UNCTAD/ITE/IPC/2003/7

UNITED NATIONS CONFERENCE ON TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT

Eco-efficiency Indicators
Version 1.1

A Manual for the Preparers and Users of

New York and Geneva, 2004

United Nations

NOTES UNCTAD serves as the focal point within the United Nations Secretariat for all matters related to foreign direct investment and transnational corporations. In the past, the Programme on Transnational Corporations was carried out by the United Nations Centre on Transnational Corporations (1975–1992) and the Transnational Corporations and Management Division of the United Nations Department of Economic and Social Development (1992–1993). In 1993, the Programme was transferred to the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development. UNCTAD seeks to further the understanding of the nature of transnational corporations and their contribution to development and to create an enabling environment for international investment and enterprise development. UNCTAD’s work is carried out through intergovernmental deliberations, technical assistance activities, seminars, workshops and conferences. Symbols of United Nations documents are composed of capital letters combined with figures. Mention of such a symbol indicates a reference to a United Nations document. The designations employed and the presentation of the material in this publication do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the Secretariat of the United Nations concerning the legal status of any country, territory, city or area, or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers or boundaries. Material in this publication may be freely quoted or reprinted, but acknowledgement is requested, together with a reference to the document symbol. A copy of the publication containing the quotation or reprint should be sent to the UNCTAD secretariat and Ellipson.

UNCTAD/ITE/IPC/2003/7 UNITED NATIONS PUBLICATION Sales No. E.04.II.D.13 ISBN 92-1-112620-7

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ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This publication is the third contribution of UNCTAD and the Intergovernmental Working Group of Experts on International Standards of Accounting and Reporting (ISAR) to the field of environmental accounting. The manual was prepared under the overall direction of Lorraine Ruffing and Con Bartel. The UNCTAD secretariat would like to thank the World Bank for its funding and the authors, Dr. Andreas Sturm, Kaspar Müller (Ellipson Ltd, Basel, Switzerland) and Suji Upasena (Arrow Consult, Kandy, Sri Lanka). This manual was vetted by a number of experts from the ISAR steering group, including Christophe Butz (Pictet & Cie), Claude Fussler (WBCSD), Ndung'u Gathinji (ECSAFA), Dr. Udo Hartmann (DaimlerChrysler Ltd), Charles Peter Naish (Ciba Specialty Chemicals Inc), David J. Moore (CICA), Dr. Suphamit Techamontrikul (Chulalongkorn University Bangkok), R. Child Villiers (Nestlé) and Christopher Wells (ABN AMRO).

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On the other hand. In 1998 ISAR revisited the issue of environmental disclosure and expanded its recommendations based on emerging best practices. The Group soon discovered in its first survey that there were no national accounting standards specific to environmental information disclosure. as well as information on its corporate governance structures and procedures. iv . It found that the financial information provided by transnational corporations was not reliable. ISAR issued its first recommendations for environmental disclosure in financial statements in 1991. transparent or comparable. the financial community is concerned about how environmental performance affects the financial results of an enterprise. some CEOs believed that environmental information was not necessary for a true and fair view of the enterprise's performance or that it was too difficult to obtain. This concern about sustainable development is now complemented in the postEnron era by corporate concern about "sustainable value" or "sustainable business". The environmental world summits in Rio (1992) and Johannesburg (2002) have shown that the business community has become committed to the concept of sustainable development and to improving its environmental performance. In order to promote the harmonization of financial information and meaningful disclosure to all users of financial statements. Its objective in issuing a new guideline – Accounting and Financial Reporting for Environmental Costs and Liabilities – was to ensure that different standard-setters did not adopt different solutions for the same problems. To achieve sustainable development. In 1989 ISAR took up the topic of corporate environmental accounting. it is clear that the conventional accounting model is not able to assess an enterprise's environmental performance and its impact on financial performance to the degree desired by all stakeholders. stakeholders want non-financial information covering the enterprise's environmental and social performance. it is obvious that in the post-Enron era. To meet this obvious need for guidance. In particular. This guidance was soon followed by intense study and analysis by national standard-setters. enterprise management must take into account the impact of their performance on their employees. However. sustainable value or sustainable business. This is because the conventional model was developed to provide information only on financial position and performance. their customers. various stakeholders are demanding that enterprises report on these improvements.PREFACE The United Nations' work on transparency and accountability originated in 1975 when the former UN Commission on Transnational Corporations became concerned about the lack of meaningful disclosure by transnational corporations in their financial statements. Furthermore. the Economic and Social Council created the Intergovernmental Working Group of Experts on International Standards of Accounting and Reporting (ISAR). their suppliers and the community. including its environment. However.

their construction and use are highly problematic. The precise correlation between improved environmental performance of an enterprise and its bottom line is extremely difficult to prove because of the many factors that can affect profits. Despite the practical usefulness of eco-efficiency indicators.This manual presents the results of ISAR's work to extend the conventional accounting model and to link environmental performance with financial performance. where increased profits are achieved under conditions of declining environmental impact. thus improving the quality of environmental reporting and stakeholder satisfaction. demonstrates such a link. However. The manual provides detailed explanations and examples for the preparers and users of eco-efficiency indicators so that they can produce internally consistent environmental and financial information. Rubens Ricupero Secretary-General of UNCTAD v . This manual presents a method by which environmental and financial performance indicators can be used together to measure an enterprise's progress in attaining eco-efficiency or sustainability. the concept of ecoefficiency.

........................... 1 I........................... Comparability .. Complement Financial Statements.. Objectives of Eco-efficiency Indicators.......................ii Acknowledgements............................... Rationale for an Accounting Framework for Eco-efficiency Reporting........... Scope .....................................1............................... Understandability ............. 9 II..............3.................................2.............4......................B.. Qualitative Characteristics............3...F.......................................................... Users and Their Information Needs .... 7 II.1...........B....E.. 8 II....... Going Concern .................. Accrual Basis ................. Overview ....................................... 7 II.................11 II............... Introduction to the Framework .................. 10 II.......3.................. Introduction.......... 12 II...........14 vi ......... 7 II......... Conceptual Accounting and Reporting Framework for Ecoefficiency Reporting .............................. iv Abbrevations .........................C..................................1. iii Preface.......................................................................13 II.....13 II.C..................... Objectives.... Underlying Assumptions ........13 II....................... Reporting Entity and the Principle of Congruity ...........................................2..F.....C.........................B...................................F.... Relevance and Materiality........................................................................................3.....................3................ 3 I..........B................E............. 8 II......................F..........................................A..........................11 II....................... Reliability ............ 7 II................................... 8 II..................................... 3 I....11 II............................... 8 II..........................................4....... 7 II.......B.................................................2.... Elements and Items of an Eco-efficiency Statement ....1...B......... Improve Decision-Making ..... Financial Accounting Framework as a Starting Point ............E............B...D..........2................... 8 II... 4 II..... Consensus and Quality of Information ..............4.......................Table of Contents Notes.C........................................ Provide Information..................B.....10 II.. 4 I.... xii I....... Duty of Users ............. 1 I..... The Accounting Framework for Eco-efficiency.......2.........B............................................... Reporting Scope .............. Purpose and Status ..............E....A...........E..... 3 I..1........................F.......................................

............ Kinds of Water Use .B......... Global Warming Potential..... Measurement.....II........... Accounting Treatment of Water Use ...3..B................................ Disclosure ...29 III..................C............B.. Conversion Factors from Thermal Equivalents to Work........ True and Fair View/Fair Presentation ........................52 III.................. General Definition of Energy and Energy Use ...D..........................................b.C........................................60 III.20 III..........7... 16 II...........20 III.............C....... Definitions .........................C.......................3........ Objective .. Accounting Treatment of Global Warming Contribution...G..............................60 III............26 III..c...... 20 III... Recognition16 II............B..................... 19 III.........a........F.7............... Recognition .....3.................50 III.......60 III..58 III......16 III...............................B...........30 III.........C....29 III.........................................49 III....50 III.............. Accounting Treatment of Energy Use .......................D.......d............3............5................ Annexes to Water Use ... Global Warming Contribution..................... Recognition and Measurement of Items .....................27 III..B..............G... Definitions ...... Water Received and its Source ............26 III......7.1..C.49 III..B..........50 III..............29 III.29 III.....................................3..A..........a...27 III..........B.....................................16 II...........7.............D........B.......5...........3.................60 III....................... Scope ........................... Forms and Sources of Energy ............D...............C.1...20 III..................... Releases of Water...................... Balancing Qualitative Characteristics ....D...... Scope .20 III.....................3.d....................................... Disclosure of Energy Use ................ Guidelines ....B....F...........3...................3..2....c......................29 III........... Objective ..........3.61 vii ..........2................ Global Warming Gases.........25 III...................... 29 III.......a........C.. Measurement of Water Use .3.... Scope ............. Definitions ............ Annex to Energy Use ......5.........a.. General Scope ........C.....................b............60 III.. Measurement of Energy........C........1......C...............3..........................7..............2..... General ............21 III..............................6........................................................ Energy Sources......G. Units and Conversions ...3.......... Recognition of Energy ..............C...3...........6.................b....6...... Purchase and Sale of Energy.......15 II...........2..................... Objective ............c.......... 60 III....D......C.....26 III...........20 III.................... Example of Disclosure of Energy Use ....49 III.C..b.4...C.....D........ Example of Disclosure of Water Use ................a.........B................c...B.......B.7... 19 III......................................1...............4...........

................................E......... Accounting Treatment of Ozone-Depleting Substances.....................7..... Ozone-Depleting Substances.and Transport-Related Global Warming Gases ...c........................3...........................3.84 III..........E.....D...... Products Containing Ozone-Depleting Substances .. CO2-Emission Factors for Electricity ........62 Measurement.........................6.............71 III..... Carbon Offset and Sequestration ...77 III......61 Recognition of Global Warming Gases .......81 III.....................E............. Scope ..................78 III...E.......... Purchase of ODS .D..........7...a.....E......3.....83 III.................... Example of a Disclosure of Global Warming Contribution ..............79 III....... CO2-Emission Factors for Fossil Fuels....d.....a.. Annex to Ozone-Depleting Substances .........7.....E..E.....79 III...D.....86 III......3..... Definitions ..D...........7..........7..3....... III.. Stocks of ODS .74 III.......3................7.......E... Potentials and Contributions ...................j......................65 III..... Main Sectors using Ozone-Depleting Substances .......81 III.......b............................. Recognition of Ozone-Depleting Substances.............D.......5.....................................f...4.........D.....82 III..........4............................D.... Example of a Disclosure of Ozone-Depleting Substances .............................E.........e...E........ Energy Supply ........3.................... Reclamation and Recycling of ODS.........5. Destruction of ODS...... In General .....E.....E.84 III.........d...h.......... Production of ODS....i......c...90 viii .... Controlled Substances and their Ozone Depletion Potential according to the Montreal Protocol .5....63 III.E.E...b.80 III..82 III...3.....b......E....3................................................ Sales of ODS..................3.......D.....7.......................... III....... III.e.................4.....E................3..2..5......81 III.E............ Global Warming Gases Related to Other Industrial Processes . Energy.a.... Measurement of Ozone-Depleting Substances ..d..E.....74 III....62 III.....83 III.5........................g..........81 III.......... Types of ODS.....63 III.............................a.....e...3.................D.....5................77 III........................E...4............ 77 III......................... Dependency on ODS......................D..........3..........D..............c..........D......6. Emissions of ODS .........3.... Objective ............ III.73 Annex to Global Warming Contribution ......75 III...........64 III.......................E.D..... Global Warming Gases Related to Other Industrial Processes .....89 III....... Calculating Global Warming Contribution ....b.d...a....7...77 III....D.......E.62 III....61 III....b.................D................................................77 III.....E......... Disclosure of Ozone-Depleting Substances..82 III.5...1..k...71 Disclosure of global warming gases .............. Recovery................. Forms of Existence of ODS ..III... General Approach .........E.........................

105 III..3........................................................ 106 III............... Annex to Waste ............................. Objective .......... Full Consolidation ........3..d.......... Definition ...... 105 III. 106 III..........G.............3..........................H. 103 III............................4..F............................F.................7.......F..7..1.......... Example of Disclosure of Waste .................. 107 III..................91 III....7....................92 III.. 106 III................................... Measurement of Waste ..G...........................5.........H.......F........... 113 Authors........ 101 III....... 103 III.........G........... 109 III....... 111 Steering Group.........H....................3.. Consolidation Procedure ................91 III......... 108 III.....F....... Definitions Referring to Waste Generated ........95 III.....H....................4...96 III..f.H...91 III.... Disclosure of Waste ..93 III................................F............H................ Objective .......................91 III...................1..................97 III...c................7.................................................... Recognition .........F..............................F.... Definitions Referring to Waste Treatment Technology .... Measurement..b.....6....96 III......G.....III........ V...........97 III.........G..........F........................................ Scope ........3.......... Primary Issues in Consolidating Environmental Items ..................... Scope ....a......H........5..............2........F...................................... Accounting Treatment of Waste ........ 105 III. 109 IV... 103 III... Definitions Based on the Classification of Waste .......2..........3................. Objective ....................c.....H..... 114 ix ...................... Consolidation of Eco-efficiency Indicators ...a..............F..... 108 III......................................7............... References .......c...... Definitions Based on the Quality of Waste ... 106 III... Annex I of the Basel Convention ........................G.................. 103 III....F.......H..............99 III................3.. Disclosure ........... 107 III............ Disclosure .............. Proportionate Consolidation ...........................6............ Definitions .............95 III......F.............6.............91 III............................................................F.................... Equity Method ....................3....96 III...............................3. 108 III.....................7..7.. Annex III of the Basel Convention..b................... Scope of Guidance ... Definitions Referring to the Location of Waste Treatment ... Accounting Treatment of the Financial Items .H...4.....7.........F..............F...... Definitions ....... General Definition of Waste ....1................e...... Annex to Consolidation .................................b..........a....... 91 III........................F.......2.............................................H.....5......... Recognition of Waste ............G............ VI...................

........................52 Table 23 CO2 Emission Factors of Petroleum Products..................................35 Table 7 Net Caloric Values for Coal and Coal Products OECD Countries A-J ...............27 Table 2 Water Received and its Use ...... Targets and Measures ..32 Table 5 Net Caloric Values for Petroleum Products ...........67 x .................................................22 List of Tables Table 1 Water Consumption and Return Flow ..................... Water Policy....43 Table 15 Net Caloric Values for Coal and Coal Products Non-OECD Countries Sr-Ve ..................................................................................................................................................65 Table 25 Electricity-derived CO 2-Emission Factors for Africa ...34 Table 6 Densities of Petroleum Products................................................................................ Gas and Biomass Fuels ......28 Table 4 Road Transportation: Guidance Values for Fuel Consumption..................46 Table 19 Typical Net Caloric Values for Biomass Fuels.....................................................................................................................................................41 Table 13 Net Caloric Values for Coal and Coal Products Non-OECD Countries/Territories Lit-P ................................................36 Table 8 Net Caloric Values for Coal and Coal Products OECD Countries K-U................................................................................ other Africa and other Latin America ................................. Coal and Coal Products...........................................................................................................44 Table 16 Net Caloric Values for Coal and Coal Products Non-OECD Countries Vi-Z ........................................................45 Table 18 Gross and Net Caloric Values for Gas ........47 Table 20 Energy Requirement ...................................42 Table 14 Net Caloric Values for Coal and Coal Products Non-OECD Countries N-So .................38 Table 10 Net Caloric Values for Coal and Coal Products Non-OECD Countries/Territories B-C.......................45 Table 17 Net Caloric Values for Coal and Coal Products other Asia..................................................66 Table 26 Electricity-derived CO 2-Emission Factors for Non-OECD Europe ....40 Table 12 Net Caloric Values for Coal and Coal Products Non-OECD Countries I-Lib .........................................39 Table 11 Net Caloric Values for Coal and Coal Products Non-OECD Countries/Territories D-H ................... Targets and Measures .............List of Figures Figure 1 Sub-Categories of Water Use ............................51 Table 21 Energy Flows and Stocks.........................................51 Table 22 Accounting Policy.....................................28 Table 3 Accounting Policy.................. Energy Policy.....37 Table 9 Net Caloric Values for Coal and Coal Products Non-OECD Countries A-B ..........................................64 Table 24 Electricity-derived CO 2-Emission Factors for Non-OECD Asia.......

............................... 101 Table 52 Annex III of the Basel Convention List of Hazardous Characteristics Class 5............................................1-9 ...... Global Warming Policy..90 Table 47 Waste Generated ............................................................................85 Table 41 Controlled Substances and their Ozone Depletion Potential Montreal Protocol. Targets and Measures ..89 Table 46 Main Sectors Using Ozone-Depleting Substances..Table 27 Electricity-derived CO 2-Emission Factors for Non-OECD Former USSR...................................................................................87 Table 44 Controlled Substances and their Ozone Depletion Potential Copenhagen Amendment to the Montreal Protocol Part 2 ................70 Table 34 Global Warming Potentials Part I ................................ Targets and Measures ......................................................................98 Table 49 Annex I of the Basel Convention Categories of Waste to be Controlled Y1-Y29 ...72 Table 35 Global Warming Potentials Part II........................................69 Table 30 Electricity-derived CO 2-Emission Factors for OECD Europe.................................86 Table 42 Controlled Substances and their Ozone Depletion Potential London Amendment to the Montreal Protocol ......... Targets and Measures ..................................84 Table 39 Total Emissions of ODS ..............73 Table 36 Global Warming Contribution...................................... 102 xi .......... ODS Policy..................................74 Table 37 Accounting Policy on Global Warming Gases...........................................................................74 Table 38 Dependency on ODS. 100 Table 51 Annex III of the Basel Convention List of Hazardous Characteristics Class 1-4..........85 Table 40 Accounting Policy on ODS...................................................70 Table 33 Electricity-derived CO 2-Emission Factors for World Regions ........................ Waste Policy.............98 Table 48 Accounting Policy on Waste......................................99 Table 50 Annex I of the Basel Convention Categories of Waste to be Controlled Y30-Y45 .....................................................................................................................67 Table 28 Electricity-derived CO 2-Emission Factors for Non-OECD Latin America ....................................68 Table 29 Electricity-derived CO 2-Emission Factors for Middle East ....................................................................70 Table 32 Electricity-derived CO 2-Emission Factors for OECD Asia-Pacific ......88 Table 45 A list of products containing controlled substances specified in Annex A of the Protocol ...................................................3 ..................87 Table 43 Controlled Substances and their Ozone Depletion Potential Copenhagen Amendment to the Montreal Protocol Part 1 ........69 Table 31 Electricity-derived CO 2-Emission Factors for North America .............................................

ABBREVATIONS eq. equivalent GWP global warming potential IAS International Accounting Standards IASB International Accounting Standards Board IPCC Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change ISAR Intergovernmental Working Group of Experts on International Standards of Accounting and Reporting ODS ozone-depleting potential OECD Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development UN United Nations UNCTAD United Nations Conference on Trade and Development UNEP United Nations Environment Programme WBCSD World Business Council for Sustainable Development xii .

(b) 1 2 The term and concept of eco-efficiency was developed in the late 1980s. This manual is a guide for users and preparers of eco-efficiency indicators1 (see Box 1). The main objective is to describe the method that enterprises can use to provide information on environmental performance vis-à-vis financial performance in a systematic and consistent manner over periods of time. while progressively reducing ecological impacts and resource intensity…" The WBCSD includes a clear target level: An eco-efficient state is reached when economic activities are at a level "…at least in line with the earth’s estimated carrying capacity". Overview 1. (WBCSD 1996) An eco-efficiency indicator is the ratio between an environmental and a financial variable. It measures the environmental performance of an enterprise with respect to its financial performance. To improve and harmonize the methods used so that enterprises are able to report eco-efficiency indicators in a standardized format so that they are meaningful to decision makers and can be compared across enterprises. This manual complements two previous UN reports and should be seen as a series. 2. It was first described in a scientific publication back in 1989 (see Schaltegger/Sturm 1989). measurement and disclosure of environmental information either within the same industry or across industries. The Concept of Eco-efficiency Investors increasingly require that companies pursue eco-efficient strategies that reduce the damage caused to the environment while increasing or at least not decreasing (shareholder) value. . recognize. 2 Box 1.A. there are no rules for consolidating environmental information for an enterprise or for a group of enterprises so that it can be used together and in line with the enterprise’s financial items. The purpose of the manual is threefold: (a) To give guidance on how to define. The problem with constructing eco-efficiency indicators is that there are no agreed rules or standards for recognition.I. The aim of environmentally sound management is to increase eco-efficiency by reducing the environmental impact while increasing the value of an enterprise (Schaltegger/Sturm 1989). The World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD) describes how eco-efficiency is achieved: "Eco-efficiency is reached by the delivery of competitively priced goods and services that satisfy human needs and bring quality of life. measure and disclose environmental and financial information as specified within the traditional accounting and reporting frameworks (Box 2). Most importantly. Accounting and Financial Reporting for Environmental Costs and Liabilities (1999) and Integrating Environmental and Financial Performance at the Enterprise Level (2000). INTRODUCTION I.

The above list is basically open-ended and should be adapted whenever new environmental issues evolve and/or existing environmental problems are reassessed in the light of new scientific and/or social knowledge. Furthermore they can be used by all enterprises across all sectors. 2 . In particular the framework draws directly from the International Accounting Standards Board (IASB) framework (IASB 2002) and is adapted to report environmental performance vis-à-vis financial performance of the reporting entity. measurement and disclosure of information. Global warming contribution. the manual follows the logic of the widely accepted International Accounting Standards (IAS). A reporting framework — such as the Sustainability Reporting Guidelines of the Global Reporting initiative (GRI 2001) — provides additional guidance on the issues to be reported.A Manual for the Prepareres and Users of Eco-efficiency Indicators (c) To complement and support existing reporting guidelines (e. Hence they are generic rather than sector-specific indicators. They were chosen by ISAR because they address worldwide problems as reflected in international agreements or protocols. eco-efficiency 4. Managers are encouraged to include additional eco-efficiency indicators in their disclosure as they become relevant and material to understanding and evaluating an enterprise's performance in its sector. income statement and cash flow statement). 5. In addition to the above environmental issues. Energy use. the UN Sustainability Reporting Guidelines developed by the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI)). Box 2. These indicators represent a basic set upon which an enterprise could or should report.g. As an attempt to harmonize the provision of eco-efficiency information across the globe. It also suggests the issues to be reported and the format and structure of disclosure. 3. 7. Waste. the manual presents the accounting treatment of the financial item used for constructing eco- 6. measurement and disclosure of environmental transactions and variables. Accounting and Reporting Framework An accounting framework describes an interrelated system that consists of different financial statements (such as a balance sheet. the structure and the format of the report. Ozone depleting substances. It covers issues of recognition. This manual will enable enterprises to report their performance for the five generic environmental issues below: (a) (b) (c) (d) (e) Water use. This manual therefore covers the technical issues of recognition.

2. Users must also be able to compare the eco-efficiency statements of different enterprises. The basic objective of financial accounting is to provide information that is useful to a wide range of users in making economic decisions. can also be mandated by the accounting standard-setting bodies or other regulators and would then have to be applied. Users must be able to compare the eco-efficiency statements of an enterprise over time so that they can identify trends in its eco-efficiency position and performance.3 Acceptance can be gained by integrating the views and values of all important target groups. Rationale for an Accounting Framework for Eco-efficiency Reporting This section aims to demonstrate the necessity and usefulness of a conceptual framework for eco-efficiency reporting by discussing some issues and frequently asked questions. paragraphs 12 and 14). Assessing acquisitions and divestments. Consensus and Quality of Information 13. the more costly it is. But quality has its price – the higher the quality of information. Assessing the impact of changes in the product line of an enterprise. Objectives 10. 11. Disclosure of accounting policies is essential for comparability (IASB Framework. A secondary objective is to show the results of the stewardship of management or the accountability of management for the resources entrusted to it (IASB Framework. 14. If these groups do not accept a guideline or standard. It deals with issues of consolidation of financial and environmental data for the enterprise as a whole.B. The basic objective of ISAR in developing guidelines and manuals for ecoefficiency indicators is to provide information that is useful to a wide range of users in making decisions and for the accountability of management for resources entrusted to it. I. paragraphs 39-42). 9. I. 3 3 . All involved parties should therefore agree on the degree of A standard. This guidance can serve as a management tool for the following: (a) (b) (c) I. 12.Introduction efficiency indicators. irrespective of agreement by the parties involved. If there is to be consensus on a framework.B. 8. it will not be applied. The most essential aspect of a guideline is its acceptance by the main stakeholder groups involved.1.B. on the other hand. Benchmarking. it must attain a certain level of quality.

the financial accounting (b) (c) 4 . the applied conceptual frameworks for ecological and financial accounting have to be comparable if environmental and financial data are to be combined to produce eco-efficiency indicators. The quality of decision-making (by enterprise directors. Thus. The four main qualitative characteristics are understandability. There are several reasons for this: (a) Eco-efficiency indicators link environmental and financial items. reliability and comparability (see II.B. A general framework improves the quality and consistency of ecoefficiency statements considerably. I. Qualitative characteristics are important because they also address the requirements of users.A Manual for the Prepareres and Users of Eco-efficiency Indicators quality the required information should have. Where appropriate.5). For instance. investors and financial analysts) can be improved by linking environmental and financial items. The general framework also provides guidance when periodically reviewing existing and newly developed guidelines.and region-specific environmental aspects and issues need to be considered. The description and definition of the degree of quality is an integral part of the conceptual accounting framework. Duty of Users 16.F). either because no user would be able to understand it correctly or because it would be too voluminous to describe. while others do not. I. Often it is argued that information about special issues should be suppressed. Accordingly. This issue will be discussed further in the consolidation section. The characteristics that make information useful to users are termed qualitative characteristics. Consequently. industry.3. qualitative characteristics balance the requirements of users and preparers in such a way as to be cost effective (see II. Since the main objective of financial accounting is to improve the quality of decision making. More explicitly.B. Since a conceptual framework and standards have been developed on an international level for financial accounting. Accounting for eco-efficiency should benefit from the experience of financial accounting and not reinvent the wheel.F. Qualitative characteristics clearly stipulate the duty of users to understand and to undertake efforts to understand information even if it might be complex. it is proposed to use these as a starting point for eco-efficiency accounting. Financial Accounting Framework as a Starting Point 18. energy requirement per unit of value added provides a good indication of the impact of an energy tax on an enterprise. relevance. and eco-efficiency indicators thus use data from both environmental and financial accounting systems.4. the data have to be derived from the same reporting entity and not different subsets of that entity. some disclose such information. 17. 15.

Introduction framework can serve as a valuable starting point in formulating the respective systems for environmental elements and items. 5 .

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However eco-efficiency indicators will provide a useful basis for benchmarking. The framework is concerned with environmental and related financial information on the eco-efficiency of an enterprise.B.B. recognition and measurement of environmental and financial items used in eco-efficiency accounting and reporting. II. additional industry. .II. This framework does not provide standards for eco-performance.B. Purpose and Status 20. This framework will follow a similar approach in reporting financial information as specified by International Accounting Standards. Elements and items of an eco-efficiency statement. The definition.or region-specific indicators) and in the review of existing guidelines on eco-efficiency indicators. recognition. Such information is prepared and presented annually and directed towards the common information needs of a wide range of users (see IASB Framework. CONCEPTUAL ACCOUNTING AND REPORTING FRAMEWORK FOR ECOEFFICIENCY REPORTING II. The Accounting Framework for Eco-efficiency II. This section introduces a conceptual accounting and reporting framework (framework) for eco-efficiency reporting. This conceptual framework also provides guidance in the development of future eco-efficiency indicators (e.2.1. paragraph 6). The objectives of eco-efficiency indicators. The purpose of this conceptual framework for eco-efficiency reporting is to improve and harmonize the methods used for definition. The framework deals with: (a) (b) (c) (d) 24.A.g. II. 21. measurement and disclosure of eco-efficiency information related to events and activities of an enterprise with a view to promoting comparability between reporting organizations. Introduction to the Framework 19. Scope 23. Qualitative characteristics that determine the usefulness of ecoefficiency indicators. 22.

Objectives of Eco-efficiency Indicators 27.C. II. financial statements do not provide all the information that users may need to make economic decisions since they largely portray the financial effects of past events and do not necessarily provide non-financial information" (IASB Framework. other trade creditors. Users and Their Information Needs 26. lenders. standard-setters are well aware that financial statements are not sufficient. suppliers' customers. Such information is also necessary for the accountability of management for the use of natural resources entrusted to it (see IASB Framework. the public sector and non-profit organizations can also use the framework. employees.1.. and such information should therefore be prepared and presented with their needs in view (see IASB Framework.C. Provide Information 28. Eco-efficiency data can also be used to forecast the impact of current and upcoming environmental issues on future financial performance. The users of eco-efficiency indicators include present and potential investors. Most users have to rely on environmental and financial items as their major source of environmental information. Improve Decision-Making 29.C. This framework was developed primarily for business organizations to provide information on the eco-efficiency of their enterprises.3.2. 4 The information is useful to a wide range of users in making economically and environmentally sound decisions and in evaluating the impact of their decisions. II. The objective of eco-efficiency reporting is to provide information on the environmental performance of an enterprise with respect to its financial performance (financial performance/environmental performance). Governments and their agencies.. 8 . Complement Financial Statements 30.A Manual for the Prepareres and Users of Eco-efficiency Indicators 25. paragraph 13). paragraph 9). Two main shortcomings are mentioned in the 1983 version of the framework of the International Accounting Standards Committee (the predecessor of the International Accounting Standards Board IASB): ". 4 Although financial statements support the quality of decision-making. II. However. II. and the general public (see IASB Framework. Empirical evidence suggests that there is a strong link between eco-efficiency and future cash generation.C. paragraph 6). II.B.3. Eco-efficiency information complements financial statements in order to enhance the quality of decision-making. paragraphs 12 and 14).

global warming contribution. "per unit of net value added" or "per unit of sales". liabilities. As we do not see any reason to change accepted terminology. equity. an energy source used. 33. 6 Indicator An indicator is a specific measurement of an individual element that is used to track and demonstrate performance related to the element via recognition and measurement of items. indicators use a reference item to exclude effects of quantitative changes in activities and to make them comparable. Note: The Global Reporting Imitative (GRI 2001) uses the term "aspect". II. The following definitions refer to the hierarchy of information within an ecoefficiency statement: (a) Element Elements are the broad areas or groupings of financial and/or environmental issues of concern to stakeholders (e. assets. eco-efficiency indicators are set in relation to a financial item.e. As we do not see any reason to change accepted terminology. (b) (c) 5 6 Note: The Global Reporting Imitative (GRI 2001) uses the term "category". income and expense. a type of waste. As per definition. we prefer to stick to the terms and concepts already in use in international accounting standards. sales.g. we prefer to stick to the terms and concepts already in use in international accounting standards. To normalize a dynamic development over time.). indicators are ratios composed of an environmental item divided by a financial item. examples include "per tonne".D. i. cost of goods and services purchased). Elements and Items of an Eco-efficiency Statement 32. etc. Information about environmental performance vis-à-vis financial performance is useful in determining the ability of an enterprise to adapt to changes in the environment in which it operates. A given element may have several indicators based on different items. A given element may have several items or a group of items.Conceptual Accounting and Reporting Framework for Eco-efficiency Reporting 31.5 Item An item or a group of items is information that is related to a specific element (e. 9 . waste. Eco-efficiency statements portray environmental and financial effects of transactions and activities by grouping these effects into broader classes according to their environmental and financial characteristics.g. a specific greenhouse gas. energy requirement.

Global warming contribution. This framework and the accompanying guidance recommend 7 that all enterprises report their eco-efficiency at least with respect to the following environmental elements: (a) (b) (c) (d) (e) Energy use.or region-specific environmental elements and associated guidance. An eco-efficiency statement will clearly define the reporting entity in terms of which sites. Waste. Water use. the definition of the reporting entity for both these items must be congruent. activities and legal entities are included or excluded and how and to what extent this is done.g. including the guidance for the above elements.A Manual for the Prepareres and Users of Eco-efficiency Indicators 34. (2) the environmental indicator must be applicable to all industries across all sectors. equity. (3) the environmental indicator must link an environmental problem at the macro level to activities of an enterprise at the micro level. 39. As eco-efficiency indicators set an environmental item (e. 38. energy use) in relation to a financial item (e. and (4) the environmental problem measured by the indicator must have an impact on the financial performance of an enterprise. as a starting point for the development of any additional guidance. Reporting Entity and the Principle of Congruity 37. 7 This recommendation is based on the identified environmental problems presented in the UNCTAD conceptual paper (UNCTAD 2001). net value added). The criteria for the selection were: (1) the environmental indicator must address a worldwide environmental problem.1. Enterprises are encouraged to define industry.E. Underlying Assumptions 36. For the purpose of this manual. Env ironmental information is measured in physical units. For the purpose of eco-efficiency statements. 10 . See also Sturm/Müller 2001. in other words they must represent the same activities of the same entity. the same concepts and criteria used in financial accounting and reporting will be applied when defining the reporting entity for the recognition and measurement of environmental elements and items and the disclosure of such information. environmental information means any data on an item that relates to one of the above environmental elements. while financial information means any data on an item that relates to assets.g. while financial information is measured in monetary units. 35. it is recommended to use this framework. II. liabilities. When doing so. income and/or expenses.E. II. Contribution to ozone depletion.

E. Going Concern 44. Accrual Basis 42.3. which expands the definition of the reporting entity up. 45. If this is done the enterprise will expand the boundaries in terms of environmental data and in terms of financial data to maintain congruity (see Box 3). An eco-efficiency statement will make clear the scope of activities reported and provide explanations for any restrictions in reporting scope. If the enterprise either intends or needs to liquidate or curtail materially the scale of its operations. environmental impacts. 46. events and activities will be recognized when they occur and will be recorded and reported in the periods to which they relate (see IASB Framework. emissions. 43. paragraph 22).4. 11 .E. paragraph 23). the basis used should be disclosed (see IASB Framework. Reporting Scope 41. the eco-efficiency data may have to be prepared on a different basis and. a reporting entity will cover the impacts of its activities on at least the five environmental elements set out in paragraph 34. The published data should reflect the assumption that the reporting entity is expected to continue operations into the foreseeable future. if so. The published report should also include the management’s assessment of the consequences of moving towards modes of production and/or service delivery compatible with sustainability (GRI 2001). Eco-efficiency indicators prepared on an accrual basis inform users not only of past environmental performance vis-à-vis financial performance but also of the potential impact that a change in environmental legislation has on an enterprise's future cash flows. II.2. II.E. It is up to the reporting entity to include additional information. Hence they provide information that is useful to users to make informed economic and environmental decisions. II. Ideally. Reportable resource uses.or downstream in the value chain.Conceptual Accounting and Reporting Framework for Eco-efficiency Reporting 40.

Consequently if sales are used as a reference item and the environmental item should cover the same activities. Life-cycle approaches provide highly valuable information but are too costly and impractical to use on larger entities with many activities. then the relevant environmental information of the suppliers linked to the reporting entities’ purchases must also be included. paragraph 24). products and services on a regular basis. This is clearly not the intent of an annual report.and therefore the eco-efficiency figure is inconsistent and the information worthless. the financial item used as a reference figure also covers these activities.g. To avoid these problems with sales as a reference figure and to arrive at a consistent eco-efficiency indicator. it must make sure that. meaning that the reporting entity should include processes up. Principle of Congruity and the Life-Cycle Approach Most environmental accounting and reporting guidelines developed by environmentalists and economists take a so-called life-cycle approach. 48. That way the financial figure represents economic activities of the reporting entity only. These approaches illustrate that including up. II. it means that the expansion has to be done for all the company’s activities. Qualitative Characteristics Qualitative characteristics are attributes that make the information provided in eco-efficiency statements useful to users. On the other hand. which describes the eco-efficiency of an enterprise. what the company calls purchase cost is sales from the supplier’s perspective. Otherwise the two items are not congruent . 47. 12 . if the environmental item includes activities up.they do not cover the same activities . The four principal qualitative characteristics are (a) (b) (c) (d) Understandability. products and services and therefore for all of its suppliers and customers as well.and/or downstream. This framework and guidance clearly takes a different stand on this aspect. and Comparability (see IAS framework. This in turn makes it possible to restrict the environmental data to the reporting entities’ own resource consumption.and downstream information is highly impractical.F. it must be aware that its own sales also include part of the sales of its suppliers. if an enterprise chooses sales as a reference figure. since environmental and financial data must be consistent. The scope and the objective of life-cycle approaches are to analyse specific products and to optimize these products throughout the value chain. emissions or waste production. It follows the approach used in financial accounting. a company must deduct the cost of goods and services purchased from its sales figures.A Manual for the Prepareres and Users of Eco-efficiency Indicators Box 3.and downstream in the value chain (e. that is they must match the transactions of the same entities included in a consolidated financial statement. Reliability. the Guideline on Sustainability Reporting published by the Global Reporting Initiative). Especially in the case of an annual company report. Relevance. If an enterprise expands its eco-efficiency reporting to include the life cycle of its products and services.

Or by confirming or correcting their past evaluations (see IASB Framework. materiality provides a threshold or cut-off point rather than being a primary qualitative characteristic that information must have if it is to be useful (see IASB Framework. The same information plays a confirmatory role in respect of past predictions about.1. information about the current level and structure of environmental performance has value to users when they endeavour to predict the ability of an enterprise to take advantage of opportunities and its ability to react in adverse situations. Information must be understandable to users. The application of these four qualitative characteristics normally results in eco-efficiency information that conveys a true and fair view of the ecoefficiency performance of an enterprise (see IASB Framework. paragraph 46). users are assumed to have reasonable knowledge of business environmental issues and accounting and a willingness to study the information with reasonable diligence.2. paragraph 26). Understandability 50. present or future events (see IASB Framework. paragraph 26).F.F. II. II.F. Eco-efficiency information has the quality of reliability when it is free from material error and bias and can be depended upon by users to represent faithfully what it either purports to represent or could reasonably be expected to represent (see IASB Framework. 13 . Information is material if its omission or misstatement could influence the decisions of users taken on the basis of eco-efficiency statements.Conceptual Accounting and Reporting Framework for Eco-efficiency Reporting 49. 51. For this purpose. The relevance of eco-efficiency information is affected by its nature and materiality (see IAS framework. paragraph 30). II. Eco-efficiency information is relevant when it influences the decisions of users in the following manner: (a) (b) 53. However. Thus. The predictive and confirmatory roles of eco-efficiency information are interrelated. 54. Reliability 55.3. Materiality depends on the size of the item or error judged in the particular circumstances of its omission or misstatement. By helping them evaluate past. environmental objectives and targets (see IASB Framework. information about complex environmental matters which is relevant to the decision-making needs of users should be included and not excluded merely on the grounds that it may be too difficult for certain users to understand (see IASB Framework paragraph 25). Relevance and Materiality 52. For example. paragraph 29). paragraph 31). for example. paragraph 27).

For example. paragraph 39 and 42). paragraph 36). eco-efficiency information must represent faithfully the activities and other events of the reporting entity. 14 62. and the effects of such changes. The eco-efficiency information must be complete within the bounds of materiality and cost. the measurement and display of the environmental effect of like activities and other events must be carried out in a consistent way throughout an enterprise and over time for that enterprise and in a consistent way for different enterprises. Such uncertainties are recognized by disclosing their nature and extent and by exercising prudence in the preparation of the ecoefficiency information (see IASB Framework. paragraph 37).4. . This is known as the "substance over form" principle. it is important that the eco-efficiency information show consistent information for the preceding periods (see IASB Framework. by the selection or presentation of information. any changes in these policies/methodologies. an enterprise may report very low global warming emissions based on the substances listed under the Kyoto protocol but emit major amounts of other non-listed global warming gases. paragraph 35). Hence. To be reliable. Thus. Users must also be able to compare the eco-efficiency information of different enterprises in order to evaluate their relative ecoefficiency performance (benchmarking). 59. that is free from bias. for example. The preparers of eco-efficiency information do. For eco-efficiency information to be reliable. Comparability implies that users must be informed of the policies and methodologies employed in the preparation of eco-efficiency information. 57. Because users wish to compare the eco-efficiency information over time. these emissions have to be accounted for (see IASB Framework. II. Eco-efficiency information must be neutral. Users must be able to compare the eco-efficiency information of an enterprise over time in order to identify trends in its eco-efficiency performance. the aggregated emissions of global warming gases should represent faithfully the contribution of the reported activities/transactions of an enterprise to the problem of global warming (see IASB Framework. 60. have to contend with the uncertainties that inevitably surround many events and circumstances. however. Comparability 61.A Manual for the Prepareres and Users of Eco-efficiency Indicators 56. The substance of activities or other events is not always consistent with what is apparent from their legal or contrived form. paragraph 38). For eco-efficiency information to be reliable. it influences a decision or judgement in order to achieve a predetermined result or outcome (see IASB Framework. An omission can cause information to be false or misleading and thus unreliable and deficient in terms of its relevance (see IASB Framework. Ecoefficiency information is not neutral if. it is necessary that activities and other events are accounted for and presented in accordance with their substance and environmental reality and not according to their legal form. paragraph 33).F. 58.

As a minimum. the costs do not necessarily fall on those users who enjoy the benefits (see IASB. the aim is to achieve an appropriate balance among the characteristics in order to meet the objectives of eco-efficiency reporting. As there are trade-offs between different qualitative characteristics it is often necessary to balance the four qualitative characteristics. 66. 15 . paragraph 40). the need for comparability should not be confused with absolute uniformity (see IASB Framework. Furthermore. substantially a judgemental process.5. thus impairing reliability. however.F. Conversely. Generally. 64. 67. paragraph 43). In achieving a balance between relevance and reliability. It is inappropriate for an enterprise to continue reporting in the same manner on a transaction or other event if the policy adopted is not in keeping with the qualitative characteristics of relevance and reliability. An enterprise has. To provide information on a timely basis it may often be necessary to report before all aspects of a transaction or other event are known. the information may be highly reliable but of little use to users who have to make decisions in the interim. from which data is recalculated. But it could also be any defined base year. 63. Framework paragraph 45).Conceptual Accounting and Reporting Framework for Eco-efficiency Reporting Users need to be able to identify differences between the policies and methodologies for like activities and other events used by the same enterprise from period to period and by different enterprises (see IASB Framework. to balance benefit and cost. The benefits derived from information should exceed the cost of providing it. The relative importance of the characteristics in different cases is a matter of professional judgement (see IASB. in the interest of both users and the enterprise. when new scientific knowledge is developed which leads to a change in methodology applied to environmental information. for example. II. It is also inappropriate for an enterprise to leave its reporting policies unchanged when more relevant and reliable alternatives exist. Comparability implies that. if reporting is delayed until all aspects are known. Framework paragraph 44). Preparers may need to balance the relative merits of timely reporting and the provision of reliable information. this should lead to a re-evaluation and recalculation of ecoefficiency information disclosed in the past (assuming that past values are available). The evaluation of benefits and costs is. paragraph 41). the overriding consideration is how best to satisfy the decision-making needs of users (see IASB Framework. Balancing Qualitative Characteristics 65. Thus. the year used for comparison (which is normally the last year) should be recalculated.

such information. calculations and estimations are employed to different degrees and in varying combinations: (a) Metered value A metered (or gauged) value is a value that is scaled by means of a balance or other instrument.1. the item is not recognized. where an average level of technology is assumed. a value must be estimated. If other levels of technology are used for the estimate. Recognition is the process of incorporating an environmental or financial item that satisfies the criteria for recognition set out in paragraph 70. however. The application of the principal qualitative characteristics and of appropriate guidelines normally results in eco-efficiency statements that convey what is generally understood as a true and fair view of. Measurement 72.G. the use of reasonable estimates is an essential part of the preparation of eco-efficiency information and does not undermine their reliability. Recognition 69. When. 71. II. this should be disclosed. (b) 16 .2. paragraph 88). It involves the depiction of the item in words and by an amount in physical or monetary units (see IASB Framework. paragraph 86). This is appropriate when knowledge of the item is considered to be relevant to the evaluation of the eco-efficiency position. a reasonable estimate cannot be made. True and Fair View/Fair Presentation 68. An item can be incorporated if the item has a value that can be measured in physical or monetary units with reliability. Eco-efficiency statements can be seen as presenting fairly the eco-efficiency position.6. paragraph 82). Estimated value An estimated value is a value based on common practice and applied technology. Recognition and Measurement of Items 70. 73. In many cases. II. performance and changes in position of an enterprise by the users of eco-efficiency statements (see IASB Framework. II. performance and changes in the eco-efficiency position of an enterprise.F.A Manual for the Prepareres and Users of Eco-efficiency Indicators II. Measurement is the process of determining the physical or monetary value at which an item is to be recognized. Where relevant it should be disclosed (see IASB Framework.G. A number of different measurements.G. or as presenting fairly.

100 m3. results for different entities with different levels of activities and dynamics are transformed into the same unit. metered. Reference value A reference value is a value used to normalize a dynamic development. and in 2001 it used 1. the normalized eco-efficiency figure for both years is equal.g. The inputs into the calculation are values of different quality levels (e.Conceptual Accounting and Reporting Framework for Eco-efficiency Reporting (c) Calculated value A calculated value is based on (user-) defined algorithms. we need to divide the water use by a figure that represents the level of activity. concepts or models. 17 . Empirical value An empirical value is a value based on empirical studies/research and scientific evidence. One possibility is sales. Assuming sales were 100 in the year 2000 and 110 in 2001. so they become comparable. another value added.000 m3 water. (d) (e) (f) 8 Example: In the year 2000 company A used 1. To judge the eco-efficiency of that company. estimated) and/or defined conversion factors.8 Conversion factor A conversion factor is a consensus value based on generally accepted scientific standards. Through normalization.

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revenue. Ozone-depleting substances (III.F). region-. siteor company-specific) using the framework and the included guidelines as guidance. recognizing. GUIDELINES III. Dependency on ozone-depleting substances per unit of net value added. Water use (I. Companies are encouraged to develop additional indicators (e. The manual describes the following financial items and issues relevant for eco-efficiency indicators: (a) (b) Value added and net value-added. The manual contains a methodology for calculating.A) 76. Global warming contribution per unit of net value added.C).E).A. 78. measuring and disclosing the following five indicators: (a) (b) (c) (d) (e) Water consumption per net value added. Global warming contribution (III. Waste (III. purchased goods and services (III. All figures refer to a calendar year.III. Energy requirement per unit of net value added.A). Waste generated per unit of net value added. Energy use (III.G) Consolidation (I. 77.g. This manual assesses the impacts of the following environmental variables: (a) (b) (c) (d) (e) 75. The above list is basically open-ended and should be adapted whenever new environmental issues evolve and/or existing environmental problems are reassessed by new scientific and/or social knowledge. It would be more appropriate for industry associations to specify sector-specific indicators because they are best positioned to obtain industry consensus. General Scope 74. . The list can also be expanded to cover the particular industry sector.D).

General 83. Objective The objective of this manual is to describe a methodology for the accounting 9 treatment of water use. 82. be it withdrawals.b. and use of materials and energy flow information.B. 80.EMAwebsite. 9 Traditionally "accounting" has a financial connotation. III.A Manual for the Prepareres and Users of Eco-efficiency Indicators III. estimation. Water received is any input of freshwater into the reporting entity. analysis. Accounting Treatment of Water Use III.2. internal reporting. Scope III. Figure 1 provides an overview of the categories and subcategories of water use. This methodology should be applied by all enterprises in accounting for all types of water used by them as defined in section III. Environmental Management Accounting (EMA) can be defined as the identification. Public water supply refers to water withdrawn by public and private water suppliers.B.B. paragraph 81) this category covers water that is withdrawn by the reporting entity itself but does not cover withdrawal by public water suppliers. environmental cost information.B.a.3. Definitions III. 79.B. According to the US EPA Environmental Accounting Project. An enterprise is a water supplier when the rationale for the activities of the company is to distribute water to users. and other cost information for both conventional and environmental decision-making within an organization (Source: www. 81.org). which is linked with ordinary and extraordinary activities of the reporting entity: (a) Withdrawal Withdrawal is the quantity of water (i) removed from a ground water source or (ii) diverted from a surface water source for the reporting entities’ use.1. 20 .3.B. In recent years the term "accounting" has also been applied to non-financial environmental aspects of management. collection.3. The following terms are used in this methodology. III. According to the scope of this guidance (see III. deliveries or conveyance gains.B.B.2.3. This guidance is not intended for companies in the public water supply sector. Water Received and its Source 84.

hydroelectric power generation. see III. for example. paragraph 100). 21 . enterprises are advised to disclose qualitative information on in-stream water use for the time being.c. (b) ecological needs include fish and wildlife preservation. and cultural resource preservation.3.3. fish and shrimp farming.(vii). from a surfaceor ground water source.B. releases and return flows are the endpoints of conveyances. but not withdrawn. fish and shrimp farming. transportation. mining and power generation (see III.3. Withdrawals. Off-stream water use covers the following: domestic.(i) – III.B. transportation.d. its treatment. Conveyance gains Conveyance is the systematic and intentional movement or transfer of water from one point to another. water used for irrigation. aesthetics. (b) 10 In-stream uses can be broadly characterized as streamflows to meet human needs and streamflows to meet ecological needs: (a) human needs include recreation. distribution and use. paragraph 106(b)). freshwater dilution of saline estuaries. see III.Guidelines (b) Delivery Deliveries are the quantity of water delivered to the reporting entity by a public water supplier. treatment and release of wastewater and return flow. deliveries. (c) III. Although in-stream water use is an important aspect of water preservation.(vii)) In-stream water use In-stream use is water that is used.(ii).3. waste assimilation. Conveyance gains may occur through infiltration and inflow (conveyance losses may occur through evaporation from an open system or seepage. (a) Off-stream water use Off-stream use involves the withdrawal or diversion of water from a source.c.B. and the collection.3.c. wetlands preservation. commercial and industrial use. Water use is divided into off-stream use and in-stream use.B. current knowledge does not allow for a quantitative inclusion of these flows into an eco-efficiency statement. hydroelectric power generation. 10 Commercial in-stream water use activities include. biodiversity.B. Kinds of Water Use 85. With the exception of in-stream water use for hydroelectric power generation (turbine water.c. and maintenance of the riparian zone. livestock and other animals.

car washing. deliveries from public water suppliers. and watering lawns and gardens.3.B.c. releases into surface water.(i) 86. student accommodation on campus. 11 Domestic water-use activities include withdrawals from ground and surface water. 11 (c) 87. ground water or wastewater-collection systems. washing dishes and clothes. water use by customers is considered commercial water use (see III.B.A Manual for the Prepareres and Users of Eco-efficiency Indicators Figure 1 Sub-Categories of Water Use source of water kind of use kind of release without treatment water withdrawal domestic release of wastewater commercial without treatment conveyance loss irrigation livestock & other animals mining conveyance gain instream water power generation incorporated into products and crops consumption by humans and livestock evaporation (and transpiration) cooling water released to a small water body cooling water released to a significant water body return flow with on-site treatment public wastewater collection system surface water. bathing. etc. flushing toilets.g.3. Domestic Water Use Water use is considered to be domestic under the following circumstances: (a) (b) The use takes place in and on property owned by the reporting entity. 22 . consumptive use in the form of evaporation.(ii)). company-owned restaurant or housing). usually during outdoor use. The water is used by employees/members of the organization or their families during non-working hours (e. In the case of the tourism industry. but also through washing and cooking. food preparation. ground water or soil surface water ground water water received water delivered offstream industrial water consumption power generation turbine water for hydroelectric power generation return flow III. The water is used for purposes such as drinking. usually through septic systems.c.

B. and releases to ground and surface water. retail stores. deliveries of reclaimed wastewater. transport of materials. for example.c.3. consumptive use as evaporation and product incorporation during dust control.such as hotels. Industrial water-use activities include water withdrawal from ground and surface water. water used as process and production water and boiler feed and for air conditioning. Water Use for Mining 91. Water use activities in mining include: withdrawals from ground and surface water. 13 Industrial water use does not include water used for power generation for sale to third parties. cooling.3. snow and ice making. leisure parks and ski resorts and for transportation . 93. restaurants. ground water or surface water. 23 . III. 12 13 14 Commercial water-use activities include withdrawals from ground or surface water. consumptive use through evaporation and product incorporation (as in a bottling plant). washing floors and other surfaces. It includes.c.(iv). 14 Water used in smelting and refining of minerals is considered as industrial use. Commercial Water Use Commercial water use includes water used by commercial facilities . or the extraction of crude petroleum and gases. coal.c. III.(vii)). water and wastewater treatment. deliveries from public water suppliers. and drying.c. 12 Water used for off-stream fish and shrimp farming is considered commercial water use. and dewatering. slurry conveyance. office buildings. toilet flushing. Industrial Water Use 89. tailings disposal. motels. pools and laundries. and natural gas. hospitals and educational institutions. water for food preparation. fountains and watering lawns.(iv) 92.3.B.B. washing. recycling. Mining water use includes water used for the extraction and on-site processing of minerals. III.as well as by non-commercial entities such as government and military facilities. sanitation.Guidelines III. air-conditioning. releases to ground water and surface water. and steam generation for internal use.3. Off-stream fish hatcheries engaged in hatching fish for release to public lakes and streams for fishing are also classified as commercial use. cooling. including ores.B.B.3. release into wastewater-collection systems. consumptive use in the form of evaporation. mining of minerals. but also from wash water and food preparation.(iii) 90. which are included in separate categories (see III. deliveries from water suppliers. petroleum. chemical and paper. as well as water used in refining petroleum and metals. Industrial water use includes.(ii) 88. for example. releases to wastewater collection systems. usually during outdoor use. wastewater treatment. Industrial water use includes water used to manufacture products such as steel.c. deliveries from water suppliers.

16 Under this category. The water used for hydroelectric power generation which drives the turbine generators and is returned to the stream or is recycled is considered return flow and not consumptive use. It is not considered consumptive use if the release is discharged into a significant water body such as an ocean. The thermoelectric power generation category includes water used in the generation of electric power when the following fuel types are used: fossil.(vii) Generation 98. and releases of wastewater.3.d. horses in captivity and others. water used by the animals for drinking. dairy sanitation.3. 101. Water Use for Livestock and other Animals III. hogs.3. consumptive use through evaporation and product incorporation (in plants and releases to ground and surface water). paragraph 105). or geothermal energy. 100.c. nuclear. 95.3. 99. llamas. It excludes water used for fish and shrimp farming. a major river or a lake at a temperature not significantly higher than the water body (see III. consumptive use in the form of evaporation and incorporation into the animal and animal products.B. which is considered commercial offstream water use (see paragraph 89). The hydroelectric power generation category includes water used in the generation of electric power by utilising either cascading water or water pressure. goats. biomass.(ii). In general the release of cooling water is considered consumptive use (see III.A Manual for the Prepareres and Users of Eco-efficiency Indicators III.B. Water Use for Thermoelectric and Hydroelectric Power 97. such as milk.B. cooling of an animal or a product and processing animal products are included. III.c.(vi) 96.3. Water use for livestock and other animals includes water used to raise cattle.(v) 94. 24 . deliveries from public water suppliers.c.B. waste. cleaning and waste-disposal systems. 15 Watering of lawns and gardens is considered domestic or commercial water use. 15 16 Water-use activities in irrigation include: water withdrawal from ground and surface water. Water Use for Irrigation Water use for irrigation includes water used in agricultural activities for irrigation purposes. Water-use activities in the livestock and animal specialties categories include withdrawals from ground or surface water.B. sheep. poultry.d). It also includes evaporation from stock ponds and incidental water losses. deliveries from water suppliers. Cooling water used for thermoelectric power generation in the condenser to cool the steam back into water is discharged as return flow or is recycled through cooling ponds or towers.

although it is available for future (but not for immediate) consumption.g. (iii) Release of wastewater to surface water. and in nuclear plants. blowdown (purging) of boilers. is consumed by humans or livestock.3. ground water or soil so that it becomes available for immediate 17 reuse. Water consumption is the difference between water received and off-stream return flow (see Figure 1). to keep the nuclear fuel from overheating and melting is considered consumptive use.d. ground water or soil after use by the reporting entity. Releases of Water III. Water consumed is that amount of water received that is not available for immediate reuse/consumption. washing of stacks.B. 106.d. It includes: (a) Release of waste water This is the quantity of water released after use or treatment by the reporting entity. This category includes: (i) Release of wastewater into public wastewater collection systems after use by the reporting entity. water and wastewater treatment. plant and employee sanitation. water is degraded in quality).(ii) 105. Return flow is either (a) (b) Off-stream cooling water released to a significant surface/ground water body or In-stream use of water to drive a turbine to produce hydroelectricity. transpires. Return flow is the quantity of water that is discharged after use to surface water. Water Consumption III.d. 104. It also includes waste water that is released to the public waste water collection system.3. is incorporated into products or crops. which draws a questionable line between consumption and return flow. Make up water to replace the water lost as steam. 17 18 The criterion used here is "immediate" to differentiate between consumption and return flow.B. III. to surface or ground water bodies or to the soil18 and that is not available for immediate consumption (e. or otherwise removed from the immediate water environment. 25 . (ii) Release of wastewater into public wastewater collection systems after use and on-site treatment by the reporting entity. It includes water that evaporates.(i) Return flow 103. As all water released becomes available for reuse sooner or later immediate is the only criterion.B.3. Water that is returned to the soil to percolate downwards to a deep water table with the intention of making it available again is considered consumptive use.Guidelines 102.

Recognition 108. Water use should be measured in litres or cubic metres.B. cubic metres). the amount per source and use category as recognized during the accounting period and the respective amounts of the previous year.B. 107. Water use should be metered. The total amount of water received. Total water consumption. The accounting policies adopted on water use. Disclosure 114. 113.c. III. Measurement of Water Use 110. paragraph 101). 109. the total return flow and the respective amount per category as defined and recognized during the accounting period and the respective amounts of the previous year. Cooling water that is not released to a significant water body (see III. 112.B. Water evaporated and transpired. If water is temporarily stored on-site the stock should be recognized at the beginning and at the end of the reporting period. Qualitative information on the wastewater treatment technology applied on-site and in the public wastewater system.4.B. An enterprise should disclose: (a) (b) (c) The eco-efficiency indicator "water consumption per net value added". III.3.6.). ground water or soil after use and on-site treatment by the reporting entity.3 should be recognized in the period in which the flow occurs.B. III.5. If an amount of water used is estimated or calculated the range of uncertainty should be recorded. Water use as defined by III. This excludes water in closed systems.b. etc. paragraph 84(c)).3.A Manual for the Prepareres and Users of Eco-efficiency Indicators (b) (c) (d) (e) (f) (iv) Release of wastewater to surface water. (d) (e) 26 . The item "water consumption" is used for the calculation of the eco-efficiency indicator "water consumption per net value added" (see paragraph 76(a)). Water consumed by humans and livestock (drinking). water in tubes. small boilers used to catch an overshoot of water.g. Conveyance losses (see III.(vii). Water incorporated into products and crops. Water use should be reported according to volume (litres. which are not used as reserves (e. 111.B.

Guidelines (f) The management's stance on the water use policy. Annexes to Water Use III. Example of Disclosure of Water Use 115.without treatment Conveyance losses Consumption by humans and livestock Evaporation Cooling water Change in water storage Total water consumption° Net value added (€) Eco-efficiency indicator "water consumption/net value added" (m3/€) Return flow (m3) Cooling water Total return flow° Notes: *Average treatment technology applied. Table 1 Water Consumption and Return Flow Water consumption (m3) Release of wastewater to public wastewater collection systems . An example of a disclosure of water use is given in the annex. °Total Water Consumption + Return Flow = Water Received 100 100 150 150 2000 1 000 1 000 1 000 1 000 100 20 500 280 0 4 900 10 000 0. water policy.7. III. A disclosure on water use consists of three parts: (a) (b) (c) Total water consumption and return flow (Table 1).B.7. Water received and its use (Table 2). 116. targets and measures (Table 3). ground water or soil .a.with on-site treatment* . ^Best available technology applied. The following tables show an example of a disclosure on water use.B.a.with on-site treatment^ .7.486 27 .without treatment Release of wastewater to surface water. III.B. the objectives and targets regarding water use and the measures taken to achieve the targets. Accounting policy on water use. Enterprises are advised to only include the line items that actually show a flow.490 2001 1 100 1 000 1 000 1 100 200 50 600 300 0 5 350 11 000 0.

A Manual for the Prepareres and Users of Eco-efficiency Indicators Table 2 Water Received and its Use Water Received [m3 ] Water withdrawal from a ground water source Water diverted from a surface water source Water delivered Conveyance gains Total water received Use Domestic Commercial Industrial 2000 4'000 500 500 5'000 100 900 4'000 2001 4'100 600 800 5'500 150 950 4'400 Table 3 Accounting Policy. Water Policy. Targets and Measures Accounting policy Water policy Targets Measures 28 .

This guidance should be applied by all enterprises in accounting for all types of energy used by them as defined in III.C.3. General Definition of Energy and Energy Use 122.C. III.3. Objective 117. Energy use is defined as all inp uts into the reporting entity whose purpose it is to use its productive capacity for doing work and/or for providing heat for the reporting entities’ activities.a.Guidelines III. The focus of this guidance is therefore on entropy and energy conservation. III. This guidance is not intended for energy-producing 19 enterprises.C.C. III.C. The objective of this manual is to describe a method for the accounting treatment of energy use. in everyday language the term "produced" is used. 119. For the energy-producing industry this guidance on energy should be used with care.2. Scope 118.3.c that a company receives from third parties and is used for the company's activities. Definitions 121. products and/or services.C. 29 .1. products and/or services shall be considered a purchase of energy regardless of 19 Energy is not produced but rather transformed from one form to another. Energy is the capacity for doing work and/or the capacity for providing heat.b. An enterprise is an energy producer when the rationale for the activities of the company is to sell energy in whatever form. 120. the quality in terms of renewable/non-renewable energy and energy-linked emissions of greenhouse gases are not covered by this manual but by the accounting guidance on energy supply and greenhouse gases. the technology and the source used. In the future specific guidance on energy use by energy-producing companies needs to be developed by the industry itself. Any form of energy from any source as defined by III. The impacts of energy use or issues concerning the supply of energy. The terms used for the accounting treatment of energy use are defined as follows: III. Accounting Treatment of Energy Use III.3.C.3. This manual treats energy flows from a thermodynamic perspective. 123. Nevertheless.C. Purchase and Sale of Energy 124.

solar process heat. heavy fuel oil. kerosene. gas coke.C. peat.C. lignite and brown coal. motor gasoline.b. patent fuel and brown coal/peat briquettes (BKB). paraffin waxes. aviation gasoline. Different forms and sources of energy are defined in the appendix III. 20 Non-energy refined petroleum products used such as white spirit. mineral oils and other non-energy petroleum products are not considered energy use. (iii) The combustion of coal and coal products Including: coking coal (hard coal). lubricating oils and grease. (v) The combustion (incineration) of waste (vi) Steam Including: district heating systems and other steam generated outside the reporting entity (vii) The surrounding natural systems Including: geothermal heat (deep heat mining. solar space heating and cooling).A Manual for the Prepareres and Users of Eco-efficiency Indicators whether the underlying financial transaction has a negative or positive value for the reporting entity. 30 . (iv) The combustion of biomass Including: direct combustion of biomass. sub-bituminous coal.3. coke oven coke. naphtha. Any form of energy from any source as defined by III. biofuels and biochemicals.C. solar hot water systems. gas works gas and substitute gas. passive solar heating. coke oven gas. Forms and Sources of Energy 126. III. bituminous coal and anthracite (hard coal). The different forms and sources of energy relevant for companies covered by this manual (non-energy sector only) are: (a) Heat from (i) The combustion of petroleum Including: liquefied petroleum gases and methane. ocean thermal heat.20 (ii) The combustion of gas Including: natural gas. 125.7. including shallow ground and ambient air heat pumps). direct solar heat (concentrating solar systems.3. bitumen (asphalt). gas/diesel fuel.c. products and/or services shall be considered a sale of energy regardless of whether the underlying financial transaction has a negative or positive value for the reporting entity. blast furnace gas. jet fuels.c that a company transfers to third parties and is being used for the third parties’ activities. 127. petroleum coke. industrial spirit.

e.g. For the purpose of this guideline. Petrochemical feedstock use is not considered energy use. Table 4 provides guidance. batteries) (ii) Pressure-volume work (e. If no fuel data are available. including geothermal heat.6). rotation produced by a combustion engine. 130.g. 131. Non-road transportation. (b) 21 22 23 Work involves the net directed movement of matter from one location to another. These services can nevertheless be disclosed separately (see III. ocean thermal heat and direct solar heat. estimation values based on the technology and/or model year of the vehicle should be used. compressed air) (iii) Mechanical work (e. Transport-related energy use includes all transports carried out as part of the company’s business activities (transportation of goods and personnel) either by the company itself or by a subcontractor23 in charge of a company's transports. Assumptions made should be disclosed. marine shipping. is not accounted for. including air freight. transport services supplied by third parties other than subcontractors (see next paragraph) are not accounted for. steam. If no fuel data are available. 129. A subcontractor works in the name and on behalf of the company. passenger flights and passenger trai n rides shall be accounted for using actual fuel or electricity consumption of the mode of transport used. Assumptions made should be disclosed. inland shipping. a water wheel in a mill. it is regarded as excess heat.22 132. a wind rotor) 128. Heat from the surrounding natural system. from hydropower.Guidelines (b) Work21 (i) Electricity (i. company owned or rented business jets. (a) Vehicle transport by road shall be accounted for using the actual fuel consumption of the vehicles used. nuclear power station. When the purpose of the process from which the heat originates is not heat generation. for example rented personnel transports. estimation values based on the technology of the vehicle should be used.C. 31 . train freight. The use of excess heat from third parties is not accounted for.

2 21.7 20.2 – 22.5 – 7.7 41.4 11.0 10.9 17.6 10.1 22.6 >1996 1996 1983 1978 1973 1964 1996 1983 1968 1996 1983 1978 1996 1983 1978 1996 1983 1968 1996 1973 16.0 12.5 43.5 9.3 13.9 – 5.5 16.4 13.2 13.7 45.9 13.3 Model Year l / 100 km Gasoline passenger car Low-emission vehicle technology Three-way catalyst control Early three-way catalyst control Oxidation catalyst Non-catalyst control Early non-catalyst controls Uncontrolled Light duty gasoline trucks Moderate control Low-emission vehicle technology Three-way catalyst control Early three-way catalyst control Oxidation catalyst Non-catalyst control Uncontrolled Heavy duty gasoline vehicle Three-way catalyst control Non-catalyst control Uncontrolled Diesel passenger car and light trucks Advanced control Moderate control Uncontrolled Light duty diesel truck Advanced control Moderate control Uncontrolled Heavy duty diesel vehicle Advanced control Moderate control Uncontrolled Motorcycles (4 stroke) Non-catalyst controls Uncontrolled Source: IPCC (1996(b)).0 24.8 20.3 – 10. >1996 1996 1983 1978 1973 1964 1989-95 1988-91 1980-90 1971-79 pre-1970 – 8.A Manual for the Prepareres and Users of Eco-efficiency Indicators Table 4 Road Transportation: Guidance Values for Fuel Consumption Transport Model Year US Europe l / 100 km 11.5 41.3 11.8 25.7 16.8 12.4 43.3 9.5 8.1 32 .5 55.1 8.9 29.

i.i.C.c. In the case of coal and oil.B for coal and coal products. Petroleum Products 134. aviation gasoline.D for biomass fuels). III.3.(i) Conversion Factors from Energy Source to Thermal Equivalents for Fossil Fuel and Biomass Fuels 133.c.3. 24 The difference between net caloric value (NCV) and gross caloric value is the latent heat of vaporization of the water produced during combustion of the fuel.C. gas.3. coal.3.3. Petroleum products include ethane. jet kerosene.C.c. while for most gases the difference is between 9 and 10 per cent. gas/diesel fuel. heavy fuel oil and petroleum coke.c.C for gas and III. NCV is 5 per cent less than gross values. 136. To make them comparable they are converted into thermal equivalents using their respective net caloric content 24 (see III. Petroleum products are converted into heat equivalents using the net caloric content of the energy commodity.Guidelines III. If the energy commodity is used in a country for which specific values are listed then these values should be used. naphtha. 33 . Different energy commodities such as petroleum products. coal products and biomass fuels all have a different caloric content.i.c. LPG.i.C.3. III. 135. other kerosene. III.C. motor gasoline.A for petroleum products. (OECD/IEA 2001a).C. Otherwise the default value should be applied (Table 5). jet gasoline.A.c.i.

55 40.50 44.64 46.12 42.77 44.96 43.89 45.71 41.33 43.87 43.66 40.19 50.98 Lebanon Default and country specific values [GJ per tonne] Algeria Argentina Brazil China.54 43.32 40.59 43.64 43.11 47.38 Sri Lanka 44.21 43.64 45.83 44.57 43.24 43.03 39.56 43.89 50.64 45.09 45.71 41.09 40.39 35.55 43. 2001b.A Manual for the Prepareres and Users of Eco-efficiency Indicators Table 5 Net Caloric Values for Petroleum Products Net caloric values Product Ethane LPG Motor gasoline Aviation gasoline Jet gasoline Jet kerosene other kerosene Gas/diesel fuel Heavy fuel oil Naphtha Petroleum coke Product Ethane LPG Motor gasoline Aviation gasoline Jet gasoline Jet kerosene other kerosene Gas/diesel fuel Heavy fuel oil Naphtha Petroleum coke Product Ethane LPG Motor gasoline Aviation gasoline Jet gasoline Jet kerosene other kerosene Gas/diesel fuel Heavy fuel oil Naphtha Petroleum coke Default value 47.01 45. see Table 6 for a conversion from volume to mass.57 46.33 40.12 Tunisia Venezuela 46.89 51.94 47.99 43.13 Pakistan 45.31 44.27 46.05 45.45 42. 2001c).16 46.64 47.12 43. PR Colombia Jordan 49.16 43.99 44.91 42.14 Namibia 49.40 46.43 43.67 43.01 44.96 41.96 43.21 45.33 43.02 44.29 47.09 28.12 43.50 41.96 Nicaragua 47.80 44.21 49.29 42.19 45.27 Malaysia 45.31 47.98 47.80 44.49 44.13 36.37 42.43 41.80 44.25 43.88 43.13 Source: OECD/IEA (2001a.19 46.92 Thailand 46.00 40.21 42.03 43.94 South Africa 46.03 45.12 43.29 44.75 41.93 45. 34 .33 30.53 42.21 42.38 45.07 43.10 43.86 44.27 46.54 43.50 41.85 46.43 45.74 44.58 43.25 42.54 43.74 41.53 44.87 41.24 43.54 43.21 43.91 42.59 Nepal 49.60 46.10 41.75 43.12 42.88 43.38 42.54 43.12 43.75 43.01 30.43 46.29 43.12 43.05 43.31 43.96 43.84 Viet Nam Paraguay 45.60 46.88 43.91 41.19 47.

bituminous coal and anthracite (hard coal). patent fuel and brown coal/peat briquettes (BKB). Coal and coal products include coking coal (hard coal). 139. (litre per tonne) OECD Europe Default 2 678 1 843 1 351 1 414 1 356 1 260 1 260 1 230 1 185 1 058 874 OECD 1 414 1 343 1 311 1 252 1 252 1 025 III. these values should be used. 35 .i. gas coke.Guidelines Table 6 Densities of Petroleum Products Density Product Ethane LPG Naphtha Aviation gasoline Motor gasoline Jet gasoline Jet kerosene other kerosene Gas/diesel fuel Heavy fuel oil Petroleum coke Source: OECD/IEA (2001a.c.3. If the actual net caloric value is known. lignite and brown coal. sub-bituminous coal. Otherwise country-specific or region-specific values should be applied. 138.C. coke oven coke. and Table 9 to Table 17 for non-OECD countries). Coal and Coal Products 137. peat. Coal and coal products are converted into heat equivalents using the net caloric content of the energy commodity (see Table 7 and Table 8 for OECD countries. 2001c).B. 2001b.

37 29.03 17.58 14.05 28.37 29.00 18.37 17.66 28.05 28.68 11.37 29.40 28.61 14.00 28.31 28.05 21.55 30.35 26.31 28.83 8.10 27.00 28.11 19.37 32.37 27.67 28.68 8.20 29.38 14.27 25. 36 .21 15.06 29.31 26.75 16.11 24.05 20.31 26.31 27.00 8.00 8.50 8.00 8.40 18.61 8.65 20.30 25.59 8.55 28.05 16.37 31.89 18.68 8.30 Hungary 31.64 28.10 Ireland 29.05 20.00 Czech Republic 29.64 19.39 20.05 18.67 30.78 8.75 8.91 32.37 8.30 29.98 26.23 24.65 28.43 23.30 28.00 5.62 Greece 29.29 16.31 25.29 8.10 Germany 29.31 29.37 8.00 28.37 29.40 28.12 25.12 8.00 Denmark 25.72 Austria 28.31 28.31 29.30 29.10 France 30.57 8.A Manual for the Prepareres and Users of Eco-efficiency Indicators Table 7 Net Caloric Values for Coal and Coal Products OECD Countries A-J Net caloric values [GJ per tonne] Coking coal Other bituminous coal/anthracite Sub-bituminous coal Lignite/brown coal Peat Patent fuel Coke oven coke and lignite coke Gas coke Bkb/peat briquettes Net caloric values [GJ per tonne] Coking coal Other bituminous coal/anthracite Sub-bituminous coal Lignite/brown coal Peat Patent fuel Coke oven coke and lignite coke Gas coke Bkb/peat briquettes Net caloric values [GJ per tonne] Coking coal Other bituminous coal/anthracite Sub-bituminous coal Lignite/brown coal Peat Patent fuel Coke oven coke and lignite coke Gas coke Bkb/peat briquettes Australia 28.65 21.64 21.31 29.37 29.25 8.31 15.37 10.31 24.37 28.28 16.30 28.28 Japan 30.08 18.14 12.55 Canada 27.48 9.50 8.37 16.31 29.00 25.00 10.23 Italy 30.17 17.37 29.30 Finland 29.03 22.80 18.86 8.00 20.29 16.39 27.37 29.56 29.05 20.05 20.10 Belgium 29.56 8.05 27.10 Iceland 28.48 Source: OECD/IEA (2001b).50 28.65 25.65 18.75 19.

17 35.67 24.50 28.37 8.76 18.47 28.37 31.37 29.49 8.Guidelines Table 8 Net Caloric Values for Coal and Coal Products OECD Countries K-U Rep. 37 .05 28.51 20.10 29.30 29.55 24.30 25.05 20.10 Poland 29.31 18.31 28.93 20.57 8.05 20.10 8.10 Mexico 23.10 30.31 20.37 8.31 27.18 8.16 22.93 20.31 28.05 20.31 20.33 7.93 Netherlands New Zealand 28.10 8.68 27.03 29.37 29.37 8.96 20.37 29.37 8.37 27.30 20.52 20.31 29.22 12.93 25.31 28.31 28.05 21.05 20.04 14.30 30.16 8.35 28.06 8.10 20.62 21.68 28.10 Portugal 29.43 United Kingdom 29. of Korea 27.54 14.02 28.37 29.37 29.94 13.37 8.37 29.84 8.05 20.73 25.04 28.04 20.50 28.37 24.30 28.10 Net caloric values [GJ per tonne] Coking coal Other bituminous coal/anthracite Sub-bituminous coal Lignite/brown coal Peat Patent fuel Coke oven coke and lignite coke Gas coke Bkb/peat briquettes Net caloric values [GJ per tonne] Coking coal Other bituminous coal/anthracite Sub-bituminous coal Lignite/brown coal Peat Patent fuel Coke oven coke and lignite coke Gas coke Bkb/peat briquettes Net caloric values [GJ per tonne] Coking coal Other bituminous coal/anthracite Sub-bituminous coal Lignite/brown coal Peat Patent fuel Coke oven coke and lignite coke Gas coke Bkb/peat briquettes Luxembourg 29.10 2 8.40 28.05 20.48 18.28 28.37 29.31 26.05 20.05 28.06 20.10 Source: OECD/IEA (2001b).31 26.04 8.45 19.52 26.84 23.10 8.37 29.00 23.37 12.25 Switzerland 28.33 8.10 Sweden 3 26.05 28.48 8.48 23.12 28.31 28.82 17.50 2 Slovak Republic 28.50 28.31 29.10 Spain 3 21.45 28.50 29.00 10.10 Norway 28.10 Turkey 31.03 8.37 28.10 8.37 29.20 12.37 29.75 8.37 8.22 United States 29.17 27.38 8.37 8.10 28.

37 25.65 14.31 25.91 8.65 18.21 Bulgaria 27.54 14.31 25.10 20.58 14.76 8.21 9.75 8.21 20.54 14.31 26.75 8.93 8.46 20.37 8.37 8.93 20.37 29.37 8.95 13.84 8.21 6.37 29.31 30.A Manual for the Prepareres and Users of Eco-efficiency Indicators Table 9 Net Caloric Values for Coal and Coal Products Non-OECD Countries A-B Net caloric values [GJ per tonne] Hard coal Lignite/brown coal/sub-bituminous ~ Coking coal Other bituminous coal/anthracite Sub-bituminous coal Lignite/brown coal Peat Patent fuel Coke oven coke and lignite coke Gas coke BKB/Peat Briquettes Net caloric values [GJ per tonne] Hard coal Lignite/brown coal/sub-bituminous ~ Coking coal Other bituminous coal/anthracite Sub-bituminous coal Lignite/brown coal Peat Patent fuel Coke oven coke and lignite coke Gas coke BKB/Peat Briquettes Net caloric values [GJ per tonne] Hard coal Lignite/brown coal/sub-bituminous ~ Coking coal Other bituminous coal/anthracite Sub-bituminous coal Lignite/brown coal Peat Patent fuel Coke oven coke and lignite coke Gas coke Bkb/peat briquettes 20.37 28.65 25.40 15.37 29.37 27.21 Algeria 25.37 8.84 27.37 25.37 31.37 27.58 18.37 Angola 25.12 Albania 27.75 25.10 20.37 25.37 20.37 Armenia 18.75 8.30 6.37 8.58 14.37 29.65 8.84 9.65 14.21 9.31 27.37 27.37 8.75 25.58 14.10 Bolivia 25.31 25.75 25.37 8.95 25.75 8.75 25.12 11.93 8.75 8.37 8.75 8.90 20. 38 .80 8.66 25.65 8.70 8.91 32.10 20.10 Brazil 26.58 14.37 8.65 18.37 8.37 8.10 Bosnia and Herzegovina 25.70 8.12 20.10 Bahrain 25.75 25.10 Benin Source: OECD/IEA (2001c).65 8.37 8.21 20.37 29.37 24.37 25.37 27.75 25.21 Bangladesh 20.21 27.75 Argentina 24.37 8.10 18.83 8.14 Azerbaijan 18.70 24.58 18.65 14.75 8.21 8.10 Belarus 25.95 13.75 8.37 27.37 8.54 25.12 8.05 13.05 8.37 27.34 20.37 29.37 Brunei 25.05 25.

37 8.37 28.37 26.75 Source: OECD/IEA (2001c).37 8.21 8.37 27.43 28.10 20.80 26.80 20.75 Chile 28.05 Costa Rica 25.37 25.60 8. 39 .75 25.37 Cuba 25.75 8.47 18.37 8.37 8.30 6.40 15.21 29.37 Bulgaria 27.35 8.17 8.31 27.14 18.37 8.60 29.37 8.31 27.75 8.10 Brazil 26.10 20.75 8.37 8.37 8.10 Côte d'Ivoire 25.31 27.21 27.80 8.21 27.37 8.17 28.76 20.10 Cyprus 25.43 17.75 25.37 25.75 25.10 Taiwan POC 26.80 8.37 29.37 8.75 8.75 25.37 8.37 29.37 25.37 25.34 Colombia 27.21 20.97 14.10 China 21.37 25.75 26.31 30.37 25.43 17.75 25.80 8.37 8.37 8.10 20.37 8.31 26.37 Cameroon 25.37 8.91 32.66 25.60 14.83 8.23 8.21 8.80 28.75 25.21 6.91 8.10 Congo.37 8.37 20. DR 25.21 27.93 8.10 Croatia 28.75 8.37 29.37 27.37 31.37 Congo 8.17 17.75 Brunei 25.23 25.Guidelines Table 10 Net Caloric Values for Coal and Coal Products Non-OECD Countries/Territories B-C Net caloric values [GJ per tonne] Hard coal Lignite/brown coal/sub-bituminous ~ Coking coal Other bituminous coal/anthracite Sub-bituminous coal Lignite/brown coal Peat Patent fuel Coke oven coke and lignite coke Gas coke Bkb/peat briquettes Net caloric values [GJ per tonne] Hard coal Lignite/brown coal/sub-bituminous ~ Coking coal Other bituminous coal/anthracite Sub-bituminous coal Lignite/brown coal Peat Patent fuel Coke oven coke and lignite coke Gas coke Bkb/peat briquettes Net caloric values [GJ per tonne] Hard coal Lignite/brown coal/sub-bituminous ~ Coking coal Other bituminous coal/anthracite Sub-bituminous coal Lignite/brown coal Peat Patent fuel Coke oven coke and lignite coke Gas coke Bkb/peat briquettes 20.23 8.37 8.00 14.75 8.12 11.21 20.37 26.21 27.37 8.37 27.37 8.75 8.37 17.75 8.10 20.21 20.75 25.43 20.37 8.

75 Gibraltar 25.31 27.37 25.75 8.37 27.10 20.37 20.37 8.75 8.37 8.10 Haiti 25.37 8.37 29.37 8.75 25.75 8.75 25.75 8.10 20.10 Estonia 24.75 25.75 25.21 Egypt 25.37 25.31 29.65 14.75 8.37 8.75 8.21 8.75 8.37 25.37 29.37 8.21 Hong Kong.21 28.79 24.37 8.37 8.37 20.58 14.37 8.75 Ghana 25.31 27.75 8.37 29.37 25.58 18.21 Ecuador 25.31 27.37 29.10 Ethiopia Dominican Republic 25.75 8.75 8.65 8.75 25.21 20.37 8.31 16.05 20.75 8.75 8.45 8.37 27.10 20.21 8.37 8.10 20.37 29.21 27.45 24.37 25.37 25.75 25. China 25.75 25.65 18.37 8.37 8.45 8.75 25.58 14.37 25.A Manual for the Prepareres and Users of Eco-efficiency Indicators Table 11 Net Calo ric Values for Coal and Coal Products Non-OECD Countries/Territories D-H Net caloric values [GJ per tonne] Hard coal Lignite/brown coal/sub-bituminous ~ Coking coal Other bituminous coal/anthracite Sub-bituminous coal Lignite/brown coal Peat Patent fuel Coke oven coke and lignite coke Gas coke Bkb/peat briquettes Net caloric values [GJ per tonne] Hard coal Lignite/brown coal/sub-bituminous ~ Coking coal Other bituminous coal/anthracite Sub-bituminous coal Lignite/brown coal Peat Patent fuel Coke oven coke and lignite coke Gas coke Bkb/peat briquettes Net caloric values [GJ per tonne] Hard coal Lignite/brown coal/sub-bituminous ~ Coking coal Other bituminous coal/anthracite Sub-bituminous coal Lignite/brown coal Peat Patent fuel Coke oven coke and lignite coke Gas coke Bkb/peat briquettes 20.37 29.75 8.37 Eritrea Source: OECD/IEA (2001c).37 8.21 8.12 20.31 25.37 8.10 Georgia 18.31 27.75 25.21 8.37 8.75 8.37 25.37 27.37 8.37 8.37 25.75 8. 40 .75 8.75 El Salvador 25.75 25.75 8.37 Guatemala 27.10 Honduras 25.75 8.37 25.37 8.37 8.10 Gabon 25.37 27.

21 Israel 26.37 25.37 20.37 25.75 8.37 8.80 19.37 8.37 20.37 25.75 8. 41 .67 8.22 4.58 14.37 8.37 4.37 27.10 8.65 18.10 Jamaica 25.37 8.37 25.21 Source: OECD/IEA (2001c).37 20.37 8.10 Latvia 25.21 Indonesia 25.65 14. Islamic Rep.75 8.37 8.65 18.10 Lebanon 27.12 27.75 8.37 29.37 27.75 8.21 Iran.10 Korea.12 28.21 20.58 25.37 25.37 29.22 26.19 8.58 17.37 8.37 8.98 9.95 14.37 27.37 20.75 8.75 25.31 25.37 27.10 Kuwait 25.67 8.75 25.75 25.58 14.37 25.37 8.19 26.31 25.65 14.21 Iraq 25.75 25.75 25.21 20. DPR 25.31 25.37 25.10 Kenya 25.10 20.98 9.37 8.37 8.98 19.75 8.58 18.86 8.65 8.75 8.37 29.22 8.75 17.80 14.37 8.37 8.75 8.75 8.75 8.58 18.10 Kyrgyzstan 18.75 27.58 8.10 Libyan AJ 25.37 27.21 20.21 20.21 27.95 25.47 20.75 8.10 27.75 25.37 27.37 8.21 20.10 Jordan 25.75 8.37 27.37 8.75 25.37 25.37 8.75 17.75 8.37 25.58 14.12 20.37 8.75 8.65 8.10 20.75 25.95 14.10 Kazakhstan 18.75 8.21 27.37 8.37 India 19.65 8.37 27.Guidelines Table 12 Net Caloric Values for Coal and Coal Products Non-OECD Countries I-Lib Net caloric values [GJ per tonne] Hard coal Lignite/brown coal/sub-bituminous ~ Coking coal Other bituminous coal/anthracite Sub-bituminous coal Lignite/brown coal Peat Patent fuel Coke oven coke and lignite coke Gas coke Bkb/peat briquettes Net Caloric Values [GJ per tonne] Hard coal Lignite/brown coal/sub-bituminous ~ Coking coal Other bituminous coal/anthracite Sub-bituminous coal Lignite/brown coal Peat Patent fuel Coke oven coke and lignite coke Gas coke Bkb/peat briquettes Net Caloric Values [GJ per tonne] Hard coal Lignite/brown coal/sub-bituminous ~ Coking coal Other bituminous coal/anthracite Sub-bituminous coal Lignite/brown coal Peat Patent fuel Coke oven coke and lignite coke Gas coke Bkb/peat briquettes 20.75 25.65 25.65 14. 25.58 14.

37 8.95 25.37 26. 42 .75 8.65 8.37 29.21 Moldova.10 Netherlands Antilles 25.37 25.95 13.37 29.75 25.75 25.37 8.37 8.75 8.21 20.75 25.38 Malta 25.70 8.37 8.70 24.31 27.37 8.75 8.21 20.37 25.05 25.37 18.21 20.21 20.58 18.90 Malaysia 29.10 27.26 8.12 14.31 29.10 27.58 14.12 25.37 8.37 8.65 11.10 Namibia 22.37 25.69 8.30 11.30 Macedonia.65 25.37 Lithuania 25.12 8.12 25.10 Nepal 25.75 8.73 8.37 8.75 25.69 8.37 27.21 20.37 25.58 14.37 8.37 8.95 13.31 11.75 8.37 8.37 25.37 8.12 Source: OECD/IEA (2001c).75 22.21 20.37 8. Republic of 18.37 25.75 8.37 27.65 14.31 29.21 20.37 20.37 24.37 8.37 8.10 Myanmar 25.10 Nicaragua 25.70 8.10 Oman 25.31 11.10 27.30 29.75 25.21 27.73 18.68 29.37 20.05 8.10 14.21 20.75 8. FYR 25.10 Mozambique 25.75 8.65 Morocco 24.73 8.00 8.37 8.31 25.37 8.37 8.21 20.37 27.75 8.37 29.12 14.37 8.10 Nigeria 25.31 26.10 Pakistan 18.37 25.12 8.37 20.37 29.75 8.65 18.A Manual for the Prepareres and Users of Eco-efficiency Indicators Table 13 Net Caloric Values for Coal and Coal Products Non-OECD Countries/Territories Lit-P Net caloric values [GJ per tonne] Hard coal Lignite/brown coal/sub-bituminous ~ Coking coal Other bituminous coal/anthracite Sub-bituminous coal Lignite/brown coal Peat Patent fuel Coke oven coke and lignite coke Gas coke Bkb/peat briquettes Net caloric values [GJ per tonne] Hard coal Lignite/brown coal/sub-bituminous ~ Coking coal Other bituminous coal/anthracite Sub-bituminous coal Lignite/brown coal Peat Patent fuel Coke oven coke and lignite coke Gas coke Bkb/peat briquettes Net caloric values [GJ per tonne] Hard coal Lignite/brown coal/sub-bituminous ~ Coking coal Other bituminous coal/anthracite Sub-bituminous coal Lignite/brown coal Peat Patent fuel Coke oven coke and lignite coke Gas coke Bkb/peat briquettes 27.05 13.37 8.37 8.75 8.00 8.37 8.37 27.31 27.65 14.75 8.37 25.75 25.37 25.21 20.37 27.75 25.

37 8.83 15.75 25.99 27.75 25.37 8.37 8.37 8.75 8.37 27.95 25.37 8.37 27.10 20.37 27.50 Source: OECD/IEA (2001c).75 8.21 20.10 Singapore Panama 25.37 8.99 8.Guidelines Table 14 Net Caloric Values for Coal and Coal Products Non-OECD Countries N-So Net caloric values [GJ per tonne] Hard coal Lignite/brown coal/sub-bituminous ~ Coking coal Other bituminous coal/anthracite Sub-bituminous coal Lignite/brown coal Peat Patent fuel Coke oven coke and lignite coke Gas coke Bkb/peat briquettes Net caloric values [GJ per tonne] Hard coal Lignite/brown coal/sub-bituminous ~ Coking coal Other bituminous coal/anthracite Sub-bituminous coal Lignite/brown coal Peat Patent fuel Coke oven coke and lignite coke Gas coke Bkb/peat briquettes Net Caloric Values [GJ per tonne] Hard coal Lignite/brown coal/sub-bituminous ~ Coking coal Other bituminous coal/anthracite Sub-bituminous coal Lignite/brown coal Peat Patent fuel Coke oven coke and lignite coke Gas coke Bkb/peat briquettes 20.75 25.83 22.95 8.25 18.75 25.37 27.83 15.37 8.75 8.75 8.10 20.33 8.00 30.37 8.37 27.10 Saudi Arabia 25.37 25.37 25.21 20.75 8.75 8.10 Romania 25.01 17.37 27.65 26.91 9.82 9.21 20.65 Slovenia 17.37 25.73 18.75 8.37 27.37 25.43 25.10 Russian Federation 22.37 18.31 26.37 Pakistan 18.75 8.10 Philippines 24.75 8.37 8.21 20.37 25.21 8.75 8.99 25.10 20.37 8.37 8.21 Nigeria 25.21 20.33 8.37 26.75 8.37 27.00 8.57 7.37 8.37 27.37 27.31 29.10 Senegal 25.37 8.58 South Africa 27.79 14.37 27.10 24.95 27.10 Peru 29.37 29.31 29.75 8.75 8.95 17.73 8.37 8.10 Qatar 25.37 8. 43 .96 29.37 8.91 22.21 20.76 9.21 8.75 25.37 8.71 7.75 8.73 8.75 25.75 25.37 20.31 Oman 25.37 8.41 14.37 25.37 8.90 Paraguay 25.91 15.21 20.37 25.21 8.37 8.37 8.

31 25.37 25.59 21.37 27.75 25.14 12.58 14.38 12.37 8.31 25.65 14.65 8.59 14.10 Trinidad & Tobago 25.21 20.37 8.10 Venezuela 30.75 25.37 8.56 8.65 21.65 14.37 8.75 25.65 18.75 8. of 25.37 27.65 14.37 25.21 27.10 8.75 8. United Rep.A Manual for the Prepareres and Users of Eco-efficiency Indicators Table 15 Net Caloric Values for Coal and Coal Products Non-OECD Countries Sr-Ve Tanzania.37 8.65 8.37 27.21 Togo 25.21 20.75 8.75 8.37 29.10 United Arab Emirates 25.58 14.75 8.37 29.21 8.31 25.10 Turkmenistan 18.37 25. 44 .37 8.75 29.21 20.56 30.58 18.37 8.37 25.63 26.37 27.56 8.37 25.37 8.75 8.65 8.37 29.37 Tajikistan 18.12 20.31 8.10 8.37 29.10 Tunisia 25.37 30.37 8.58 14.75 8.37 27.37 29.37 27.58 14.37 27.75 8.38 12.12 20.75 8.21 20.12 20.58 18.65 8.37 25.59 14.37 8.37 27.75 8.21 20.75 8.37 8.31 25.75 25.14 8.21 20.37 25.37 26.12 20.75 25.37 8.75 Net caloric values [GJ per tonne] Hard coal Lignite/brown coal/sub-bituminous ~ Coking coal Other bituminous coal/anthracite Sub-bituminous coal Lignite/brown coal Peat Patent fuel Coke oven coke and lignite coke Gas coke Bkb/peat briquettes Net Caloric Values [GJ per tonne] Hard coal Lignite/brown coal/sub-bituminous ~ Coking coal Other bituminous coal/anthracite Sub-bituminous coal Lignite/brown coal Peat Patent fuel Coke oven coke and lignite coke Gas coke Bkb/peat briquettes Net Caloric Values [GJ per tonne] Hard coal Lignite/brown coal/sub-bituminous ~ Coking coal Other bituminous coal/anthracite Sub-bituminous coal Lignite/brown coal Peat Patent fuel Coke oven coke and lignite coke Gas coke Bkb/peat briquettes Sri Lanka 29.10 Uzbekistan 18.10 Thailand 26.65 14.38 27.37 27.58 14.75 8.31 8.10 Ukraine 21.58 18.10 Sudan Syrian AR 25.37 8.30 20.75 25.21 20.58 14.65 18.75 25.10 Source: OECD/IEA (2001c).37 8.65 18.75 25.10 Uruguay 25.14 27.21 20.37 8.

75 25.31 27.75 8.75 25.71 8. As the net caloric content varies considerably.75 8.37 8.37 8.37 27.00 8.10 20.37 8.05 13.10 Other Latin America 25.45 8.37 8. Gas is converted into heat equivalents using the net caloric content of the energy commodity.00 27.37 25. the value as declared by the supplier should be used.21 Yugoslavia.00 8.75 25.05 8.90 Zambia 24.75 8.05 25.i.12 Source: OECD/IEA (2001c).37 8. III.10 Other Asia 25.C.75 8.75 25. FR 25.31 27.37 27. gas works gas (including substitute gas). Gas includes natural gas.10 20. Gas 140.71 24.10 20.37 8.37 8.3.45 8.75 8.37 8.Guidelines Table 16 Net Caloric Values for Coal and Coal Products Non-OECD Countries Vi-Z Net caloric values [GJ per tonne] Hard coal Lignite/brown coal/sub-bituminous ~ Coking coal Other bituminous coal/anthracite Sub-bituminous coal Lignite/brown coal Peat Patent fuel Coke oven coke and lignite coke Gas coke Bkb/peat briquettes 20.10 Source: OECD/IEA (2001c).75 8.37 23.37 29.31 26.37 8.37 25.75 8.10 Viet Nam 23.C. other Africa and other Latin America Net caloric values [GJ per tonne] Hard coal Lignite/brown coal/sub-bituminous ~ Coking coal Other bituminous coal/anthracite Sub-bituminous coal Lignite/brown coal Peat Patent fuel Coke oven coke and lignite coke Gas coke Bkb/peat briquettes Other Africa 25.37 25.21 20.75 8. Table 17 Net Caloric Values for Coal and Coal Products other Asia.95 13.c.37 8.31 27. 45 . coke oven gas and blast furnace gas.37 27.45 23.37 25.37 8. 142.21 Zimbabwe 27.37 29.37 29.37 25.21 20.10 20.31 27.71 8.37 29.95 13.37 8.37 24.21 Yemen 25.37 29.37 8. 141.21 20.95 25.37 8.

46 .20 MJ/m3 should be applied.579 38.80 34.c. the default value of 34. biofuels and biomass (see annex.10 34.41 > 33.C.889 38.90 35. III.D.32 29. Table 18 Gross and Net Caloric Values for Gas Caloric values Product Natural gas (default value) Natural gas originating from: Russian Federation United States Canada Netherlands United Kingdom Indonesia Algeria Uzbekistan Saudi Arabia Norway Gas works gas and substitute gas Coke oven gas Blast furnace gas Source: OECD/IEA (2001b.9 0.7.9 0.(v)) 144.9 1 Net caloric value 34.416 38.9 0. Biomass fuels 143. If no specific value is provided standard values listed in Table 19 should be applied.000 40.82 34.50 please use specific values III.130 33.9 0.54 37.20 33.b. Biomass fuels are converted into heat equivalents using the net caloric content of the energy commodity.600 42. Biomass fuels include biochemicals. Net caloric values of biomass fuels vary considerably even among the same fuel type.9 0.518 40.9 0.9 0. 2001c).9 0.9 0. (MJ per m3) Gross caloric Factor to convert gross value caloric content to net 38.9 0.57 36. By default the value as declared by the supplier of the energy commodity should be used.000 37.220 39. If no country-specific value is provided in Table 18.3. 145.20 36.9 0.460 0.C.i.000 37.A Manual for the Prepareres and Users of Eco-efficiency Indicators (a) (b) If the actual net caloric value is not known but the country of origin is known these specific values from Table 18 should be applied.9 0.57 34.

including waste.9 16. III.0 40. dry zone Wood oven-dry Wood charcoal Charcoal Dung Bagasse Wet Air-dry Agricultural waste Other waste Dung cakes (dried) Coffee husks Rice hulls (air-dry) Wheat straw Maize (stalk) Maize (cobs) Cotton gin trash Cotton stalk Coconut husks Coconut shells (a) mcwb: moisture content weight basis.2 16.2 14. Other energy sources.9 15.0 Typical net calorific value (b) (MJ/kg) 15.0 12.1 12.0 11.0 13.0 40.4 11.Guidelines Table 19 Typical Net Caloric Values for Biomass Fuels Biomass fuel Fuelwood (c) Wood wet.8 17.0 50. Moisture content (% mcwb) (a) 20.c.0 15.0 12.7 15.0 10.0 8.0 5.9 Source: IPCC (1996b).0 11.2 15.0 16. an estimate has to be made.0 9.0 13.4 9.6 20.C.0 0.0 12. (b) Typical values to be considered as rough approximations. freshly cut Wood air-dry. (c) Assuming air-dry wood.(ii) Conversion Factors from Energy Source to Thermal Equivalents for other Energy Sources 146.0 8. humid zone Wood air-dry.0 29. The reporting entity shall disclose the specific values chosen and the underlying assumptions.0 24. 47 .5 16.0 12. are converted into thermal equivalents using the specific net caloric content of the combusted material as indicated by the supplier.0 30.0 12.3.4 15.0 20.0 4.0 12. If no specific value is available.0 50.

000. they will have the same eco-efficiency. which is converted into steam to propel a turbine (= work).35 kWh/MJ Company A uses 5.35 (OECD/IEA 1997).A Manual for the Prepareres and Users of Eco-efficiency Indicators Box 4. Both purchase 1.63 kWh/€.000 kWh work equivalent. This perfectly reflects the real situation. Company A Conversion efficiency Energy source Electricity Gas 54 000 thermal work 3 600 10 800 MJ MJ 1 000 3 000 4 000 10 000 0. for example 0.35 work 3 600 18 900 MJ 5 250 6 250 10 000 0. while company B has a much higher eco-efficiency of 0. The eco-efficiency of company A is 0. Technically both need 4. As company B is more efficient.4 kWh/€.63 kWh KWh € kWh/€ 18 621 6 517 MJ 1 810 2 810 10 000 0. Both use 1. Assuming they have the same net value added of €10.35 is not very suitable as conversion processes within a specific company will in almost any case be different from the default value.250 kWh work equivalent.4 kWh kWh kWh € kWh/€ Company B 0. company B 2 . So why not use the company-specific efficiency for the conversion of heat equivalent to work equivalent? To see the effect of using a default value.810 kWh work equivalent of gas.58 kWh/MJ. Assume that two different companies both use gas as a major energy source.621 MJ thermal for company B compared with 54.35 as the default value? B ecause the average efficiency of one of the most important and widely used conversion processes.250 kWh work equivalent of gas while company B uses 1 . the one that converts fossil fuels (= heat) to electricity (= work).2 kWh/MJ thermal work 3 600 10 800 MJ MJ 1 000 3 000 4 000 10 000 0.58 kWh/MJ Energy requirement Net value added Eco-efficiency If we start with the amount of energy purchased and then convert thermal energy to work equivalents using the proposed default factor of 0.4 kWh kWh KWh € kWh/€ 18 621 0.2 kWh/MJ converting natural gas (= heat) into work.28 kWh/€.000 kWh work equivalent of energy for their processes.35 kWh/MJ we get a more adequate result: Company A Conversion efficiency Energy source thermal Electricity Gas 54 000 0. But why the 0. while company B is highly efficient with an efficiency of 0. 48 . less gas needs to be purchased: 18. If the actual efficiency is taken to convert the amount of gas purchased to work equivalents both will end up having used 3. The result using the default factor then would be: company A 6 . Conversion Factor One could argue that using a default conversion factor of.000 kWh of electricity (= work) in addition to gas.810 kWh work equivalent.000 MJ thermal for company A.28 kWh kWh € kWh/€ Energy requirement Net value added Eco-efficiency MJ 1 000 kWh kWh/MJ thermal work 3 600 MJ 1 000 kWh Company B 0. namely 0. Company A has an average efficiency of 0.000 kWh electricity. is 0. see the following example in the table below. Obviously this does not reflect the reality.

3 should be recognized in the period in which it is: (a) (b) Purchased or sold. The conversion factor for thermal energy to work equivalents will be 0.C. Therefore. For the purpose of eco-efficiency reporting within this framework. Recognition of Energy 151. The factor to convert MJ into GWh is 0.C.C. thermal energy needs to be converted so that it is of a quality comparable to that of energy supplied to the reporting entity in the form of work (e.fr/enus/3_SI] 49 . international abbreviation SI) for the recommended practical system of units of measurement. 25 III.35 x MJ thermal equivalent x 0. Steam tables come as voluminous books and/or software packages. Work equivalents should be expressed in GWh.3 should be recognized at the beginning and at the end of an accounting period.C.C. for a complete conversion table of different energy units). 154. Steam from whatever external source is accounted for using standard steam tables.bipm.d. The 11th Conférence Générale des Poids et Mesures (1960) adopted the French name Système International d'Unités (International System of Units. Conversion Factors from Thermal Equivalents to Work 147. 148. Energy purchased or sold should be measured in an adequate SI unit (kWh.4. energy should be valued by its capacity to provide work. III.3.Guidelines III. Energy as defined by paragraph III. Measurement of Energy 153. And when it is probable that the amount or value can be measured.(ii). thermal equivalents should be expressed in MJ.2778 150. provides a list of all SI units [http://www. MJ.g. 149. kg etc.2778 (see annex III.26 25 26 Steam tables are published by various national engineering associations (e.c.C. 152. The organization in charge.g.7.5. Stocks of energy commodities as defined in III.). GWh work equivalent = 0. "ASME International Steam Tables for Industrial Use". American Society of Mechanical Engineers 2000). The amount of energy purchased and sold should be weighed or metered. For that reason they are not listed in the guidelines. Within this framework two different categories of energy are accounted for: heat and work.35 (see Box 4 for the rationale). the "Bureau International des Poids et Mesures". electricity). m3.

the objectives and targets regarding energy use and the measures taken to achieve the targets. energy policy. (b) (c) 50 .A Manual for the Prepareres and Users of Eco-efficiency Indicators 155.a. energy sold and stocks of energy converted into heat and work equivalents. For the purpose of eco-efficiency reporting. 156. sold or in stock shall be converted in a first step into heat equivalents (this step is obsolete when the company purchases energy in the form of work) and in a second step into work equivalents.C. The accounting policies adopted for energy use. including the respective conversion factors used. covering energy purchased. An example of a disclosure of energy use is given in the annex. 157. The management's stance on energy use. Accounting policy. Raw data on the above flows and stocks (Table 21). covering energy purchased. III.C. The total energy requirement recognized during the accounting period and the respective amounts of the previous year expressed in work equivalents.6. III. An enterprise should disclose: (a) (b) (c) (d) The eco-efficiency indicator "energy requirement per unit of net value added". Example of Disclosure of Energy Use 159.a. Total energy requirement is defined as purchased work equivalents minus sales of work equivalents plus/minus a decrease/increase in stocks of energy commodities expressed in work equivalents. all energy purchased. Disclosure of Energy Use 158. The item energy requirement is used for the calculation of the eco-efficiency indicator "energy requirement per net value added" (see paragraph 76(b)).C. III. energy sold and stocks of energy. Annex to Energy Use (e) III.7.C. If an amount is estimated or calculated the range of uncertainty should be recorded.7. Disclosure of energy use consists of three parts: (a) Total energy requirements (Table 20). targets and measures (Table 20).7. The amounts of each energy source recognized during the accounting period and the respective amounts of the previous year.

00 1 500 0 Amount 2001 10 000 500 000 10 000 0 50 000 31.)* 2001 2002 Work (MWh work) 2001 2002 10 000 17 100 247 020 0 264 120 50 000 50 000 -12 351 0 -12 351 201 769 18 810 222 318 79 130 320 258 60 000 60 000 24 702 -79 130 -54 428 205 830 10 000 10 500 10 500 Total (MWh work eq.12. = equivalent Table 21 Energy Flows and Stocks Energy flows and stocks (raw data) Energy purchased Electricity Natural gas Bituminous coal (Argentina) Bituminous coal (Brazil) Energy sold Steam Stocks Bituminous coal (Argentina) Bituminous coal (Brazil) 31.2 24 702 15 826 MJ/m3 MJ/t MJ/t Conversion 51 .12.962 10 500 6 829 21 616 7 694 41 639 5 834 5 834 2 402 -7 694 -5 292 30 513 11 000 2.774 Energy purchased Electricity Natural gas Bituminous coal (Argentina) Bituminous coal (Brazil) Total energy purchased Energy sold Steam Total energy sold Stocks Bituminous coal (Argentina) Bituminous coal (Brazil) Stocks Total energy requirement Net value added (€) 10 000 10 500 Eco-efficiency indicator "energy requirement/n et value added" (MWh/€) * Note: e.12.g.02 1 000 5 000 kWh m3 t t MJ t t 24 702 15 826 MJ/t MJ/t 34.)* 2001 2002 10 000 1 663 24 018 0 35 680 4 862 4 862 -1 201 0 -1 201 29 618 10 000 2.01 2 000 0 2002 10 500 550 000 9 000 5 000 60 000 31.Guidelines Table 20 Energy Requirement Energy requirement Heat (GJ heat eq.

Liquefied petroleum gases (LPG) are light saturated paraffinic hydrocarbons derived from the refinery processes. Motor gasoline may include additives. A fossil fuel is any naturally occurring fuel of an organic nature formed by the decomposition of plants or animals. Crude oil is unrefined petroleum that reaches the surface of the ground in a liquid state.iea. 52 .7.7. viscosity. crude oil stabilization and natural gas processing plants. etc. 163.C. 164.htm) 160. Ethane is a naturally gaseous straight-chain hydrocarbon (C2H6) extracted from natural gas and refinery gas streams.org/stats/files/queoil. Targets and Measures Accounting policy Energy policy Targets Measures III. It consists of a mixture of light hydrocarbons distilling at between 35oC and 215oC. this includes petroleum.b.http://www. Energy Sources (Note: The following definitions are based on the definitions used by the International Energy Agency for its statistics . It is used as a fuel for land-based spark ignition engines.b. They consist mainly of propane (C3H8) and butane (C4Hl0) or a combination of the two. Petroleum products are obtained from the processing of crude oil (including lease condensate) and other hydrocarbon compounds. III. such as sulphur. Its physical characteristics (density. Motor gasoline exists as regular. midgrade and premium quality depending on the octane value. oxygenates and octane enhancers.A Manual for the Prepareres and Users of Eco-efficiency Indicators Table 22 Accounting Policy.) are highly variable. including lead compounds such as TEL (tetraethyl lead) and TML (tetramethyl lead).(i) Petroleum 161.C. It is a mineral oil of natural origin comprising a mixture of hydrocarbons and associated impurities. Energy Policy. natural gas and coal. 162. They are normally liquefied under pressure for transportation and storage. This category includes field or lease condensate recovered from associated and nonassociated gas where it is commingled with the commercial crude oil stream.

It has the same distillation characteristics between 150oC and 300oC and flash point as kerosene. The flash point is always above 50oC and density is always more than 0. tar and pitches in processes such as delayed coking or fluid coking. 167. Several grades are available depending on uses: diesel oil for diesel compression ignition (cars. This category also includes "catalyst coke" deposited on the catalyst during refining processes. with an octane number suited to the engine. marine diesel and diesel used in rail traffic.6kPa. Kerosene comprises refined petroleum distillate and is used in sectors other than aircraft transport. 170. Petroleum coke is a black solid residue. Gas/diesel fuel is primarily a medium distillate distilling at between 180oC and 380oC. for electrode manufacture and for production of chemicals. Naphtha comprises material in the 30oC and 2l0oC distillation range or part of this range. High sulphur content: sulphur content of 1 per cent or higher.7kPa and 20. Kerosene-type jet fuel is a distillate used for aviation turbine power units.Guidelines (a) (b) Unleaded: motor gasoline where lead compounds have not been added to enhance octane rating. it has particular specifications. It distils at between 150oC and 300oC. Aviation gasoline is motor spirit prepared especially for aviation piston engines. light heating oil. 168. Leaded: motor gasoline with TEL (tetraethyl lead) and/or TML (tetramethyl lead) added to enhance octane rating. The two most important qualities are "green coke" and "calcinated coke".g.90 kg/l. Naphtha-type jet fuel includes all light hydrocarbon oils for use in aviation turbine power units. There are two qualities: (a) (b) Low sulphur content: sulphur content lower than 1 per cent. a freezing point of -60oC and a distillation range within the limits of 30oC and 180oC. Heavy fuel oil covers all residual fuel oils (including those obtained by blending). In addition.). marine. 165. It consists mainly of carbon (90 to 95 per cent) and has a low ash content. distilling at between 100oC and 250oC. 169. 171. Naphtha is a feedstock destined for the petrochemical industry (e. for heating purposes. and the vapour pressure is between 13. etc. ethylene manufacture or aromatics production) or for gasoline production by reforming or isomerization within the refinery. 53 . trucks. which are established by the International Air Transport Association (IATA). 172. obtained mainly by cracking and carbonizing residue feedstock. 166. They are obtained by blending kerosene and gasoline or naphtha in such a way that the aromatic content does not exceed 25 per cent in volume. It is used as a feedstock in coke ovens for the steel industry. It may contain traces of organic lead. this coke is not recoverable and is usually burned as refinery fuel.

by cracking of natural gas. Used for steam raising and space heating purposes.C. etc. Blast furnace gas is obtained as a by-product in operating blast furnaces. 175. Hard coal comprises coking coal and other bituminous coal/anthracite: (a) Coking coal is a hard. It is used for steam raising and space heating purposes. which are not connected with gasworks and municipal gas plants.b.865 kJ/kg contains more than 31 per cent volatile matter on a dry mineral matter-free basis. Substitute natural gas is distinguished from other manufactured gases by its high heat value (above 33. Sub-bituminous coal is a dull black coal. and by reforming and simple mixing of gases and/or air. Coking coal has a quality that allows the production of a coke suitable to support a blast furnace charge. dry carbon substance produced by coal at a very high temperature in the absence of air. manufactured by chemical conversion of a hydrocarbon fossil fuel. 54 . III. occurring naturally in the earth. This category includes substitute natural gas that is a high-calorific-value gas. including substitute natural gas produced in a public utility or private plants.6.b.(iii) Coal 177.C. Coke oven gas is a by-product of solid fuel carbonization and gasification operations carried out by coke producers and iron and steel plants.7. 174. It includes gas produced by carbonization (including gas produced by coke ovens and transferred to gas works gas).435 kJ/kg and 23. It is therefore used in the manufacture of iron and steel.865 kJ/kg on an ash-free but moist basis and with a mean random reflectance of vitrinite of at least 0. Natural gas is a mixture of gaseous hydrocarbons.(ii) Gases 173. whose main purpose is manufacture. Gas works gas covers all types of gases. (b) (c) 178.). Non-agglomerating coals with a gross calorific value of between 17. transport and distribution of gas. composed primarily of methane (CH4). by total gasification with or without enrichment with oil products (LPG. it is recovered on leaving the furnaces and used partly within the plant and partly in other steel industry processes or in power stations equipped to burn it. Anthracite is the hardest coal and gives off the greatest amount of heat when it burns. residual fuel oil. that is used as a fuel.A Manual for the Prepareres and Users of Eco-efficiency Indicators III.5 MJ/m3) and by its high methane content (above 85 per cent). It is chemically and physically interchangeable with natural gas and is usually distributed through the natural gas grid.7. 176. Other bituminous coal not included under coking coal. Hard coal refers to coal of gross calorific value greater than 23. It gives off a little more energy (heat) than lignite when it burns.

Passive solar heating and day lighting systems that use solar energy to heat and light buildings. dried and moulded under high pressure into an even-shaped briquette without the addition of binders. Gas coke is used for heating purposes. foundry coke and semicoke (the solid product obtained from carbonization of coal at low temperature) are included in this category. Direct solar energy includes the following: (a) (b) (c) (d) (e) (f) Photovoltaic (solar cell) systems which produce electricity directly from sunlight. Lignite dust is included in this category.Guidelines 179.nrel. fossil sedimentary deposit of plant origin with high water content (up to 90 per cent in the raw state). Coke oven coke is used mainly in the iron and steel industry acting as an energy source and chemical agent. Solar process heat for industrial and commercial uses. Coke oven coke also includes coke and semi-coke made from lignite/brown coal. Solar space heating and cooling. Solar hot water systems that heat water for other purposes than heating.(iv) Direct Solar Energy 185. at high temperature. Coke oven coke is the solid product obtained from carbonization of coal.C. Peat is a combustible soft. 55 . 181. 182. Coke breeze.html) III. Concentrating solar systems that use the sun's heat to produce steam and convert it to electricity. brownish-black coal that forms the lowest quality level of the coal family. for example coffee bean drying. The lignite/brown coal is crushed. porous or compressed. easily cut. Brown coal/peat briquettes (BKB) is a composition fuel manufactured from lignite/brown coal or peat. The largest portion of the world's coal reserves is made up of lignite/brown coal. http://www. 184.b.gov/clean_energy/whatisRE. 180.435 kJ/kg and greater than 31 per cent volatile matter on a dry mineral matter-free basis. of light to dark brown colour. Gas coke is the by-product of hard coal used for production of town gas in gas works. (Note: The following definitions are based on the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (US) definitions. principally coking coal. Lignite and brown coal are non-agglomerating coals with a gross calorific value of less than 17. a soft.7. Patent fuel is a composition fuel manufactured from hard coal fires by shaping with the addition of a binding agent (pitch). 183. it is low in moisture and volatile matter.

C. Ocean energy conversion includes: (a) Ocean thermal energy.(vii) 188. The chemical conversion process is called pyrolysis.7.7. commonly called wood alcohol. Water released from the reservoir flows through a turbine. which in turn activates a generator to produce electricity. spinning it.b. the resulting hot gas is sent through a tube and then converted into liquid methane.7. but a canal to channel the river water through a turbine. or is converted into a gaseous fuel (e.b.b. After gasification.(v) Biomass Fuels (Biomass-Based Solar Energy) 186. Hydropower (b) (c) III.C.(vi) 187. including electricity generation.C. Biomass Biomass is burned directly. River plants Hydropower river plants use not a reservoir. Geothermal Energy (b) III. The two most common types of biofuels are ethanol (an alcohol) and biodiesel (an ester). Production of heat directly from hot water within the earth. There are three types of electricity conversion 56 . Using the shallow ground to heat and cool buildings. and it occurs when biomass is heated in the absence of oxygen. Other biofuels include methanol and reformulated gasoline components. Geothermal energy refers to: (a) (b) (c) Production from the earth's heat. Ocean Energy III.A Manual for the Prepareres and Users of Eco-efficiency Indicators III. methane). Hydropower includes: (a) Dams Most large-scale hydropower plants use a dam on a river to store water in a reservoir. is produced through the gasification of biomass. to generate heat.C.7. biomass turns into a liquid – called pyrolysis oil – which can be burned like petroleum.g. Biofuels Biomass is converted into liquid fuels for transportation needs. After pyrolysis. electricity or any other form of energy.b. Methanol. Biomass fuels includes: (a) Biochemicals Heat is used to chemically convert biomass into a fuel oil. which is used for many applications.(viii) 189.

water. (i) Wave Energy For wave energy conversion. The mechanical power created from these systems either directly activates a generator or transfers to a working fluid. As a result. activating a generator. which then drives a turbine/generator. Closed-cycle systems use the ocean's warm surface water to vaporize a working fluid. Also. This produces steam that passes through a turbine/generator. which is quite different from ocean thermal energy. 57 .Guidelines (b) systems: closed-cycle. the electricity conversion of both tidal and wave energy usually involves mechanical devices. The vapour expands and turns a turbine. which has a low-boiling point. Hybrid systems combine both closed-cycle and open-cycle systems. open-cycle and hybrid. The turbine then activates a generator to produce electricity. and oscillating water column systems that use the waves to compress air within a container. unlike in the case of thermal energy. tides and waves a intermittent re sources of energy. float systems that drive hydraulic pumps. Open-cycle systems actually boil the seawater by operating at low pressures. tides are driven primarily by the gravitational pull of the moon. or air. Even though the sun affects all ocean activity. and waves are driven primarily by the winds. Ocean mechanical energy conversion includes: Ocean mechanical energy. while ocean thermal energy is fairly constant. there are three basic systems: channel systems that funnel the waves into reservoirs. such as ammonia. (ii) Tidal Energy A barrage (dam) is typically used to convert tidal energy into electricity by forcing the water through turbines.

1781 0.000 1.000 1.97 6.283 0.2 0.1868 x 10-3 4.7.(ii) (2) to: (1) from: TJ Gcal Mtoe MBtu GWh General Conversion Factors for Energy TJ (3) multiply by: 1 4.C.000.785 4.000 1.000.01 0.7.3147 l 3.000.001 1 58 .02859 1 0.000.000.000 1.8 3.C.000.159 0.c.A Manual for the Prepareres and Users of Eco-efficiency Indicators III.615 1 0.8327 1 34.0551 x 10-3 3.000. Units and Conversions III.7.163 x 10-3 11630 2.6 Gcal 238.1 0.000.52 x 10-8 8.001 0.48 0.c.546 159 28.0045 0.000.0353 35.968 3.000.001 0.c.252 860 Mtoe 2.000.001 0.6 x 10-5 MBtu 947.C.000.000 1.1337 0.000.c.000.000.1605 5.000 100 10 0.000.000.2778 1.8 1 107 0.000.001 III.000.000.0063 6.388 x 10-5 10-7 1 2.220 220 bbl 0.02381 0.001 0.000.000.000.289 ft3 0.968 x 107 1 3412 GWh 0.000.000.(iii) (2) to: (1) from: gal US gal UK bbl ft3 l m3 General Conversion Factors for Volume gal US gal UK (3) multiply by: 1 1.1868 x 104 1.3 1 1000 m3 0.2642 264.000.7.931 x 10-4 1 III.0038 0.201 42 7.(i) Prefix exa peta tera giga mega kilo hecto deca deci centi mili micro nano pico femto atto Decimal Prefixes Symbol E P T G M kg h da d c m µ n p f a Factor 1018 1015 1012 109 106 103 102 101 10-1 10-2 10-3 10-6 10-9 10-12 10-15 10-18 1.229 0.000.000.000.C.001 0.000.

C.102 x 10-3 1.7.c.454 t 0.893 4.84 x 10-4 0.1023 1.120 1 5 x 10-4 lb 2.54 x 10-4 lt 9.46 x 10-4 st 1.2 0.9072 4.6 240 2000 1 59 .2046 2204.984 1 0.(iv) 2) to: 1) from: kg t lt st lb General Conversion Factors for Mass kg 3) multiply by: 1 1000 1016 907.Guidelines III.001 1 1.016 0.

III. Hydrofluorocarbons HFCs. Accounting Treatment of Global Warming Contribution Objective 190. A specific guideline on the global warming contribution by energy-producing companies. Methane (CH4). 195.3. Global warming gases are all gases that are listed under the Kyoto Protocol/Convention (the protocol): (a) (b) (c) (d) (e) (f) Carbon dioxide (CO2).3. This guidance should be applied in accounting for substances that contribute to global warming and which are listed under the Kyoto Protocol/Convention. 192. The contribution of a gas is considered significant when its share of the total global warming contribution of the company exceeds 1 per cent. 194. uses or emits other substances that contribute to global warming other than the ones listed in the protocol and these gases make a significant contribution to the total global warming contribution of the reporting entity. III. Global Warming Gases 193. Nitrous oxide (N2O). Perfluorocarbons (PFCs) and. agricultural activities and forestry.D.b.3. Global warming potential is the assumed impact of a substance on global warming. These industries should use this manual on global warming contribution with care. Definitions III. 60 . they should be included. the agricultural sector and forestry needs to be developed. Scope 191.D.A Manual for the Prepareres and Users of Eco-efficiency Indicators III.1.D. If a enterprise produces. III.2). III. The objective of this manual is to provide guidance regarding the accounting treatment of the global warming contribution of an enterprise.a. This manual does not deal with specific aspects of energy-producing enterprises (see the definition in the guideline for energy use in III. Global warming potentials are based on current scientific knowledge and are expressed in kg carbon dioxide (CO2) equivalents per kg of the substance.D.D. The values are listed in Table 34.D.C. Global Warming Potential 196. Sulphur hexafluoride (SF6).2.

Electricity derived CO 2 emissions are based on the technology and fuels used in a specific country – the so-called electricity-mix. Global warming potentials are dependent on the time frame: the longer the period. the longer a substance is potentially able to contribute to global warming. Global Warming Contribution 198. Global warming potentials can be expressed in a 500-year time frame. For the time being. The total global warming contribution of an enterprise is used as an indicator for the effect the enterprise has on an increase in global temperature.D.Guidelines 197.and transport-related global warming impacts are reduced to CO2 emissions caused by the use of non-renewable energy sources. III. The amount of non-renewable energy and electricity used is based on the energy requirement as recognized using the guideline on energy use (III. Examples include cement production. 27 201. methane) are not considered. Process-related and other global warming gases are all global warming gases caused by non-energy and non-transport processes. other global warming gases stemming from the use of energy and transport services (e. A list of different fuels and the respective CO2 emissions is provided in Table 23.e. A country list is provided in Table 25.3. III. 202. For the purpose of this manual the values for the 100-year time frame are used.C). Agricultural activities such as rice farming and cattle breeding also fall into this category.and Transport-Related Global Warming Gases 200. 199. Global Warming Gases Related to Other Industrial Processes 205.D.3. Energy. It is assumed that all carbon is oxidized to CO2 and no carbon is stored in residuals (e. ashes). CO2 emissions stemming from the use of fossil fuels are derived from the carbon content of the fuel. 203. these are not dealt with specifically in this manual (see paragraph 192). 61 . waste incineration and others.when taking the whole product life cycle of renewable energy sources/systems into account – renewable energy sources are not 100 per cent free of global warming gas emissions.g. Values are derived from data provided by the International Energy Agency.d. Global warming contribution is the amount of global warming gases (kg per year) multiplied by their respective global warming potential (kg CO2/kg and year). 204.3. 27 We are well aware that . However. For practical reasons.c.g. It is expressed in kg carbon dioxide (CO 2) equivalents per year. energy. including electricity suppliers. III.D. Renewable energy is assumed to have no global warming contribution.

and transport-related global warming gases are recognised when the underlying energy is recognized (see the guideline on energy use. based either on the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM).4. Besides a clear statement of intent to reduce global warming contribution. III. on Activities Jointly Implemented (AJI) or on similar initiatives.d). 62 .D. waste disposal. For the purpose of eco-efficiency reporting. the additional component should be demonstrated by using historical data.4.b. market incentives which lead to an increase in emissions elsewhere.28 209. Carbon Offset and Sequestration 211. while other energy-linked global warming gases (e. 210. Energy. outsourcing activities which w ere once done on-site. The programme is an additional component and not business as usual (= baseline). chemical usage. methane.D. (c) (d) 28 29 CO2 emissions are related to the carbon content of the fuel. gender issues. Global warming gases should be recognized in the period in which they are emitted. Examples of non-global-warming-related externalities include: negative impacts on biodiversity. programme-induced changes in up. capacity building etc. The contribution of a gas is considered significant when its share of the total contribution of the company exceeds 1 per cent. In General 206. 207. hydrology. Examples of global warming-related externalities include: activities simply shifting to other areas.A Manual for the Prepareres and Users of Eco-efficiency Indicators III.C. are recognized when the following conditions are met: (a) (b) The programme does not violate the development objectives.4. Recognition of Global Warming Gases III.a.or downstream processes leading to higher emissions. The programme does not cause negative externalities. III. 29 The programme is supplied with sufficient financial and managerial capacity and has the appropriate infrastruc ture and technological support. economic development. Global warming gases relating to other industrial processes are only recognized when these gases contribute significantly to the total global warming contribution of the reporting entity. Carbon offset/sequestration programmes undertaken by the reporting entity. economic priorities and regulations of the country of the participating party.3. only the amount of CO2 linked to the use of energy is recognized.D.g. non-methane volatile organic compounds) depend on the technology used. 208. future trends and financial aspects (usually the aspect of carbon offset adds additional costs to a project compared with the baseline).

Fourth step: Significant global warming gases relating to other industrial processes are included. 212. Measurement III. An independent body reviews the above criteria and a recognized national or international certification body certifies the effect.a. Second step: The amount of energy expressed in heat equivalents is converted to CO2 emissions (the amount of CO2 linked to the use of nonrenewable energy sources is listed in Table 23).D. III. Third step: The amount of electricity expressed in work equivalents is converted to CO 2 emissions (the amount of CO2 linked to the use of electricity for different countries is listed in Table 25).C). General Approach 213. (c) (d) (e) 63 .5.5.D. If the above conditions are met the offset or sequestrated amount of global warming gases can be deducted.Guidelines (e) (f) The programme is monitored continuously and data on its carbon effect are collected on a yearly basis within an acceptable level of certainty. Fifth step: The amounts of the different global warming gases are multiplied by their respective global warming potential to arrive at the global warming contribution of the reporting entity. It consists of the following steps: (a) (b) First step: The total energy requirement as defined by the guideline on energy use is determined (see III. The measurement of global warming contribution is mainly a matter of calculations.

67 242. (44/12).00 Carbon emission factor (t CO2/TJ) 61. CO2-emission factors of petroleum products. coal and coal products.30 13.50 29.20 27.20 21. If biogas is released and not combusted.20 27.73 100.D. Gas and Biomass Fuels Carbon content (t C/TJ) 16.80 29.20 105. a) This value is a default value until a fuel-specific CEF is determined.20 20.10 47.17 94. CO2-Emission Factors for Fossil Fuels 214.30 71.80 26. Coal and Coal Products.50 25.80 25.87 74.97 94.60 56.50 25.80 26.90 19.A Manual for the Prepareres and Users of Eco-efficiency Indicators Table 23 CO2 Emission Factors of Petroleum Products.27 96.33 69. It is assumed that all carbon is oxidized.17 108.50 19.07 101.07 77.80 17. gas and biomass fuels (Table 23) are based on data provided by IPCC and are used for national greenhouse gas inventories (IPCC 1996b).60 20.00 18.07 73.60 98.b.60 63.60 94. 64 .60 108. the carbon emission factor is based on the assumption that 50 per cent of the carbon in the biomass is converted to methane and 50 per cent is emitted as CO2.00 Fuel carbon emission Petroleum products Ethane Lpg Naphtha Aviation gasoline Motor gasoline Jet gasoline Jet kerosene Other kerosene Gas/diesel fuel Heavy fuel oil/residual fuel oil Petroleum coke Coal and coal products Coking coal Other bituminous coal Anthracite Sub-bituminous coal Lignite / brown coal Peat Patent fuel Coke oven coke Gas coke Bkb/peat briquettes Gas Natural gas (dry) Gas works gas Coke oven gas Blast furnace gas (a) (a) (a) Note: The carbon ("C") content is multiplied with the molecular weight ratio of CO2 to C. For gas biomass.90 25.50 71. III.80 15.83 94.00 66.5. 50 per cent of the carbon content should be included as methane.60 28.

c.000325 0.000797 0. The factors in Table 24 to Table 33 have been calculated by taking CO2 emissions from public electricity and heat production (OECD/IEA 2001a) which incorporate emissions from public electricity generation. Solomon Islands and Vanuatu) t CO2/kWh 0.D. Maldives.000989 0.000690 0.000210 0.000556 0. CO2-Emission Factors for Electricity 215.000486 0. New Caledonia. Kiribati.000603 0. Total emissions are then divided by the total electricity production (OECD/IEA 2001b) including electricity from nuclear power and renewables. People's Republic of Taiwan (POC) Hong Kong.000232 65 . 216. Electricity-derived CO 2-emission factors are based on IEA data.000410 0.000593 0.000956 0. China India Indonesia Korea. Papua New Guinea.001007 0.000621 0. Whenever country-specific factors are known these should be used.5. DPR Malaysia Myanmar Nepal Pakistan Philippines Singapore Sri Lanka Thailand Viet Nam Other Asia (Afghanistan. Table 24 Electricity-derived CO2-Emission Factors for Non-OECD Asia Asia (Non-OECD) Bangladesh Brunei China. French Polynesia.Guidelines III. to arrive at an emission factor of tonnes of CO2 per kWh of electricity produced.000440 0.000033 0. Samoa.000836 0. Bhutan. which are assumed to have zero CO2 emissions. Fiji. public combined heat and power generation and public heat plants.000533 0.

A Manual for the Prepareres and Users of Eco-efficiency Indicators

Table 25 Electricity-derived CO2-Emission Factors for Africa
Africa Algeria Angola Benin Cameroon Congo, Republic of Congo, Democratic Republic of the Côte d'Ivoire Egypt Eritrea Ethiopia Gabon Ghana Kenya Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Morocco Mozambique Namibia Nigeria Senegal South Africa Sudan Tanzania, United Republic of Togo Tunisia Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Other Africa (Botswana, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Djibouti, Equatorial Guinea, Gambia, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Lesotho, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Niger, Rwanda, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Swaziland and Uganda) t CO2/kWh 0.000687 0.000328 0.000938 0.000952 0.000000 0.000004 0.000674 0.000480 0.000683 0.000024 0.000256 0.000189 0.000250 0.000632 0.000739 0.000001 0.000017 0.000365 0.000920 0.000862 0.000447 0.000035 0.001154 0.000564 0.000558 0.000000 0.000779 0.000629

66

Guidelines

Table 26 Electricity-derived CO2-Emission Factors for Non-OECD Europe
Europe (Non-OECD) Albania Bosnia-Herzegovina Bulgaria Croatia Cyprus Gibraltar Macedonia, Former Yugoslav Republic of Malta Romania Slovenia Yugoslavia, Federal Republic of t CO2/kWh 0.000021 0.001572 0.000685 0.000418 0.000860 0.001613 0.000908 0.000971 0.001120 0.000640 0.001689

Table 27 Electricity-derived CO2-Emission Factors for Non-OECD Former USSR
Former USSR (Non-OECD) Armenia Azerbaijan Belarus Estonia Georgia Kazakhstan Kyrgyzstan Latvia Lithuania Moldova, Republic of Russian Federation Tajikistan Turkmenistan Ukraine Uzbekistan t CO2/kWh 0.000442 0.009216 0.001677 0.001476 0.000140 0.009002 0.000136 0.000976 0.011594 0.000992 0.001760 0.000045 1.744000 0.001317 0.001296

67

A Manual for the Prepareres and Users of Eco-efficiency Indicators

Table 28 Electricity-derived CO2-Emission Factors for Non-OECD Latin America
Latin America (non-OECD) Argentina Bolivia Brazil Chile Colombia Costa Rica Cuba Dominican Republic Ecuador El Salvador Guatemala Haiti Honduras Jamaica Netherlands Antilles Nicaragua Panama Paraguay Peru Trinidad and Tobago Uruguay Venezuela Other Latin America (Antigua and Barbuda, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Bermuda, Dominica, French Guiana, Grenada, Guadeloupe, Guyana, Martinique, Saint Kitts and Nevis and Anguilla, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines and Suriname) t CO2/kWh 0.000343 0.000482 0.000057 0.000461 0.000104 0.000024 0.000863 0.000655 0.000231 0.000269 0.000214 0.000415 0.000260 0.000676 0.000746 0.000585 0.000262 0.000000 0.000131 0.000696 0.000187 0.000191 0.000455

68

000745 0.000737 0.000699 0.000487 69 .000815 0.000565 0.000672 0.000639 0.000373 0.000045 0.000048 0.000000 0.000498 0.000004 0.000540 0.001104 0.000841 0.000808 0.000476 0.000002 0. Islamic Republic of Iraq Israel Jordan Kuwait Lebanon Oman Qatar Saudi Arabia Syrian Arab Republic United Arab Emirates t CO2/kWh 0.000259 0.000497 0.000002 0.000394 0.000157 0.000705 0.000544 0.Guidelines Table 29 Electricity-derived CO2-Emission Factors for Middle East Middle East Bahrain Iran.000372 0.000762 Table 30 Electricity-derived CO2-Emission Factors for OECD Europe Europe (OECD) Austria Belgium Denmark Finland France Germany Greece Ireland Italy Luxembourg Netherlands Portugal Spain Sweden United Kingdom Czech Republic Hungary Iceland Norway Poland Slovak Republic Switzerland Turkey t CO2/kWh 0.000851 0.000580 0.000823 0.001082 0.000375 0.000254 0.

000683 0.000297 0.000527 0.000819 0.000540 0.000792 0.000196 0.001007 0.000912 0.000616 0.000663 0.A Manual for the Prepareres and Users of Eco-efficiency Indicators Table 31 Electricity-derived CO2-Emission Factors for North America North America Mexico Canada United States t CO2/kWh 0.001653 0.000362 0.000371 0.000514 Table 32 Electricity-derived CO2-Emission Factors for OECD Asia-Pacific Asia-Pacific (OECD) Japan Republic of Korea Australia New Zealand t CO2/kWh 0.000356 0.000124 Table 33 Electricity-derived CO2-Emission Factors for World Regions World Regions World Africa Latin America Asia excluding China China Former USSR Middle East OECD total OECD North America OECD Pacific OECD Europe Non-OECD Europe Non-OECD total European Union t CO2/kWh 0.000476 0.000169 0.000349 70 .000420 0.

d.Guidelines III.5. 71 .D.5. Where the actual substance is not known but the substance group is known the highest value of that group should be applied. To arrive at the global warming contribution pertaining to the activities of the enterprise. 222. 221. the amounts of global warming gases are multiplied by their respective global warming potentials.D. 218.e. Table 34 and Table 35 provide values for the main global warming gases and groups of global warming gases. Calculating Global Warming Contribution 219. III. The item "global warming contribution" is used for the calculation of the ecoefficiency indicator "global warming contribution per unit of net value added" (see paragraph 76(c)). If an amount is estimated or calculated the range of uncertainty should be recorded. 220. The amount of global warming gases related to other industrial processes should be metered. Global Warming Gases Related to Other Industrial Processes 217.

0 1 500 (kg CO2-equivalent per kg sulphur hexafluoride) 3 200 22 600 50 000 5 700 10 000 11 900 2 600 8 600 2 600 8 600 3 200 10 000 4 100 8 900 3 200 9 000 Fully fluorinated species SF6 CF4 C2 F6 C3 F8 C4F10 c-C4F8 C5F12 C6F14 Source: IPCC (2001).6 1 100 13. 72 .0 9 400 5.0 1 200 220.0 3 500 13.0 4 300 0.0 550 2.9 890 15.0 12 000 5.2 950 9.6 97 29.4 330 52.0 3 400 9.4 120 0.8 1 300 3.3 12 33.9 640 7.2 1 300 10.A Manual for the Prepareres and Users of Eco-efficiency Indicators Table 34 Global Warming Potentials Part I Global warming gas Carbon dioxide Carbon dioxide Methane Methane Nitrous oxide Nitrous oxide Hydrofluorocarbons HFC-23 HFC-32 HFC-41 HFC-125 HFC-134 HFC-134a HFC-143 HFC-143a HFC-152 HFC-152a HFC-161 HFC-227ea HFC-236cb HFC-236ea HFC-236fa HFC-245ca HFC-245fa HFC-365mfc HFC-43-10mee CO2 CH 4 N2O CHF3 CH2F2 CH3F CHF2CF3 CHF2CHF2 CH 2FCF3 CHF2CH2F CF3CH3 CH2FCH2F CH 3CHF2 CH3CH2F CF3CHFCF3 CH 2FCF2CF3 CHF2CHFCF3 CF3CH2CF3 CH 2FCF2CHF2 CHF2CH2CF3 CF3CH2CF2CH3 CF3CHFCHFCF2CF3 Lifetime Global Warming Potential (years) (100 years) (kg CO2-equivalent per kg carbon dioxide) 1 (kg CO2-equivalent per kg methane) 12.0 23 (kg CO2-equivalent per kg nitrous oxide) 114 296 (kg CO2-equivalent per kg hydrofluorocarbons) 260.5 43 1.

1 2700 6.77 55 6. Lifetime Global warming potential (years) (100 years) (kg CO2-equivalent per kg per fluorocarbons) 0. 73 .Guidelines Table 35 Global Warming Potentials Part II Global warming gas Ethers and halogenated ethers CH3OCH3 HFE-125 CF3OCHF2 HFE-134 CHF2OCHF2 HFE-143a CH 3OCF3 HCFE-235da2 CF3CHClOCHF2 HFE-245fa2 CF3CH2OCHF2 HFE-254cb2 CHF2CF2OCH 3 HFE-7100 C4F9OCH3 HFE-7200 C4F9OC2H 5 H-Galden 1040x CHF2OCF2OC2F4OCHF2 HG-10 CHF2OCF2OCHF2 HG-01 CHF2OCF2CF2OCHF2 Source: IPCC (2001). An enterprise should disclose: (a) (b) (c) (d) (e) The eco-efficiency indicator "global warming contribution per unit of net value added".3 1800 12.a.015 1 150 14900 26.22 30 5.7.4 570 0. Disclosure of global warming gases 223. the objectives and targets regarding global warming and the measures taken to achieve the targets. An example of a disclosure of global warming contribution is given in the annex.0 390 0. The accounting policies adopted for global warming gases.6 340 4.2 1500 III.D. III.4 750 2.2 6100 4. The amount of each category of global warming gas recognized during the accounting period and the respective amounts of the previous year.D.6. The total global warming contribution during the accounting period and the respective amounts of the previous year. The management's stance on energy use.

Targets and Measures Accounting policy Energy policy Targets Measures 74 . global warming policy. Table 36 Global Warming Contribution CO2 emissions related to energy use Energy requirement 2001 2002 Electricity (Germany) 10 000 000 11 000 000 Electricity (Switzerland) 20 000 000 25 000 000 Natural gas (dry) 1 700 2 000 Bituminous coal 2 000 2 200 Motor gasoline 500 600 Energy derived global warming contribution Other industrial Processes Other global warming gases Sulphur hexafluoride (t) Other global warming gases Total global warming contribution Net value added Eco-efficiency indicator "global warming contribution/net value added" 2001 3'000 2002 Global warming contribution 2001 2002 4 980 000 5 478 000 40 000 50 000 95 370 000 112 200 000 189 200 000 208 120 000 34 650 000 41 580 000 324 240 000 367 428 000 (100 y) (t CO2) (t CO2) (t CO2) (t CO2) (t CO2) (t CO2) (b) MWh MWh GJ GJ GJ Global Warming Potential (GWP) kg CO2-eq.A Manual for the Prepareres and Users of Eco-efficiency Indicators III. Example of a Disclosure of Global Warming Contribution 224. targets and measures (Table 37). Accounting policy on global warming gases.D.D.7.155 (t CO2-eq/€) 2'800 22'600 Table 37 Accounting Policy on Global Warming Gases. A disclosure on global warming contribution consists of two parts: (a) Global warming contributions (Table 36) caused by CO2-emissons related to energy use and other global warming gases caused by other industrial energy processes. Global Warming Policy.204 63 280 000 (t CO2-eq) 63 280 000 (t CO2-eq) 430 708 000 (t CO2-eq) 11 000 000 (€) 39.7. Annex to Global Warming Contribution III.a./kg 67 800 000 67 800 000 392 040 000 10 000 000 39.

(vii)).(vi)).7.C.b. 75 .(v)).(ii) 228. Non-Renewable Energy III.7.b.C. blast furnace gas.b.C.b. 229.b.Guidelines III.C.b.b. lubricating oils and grease.7. 227. All other energy sources (including waste) are considered to be nonrenewable. (b) 30 Non-energy refined petroleum products used such as white spirit. Hydropower (see III. industrial spirit.D.C. bitumen (asphalt). heavy fuel oil. Geothermal energy (see III.7.(i) Renewable Energy 226. energy supply that is based on renewable energy sources and energy supply based on non-renewable energy sources. gas/diesel fuel.30 Gas Including: natural gas. Renewable energy is divided into the following sub-categories according to its source (for a more detailed description see III. coke oven gas. gas works gas and substitute gas.b): (a) (b) (c) (d) (e) (f) (g) Direct solar energy (see III. motor gasoline.7. Energy Supply 225.C.b. Wind energy (see III. Ocean thermal and mechanical energy (see III.7.7. Non-renewable energy is divided into the following sub-categories according to its source (for a more detailed description see III.C. Renewable energy refers to any energy resource that is naturally regenerated over a short time scale and derived directly or indirectly from the sun. or from other natural movements and mechanisms of the environment.(v)). kerosene.7. For the purpose of accounting for global warming gases.D. energy supply is divided into two broad categories. III.b. Biomass energy (see III.7. naphtha.(viii)).D. mineral oils and other non-energy petroleum products are not considered energy use. Non-renewable energy refers to any energy resource that is either not replaced or is replaced very slowly by natural processes. jet fuels.C.(v)). paraffin waxes.7.b): (a) Petroleum Including: liquefied petroleum gases and ethane. petroleum coke. aviation gasoline.7.

lignite and brown coal.C. III. peat. Nuclear fuels Within the scope of this guideline (energy sector is excluded) nuclear fuels are not considered an energy source and therefore not taken into account as a source of global warming gases (see also the guideline on energy use.3. (d) 230. bituminous coal and anthracite (hard coal). coke oven coke. sub-bituminous coal.c). All other energy sources not listed in the above paragraph and not defined as renewable are considered "other non-renewable energy". 76 . patent fuel and brown coal/peat briquettes (BKB). gas coke.A Manual for the Prepareres and Users of Eco-efficiency Indicators (c) Coal and coal products Including: coking coal (hard coal).

236. C or E of the Protocol.a.a.3.E. Ozone-depleting potential (ODP) is an assigned value indicating a substance's impact on the stratospheric ozone layer per unit mass of a gas.7. B.E. The objective of this manual is to provide guidance regarding the accounting treatment of ozone-depleting substances. Ozone-depleting substances (ODS) are all bulk chemicals/substances – existing either as a pure substance or as a mixture – that are controlled under the Montreal Protocol. For illustrative purposes a list is provided in III. Ozone-Depleting Substances. B. that is. The terms used in this manual are defined as follows. Ozone-depleting contribution (ODC) is calculated by multiplying the amount of an ozone-depleting substance by the ozone-depleting potential of that substance (see Box 5). 77 .2. This guidance should be applied by enterprises in accounting for all ozonedepleting substances which are: (a) (b) III. The result indicates the contribution of the amount of that substance to the depletion of the ozone layer expressed in CFC-11 equivalents. III. and Can be influenced by an enterprise through specific measures and programmes.7. Scope 232.E. Definitions 233.E. as compared with the same mass of CFC-11 (CFCl3). 235.E. For illustrative purposes a list is provided in III.a.E. Potentials and Contributions 234.E. III. Defined in this manual. Ozone-depleting potential values are listed in Annex A.31 III. C or E of the Protocol. they are listed in Annex A.1.Guidelines III. 31 Also see UNEP 1999. Accounting Treatment of Ozone-Depleting Substances Objective 231.3.

III. Such substances are considered to be embodied in goods or equipment. A variety of goods and equipment contain ozone-depleting substances. a refrigerator or a fire extinguisher are examples of a use system.E. Example: The ozone-depleting substance Halon-1211 is listed with an ozone depletion potential of 3. A limited number of ozone-depleting substances are not yet controlled under the Protocol because they have not been produced or consumed in significant quantities. Ozonedepleting substances are considered part of a use system when the product is applied directly to realize its intended use and is not contained in a container used for storage or transport of the substance. therefore. The most important ozone-depleting substances are controlled under the Montreal Protocol.3. Ozone-depleting substances that are part of a use system can be separated from the product by a special purpose recovery process (e. Ozone-depleting substances which exist as a substance Ozone-depleting substances are sold as pure substances or as mixtures (blends). How much is the ozone-depleting contribution of this specific halon use? The answer is quite simple: multiply the amount of halon-1211 (100 kg) by the ozone depletion potential value of 3 (kg CFC-11 equivalent/kg halon-1211) to come to the ozone depletion contribution (ODC) of 300 kg CFC-11 equivalent. These are generally chemicals containing chlorine and/or bromine. Ozone-depleting substances can exist in two forms: (a) Ozone-depleting substances which exist as part of a "use system".A Manual for the Prepareres and Users of Eco-efficiency Indicators Box 5. Containers are not considered products. An ozone depletion potential value indicates how much impact a certain substance has on the depletion of the ozone layer relative to a reference substance.7. Mixtures are chemicals which contain two or more ozonedepleting substances or one or more ozone-depleting substances mixed with other non-ozone-depleting chemicals (see Box 6).b.E. be it liquid or gaseous (for examples see annex. Assume a company uses 100 kg of halon-1211 during a reporting period. This means that 100 kg of halon-1211 has the same impact on the depletion of the ozone layer as 300 kg CFC-11. III. ozonedepleting substances. How to Calculate the Ozone-Depleting Contribution All substances having an ozone-depleting potential above zero are. In the Annex of the Montreal Protocol every substance controlled is listed together with a value expressing the ozone depletion potential. ozone depletion potential values are expressed in kg CFC11 equivalents per kg of the respective substance. in principle. foam) or by a release valve (e. Forms of Existence of ODS 237.c).g. The reference substance normally taken is CFC-11 with an ozone depletion potential of 1. (b) 78 .g. refrigerator). A pure controlled substance contains only one ozone-depleting substance.

615 tons to the HCFC-142b figure (1. For example. carbon tetrachloride is commonly used in the production of CFCs.55) and 0. 32 (c) 32 Consumption equals production plus imports minus exports of controlled substances. a large number of ODS mixtures used as refrigerants and solvents exist.h.3. 41 per cent HCFC-142b and 4 per cent HC-600a. Hydrocarbon 600a is not an ODS and does not need to be reported.E. Production of ozone-depleting substances means literally the amount of virgin ozone-depleting substances added by the reporting entity. when they are used in the production of other chemicals. R-406A contains 55 per cent HCFC-22. 79 . reclamation and recycling of ozone-depleting substances Feedstock use of ozone-depleting substances Ozone-depleting substances that are used in the manufacture of other chemicals and are completely transformed in the process are defined as feedstock. any ozone-depleting substance that has not been recovered. In particular.E. Production of ODS 240. Ozone-depleting substances are considered reused if they have been recovered. this would add 0. reclaimed or recycled. 239.5 multiplied by 0. reclaimed or recycled prior to use is a new substance.3. If the company purchases 1. The following operations of the reporting entity cannot be considered as producing ozone-depleting substances: (a) (b) Recovery.5 multiplied by 0.E.3. Ozone-depleting substances are considered new (virgin. Process agents Ozone-depleting substances are considered process agents.825 tons to the HCFC-22 figure (1. Types of ODS 238. 241.d. without being consumed. III. when they are manufactured using ODS which are not recovered. Mixtures A number of mixtures containing different ODS have been introduced as replacements for pure ODS. Source: UNEP (1999).Guidelines Box 6. III.5 tons of R-406A.c. reclaimed and/or recycled as defined in III. For example. unused). for example as a catalyst or an inhibitor of a chemical reaction. In other words.41).

Ozone-depleting substances embodied in equipment for own use Any ozone-depleting substances embodied in the reporting entity's equipment as defined in paragraph 237(a) that a company receives from third parties and is used to deliver a certain feature for the reporting entity's own equipment.A). other manufactured and semi-manufactured goods into a finished product using technical know-how.3. Purchase of ODS 242. Equipment is considered to be a company's own when the entity that operates the equipment is part of the same legal entity or is consolidated in the financial statement of the group (for consolidation issues see I. Ozone-depleting substances as substances for own equipment Any ozone-depleting substance as defined in paragraph 237(b) that a enterprise receives from third parties and is used to deliver a certain feature for the reporting entity's own equipment. A process is considered to be a company's own when the entity that operates the process is part of the same legal entity or is consolidated in the financial statement of the group (for consolidation issues see I. Ozone-depleting substances as substances for goods manufactured Any ozone-depleting substance existing either as a pure substance or a mixture (as defined in paragraph 237(b)) that a company receives from third parties and which is used to deliver a certain feature for the reporting entity's manufactured goods.E.e. 80 (b) (c) (d) (e) (f) . Ozone-depleting substances as substances for own production process Any ozone-depleting substance as defined in paragraph 237(b) that a company receives from third parties and which is used to deliver a certain feature for the reporting entity's own production process.A). equipment and energy with the purpose of selling the product to a third party. Ozone-depleting substances embodied in traded goods Any ozone-depleting substance embodied as defined in paragraph 237(a) in traded goods and used to deliver a certain feature either for the reporting entity or for third parties. be it purchased or manufactured.A Manual for the Prepareres and Users of Eco-efficiency Indicators III. Repackaging is not considered a change of product. ODS are purchased in many different forms: (a) Ozone-depleting substances embodied in supplied goods Any ozone-depleting substances embodied in a use system as defined in paragraph 237(a) and used to deliver a certain feature for a product that is sold. A good is considered to be manufactured when the reporting entity processes raw materials.A). Equipment is considered to be a enterprise's own when the entity that operates the equipment is part of the same legal entity or is consolidated in the financial statement of the group (for consolidation issues see I. Goods are considered supplied when they are purchased by the reporting entity from third parties. Goods are considered traded when the reporting entity sells supplied goods leaving them unchanged.

Ozone-depleting substances can be recovered.3. and so forth. when applied to ozonedepleting substances. Reclamation Reclamation means the reprocessing and upgrading of a recovered ozone-depleting substance through such methods as filtering. recovery. Reclamation and Recycling of ODS 247.f. in goods.Guidelines (g) Ozone-depleting substances as substance for trade Any ozone-depleting substances as defined in paragraph 237(b) and used to deliver a certain feature either for the reporting entity or for third parties. 246. containment vessels. Repackaging is not considered a change of a substance.g. Recycling Recycling means the reuse of a recovered ozone-depleting substance following a basic cleaning process such as filtering and drying. in own equipment and in use as process agents. (b) (c) III. The dependency of an enterprise on ozone-depleting substances is defined as production plus purchases and stocks. 81 .E. Destruction of ODS 248.i. Stocks include ozone-depleting substances in containers. recycling or destruction in the future. equipment.E. III. Recovery. Substances are considered traded when the reporting entity sells supplied substances leaving them unchanged. drying. distillation and chemical treatment in order to restore the substance to a specified standard of performance. III.E.h.3.E. The item "dependency on ozone-depleting substances" is used for the calculation of the eco-efficiency indicator "dependency on ODS per net value added" (see paragraph 76(d)). Destruction of ODS refers to any process which.3. Stocks are defined as any ozone-depleting substance stored or accumulated on the reporting entity’s premises for use. III. Dependency on ODS 245. Stocks of ODS 243.3. results in the permanent transformation or decomposition of all or a significant portion of such substances. reclaim. reclaimed and recycled: (a) Recovery Recovery means the collection and storage of ozone-depleting substances from machinery. 244. during servicing or prior to disposal.

reused.E. used as feedstock. III.3 should be recognized at the beginning and at the end of an accounting period. 252.C.k. sold or emitted. 253.3. recycled. The item "emissions of ozone-depleting substances" can be used for the calculation of a secondary eco-efficiency indicator "emissions of ODS per net value added". 255. or refer to the OzonAction website at http://www. A mixture containing ozone-depleting substances shall be recognized according to their respective components. Recognition of Ozone-Depleting Substances 254.E. 82 . reclaimed.for purposes other than recovery.4.C. recycled. Stocks of ozone-depleting substances as defined by III. ODS in equipment. destroyed. recovered. reclamation or destruction . circulated by UNEP Industry and Environment OzonAction Programme. An emission of an ozone-depleting substance occurs when the substance leaves the reporting entity during ordinary and extraordinary activities of an enterprise in such a way that it is technically impossible to regain control over the relevant ODS. and When it is probable that the amount or value can be measured.3 should be recognized in the period in which they are (a) (b) Produced. sold and in stock. Sales of ODS 249. ODS in traded goods. refer to the database reference tool known as the OAIC-DV MKV. purchased. Sales of ODS shall be divided into the following four sub-categories: (a) (b) (c) (d) ODS in manufactured goods.unepie. Emissions of ODS 251.html. 250. 33 33 For information about the composition of mixtures. Ozone-depleting substances as defined in III.E.org/ozonaction. 256. III. from it.3. ODS in containers. Ozone-depleting substances handed over to third parties . destroyed. recycling.shall be considered sales regardless of whether the underlying financial transaction has a negative or positive value for the reporting entity.A Manual for the Prepareres and Users of Eco-efficiency Indicators III. Emissions of ozone-depleting substances can be derived by calculating the total dependency on ODS and subtracting the amount recovered.j. reclaimed.

Measurement of Ozone-Depleting Substances 258. The management's stance on ozone-depleting substances and the Montreal Protocol.g. The accounting policies adopted for ozone-depleting substances. If an amount is estimated or calculated the range of uncertainty should be recorded. 261.5.E. litres and cubic metres. Disclosure of Ozone-Depleting Substances 262. 259. The ozone depletion potential of a substance shall be recognized according to the latest ozone depletion potential values listed in the Montreal Protocol.a). see Box 5 in III. The total ozone depletion contribution as recognized during the accounting period and the respective amounts of the previous year.6. Special attention should be drawn to replacement technology and replacement substances and their respective environmental impact (e. metric tons.3. Ozone-depleting substances shall be reported (a) (b) III. The targets shall be compared with the targets set out in the Montreal Protocol. An enterprise should disclose: (a) (b) (c) (d) (e) The eco-efficiency indicator "dependency on ODS per net value added". According to weight (kg.E. global warming potential). the objectives and targets regarding ozone-depleting substances and the measures taken to achieve the targets. 260.E. III. Ozone-depleting substances should be weighed or metered.Guidelines 257. and According to the respective ozone depletion potential (kg or metric t CFC-11 equivalent. The total amount of ozone-depleting substances recognized during the accounting period and the respective amounts of the previous year. 83 . metric t) of the respective substance. III. An example of a disclosure of ozone-depleting substances is given in the annex.F. Ozone-depleting substances should be measured in kilograms.

84 . recycling. covering recovery. purchase and stocks. Annex to Ozone-Depleting Substances III.goods manufactured .04 1 1 200 10 1 211 1 1 300 20 1 321 0 0 48 0.E.8 52. feedstock use. Example of a Disclosure of Ozone-Depleting Substances 263.925 0.own production processes .a.for trade Substance HCFC-21 ODP 0.84 72. Total emissions of ODS (Table 39).52 52 0. Accounting policy on ODS.7.) 2000 2001 40 40 20 20 Purpose and form Production produced ODS Production of ODS Purchase purchased ODS embodied in .04 0. Table 38 Dependency on ODS Total (t substance) 2000 2001 1 000 1 000 500 500 New ODS * (t substance) 2000 2001 10 10 50 50 Total ODC (t CFC-11 eq.traded goods purchased ODS for .7. An ODS disclosure consists of three parts: (a) (b) (c) Total dependency on ODS (Table 38).663 Eco-efficiency indicator "dependency on ODS/value added" (t/€) * The difference between the total amount and the amount listed as new ODS (virgin) is used ODS (recycled).4 48. ODS policy. destruction.supplied equipment .88 10 000 11 000 0.A Manual for the Prepareres and Users of Eco-efficiency Indicators III.44 92.04 CFC-112 1 100 4 0 Halon-1301 10 2 102 1 1 0 0 0. targets and measures (Table 40).E.04 Purchase of ODS Stocks ODS in goods ODS as substance in containers ODS in equipment halon-1301 ODS in use as process agent HCFC-124 Stocks of ODS Total dependency on ODS Net value added (€) 10 0.supplied goods . stocks and sales.08 0. reclamation. covering production.08 4.own equipment .

12 0.8 2. Targets and Measures Accounting policy on ODS ODS policy Targets Measures 85 .0848 0.) 2000 2001 92. reclaimed.84 1.96 11 000 1.04048 0.04 1. recycled ODS Destruction of ODS and feedstock use feedstock use of ODS ODS destroyed halon-1301 Destruction of ODS and feedstock use Sales ODS in manufactured goods ODS in traded goods ODS as substance in containers ODS in equipment sold halon-1301 Sales Stocks of ODS (from Table 38) Total ODS emissions (derived) Net value added (€) Secondary eco-efficiency indicator "emissions of ODS/value added" (kg/€) 0.5 8 8 18 18 10 1.5 0 15 15 48. recycled ODS Recovered Reclaimed Recycled HCFC-124 Recovered.04048 0.52 72.012 2.44 21. reclaimed.88 Total dependency on ODS (from Table 38) Recovered.104 0 0 52.04 10 000 2.0848 10 0.Guidelines Table 39 Total Emissions of ODS Purpose and form Substance ODP Total (t substance) 2000 2001 Total ODC (t CFC-11 eq. ODS Policy.781 Table 40 Accounting Policy on ODS.

268.0 0.0 34 As adjusted and/or amended in London (1990). 34 265. Where a range of ozone-depleting potentials is indicated. Table 41 lists controlled substances and their respective ozone-depleting potential according to the Montreal Protocol. Vienna (1995).0 10. 86 .0 6.E. Table 41 Controlled Substances and their Ozone Depletion Potential Montreal Protocol Annex A Group Group I CFCl3 CF2Cl2 C2F3Cl3 C2F4Cl2 C2F5Cl Group II CF2BrCl CF3Br C2F4Br2 (Montreal Protocol) Substance (CFC-11) (CFC-12) (CFC-113) (CFC-114) (CFC-115) (halon-1211) (halon-1301) (halon-2402) Ozone-Depleting Potential 1. 267. Copenhagen (1992).6 3.0 1. Montreal (1997) and Beijing (1999).8 1.b. the highest value in that range shall be used for the purposes of this guideline. Ozone-depleting potentials are expressed in kg CFC-11 (CFCl3) equivalent per kg of the respective substance 266.A Manual for the Prepareres and Users of Eco-efficiency Indicators III.0 0. Controlled Substances and their Ozone Depletion Potential according to the Montreal Protocol 264.7. The texts of the adjustments and amendments to the Protocol as agreed by the Parties to the Protocol are available at the Ozone Secretariat in UNEP or the Treaties Sections of the Ministries of Foreign Affairs of various Governments. Ozone-depleting potentials are based on existing knowledge and will be reviewed and updated periodically.

87 .1.1 Table 43 Controlled Substances and their Ozone Depletion Potential Copenhagen Amendment to the Montreal Protocol Part 1 Annex C Group Group I CHFCl2 CHF2Cl CH2FCl C2HFCl4 C2HF2Cl3 C2HF3Cl2 CHCl2CF3 C2HF4Cl CHFClCF3 C2H 2FCl3 C2H 2F2Cl2 C2H 2F3Cl C2H 3FCl2 (Copenhagen Amendment to the Montreal Protocol) Substance (HCFC-21) ** ** Number of isomers 1 1 1 2 3 3 – 2 – 3 4 3 3 Ozone-depleting potential 0.02–0.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.022 0.1-trichloromethane chloroform) 35 Ozone-depleting potential 1.04 0.0 1.08 0.0 1.02–0.008–0.055 0.0 1.02 0.05 0.02–0.07 (HCFC-22) (HCFC-31) (HCFC-121) (HCFC-122) (HCFC-123) (HCFC-123)** (HCFC-124) (HCFC-124)** (HCFC-131) (HCFC-132) (HCFC-133) (HCFC-141) 35 ** This formula does not refer to 1.06 0.0 1.04 0.04 0.2-trichloromethane.02–0.Guidelines Table 42 Controlled Substances and their Ozone Depletion Potential London Amendment to the Montreal Protocol Annex B Group Group I CF3Cl C2FCl5 C2F2Cl4 C3FCl7 C3F2Cl6 C3F3Cl5 C3F4Cl4 C3F5Cl3 C3F6Cl2 C3F7Cl Group II CCl4 Group III C2H 3Cl3 (London Amendment to the Montreal Protocol) Substance (CFC-13) (CFC-111) (CFC-112) (CFC-211) (CFC-212) (CFC-213) (CFC-214) (CFC-215) (CFC-216) (CFC-217) Carbon tetrachloride 1.01–0.007–0. Identifies the most commercially viable substances with ODP values listed against them to be used for the purposes of the Protocol.0 1.005–0.1 (methyl 0.1.02 0.05 0.0 1.06 0.

003–0.005 0.10 0.02–0.03 Note: HBFCs (hydrobromofluorocarbons) have already been phased out by all Parties.01–0.05–0.07 0.001–0.08 0.065 0.007–0.6 88 .008–0.09 0.01–0.14 0.002–0.02–0.09 0.03–0.005–0.07 0.11 0.01 0.005–0.28 0. CH3CFCl2 C2H 3F2Cl CH3CF2Cl C2H 4FCl C3HFCl6 C3HF2Cl5 C3HF3Cl4 C3HF4Cl3 C3HF5Cl2 CF3CF2CHCl2 CF2ClCF2CHClF C3HF6Cl C3H 2FCl5 C3H 2F2Cl4 C3H 2F3Cl3 C3H 2F4Cl2 C3H 2F5Cl C3H 3FCl4 C3H 3F2Cl3 C3H 3F3Cl2 C3H 3F4Cl C3H 4FCl3 C3H 4F2Cl2 C3H 4F3Cl C3H 5FCl2 C3H 5F2Cl C3H 6FCl Group II (Copenhagen Amendment to the Montreal Protocol) Substance (HCFC-141b)** (HCFC-142) (HCFC-142b)** (HCFC-151) (HCFC-221) (HCFC-222) (HCFC-223) (HCFC-224) (HCFC-225) (HCFC-225ca)** (HCFC-225cb)** (HCFC-226) (HCFC-231) (HCFC-232) (HCFC-233) (HCFC-234) (HCFC-235) (HCFC-241) (HCFC-242) (HCFC-243) (HCFC-244) (HCFC-251) (HCFC-252) (HCFC-253) (HCFC-261) (HCFC-262) (HCFC-271) Number of isomers – 3 – 2 5 9 12 12 9 – – 5 9 16 18 16 9 12 18 18 12 12 16 12 9 9 5 Ozone-depleting potential 0. Therefore.02 0.003–0. we do not list them in this guideline.10 0.09 0.23 0. Bromochloromethane 1 0.01–0.03 0.002–0.12 Group III CH2BrCl Annex E Group Group I CH3Br Substance Methyl bromide Ozone-depleting potential 0.033 0.13 0.07 0.001–0.01–0.008–0. Consult the Copenhagen Amendment to the Montreal Protocol for the original list.009–0.09 0.025 0.12 0.004–0.015–0.04 0.A Manual for the Prepareres and Users of Eco-efficiency Indicators Table 44 Controlled Substances and their Ozone Depletion Potential Copenhagen Amendment to the Montreal Protocol Part 2 Annex C Group Group I cont.02 0.52 0.007–0.

e. panels and pipe covers Pre-polymers Source: UNEP (1999). Table 45 A list of products containing controlled substances specified in Annex A of the Protocol Products Automobile and truck air conditioning units (whether incorporated in vehicles or not) Domestic and commercial refrigeration and air conditioning/heat pump equipment.7.g. Table 45 lists products which contain ozone-depleting substances as specified in Annex A of the Protocol.c. 89 .: • • • • • • Refrigerators Freezers Dehumidifiers Water coolers Ice machines Air conditioning and heat pump units Aerosol products Portable fire extinguishers Insulation boards.Guidelines III. Products Containing Ozone-Depleting Substances 269.E.

113. precision cleaning. 115. industrial. coatings and inks. Table 46 lists products which contain controlled substances as specified in Annex A of the Protocol.g. 124. 90 . commercial. 114. Main Sectors using Ozone-Depleting Substances 270. 141b. 114. 124 CFCs 12. 2402. 123. and structures and transportation e.1-trichloromethane). HCFCs 225. 11. heat pumps. Carbon Tetrachloride. 113. perishables. packaging. 113. CFCs 11. cushions/bedding) Fire extinguishing Domestic. 141b Methyl Bromide Fire fighting Refrigeration Solvent Fumigation etc. 112) CFC-113.E. 123. transport refrigeration. Other CFC-11 Note: The following substances are not included in the list: B I substances (other fully halogenated CFCs) are rarely used and C II substances (HBFCs) are not used. air conditioning Electronics.1. 225cb. HCFCs 22. Methyl Chloroform (1.d. tobacco fluffing Halons 1211. Source: UNEP (1999). HCFCs 22. 1301. 123. Table 46 Main Sectors Using Ozone-Depleting Substances Sector Aerosols and sterilants Foams Sub-sector Substance mainly used CFCs 11. 225ca. 124. 12. aerosols Fumigation of soil. food processing and storage. 12. 142b. extruded polystyrene HCFCs 22. durables. 114 Polyurmethane foam. 123. dry cleaning.7. metal applications cleaning. other fully halogenated CFCs (CFC 13.A Manual for the Prepareres and Users of Eco-efficiency Indicators III. phenolic foams. 142b (in particular for various kinds of insulation. polyolefin foams.

agricultural waste and most industrial waste. essentially insoluble and not decomposable. It can be discharged without requiring special landfill technology and/or long-term landfill management. Accounting Treatment of Waste III.F. Discharge requires special landfill technology and/or long-term landfill management. Non-mineral Waste that is categorized as non-mineral has the potential to be chemically and/or biologically reactive.1. for example all carbon is oxidized through an incineration process. Waste is divided into the following sub-categories according to its quality: (a) Mineral Waste that is categorized as mineral or mineralized is inert (see Box 7). Mineralized waste is non-mineral waste treated in a manner that the result is of mineral quality. III.F.F. brick and glass. 274.36 Mineral quality waste is safe by nature. If the value of the waste fluctuates according to market conditions.F.3. The objective of this manual is to provide guidance regarding the accounting treatment of waste. Non-mineral waste can be mineralized through waste treatment technology.F. III. General Definition of Waste 273. Waste is defined as a non-product output with a negative or zero market value.a. liquid or have a paste-like consistency. 91 . Waste can be solid. Scope 272. Definitions III. is soluble and/or 37 decomposable.3.3.F. This guidance should be applied by all enterprises in accounting for all types of waste generated by them as defined in III. accumulated net costs/revenues during the reporting period are used to determine the market value. (b) 36 37 Examples of mineral waste include rock. Water and air-polluting emissions – although they are non-product output – are not regarded as waste. Objective 271. III. Examples include household waste. Definitions Based on the Quality of Waste 275. All waste containing carbon that can be oxidized is non-mineral waste.Guidelines III.F.3.2.b.

Inert material38 Waste is deemed to be inert if chemical analysis reveals the following: A high percentage of waste by weight (e. 1996 Elution is the process of removing one substance from another. If no specific information is available on the quality of the waste it is assumed to be non-mineral. Technical Ordinance on Waste.a) and possessing any of the characteristics contained in Annex III of the Basel Convention. (b). Forest and Landscape. 92 .c. (b) (c) (d) 279. Waste is classified as hazardous when one or more of the following conditions are met: (a) Waste belonging to any category contained in Annex I of the Basel Convention (see III. 276. as a result of being radioactive.F. Definitions Based on the Classification of Waste 277. Wastes which are not covered by any of the above paragraphs (a). by washing it out with a solvent. carbonates or aluminates.F. 95 per cent) relative to the dry substance consists of material similar to stone such as silicates.7. hazardous waste by the domestic legislation in the country where the waste is generated by the reporting enterprise. Waste that is not covered under paragraphs (a) and (b) but is defined as. or considered to be. When a crushed sample of waste is extracted with distilled water no more than a certain limit of waste per kg of dry substance is dissolved. The concentration of heavy metals is limited. Waste is further classified according to the Basel Convention on the Control of Transboundary Movements of Hazardous Wastes and their Disposal (Basel Convention). (c) or (d) shall be regarded as "other waste". III.3. Waste that possesses any of the characteristics contained in Annex III of the Basel Convention. Waste which. 278. Defined limits of different substances are not exceeded in the eluate 39 of the waste. usually an absorbed material from an absorbent material. is subject to other national or international control systems. The eluate is the liquid left after the process of elution.A Manual for the Prepareres and Users of Eco-efficiency Indicators Box 7. consisting of dissolved matter and the solvent used. 38 39 Based on the definition by the Swiss Agency for the Environment.g.

Waste treatment technology is divided into the following sub-categories: (a) Reuse. (iii) Recycling is recovery and reuse of materials from scrap or other waste materials for the production of new goods.3. re-manufacturing and recycling. In-process recycling is the shortest possible closed-loop. (v) Closed-loop The recycled. however. that is air emissions. Reuse does not include a manufacturing process. slag. Definitions Referring to Waste Treatment Technology 280. ash. It results in the output of "other" waste streams. biological or physical means. reused or re-manufactured material is not returned to the processes of the reporting entity. Treatment of waste means recovery of waste. part or product after it has been removed from a clearly defined service cycle. 281. cleaning. 282. re-manufacturing. and intend to reduce or eliminate their danger to people and the environment..F. Waste treatment technologies are processes applied to waste to permanently alter their condition through chemical. part.Guidelines III. it is returned to the market. reused or remanufactured material is returned to the processes of the reporting entity. that are supposed to be treated adequately (for treatment schemes that convert waste to energy see Box 8). Energy recovery (called "thermal recycling") is not regarded as recycling but as incineration. or product after it has been removed from a clearly defined service cycle in a new manufacturing process that goes beyond cleaning. Waste is considered temporarily stored when it will later undergo a waste treatment process. instead. (iv) Open-loop The recycled. Waste treatment includes temporary storage but not collection and transportation of waste. heat etc.and closed-loop reuse. (ii) Re-manufacturing is the additional use of a component. Pre-treatment processes that condition the waste for recycling are regarded as part of the recycling path. For the purpose of eco-efficiency. mineralizes it and reduces the volume of solid residuals. Types of controlled incineration processes include: 93 . repair or refurbishing may be done between uses. reporting companies shall further distinguish between open. recycling (i) Reuse is the additional use of a component. 283.d. (b) Waste incineration Incineration of waste. repair or refurbishing. which renders it harmless. for final disposal.

A Manual for the Prepareres and Users of Eco-efficiency Indicators

(i) Low-temperature (municipal) waste incinerators; (ii) High-temperature waste incinerators; (iii) Cement kilns.

Box 8. Waste to Energy Schemes
Waste can be directly combusted in waste-to-energy incinerators or it can be processed as refuse-derived fuel before incineration (or combustion e.g. in power plants), and it can be gasified using pyrolysis or thermal gasification techniques. Another waste-to-energy process is the recovery of landfill gas or the gas produced by anaerobic fermentation (digestion) of municipal sewage sludge. For the purpose of this guideline we suggest that incineration not be distinguished by the type of energy recovery scheme attached to the incineration process but rather that incineration schemes be distinguished by the technology used to mineralize waste. The fact that energy is recovered should be disclosed.

(c)

Sanitary landfill Sanitary landfills provide outlets for the ultimate disposal of waste generated. A sanitary landfill is a controlled area of land on which waste is disposed of, in accordance with standards, rules or orders established by a regulatory body. Waste material is placed in trenches or on land, compacted by mechanical equipment and covered with earth and a final cover. Within the category of sanitary landfill three technologies can be distinguished: (i) Bioactive sanitary landfills The material is of non-mineral quality (see III.F.3.b). It is reactive and therefore needs extensive control systems covering the operational, closure and post-closure phase.40 The chemical composition of the residues is not known.

(ii) Sanitary landfills for stabilized residues Similar to (i) but for materials that will not form either gases or water soluble substances when in contact with water, air or other stabilized residues. The chemical composition of the residues is well known. (iii) Sanitary landfills for inert materials The material is inert (mineral quality, see III.F.3.b). Therefore the landfill needs no control systems during the operation phase, closure and post-closure phase.
40

For example, ground water is monitored, corrective action requirements are in place, closure and post-closure criteria are defined, an operation and maintenance manual and a leachate management plan exists, and so on.

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Guidelines

(d)

Open dumpsite An open dumpsite is an uncontrolled area of land on which waste is disposed, either legally or illegally. Special cases: Pre-treatment and temporary on-site storage of waste (i) Pre-treatment Pre-treatment processes prepare waste for incineration or landfill. For the purpose of this guideline, pre-treatment does not constitute a separate category of waste treatment technology. Waste that undergoes external pre-treatment is dealt with under waste incineration and landfill. If the path is not known and documented, landfill is assumed. (ii) Temporary on-site storage Waste that is temporary stored on-site and for which the treatment technology is not yet known constitutes a separate category of waste treatment technology. The reporting entity shall give special attention to include adequate information on the technology used and the processes involved in the on-site storage.

(e)

284. If no company-specific information on the treatment technology is available, landfill is assumed as the default treatment technology. 285. Companies shall disclose information on the quality of treatment technology applied to waste. The classification should at least cover the following categories (world-wide or country specific): (a) (b) (c) Best available technology; Average technology; Worst available technology.

286. If no information is disclosed on the type of technology used it is assumed to be the worst available technology. III.F.3.e. Definitions Referring to the Location of Waste Treatment 287. On-site refers to all processes and activities that take place on premises under the control of the reporting entity. 288. Off-site refers to all processes and activities that take place on premises out of the control of the reporting entity. 289. Control is the power to govern the financial and operating policies of an enterprise so as to obtain benefits from its activities (IAS 27, paragraph 6). III.F.3.f. Definitions Referring to Waste Generated 290. Total waste generated during a reporting period is defined as the total amount of all mineral, non-mineral and/or hazardous waste as defined by

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III.F.3.c and treated by any waste treatment technology as defined by III.F.3.d This excludes the amount that is treated either on-site or off-site (see III.F.3.e) through closed-loop recycling, reuse or remanufacturing processes (see paragraph 283(a)(v)). 291. The item "waste generated" is used for the calculation of the eco-efficiency indicator "waste generated per unit of value added" (see paragraph 76(e)). III.F.4. Recognition of Waste

292. Waste as defined by III.F.3.a should be recognized in the period in which it is generated. If generated waste is temporarily stored on-site the stockpile should be recognized at the beginning and the end of the reporting period. 293. The quality of waste as defined by III.F.3.b should be recognized in the period in which it is generated. 294. The class of waste as defined by III.F.3.c should be recognized prior to being treated. 295. Waste treatment technology as defined by III.F.3.d should be recognized when the waste is treated (on-site treatment) and/or when it gets out of the control of the reporting enterprise (off-site treatment). III.F.5. Measurement of Waste

296. Waste should be weighed or metered. 297. Waste should be measured in kilograms and metric tons, litres or cubic metres. 298. If an amount of waste is estimated or calculated the range of uncertainty should be recorded. 299. Waste shall be reported according to weight (kg, t) and not volume (litres, m3). III.F.6. Disclosure of Waste

300. An enterprise should disclose: (a) (b) (c) (d) (e) The eco-efficiency indicator "waste generated per unit of net value added"; The accounting policies adopted on waste; Total amount of waste recognized during the accounting period and the respective amounts of the previous year; The quality of the waste as recognized; The classification of the waste as recognized;

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The management's stance on waste management policy. A disclosure on waste generated consists of three parts: (a) (b) Total waste generated according to the quality and classification of the waste and the treatment technology applied. Annex to Waste III.G. waste policy.7.Guidelines (f) (g) (h) The treatment technology as recognized. An example of a disclosure of waste is given in the annex. 97 . Energy recovery in waste-to-energy schemes. targets and measures (Table 48).F. III. the objectives and targets regarding waste and the measures taken to achieve the targets.F. Example of Disclosure of Waste 301.7. III.a. Accounting policy on waste.

9 0.6 -3.0 -12.4 45.4 94.0 -0.1 44.0 26.3 55.4 107.8 3.4 8.438 *The columns "non-mineral" and "mineral" add up to 100%.2 0.6 36.4 16.9 340.2 -2.6 125.7 10.0 0.7 33.3 9.7 90.6 230.0 -12.4 35.4 9.0 -1.8 32. Waste Policy.3 20.3 5.8 23.3 5.0 68.7 13.0 0.3 68.9 67.1 -1.0 210.3 12.3 28.9 34. while the column "hazardous" lists that amount of non-mineral waste that is classified as hazardous.3 75.9 132.0 30.5 97.4 24.3 0.3 56.0 21.7 58.6 21.8 126.0 -10.0 -14.656 0.2 0.0 0.3 9.5 -10.9 51.0 -2.9 -0.6 61.8 74.5 8.8 60 80.0 222.2 12.5 22.2 -12.9 16. Targets and Measures Accounting policy Waste policy Targets Measures 98 .8 39.0 -1.2 -0.2 8.0 0.0 46.9 335.3 18.1 78.7 5.0 1.6 12.4 16.9 208.0 331.3 -15.9 19.6 99 51.0 7.0 3.2 38.5 39.5 14.2 79.0 -5.3 22. Table 48 Accounting Policy on Waste. recycling • Reuse • Remanufacturing • Recycling Incineration • Low-temperature • High-temperature • Cement kilns Sanitary landfills • Landfills for bioactive materials • Landfills for stabilized materials • Landfills for inert materials Open dumpsite Temporary stored on-site° Total Closed-loop reuse.4 74.6 453.2 5.6 41.4 2.3 19.3 671. °To store waste temporary on-site best technologies are used.4 1.3 97.2 7.8 105.1 71.6 -15.5 -1.3 1 000 1 100 0.5 -1.2 87.4 656.2 12.3 14.8 10.5 5.4 3.8 15.4 438.1 -0.A Manual for the Prepareres and Users of Eco-efficiency Indicators Table 47 Waste Generated Waste generated Treatment technology Open-loop reuse.7 58.5 26.2 104.4 55.1 3.1 1.2 1.8 73. recycling • Reuse • Remanufacturing • Recycling Total waste generated Net value added (€) Eco-efficiency indicator "waste generated/net value added" (m3/€) Notes: Quality and classification Mineral Non-mineral Non-hazardous Hazardous 2000 2001 2000 2001 2000 2001 83.1 0.5 130.1 0. remanufacturing.4 107.1 72.9 5.5 82.1 321.8 7.4 52.2 10.4 227.7 Total* 2000 2001 189.0 1.1 -1.6 42.6 10.6 6.3 21. remanufacturing.

selenium compounds Cadmium. medical centres and clinics Wastes from the production and preparation of pharmaceutical products Waste pharmaceuticals.Guidelines III. paints. varnish Wastes from production. beryllium compounds Hexavalent chromium compounds Copper compounds Zinc compounds Arsenic. formulation and use of organic solvents Wastes from heat treatment and tempering operations containing cyanides Waste mineral oils unfit for their originally intended use Waste oils/water. formulation and use of wood preserving chemicals Wastes from the production. pigments. Table 49 Annex I of the Basel Convention Categories of Waste to be Controlled Y1-Y29 Category Definition Y1 Y2 Y3 Y4 Y5 Y6 Y7 Y8 Y9 Y10 Clinical wastes from medical care in hospitals. plasticizers. hydrocarbons/water mixtures. formulation and use of photographic chemicals and processing materials Wastes resulting from surface treatment of metals and plastics Residues arising from industrial waste disposal operations Metal carbonyls Beryllium. lacquers. distillation and any pyrolytic treatment Wastes from production. categories Y1-45) the categories of waste in Table 49 have to be controlled. dyes. mercury compounds Y11 Y12 Y13 Y14 Y15 Y16 Y17 Y18 Y19 Y20 Y21 Y22 Y23 Y24 Y25 Y26 Y27 Y28 Y29 99 . cadmium compounds Antimony. tellurium compounds Mercury.F. Annex I of the Basel Convention 302. drugs and medicines Wastes from the production.b. latex.7. arsenic compounds Selenium. emulsions Waste substances and articles containing or contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and/or polychlorinated terphenyls (PCTs) and/or polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs) Waste tarry residues arising from refining. formulation and use of inks. formulation and use of resins. antimony compounds Tellurium. formulation and use of biocides and phytopharmaceuticals Wastes from the manufacture. glues/adhesives Waste chemical substances arising from research and development or teaching activities which are not identified and/or are new and whose effects on man and/or the environment are not known Wastes of an explosive nature not subject to other legislation Wastes from production. Under the Basel Convention (Annex I.

lead compounds Inorganic fluorine compounds excluding calcium fluoride Inorganic cyanides Acidic solutions or acids in solid form Basic solutions or bases in solid form Asbestos (dust and fibres) Organic phosphorous compounds Organic cyanides Phenols. Y44). phenol compounds including chlorophenols Ethers Halogenated organic solvents Organic solvents excluding halogenated solvents Any congenor of polychlorinated dibenzo-furan Any congenor of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin Organohalogen compounds other than substances referred to in this Annex (e. 100 . thallium compounds Lead. Y39.g. Y42. Y43. Y41.A Manual for the Prepareres and Users of Eco-efficiency Indicators Table 50 Annex I of the Basel Convention Categories of Waste to be Controlled Y30-Y45 Category Definition Y30 Y31 Y32 Y33 Y34 Y35 Y36 Y37 Y38 Y39 Y40 Y41 Y42 Y43 Y44 Y45 Thallium.

101 . are liable to become spontaneously flammable or to give off flammable gases in dangerous quantities.3 H4. or not more than 65. New York. United Nations. or waste solids. According to the Basel Convention (Annex III. Flammable liquids The word "flammable" has the same meaning as "inflammable. Table 51 Annex III of the Basel Convention List of Hazardous Characteristics Class 1-4. Substances or wastes which. 3 H3 4.3 41 Corresponds to the hazard classification system included in the United Nations Recommendations on the Transport of Dangerous Goods (ST/SG/AC..1 H4. or liquids containing solids in solution or suspension (for example. Annex III of the Basel Convention 303. other than those classed as explosives.c.7.Guidelines III.2 4. varnishes. which under conditions encountered in transport are readily combustible. open-cup test. (Since the results of open-cup tests and of closed-cup tests are not strictly comparable and even individual results by the same test are often variable.6EC. Substances or wastes liable to spontaneous combustion Substances or wastes which are liable to spontaneous heating under normal conditions encountered in transport.10/1Rev. emit flammable gases Substances or wastes which.2 H4.F. etc. closed-cup test.5." Flammable liquids are liquids. or to heating up on contact with air. 1988).5E C.1 4. categories H1-H13) hazardous waste possesses the characteristics listed in Table 51 and Table 52. regulations varying from the above figures to make allowance for such differences would be within the spirit of this definition. by interaction with water. lacquers.3 UN Class1 1 41 Code Characteristics H1 Explosive An explosive substance or waste is a solid or liquid substance or waste (or mixture of substances or wastes) which is in itself capable by chemical reaction of producing gas at such a temperature and pressure and at such speed as to cause damage to the surroundings. paints. but not including substances or wastes otherwise classified on account of their dangerous characteristics) which give off a flammable vapour at temperatures of not more than 60. or mixtures of liquids. in contact with water.) Flammable solids Solids. and being then liable to catch fire. or may cause or contribute to fire through friction.

which can be applied to materials listed in Annex I. Ecotoxic Substances or wastes which if released present or may present immediate or delayed adverse impacts to the environment by means of bioaccumulation and/or toxic effects upon biotic systems. if they are inhaled or ingested or if they penetrate the skin. may involve delayed or chronic effects. including carcinogenicity. Corrosives Substances or wastes which.1 6. Organic Peroxides Organic substances or wastes which contain the bivalent-OO-structure are thermally unstable substances which may undergo exothermic selfaccelerating decomposition. may. Tests The potential hazards posed by certain types of wastes are not yet fully documented. Many countries have developed national tests. leachate. of yielding another material.1 H6. Further research is necessary in order to develop means to characterise potential hazards posed to man and/or the environment by these wastes. are liable to give off toxic gases in dangerous quantities. Liberation of toxic gases in contact with air or water Substances or wastes which. by any means.1 Oxidising Substances or wastes which.2 8 H8 9 H10 9 H11 9 H12 9 H13 102 . while in themselves not necessarily combustible. other goods or the means of transport. or even destroy.g. e.2 H6. will cause severe damage when in contact with living tissue. Infectious substances Substances or wastes containing viable micro-organisms or their toxins which are known or suspected to cause disease in animals or humans.) H5. in order to decide if these materials exhibit any of the characteristics listed in this Annex. will materially damage. by chemical action. cause. they may also cause other hazards. in the case of leakage. or. the combustion of other materials. by interaction with air or water. after disposal.1-9 UN Class1 5. tests to define quantitatively these hazards do not exist.1 Code Characteristics (cont.2 H5. Standardised tests have been derived with respect to pure substances and materials. 5. which possesses any of the characteristics listed above.2 6. or contribute to.. Toxic (Delayed or chronic) Substances or wastes which. Poisonous (Acute) Substances or wastes liable either to cause death or serious injury or to harm health if swallowed or inhaled or by skin contact. generally by yielding oxygen. Capable.A Manual for the Prepareres and Users of Eco-efficiency Indicators Table 52 Annex III of the Basel Convention List of Hazardous Characteristics Class 5.

Guidelines

III.G. Accounting Treatment of the Financial Items III.G.1. Objective

304. The objective of this manual is to provide guidance on the accounting treatment of the financial items used as reference figures for normalization in eco-efficiency accounting and reporting. III.G.2. Scope

305. This guidance should be applied by all enterprises in accounting for all reference figures used as normalization values for eco-efficiency indicators. III.G.3. Definitions

306. All financial items are defined in line with the International Accounting Standards (IAS). 307. For the purpose of eco-efficiency accounting and reporting, the following items are of importance and are defined as follows: (a) (b) (c) Value Added (see Box 9) Value Added = Revenue – Purchase of Goods and Services Net Value Added = Value Added - Depreciation on tangible assets Revenue is defined as the gross inflow of economic benefits during a period arising in the course of the ordinary activities of an enterprise when those inflows result in an increase in equity, excluding increases relating to contributions from equity participants (see IAS 18). Revenue includes only gross inflows of economic benefits received and receivable by the enterprise on its own account. It does not include taxes collected on behalf of third parties, nor does it include the amounts collected on behalf of the principle as in an agency relation. Revenue is generated from the following transactions as defined by IAS 18: (i) Sales of goods; (ii) Rendering of services; (iii) Interest, royalties and dividends Purchase of goods and services is the gross outflow of economic benefit to the supplier of the goods and services during a period arising in the course of the ordinary activities of an enterprise when those outflows would qualify as revenue according to IAS 18 with the supplier.

(d)

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Box 9. Value Added/Net Value Added
Value added is a widely used but often poorly understood concept in accounting. It is widely used in the sense that value added is the aggregate that gets taxed by a value added tax scheme. A value added tax is levied on the value which is added to the goods or services in question at each stage in the production and distribution process. This is achieved by levying a tax at each point en route, as ownership passes from one person to another. At every stage, "output" tax is charged on the current sales value, but the "input" tax which has been charged by those at an earlier stage of the game can be offset or recovered. Thus the tax liability at each stage is based on the difference between the value of the outputs and the value of the inputs (hence "added value"). Most countries have implemented a VAT. For social reporting it is used to show how the value created is distributed amongst different stakeholders (employees, lenders, authorities, shareholders). Value added is used as a normalization figure in environmental reports especially with multi-product companies, where for example tonnes of production is meaningless. There are two alternative ways to calculate value added, one method asks how value added is generated (source or tax approach), while the other asks how value added is distributed (distribution approach): • • Source or tax approach: Value added = Revenue – Cost of goods and services purchased Distribution approach: Value added = Salaries + Depreciation + Amortisation + Interest Paid + Taxes + Dividends + Retained Profit

Both approaches yield the same answer. 42 For the purpose of eco-efficiency accounting we need to go one step further (Lahti-Nuuttila 2002). Investment goods are not accounted for as goods and services purchased but rather as depreciation, although both are purchased from outside the enterprise. For the purpose of eco-efficiency accounting, investment goods (tangible assets to be precise) and goods purchased should not be treated differently. Their value has been created outside the enterprise and the energy, water etc. used and the waste produced for the production of the asset are accounted for within the accounts of the enterprise that produced the respective asset. Therefore, depreciation on tangible assets is deducted from value added. The resulting figure is defined as follows: Net value added = Revenue – Cost of goods and services purchased – Depreciation on tangible assets Net value added = Salaries + Amortization on intangible assets + Interest paid + Taxes + Dividends + Retained Profit

42

On the assumption that tangible assets are purchased from outside the enterprise. In turn, only amortisation of intangible assets is included in value added under the distribution approach.

104

Guidelines

III.G.4.

Recognition

308. The financial items shall be recognized according to applicable IAS standards. III.G.5. Measurement

309. The financial items shall be measured according to applicable IAS standards. III.G.6. Disclosure

310. The financial items shall be disclosed according to applicable IAS standards.

105

(iii) Control is the power to govern the financial and operating policies of an enterprise so as to obtain benefits from its activities (IAS 27. paragraph 12).H. paragraph 2).H. The following terms are used in this guideline with the meanings specified: (a) A subsidiary is an enterprise that is controlled by another enterprise (known as a parent) (IAS 27. 106 (b) (c) . Consolidation of Eco-efficiency Indicators III. paragraph 3). the methods of consolidation must be known and it must be clear that all entities consolidated have applied uniform accounting policies for like transactions and other events in similar circumstances. directly or indirectly through subsidiaries. paragraph 6).A Manual for the Prepareres and Users of Eco-efficiency Indicators III. paragraph 6). The objective of this manual is to provide guidance on the accounting treatment for eco-efficiency indicators and their environmental and financial items respectively. Definition 314. for a parent and its subsidiaries. (ii) A group is a parent and all its subsidiaries (IAS 27. which is subject to joint control (IAS 31. Primary Issues in Consolidating Environmental Items 311. The primary issues in consolidating environmental items are: (a) The scope of consolidation The scope of consolidation indicates which enterprises are and which are not integrated into the consolidated figures. A joint venture is a contractual arrangement whereby two or more parties undertake an economic activity. (i) A parent is an enterprise that has one or more subsidiaries (IAS 27. III.H. The scope and the methods of consolidation applied can influence the consolidated financial and environmental figures materially. III. According to the consolidation method applied.2. paragraph 6). (b) 312. Objective 313. Control is presumed to exist when the parent owns. paragraph 6).1. certain data may or may not appear in the consolidated group accounts.3. more than half of the voting power of an enterprise (IAS 27. An associate is an enterprise in which the investor has significant influence and which is neither a subsidiary nor a joint venture of the investor (IAS 28.H. The method of consolidation For a useful analysis of consolidated data. its investments in associates and/or joint ventures.

Consolidation Procedure 317. This guidance should be applied by all enterprises in the preparation and presentation of consolidated eco-efficiency data for subsidiaries (IAS 27). its interests in associates and joint ventures presented as those of a single enterprise. then the environmental items shall also be fully consolidated. III. Therefore the consolidation method used for the consolidated financial report (equity. The starting point for the recognition and measurement of eco-efficiency information .are activities and events of the reporting entity.H. revenue.1 of the framework on the principle of congruity).1) shall also be applied to the consolidation of the environmental items used for the eco-efficiency indicators. The implications are as follows: (a) (b) The consolidated eco-efficiency data fully include the environmental and financial items of subsidiaries that are controlled by the parent.H.5. purchase of goods and services) are (a) (b) (c) Fully consolidated. 320. 107 . Scope of Guidance III.Guidelines (d) Consolidated eco-efficiency information is the eco-efficiency data of a parent and its subsidiaries. 31 and other standards apply accordingly. then the environmental items shall also be consolidated on the basis of equity consolidation. for a description of these methods see I. Proportionally consolidated then the environmental items shall also be proportionally consolidated. investments in associates (IAS 28) and investments in joint ventures (IAS 31).4. proportional consolidation. full. In the case of associates where equity consolidation is applied the consolidated eco-efficiency data do not include environmental and financial items of the associates. 315. 28. 319. 316. Consolidated using the equity method.E. Consolidated eco-efficiency statements should be prepared using uniform accounting policies for both the environmental and the financial items for like transactions and other events in similar circumstances (IAS 27. an enterprise shall look at the same set of activities and events as when recognizing the financial information (see II.regardless of whether it is environmental or financial . When recognizing environmental information. paragraph 21). If the financial items or group of financial items used for a consolidated eco-efficiency statement (net value added. 318. This implies that uniform accounting policies must be applied when consolidating financial and environmental items (see paragraph above). Accounting policies for consolidation as defined by IAS 27.A.

equity. 50 per cent or more of voting rights. liabilities.6. The standard procedures are (IAS 22. Full Consolidation 323.31): III. 324.a. 322. The magnitude of control (e.H. or by using the equity method.g. In a consolidated eco-efficiency statement an enterprise should disclose a listing of all subsidiaries.7. and any unrealized losses would also be eliminated unless costs cannot be recovered. The enterprise under the parent’s control is referred to as a subsidiary. investments in associates and joint ventures including (a) (b) (c) (d) The names and descriptions of all subsidiaries. the percentage of voting share). The consolidation method used in the financial statements. Annex to Consolidation (e) (f) III. IAS and other standards require three different methods of consolidation depending on the stake of the investor: full consolidation. Disclosure III. income and expenses. the financial statements of the enterprises in the group are combined on a line-by-line basis by adding together like items of assets. The carrying amounts of any inter-enterprise investments (in particular. The eco-efficiency information of all consolidated entities.H. those of the parent enterprise) and the related portion of the equity of each of the group enterprises are eliminated. equity consolidation or proportional consolidation. A management discussion on the financial and environmental aspects of the consolidation methodology and procedure applied. the parent enterprise owns or controls. acquisitions or divesting activities in the reporting period. investments in associates and joint ventures. 321. This means that. directly or indirectly. In that case. regardless of whether they are consolidated fully.7. environmental and financial items of the joint venture are included in the consolidated ecoefficiency data in line with the percentage used in financial consolidation.27. in practice. Inter-enterprise balances and inter-enterprise transactions are totally eliminated. Full consolidation is normally applied to all enterprises that are controlled by a parent enterprise. A management discussion on the financial and environmental aspects of mergers. 108 . proportionately.A Manual for the Prepareres and Users of Eco-efficiency Indicators (c) In the case of joint ventures where proportionate consolidation is applied the consolidated eco-efficiency data include environmental and financial items of the joint venture.H. Any unrealized profits resulting from inter-enterprise transactions are eliminated. Under full consolidation.

paragraph 2). paragraph 50). together with any unrealized profits and losses relating thereto.c. "Significant influence" is described by the IASB as the power to participate in the financial and operating policy decisions of the investee but not control over those policies (IAS 28. The consolidated income statements reflect the transnational corporation’s share of the operating results of the other enterprise" (UNCTAD 1994. Equity Method 325.H.b. income and expenses of the other group’s enterprises is combined on a line-by-line basis with similar items in the parent’s/investor’s financial statements. Proportionate Consolidation 328. As is the case in full consolidation. The equity method is normally applied for investments in "associates". The income statement reflects income from the investment only to the extent that the investor receives a share of the accumulated net profits of the investee. Under proportionate consolidation. An "associate" is an enterprise which is neither a subsidiary nor a joint venture and in which the investor has a significant influence (normally. Proportionate consolidation is normally only used in accounting for the interests in a joint venture (which has been defined by the IASB as "a contractual arrangement whereby two or more parties undertake an economic activity so as to obtain benefits from it" (IAS 31.Guidelines III. III. an initial investment by a transnational corporation in another enterprise is so adjusted in the consolidated financial statements of the transnational corporation as to reflect its share of the net assets of the other enterprise.7. together with any unrealized profits and losses relating thereto. Standards issued by the IASB indicate that "an investment in an associate should be accounted for in consolidated financial statements under the equity method except when the investment is acquired and held exclusively with a view to its disposal in the near future in which case it should be accounted for under the cost method" 43 (IAS 28. 329. paragraph 8). the investor’s investment in an investee enterprise is initially recorded at cost and is adjusted thereafter for changes in the net assets of that enterprise (IAS 28. between 20 per cent and 49 per cent).7. 326. paragraph 3). the parent’s/investor’s share of each of the assets. liabilities. 43 Under the cost method.H. paragraph 3). Again. Under the equity method. the investment is recorded at its initial cost. the method is not permitted in some jurisdictions. inter-enterprise balances and inter-enterprise transactions are eliminated. The Intergovernmental Working Group of Experts on International Standards of Accounting and Reporting (ISAR) has indicated that "under the equity method. Even in this situation. inter-enterprise balances and inter-enterprise transactions are eliminated. 327. arising after the investment has been made. 109 .

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OECD/IEA (2001a): CO2-Emissions from Fuel Combustion 1971-1999. Lahti-Nuuttila.IV. OECD/IEA (2001c): Energy Balances and Energy Statistics of Non-OECD Countries 1998-1999.html). OECD/IEA (2001b): Energy Balances and Energy Statistics of OECD Countries 19981999. October/November 2002. OECD/IEA (1997): Indicators of Energy Use and Efficiency. Paris: OECD. Forest and Landscape (1996): Technical Ordinance on Waste.com/projects/eco_efficiency_indicators. Beijing 1999. Swiss Agency for the Environment. Schaltegger/Sturm (1989): Ökologieinduzierte Entscheidungsinstrumente des Managements. Paris: OECD. Workbook and Reporting Instructions. Montreal 1997. IASB (2002): International Accounting Standards 2002. Montreal Protocol (2000): The Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer as adjusted and/or amended in London 1990.ellipson. IPCC (1996a): Climate Change 1995: The Science of Climate Change. IAS #. REFERENCES Basel Convention (1992): Basel Convention on the Control of Transboundary Movements of Hazardous Wastes and their Disposal. GRI (2001): The Global Reporting Initiative Sustainability Reporting Guidelines. IPCC (2001): Climate Change 2001: The Scientific Basis. 111 . Paris: OECD. in: IASB: International Accounting Standards 2002. Vienna 1995. Sturm/Müller (2001): Standardized Eco-Efficiency Indicators 2001 (http://www. in: IASB: International Accounting Standards 2002. IASB Framework. Kimmo (2002): Personal e-mail correspondence. Reference Manual. Kyoto Protocol (1997): Kyoto Protocol to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. UNEP: 2000. IPCC (1996b): Revised 1996 Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories. Copenhagen 1992.

al.. 112 . by Stefan Schmidheiny et. WBCSD (1996): Changing Course. UNCTAD (2001): Integrating Environmental and Financial Performance at the Enterprise Level: A Methodology for Standardizing Eco-efficiency Indicators. The Intergovernmental Working Group of Experts on International Standards of Accounting and Reporting.A Manual for the Prepareres and Users of Eco-efficiency Indicators UNCTAD (1994): Conclusions on Accounting and Reporting by Transnational Corporations. UNEP (1999): Handbook on Data Reporting under the Montreal Protocol. UNEP (2000): The GHG Indicator: UNEP Guidelines for Calculating Greenhouse Gas Emissions for Businesses and Non-Commercial Organizations. with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development.

Group Service Environment. Nairobi/Kenya. Health and Safety Canadian Institute of Chartered Accountants (CICA). Head EcoEfficiency Projects Eastern Central and Southern African Federation of Accountants (ECSAFA). Quantitative Team c4c ltd. Suphamit Techamontrikul R. Senior Manager Environmental Protection Ciba Specialty Chemicals Inc. (Switzerland) ABN AMRO (Brazil). Chief Executive Officer DaimlerChrysler Ltd. Child Villiers Christopher Wells 113 . (Germany). Moore Dr. STEERING GROUP 330.A. The members of the steering group are: Christoph Butz Pictet & Cie. SRI Manager Ndung'u Gathinji Dr. Research Studies Director Chulalongkorn University Bangkok (Thailand). Udo Hartmann Charles Peter Naish David J. (Switzerland). Sustainability Expert. (Switzerland).V. (Switzerland) Founder of concepts for carbon (c4c) Claude Fussler World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD). Lecturer for Accounting Nestlé S.

Constantine Bartel Phone +41-22-917-5802.com e-mail: mueller@ellipson. Mr. Kaspar Müller Ellipson Ltd Leonhardsgraben 52 CH-4051 Basel Switzerland Ms.org/isar or at http://www.lk Phone: +94-8-232 318 Dr.ellipson.com For information.com Phone: +41-61-261 93 20 Fax: +41-61-261 93 13 e-mail: arrow@sltnet. Suji Upasena Arrow Consult 14/2. AUTHORS e-mail: sturm@ellipson.org Mail: UNCTAD-ISAR DITE-UNCTAD Palais des Nations 1211-Geneva 10 Switzerland 114 . Sri Dharmapala Mawatha Asgiriya. Kandy Sri Lanka The most recent version is always available at http://www. or.com Web: www.unctad.ellipson. 5601 Fax + 41-22-907-0122 E-mail: isar@unctad. Andreas Sturm (Project Leader) Mr. 5495.VI.

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