all requirements are simultaneously fulfilled: 93°C max.2. (MP INQUIRY #2006-10) ANSWER: You are correct.2 and in Paragraph A. a part must meet the requirements of MR0175/ISO 15156.2 and Tables A.1..500 ppm." It is my interpretation that this was a requirement for the base material and was not intended for a fabricated part. "Welding of austentitic stainless steels of this materials group. I have a 316 st/st (UNS S31600) part that we spec 1/4 hard temper. A.3. My mechanical engineer tells me 1/4 hard in essence means cold-working the material to increase its properties.2. (MP INQUIRY #2006-14) ANSWER: No. .g.be in the solution-annealed and quenched . . My question is: Can we do 1/4 hard if we still meet the hardness requirement? I am looking to comply with Annex A.

2.7 of NACE MR0175-2003 Standard QUESTION: It is not clear whether or not the word "restrictions" as used in paragraph 11. The 2003 edition of MR0175 now contains many restrictions regarding the use of austenitic SS...6).In the latest NACE MR0175 there are two component categories "Instrument tubing and associated compression fittings. valve cages as well as packing cups were manufactured out of austenitic stainless steel to prevent corrosion.. Under these circumstances (max.1 apply. Table A..2. In order to avoid surface corrosion we furthermore intend to 49 .7? (MP INQUIRY #2003-33) ANSWER: NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 provides a clear interpretation in Table A. Table A. No data have been submitted to verify resistance to cracking in the presence of elemental sulfur. we supply machines for compressing sour gas sometimes with a H2S partial pressure up to 10 bar.7 provide an exemption to all of the environmental restrictions or limits detailed in Paragraph 4.2.2.4. The Maintenance Panel cannot meet your request to categorize Bourdon tubes between "Instrument tubing and associated compression fittings.2 of NACE MR0175-2003 included in the word "restrictions" as used in Paragraph 11.7 of NACE MR0175-2003 includes any environmental restrictions.4.2. pressure measuring devices and pressure seals. pressure measuring devices and pressure seals.6 The revised version of Table A. are all of the environmental restrictions detailed in Paragraph 4. item 4. A. temperature 60°C) these materials are not any more applicable for the compression part.2). the use of austenitic SS (UNS S31635/1. limiting the H2S partial pressure and temperature to very low values (see page 9..2 in cases in which an austenitic stainless steel material has been selected for use in compressors in sour environments? QUESTION: If the answer to the former question is no.4571) acc.4.6 that only the metallurgical limits in Paragraphs 4. Environmental restrictions do not apply. EN ISO 151563:2003 is allowed--presumed the required heat treatment has been carried out (see page 19.4.6 is included in Reference 3 QUESTION: SUBJECT: Paragraph 11.2 and 4.. QUESTION: As a manufacturer of reciprocating compressors." and "Diaphragms." In all cases the material selected must be acceptable to the equipment user for their service conditions.2." and "Diaphragms." To which category does the Bourdon tube belong? (MP INQUIRY #2007-01) ANSWER: Bourdon tubes are not specifically addressed in NACE MR0175/ISO 15156. On the contrary. Does Paragraph 11. Before NACE Standard MR0175-2003 came into force. compressor components like valves.

austenitic stainless steels meeting Paragraph 4.6.3. they are: NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-1. and NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 These NACE/ISO documents replace all earlier versions of NACE MR0175 including NACE MR0175-2003.6 since this standard was published.iso.3 does not specifically require an anneal after welding to meet the requirements of 5. (1) Am I correct in assuming these materials must be annealed regardless of hardness? (2) If a construction started with materials in this condition.4 50 . Please see NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 A. In addition.2 is included in Reference 3. We ask for clarification on your part. Please see Paragraph 5. and ISO 15156-3 (and their EN versions) all have NACE versions with identical technical content. The requirements for austenitic stainless steels are now presented in Table A.3 Note: The revised version of Table A.3 for requirements for welding the austenitic stainless steels. QUESTION: The way I read Paragraph 4.2 and A. Tables A. there have been a number of inquiries on NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3.2.2 regardless of their hardness.2. (MP INQUIRY #2005-19) ANSWER: For your information ISO 15156-1. the answers provided by the ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel are included in the document titled "02. NACE MR0175/ISO 15156.3. you are correct that the materials must meet the treatment conditions regardless of their hardness (maximum 22 HRC).org/iso15156maintenance These answers provide clarification of the intent of Table A.3. A. But by doing so we are contradicting the NACE standard requirements--the standard that is mostly quoted by our customers.1 must be solution-annealed and quenched or annealed and thermally stabilized with a maximum hardness of 22 HRC.3 for requirements for welding austenitic stainless steels.2.2. Table A. ISO 15156-2.3.2. would it be necessary to anneal again following a welding operation? (MP INQUIRY #2004-04) ANSWER: You are correct that materials must meet the requirements of MR0175-2003.2 and A. Table A. Paragraph 5.use austenitic SS. NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2.2. Paragraph 4.2. Inquiries and Answers" available on the ISO 15156 Maintenance Web site at www.

2.2. My hardness values are all below 22 HRC as required. I am forming this sheet into tubes and (longitudinally) welding the formed tube without filler metals using an automatic arc welding process (ASTM 249/ASTM 269).3 QUESTION: My stainless steel sheet material qualifies to Section A. After welding the tube is fully annealed per ASTM.iso. This is where I also need help.4. Yes. Your last point cannot be answered as the MP does not do consulting work. if I now butt weld two ends of the tubing above using the orbital weld (no filler metal) process (no additional anneal).2.org/livelink/livelink?func=ll&objId=3340364&objAction=browse&sort=n ame QUESTION: In Section of Part 3: Table A. but I believe it goes into the Part 3 category.2. A. were their specific reasons that lead to its removal? (MP INQUIRY #2009-07) ANSWER: Indeed alloy UNS N06600 was part of the 2002 version with a limit at 25 HRC and it is not included in ISO 15156-3. this is still a weld even if it was made without filler materials.4 it shows S31600 stainless. It includes low C 316L SS. It is up to the user to determine which Table to use. Also. S31603. Am I overlooking a reference to this material.1. Note that the 2009 version of the Standard has an error: the first column should read S31600. (MP INQUIRY #2009-17) ANSWER: Table A.2 (austenitic stainless steel) states: 51 ." [now June 2010] [http://isotc.QUESTION: In Part 3. QUESTION: Inconel 600 (UNS N06600) was an included material in the 2002 revision of MR0175.3 and 6. Table A.2. A. Is my welded and annealed tubing bound to the welding requirements of A. per section 4. am I now bound to A. so do I treat it as a fitting? As for the bolt material.3 and 6. but not S31603 stainless (316Lss).2 that applies to any equipment or components or another Table that applies to the specific equipment or component. In this case it can be either Table A.2? B.1.2? (MP INQUIRY #2004-19 Q2) ANSWER: A. I have not been able to find any references to N06600 or any material category/type that would cover this material. I don’t see this material anywhere in any of the 3 parts.2. You may read the answer to a previous inquiry # 2004-19 Q1 at the following link and then go to "02 Inquiries and Interpretation September 2007. Yes. B. In both the 2003 revision of MR0175 and MR0175/ISO 15156-3:2003. or was this material removed from the specification? If it was removed.2. our equipment is a flowmeter which is not specifically referred to anywhere in the standard. ASTM A354/ UNS K04100. After annealing.2 applies for austenitic stainless steels whose composition are defined in § A.

6.7. Please confirm that the interpretation that NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 therefore places no hardness restrictions for welds in these materials is correct. i.4 52 ."These materials shall also -be in the solution-annealed and quenched. For matching consumables for solid-solution nickelbased alloys (Section A.e. (MP INQUIRY #2005-13) ANSWER: (1) NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 provides no guidance for hardness conversion from the Vickers to the Rockwell scales for the austenitic stainless steels.2.4. and the hardness of the weld metal shall not exceed the maximum hardness limit of the respective alloy used for the welding consumable." Whereas for welding in Section A." Q1. Please clarify how the requirement for 22 HRC is interpreted in light of this. The relevant sections (A.7) there are no hardness limits for weld metal. which is then left to an agreement between the manufacturer and the equipment user possibly based on conversion tables made using empirical data. For the weld metal. for solid-solution nickel-based alloys (Section A. any hardness limit depends on any hardness limit set for the alloy used as consumable.7) there are no hardness requirements for materials in the solution-annealed condition (with the exception of one HIP duplex stainless steel alloy)." I addition Section 6. A. Q2. The use of other methods shall require explicit user approval.2. Paragraph 2. and -have a maximum hardness of 22 HRC.1.2. see ISO 15156-3.2. (2) There are no hardness limits for the HAZ of welds of corrosion-resistant alloys when there are no hardness limits in the tables or the text of the document for the base materials.3 and A. -be free of cold work intended to enhance their mechanical properties. or annealed and thermally stabilized heat-treatment condition..4) and duplex stainless steels (Section A.2.2 states that "Hardness testing for welding procedure qualification shall be carried out using Vickers HV 10 or HV 5 methods in accordance with ISO 6507-1 or the Rockwell 15N method in accordance with ISO 6508-1.3 and A.3) on welding state: "The hardness of the HAZ after welding shall not exceed the maximum hardness allowed for the base metal. what Vickers (HV 10 or HV 5) or Rockwell (15N) value should be used as a maximum for weld HAZ and weld metal? On an associated point.3 it is stated that: "The hardness of the HAZ after welding shall not exceed the maximum hardness allowed for the base metal.4) and duplex stainless steels (Section A. and the hardness of the weld metal shall not exceed the maximum hardness limit of the respective alloy used for the welding consumable".

.2.g. 5%.8 is included in Reference 3. or is any cold work whatsoever included? (MP INQUIRY #2003-28 Q1) ANSWER: NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 does not prohibit all cold work of the austenitic stainless steels. We do not use the cold deformation in order to enhance the mechanical properties! Is this practice allowed under the rules of NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 ? (MP INQUIRY #2003-28 Q2) ANSWER: Hydrotesting the austenitic stainless steels to the appropriate industry or design code is acceptable.g. We understand that forging grade equivalent of above J 93254 which is UNS 31254 will also be qualified under these conditions. QUESTION: We have requirement of 6Mo valves for one of our ongoing projects wherein we need to use A 351 CK3MCuN (J 93254) body material. This overstressing causes a "cold deformation" of 0. Table A. Question: Is there a limit to what is considered cold work.5%.3.8 lists the above material J 93254 (ASTM A 351 CK3MCuN) can be used for any combinations of temperature. QUESTION: In order to decrease the danger of low stress creep we slightly overstress superaustenitic SS and Ni-based alloy valve bodies during hydrotesting. Ni-based only).2-0.2003 Environmental and materials limits for highly alloyed austenitic steels used for any equipment or components ) we have following clarification: Table A .g. A limit for the percentage of cold work is not provided. Please confirm /clarify the whether forging grade equivalent of J 93254 which is UNS 31254 will also be qualified? (MP INQUIRY #2006-12) 53 .. A. austenitic SS) are acceptable if they are free of cold work intended to enhance their mechanical properties or is stated "in the annealed or solutionannealed condition only" (e.. chloride concentration and in situ pH occurring in production environments are acceptable.8 The revised version of Table A.QUESTION: In several paragraphs of both NACE MR0175 and ISO 15156 it is stated that materials (e. With reference to Table A -8 of NACE MR0175/ISO-15156 . it prohibits cold work intended to enhance mechanical properties. e. pH2S.

QUESTION: Paragraph 4.4) with Ni% + 2 Mo% >30 (and Mo>=2%) and one (Paragraph 4. (MP INQUIRY #2003-15) ANSWER: Your answer A2 is correct. The paragraph states: Highly alloyed austenitic stainless steels in this category are those with Ni% + 2 Mo% >30 and 2% Mo minimum. The chemistry requirements are additive. Is it intended by the standard 54 . This same sentence is repeated in Paragraph 10.1.8 and Table A. .8 is the subject of an amendment proposal that has been accepted by the ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel. Does the statement mean that there are essentially two groups in this category? Such that . by NACE TG 299 (ISO 15156 Oversight Committee) and by ISO TC67 WG7 and will now go forward for publication. 317). A1.Answer:Table A.3. The revision involves limits being placed upon the application of UNS J93254.4 in MR0175-2003. one (Paragraph 4.2. Or does the statement mean that there must be a minimum of 2% Mo in the Ni% + 2 Mo% >30 requirement? Since the environmental restrictions in Paragraph 4. A2. I assume #A1 is the correct interpretation since this would allow for inclusion of 316 and 317. and maximum chloride content.2 (where most austenitics are acceptable).5) with PREN >40.2. .9 QUESTION: We have a question regarding the meaning of a sentence in Paragraph 4. partial H2S partial pressure.4 are the same as in 4. Both have two different ranges for temperature. then the less restrictive environmental limits in Paragraph 4.5 apply. Table A. A.4 in MR0175 identifies "Highly Alloyed Austenitic Stainless Steels with Ni% + Mo>30 and 2% Mo minimum" as a category. One qualifying group consists of materials that contain N% + 2 Mo% >30 Another qualifying group consists of any austenitic stainless steel with 2% Mo minimum (such as 316. QUESTION: NACE Standard MR0175-2003 has two different highly alloyed austenitic SS families. Publication of this document can be expected within the coming year. Which environmental limits have to be used for materials applicable for both categories like UNS S31254? (MP INQUIRY #2003-19 Q1a) ANSWER: If UNS S31254 has a PREN >40.

4 in NACE Standard MR0175 is a single alloy category defined by the additive requirements of Ni% + Mo% >30 and 2% Mo. Does 600 qualify anywhere in NACE MR0175/ISO 15156? B. Both requirements for chemistry must be met.4. it is included in the revised version of Table A. The newest revision does not list either 600 or 800 and now appears to place equipment restrictions on alloy 400 (Table A. shell.12. A. 600 (N06600).16). and 800 (N08800) were previously listed in MR0175-94 as acceptable to 35 HRC. QUESTION: Are "contained" electrical tubular heating elements manufactured from solutionannealed or annealed UNS N08800 tube (sheath material) acceptable for applications under Paragraph A.1 Austenitic Stainless Steels? Some publications refer to 800 as a stainless steel and others as a nickel alloy. that allows less restricted use. B. 21).4 Solid Solution Nickel Based Alloys (Table A.4. (MP INQUIRY #2005-06) ANSWER: 1.org/iso15156maintenance. This ballot should take the form illustrated in ―01. Introduction to ISO 15156 Maintenance Activities‖ Annex C.16? (MP INQUIRY #2004-19 Q1) REVISED ANSWER 2005-09-01: A.1 (MR0175/ISO 15156-3)? By "contained" we mean that the heating elements are in a bundle totally enclosed inside a pipe body. A. None of these alloys appear to qualify by chemistry under A.4 QUESTION: Alloys 400 (N04400). C." (MP INQUIRY #2003-20 Q1) ANSWER: Paragraph 4. Please see also the previous interpretation (2004-19Q1) provided in response to a similar question to the ISO Maintenance Panel and listed under "Inquiries and 55 . No.1 and Table A. ASTM lists it as an Ni-Fe-Cr alloy as did MR0175-94.12. p. C. Does 800 qualify anywhere in NACE MR0175/ISO 15156? Can 800 be qualified under A. Alloys UNS N06600 and N08800 were inadvertently left out of the document. is it Ni% + Mo>30 with 2% Mo minimum? Or is the 2% Mo minimum another defined material group in the category? I believe it to be the former as I am not aware of highly alloyed austenitic stainless steels only defined by the term "2% Mo minimum. Unfortunately after 6-plus years of balloting.13. or tank. This document is available at www.0 The solution-annealed or annealed material UNS N08800 does not match any of the materials groups mentioned in NACE MR0175/ISO 15156:3.iso. that is included in Reference 3.2. I assume 400 is restricted to only the equipment and conditions listed in Table A. See answer A. A. The Maintenance Panel will be grateful if you would submit a ballot item for their inclusion in the set of addenda now being prepared for 2005. no one noticed this.writers that the two conditions be both present? In other words.

1 (NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3.4 (NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3. Sub-clause A. materials to the specification UNS N08535 can only be guaranteed to match the Category requirements of "Austenitic stainless steel" (Covered in NACE MR0175-2003 as Paragraph 4.5. Table A. Table A.1.4. i.2)) or of "Highly alloyed stainless steel" (Covered in NACE MR0175-2003 as Paragraph 4. Table A.e. Sub-clause A. Table A.9). Table A. Does this mean that its environmental limits are given in Table 5 of MR0175-2003 instead of Table 6 (NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3.4 at http://www.2. Subclause A. Table A.2 (NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3. A. while applying the same environmental limits. However. may contain as little as 35.1.9) that are the same as for austenitic stainless steels like 316? (MP INQUIRY #2003-13 Q1) ANSWER: You are correct. classified as a "nonferrous alloy" in MR0175-2002) only contains 29.12 and is acceptable for use in accordance with the requirements of NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3.0 Please note the ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel is unable to comment on questions related to design.iso.9% Ni.. without further restrictions on their chemical compositions. Rows 2-6. for NACE MR0175/ISO 15156.1.2. does accept cold-worked material with a maximum hardness of 35 HRC. Sub-clause A. Table A. 2.12)) requires a minimum Ni content of 29. if the chemical composition of heats of UNS N08535 is specified to a minimum nickel concentration of 29.14.5%. you are correct. Use in accordance with Paragraph 10. Does this mean that Alloy 2535 must be restricted to environments described by Paragraph 10. a 6% Mo.12 QUESTION: Paragraph 10.1.5%.12)? (MP INQUIRY #2003-13 Q2a) ANSWER: Yes.4. Sub-clause A. A. Sub-clause A. In addition. However.Answers" for NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3.0% Ni (minimum).2.2. classified as a "Nonferrous alloy" in MR0175-2002).org/iso15156maintenance.2. if the chemical composition is specified to a minimum nickel + cobalt concentration of 45% the alloy qualifies as a material of Type 4d and can be used in accordance with the 56 . but solution-annealed and cold-worked alloy UNS N08535 (Alloy 2535. Table 5. solution-annealed and cold-worked alloy. Please refer to the Scope of NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 on page 1 for the applicability of the standard. QUESTION: Alloy G-3 (UNS N06985. the alloy qualifies as a material of Type 4c as defined in NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3. Use in accordance with either of these two sub-clauses does require adherence to the relevant environmental limits. These rows include the provisions of NACE MR0175-2003.1 of MR0175-2003 (NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3. any decision concerning the applicability of the standard is the responsibility of the equipment user.1 (NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3. higher than the minimum stated Ni content of 29%.3)).

qualify for no environmental limits with respect to partial pressures of H2S in accordance with Paragraph 4.4. Table A. Grade 1 material is NOT solution annealed. These rows include the provisions of NACE MR0175-2003. The MP will investigate the history of this alloy in NACE MR0175 and may make an amendment proposal to re-include it. Table A.2. QUESTION: We manufacture a fluid-handling product machined from UNS N06600 in the coldworked condition with a hardness less than 35 HRC.11.1 of MR0175-2003? Discussion: It clearly was acceptable in the previous version of MR0175. however. Do solid-solution nickel-based alloy wrought materials complying with either of the two chemical composition alternatives detailed in Paragraph 4. A. Rows 28. Table 6.1 of MR0175-2002.1.12 and sub-clause A. as appears to be required by Paragraph 4. or B446 (also commonly referenced as stabilized or stabilize annealed) acceptable as a material under Paragraph 4.000°F and is identified as Grade 2.1.11.11 of NACE Standard MR0175-2003 does not stipulate a minimum cobalt content. This condition is typically reserved for service temperatures in excess of 1. Solution-annealed material requires annealing at a temperature above 2.11. Table A. 57 .1. is it acceptable to continue to certify meeting MR0175-2002? (MP INQUIRY #2003-10 Q2) ANSWER: The MP cannot provide interpretations involving the certification of equipment. QUESTION: Question: Is annealed UNS N06625. Grade 1.11. Chemistry requirements for Co are expressed only for the sum of nickel and cobalt.1. We have certified that this product meets MR0175 based on Paragraph 4. a) It appears this material is not included in MR0275-2003. Is it acceptable to certify that this material meets MR0175-2003 based on the listing in previous versions? b) If not.13 QUESTION: Paragraph 4.11.12 as an alloy that may be used in the solution-annealed or annealed metallurgical condition.2? (MP INQUIRY #2003-25) ANSWER: There are no environmental limits with respect to partial pressures of H2S or elemental sulfur as stated in NACE Standard MR0175-2003 Paragraph 4.11. per ASTM B443.14. please note that UNS N06625 is considered in NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 Table A.4. We can only interpret the current edition of MR0175. However.requirements of NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3.4. but with zero percent cobalt.2 for solid-solution nickel-based alloys defined as a category in Paragraph 4. (MP INQUIRY #2003-40) ANSWER: Please see the definition of solution anneal in NACE MR0175 Section 2. B444. This Maintenance Panel cannot interpret ASTM specifications. Sub-clause A.11.100°F. There is no individual requirement for the minimum content of Co alone in Paragraph 4.4.

Alloy manufacturers did not object to the change. QUESTION: I have a query regarding UNS N08825 pipe material in hot finished annealed delivery condition as availability of ASTM B 423 (UNS N08825) material in cold finished annealed condition is scarce but it is generally available in hot finished delivery condition above 8" size.1 and A. ― We propose that Alloy 400. A. Special Components.2.11 and A13: N06625 solution-annealed only: Technical justification? (MP INQUIRY #2003-27 Q2) ANSWER: The consensus during the balloting process for the 2003 edition was that no hardness limit was required for solution-annealed material. Table A.13 and Table A. and Pressure Seals. As outlined in the foreword of MR0175-2003. Pressure-Measuring Devices. . 4c and 4d depending on Cr. ―Many of the guidelines and specific requirements in this standard are based on field experience with the materials listed .4. Table A.QUESTION: Old (2002) Paragraph 4.12 and A. should be included in both the latest version of MR0175 and the imminent ISO 15156 standard.13." (MP INQUIRY #2006-15) ANSWER: The alloy UNS N08825 in the annealed condition falls under the materials Type 4a in Tables A. N08825 in hot finished annealed condition in Table A.4.1 UNS N06625 HRC >35 New (2003) Paragraph 4.13 is included in Reference 3. Mo and Mo+W mass fraction and metallurgical condition. UNS N04400. Diaphragms. The term "annealed" refers to the final stage of the heat treatment of the material or component that determines its metallurgical condition in the service environment. be added to Section 8. 4b.1. Paragraph 8.13 and A. QUESTION: 58 . Ni+Co.16 QUESTION: We believe that Alloy 400.12 breaks down solid solution nickel-based alloys into Type-4a.12. Therefore my query goes as follows: "NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3:2003(E) does not list UNS No.5.14.2. . A.4. (MP INQUIRY #2003-07) REVISED ANSWER 2005-09-01: The revised version of Table A. UNS N04400. Now my question is whether ASTM B 423 (UNS N08825) pipe in hot finished annealed delivery condition for 8" and 10" pipe shall be acceptable for piping because for type 4a and 4b metallurgical condition does states the requirement of cold-worked or hot worked.

13 in Reference 3.1. e.13 in Reference 3.1. a) May we continue to certify that this product meets MR0175-2003. UNS N04400. Section 4. UNS N04405. These CRA metals have been omitted from MR0175-2003 except for brief mention under Section 10 for specific equipment not related to our business. These metals (especially N04400) have always been used in our (and other manufacturers') gauges for pressure-containing parts having direct exposure to sour gas. since this material is mentioned in Paragraph 10. Paragraph 8.2? b) Is it acceptable to continue to certify meeting MR0175-2002? (MP INQUIRY #2003-10 Q1) REVISED ANSWER: The MP cannot provide interpretations involving the certification of equipment.In what paragraph are the requirements for wrought bar in nickel-copper alloy (i. We are a manufacturer of process gauges. BOURDON TUBE-type pressure gauges. QUESTION: What are the reasons for the exclusion of nickel-copper alloys.1 titled NickelCopper Alloys specifically listing UNS N04400 (K-Monel). these materials were covered in Paragraph 4. Have these materials been omitted for a reason or are they still acceptable? (MP INQUIRY #2003-29) REVISED ANSWER 2005-09-01: The omission of UNS N04400 and N04405 has now been rectified.1.e. We can only interpret the current edition of MR0175. and N05500.g. QUESTION: We manufacture instrumentation and in particular.2. The alternative has always been to supply ―MONEL‖ UNS N04400 to comply with NACE MR0175. UNS N04400 and N04405)? In the 2002 version. some of which are for use in sour gas environments. More information on the use limits for UNS N04400 and N04405 are provided in the revised version of Table A.1.6.. We have certified that this product meets MR0175 based on Paragraph 4. from the materials listed in Section 4? (MP INQUIRY #2003-26 Q1) REVISED ANSWER 2005-09-01: The omission of UNS N04400 and N04405 has now been rectified. See the revised version of Table A.1. QUESTION: We manufacture a fluid-handling product machined from UNS N04400 and N04405 in the cold-worked condition with a hardness less than 35 HRC.13 in Reference 3.1 of MR0175-2002. (MP INQUIRY #2003-09 Q1) REVISED ANSWER 2005-09-01: The omission of UNS N04400 and N04405 has now been rectified. See the revised version of Table A. Due to the manufacturing process.4 would previously have 59 . includes Paragraph 4. See Reference 3. QUESTION: NACE Standard MR0175-96.. 316 SS tube exceeds the hardness limit in NACE MR0175.

in which 625 material was accepted up to 35 HRC regardless of the delivery condition.13 in Reference 3. See the revised version of Table A.2. This definition does not prescribe the temperature for the solution-annealing heat treatment.2 QUESTION: According to NACE Standard MR0175-2003. even more narrow than the range from 1.4. A. and A.4. Unless a real problem exists in using annealed 625. specific to downhole equipment.900°F) can be considered a solution-annealing heat treatment as defined in Section 2. or For 625 material. as a solid-solution nickelbased alloy. can you please clarify: Is UNS N04400 no longer within the scope of MR0175-2003 section 4.12. (MP INQUIRY #2003-11) ANSWER: Tables A. thus meeting the requirements. annealing performed in a given temperature range (to be suitably defined. We are holders of your standard NACE MR0175-2003. NACE will be adopting ISO 15156 in 2003 as a technically equivalent document. Please also refer to the definition of ―solution-annealed‖ in Section 2 of NACE Standard MR0175. Table A. 625 material. We note N04400 is referenced in Section 10 only. The 2003 edition of the standard does not contain in Section 4 (CRAs) a section for nickel-copper alloys (NACE MR0175—ALL PREVIOUS ISSUES). or will an amendment be issued to re-include it in Section 4? (MP INQUIRY #2003-31) REVISED ANSWER 2005-09-01: The omission of UNS N04400 has now been rectified. The nickel-based alloys may be used in the annealed or solution-annealed condition within the requirements of these ISO tables. This constitutes a major change with respect to previous editions.14 in ISO 15156 provide answers to your requests for interpretations. is acceptable only in the solution-annealed condition.13. The annealed condition is considered the most suitable condition by most of our customers and we are not aware of problems or failures with material 625 used in this condition for NACE applications. We have a particular query regarding UNS N04400. A. we would like to understand whether: The definition of solution annealing given in NACE Standard MR0175-2003 has to be interpreted to exclude 625 material in the annealed condition.referenced N04400 in Section 4.12 QUESTION: Question on Alloy 31 (UNS N08031) 60 . and as UNS N04400 does not fall within the stated parameters within Section 4. A.600 to 1.

20. Part 3 document.11 Solid-Solution Nickel-Based Alloys (Category) appears to be the section in which Alloy 31 fits the category of 4. N 0.. I fully understand that this document NACE MR0175-2003 is no longer valid and now has been replaced by NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 First Edition. Is this the material type/grouping that alloy 31 (UNS N08031) should be grouped with? Table D.2.0% Cr min. *The balloted table of data for alloy 31 appears in Appendix C: Ballot Submittal Data. Cr 27. It would further appear that alloy 31 (UNS N08031) fits the materials type 4c described in Table A. NACE MR0175-2002: *Alloy 31 appears in Section 4: Nonferrous Metals. 29. It appears that name of this alloy UNS N08031 (alloy 31) began to disappear in this version. 61 .14 (provides allowed use and the table of balloted data).3 Nickel-Iron-Molybdenum Alloys Paragraph 4..12 as: 19.The typical chemical composition of this alloy is: Fe bal. Could 32 be a typo error and should be 31?? It appears that alloy 31 (UNS N08031) has completely disappeared from this version. how do we get it corrected and if this is not an error how do we get alloy 31 in this document? (MP INQUIRY #2004-15) ANSWER: Alloy 31 as you describe it fits in Type 4c as defined in NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3. NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 First Edition.5% Mo min.4 Solid-solution nickel-based alloys. 2003-12-15.5% Mo min. Ni 31. Based on the individual heat chemistry. *4.5. Alloy 28 (Alloy 28 in reality is not a nickel-based alloy) and 32 are listed in this table.11.4 lists various alloys included in the Section A. Cu 1. and 2.12. NACE MR0175-2003: The nonferrous section is no longer present in this version. 2003-12-15.3. If this is an error. Table A.5% Ni + Co min. 29. Mo 6. Part 3.5% Cr min. I would appreciate clarification on this point. No specific mention of alloy 31 is made in this section.5% Ni + Co min. Table C7. and 2. *Section 4 is now entitled ―Corrosion-Resistant Alloys (CRAs)--All Other Alloys Not Defined As Carbon and Low-Alloy Steels and Cast Irons in Section 3‖ *Section 4. Alloy 31 (UNS N08031) should be listed in this NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 First Edition.. No mention is made of alloy 31 in this table or within the document.4 Solid-solution nickel-based alloys.1: 19.1. Part 3 (Comments and Questions) It appears that alloy 31 (UNS N08031) should appear in Section A.1. the alloy could be either a nickel-based alloy (nickel being the highest element) or high-performance stainless steel in which iron is the highest element..

4. but not at 425°F.Alloys that comply with the requirements of Table A.12.4. Table A.14 The revised version of Table A. as noted in its title. 4c and 4d depending on Cr.2. Table A.12 breaks down Solid solution nickel-based alloys into Type-4a. A. Annex A.13. Table A.9.14. 4b. If a solid-solution nickel-based alloy. as defined in NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3. 6Mo alloys) (NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3. Now my question is whether ASTM B 423 (UNS N08825) pipe in hot finished annealed delivery condition for 8" and 10" pipe shall be acceptable for piping because for type 4a and 4b metallurgical condition does states the requirement of cold-worked or hot worked". A. Similarly.2. Table A.12 for solid-solution nickel-based alloys are not individually listed in NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3. Please note it is not a requirement of NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 that an alloy be individually listed to meet the requirements of the document. A. Sub-clause A. A. yet again at 400°F.13 is included in Reference 3. precipitation-hardenable 6 Mo alloys) (NACE 62 .3. Mo and Mo+W mass fraction and metallurgical condition.14 it meets the requirements of the standard. Ni+Co. NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3.14 is included in Reference 3. Table A. The document makes use of alloy types in order to avoid the listing of all possible examples of such alloys. Table D. QUESTION: Table 4 (for precipitation-hardenable. does not attempt to provide an exhaustive list of alloys that can meet the requirements of these types of alloys. Therefore my query goes as follows: "NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3:2003(E) does not list UNS No.13 The revised version of Table A.12. (MP INQUIRY #2006-15) ANSWER: The alloy UNS N08825 in the annealed condition falls under the materials Type 4a in Tables A. Where does the user discover whether sulfur is or is not acceptable for applications between these temperatures? This is odd enough. but Table 6 (for 6 Mo. N08825 in hot finished annealed condition in Table A.33) permits elemental sulfur in the environment at 450°F. The term "annealed" refers to the final stage of the heat treatment of the material or component that determines its metallurgical condition in the service environment.12.13 and A.2.13 or Table A. is used within the environmental and metallurgical limits defined in Table A. QUESTION: I have a query regarding UNS N08825 pipe material in hot finished annealed delivery condition as availability of ASTM B 423 (UNS N08825) material in cold finished annealed condition is scarce but it is generally available in hot finished delivery condition above 8" size.

In some cases the available data cannot be used to answer the questions you pose.2. but in the above-referenced latest edition we are finding it difficult to trace this requirement and keep our records and practices updated.14) does allow sulfur at 425°F. between 425°F and 300°F are alloys in this category sulfur-resistant? If an oilcompany client has a well with bottom-hole temperature of 350°F with produced brine that contains sulfur. if anywhere. QUESTION: (a) Table 6 (NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3.14) permits sulfur at 300°F in any H2S partial pressure.2. see also the answer to MP Inquiry #2003-13 Q6 under ISO 15156-1 Clause 5. Are the precipitation-hardenable versions of these alloys more resistant to cracking than their solution-annealed and cold-worked analogs? (MP INQUIRY #2003-13 Q3) ANSWER: In response to your questions 3 and 4a): The data used in NACE MR0175-2003 and NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 represent the limits of successful laboratory tests reported to NACE so far.MR0175/ISO 15156-3. in the temperature limits. QUESTION: NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3: We make bellows for use in Safety Relief Valves. In previous editions of the NACE standard. Table A. Would you please confirm the hardness requirements stated in the above-referenced latest edition and also reference relevant paragraphs and tables. QUESTION: Could you please confirm that the kPa units of the H2S column of ISO 15156-3. ANSWER: (b) UNS N10276 would be acceptable. 63 . Table A. Sub-clause A. Sub-clause A. Table A. Where. We use all nickel alloy materials but we are particularly concerned with Inconel 625/Inconel 625LCF.4. It is thought that the limits given are conservative and further testing could demonstrate that the true limits are less restrictive than those shown. will an alloy like 2550 (UNS N06975) be sufficiently resistant. but there is a certain amount of work hardening that takes place during the bellows forming process.4.14 is included in Reference 3. but not at 425°F. and in the metallurgical limits that are imposed.14 are incorrect and that the units should be MPa not kPa? (MP INQUIRY #2004-07) REVISED ANSWER 2005-09-01: The revised version of Table A. We buy the strip material in the solution-annealed condition. or (b) must C-276 (UNS N10276) be deployed? (MP INQUIRY #2003-13 Q4) ANSWER (a) In some cases the comparisons you make are not strictly valid because the data sets for the materials considered vary in the H2S limits. the material hardness value for UNS N06625 is clearly stated as being acceptable to 35 HRC maximum.

A. The revised version of Table A.4.2. Therefore. A. Table A.4.3 See A. the use must fit an application described in one of these two paragraphs in order to be directly acceptable. Appendix A.3 Welding solid-solution nickel-based alloys of this materials group. The requirements for the cracking-resistance properties of welds shall apply (see 6.2).4) welded with solid-solution nickel-based weld metal? (MP INQUIRY #2006-06) 64 .4. Paragraph 4.3. UNS N04400 appears in MR0175 in Paragraphs 10.4. A. Is the hardness testing survey required as part of the welding procedure qualification for solid solution nickel-based alloys (as addressed in NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3. Is the hardness testing survey required as part of the welding procedure qualification for solution heat-treated nickel-based alloys welded with solid-solution nickel-based weld metal? In accordance with A.1 is a constraint.3.14 for hardness and yield strength limits achieved by cold work for nickel-based alloys. Please see Table A. The hardness of the HAZ after welding shall not exceed the maximum hardness allowed for the base metal.2.8. for cold-worked alloy UNS N06625 has been dropped in NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2003.(MP INQUIRY #2004-10) REVISED ANSWER 2005-09-01: The individual hardness limit of 35 HRC max. Paragraph A. please note Paragraph 1.2 and 10.14 is included in Reference 3.3 there are no hardness requirements.4.2.7.6.4. There are no hardness requirements for welding solid-solution nickel-based alloys with solid-solution nickel-based weld metal.16 QUESTION: Does Monel in the annealed condition in accordance with ASTM B 127 and Monel in the as-cast condition in accordance with ASTM A 494 M-35-2 and M-30C meet NACE Standard MR0175-2003? (MP INQUIRY #2003-14) ANSWER: (Response from Transition Team) As a sub-paragraph to 4.3. which directs the reader to the options of balloting the material and/or application for inclusion into MR0175 or using the material for application-specific cases without balloting. A.11. Monels do not apply since they are not alloyed with chromium or molybdenum.11.2. Otherwise. and the hardness of the weld metal shall not exceed the maximum hardness limit of the respective alloy used for the welding consumable. MP inquiry #2005-13 QUESTION: This question relates to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 Part 3.

2. derived from the tables of ASTM E 140 and BS 860.2. Other conversion tables also exist.2 of MR01756/ISO 15156-2 which stipulates that users can establish hardness correlations for individual materials. As stated in Paragraph 6.2. Conversions to other hardness scales are no longer included in the standard.2—Low-Carbon Martensitic Stainless Steels. which is not the same thing. The user may establish the required conversion tables. Please advise whether this material is acceptable. In the 2002 edition this was Paragraph 3.8. Other hardness scales may still be used provided a correlation can be shown between the scale used and the prescribed Rockwell C scale for the particular material being tested.1.7. conversion between hardness scales is material-dependent. Table A.18 is included in Reference 3. In the new MR0175/ISO 15156.1 of NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3. from Vickers (HV) to Rockwell (HRC) and from Vickers (HV) to Brinell (HBW). just S42400. The 2002 edition allowed wrought material meeting the chemistry requirements of ASTM A 487 CA6NM. A. however. this statement is no longer used.6. In this paragraph there is a note (12) stating that the hardness correlation in ASTM E 140 doesn’t apply to CA6NM and that for this material the maximum permissible value (in Brinell) is 255 BHN. QUESTION: 65 . The ISO Maintenance Panel cannot make this conversion for you.18 in NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 utilizes the Rockwell C scale as the basis for acceptance. There is.1. a paragraph in Paragraph 7. Users may establish correlations for individual materials. The 2003 edition appears not to allow these F6NM wrought materials (UNS S41500). (MP INQUIRY #2003-17) REVISED ANSWER 2005-09-01: The revised version of Table A.ANSWER No.18 QUESTION: We need clarification of Paragraph 4.3.7. QUESTION: My inquiry concerns CA6NM: In the old MR0175-2002 this material is discussed in Paragraph 3. Finally the questions: Is CA6NM acceptable per MR0175/ISO 15156 at a hardness of max 255 BHN which has been (empirically) determined to be the equivalent of 23 HRC (but which on the ASTM E 140 scale corresponds to about 25 HRC)? (MP INQUIRY #2004-18 Q1) ANSWER: The prescribed hardness limit of 23 HRC for CA6NM in Table A.2. Please see below: For ferritic steels EFC Publication 16 shows graphs for the conversion of hardness readings.

18? (MP INQUIRY #2005-29) ANSWER: Alloy UNS S43100 is not at present qualified to the requirements of NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 for inclusion in Table A. Other heat treatments may be qualified in accordance with the requirements of NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 Annex B. as shown in Table A.18 may be submitted and must contain supporting evidence from field experience or laboratory testing.23 QUESTION: Inconsistency between Table A.18. are other heat treatments allowed as long as they do not exceed the original? We're trying to find out if a supplemental stress relieve is acceptable to try and lower the material hardness.18.iso. 22 HRC? Do we need to apply any special attention to the heat treatments. but Table A. On Table A. A. Requirements/procedures for qualification are given in NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-1.18 allows martensitic stainless steels for any equipment or component. What is the meaning of any equipment or component? Does any equipment or component from Table A. Clause 8. the heat treatment requirements for CA6NM and F6NM are listed. (MP INQUIRY #2006-19) ANSWER: Only the heat treatments listed are currently acceptable.23 of Para. Table A. does that mean that it cannot be used according to NACE or can we use it as long as the hardness of the material is max.My question is about SS 431 (wnr 1.6.6 Martensitic (stainless) steels (identified as individual alloys) and Table A.2 in NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3:2003. QUESTION: I have a question regarding NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3:2003. Annex B and in "01. A proposal to amend Table A.2. the alloy may be qualified for specific applications and may then be used without listing in the standard.org/iso15156maintenance.23 excludes casing and tubing hanger and valve stems. A. In Part 3 of the documentation. As the alloy SS 431 (wnr 1. according to A. NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3.4057/S43100) which is a martensitic stainless steel.18.4057/S43100) is not mentioned. Is this the only approved heat treatment? If we follow this heat treatment initially.18 and Table A. Introduction to ISO 15156 maintenance activities" at www.6.18 exclude casing and tubing hangers and valve stems? (MP INQUIRY 2004-23 Q2) 66 .18 and A. Environmental and materials limits for martensitic stainless steels used for any equipment or components. Table A. With the agreement of the equipment user.

19 The revised version of Table A. ISO 15156-3. A. "Any equipment or component" included wellhead and tree components and valve and choke components.18 and A. and other subsurface equipment. Discussion: NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3. The other environmental limits are the same. Please see Table 1 of NACE MR0175/ISO15156-3 for the list of equipment covered by this standard and also "General Remarks" under ISO 15156-3.6 of ISO 11960.ANSWER: No. and therefore the maximum hardness for ISO 11960 L-80 13 Cr tubing is currently 23 HRC as specified in Table C. Note: ISO 11960 currently specifies 23 HRC as the maximum hardness for L-80 Type 13 Cr tubing. the unnecessary repetition of information provided in cited sources was avoided. Table A. As a general rule during the preparation of ISO 15156. Table A.19 is included in Reference 3. and other subsurface equipment in accordance with NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 the maximum hardness as specified in the latest edition of ISO 11960? Note: ISO 11960 is also designated as API 5CT.19 lists ISO 11960 L-80 Type 13 Cr and two other materials as begin acceptable for "downhole tubular components. A.6 and Table E.23 allows the use of the same selection of materials for wellhead and tree components and valve and choke components under a less restrictive set of environmental conditions but excludes casing and tubing hangers and valve stems under these less restrictive conditions.1. individually. Table A. packer. Tables A." There are notes in this table that specify the maximum hardness limits of the other two materials.6.2. This seems to indicate that ISO 11960 becomes the controlling document for L-80 Type 13 Cr. QUESTION: Is the maximum hardness limit for ISO 11960 L-80 Type 13 Cr tubing used as a downhole tubular component. (MP INQUIRY 2006-03) ANSWER: Your interpretation is correct. Table A. packers.23 set different H2S limits for the same selection of martensitic stainless steels.18 addresses the use of the materials under the environmental limits of this table. However. and casing and tubing hangers and valve stems.6 of this "Inquiries and interpretations" document. 67 . there is no note to specify the maximum hardness limit of ISO 11960 L-80 Type 13 Cr tubing.

A. Please note: A revised version of ISO 15156-3. treated as two separate categories? Tubing itself is subsurface equipment so why is it treated separately? Moreover. respectively. These contents in turn reflect the experience of the oil industry and its experts in the use of materials in sour service over many years.20. Table A.19. For martensitic alloys not listed in Tables A. In all cases the data presented reflect successful laboratory testing of an alloy or successful field experience with the alloy used in the product form listed.6. Why are tubing and subsurface equipment in Tables A.20. As indicated in the title of Table A. A. Table A.19. 420 (modified) having the chemical composition of ISO 11960 L80 type 13Cr is acceptable for packers and subsurface equipment.21.22 68 .2.19. A. The separation of materials into Tables A.19 is included in ISO 15156-3 Technical Corrigendum 2 that was published September 1. exposed to the same condition.21 allowed convenient grouping of the data available and is the same as the grouping in the previous NACE standard. and A.20 is recommended for subsurface equipment under any H2S partial pressure but not for tubing. ISO 11960 L80 type 13Cr is acceptable for other subsurface equipment (other than tubing) providing the material fully meets the applicable material requirements of ISO 11960 L80 type 13Cr. K90941 as mentioned in Table A.21 qualification of the alloy for use in accordance with ISO 15156-3 can be carried out in accordance Annex B. why? We are in a process of developing a sour gas field and purchased a copy of this standard to be a guideline for material selection.19. A. Additionally as indicated in the title and notes of Table A. still it is not recommended for subsurface equipment apart from tubing.20 and A.6.2. and A. In some cases the differences you identify reflect the availability of different product forms manufactured from the different materials. Table A.20. 2005. why? L-80 type 13 Cr is more crackingresistant material than K90941.A. (MP INQUIRY #2005-22) ANSWER: NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 reflects the contents of NACE MR0175-2003 and earlier editions of this NACE standard. We need answers to these questions so we can select the most appropriate material for downhole casing/tubing.19 and A.21 QUESTION: I need to clarify a confusion about NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3:2003 (E).

4 should have been 4.24 The revised version of Table A.4) is only limited to maximum hardness? (MP INQUIRY #2003-19 Q2) ANSWER: Paragraph 4. Has the hardness requirement been dropped for this material.2.6.9.24 of ISO 15156. QUESTION: What is the foundation for limiting forged and cast UNS S31803 (Paragraph 4.2.9 of the 2003 version of this standard. There was no negative on the final ballot for the 2003 edition.22 is included in Reference 3. QUESTION: Zeron 100: Old (2002): Paragraph 3.24 is included in Reference 3.6/3. This same material is now covered in Paragraph 4.6.1. A.3) to a maximum partial H2S pressure and temperature while the hot isostatic pressureproduced equivalent (Paragraph 4.3 69 .9.2 bar (20 kPa) only: What is the technical justification for this change? (MP INQUIRY #2003-27 Q3) ANSWER: The restrictions for duplex stainless steels was a consensus of the original drafting team based on their review of the literature.3.23 The revised version of Table A. A.3 is included in Reference 3.9.3 The revised version of the text of A. Table A.9. There is no hardness requirement for the duplex stainless steels covered in Paragraph 4.3. A.6 New (2003) Paragraphs 4.The revised version of Table A.9.7.1.23 is included in Reference 3.10 and A24: pH2S <0. Paragraph 4. having the same environmental limits as Paragraph 4. and this error has been corrected in an interpretation and in Table A. Table A.7: pH2S <0. the maximum hardness requirement for duplex UNS S32550 was covered in Paragraph 3. QUESTION: In the 2002 version of MR0175.4 was intended to provide metallurgical requirements only for the HIP alloy.7. but the hardness requirement seems to be missing.9. or is the hardness assumed to be acceptable as long as the material has been solution annealed and liquid quenched? (MP INQUIRY #2003-09 Q2) ANSWER: This is correct.2 bar (20 kPa) and 120 pH2S <1 bar (100 kPa) and 15 g/L Cl.1.9. A.9.and pH >5.6.9.9.

An acceptance criterion or other quantitative limit shall be agreed between the manufacturer/supplier and the equipment user.3. MP inquiry #2005-13. c). (MP INQUIRY #2005-18) ANSWER: There is no definition of "continuous precipitates" in the standard. QUESTION: ISO 15156-3. Is there any guidance as to what continuous means? For example. d). e) For NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3. Scope. shall have grain boundaries with no continuous precipitates".7. nitrides.3--Regarding metallographic examination of the microstructure: a) Do closely spaced spheroidal precipitates such as grain boundary carbides constitute continuous precipitates? b) At what spacing would closely spaced spheroidal precipitates be considered continuous? c) Are the quantification of precipitates (intermetallic phases.7... A. In A. it requires that "the microstructure .7.2.3 it is the responsibility of the equipment user and the manufacturer to set the quantitative standard they wish to follow when this goes beyond the guidance given. As noted in the WARNING above ISO 15156-3.See A.7 of NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3:2003(E). does 1 vol. QUESTION: 70 . b). QUESTION: The question is in regard to Appendix A.% represent the maximum allowable carbide precipitate content? f) What is a suitable recommended practice or standard by which to perform this quantification? (MP INQUIRY #2005-28) ANSWER: a). is the quantification to be made as a volume fraction relative to the bulk sample or as a lineal fraction relative to grain boundary length? e) In the absence of intermetallic phases and nitrides. does it mean continuous throughout the microstructure? Our laboratory has reported suspected continuous precipitates "at some locations". f) It is the responsibility of the equipment user and the manufacturer to agree on the method and acceptance criteria for the measurement of precipitates.3 third paragraph. it is the equipment user's responsibility to select the CRAs and other alloys suitable for the intended service. carbides) to be evaluated as a volume fraction relative to the bulk sample? d) In cases where only grain boundary precipitates are observed. A. This responsibility includes the selection of specific quality requirements when none are given by the standard.

(MP INQUIRY #2006-02) ANSWER The ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel can only provide a response to the inquiry in the context of NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 and cannot give interpretations based upon earlier editions of NACE MR0175. for Table A. In most cases Table A." When applied to ASTM A790 UNS 32760 (see attachment) only a Brinel hardness is given 270 BHN (28 HRC equiv. The texts that form the lower parts of Table A. last sentence of Clause 1 "Scope". liquid-quenched and cold-worked alloy base metal that qualifies for use in sour service.25 the maximum hardness of 36 HRC refers to the maximum hardness of any solution annealed.) Where the material manufacturing specification does not define a hardness limit but the alloy base metal does comply with the requirements of one of the Tables. (The equivalent Vickers/Rockwell 15N hardness for use in welding procedure qualification can be determined in accordance with ISO 15156-3.1.2. If no HRC limit is given in the material specification do we assume no maximum HRC hardness limit or use the Brinel hardness specified (28 HRC equiv.8. for the example quoted.3 (2nd para) " The hardness of the HAZ after welding shall not exceed the maximum hardness allowed for the base metal. Alternatively do we revert to the referenced NACE MR0175 [14] and assume 34 HRC.24 " Environmental and materials limits for duplex stainless steels used for any equipment or component" and Table A. Table A. which must be met by duplex stainless steels in sour service.). This is a reduction of 6 HRC from the 34 HRC allowance in NACE MR0175:2000. ASTM A790 UNS S32760.7. as maximum base metal hardness in the interpretation of A. A. such as heat treatment and hardness etc. For this alloy.5? 71 .7.26 QUESTION: What grade of stainless steel meeting NACE requirements can be used for a tubing hanger when the pH is <3. it is the responsibility of the equipment user and the manufacturer to agree on any hardness limit used for welding procedure qualification. standards or regulations such as. the use of Brinell 270. Para.24 does not define a maximum acceptable base material hardness. 6.).25 " Environmental and materials limits for duplex stainless steels used as downhole tubular components and as packers and other subsurface equipment " provide information on the metallurgical requirements.Can you please answer the following queries or pass to committee. Please note.3. is correct. A. alloys must also meet the requirements of the appropriate design codes. 2. of MR0175/ISO 151563.. As indicated in the first paragraph. These queries relate to welding of 22% Cr duplex/25% Cr duplex Annex A7.

My interpretation based on understanding Paragraph 9.2 of NACE MR0175 and Section A.8 of ISO 15156 is that only UNS S66286 is acceptable. Could you please confirm my statement or correct it? (MP INQUIRY #2004-13) ANSWER: UNS S66286 is the only precipitation-hardenable stainless steel that is acceptable for tubing hangers in environments with pH <3.5. The martensitic stainless steels are also not acceptable for environments with pH <3.5. QUESTION: Table A.26 limits the precipitation-hardened austenitic steel UNS S66286 to 150°F and 15 psi H2S when chlorides are present. a) Can this material be used at higher temperature if no chlorides are present? (MP INQUIRY #2005-02 Qa) ANSWER: No, it may not. The table states that the temperature restriction is for "Any combinations of chlorides . . . " Neither ISO 15156-3 nor its predecessor NACE MR0175-2003 defines the expected performance of UNS S66286 in environments containing no chlorides. b) Is this material included in the current ballot for austenitic steels which (apparently) would allow their use at a higher temperature if no chlorides are present? (MP INQUIRY #2005-02 Qb) ANSWER: No, it is not. The current ballot is for materials currently covered in Table A.2, which represent materials free of cold work to enhance their properties and with hardnesses of 22 HRC maximum. c) Would the MP consider adding an unrestricted clause for the use of this material for valve stems, pins, and shafts (similar to Table A.3 for UNS S20910)? This material would perform much better as a valve stem in H2S environment than the cold-worked Nitronic 50. (MP INQUIRY #2005-02 Qc) ANSWER: The IMP would accept a ballot item with the proper documented laboratory data and/or field experience to expand the acceptable environmental limitations for the alloy. The procedure for the submission of a ballot item is described in the document "01. Introduction to ISO 15156 Maintenance Activities," which can be found at http://www.iso.org/ISO15156Maintenance. QUESTION: Does NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 Table A.26 apply to Gr. 660 material used in subsea bolting applications external to the production wellbore environment when indirectly heated above 150°F?

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(MP INQUIRY #2005-09Q2) ANSWER: Table A.26 does not apply to Grade 660 material used in subsea bolting applications external to the production wellbore environment. A.8.2, Tables A.27 QUESTION: Reference: NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 Table A.27--Environmental and materials limits for martensitic precipitation-hardened stainless steels used for wellhead and christmas tree components (excluding bodies and bonnets), valves and chokes (excluding bodies and bonnets) and packers and other subsurface equipment API 6A makes a distinction between hangers and body components. NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 doesn't define either. This has led to some confusion regarding whether or not UNS S17400 material may be used as hangers in a sour environment. Q1. Does the exclusion of wellhead "bodies and bonnets" in Table A.27 also mean that hangers are excluded? Q2. Are hangers considered "subsurface equipment" in the context of Table A.27? Q3. Does Table A.27 prohibit the use of UNS S17400 material for hangers in sour service? (MP INQUIRY #2005-12) ANSWERS: A1. No, it does not. A2. In the context of Table A.27, hangers are more commonly considered to be covered by the term "wellhead and christmas tree components." A3. No, it does not provided the environmental limits and metallurgical requirements of Table A.27 are followed. See also response to MP Inquiry #2006-07 posted under ISO 15156-3, Table A.3. A.8.2, Tables A.27 and A.28 QUESTION: If both Paragraphs 9.2 and 9.5 are applicable, as we believe they are, can we select which paragraph we follow when they cover the same component or materials? Does Paragraph 9.4 apply to choke valves? (MP INQUIRY #2003-02 Q2) ANSWER: Choke non-pressure-containing parts made of alloy UNS S17400 have no environmental restrictions in accordance with Paragraph 9.5.2, while there is a limit of 0.5 psi H2S for pressure-containing parts in Paragraph 9.2.4.1.

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QUESTION: Paragraphs 9.2.4.1 and 9.5.2. Why is it that UNS S17400 can be used for pressurecontaining wellhead and Christmas tree components (Paragraph 9.2.4.1) but not for pressure-containing valve components (Paragraph 9.5.2)? (MP INQUIRY #2003-12 Q4) ANSWER: Paragraph 9.5.2 allows UNS S17400 to be used with no environmental restrictions. Therefore, the alloy is not allowed for pressure-containing components in valves. In comparison, Paragraph 9.2.4 has environmental restrictions and will therefore allow the use of S17400 for parts other than bodies and bonnets. A.8.2, Tables A.27, A.28 and A.30 QUESTION: 17-4 pH: Old (2002): Paragraph 3.8.1. Only requirement: HRC 33 New (2003): Paragraph 9.2.4.1 and A27: pH2S <0.034 bar: Technical justification? (MP INQUIRY #2003-27 Q4) ANSWER: The 17-4 pH SS alloy was restricted because of industry failures. Please see the attached documentation. There was no negative on the final ballot. A.8.2, Table A.28 QUESTION: Can you provide clarification on Paragraph 9.5.7: ―UNS S17400 …. has been used in service tool applications at the surface when stressed at less than 60% of its minimum specified yield strength under working conditions.‖ Paragraph 9.5 is concerned with Internal Components for Valves, Pressure Regulators, and Level Controllers. What exactly do service tool applications encompass? (MP INQUIRY #2003-32) ANSWER: This paragraph is intended to apply to components that are temporarily installed at the surface as part of routine well servicing. For example, components of wireline valves used during a wireline job are considered as service tools. A.8.2, Table A.30 QUESTION: SUBJECT: Paragraph 11.4.5 of NACE MR0175-2003 Standard QUESTION: Are wrought UNS S17400 and S15500 martensitic precipitationhardenable stainless steels that meet the hardness and heat-treat requirements of Paragraph 11.4.5 of NACE MR0175-2003 acceptable for use in compressors in sour environments with no environmental limits with respect to chloride content, partial pressure of H2S, temperature, and free elemental sulfur? QUESTION: If the answer to the former question is no, what are the specific environmental limits? (MP INQUIRY #2003-34) ANSWER:

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Yes, they are acceptable with no environmental limits in accordance with NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 Table A.30. No data have been submitted to verify resistance to cracking in the presence of elemental sulfur. QUESTION: SUBJECT: Paragraphs 11.4.4 and 11.4.6 of NACE MR0175-2003 QUESTION: Are the martensitic stainless steels that are listed in Paragraphs 11.4.4 and 11.4.6 of NACE MR1075-2003 and meet the hardness and heat-treat requirements specified in their respective paragraphs acceptable for use in compressors in sour environments with no environmental limits with respect to chloride content, partial pressure of H2S, temperature, and free elemental sulfur? QUESTION: If the answer to the former question is no, what are the specific environmental limits? QUESTION: Are the answers to the above questions in agreement with ISO 15156? (MP INQUIRY #2003-38) ANSWER: Yes, they are acceptable with no environmental limits in accordance with ISO 15156 Table A.30. No data have been submitted to verify resistance to cracking in the presence of elemental sulfur. A.9.2, Table A.31 The revised version of Table A.31 is included in Reference 3. QUESTION: The precipitation-hardenable version of G-3 has no environmental limits per Paragraph 4.15.6 of the 2003 edition. "Conventional wisdom" has it that a solutionannealed and cold-worked nickel-based alloy is more resistant to environmental cracking than its precipitation-hardenable clone. (MP INQUIRY #2003-13 Q2b) ANSWER: Materials used in accordance with Paragraph 4.15.6 are subject to the environmental limits stated in Paragraph 4.15, i.e., the limits of Table 2. These limits are restated in NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3, Table A.31, Rows 2-5 for material UNS N07048.

A.9.2, Table A.32 QUESTION: I think that the (Cartesian) coordinates in Table 3 (NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3, Sub-clause A.9.2, Table A.32) {T 390°F, pH2S 360 psi} may have come from data supplied by me to NACE from my office files for recommendations made to oil companies for Alloy 925 (UNS N09935). If so, I have no confirmation that the oil companies ever deployed equipment made from Alloy 925 in these environments. I recommend that NACE remove these data from Table 3, replacing them with test data from Battelle showing cracking resistance at 450°F, pH2S 400 psi in 15% Cl and also a second set of coordinates at 425°F, pH2S 300 psi in the presence of elemental sulfur (Hibner). (MP INQUIRY #2003-13 Q5) ANSWER:

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9. usually from laboratory tests.org.33 is included in Reference 3. but Table 6 (NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3. QUESTION: Table 4 (for precipitation-hardenable. Cl-. H2S.14) 76 . The limits on temperature.32: How should the table be interpreted in terms of the maximum allowable temperature for applications with less than 30 psi partial pressure of H2S? For example. There were no data available related to the use of UNS N07718 at any temperature higher than 450°F. Table A.2. A.9.1.2. 6Mo alloys) (NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3. Table A.A technical change such as that suggested can only be made following a ballot process involving the ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel and the Oversight Committee (NACE TG 299) on behalf of ISO/TC 67/WG 7.4. Column 2.) A qualification to define an alternative temperature limit for UNS N07718 for a partial pressure of H2S less than 30 psi must be carried out in accordance with ISO 151563. Annex B. (MP INQUIRY #2003-13 Q4a is addressed under heading NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3. Table A. Table A. Sub-clause A. Figure B. Table A. precipitation-hardenable 6 Mo alloys) does allow sulfur at 425°F. In some cases the available data cannot be used to answer the questions you pose. to an equipment user's requirements. Table A. Are the precipitation-hardenable versions of these alloys more resistant to cracking than their solution-annealed and cold-worked analogs? (MP INQUIRY #2003-13 Q3) ANSWER: In response to your questions 3 and 4a): The data used in NACE MR0175-2003 and NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 represent the limits of successful laboratory tests reported to NACE so far. outside the limits stated in the tables. yet again at 400°F.32 does not qualify UNS N07718 for use at higher temperatures than 450°F. in its current layout the table prohibits the use of UNS N07718 at temperatures higher than 450°F at any H2S pressure below 30 psi. Ballot proposal forms can be obtained from Linda.nace.Goldberg@mail.33) permits elemental sulfur in the environment at 450°F. Sub-clause A. Annex A apply collectively and reflect the knowledge available. at the time the standard was published. but not at 425°F. (MP INQUIRY #2005-20) ANSWER: ISO 15156-3. Where does the user discover whether sulfur is or is not acceptable for applications between these temperatures? This is odd enough. pH.33 The revised version of Table A.2.14) (for 6 Mo. QUESTION: Our question relates to ISO 15156-3. and sulfur defined in some of the tables of ISO 15156-3. ISO 15156 allows the qualification and use of materials. (See ISO 15156-3.

QUESTION: In MR0175/ISO 15156-3. 2) In Table A.39 QUESTION: 1) Does NACE MR0175 / ISO 15156 apply to the spring application as depicted in figure 1.12 QUESTION: Because UNS C72900 and C96900 are copper alloys. when areas of the spring are plastically deformed (not more than 1 or 2% strain)? 2) Why does NACE MR0175 / ISO 15156." is a blank.4. which informs the user that such materials may exhibit accelerated general weightloss corrosion in some sour environments? (MP INQUIRY #2003-21) ANSWER: The UNS C72900 and UNS C96900 copper alloys are included in NACE Standard MR0175 Paragraph 4. I don't see anywhere else in all of MR0175 where a field in a table is left blank. This is suspicious to me.2.10. Table A.39 the cold worked + age hardened condition of UNS R30003 was the only condition originally balloted and accepted. by definition. Part 3 specifically demand agehardening although age-hardening typically increases the hardness of UNS R30003? Is this because problems were reported when the material was not age-hardened. covered by Section 4 of NACE Standard MR0175. Qualification through testing or field experience may be used to qualify this type of design but this will be outside the limits of the standard. are they. this box should read "175°C (350°F). because data is only available for age-hardened material. which basically states copper alloys are suitable for use without restriction other than as noted in the footnote. A. Corrigendum 2 there is a new version of Table A. Prior versions of Table A. Table A. A.33.13. under the heading "Temperature.1 77 . In the last row of this table. Can you tell me if this field is intended to be empty.40 See question and response posted under A. as written in Paragraph 5 of Part 1. This has been corrected in the 2009 Version of ISO 15156 Part 3.20.2. A.2.33 placed a temperature of 175 C in this field. or if there should be some data here? (MP INQUIRY #2009-09) ANSWER: You are right. or another reason? (MP INQUIRY #2009-05) ANSWER: 1) NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 does not apply to design made with plastic deformation criteria. Table A.

or spray metallizing systems are acceptable for use in sour environments.3. Question: In NACE MR0175-2003 cobalt-based alloys (e.2. A.2 and 5. Paragraph A. 78 . The requirements of NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 are provided in ISO 15156-3. which states: ―Overlays applied to carbon and low-alloy steel or to martensitic stainless steels by thermal processes such as welding.2.1 of NACE Standard MR0175-2003 states that ―SCC may be controlled by any or all of three measures: (1) using the materials and processes described in this standard.13.2 The revised versions of A.2 states "the cracking resistance of alloys specifically designed to provide hard-facing is not specified in this part of NACE MR0175/ISO 15156.1 is included in Reference 3.2 QUESTIONS: (1) Subject: Equivalency of the technical content of both MR0175-2003 and MR0175/ISO 15156 in relation to the use of Stellite 6 cladding.1 does not apply since the base metal is isolated from the sour environment with Inconel 625.2. which is acceptable to 35 HRC.5.‖ My client has an application in which Inconel 625 weld metal is overlay welded onto a martensitic steel component." Is there perhaps another part of this specification that we may have overseen? (2) Subject: Solid Stellite 6 Castings.2. or (3) isolating the components from the sour environment. Stellite 6) are acceptable for hardfacing applications (Section 5. the component must be heat treated or thermally stress relieved in accordance with procedures that have been shown to return the base metal to the base metal hardness as specified in this standard.1.13. (2) controlling the environment.g. A.13.2 are included in Reference 3. In NACE MR0175/ISO 15156. Sub-clause A. provided the substrate does not exceed the lower critical temperature during application. My client’s customer believes the base material must be stress relieved in accordance with Paragraph 5. all wetted surfaces are Inconel 625. silver brazing.2. (MP INQUIRY #2003-16) REVISED ANSWER 2005-09-01: The requirements of NACE MR0175-2003 are provided in Paras 5. The revised version of the text of A.‖ We believe that Paragraph 5.5).13.13..13.2.1 and A.13.2. Paragraph 5. The martensitic steel component base material and heat-affected zones are isolated from the fluids by the Inconel 625.1.QUESTION: Paragraph 1. In those cases in which the lower critical temperature is exceeded.

1 and A. that something is not listed as approved is not a sign that it may not be used.13. The revised versions of the texts that clarify the intents of A.1-D. Table D.1:2005(E) 200502-15.1 and A. Annex D General QUESTION: We believe that the inclusion of some alloy trade names in the second columns of ISO 15156-3.2 should be made clearer and is processing a ballot to achieve this. Q2 It does not ALSO have to be listed in Annex D Table D7.13. For ISO documents.2 are included in Reference 3.2 79 . QUESTION: It is our understanding of NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 that provided ASTM A 995 Grade 4A (UNS J92205) 22 Cr duplex stainless steel complies with the materiallimits of Table A24 of Annex A.13. see Reference 4.12 is in conflict with the NACE policy on the use of trade names in standards. it becomes the equipment user's responsibility to use it or not. Nevertheless.2. Could the Maintenance Panel please propose steps to resolve this policy problem? (MP INQUIRY #2004-22) REVISED ANSWER 2005-02-15: This issue is resolved by the publication of ISO 15156-3:2003/Cor. which we believe is for information only and lists only SOME duplex stainless steels. This contrasts to the approach in earlier editions of NACE MR0175 when not being listed was a bar to use.Question: Are solid Stellite 6 castings are permitted for wear-resistant parts in valves under the MR0175/ISO 15156 regime? (MP INQUIRY #2004-01) REVISED ANSWER 2005-09-01: There has been no change of technical intent between previous editions of NACE MR0175 and NACE MR0175/ISO 15156. the Maintenance Panel accepts that the intent of A.13. (MP INQUIRY #2006-04Q1) ANSWER: Your understanding is correct. Annex D Tables D.2. (MP INQUIRY #2006-04Q2) ANSWER: You are correct. it can be selected for use in H2S-containing environments provided the environmental limits given in Table A24 are not exceeded.

5 to39.6 for F6NM does not match either one of these UNS numbers.6 QUESTION: In NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 Table D.QUESTION: Could you please confirm that the information given for alloy UNS N08367 in NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3. Table D.6. If this was a mistake. Calculations based on Cr +3. (MP INQUIRY #2007-04) ANSWER: Thank you for raising this issue.18 to 0.75 FPREN should be 42 to 49 Ni + 2 Mo should be 35.03 N range should be 0. Please note: Annex D is described as "Informative" and no requirement to meet the chemical analysis for an alloy given in Table D.6 is implied by the data included in this Table. Table D2 is incorrect and should be that shown below for the elements affected? S maximum should be 0.23.5 (MP INQUIRY #2005-24) ANSWER: Yes. The ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel will ensure that any errors found in the Tables of NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3.45).25 Cu range should be 0. 80 .3 Mo yields much higher PREN (40 . the alloy N08367 was assigned a PREN of 20 .00 to 0. Annex D will be corrected the next time the document is fully updated. But composition listed in Table D. Is there a reason for that or is it a mistake? The composition is similar to both but does not match up. In ASTM A182. (MP INQUIRY #2007-06) ANSWER: Thank you for raising this issue. Annex D will be corrected the next time the document is fully updated. The ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel will ensure that any errors found in the Tables of NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3. QUESTION: In Table D2. please correct. F6NM is associated with UNS S41500. F6NM is associated with UNS S42400.

org/iso15156maintenance 81 . Petroleum and natural gas industries — Materials for use in H2S-containing environments in oil and gas production — Part 3: Cracking-resistant CRAs (corrosion-resistant alloys) and other alloys: TECHNICAL CORRIGENDUM 2 (2005-09-01) 4.References: 1. Petroleum and natural gas industries — Materials for use in H2S-containing environments in oil and gas production — Part 1: General principles for selection of cracking –resistant materials TECHNICAL CORRIGENDUM 1 (2005-09-01) 2. and the use of cast irons TECHNICAL CORRIGENDUM 1 (2005-09-01) 3. Petroleum and natural gas industries — Materials for use in H2S-containing environments in oil and gas production — Part 3: Cracking-resistant CRAs (corrosion-resistant alloys) and other alloys: TECHNICAL CORRIGENDUM 1 (2005-02-15) All are available via www. Petroleum and natural gas industries — Materials for use in H2S-containing environments in oil and gas production — Part 2: Cracking-resistant carbon and low alloy steels.iso.

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