You are on page 1of 31

Surface Characterization 

by Spectroscopy
• The surface of a solid in contact with a liquid or gaseous phase usually differs 
substantially from the interior of the solid both in chemical composition and 
physical properties.

• Characterization of these surface properties is often importance in a number 
of fields such as:
• semiconductor thin film technology, 
• corrosion and adhesion mechanisms, and 
• studies of the behavior and functions of biological membranes
Definition of a solid surface

Vacuum, gas, or liquid

Top layer of atoms or molecules
Boundary,
Several atomic  Transition layer
layers deep (non‐uniform composition that varies continuously)
(part of the solid that 
differs in composition 
from the average  bulk
composition of the bulk )

• Ordinarily, the difference in composition of surface layer does not significantly affect 
the measured overall average composition of the bulk

• From practical standpoint, it appears best to adopt an operational definition of a 
surface as that volume of the solid that a specific measurement technique samples
Types of surface measurements

• Classical methods provide information about the physical nature of surfaces but 
less about their chemical nature

• Methods involve:
• Obtaining optical and electron microscopic images
• Measurement of adsorption isotherms,
• Surface areas, 
• Surface roughness,
• Pore sizes, and
• Reflectivity.

• Beginning in the 1950’s spectroscopic surface methods began to appear that 
provided information about the chemical nature of surfaces.
General Technique in Surface Spectroscopy

To spectrometer
From source
• Most effective surface methods are 
those in which the primary beam, 
Secondary beam
Primary beam secondary beam, or both is made up 
(photons, 
(photons, electrons,  electrons, ions, or  of either electrons, ions, or molecules 
ions, or molecules) molecules) and not photons.

Sample Æ this limitation assures that the 
measurements are restricted to the 
surface.
Example:
Beam Maximum penetration depth
Electrons or ions (1 keV) 25 Å
Photon of same energy 10,000 Å
Surface Spectroscopic Methods

Six of the more widely used spectroscopic methods:

Method Primary Beam Secondary Beam


X‐ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), or X‐ray photons Electrons
Electron Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis (ESCA)
Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES) Electrons, or Electrons
X‐ray photons
Ultraviolet Photoelectron Spectroscopy (UPS) UV photons Electrons
Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) Ions Ions
Laser Microprobe Mass Spectrometry (LMMS) Photons Ions
Electron Microprobe (EM) Electrons X‐ray photons
Sampling Surfaces

Regardless of the type of spectroscopic surface methods being used, three 
types of sampling are employed:

1) Focusing primary beam on a single small area of the sample and observing 
the secondary beam.

2) Mapping the surface, in which a region of the surface is scanned by moving 
the primary beam across the surface in a raster pattern of measured 
increments and observing changes in the secondary beam that result.

3) Depth profiling. A beam of ions is used to etch a hole in the surface by 
sputtering. During the process a finer primary beam is used to produce a 
secondary beam from the center of the hole, which provides the analytical 
data on the surface composition as a function of depth.
Surface Contamination
• A frequently encountered problem is contamination by adsorption of components 
of the atmosphere such as oxygen, water, and carbon dioxide.
• Even in vacuum, this type of contamination occurs in a relatively short time.

Pressure (torr) Time for monolayer formation
10‐6 3 seconds
10‐8 1 hour
10‐10 10 hours

• Cleaning may involve:
• Baking sample at high temperature
• Sputtering sample with inert gas ions
• Mechanical scrapping or polishing the surface with an abrasive
• Ultrasonic washing in various solvents
• Bathing sample in reducing atmosphere to remove oxides

• The primary beam itself can alter the surface as measurement progresses
X‐ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS)
• Pioneered by Swedish physicist K. Siegbahn (Nobel prize, 1981)
• Chose to call the technique electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA)
• Because XPS provides information about:
‐ atomic composition
‐ structure and oxidation state

Fundamental difference between electron 
spectroscopy and other types of 
spectroscopy:
• In electron spectroscopy, the kinetic 
energy of emitted electrons is 
recorded.
• Thus, the spectrum consists of a plot of 
the number of emitted electrons, or 
the power of the electron beam, as a 
function of the energy (or the 
frequency or wavelength) of the 
emitted electrons.
Principles of XPS
ƒ One of the photons of a monoenergetic x‐ray 
Physical process: beam of known energy hv displaces an electron e‐
from a K orbital Eb :
A + hν → A +∗ + e −
where:
A can be an atom, a molecule, or an ion, 
Outer shell or 
valence 
electrons A+*  is an electronically excited ion with 
a positive charge greater than that of A.

ƒ Kinetic energy of emitted electron Ek is 
measured
ƒ The binding energy of the electron Eb is 
then calculated by means of:
Eb = hv − Ek − w
inner shell 
K and L 
electrons
• Eb is a characteristic of the atom and orbital from 
which the electron is emitted.
• w is the work function
Example of a low resolution or survey XPS spectrum:

• X‐ray spectrum of Tetrapropylammonium‐
diflouridethiophosphate
• Peaks are labeled according to the element and 
orbital from which the emitted electron 
originated
• Analyte consisted of an organic compound 
made up of 6 elements
• Presence of oxygen – suggesting that some 
surface oxidation of the compound
• Binding energy of 1s electrons increase with 
atomic number (due to increase positive 
charge of nucleus)

• More than one peak for a given 
element can be observed e.g. 
peaks for 2s and 2p electrons of 
S and P

• Large background count arises because associated with each peak is a tail due to ejected 
electrons that have lost part of their energy by inelastic collisions within the slid sample.
• These electrons have less kinetic energy than their non‐scattered counterparts and will thus 
appear at lower kinetic energies or higher binding energies.
Instrumentation
(3)

(4)
Components of XPS spectrometer:
1. Source 
2. Sample holder
3. Analyzer
4. Detector (5)
5. Signal processor and read‐out

XPS spectrometers generally require elaborate  (2)
vacuum systems to reduce pressure in all of the 
components to as low as 10‐5 to 10‐10 torr (1)
1. Sources:
• Simplest sources
o X‐ray tubes equipped with magnesium or aluminum targets with suitable 
filters
o Kα lines for Mg and Al have considerably narrower bandwidths (0.8 to 0.9
eV) compared to higher atomic number elements
o Narrow bands Æ higher resolution

• More sophisticated sources:


o Use crystal monochromator to x‐ray beam having about 0.3 bandwidth
o Monochromators eliminate Bremsstrahlung background
Æ improving S/N ratio
o Allow smaller spots on a surface to be examined
2. Sample holders:

• Solid samples are mounted in a fixed position as close to the photon or electron 
source and entrance slit as possible

• The sample compartment must be evacuated to a pressure of 10‐5 torr or smaller


Æto avoid attenuation of the electron beam

• Usually, better vacuums (10‐9 to 10‐10 torr) are required


ÆTo avoid contamination of surface by oxygen or water

• Gas samples are leaked into the sample area through a slit 
‐‐ slit sizes are such that a pressure of perhaps 10‐2 torr
‐‐ higher pressures lead to excessive attenuation of electron beam due to 
inelastic collisions
‐‐ on the other hand, if sample pressure is too low, weakened signals are 
obtained.
3. Analyzers:

• Mostly hemispherical type

• Electron beam is deflected by an electrostatic magnetic field

• Electron travel in a curved path

• Radius of curvature is dependent upon 
• Kinetic energy of electron beam, and
• Magnitude of the field

• By varying the field, electron of various kinetic energies can be focused on 
the detector

• Typically, pressures in the analyzer are maintained at or below 10‐5 torr.
4. Transducers:

• Mostly based on solid‐state, channel electron multipliers
• These consist of tubes of glass that have been doped with lead or 
vanadium

• When a potential of several kilovolts is applied
ÆA cascade or pulse of 106 to 108 electrons are produced for each incident 
electron

• The pulses are then counted electronically

• 2‐D multi‐channel electron transducers are now available
Application of XPS
XPS (or ESCA) provides 
• qualitative, and 
• quantitative information about elemental composition of 
matter
• Useful structural information

a) Qualitative Analysis
• A low‐resolution, wide‐scan XPS spectrum (called a survey spectrum) 
serves as a basis for the determination of elemental composition of 
samples
• With Mg or Al Kα source, all elements (except H and He) emit core 
electrons having characteristic binding energies
• Typical spectrum encompasses a kinetic energy range of 250 to 1500 eV
‐‐ (correspond to binding energies of about 0 to 1250 eV)
• Peaks are well resolved
ÆUnambiguous identification (provided the element is present in 
concentration > 0.1 %
• Overlapping peaks are resolved by investigating other spectral regions 
for additional peaks
• Often peaks resulting from Auger electrons are found in XPS spectra
• Such peaks are readily identified by comparing spectra produced by two  x‐ray 
sources (usually Mg and Al Kα)
• Auger peaks remain unchanged on the kinetic energy scale while photoelectric 
peaks are displaced.

b) Chemical shifts and oxidation states

• Examination of a peak under conditions of higher energy resolution, 
ÆPosition of maximum is found to depend to a small degree upon the 
chemical environment of the atom responsible for the peak
• That is, variations in the number of valence electrons, and the type of bonds 
they form, influence the binding energies of core electrons
Effect of number of valance electrons (thus, oxidation states) 

• Binding energies increases as oxidation state becomes more positive
• Explanation for this chemical shift:
• Assume that attraction of the nucleus for core electrons is diminished by presence of 
outer electrons
• When one of these electrons is removed, the effective charge sensed for the core 
electrons is increased Æ increase in binding energy
• One of the most important application of XPS ÆIdentification of oxidation states of elements 
in inorganic compounds
c) Chemical shifts and structure

Effect of structure on the position of peaks for an element
• Each peak correspond to the 1s electron of the carbon atom 
located directly above it in the structural formula

The shift in binding energies can be rationalized by taking into 
account the effect of the various functional groups on the 
effective nuclear charge experienced by the 1s core electron.

• Of all the attached groups, fluorine atoms have the 
greatest ability to withdraw electron density  from 
the carbon atom
• The effective nuclear charge felt by the carbon 1s 
electron is therefore a maximum
Æ higher binding energy

Carbon 1s x‐ray photoelectron 
spectrum for ethyl trifluoroacetate
d) Quantitative analysis

• Has not enjoyed widespread application
• Both peak intensities and peak areas have been used as the analytical parameter 
• the relationship between these quantities and concentration are established 
empirically
• Internal standards have been recommended
• Relative precisions of 3% to 10% have been claimed
• For analysis of solids and liquids,
ÆNecessary to assume surface composition is the same as bulk composition
Æleads to significant errors
Example:
Source: Mg Kα (λ = 9.89 Å)
Kinetic energy of XPS electron = 1073.5 eV
Work function = 14.7 eV

What is the binding energy for the emitted electrons?
If source is changed to Al Kα (λ = 8.3393 Å), what is the kinetic energy of the emitted 
electron?

Eb = hv − Ek − w
hc
hv =
λ
6 .6 2 5 6 × 1 0 − 3 4 J ⋅ s × 2 .9 9 7 9 × 1 0 1 0 c m ⋅ s − 1
= −8 −1
× 6 .2 4 1 8 × 1 0 1 8 e V ⋅ J − 1
9 .8 9 0 × 1 0 c m ⋅ Α
= 1 2 5 3 .6 e V

Eb = 1253.6 − 1073.5 − 14.7


= 165.4 eV
Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES)
• In contrast to XPS,  AES is based upon a two‐step process:
First step: Formation of an electronically excited ion A+* by exposing the 
analyte to a beam of electrons (or sometimes x‐rays):

A + ei− → A +∗ + ei'− + eA−

Incident electron  Incident electron  Electron 


from source after interaction  ejected from 
with A one of the inner 
orbitals of A
Second step:  Relaxation of excited ion A+* in either of two ways:

A +∗ → A + + hv f
Fluorescence photon
or

A +∗ → A ++ + eA−
Auger electron
X‐ray fluorescence

A +∗ → A + + hv f
• Energy of fluorescence radiation 
is independent of the excitation 
energy
• Thus, polychromatic radiation 
can be used for the excitation 
step
Auger electron emission

+∗ ++ −
• The energy given up in relaxation results in the ejection of an 
A →A +e
A electron (the Auger electron) with a kinetic energy Ek
• Energy of the Auger electron is independent of the energy of 
the photon or electron that originally created the vacancy in 
energy level Eb
ÆA monoenergetic source is not required for excitation

• This independence of Auger peaks from input energy makes 
it possible to differentiate between the Auger peak in a 
spectrum and the XPS peaks

• The kinetic energy of the Auger electron =
(energy released in relaxation of excited ion, Eb – E’b) 
− (energy required to remove the second electron from its orbit, E’b)

Thus, Ek = ( Eb − Eb′ ) − Eb′


= Eb − 2 Eb′
• Auger emissions are describe in terms of the type of orbital transitions 
involved in the production of the electron.
Example:

a KLL Auger transition involves
• an initial removal of a K electron, followed by
• a transition of an L electron to the K orbital, with a simultaneous
• ejection of a second L electron

• Other common transitions are LMN and MNN
Typical Auger spectra for two samples of 70% Cu/30% Ni alloy

Sample A: passivated by anodic oxidation
Sample B: not passivated
• Derivative of the counting rate are used 
to enhance the small peaks and to 
repress the effect of the large but slowly 
changing, scattered electron background 
radiation

• Auger electron emission and x‐ray 
fluorescence are competitive processes
• Their rates depend upon the 
atomic number of the element 
involved
• High atomic numbers favor 
fluorescence
• Auger emission predominates with 
atoms of low atomic numbers
Æ x‐ray fluorescence not a very 
sensitive  means of detecting 
elements with Atm. No. < 10
• AES and XPS provide similar information about the composition of matter.

• The methods tend to be complimentary rather than competitive.

• AES is more reliable and efficient for certain applications, while XPS for others.

• Particular strength of AES:
• Its sensitivity for atoms of low atomic numbers,
• Its minimal matrix effects,
• Its high spatial resolution
• High spatial resolution arises because the primary beam is made up of 
electrons that can be more tightly focused on a surface than can x‐
rays.
Instrumentation
• Similar to that of XPS except that the source is usually an electron gun rather 
than an x‐ray tube.

Schematic of electron gun
• Heated tungsten filament 
≈ 0.1 mm in diameter bent into the 
shape of a hairpin with a V‐shaped tip
• The cathodic filament is maintained at a 
potential of 1 to 50 kV with respect to the 
anode
• Wehnelt cylinder is biased negatively with 
respect to filament
• Effect of field in the gun is to cause the 
emitted electrons to converge on a tiny 
spot called the crossover that has a 
diameter of d0 (≈ 50 µm)

• the beam of electrons produced (energy of1 to 10 keV) can be focused on the surface 
for Auger electron studies.
• Beam diameters ranging from 500 to 5 µm are used.
• Guns producing beams of approximately 5 µm are called Auger microprobes. 
Applications of Auger Electron Spectroscopy

a) Qualitative analysis of solid surface
• Typically, an Auger spectrum is obtained by bombarding a small area of a 
surface ( diameter from 5 to 500 µm) with a beam  of electrons from a gun

• An advantage of AES for surface studies is the low‐energy Auger electrons  
(20 to 1000 eV) are able to penetrate only a few atomic layers (3 to 20 Å) 
of solid
Æ while electrons from the electron guns penetrate to a 
considerably greater depth below the sample surface, only 
those Auger electrons from the first four or five atomic layers 
escape to reach the analyzer.

Æ consequently, an Auger spectrum is likely to reflect the true 
surface composition of solids.
b) Depth profiling of surfaces

• Involves the determination of the elemental composition of a surface as it is 
being etched away (sputtered) by a beam of argon ions.

• The microprobe and etching beams operate 
simultaneously.

• The intensity of one or more Auger peaks 
are recorded as a function of time.

• Since etching rate is related to time, a depth 
profile of elemental composition is obtained.

• Such information is of importance in a 
variety of studies such as 
• Corrosion chemistry
• Catalyst behavior
• Properties of semiconductor junctions