The East Northamptonshire Initial Teacher Training College: Graduate Teacher Training Programme

Lesson Observation Proforma – P.E Tuesday 11th January 2011
School Date Teacher Number of student numbers Student ability Focus of observation Wellingborough Park Junior 11/01/2011 Mrs Jo Whiting 30 Mixed Structure and delivery Lesson time Year group Subject Other adults in the room 13.00-14.15 Y3 Physical Education M 18 F T.A and myself

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Establishing the learning environment (Routines: entry, registers, distributing equipment, dismissal) Verbal re-cap of what was covered during yesterdays lesson – converting dollars into pounds. APP sheets out for children to reference and measure progress from yesterday to today. Children working from level 4 to 5. DT outlines that because the children have achieved well during the previous lesson, the plans have changed, and there’s no need to go over yesterdays conversion again. How the teacher gains the students’ attention Children are well trained and come into the room ready to learn and already settled. They all have the correct and necessary equipment, including their own APP sheets. After the starter, DT asks the children ‘who’s good at stopping?’. DT then claps and children all ready for listening, hands empty and looking towards the front. Explanation of learning objectives and success criteria L.I written up on the board already and related to at the very beginning of the lesson. DT outlines the starter isn’t related to the L.I., but will of course be useful. Steps to success: 1) to understand how to use a probability scale, 2) to predict certain events/outcomes, 3) design a fair investigation and write a generalised conclusion. These are referred to at the start of a lesson, and after the recording of the various probabilities. Evidence of a three part lesson: a starter, main task(s) and a plenary DT outlines that the starter isn’t part of, or related too, the L.I. Starter focuses on rules applied to numbers divisible by 2,3,4,5,6,7. Verbal Q&A session about various rules of division. Starter mostly focuses on dividing by 7. The rule outlines is that the last number is doubled, then taken away from the rest of the number, e.g. 672… 2x2=4, 67-4=63 (672 divided by 7 = 63). Children instructed to write down numbers between x and x, or any 3 digit numbers, and to divide them by 7 using the method above, great way of differentiating a starter activity, “this table, any 3 digit numbers”, “this table, numbers between 1-50”. A child to do 5 sums each as their starter. Starter is verbally extended for the children who are confident with this – ‘find a 3 digit number that goes into 7’. Then again “find the same but with a 4 digit number”. DT summarises the starter by taking the examples of 4 digit numbers and checking them with the easiteach calculator. A final part of the starter sees DT introducing a rule about the 11x’s table. After explaining the rule, DT sets a challenge of “who can find

The East Northamptonshire Initial Teacher Training College: Graduate Teacher Training Programme

a 4 digit number that is in the 11x’s table?” The main teaching begins with the introduction of a probability scale. The scale is displayed on the IWB and DT asks for some examples of events that are impossible, then for examples of events that are certain. This provides are great opportunity for some humour and rapport. DT guides and highlights the events into a mathematical theme. “Evens” is used to describe the half-way point on the scale. more examples from the children of 50/50 events. The childrens task is to work out the probability different scores when throwing a dice two times. Children instructed to draw a probability scale in their books. DT then asks the children for some things to think about, e.g ‘is there a number that’s impossible to get?’ etc. DT instructs that they will come back to this to discuss at the end of the lesson. Children then instructed to draw a tally chart in their books where they will measure their throws of a dice. DT takes a range of questions about the task as he hands out the dice to the children. Children are working in 2’s and 3’s to throw the dice and record their results in their tally charts. Dices to be thrown 100 times and each result recorded in the tally charts. *** Lesson then interrupted for a few minutes as another maths group, also working with data collection themes, come in and need to gather some data from the class about which after-school clubs the children would like to join. This serves as a nice way of breaking up the lesson as this session is 1hr15mins in duration. *** As the children begin to finish, the class comes back together as a group. DT refers back to some predictions and highlights that a total of 12 with 2 dice throws, is pretty un-likely, as there’s only one combination of this. Children are asked to write down all the different combinations by throwing a dice twice, e.g. 7=3&4, 2&5, 6&1 etc. DT then brings the learning together and matches the tally chart outcomes with the levels of probability recorded by the children. As the lesson ends, DT asks the children to record a red, orange or green circle on their work to self-assess their level of confidence with today’s activities. Teaching and learning strategies; subject knowledge DT’s subject knowledge is fantastic, a real inspiration. It is clear that the children recognise and appreciate this. Time indicators are used to good effect throughout the lesson, counting down to end a task etc. When the children are set to drawing a tally chart in their books, DT advises that the first person to finish will get a special merit sticker. Behaviour management strategies None needed. The children remained engaged throughout and there were no negative behaviours to deal with. When the children are working and DT needs to bring the class back together again, DT has 2 claps. The first signals to stop what they’re doing, and the second signals to stop Assessment methods As with most practical subjects, the vast majority of JW’s assessment is completed via observations, coupled with some questioning. Use of other adults in the room and how this affects the dynamics of the lesson

The East Northamptonshire Initial Teacher Training College: Graduate Teacher Training Programme

The 2 other staff members present are joining in and modelling. They are there working with the 2 children from the DSP unit. Relationships with students Good. DT has a wonderful rapport with the children and uses humour when highlighting minor mistakes. DT recommends the children (and me) a good website for maths activities – ‘maths is fun’. What the students learnt in the lesson (were the learning objectives and success criteria met?) Yes, this was due to the physical and practical nature of the work, and the fact that DT linked the main teaching steps and plenaries so effectively. Any other relevant points noticed in the lesson Children using the back of their maths books to record the challenges and tasks set by DT.

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