College Entrance Examination Board

QUESTIONS
SET AT THE EXAMINATIONS HELD
June 15-20, 1914
GINN AND COMPANY
BOSTON • NEW YORK• CHICAGO • LONDON
ATLANTA• DALLAS - COLUMBUS • SAN FRANCISCO
COPYRIGHTS 1914
BYTHE
COLLEGE ENTRANCE EXAMINATIONBOARD
ALLRIGHTS RESERVED
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l t:be 1 Rtbenacum dress
GINNANDCOMPANY• PRO•
PRIETORS . BOSTON• U.S.A.
CONTENTS
PRHFACE

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BIOLOGY

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ANY
CHEMISTRY

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DRAWING .

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ENGLISH .

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FRENCH

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CJFOGRAPHY

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X-MAN
Hx<TORY
LAID;
MATHEMATICS

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W, sic
sicS
StA\I II .
EDt LE OF EXAMINATIONS
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129
133
College Entrance Examination Voara
COLLEGES
Aa,-?phi College: Professor HENDERSON
- teerst College: Dean OLDS
.own University: Dean RANDALL
r Mawr College: President THOMAS
School of AppliedScience: President HOWE
gate University: Dean CRAWSHAW
, lumbia College: Dean KEPPEL
Cornell University: President SCHURMAN
Dartmouth College: Dean LAYCOCK
Gcsucher College: President GUTH
HarvardUniversity: Dean HURLBUT, Chairman
JohnsHopkins University: Dean GRIFFIN
Nfassachusetts Institute ofTechnology: ProfessorTYLER
Mount Holyoke College: President WOOLLEY
NewYorkUniversity: Chancellor BROWN
`. HENRYBLACK, Boston, Mass.
H. (. BUEHLER, Lakeville, Conn.
,
HV H. DENBIGH, NewYork, N.Y.
WiLsoN FARRAND, Newark, N. J.
WILLIAMGALLAGHER, South Braintree, Mass.
AND UNIVERSITIES
REPRESENTATIVES OF THE SECONDARY SCHOOLS
Princeton University: Dean MCCLENAHAN
Rutgers College: Dean BEVIER
Smith College: President BURTON
Stevens Institute of Technology: President HUMPHREYS
Swarthmore College: Dean ALEXANDER
Tufts College: Dean WREN
Union College: DeanRIPTON
Universityof Pennsylvania: Dean FRAZER
Vassar College: Dean MCCALEB
WellesleyCollege: President PENDLETON
Wells College: President MACMILLAN
Wesleyan University: Professor NICOLSON
Western Reserve University: President THwtNG
Williams College: Dean FERRY
Yale University: Professor CORWIN
EDWARDL. HARRIS, Cleveland, Ohio
WILLIAMC. HILL, Springfield, Mass.
JAMESL. PATTERSON, Philadelphia, Pa.
STANLEY R. YARNALL, Philadelphia, Pa.
SECRETARY: THOMAS S. FISKE, PH. D.
POSTOFFICESUB-STATION 84, NewYork, N.Y.
The College Entrance Examination Board consists of the president
authorized representative of each participating college or university and of
sentatives of the secondary schools.
Representatives of the secondary schools are appointed, in such manner as the
association choosing them may direct, by
or an
repre-
The NewEngland Association of Colleges and Preparatory Schools
The Association of Colleges and Preparatory Schools of the Middle States
and Maryland
The Association of Colleges and Preparatory Schools of the Southern States
The North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools
Each association may appoint one secondary-school representative for every three
colleges and universities that are members of the Board and represented in such
association, provided, however, that one representative may be appointed on the
admission to the Board of one such college or university, and provided further, that
the number of secondary-school representatives appointed by any one association
shall in no case exceed five. Representatives of secondary schools may also be
appointed directly by the Board to the number of five.
The certificates issued by the Board are accepted by almost every college and
university in the United States.
No college which accepts these certificates in lieu of separate admission exami
nations surrenders its right to enforce such standards of excellence as it pleases,
5
or to make such allowance as it wishes for character and capacity on the part of
students applying for admission. The certificate merely states that the holder was
examined at a stated time and place in specified subjects and, as a result of such
examinations, received the ratings entered upon the certificate.

Each college deter-
mines for itself what subjects it will require for admission and what minimumrating
it will accept as satisfactory.
The manifest advantages of the examinations held by the Board are
1. That they are uniformin subject-matter.
z. That they are uniformly administered.
3. That they are held at many points, to meet the convenience of students, at
one and the same time.
4.
That they represent the cooperative effort of a group of colleges, no one of
which thereby surrenders its individuality.
5. That they represent the cooperation of colleges and secondary schools in
respect to a matter of vital importance to both.
6. That by reason of their uniformity they aid greatly the work of the secondary
schools.
7.
That they tend to effect a marked saving of time, money, and effort in
administering college admission requirements.
The pamphlet containing the definitions of the several requirements will be sent
to any address on receipt of ten cents in stamps.
The uniformentrance examinations of 1915 will be held during the week begin-
ning June
1 4,
1915.
A list of places at which the examinations are to be held will be published about
March 1. Requests that the examinations be held at particular points, in order to
receive proper consideration, should be received by the secretary not later than
February 1.
Full information in regard to examination fees, dates at which applications for
examination must be filed, and the rules governing the conduct of the examinations
will be furnished by the secretary upon request.
All correspondence relating to the work of the Board should be addressed
College Entrance Examination Board
Post Of f ice S ub-S tation 8¢, New Y ork , N. Y .
6
Biology EXAMINERS
I9I4
GEORGE HOWARD PARKER . . . . . . . Professor of Zoology, Harvard University
Harvard University, S.B., 1887, and S.D., r8g1
WILLARD WINFIELD ROWLEE . . . . . . . Professor of Botany, Cornell University
Cornell University, B.L., 1888, and D.Sc., 1893
PAUL BLAKESLEE MANN, Head of Department of Biology, Evander Childs High
School, New York, N.Y.
Cornell University, A.B., 19o2, and A.M., 1903
GEORGE C. WOOD . . . . Teacher of Biology, Boys High School, Brooklyn, N.Y.
Syracuse University, A.B., rgoo
JAMES HOWARD MCGREGOR, Assistant Professor of Zoology, Columbia University
Ohio State University, B.S., 1894; Columbia University, A.M., 1896, and Ph.D., 1899
GEORGE C. WOOD . . . . Teacher of Biology, Boys High School, Brooklyn, N.Y.
Syracuse University, A.B., rgoo
8
BIOLOGY
1
9
1
4
A teacher's certificate covering the laboratory instruction must be presented as part
of the examination.
z.
Name five animals or plants which are economically important and state in
what way each is beneficial or injurious.
III.

(Answer any three questions.)
Name and describe briefly a representative of each of four different animal
groups found in a fresh water pond.
Describe three examples of the adaptation of animals to their surroundings.
Name two important functions performed by any vertebrate and show how
the animal selected is enabled by its structure to perform these
functions.
i o.
Describe the life history of any insect whose development proceeds through
a series of stages (metamorphosis).
I.

(Answer both questions.)
i. (a) Name and define three functions common to plants and animals.
(b) Make a drawing of some cell you have studied and label the various
parts.
II.

(Answer any three questions.)
(a) Compare the bean seed and corn kernel as to (I) number of seed leaves
(cotyledons); (a) kinds of stored food; (3) position of stored food in each.
(b) Which one of these foods must be changed before being used by the
young plant? (c) Why must this change occur? (d) How is this change
accomplished ?
Discuss photosynthesis, telling:
(a) the conditions necessary for carrying on the process;
(b) the kinds of material used in the process;
(c) the sources of the materials used.
(a)

State briefly the common agencies of seed dispersal.

(b) Describe three
ways in which seeds and fruits are structurally adapted to use these agencies.
(a) Name three substances used by man which are found in seeds.

(b) How
would you detect the presence of any two of these substances?

(c) What
part of a plant furnishes: flour, manila-hemp, linen, castor oil?
9
BOTANY
Botany

EXAMINERS
1
94
WILLARD WINFIELD ROWLEE . . . . . . . Professor of Botany, Cornell University
Cornell University, B.L., 1S88, and D.Sc., 1893
MARGARET CLAY FERGUSON . . . . . . . . Professor of Botany, Wellesley College
Cornell University, A.B., 18gg, and Ph.D., 1go1
GEORGEC. WOOD . . . . Teacher of Biology, Boys High School, Brooklyn, N.Y.
Syracuse University, A.B., igoo
READERS
1
9
1
4
BERNARD OGILVIEDODGE. . . . . . . Instructor in Botany, Columbia University
University of Wisconsin, Ph.B., igog; Columbia University, Ph.D., 1912
GEORGEC. WOOD . . . . Teacher of Biology, Boys High School, Brooklyn, N.Y.
Syracuse University, A.B., igoo
12
BOTANY
1
94
2
-
4P.
m.
A teacher's certificate covering the entire laboratory instruction must be presented
as a part of the examination.
Answer ten questions.

At least two questions must be selected from Group E and
one from each of the other groups.

The remaining four questions may be selected as
desired by the student.

No extra credit will be given for more than ten questions.
A. The Plant Cell.

(Answer one question from this group.)
i. Describe and illustrate by labeled drawings a typical cell.
2. Why is the cell called the "unit of plant structure" ?
B. The Plant in Germination.

(Answer one question from this group.)
3. Compare the process of germination in a seed with endosperm and in a
seed without endosperm.
y.. By carefully labeled drawings, illustrate three stages in the germination
of a monocotyledonous and of a dicotyledonous plant.
5. Explain why a test for the presence of sugar in a wheat seedling shows a
marked reaction, while the test for the same substance in a wheat kernel
shows no reaction.
C. Life Processes of the Mature Plant.

(Answer three questions from this group.)
6. Name two important functions of roots and give the characteristics of the
root which adapt it to perform these functions.
q. Describe an experiment to prove that one of these functions is performed
by the root.
8. Describe an experiment to show that oxidation is carried on in green plants.
9. How would you prove that the result of this process is the same as that
produced by burning a match or by the respiration of an animal?
ro. Discuss photosynthesis, outlining in detail (i) the conditions necessary
for carrying on the process together with (2) the nature and (3) the
sources of the materials used.
D. The Plant in Relation to Its Environment.

(Answer two questions from this
group.
rr.
In what ways is the quantity of water in the environment of a plant of
importance to its growth ?
12.
Describe some modifications adapting the plant to a limited water supply.
1
3. What in general are the characteristics of wind-pollinated flowers?
14. State briefly the common agencies of seed dispersal, and describe the
general structural modifications by which the plant makes use of these
agencies.
E. Plant Groups.

(Answer three questions from this group.)
15. Discuss reproduction in the algae as illustrated by a type plant studied
in class.
16. Name a fungus and describe its life history.
I q .
Give the principal similarities and differences in the life history of the
fern and of the moss.
18.
Name and give the chief characteristics of five families of Angiosperms.
ig.
What part of a plant furnishes: flour, manila-hemp, linen, cotton,
castor oil?
13
CHEMISTRY
Chemistry
EXAMINERS
ALEXANDER SMITH. . . . . . . . . .
Professor of Chemistry, Columbia University
University of Edinburgh, B.Sc., x886; University of Munich, Ph.D., 1889
LEON BURR RICHARDSON,
Assistant Professor of Chemistry, Dartmouth College
Dartmouth College, B.L., 19oo, and A.M., 1902
BOYNTON WELLS McFARLAND,
Assistant Principal and Head of Department of
Science,
New Haven High School, New Haven, Conn.
Yale University, Ph.B., 1889, C.E., 1891, and Ph.D., 1895
GEORGE SHANNON FORBES,
Assistant Professor of Chemistry, Harvard University
Harvard University, A.B., 1902, A.M., 1904, and Ph.D., 1905
SAMUEL WILSON HICKS, Instructor in Chemistry,
Williston Seminary, Easthamp-
ton, Mass.
New York University, B.S., 19oo
1
94
READERS
1
9
1
4
BOYNTON WELLS MCFARLAND,
Assistant Principal and Head of Department of
Science, New Haven High School, New Haven, Conn.
Yale University, Ph.B., 1889, C.E., 1891, and Ph.D., 1895
LEON BURR RICHARDSON,
Assistant Professor of Chemistry, Dartmouth College
Dartmouth College, B.L., 19oo, and A.M., 1902
ALFREDEDWARD ROBERTS,
Head of Department of Chemistry, Yonkers High
School, Yonkers, N.Y.
Amherst College, B.A., 19o5; New York University, M.S., 1914
DONALDPRITCHARDSMITH,
Assistant Professor of Chemistry, Princeton University
Williams College, A.B., 1902; University of Gottingen, Ph.D., 1907
16
CHEMISTRY
Saturday

9-11 a. m.
A teacher's certificate covering the laboratory instruction must be presented as a part
of the examination.
Answer nine questions as indicated below.

No extra credit will be given for more
than nine questions.
Attach to the answer, in each case, the number and letter used in the printed paper.
GROUP A
(Answer all questions in this group. Each question counts t2.)
1914
i. Write equations for six of the following reactions, using formulae throughout.
Equations must be absolutely correct to receive credit:
(a) Zinc -} - hydrochloric acid =
(b) Calcium hydroxide -} - carbon dioxide =
(c) Manganese dioxide -{ - hydrochloric acid (cone.) _
(d) Quicklime -} - water =
(e) Calcium chloride -} - silver nitrate =
(f) Copper -} - nitric acid (dil.) =
(g) Ferrous sulphide -{ - hydrochloric acid =
2. (a) Calculate the percentage of oxygen in the substance whose formula is
Ca(N0,)
z
.
Find the result to three significant figures. (Atomic weights:
Ca 40, N 14, 0 16.)
(b) How
many liters of oxygen would be necessary to burn twelve grams of
carbon to carbon dioxide?

The volume of oxygen is to be estimated at
standard conditions.

(One liter of oxygen weighs :< .4x9 grams.

Atomic
weight: C r2.)
(c)
What weight of silver chloride may be precipitated by silver nitrate from
one kilogram of sea-water containing
2.5 per cent of sodium chloride?
(Atomic weights: Ag
108
,
C
1
35.5, Na 23.)
3. Describe the method used by you in the laboratory in the preparation of two
of the following substances; write the equation for the reaction, and tell
how each compound may be identified: (a) ammonia; (b) hydrogen
sulphide; (c) sulphur dioxide.
4. (a)
Give specific examples of chemical changes each of which results in the
production of one of the following forms of energy: (i) heat; (2) light;
(3) electricity; (4) mechanical energy.
(b)
What is meant by the statement, "the atomic weight of sodium is 23"?
(c)
Why does an iron wire burn rapidly in pure oxygen but not in the air?
State the principle involved.
(d)
Define catalysis and give an example of catalytic action.
17
5. (a) Name four important constituents of the atmosphere, and state the
relative amount of each. How does the air exhaled from the human
body differ in composition from the normal atmosphere?
(b) How may sea-water be made suitable for drinking purposes? how may
well-water which has been contaminated by sewage? Explain the prin-
ciple in each case.
GROUP B
(Omit two of the following questions.

Each question counts ro.)
6. (a) Give three different general methods for preparing salts. Write one
equation illustrating each.
(b) How are two of the following compounds prepared:

(r) bleaching pow-
der; (z) sulphuric acid; (3) nitrous oxide ?
7. Describe experiments involving chemical change sufficient to distinguish
between the following: (a) chlorine and hydrogen chloride; (b) moist
air and dry air; (c) pure water and water containing a soluble chloride;
(d) calcium carbonate and calcium phosphate; (e) freshly prepared mortar
and mortar from an old building.
8. (a) How many liters of hydrogen and how many of nitrogen are necessary
to form ten liters of ammonia gas ?

State the law illustrated.
(b) What are the valences of the metallic elements in OsO, Al,(SO
4 ) 3 , N
Z
Mg, ?
q. (a) What change takes place in the molecular condition of copper sulphate
when it is dissolved in water?
(b) Describe the chemical changes which occur when the electric current is
passed through such a solution.
(c) Why does an aqueous solution of sodium carbonate give an alkaline
reaction ?
ro. (a) What is the objection to putting fresh coal on a hot fire and closing the
damper in the flue, especially if the lid of the stove is left off ?
(b) Why is calcium chloride sometimes used to keep road surfaces dustless ?
(c) State the chemical reactions taking place in three of the following pro-
cesses: (r) boiling water containing temporary hardness; (a) adding
soap to hard water; (3) bessemerizing cast iron; (4) striking a match.
ir. (a) Mention one common use of each of six of the following substances and
in each case define the use specifically: (i) carbon monoxide; (z) sodium
nitrate; (3) sodium carbonate; (4) silver chloride; (5) zinc; (6) lead;
(7)
sulphuric acid.
(b) In connection with two of the following substances describe two instances
in which each has been used in your laboratory work, and explain its
specific action in each case: (r) chlorine; (z) carbon dioxide; (3) sulphuric
acid.
Drawing
EXAMINERS
1914
ARTHURPOPE. . . . . . . . Assistant Professor of Fine Arts, Harvard University
Harvard University, A.B., 19oi
THOMAS HENRY
HARRINGTON, Assistant Professor of Drawing, Columbia University
Columbia University, C.E., 1889
RUTHMERINGTON, Teacher of Drawing, Bushwick High School, Brooklyn, N.Y.
New York University, B.S., 191o, andA.M,, 1913
READERS
1914
THOMASHENRY HARRINGTON, Assistant Professor of Drawing, Columbia University
Columbia University, C.E., 1889
RUTHMERINGTON, Teacher of Drawing, Bushwick High School, Brooklyn; N.Y.
New York University, B.S., 191o, and A.M., 1913
20
Friday
DRAWING
Candidates must do either exercise r or a and exercise 3.
No more than forty-five minutes should be devoted to the first drawing. If this
drawing is not completed by g p.m., it should be left unfinished and work should be begun
on the second drawing. If this should be finished before 6 p.m., the candidate is at
liberty to devote the remaining time to the completion of the first exercise.
An incomplete drawing, correctly laid out and executed by correct method, is better
evidence
of proficiency than a completed drawing incorrect in construction and slovenly
in execution.
Use a soft pencil, with a light touch.
All work must be strictly free-hand work without assistance from measuring slips,
instruments, or artificial aids of any kind.
Accuracy of form is of more account than finished execution.
Students are advised not to erase completely the construction lines.
FIG. 1
1914
4.15-6 p. m.
i. Make a line drawing in perspective of the corner of a square room as seen
ham the center of the room. In the wall to the right is a partly open door,
and in the other wall a window.
The door and the window are to be drawn
indicated in the accompanying cut (Fig. i).

Wall and door are to be con-
ceived as without thickness.
Ifake the line of intersection of the two walls about 3 inches long.

Leave
all
construction lines which indicate the position of vanishing points.
FIG. z
z.
Draw in oblique perspective the table shown in plan and elevation (Fig. a),
as seen some distance below the eye, but with parts of all the legs visible.
Make the total width of the drawing about 5 inches.

Leave in all construc-
tion lines, lightly drawn.
FIG. 3 B
3.
Make a drawing in light and shade, without regard to color value, of
. 3A or Fig. 3B.

Make the drawing the same size as the figure.
In 3B draw only the foreground plane without regard to the buildings seen
the distance.
z3
ENGLISH
English

EXAMINERS
1
9
1
4
WILBUR Lucius CROSS . . . . . . . . . . .
Professor of English, Yale University
Yale University, B.A., 1885, and Ph.D., 1889
CHARLES SEARS BALDWIN, Professor of Rhetoric and English Composition,
Columbia University
Columbia University, A.B., 1888, A.M., 1889, and Ph.D., 1894
ARTHUR WILLIS LEONARD, Head of Department of English, Phillips Academy,
Andover, Mass.
Princeton University, A.B., 1897
READERS
1
9
1
4
CHARLES SEARS BALDWIN, Professor of Rhetoric and English Composition,
Columbia University
Columbia University, A.B., 1888, A.M., 1889, and Ph.D., 1894
FRANK WILLIAM CUSHWA, Odlin Professor of English, Phillips Exeter Academy,
Exeter, N.H.
West Virginia University, A.B., 1902; Harvard University, A.M., 1904
DANIEL B. DUNCAN, Teacher of English, Riverdale Country School, New York, N.Y.
Upper Iowa University, Ph.B., 1890
WILLARD HIGLEY DURHAM . . . . . . . .
Instructor in English, Yale University
Yale University, B.A., 1904, and Ph.D., 1907
OSCAR CHARLES GALLAGHER,
Head Master, West Roxbury High School, Boston,
Mass.
Harvard University, A,B., 1896, and A.M., 1906
WILLIAM ECHARD, GOLDEN,
Head of Department of English, Polytechnic Preparatory
School, Brooklyn, N.Y.
University of Indiana, A.B., 1888, and A.M., 18go
FRANCIS FLORIAN HERR, Assistant Principal, Rayen High School, Youngstown, Ohio
Western Reserve University, Ph.B., 1901, and A.M., 1903
CHARLES WILLIAM KENNEDY, Assistant Professor, Preceptor in English, Princeton
University
Columbia University, A.B., 1902; Princeton University, A.M., 1go5, and Ph.D., 1906
26
ARTHUR WILLIS LEONARD, Head of Department of English, Phillips Academy,
Andover, Mass.
Princeton University, A.B., 1897
JOHN ASHBY LESTER . . . . . . . . Teacher of English, Hill School, Pottstown, Pa.
Haverford College, A.B.,1896, and A.M.,1897 ; Harvard University, A.M., 1898, and Ph.D., x9oi
MAY ORME MACKENZIE, Teacher of English, Chicago Latin School for Girls,
Chicago, Ill.
Aberdeen University, M.A., 1904.
BENTON SULLIVAN MONROE . . Assistant Professor of English, Cornell University
Cornell University, A.B., 1896, A.M., 1897, and Ph.D., rgol
CLARK SUTHERLAND NORTHUP, Assistant Professor of English, Cornell University
Cornell University, A.B., 1893, and Ph.D., 1898
FRANK WOODWORTH PINE, Headmaster, Gilman Country School, Roland Park, Md.
University of Michigan, A.B.,
18
94; New York University, A.M., 1897.
BIRD WILLIAMS STAIR . . . Instructor in English, College of the City of New York
Purdue University, B.S., 1899, and M.S., tgol
HARRISON Ross STEEVES . . . . . . . . Instructor in English, Columbia University
Columbia University, A.B., 1903, A.M., 1904, and Ph.D., 1913
ETHEL VAN ZANDT SULLIVAN, Instructor in English Composition, Wellesley College
Wellesley College, B.A., 1905
WARIER TAYLOR . . . . . . . . . .
Instructor in English, University of Wisconsin
Columbia University, A.B., 1903, and A.M., 1905
FiLANCiS BEACH WHITE, Head of Department of English, St. Paul's School,
Concord, N.H.
Harvard University, A.B., 1894, and A.M., 1895.
NARY YOST . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Instructor in English, Vassar College
Vassar College, A.B., 1904, and A.M., 1912
27
ENGLISH A-READING AND PRACTICE
Friday

9-11 a. m.
Read the whole paper before you begin to write.

Plan each composition before you
write it.

Correct and revise it before you hand it in.
Allow about a half-hour for the first question and for each of the compositions.
r. "Though we may owe it to ourselves to continue a while longer the policy
of increasing the navy, we must not forget what we owe the world as champions
of international conciliation."
State the relation of the clauses to one another in the foregoing sentence.
Tell of each italicized word what part of speech it is and what its relation is to
other words.
z. Write three (and only three) compositions, each of 150
words or more, on
subjects selected from the following groups. Only one subject may be taken
from a single group.
Number each of your compositions according to its group;
for example, II. e., IV. a., as the case may be.
GROUP I
(Classics in Translation)
a) The last day of Samson.
b) Joseph's disclosure of himself to his brethren.
c) Helen watching the combat between Menelaus and Paris.
d) Contrasts between ancient battles and modern.
e) The ancient idea of a hero.
f) The slaying of the suitors.
GROUP II
(Shakespeare)
GROUP III
(Novels)
2s
1
94
.
a) The life of young people in Venice.
b) The ways in which A Midsummer-Night's Dream fulfils its title.
c) What makes As You Like It a gay and lively play.
d) The character of Malvolio.
e) Traits of Cassius seen in, modern politicians.
f) The battle of Agincourt.
g)
A letter describing (or discussing) the performance of one of Shakespeare's
plays.
a)
How Robinson Crusoe solved the problem of living on a desert island.
b) What brings about the happy ending of the Vicar of Wakefield.
c)
The character and customs of the Normans contrasted with those of the Saxons.
d) A crisis in the career of Quentin Durward.

,
e) The decay of the Pyncheon family.
~ ~ Mr. Micawber exposes Uriah Heep.
g) Esmond breaks his sword.
h) A person who might have lived in Cranford.
s'} What life was worth to Silas Marner.
f)
A gentleman (or a country parson) of the eighteenth century.
k) A description, based on either reading or experience, of one of the following-
a storm, a scene at school, a journey at night, an escape.
(Bunyan, Addison, Franklin, Macaulay, Thackeray, Lincoln, Parkman, Thoreau,
Huxley, Stevenson)
a) Life conceived as a pilgrimage.
b) Sir Roger's way of living.
t) A letter advising the reading of Franklin's Autobiography.
d) Westminster Abbey.
t) What England got from India and what she gave.
Thackeray's opinion of Swift.
g)
The last words of Lincoln's Gettysburg Address applied to present political
conditions.
The but by Walden Pond.
Huxley's Liberal Education applied to my outlook on college.
(For the following three topics the material may be drawn either from
reading or from experience.)
A camp.
Traveling for pleasure and traveling for knowledge.
The village schoolmaster.
GROUP IV
GROUP V
(Narrative and Lyric Poems)
he legend of the Holy Grail.
# ',) The prison of Chillon.
e.} Puritan life as seen in The Courtship of Miles Standish.
d) Poetic ideals of knighthood.
e) Poetic ideals of womanhood.
J) The character of the speaker in My Last Duchess.
g) Some qualities or characteristics of lyric poetry seen in specific poems of
Wordsworth (or of any other poet).
z9
a)
Friday

2
-
4 P. m.
Read the whole paper before you begin to write. Plan your answers before you
write them; and look them over for corrections before you hand in your book.
Of the two hours allotted to this examination, reserve about forty-five minutes for
Part II.
r. Answer a, and either b or c.
ENGLISH B-STUDY AND PRACTICE
PART I
But screw your courage to the sticking-place,
And we'll not fail.

When Duncan is asleep-
Whereto the rather shall his day's hard journey
Soundly invite him-his two chamberlains
Will I with wine and wassail so convince,
That memory, the warder of the brain,
Shall be a fume, and the receipt of reason
A limbeck only.

When in swinish sleep
Their drenched natures lie as in a death,
What cannot you and I perform upon
The unguarded Duncan? what not put upon
His spongy officers, who shall bear the guilt
Of our great quell?
Give the substance of this passage, sentence by sentence, in your own words,
turning obscure or figurative expressions into simpler or more literal language.
What is Macbeth's reply to this speech?

What motives revealed in this scene
seem to have been strongest in restraining Macbeth from his first crime?

What
change of attitude does he show in approaching his second crime?
b)

"Or bid the soul of Orpheus sing
Such notes as, warbled to the string,
Drew iron tears down Pluto's cheek,
And made Hell grant what love did seek;
Or call up him that left half-told
The story of Cambuscan bold,
Of Camball, and of Algarsife,
And who had Canace to wife."
1914
Macaulay says of the poetry of Milton:

"Its effect is produced not so much
by what it expresses as by what it suggests."

Select from the foregoing quota-
tion any two phrases which seem to you to illustrate Macaulay's statement, and
explain what these phrases suggest.
c)
Discuss the characteristic aspects of a typical masque as they appear in
the last scene of Comus, "presenting Ludlow Town and the President's
Castle."
How is the underlying theme of Comus finally emphasized in this
scene ?
30
2. Answer a or b or c.
a) Explain definitely what Burke means in each case when he says that
descent, education, religion, and the existence of slavery are causes operat-
ing to produce the fierce spirit of liberty which characterizes the Americans.
When he has completed his exposition of the temper and character of the
Americans, what use does he make of it in his subsequent argument?
b) If you were attempting to maintain that a government cannot succeed by
virtue of its constitution and laws alone, but must depend largely upon the
intelligence and the national spirit of its citizens, what could you find in
Washington's Farewell Address to support your case?
c) "Sir, we are assembled to commemorate the establishment of great principles
of liberty, and to do honor to the distinguished dead." How does Webster
carry out in his oration the particular purpose declared in the italicized
words?
PART II
Write a composition of three or more paragraphs on one of the following
subjects:
i. An important public event of the year; for example, the opening of the
Panama Canal.
2. The man (or woman) in public life who is most interesting to me.
3. What the high school does for the education of the boy or the girl who is
not going to college.
4. Some valuable uses of electricity.
S. The principle and construction of a gasoline engine (or an engine of some
other type).
6. The significance of some event which occurred between the Battle of
Bunker Hill and the dedication of the Bunker Hill Monument.
7. My opinion of a present-day author.
8. Dr. Johnson's ability as a writer of literary biography.
9. The influence of Burns's songs.
io. An Elizabethan playhouse.
31
FRENCH
French

EXAMINERS
1
9
1
4
FREDERICKMORRISWARREN, Street Professor of ModernLanguages, YaleUniversity
Amherst College, B.A., 1880; Johns Hopkins University, Ph.D., 1887; Amherst College,
L.H.D., 1901
ROBERTLONGLEYTAYLOR. . Professor of RomanceLanguages, Williams College
HamiltonCollege, B.A., 1882; YaleUniversity, Ph.D., 19oo
FRANKELBERTBROOKS, Teacher of French, HoraceMannSchool, NewYork, N.Y.
Cornell University, A.B., 1890
READERS
1
9
1
4
ALBERTBUSHNELL JOHNSON, AssociateProfessor of RomanceLanguages, Brown
University
BrownUniversity, A.B., 1891, and A.M., 1892
FRANKELBERTBROOKS, Teacher of French, HoraceMannSchool, NewYork, N.Y.
Cornell University, A.B., 1890
MAGDELEINECARRET. . . . . . AssociateProfessor of French, Wellesley College
Universityof Paris, Lic. bs L., 1906
THATCHERCLARK, Head of Department of French, Ethical CultureSchool,
NewYork, N.Y.
GeorgeWashingtonUniversity, A.B., 1898; Harvard University, A.M., 1899, and Ph.D., 1902
Louis DELAMARRE, Assistant Professor of French, College of theCityof NewYork
Universityof Paris, Bach. bs L., 1881, and Lic. b s L.,
1894;
NewYork University, Ph.D., 1905
LOUISEFONJALLEZ. . Teacher of French, Miss Rayson's School, NewYork, N.Y.
EDWARDJOSEPH FORTIER, Instructor intheRomanceLanguages and Literatures,
Columbia University
TulaneUniversity, A.B., 1904
FRAN~oIS Louis GAUTHEY, Teacher of French, Columbia Grammar School, New
York, N.Y.
ERNESTRoy GREENE, Assistant Professor of RomanceLanguages, Dartmouth
College
HarvardUniversity, A.B., 1901, and A.M., 1907
34
PHILIP MESERVEHAYDEN. . . . . . . . . . . Professor of French, Tufts College
Tufts College, A.B., 1903; Columbia University, A.M., 1913
ALBERTMARIANCOHNMCMASTER, Instructor inFrench, DartmouthCollege
Columbia University, A.B., 1910, and A.M., 1912
HENRI FRANgOIS
MULLER, Instructor inRomanceLanguages and Literatures,
Columbia University
University of Paris, Bach. bs L.,
1897; Columbia University, Ph.D., 1912
LAWRENCEWHITTIERNEWELL, Teacher of French, Hackley School, Tarrytown,
N.Y.
ALFRED G. PANARONI,
Instructor inRomanceLanguages, Collegeof theCity of
NewYork
College of theCityof NewYork, B.S., 1902
Louis ALEXANDRERoux, Master inFrenchand Latin, Newark Academy, Newark,
N.J.
BrownUniversity, A.B., 1894
JOSEPH SERONDE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Instructor inFrench, YaleUniversity
YaleUniversity, B.A., 1905, and M.A., 1910
DONALDCLIVESTUART, Assistant Professor, Preceptor inModernLanguages,
Princeton University
University of Michigan, A.B., 1903, and A.M.,
19o4; Columbia University, Ph.D.,
1910
35
Wednesday
FRENCH A-ELEMENTARY FRENCH
The use o f clear and idiomatic English is required.
3 6
1
9
1
4
2
-
4 P. m.
I
Translate into English:
La porte s'ouvrit; parut le general, appuye sur le bras de son aide. Henri,
en apercevant le jeune medecin, courut a lui:
"Vous ici, docteur!" s'ecria-t-il en lui prenant la main.

Puis, nous le
presentant: "Mesdames et messieurs, c'est celui qui m'a gueri de ma
blessure 1

Nest-il pas vrai ? "
Le docteur balbutia quelques mots et prit conge de nous . . . . car son
malade l'attendait. Le general s'assit tranquillement dans son grand fauteuil;
Henri, le sourire sur les levres, resta debout pres de la cheminee; la vicom
tesse, frappee de surprise et d'indignation, voulait et n'osait parler.

Cecile,
pale, la tete appuyee sur sa main, reflechissait en silence; et moi, je les re-

io
gardais tous, trouvant la scene tres belle, et attendant avec inquietude la
fin qu'elle allait prendre.
Le general fut le premier qui rompit le silence.-"Eh bien! mesdames,
c'est done demain que nous partons pour les Pyrenees, et que nous allons,
pour un mois, nous etablir a , Pau?"

115
Point de reponse; chacun garda le silence. Et le general encore une
fois:
"Comment?

Est-ce que nous ne partons pas tous ensemble?"
-"Non, monsieur, ma mere et moi voulions d'abord vous conduire
jusqu'a Tarbes, oix vous avez une terre et un chateau magnifiques que nous ne

20
connaissons pas; notre intention etait de nous y installer jusqu'& votre
retour- "
"Et de me laisser aller seul a Pau! . . . . C'etait bien."
"Non, monsieur, c'eiut ete mal, et la preuve, c'est que nous etions
decidees a vous accompagner, a ne pas vous quitter; mais maintenant nos

25
soins ne vous sont plus necessaires."
5
II
i. Conjugate in their respective tenses, parto ns (line r4), co nnaisso ns (line 21),
eilt ete (line 24) of I. Conjugate the present indicative of prendre, the future
of co urir, the present subjunctive of v o ulo ir, the imperfect subjunctive of
guerir, and the pluperfect indicative of se jeter.

Give the five principal parts
of appuyer, etablir, ro mpre, co nduire.
2. Give the various forms, singular and plural, of the adjectives doux , co mplet,
of the nouns ami, general, and of the third personal pronoun in both genders.
3. Ex plain the use (syntax ) of lui, in en lui prenant la main (line 3), of y, in nous
y installer (line 21), of the plural in magnif iques (line 20).
4.
When is the article in the French partitive phrase, meaning "some" or "any,"
omitted?

Give ex amples.
5 . Indicate the approx imate sound of the sentence, "notre intention
etait de
nous y installer jusqu'a
votre retour," in English or phonetic spelling.
Translate into French (based chiefly on 1):
They told us that the doctor had come to see the ladies whom he had found
so ill on Monday.

They were better and he decided he would not give them
any medicine.

He remained there for half an hour.

Then looking at me, he
said: "Won't you go with me to my house in the country?

I have just bought
it, and my family has gone away for a week.

We can start at two o'clock.

If it
is cold you will need some gloves.
One is never too warm when traveling.
Now don't tell me you cannot come."
37
3 8
FRENCH B-INTERMEDIATE FRENCH
1
94
Thursday

4.15
-
6 p. m.
The use of clear and idiomatic English is required.
Translate into English:
i. L'alerte avait 6t6 vive, compliqu6e de la separation du dauphin, rel6gu6
au second 6tage de la grosse tour sous la surveillance de Simon et de sa
femme, et cc fut au bout de quelques jours seulement que la reine, en
donnant sa serviette a Turgy, lui fit passer un papier sur lequel elle
await trac6 ces questions: "Que crie-t-on sous nos barreaux ? La femme
Tison est-elle aussi folle qu'on le dit? Est-elle bien soign6e?" Soit
qu'il eut 6t6 touch6 de 1'attitude de la reine a 1'6gard de sa femme,
soit plut6t qu'il voulut avoir le coeur net de 1'attitude de Turgy,
Tison ne tarda pas a offrir a Turgy de lui donner des nouvelles
et des journaux.

Turgy en avertit aussitbt Mme Elizabeth.

"Calcu-

zo
lez bien la demande de Tison," r6pondit-elle.

"Que votre zele ne vous
fasse rien hasarder qui puisse vous nuire, et si vous c6dez que cc ne soft
qu'apres avoir fait promettre le plus grand secret. Ne vous a-t-on
pas d6fendu de parler a Tison ?

Calculez encore cela.

TAchez de savoir
si 1'on ne veut pas rejeter cela sur ma compagne (la reine).

Cette ques-

15
tion n'est pas press6e.

C'est Toulon qui nous a donn6 le journal dont
j'ai par16 hier.

La maniere dont vous nous servez fait notre consola-
tion."-Savine, Madame Elizabeth et ses amies.
5
Translate into French (based chiefly on I, i)
Although the alarm, that the royal family had received, had frightened
Madame Elizabeth, she alone had remained calm.
The Tison woman after accus-
ing the queen and Madame Elizabeth of carrying on a correspondence with
Turgy went up into the queen's apartment.
On seeing the queen she threw
herself at her feet.

"Madam," she said to her sobbing, "I beg your Majesty's
pardon.

I am an unhappy woman, I am the cause of your death and Madame
Elizabeth's."
The guards were present at this scene.

They tried to calm her but did not
succeed.

"Pardon her Turgy," said Madame Elizabeth, "she has not offended
me, and if she had I would pardon her."

She was carried into another room
where she became more quiet after some moments.
I-(Continued)
Translate into English:
a. Le lendemain, dans un conciliabule de famille, on s'entretint du diner de
la veille.

Mme B. fut la premiere a dire que M. de T. lui await d6plu,
qu'elle n'avait pas 6t6 dupe de son enthousiasme pour Wagner, que
dans le fond il n'6tait qu'un cynique.

Cependant le mari et la femme,
qui, par exception, se trouvaient d'accord, convinrent qu'on ne pouvait
se dispenser de rendre leur politesse a M. et a Mme de Morane, et on
fixa le jour ou le vicomte de T. viendrait diner a Mon-D6sir.
Monique avait 6cout6 cette conversation sans souffier mot.

D'ha-
bitude, elle 6tait prompte a juger les gens et les choses et n'attendait
pas, pour en parler, qu'on lui demandAt son avis.

Son silence inac-

lo
coutum6 me rendit pensif et m'inqui6ta plus encore qu'il ne m'6tonna.
Je craignis qu'elle n'eiut rapport6 de sa premiere rencontre avec M. de T.
une de ces impressions vives, mais confuses, qu'on ne peut traduire en
paroles, faute de les avoir assez dig6r6es.

Je voulus m'en 6claircir, et
des que je fus seul avec elle, je lui demandai si le beau Ludovic 6tait un

15
jeune homme qui etit du brillant.-Cherbuliez, Le secret du precepteur.
3 9
5
i. Explain the use of each of the following subjunctives: voul-at (I, 1, line 8);
fasse (I, i, line rz); demanddt (I, a, line ro).
a. Give rules for the agreement of the past participle of reflexive verbs.

Illus-
trate by two examples, one where the past participle is variable, one where
it is invariable.
Give a synonym in French for each of these expressions: s'entretenir, des que,
une parole, tdcher de, avoir fair.
Give the opposite in French of each of these expressions: la veille, deplaire,
sous, la politesse, hier.
Use these expressions in sentences and translate the sentences: avant, avant
de, avant que, tant, autant.
Give the principal parts of the verbs: Jut, se croient, convinrent, craignis, e2tt.
FRENCH BC-INTERMEDIATE AND ADVANCED
FRENCH
Thursday
The use of clear and idiomatic English is required.
1914
4.15-6 p. m.
I
Translate into English:
1. Ainsi donc, messieurs, replagons Balzac a son rang de penseur, qui est tres
haut, et ne nous laissons pas effaroucher par ses methodes, qui sont douteuses
ou surannees, par certaines de ses, croyances ou de ses hypotheses, qui sont
bizarres, ni par certaines conclusions, qui peuvent etre h 1'oppose des n6tres.
L'edifice d'idees que cc romancier presente a la critique est harmonieux,
massif et stable. Il peut contrarier nos gouts d'architecture et nos theories
de la construction; mais il tient debout par sa cohesion et par son poids.
La besogne ne serait pas moins malaisee de le demonter assise par assise
que de le renverser d'un bloc: car le ciment qui lie les pierres est plus resis-
tant que les pierres memes, et les outils de fer s'y briseraient comme aux
joints des indestructibles ruines romaines.
Balzac est le litterateur moderne, parce qu'il a ecrit la comedie aux
cent actes divers des affaires et de dargent.

Et il s'etait prepare a jouer
cc role dans la litterature en le jouant d'abord dans la realite de sa vie, o u
il fut un homme moderne, je veux dire un homme d'affaires et d'argent.
-Abel Hermant, Essais de Critique.
s.

Voila de bien longs jours dejk qu'ils sont partis:
Le pere tout charge de paquets et d'outils,
La mere avec 1'enfant qui pend a la mamelle
Et quelque autre marmot qui traine la semelle
Et la suit, fatigue, s'accrochant aux jupons;
Le fils avec le sac au pain et les jambons,
Et la fille emportant sur son dos la vaisselle.
Heureux ceux qui n'ont pas quelque vieux qui chancelle
Et qui gronde et qu'on a, s'effarant, apres soi!
Pourquoi donc partent-ils, ces braves gens ?

Pourquoi
S'en vont-ils par 1'Europe et vers le Nouveau Monde,
Etonnes de montrer leur douce paleur blonde
Et la calme candeur de leurs tristes yeux bleus
Sur les chemins de fer bruyants et populeux ?
C'est que parfois la vie est inhospitaliere.
Longtemps leur pauvrete naive, pure et fiere,
En plein champ, pres du pot de gres et du pain his,
Alutte, n'arrachant que de maigres epis
A la terre trop vieille et devenue avare.
-Frangois Coppee, Emigrants.
40
II
Translate into French:
1. At one of the doors stood a pale-looking, but cheerful and good-natured woman,
who told us that she had come to that house when first married, twenty-one
years before, and had lived there ever since; and that she felt as if she had
been buried through the best years of her life.-Hawthorne,
English Note-
Book.
a.
Then in the midst of all this, the news came to me one morning that my father
had been taken to prison, and he had sent for me.
He did not tell me the
reason why he was there, but he ordered me to go to an address he gave me,
to see a Count who would be able to get him released.

The address was to
some public rooms where I was to ask for the Count, and beg him to come
to
my father. I found him, and he promised to go immediately to my
father, who came home again that very evening, bringing the Count with
him.-George Eliot, Daniel Deronda.
1.
Use the following expressions correctly in French sentences and translate each
sentence into English: A moins que, ttre d meme de, quand met"me, qui que
ce soit, avoir beau, recevoir de ses nouvelles.
s. Translate into French:
a) I had my brother read.
b) I had my brother read a book.
c) I had him read a book.
Translate the following sentences and account for the subjunctives:
a) Les choses s'arrangeaient sans qu'il s'en
melat.
b) La devotion de Melanie en fut augmentee, mais la mienne, je crains
qu'elle ne Hit attiedie.
c) L'histoire des paiens ne lui disait rien qui vaille.
d) Il ne songeait pas a les contrarier, bien qu'il dOt renoncer peut-etre a
d'autres vues qu'il avait sur eux.
41
GEOGRAPHY
Geography EXAMINERS
1
914
HERBERT E. GREGORY. . . . . . Silliman Professor of Geology, Yale University
Yale University, B.A., 1896, and Ph.D., 1899
DOUGLAS WILSON JOHNSON, Associate Professor of Physiography, Columbia
University
University of New Mexico, B.S., 1901 ; Columbia University, Ph.D., 1903
WILLIAMWALLACE CLENDENIN, Teacher of Physiography, Wadleigh High School,
New York, N.Y.
Missouri State University, B.Sc., 1886, and M.Sc., 1889; Harvard University, A.M., 18gr
READERS
1
914
DOUGLAS WILSON JOHNSON, Associate Professor of Physiography, Columbia
University
University of New Mexico, B.S., 1901 ; Columbia University, Ph.D., 1903
WILLIAM WALLACE CLENDENIN, Teacher of Physiography, Wadleigh High School,
New York, N.Y.
Missouri State University, B.Sc., 1886, and M.Sc., 1889; Harvard University, A.M., 1891
44
3-
4-
7 -
GEOGRAPHY
Saturday

9-11 a. m.
A teacher's certificate covering the laboratory instruction must be presented at the
time of the examination.
No extra credit will be given for more than the required number of questions.
GROUP A. THE EARTH AS A GLOBE
(Answer one question from this group.)
i. When it is 12 o'clock, noon, October 8, at San Francisco, having the time of
1zo west longitude, what is the day and hour at Manila, having the time
of 126' east longitude?
2. The sun is farthest from the earth in July; how then can July be a summer
month?

Explain the causes of seasons.

Use diagrams.
GROUP B. THE OCEAN
(Answer one question from this group.)
Explain changes of temperature with increasing depth in (a) the Mediter-
ranean Sea, (b) the Atlantic Ocean.

Use diagram.
Draw two sketch maps of the northern Indian Ocean, showing the position
of the equator. On one map indicate the winds and ocean currents for
January; on the other the winds and ocean currents for July.
GROUP C. THE ATMOSPHERE
(Answer two questions from this group.)
1914
5.
Describe the distribution of forested areas and deserts which would prevail
along the Pacific Coast of North and South America, if the direction of
the earth's rotation were reversed.

Illustrate by sketch map.
6. Compare the weather elements of temperature and precipitation of: Seattle,
St. Paul, and Boston, (a) in summer; (b) in winter.
Describe the usual path of a cyclonic storm in the United States, stating
and explaining the attendant conditions of temperature, wind, and precipi-
tation.
GROUP D. THE LANDS
(Answer three questions from this group.)
8. Contrast the characteristics of young and mature streams, and show how
these contrasted features affect transportation, manufacturing, and agri-
culture.
Describe a belted coastal plain and explain in detail its physiographic develop-
ment.

Use diagram.
zo. Indicate on a sketch map of the United States the extent of the continental
glacier.

Name three ways in which glaciers aid in forming lakes.
it. Define ten of the following terms: block mountain, fault, moraine, water
table, fiord, relative humidity, weathering, atoll, base level, equinox,
pot hole, playa.
Make a contour map and longitudinal profile of a hill 480 feet high, six miles
long and two miles wide, cliffed at one end by ocean waves; contour
interval 5o feet.

Give horizontal and vertical scales used.
45
GERMAN
German EXAMINERS
1
94
FRANK VOGEL, Professor of German, Head of Department of Modern Languages,
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Harvard University, A.B., 1887, and A.M., 1892
GUSTAV GRUENER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Professor of German, Yale University
Yale University, B.A., 1884, and Ph.D., 1896; Washington College, Litt.D., 1909
THOMAS ANDREW HAMMERSLEY MAWHINNEY, Instructor in German, Southern High
School, Philadelphia, Pa.
Lehigh University, A.B., 1906
READERS
1
9
1
4
FRANK VOGEL, Professor of German; Head of Department of Modern Languages,
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Harvard University, A.B., 1887, and A.M., 1892
MARGARETE A. M. BERNKOPF, Teacher of German, Yonkers High School,
Yonkers, N.Y.
Columbia University, A.M., 1911
HENRY CLEVELAND BLAKE, Teacher of Modern Languages, St. Paul's School,
Garden City, N.Y.
Dartmouth College, A.B., 1907
FLORENCE EMILY HASTINGS . . Associate Professor of German, Wellesley College
Wellesley College, A.B., 1897, and A.M., x909
ROBERT PORTERKEEP, Instructor in German, Phillips Academy, Andover, Mass.
Yale University, B.A., 1903
JOHN L. KUSCHKE . . . Instructor in German, Collegiate School, New York, N.Y.
Cornell University, A.B., 1909
FREDERICK WILLIAMCHARLES LIEDER. . Instructor in German, Harvard University
Cornell University, A.B., 1902, and A.M., 1903; Harvard University, Ph.D., 1907
THOMAS ANDREW HAMMERSLEY MAWHINNEY, Instructor in German, Southern High
School, Philadelphia, Pa.
Lehigh University, A.B., 1906
48
AUGUST PREHN, Teacher of German, Columbia Grammar School, New York, N.Y.
University of Miinster, Ph.D., x883
M9LANIE CONSTANZE RICHARDT, Teacher of German, Barnard School for Girls,
New York, N.Y.
OTTO SCHMITZ, Master in the German Language and Literature, Cutler School,
New York, N.Y.
University of Munster, Ph.D., 1885
HENRY HERMANN LOUIS SCHULZE, Instructor in Germanic Languages and Litera-
tures, Columbia University
College of the City of New York, A.B., 1
903; Columbia University, A.M.,
1905
HENRY MARTINSHUTE, Instructor in German, Phillips Exeter Academy, Exeter, N.H.
Tufts College, A.B. and A.M., 1902
WILLIAMKILBORNE STEWART,
Assistant Professor of German, Dartmouth College
University of Toronto, A.B., 1897; Harvard University, A.M., x898
WESLEY DANIEL ZINNECKER . . . . . . .
Instructor in German, Cornell University
Baldwin Wallace College, Ph.B., 1903; Cornell University, Ph.D., 1912
49
GERMAN A-ELEMENTARY GERMAN
Tuesday
The use of clear and idiomatic English is required.
i. Translate into English:
Unfer I ~aw3biener, ein fleiner, freunblider Mann, roar ein grocer &eunb ber

1
Tatur.

_ ~D 6 mir nid)t einmal bie ( 25onne auf gebj en f efj en mbclj ten, f ragte er einO

2
ZagNmid) nub meinett um ein aabr j iingeren ! Bruber; bad j et bah I ~errficfte,

3
WO man fefj en fonne.

Unb ba bie Putter a erfaubte, roedte er unb am fingft=

4
f onntag bor ZagOanbru~ unb fitlj rte unb an ben CStabtmaff fj inauf..

Unb fror

5
nub mir gitterten an ber I ~anb be6 guten Panne6 , ber unb mir afferfei Oef c~id ten

6
gu unterbaften unb gu errodrmen fud)te, unb unb bon Seit gu Seit gum Vaufen

7
unb epringen ermunterte, tuorauf mir benn rote groei j unge Ndlein ein paarmaf

8
auf unb nieber ij iipften. Wud) auf ben Oefang ber Mgef fie5 er un6 laufchen,

9
bie nac~ unb nab ilj re CStimmen ertj oben unb ben Zag einfangen.

Ser affe6 bad

10
madj te unb nic~t roarm, erft ber 9fnruf: „3e~t! 3ett fommt fie! " fief unb affo

11
bergef f en unb ri~tete unfere groten Rinberaugen auf bie ' D imm&tiir, auf ber bie

12
S6 nigin in tfj rem golbernen Sleibe nun bj era0treten foffte.

13
SD ier unb ba ftieg fd)on ein Taud) auf3 ben ( ad)ornfteinen, ber unb angeigte, bad

14
roir nid)t bie eingigen arilfj aufftefj er roaren, unb unb gugfeid) an ben Morgenfaffee

15
erinnerte, ber unb mit fetnem ~eftfuden nod) beborftanb.

16
2. a) D ecline in the singular unfere groten ftinberaugen ( line 12), in the plural
j unge &dlein
( line 8).
b)
Write the nominative and genitive singular and nominative plural ( with
the definite article) of areunb ( line i), I ~anb ( line 6 ), @ej d)t~ten ( line 6 ),
9onigin ( line 13), Sleibe ( line 13), CSdhornftecnen ( line 14).
c) Compare flecner
( line i), roarm ( line ii), gro~en ( line 12), and gern.
d)
Write in German the nominative and genitive singular of the following
phrases: such a good friend; the same little child; this one and that
one ( masculine gender).
e )
Write the nominative and genitive singular in all three genders of the
interrogative adj ective roelc~.
Write, in full, the German for the following: October 31st, 1914; half-past
eight ( o' clock); quarter of eleven ( o' clock); twelve minutes past one
( o' clock).
f)
5
0
1914
2
-
4
P.m.
3.

a) Write the synopsis of bj era0treten
( line 13), in the second person singular
of the indicative active.
b) Change the clauses in the sentence Unb ba bie
Putter . ... an. ben CStabt,
roaff bj inauf ( lines 4-5), into the passive construction, making all the
necessary changes.
c)
Write the present indicative in full and the first person singular only of
the present and the preterite ( past) subj unctive of the verb
mricfj ten ( line 2).
d)
Change the clauses in indirect discourse in the sentence
50b roir ni t ....
fefj en fbnne ( lines 2-4) into direct discourse, making all necessary changes.
e)
Write three prepositions ( with their meanings) governing the genitive;
three, the dative; and three, either the dative or the accusative case.
Name and give the reason for the word order in each of the following
clauses: s,Jb . . . . mod)ten ( line 2); bad fei , . . . ' D errfid)fte ( line 3);
Unb fror ( line 5); erft ber 9fnruf .... bergeffen ( lines 11, 12); ber unb an,
geigte ( line 14 ).
4-
5.
Write the principal parts together with the third person singular present
indicative of
aufge~en ( line 2), fror ( line 5),
unterlj aften ( line 7), erroarmen
( line 7), U6 ( line 9), erfj oben ( line io), einfangen ( line io),
bergeffen ( line
12), ftieg ( line 14 ), beborftanb ( line 16 ).
Translate into German:
a) Can anybody tell me where his older brother is and what he is doing?
b)
You could have done this as easily as I , if you had really wanted to.
c)
The maid said that the table was set, but she had forgotten to put on the
plates.-
d)
He is going to stay all day tomorrow, and will probably not leave until
late at night.
e ) You
ought to write to your father this morning, for you promised to do so.
51
GERMAN B-INTERMEDIATE GERMAN
Wednesday

4.15-6
p.m.
The use of clear and idiomatic English is required.
i. Translate into English:
Van rourbe exit lent auf bie Zunfelbett aufmerffam, bie ficb brau~en tngtnifcbeu
f dmarj nub unburd bringfid au6gebrettet batte; faitm bat etn paar SSterne Rein nub tote
in unenblicber aerne mit fcbroaebem ~fimmern auffeucbteten.

Zie CScbroeftern toubten
bie reforgten an berubigen.

~C) bne Vicbt mare freifid) ber Wbitieg fitr arembe nicbt gang
ungefabrltd, ba ber Ueg and Tauter nicbt tmmer gan3 regelmabigen CStufen beftdnbe
nub and) jettmeifig Oer6ffl mtt lid) filbre, morauf ber aub feiebt au6gletten tonne;
aber e6 fei la gdnalicb tninbitiff, nub fo tonne man bie Zifdfampe mtt btnunternebmen,
man babe itcb f
cbon mand) mal bamtt geboffen.

ad)
nabm f ofort bie 2ampe, ma6 man
obne einrebe getcbeben fteb, nub Intr macbten unb auf ben Ueg.

Rein 2fftden regte
fid. 9Sber um un6, fotoett nicbt ber ffeine 2iebtfrM ber 2ampe fief, roar fdparae
Tacbt.
„2ofdt boob bie 2ampe aa!" rief man. jNan fiebt la obne 2icbt btel betferl"
„qtr ift recbt," f agte to.

„Za bin td) einer Gorge Tebtg."
=round stones.
2 . Translate into English:
91acb ber CScbfacbt bon &tpjig
Za6 OeTiibbeI ber 9Rtfftonen, bie tat aebruar ben letten 2ftemgug an bie &freiung
be6 5iaterfanbe6 gu
f
even ber fproden, mar in etuem Zrtumpbe fiber 4e6 &marten ge=
1o ft.

5
2116 am 18. Zftober bie Racbt bah toette CScb1ad tfefb bebecfte, fieten rttf ftf cbe
1~eerbaufea

unmifffur1tcb
2

ein

refigiof e6

Zanffieb erf d affen, nab

Zaufenbe

bon
Rriegern after CStamme, bie bier bereinigt maren, ftimmten anbacbt6DOft3 mit ein.

( Y6
mar bie recbte ungefucf) te Siege6feter biefe6 boben %diferfriegec

( Etne folcbe gugfeid
lubelnbe nab ttef ernite Zanfbarfeit burcbmogte bie ' Dergen Zeutfcbfanb6, toobin bie
ficbte 58otfebaft ber areibeit tam. . . . . Oneifenau icbrteb:

„Za6
bocbfte 011id ift bie
Tacbe an einem ifermtitigen j5einb; unb mfr baben tie genommen, in einer Getfe, bon
ber bie Oef ebicbte fein 58eifptef tennt; mfr finb freifid arm geroorben, aber iutr finb lent
reid an friegertfcbem Tubm nab ftoli auf bie rotebererrungene Unabbt<ngtglett; unb bie f e
( 53iiter finb mebr inert, af6 bie unermetfidften Tetcbtumer bet frember 1~errfdaft."
I vow.

' spontaneously.

3 reverently.
52
1
9
1
4
3. Translate into English:
2 vault ( of heaven) .
4. Translate into German:
91ur in!
ed) on prangt im CSilbertau bie lunge 82ofe,
Zen Or ber Morgen in ben fufen roffte;
SSte bfilbt, a16 ob tie ate berblilben moffte,
Ste abnet nicbt6 bom lebten Numenlofe.
Zer 9-fbfer firebt binan ins Orengenlofe,
CSein 2fuge trinft fid) boff bon fprilb' nbem @o1be;
( Yr i f t ber Zor' niebt, bad er f ragen f offte,
Cb er bah Saupt nicbt an bie GofbungI ftofle.
931ag benn ber 3ugeub .01ume unb erbleicben,
Tocb gfdnaet tie unb reggt unroiberfteblicb;
Ver miff an fritb f o fiibem Trug entfagen?
Unb 2iebe, barf tie nicbt bem ?Xbler gleicben?
Zocb fiircbtet tie; aucb atircbten ift ibr felig,
Zenn aft ibr 0fild, ma6 tit' 0-ein enblo6 Vagen.
On a hot summer day a peasant rode to a distant village to sell some horses.
He had taken his little son with him.

After he had sold the horses he went home
on foot.

While he was walking along he saw a horseshoe lying on the ground.
"Look there," said he to his son, "there lies a horseshoe!

Pick it up and take it
home."

"Oh," said the son, "that is not worth while, it is only an old horse-
shoe." Then the father picked it up himself. When they came to the next
village he sold it to the blacksmith and bought some cherries with the money.
After they had walked a few miles the son became very thirsty.

But no houses
were in sight, and therefore he could get nothing to drink.

He was walking be-
hind his father very tired and thirsty when he saw a cherry lying on the ground.
Quickly he picked it up and put it in his mouth.

A little farther he saw another
cherry which he likewise picked up and ate.

And so it went on until all the
cherries were eaten up.

Then the father said to his son: "If you had picked up
the horseshoe, you need not have picked up all the cherries."
53
GERMAN BC-INTERMEDIATE AND ADVANCED
GERMAN
Wednesday

4.I5-6p.m.
The use of clear andidiomatic English is required.
I. Translate into English:
Racb ber ( acbfacbt bonVeipgig
Zaig @efilbbe ber Viffionen, bie t m ~ebruar ben lettenWtemgug anbie Tefreiung
bed ~iaterfanbe6 infeten berfprod)en, mar in einemZriumpbe uber affaC~rmarten ge=
loft. 9 1 fi3
-
am 1 8. Cftober bie %ad)t bad meite ecbla~tfetb bebedte, fie~en ruffifcbe
SDeerbauf en unmifffiirfid ein religibfe6Zanffieb erfcbaffen, unb Zaufenbe bon trcegern
after Stamme, bie bier beretntgt maren, ftimmten anbad)tf3 boff mil ein.

&mar bie
recbte ungef ucbte Siege6feier biefe3 boben Mlferfriege6.

( lne fofcbe gugfeid) zubelnbe
unb lief ernfte Zanfbarfeit burcbmogte bie DeraenZeutfdfanbi3 , mobinbie ficbte-0ot=
fcbaft ber ~reibeit tam. . . . . @neifenau febrieb:

„Zap
bocbfte@fiicf tft bie Tad)e an
einem iibermtitigen aetnb; unb mir baben tie genommen, in einer Geife, bonber bie
@efdbiebte Fein ! betfptef feunt; mir finb freilid) armgeruorben, aber rbir finb xett reid
an friegerifdem Tubm unb ftofg auf bie votebererrungene Unabbdngtgfeit; unb biefe
@filter finb mebr inert, aft bie unermetttcbften Teicbtilmer bei frember Derrfcbaft."
2. Translate into English:
Zer @runbgebanfe, bad affe Rttuffe gur 1 9 ratefung ber bbd)ftenGirfung bed Zramag
imZienfte be6 Zicbte0 gufammenaumirfen baben, mar bereit6 bon9 Ztd)arb Gagner
a0gefprocben morben unb trat ilberrvattigeub grog inbie @rfebeinung, at8 unter feiner
~eitung 1 876gumerftenmat in! 8greutb f ein ,Ting be6Mbefungen" aufgeftbrt murbe.
c~mSabre 1 81 3 f6rteb @. Zb. Doffmanit ben fuffat , Zer Zidter unb ber atom=
pontft," in bent er bie Ubergeugung a0fprad, bab bie romantifd)e Zper bie einaig
mabrbafte fei, bat bie Vufif notmenbig unmittelbar auf ber Ztebtung entfpringen
milffe, unb bat auf biefen ! 8ebingungen bah Mufifbrama als bah Vert beo geniaten
unb mabrbaft romantifcfjen Zicbte0 berborgeben mtiffe. , ad) bebaupte," beiftt ain
bent ! ffuff ate, „ber Cpernbiebter mud) ebenfogut gleid after imannern fomponieren
mieber 9 Zufifer, unb 0 tft nur bad beutticbe58etouf)tfein beftimmter Velobien, xa be-
ftimmter Z6ne ber mitroirfenben anftrumente, mil einemGorte: bie bequeme Derv
f
d)aft
fiber bad innere Reid ber done, bie bief enbonjenemunterfdeibet."
54
1 9
1
4 i. Translate into English:
4. Translate into German:
Jason.

3 a, bu triffft ben g3 unft!
&ift bed Ungfild~ eigentfid)fte6 Ungtfd,
Zab feftenbrinber 9 Nenfcb
fish
reinbemabrt.
Dier gift'6gu fenfen, bort gu biegen, beugen,
Dier radt bah 9 Zed)t etn Daar unb bort ein @ran,
Unb an bembief ber -sbabn ftebt man ein anbrer,
WM ber man mar, ba man ben Vauf begann;
Unb bem53 ertuft ber 21 d)tung biefer Geft
aebft nod) ber ecna'ge Zroft, bie ecgne 2fdtung.
~d) babe nicb0 getan, mad fdfimman
ficb,
Zocb bief gemofft, gemoebt, gemunfcbt, getraebtet;
etiff gugefeben, mie aanbre taten;
Dier LibWnicbt geroofft, boob gugegriffen
Unb nidt bebaebt, bab Ubef fid) ergeuge;
Unb zett fteb' id), born UnbeUmeer umbranbet,
Unb fannnid)t fagen: acb bab'6nicbt getan!
On seeing a young Prussian soldier who was pressing his flag to his bosom in
the agonies of death, Napoleon said to his officers: "Gentlemen, you see that a
soldier has for his flag a sentiment almost approaching
,
idolatry.' Bury this
young man at once with all military honors. Do not take away his flag; its
silken folds will be an honorable shroud3 for him."
=
grengen an ( etlb0).

2
bie Mg6tterei.

3
ba6Vei~entueb.
$.
Write in the form of a letter to a friend, at least loo words in German on one
of the following topics:
a) A visit to a large city.
b) A visit in the country.
c) Why I amgoing to college.
d) The German bookI like best.
55
EXAMINERS
191 4
YARD ROBBINS Professor of Greek, Princeton University
Princeton University, A.B., 1889, and A.M., 1890
ARRIET MACURDY ..... Associate Professor of Greek, Vassar College
Radcliffe College, A.B., 1888; Columbia University, Ph.D., 1903
FoSS, First Assistant in Classical Languages, Boys High School, Brooklyn,
N.Y.
University of Bonn, A.M. and Ph.D., 18')0
READERS
191 4
KNAPP ••••••• Professor of Classical Philology, Columbia University
Columbia University, A.B., 1887, A.M., 1888, and Ph.D., 18')0
WILLARD GLEASON, Master in Greek and Latin, Roxbury Latin School,
Boston, Mass.
Harvard University, A.B., 1888, and A.M., 1889
iUERNSEY . . . . . Instructor in Classical Philology, Columbia University
Union University, A.B., 1896; Johns Hopkins University, Ph.D., '90'
ARRIET MACURDY . . . . . Associate Professor of Greek, Vassar College
Radcliffe College, A.B., 1888; Columbia University, Ph.D., 1903
,RBERT REUTER, Instructor in Latin and Greek, Cutler School, New York,
N.Y.
Harvard University, A.B., '904
58
Al-liKAMMAK
:\1
Saturday II. IS a. m.-I2. 15 p. m. :h
Do not translate the following passage, but answer the questions in order.
L:;
i
n
' , r ..I..t" ,. {;) ", ., "\l 'f/
I "o,PEICa.I\ECTa. vuas, aVopEC; 'I" ",0£, 07rroc; CTVV VJ.LW ",OV",EV0J.LEVOC; °T£
2 S(lCo,LOV E<TTL Ka£ 7rpOC; 8EWV Ka£ 7rpOC; av8pcfJ7rwv, TOVTO 7rEpl 'Op6vTa
3 TOVTOVt· TOVTOV 'Yap 7rPWTOV J.LeV 0 € J.LOC; 1To,TItP lSWI&EV {,1T'f)lCoOV Elva£ EJLO('
, \ e( . "..1.. " r \ 'A. r.. '" '
4 E7r€£ 01: To,X E S, roc; E'I"T} aVTOC;, V7rO TOV EJ.L0V o,uEI\'I'0v OUTOC; E7rO"'EJ.LT}CTE
5 EJLol 4fXc.ov € V I.dpOECT{v a.lCpcS1ToALV Ka, E'Y@ aVTov 7rPOCT7rOXEJ.LWV
6 € 7rotT}CTa CJCTTE TOVTrp TOV 7rP0C; € J.Le 1TOAEJLOU 1To,VCTo,u9o,L, I&a,
7 lAo,pov Kal.€ owKa." J.LETa TaVTa eq,T}, "cr, 'Op6VTa, lCTTLV 8 T£ CTE i)S(lCllCTa.;"
8 a.1TElCp(Vo,TO, 5T£ oil. 7raX£v 0' 0 Kvpoc; 1Jpc1JTa' "OVKOVV VCTTEPOV, roc; CTU
9 0J.L0X0'YE'ic;, O'li8EV V7r' € J.L0V aO£KOVJ.LEVOC;, a.1TO<TTd.S Eic; MVCTOVC; lCo,lCc;)S E7rotE£';
10 € x/fJpav IS TL € OVVW;" [CPT} <> 'OpovTac;.
-Xenophon, Anabasis, I, 6, 6-7.
a) Decline in the plural (line 3), dKp6-rrOAlY (line 5), ip.ol (line 3); in the
singular, in all genders, OVOfV (line 9), 0 on (line 10), Ta.X8d<; (line 4).
b) Compare 8{Katov (line 2) in the nominative singular, in all genders; compare
KaKw,> (line 9)'
c) Give the second singular of ZAa{3ov (line 7), in this tense and voice, in the
several moods, adding the infinitive, and the nominative singular of the par­
ticiple in all genders; give the second plural, present tense, of lUTl (line 2) in
the several moods, adding the infinitive, and the participle in the nominative
masculine only; inflect d.1TOlTTa<; (line 9) in this tense, in the indicative and
optative moods.
(/,) Inflect the plural of the optative aorist active of (line 6); the singular
imperfect middle of .qO{K"1lTa (line 7), giving contracted forms only.
e) Give the principal parts of 1TapfKMfO'a (line I); of Tax(}ds (line 4); of EXWV
(line 5); of d.-rrfKp{vaTo (line 8).
n Account for the case of iI-rr.qKOOV (line 3); of d.OfAepOO (line 4); of lp.o( (line 5);
of 1TOAfp.oV (line 6).
g) Account for the mood of (line 2); of (line 6); of -rravuau(}aL (line 6).
h) How is a conditional sentence of the so-called more vivid future type
expressed in Greek? State the chief constructions in which the participle
may occur.
59
"';"
GREEK A2-ELEMENTARY PROSE COMPOSITION
;aturday
12.15-1 p. m,
'ranslate into Greek:
. The general himself led the hoplites to the top of the mountain.
. These villages were not far from a river, Kydnos by name.
They marched forward quickly on this day that they might arrive at a city
and get provisions.
When the captain had come, he blamed (al'l'&4op.IU) the soldiers because they
were going to flee.
A messenger told him that the enemy were near and that the Greeks ought to
attack them.
If you would give more money to the men, they would follow you.
The Greek soldiers are better than those whom the great king is sending
against them.
60
"""a'........... .., ••• a_•• , .. _,.
Friday 4.15-6 p. m.
The translation should be exact, but clear and idiomatic English is required. Number
your answers.
I. Translate into English:
r Kal € vTav8' KAia.pxov "aTall-a8fiv E1TECTTQ.TEL.
2 apUTTfPcf Xftp£ TO oopv E!XEV, € V TV OEgU[. {3a"TTJptav' "a£
3
,
50KOLT\
....
TOW
,

...
TOVTO
"I t:r\"
TfTaryp.EVWV fJ",a"EVEtv,
,

€ V p.ev TV
ef aimp
'"
TOV E7T'tTTJ­
4 oewv av, "al /lp.a 7T'pOUEAap.{3avEv TOV 7T'TJAOV € p.{3atvwv
ff
7T'auw atUXvVT/v eu/at
... "
p.TJ ov

"at
' , e
naa» P.EV 5
'1'
ETax WUTE
" "
UVU7T'OVoa ..ecv,
, '
6 av.ro O£ -rpuieovra ETT\ 'YE'YOVOTES' € 7T'E£ oe "a£ KA€ apxOV € ropwv
7 7T'pOUEAap.{3avov "a£ ol 7T'pEU{3VrEpOt. 7T'OAV oe lI-aAAoV 0
8 € € U7T'EVOEV, V7T'07T'TEVwV af£ oiJTW 1TATJpELS elvat TIts
9 ov rydp l1>pa oLa TO 7T'eOLOV apOEtV' aAA' iva 7T'OAAa 1TpO­
10 TO "EAATJUt OEtVa T7]V sropetav, TOVTOV € VE"a {3auIA€ a
" , \' ''''' II
XI V7T'W7rTEVE E7T'£ TO 7T'fOIOV TO VOwp ,3, 11-13.
a) Account for the case of ET'1 (line 6); of € (line 8). Comment on
the case of the word KAfaPXOV (line I), and illustrate by a similar idiom
in English.
b) Where is ;'€ ;'OVOT€ <; (line 6) made? Give the first singular present indica­
tive of (7T€ (TT/J.T€ 1 (line 1); of aq,€ IKEval (line II).
c) Account for the mood of 80KO{y/ (line 3); of 7TPO<j>a1voITo (lines 9,10).
2. Translate into English:
I TOUTO oe aVTou, 7T'TdpvVTa t -ns- 0' ot UTpanWTat
2 P.lcf 0PILU 7T'pOUf"VVT/uaV TOV 8EOV, "at 0 SEVOepWV et7T'E'
3 II-Ot, € 7T'Et 7T'Ept AE'Y0VTClW TOU TOU
4 € epdvTJ, EiJgau8at Trj> 8Eip Tovnt' 8WEtV ()7T'OV clv 7T'pWTOV
5 els eptAtav xropav Of "a£
6 8VUEW "aTa ovvap.tv. "a£ lhcp OO"Et TaUTa," eepTJ, "avaTELVaTW T7]V
...." 't, " )f t: ",
7 XEtpa. "at aVETEtVaV E" TOVTOV 0 TJVsaVTO "at ettauu/urau,
8 € 7T'E£ oe Ta TWV 8EWV f!XfV, 7T'dAtV wOf.-III, 2,9.
a) Account for the use of the participle A€ ;'OVTWV (line 3); the mood of
tlq,ucwp.€ Oa (line 5); the case of &pp.n (line 2).
b) What is Xenophon's general attitude toward the gods and signs from
heaven? Cite another instance from the Anabasis..
c) What is the force of the prepositions in € € (line 5) ?
61
-,..
-1-1---- -II-.-r-.'.--.. - - - .
[BEOIl OpOp.rp € 71"t 'TOW {JoWII'Ta<;, "at 1TOAAce p.d{;wlI € rytryIlE'TO Ourp oq
71"'Adov<; € rytryIlOIl'TO, € OO"EL P.E'i{;OIl 'TL EilIaL 'TqJ SEIIO<f>WII'TL, "at alla{Ja<;
€ <f>' £71"71"011 "at Av"toll "at 'TOW t71"71"ea<; alla'Aa{JwlI "at 'Taxa
a"ovoVUL {30WlI'TWV 'TWII CTTpa:n(l)T<oV " <8>a'Aa'T7'a," "€ >aAa'TTa," "at
71"apEryryvW!I'T(J)II. EIIBa [Beoll 71"all'TE<; /Cat ol "at 'Ta
7]'AavIIE'TO /Cat ol £71"71"OL. 'E71"Et 0' a<f>t"oll'TO 71"allTE<; € 71"t'TO /J."POIl,
€ 11'TauBa 7rEpLe{3a'AAoll "at 'TOw U'TpaTrnOV<; "at AoXaryov;
OU/CpVOIl'TE<;. "at € O'TOV ot' UTpa'TLW'Ta£
<f>epovuLlI A{Bou<; "at 71"OLOUULlI "OAWIIOIl p.€ryall.-IV, 7, 23-
2
5.
a) Account for the case of 7TOU';; (line 2); of UTpaTLWT{;w (line 5); explain
the frequent use of the imperfect tense in the passage.
b) What was the reason for the great joy of the Greeks upon this occasion?
Saturday 9-11 a. m,
The translation should be exact, but clear and idiomatic English is required.
Number your answers.
1. Translate into English:
"Xa{pETE, toLol; aryryEAoL 7]0€ /Cat allopwlI.
auuoll t'T" 'T{ \LOL V\L\LES € 71"a{noL, CtAA' 'A,,/ap.epill(J)v,
335
8 u<f>WL 71"pO{EL BpL(7)t'OO<; E£IIE"a "OVP7)<;'
aAA' a,,/E, IIa'Tpo"AELI;, € /COVP7)11
"at U<f>WLII 00<; a:yEW. 'TW 0' au,.w P.dpropoL € U'TWII
71"p0<; 'TE BEWII p.a/CapwlI 71"p0<; 'TE BII7)'TwlI avBpw71"(iJv
, , R '\ " , '" 1:"
«a: 71"Po<; 'TOU t'a.CTLI\1]OS a71""1VEO<;, EL 71"O'TE 07) aUTE
34
0
XP€ LW E\LELO 'YEV1]Ta.L aEL/Cea AOL,,/Oll ap.vlIaL
'TOL<; aAAoL<;. ,,/ap ;; "/' OAOLnCTL <f>PEut BVeL,
ovoe -ri oioE 1I017UaL ap.a 71"pouu(J) "at 071"{uuw,
" e :I. t' , 'A
XaLOL: '" I
071"71"(J)<; OL 71"apa "'lllCT UOOL \La.XEOVTa.L - , 334-344.
a) Give the Attic prose equivalents for iJp.p.£,> (line 335); {3auL>':ijO'> (line 340);
lp.lio (line 341); (line 342); YrJvul (line 344).
b) Explain the syntax of p.oL (line 335); of /J:Y£LV (line 338); of YWrrraL
(line 341); of ,."axtovTaL (line 344).
c) What part has Achilles played in preceding events that Agamemnon now
takes away his prize? Who was the prophet concerned?
2. Translate into English:
9H ' .." " , .. 'A
" p.all aUT aryop?J VL"qJ;, ,,/EpOIl, VLa<; XaLwv•
at ,,/ap, ZEfJ 'TE 71"a'TEp "at' A(7)va{7) ((at "A 71"OAAOV,
TOLOU'TOL U"a P.OL CTll\Lcjlpa.8\LoVES E'lE1I 'AXaLwlI'
'TqJ "E 'Tax' "i\LVCTELE 71"O':\L<; IIpLap.oLO ctlla,,'TO<;,
XEpCTtV ilcjl ;'\LETEPllCTLV ci.AoilCTa. 'TE 71"EpBop.ell7J 'TE.
a,A."Xa P.OL al,,/{ox0<; Kpoll(07)<; ZEW UA"/E' € O(J)((EV,
9<; P.E P.E'T' Q.1TPTJKTOllS epLoa<; /Cat IId"Ea {Ja'A'AEL.
/Cat "lap € ,,/WII 'AXL'AEW 'TE p.aX7Juap.eB' EtllE"a "OVPTJI;
allnf){oL<; € 71"eEULII, € "/w 0' Xa.AE1Ta.lV(I)V·
El"'U 71"OT' e, "/E p.{av f)oVA.€ VUOP.EII, ov"h' € 71"EL'Ta
,.,R'\ " , N'f) '" IT
Tp(J)ULII a.Va.t'I\"lCTLS «axou EUUETaL, ovo 7) atoll. ­
370
375
8
,370-3 o,
1 a) State the composition and derivation of uvp.q,pdop.ov£'> (line 372);
(line 376); (line 380).
b) Explain the mood and tense of (line 373); the use of the participle
XfLA£7Ta{vwv (line 378).
c) Write the Attic prose construction for v.p' ?J!J.£'TEPTJCm (line 374).
Give first singular present indicative of d.AoOO-a (line 374).
63
-If­
62
-_•• -,-_. r r - - -- - ..-
,jU
€ V 7rPOI.ULXOLtn ¢avezrra, IlaT€ 7r">..lrt7J ¢lAov
tit S' JTapOOV El<:; eOvo<:; € xaf;€ TO "TtP' aA€ € lvoov.
w<:; S' aT€ T{<:; T€ Spdllozrra lSwv 7ra">..{voplTo<:; a7reITT'r]
oiJp€ o<:; € V inrc5 TE TP0J-L0<:; € A.">..a.#E 7via,
tit S' UVEXWP7)rT€ V, ooxpo<:; Te J-LLV €t\.€ 1Ta.pELa.S,
35
avn<:; Ila8' OP.L">..OV eov Tpwoov a7€ pWxoov
SdlTac; 'ATpeo<:; viov € €
TOV S' "EilTOOp V€ {Il€ ITIT€ V lowv alaXpo'i<:; € 7re€ rTw'
"AvlT7rapL, € ISo<:; (1pLITT€ , 7uvaLp.av€ c;, € €
a't8' OepEAES a:yov6s T' EtLEVa.L (17UJ-L0c; T' a7ro">..lITOaL,"-III, 30-4
0
.
Explain the tense used in the main verbs of the simile.
Account for the case of (line 31); of 7i'apfu1S (line 35); of d')loJlOs
(line 40).
Write line 40 in Attic prose, expressing the meaning without the use of
°tPfAfS.
Scan lines 34 and 40, marking quantities, division into feet, ictus and chief
metrical pauses. Account for the quantity of Tf (line 34); the quantity
of the final syllable of lP.fVCU (line 40 ) .
64
------- --- ---_._---- ------., - ---., --_.- -----­
TRANSLATION
Saturday 9-u a. m.
The translation should be exact, but clear and idiomatic English is required. Read
the sight passage through several times before beginning to write the translation.
I. Translate into English:
"Xa{pETE, € ALo<:; a77€ ">..Ot Ilat avop6w.
MITOV 'tT'· ov T{ tL0L iitLtLES € 7ra{TLoL, a">..A' 'A7ap.ep.voov, 335
8 1T¢01£ 7rPO{€ L BPLIT7)i'8o<:; € lv€ Ila IlOVP7J<:;'
a">..A' a7€ , OW7€ Vfc; IIaTpdICA€ t<:;, € IlOVP7JV,
ICat IT¢OOW 00<:; CL'YELV. TO, 0' aUTO, J-LdpTVpOt
7rpck T€ O€ 6JlJ J-Lalldpoov 7rp0<:; 7'10 OV7J7'WV avOprInroov
H:al. 7rpO<:; Toil a7r7)veo<:;, 10' 7rOT€ 07] aVTE 340
XP€ LW 'YeVT)Ta.L aeLilea ">..oL70V ap.ilvat
Toi<:; &">..">..OL<:;. "lap;; 7' OAOL]aL ¢perTl. OVEt,
ouoe-ri 01010 V0TtlTaL tip.a 7rPOITITOO Ilal 07rUrITOO,
07r7roo<:; ol 7rapa VIlual. 1T00t tLa.XEOVTQ.L 'Axaw{."-I, 334-344.
a) Give the Attic prose equivalents for t,P.P.fS (line 335); (line 340);
lp.lio (line 341); tJAoLfjO'L (line 342); VYJlJO'{ (line 344).
b) Explain the syntax of p.oL (line 335); of dYfLJ/ (line 338); of YfVYJTUL (line
341); of j.£aX€ OJl7'aL (line 344).
c) What part has Achilles played in preceding events that Agamemnon now
takes away his prize? Who was the prophet concerned?
2. Translate into English:
Tov 0' w<:; oW € VOy/IT€ V O€ O€ t07]<:; 30
, , ,/" ""'/''' 'I'
€ V 7rp0p.axotlTt 'l"avezrra, lCaT€ 7r"'7)717 'l"LII.OV ",TOp,
".1" ., '''0 "i' '... ,
aT 0 € TapOOV € t<:; 10 vo<:; exa..€ TO IC17P a"'€ € tVOOV.
W<:; 0' 8TE TI<:; T€ opalCoVTa lowv 71'a">..lvoplTo<:; a7rel1'TrJ
oiJp€ o<:; EV im6 TE 7'poJ-L0<:; € A.">..a#€ ,,/via,
• .r" ., T"\ - •
aT 0 av€ xooPTJIT€ V, wxpo<:; T€ P.LV € 1Ta.pELa.S, 35
&c; atTn,; IlaO' gp.t">..OV eou Tpwoov u'ry€ ptfJxoov
&tlTa<:; 'ATpeo<:; v;ov
70V 0' "EIC'TWp velseaae» lowv a,ICTXP0'ic; brlelTlTtlJ·
".tJ.VIT7rapt, Eloo<:; &ptIT7€ , "IvutuuaV€ <; , T,7rep07rfiUTa,
aro' l5,epEAES CL'YOVOS T' EtLEVa.L &7aP.0<:; T' a7roAeITBat."-III, 30-40.
a) Explain the tense used in the main verbs of the simile.
b) Account for the case of (line 31); of 1ruPfuI.<; (line 35); of dyovos
(line 40).
65
';0­

d) Scan lines 34 and 40, marking quantities,' division into feet, ictus and chief
Saturday 4· 15-6 p. In.
metrical pauses. Account for the quantity of T( (line 34); the quantity
of the final syllable of Zp,(VIU (line 40).
, Translate into English;
l1ight has come on and Hector asks Ajax to postpone their combat to another day.]
II A!av, hrEt TOt SWICE tho" fl-e-yd)o<; TE f3trjll TE
/Cal. 'IT'€pl. S' 'Axalwv tf>lpTaTo<; eCTCl't,
vVV p.ev 'IT'avCTrf,p.ECT{}a p.dXTJ" /Cal. STJto'T'flTO<;
VCTT€POV aVr€ p.aXTJCTop.€{}', €l<; 5 /CE Sa{fl-CJ>v
11p.p.e Ota/Cp{vl/,3 06>'0 S' hepolCT( 'Y€ V{ICTJV'
0' T€Ai{}€l·4 arya{}ov /Cal VV/CT! 'IT'lBeCTBal'
cd<; CTV T' 'IT'dVTa<; 'IT'apo' VTJVCTI.V ' Axatow,
CTOV<; T€ p.aAlCTTa eTa<;6 /Cat. ha{pov<;, or TOl eaCTtv'
aVTo'p e'Yw "aTo' (J,CTTV ITpldp.oto avalCTo<;
Tpwa<; ev¢paveCJ> /Cal. Tprpdoa<;
owpa S' 11'Y' 'IT'EPllC),,VTO, S6>ofl-ev ap.¢o>."-VII, 288-299.
J j ""u:pl.", = decide between. 4TCXE(/(I=js h.ere.
!6</lpllol.", = delight. 6 tns= kinsmen. 7o!XIC(cTI7l'E1I'XOIlS= with trailing robes.
Translate into Greek:
While the Greeks were encamped here, Tissaphemes came to them and said:
"I was the first to report to the king that Cyrus was marching against him, and
we plotted together to kill Cyrus. Although I did this, I am friendly to you and
I asked him to allow me to lead you safely back to Greece. He bade me ask you
why you marched against him. I advise you to answer moderately,' so that I
may be able to save you." Clearchus replied that they would not have attacked
the king had they not been persuaded by Cyrus, and that they wished to return
home without injuring anyone.
• fJ.ETpllolr.
67
66
-...
I
ljKt.t.f... 1 1 Ilvn VI" A I 11'-' r I\.V.:lL
Saturday 2-4 p. m.
Read the passage through several times before beginning to write. The translation
should be exact, but clear and idiomatic English is required.
Translate into English:
[Xenophon calms the soldiers at Byzantium]
'0 oE S€vo<poov €!O€ Ta "!"'lvop.€Va, € Tpa7T'OtTO TO
UTpCLTwp.a /Cal € /Ca/Ca ryEvo£To TV 7T'oX€£ /Cal eavTf> "al uTpanw­
l8€£ "al UVV€£U7T't7T'T€£ €rUW TOOV 7T'vXOOV UUV Tf> 0XXffJ' ol Se
€loov TO UTpaT€vp.a /3tCf €£U7T'£7T'TOV, <P€VryOVUW e/C Q,ryopas, ol p.ev € Ta
'''' "" O€ "'"'' €VOOV €TVryXavov " " "I: Ot DE sa €£","oJl' , 7T'",ota, oi O€ w flOW' ' oucaoe, OUOt 8:'"\
€ ev € oe r'pOVTO a7T'OXWXfVa£, eaXw­
€ <> Of € els ll"pav Q,7T'o<p€vry€£. <> Of
"amopap.wv €7T'1 8aXaTTav ev aXt€VTt/Cep3 7T'XotffJ 7T'€ptrn-X€£ a/Cpo7T'oX£V,
leal € p.€Ta7T'fp.7T'€Ta£ e" ou ryap ,,,avol eSd"ovv €lva£
ol EV TV a"po7T'oX€£ UX€£V TOV<; llvopa<;' ot Of uTpaTtOOTa£ €loov S€V0<poovTa,
7T'POU7T'{7T'TOVU£ 7T'oXXol airrcfJ "at XI.ryoVUt· "Nvv UOt € rD 8€vo<poov,
avopl ry€vI.u8a£. € 7T'o?.w, € € € € €
TOUOVrOV<;' VUV &v, €l /3ouXow, uti T€ f]p.as "al € uE p.iryav 7T'Ot?]­
a aiueu," 0 0' a7T'€/CptvaTo' ,,' AXX' €v ry€ XI.ry€T€ /Cal 7rO£?}UW TaUTa' el Of
, , 8 " 8' 8 '''"\ -' '1:" "t:)"\.! "
TOVTWV eire VP.€tT€, €U e -ra 07rN.L €V Ta\;€£ 00<; Tax£uTa' €
tcaT77p€p.tuat·5 "al T€ 7rap77ryryva
6
TaVTa /Cal TOV<; llXXov<; e/CeX€V€ 7T'ap€ry·
ryvav "al T{8€uBa£ Ta ;)7rXa. at Of aUTol v<p' eavToov TaTTop.€VOt or T€ 07rX'iTa£
ev Oh{rytp xpovtp € O"TW eryfvovTo /Cal ol 7r€XTauTal €7rl TO e"dT€pOV
7T'ap€o€opap.7},,€uav.-Xenophon, Anabasis, VII, 1,18-23.
cb,jKeerTol=irremediable. 2 Ke>8ei'XKo.=launched. 'aXCflfTCK6f=fishing (adj.). 'd.I.",.",=
help. I KaT1/pe,u1 tw =: calm. 6 r apE'YOYllciw= pass the word along.
HISTORY
68
69
-,.....
History

EXAMINERS
1
94
HERBERTDARLINGFOSTER . . . . . . . Professor of History, Dartmouth College
Dartmouth College, A.B., 1885, and A.M., 1888 ; Harvard University, A.M., 1892; University of
Geneva, Litt.D., rgog
EMERSON DAVIDFITE . . . . . . . Professor of Political Science, Vassar College
Yale University, B.A., 1897; Harvard University, Ph.D., 1905
ARCHIBALDFREEMAN . . Instructor in History, Phillips Academy, Andover, Mass.
Brown University, A.B., 1889; Cornell University, A.M., 18go
READERS
I9I4
EMERSON DAVIDFITE . . . . . . . Professor of Political Science, Vassar College
Yale University, B.A., 1897; Harvard University, Ph.D., 19o5
MAACHAH BELL. BALD, Instructor in History, Brooklyn Heights Seminary, Brooklyn,
N.Y.
Toronto University, B.A., 1888; Columbia University, A.M., 1912
ELIZABETH BRIGGS . . Teacher of History, Horace Mann School, New York, N.Y.
Harvard Annex, 1887; Cornell University, A.M., 1891
STILLMAN PERCY ROBERTS CHADWICK, Instructor in History, Phillips Exeter
Academy, Exeter, N.H.
Harvard University, A.B., 1892, and A.M., 1899
EDGAR DAWSON . . . . Professor of History and Political Science, Hunter College
Davidson College, A.B., 1895; University of Virginia, M.A., 1899; University of Leipsic,
Ph.D., 1902
ELOISE ELLERY . . . . . . . . . .

Associate Professor of History, Vassar College
Vassar College, A.B., 1897; Cornell University, Ph.D., 1902
ARCHIBALDFREEMAN, Instructor in History, Phillips Academy, Andover, Mass.
Brown University, A.B., 1889; Cornell University, A.M., 18go
JOHN HAYNES, Head of Department of History, Hyde Park High School, Boston,
Mass.
Williams College, B.A., 1888; Johns Hopkins University, Ph.D., 1895
70
EDWARD F. HUMPHREY . . . . . . . . Instructor in History, Columbia University
University of Minnesota, A.B.,
1903; Columbia University, A.M., rgog, and Ph.D., 1912
EDWARDARTHUR JESSER, Teacher of History, Riverview Academy, Poughkeepsie,
N.Y.
Cornell University, A.B., 19o8
EVERETTKIMBALL. . . . . . . . . . Associate Professor of History, Smith College
Amherst College, B.A., 1896, and M.A., 1899; Harvard University, A.M., 1go1, and Ph.D.,
1904
HARRIETTE PARNALMARSH, Head of Department of History, New Haven High
School, New Haven, Conn.
University of Chicago, Ph.B., 1904
CLARENCE EUGENE MINER, Teacher of History, Franklin School, New York, N.Y.
College of the City of New York, A.B., 19o6; Columbia University, A.M., 1913
DAVIDSAVILLE MUZZEY . . . Associate Professor of History, Columbia University
Harvard University, A.B., 1893; New York University, B.D.,
1897; Columbia University,
Ph.D., 1907
HARRY MAXWELLVARRELL. . . Assistant Professor of History, Simmons College
Bowdoin College, A.B., 1897, and A.M., 1goo; Harvard University, A.M., 1gog, and Ph.D.,
1912
71
Tuesday
3-
4-
5-
6.
9.
10.
HISTORY A-ANCIENT HISTORY
In each answer give dates.
In your answer to at least one question mention authors and titles of any books
which you have used, in addition to your textbook, on the general subject referred to in
the question or on some phase of that subject.

In your answer to the question selected,
include results of your reading outside the textbook.

Indicate the nature or content of
one book other than your textbook and point out how the book has helped you.
GROUP I.

(Answer one question only.)
1. Name in succession the great nations in the Euphrates valley to the time of
Alexander the Great. What contributions to civilization were made by
one of these nations?
2. From what country did the founders of Carthage come ?

For what were they
famous?

What were the elements of strength and what the elements of
weakness among the Carthaginians?
GROUP II.

(Answer three questions only.)
Describe the career (a) of Themistocles; (b) of Aristides; and (c) compare
these men as to statesmanship and character.
What was the nature of the Spartan supremacy after 404 B.e., and what
were its effects upon Greece?

Show how the supremacy came to an end.
What did the Greeks mean by the following terms: tyrant, oligarchy, ostra-
cism, democracy, autonomy? ,,
Show influences of sea power on the history of Greece, giving concrete
illustrations.
GROUP III.

(Answer one question only.)
7.
Give a careful account of the magistrates in the Roman Republic, indicating
the time or period for which your description holds good.
8. What part did Caesar, Pompey, Augustus, Claudius, and Trajan play in the
territorial development of the Roman Empire?
GROUP IV.

(Answer one question only.)
In what respects was the reign of Marcus Aurelius important?
Comment upon the statement that "Rome's greatest contribution to civi-
lization was her law"? What men were famous in the history of
Roman law?
GROUP V.

(Answer one question only.)
11.
On map 46a mark as definitely as possible the principal seaports, the main
routes of trade, and the chief grain-exporting lands in the ancient world.
12.
On map 46a mark as. definitely as possible the territory under Roman control
about 133 B.c.

Distinguish clearly the territory gained during the Punic
Wars.
See that you have followed the directions at the head of the paper regarding dates and
collateral reading.
72
1914
4.15-6 p. m.
Monday
3-
4-
5-
7-
9
.
In each answer give dates.
GROUP I.

(Answer one question only.)
GROUP II.

(Answer two questions only.)
GROUP III.

(Answer three questions only.)
GROUP IV.

(Answer one question only.)
73
1914
HISTORY B-MEDIAEVAL AND MODERN EUROPEAN
HISTORY
4.15-6 p. m.
In your answer to at least one question mention authors and titles of any books
which, you have used, in addition to your textbook, on the general subject referred to in
the question or on some phase of that subject.

In your answer to the question selected,
include results of your reading outside the textbook.

Indicate the nature or content of
one book other than your textbook and point out how the book has helped you.
1. Give an account of the mediaeval universities under the following heads:
(a) origin; (b) famous universities; (c) subjects taught and methods of
study; (d) student life.
2. Describe fully the policy and work of Innocent III.
Describe fully the reign of Francis I of France.
What problems were before the Council of Trent and how did the Council
attempt to solve them?
Explain why Philip II of Spain delayed for thirty years his attack on England
in the reign of Elizabeth.
6. Name the most important battles and treaties of the "Second Hundred
Years' War between England and France," 1689-1815, and give the terms
of at least one treaty.
Over what countries and when have the following families ruled: Hapsburg,
Hohenzollern, Romanoff, Stuart, Bourbon? Mention the name of one
ruler in each of the families and indicate briefly for what he was famous.
8. Name in order and briefly describe the different forms of government which
France has had since 1815.
What were the causes of the Crimean War?

What principles of international
law were asserted in the treaty which closed the war?
1o. Give a brief history of the Boers in South Africa.
11. On map 46 mark as definitely as possible five of the following: Adrianople,
Balkan Mountains, Constantinople, Crimea, Suez Canal, Tripoli.
12. Mark on map 81b the names and boundaries of the leading German colonial
possessions throughout the world.
See that you have followed the directions at the head of the paper regarding dates and
collateral reading.
Tuesday
5.
In each answer give dates.
HISTORY C-ENGLISH HISTORY
GROUP I.

(Answer one question only.)
GROUP II.

(Answer one question only.)
GROUP III.

(Answer one question only.)
1914
4.15-6 p. m.
In your answer to at least one question mention authors and titles of any books
which you have used, in addition to your textbook, on the general subject referred to in
the question or on some phase of that subject.

In your answer to the question selected,
include results of your reading outside the textbook.

Indicate the nature or content of
one book other than your textbook and point out how the book has helped you.
i. Name three great churchmen of England living before 1215, who were also
great statesmen.

Describe carefully the work of one of them.
2. Show that you have a definite knowledge of five of the following, writing
not less than four or five lines on each: Constitutions of Clarendon,
Cade's rebellion, Curia Regis, Joan of Arc, Lollard, Statute of Praemunire,
Wars of the Roses.
3. "The Petition of Right, the Habeas Corpus Act, and the Bill of Rights are
the complements or the reassertions of the Magna Charta." Give the
main provisions of each of these documents and then explain what the
quotation means.
4. Name four prominent literary men in the Age of Elizabeth and the most
famous works of each. Indicate briefly the nature or content of one of
these works which you have read.
It has been said that "the defeat of the British at Yorktown had a profound
effect upon the constitutional development of Great Britain herself."
Explain this statement.
6. In what respects is England's present treatment of her colonies different from
that of the period 1763-1775 ?
GROUP IV.

(Answer three questions only.)
7. Write fully on one of the following: Duke of Marlborough, John Bright,
Robert Peel.

_
8. What was Burke's attitude toward the American Revolution? What
"source" have you for your knowledge? What was Burke's attitude
toward the French Revolution?
74
9. Why was the ReformBill of 1832 necessary?

Give an account of its pro-
visions..
1o. State the provisions of the important measures for Ireland's relief advocated
by Gladstone.
11. Indicate briefly how England got control of Australia.

What is included in
the Australian Commonwealth?

What are the main features of its con-
stitution ?
GROUP V.

(Answer one question only.)
12. On map81b indicate with names, and boundaries or locations, the possessions
which England gained in the eighteenth century.
13. On map81b indicate with names, and locations or boundaries, the possessions
of Great Britain on the way fromEngland to India.
See that you have followed the directions at the head of the paper regarding dates
and collateral reading.
75
Monday
. -'2.
3-
4-
5-
~ 6.
7.
8.
9.
HISTORY D-AMERICAN HISTORY AND CIVIL
GOVERNMENT
In each answer give dates.
GROUP I.

(Answer two questions only.)
GROUP II. . (Answer two questions only.)
GROUP III.

(Answer two questions only.)
76
1914
4.15-6 p. m.
In your answer to at least one question mention authors and titles of any books
which you have used, in addition to your textbook, on the general subject referred to in
the question or on some phase of that subject.

In your answer to the question selected,
include results of your reading outside the textbook.

Indicate the nature or content of
one book other than your textbook and point out how the book has helped you.
i. Describeandexplainthepart playedbytheDutchinthehistoryof early
America.
Describethecausesof discontent whichculminatedinBacon'srebellion.
Giveacareful account of educationinthecolonies.

(If youhavedonespecial
readingoutsidethetextbookonthedevelopment inasinglecolonyor state,
youmayconfineyour account tothat state, giving theauthor and
titleof booksused.)

What collegeswerefoundedbeforetheRevolution?
What werethecauses, provisions, andresultsof theStampAct?

Givethe
argumentsinitsfavor.
Explainwhat ismeant bythe"compact theory" of theconstitution.

Name
threeprominent advocatesof thetheorybefore1840.

Inwhat documents
isthetheoryset forth?

Stateconciselytheargumentsinitsfavor.
Inwhat casesinthenineteenthcenturyhastheUnitedStatesresortedto
arbitration?

Giveanaccount of oneof thesecases, indicatingthequestion
at stake, itsimportance, andtheresult.

Mentionother waysinwhichthe
UnitedStateshasshowninterest inarbitration.
Tracethepubliccareer of StephenA. Douglas.
Describebrieflythreeeventssince1890that haveemphasizedtheposition
of theUnitedStatesasaworldpower.
What werethecausesof theimpeachment of President Johnson?

Describe
histrial.
1o. Mentionseveral important changesinthegovernment of theUnitedStates
whichhavebeenprominentlydiscussedsince lgoo?

What aretheargu-
meints for andagainst twoof these?

What changeshavebeenadopted?
11. What wasthenatureof twoof thefollowing decisionsof theUnitedStates
SupremeCourt ?

What istheconstitutional importanceof onedecision?
(a) Dred Scott Case.

(b) McCulloch vs. Maryland.

(c) Dartmouth College
Case.
GROUP IV.

(Answer one question only.)
12. Onmap88bmarkasdefinitelyaspossibletheboundariesof theOregonterri-
toryin1850. Inyour answer book indicatehowthenorthernboundary
wasdetermined.
.~ 13. Onmap88bmark asdefinitelyaspossiblefour of thefollowing: Gettysburg,
Yorktown, GadsdenPurchase, bothKansasandNebraskaasoutlinedby
theKansas-Nebraskaact of 1854, siteof theearliest Americancollege.
See that you have followed the directions at the head of the paper regarding dates
and collateral reading.
77
LATIN
Latin

EXAMINERS
1
9
1
4
NELSONGLENNMCCREA, Anthon Professor of the Latin Language and Literature,
Columbia University
Columbia University, A.B., 1885, A.M., 1886, andPh.D., 1888
WILLIAMLYMANCOWLES, Moore Professor of the Latin Language and Literature,
Amherst College
Amherst College, B.A., 1878, andM.A., 1881
JOHNCOPELAND KIRTLAND, Morison Professor of Latin, Phillips Exeter Academy,
Exeter, N.H.
Hobart College, A.B., 18go, andA.M., 1893
READERS
1
9
1
4
NELSONGLENNMCCREA, Anthon Professor of the Latin Language and Literature,
Columbia University
Columbia University, A.B., 1885, A.M., 1886, andPh.D., 1888
BERNARD MELZARALLEN, Instructor in Latin, Phillips Academy, Andover, Mass.
Yale University, B.A., 1892
CHARLES RAYMOND AUSTIN, Instructor in Latin, NewJersey State Normal and
Model School, Trenton, N. J.
BrownUniversity, A.B., 1902, A.M., 1903, andPh.D., 1912
JOHNEDMUND BARSS . . . . Master in Latin, Hotchkiss School, Lakeville, Conn.
Acadia University, B.A., 1891 ; HarvardUniversity, A.B., 1892, andA.M., 1893
BARCLAYWHITEBRADLEY, Instructor in Latin, College of the City of NewYork
University of Pennsylvania, A.B., 1897, andPh.D., 19oo
CLIFFORD PEASE CLARK . . . . Instructor in Latin and Greek, Dartmouth, College
WesleyanUniversity, A.B., 1895; Princeton University, Ph.D., 1gio
MARio EMILIOCOSENZA, Assistant Professor of Latin, College of the City of NewYork
Collegeof the Cityof NewYork, A.B., sgol ; Columbia University, Ph.D., 1906
CHARLESJOSEPH DEGHUEE . . Teacher of Latin, Trinity School, NewYork, N.Y.
Columbia University, A.B., 1884, A.M., 1885, andL.H.D., 1886
HOWARD HUSTED DOWLIN. . . . Teacher of Latin and Greek, University School,
Cincinnati, Ohio
University of Pennsylvania, A.B., igo1
DANIEL HIGGINS FENTON. . . . . Instructor in Latin and Greek, Yale University
Yale University, B.A., 19og, andM.A., 1gio
ALBERTAMILDRED FRANKLIN, Teacher of Latin, Barnard School for Girls, New
York, N.Y.
WellesleyCollege, B.A., 1904; Columbia University, A.M., lgog
SUSANBRALEYFRANKLIN, Head of Department of Classics, Ethical Culture School,
NewYork, N.Y.
BrynMawr College, A.B., 1889, andPh.D., 1895
8o
CAROLINEMORRIS GALT, Associate Professor of Archaeology, Mount Holyoke College
BrynMawr College, A.B., 1897
FLORENCE ALLENGRAGG. . . . . . . . . . . . Instructor in Latin, Smith College
Radcliffe College, A.B., 1899, A.M., 1906, andPh.D., 1908
ELLACATHERINEGREENE, Teacher of Latin, Ethical Culture School, NewYork, N.Y.
Vassar College, A.B., 1887
ELIZABETH HAZELTONHAIGHT . . . . Associate Professor of Latin, Vassar College
Vassar College, A.B., 1894, andA.M., 1899; Cornell University, Ph.D., 19og
HELENIVES HAIGHT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tutor in Latin, Hunter College
Vassar College, A.B., 1898; Columbia University, A.M., 1913
LEOAUGUSTINEHANIGAN, Teacher of Classics, Franklin School, NewYork, N.Y.
Union University, A.B., 1911; Princeton University, A.M., 1912
ALLANCHESTERJOHNSON, Assistant Professor, Preceptor in Classics, Princeton
University
Dalhousie University, A.B., 1904; Johns Hopkins University, Ph.D., lgog
JOHNCOPELAND KIRTLAND, Morison Professor of Latin, Phillips Exeter Academy,
Exeter, N.H.
Hobart College, A.B., 18go, andA.M., 1893
WILLIAMSTUART MESSER, Instructor in Classical Philology, Columbia University
Columbia University, A.B., 1905, andA.M., lgog
JOHNLEWIS PHILLIPS . . . Instructor in Latin, Phillips Academy, Andover, Mass.
DartmouthCollege, A.B., 1894
KATHARINE CAMPBELLREILEY, Teacher of Greekand Latin, Bryn Mawr School,
Baltimore, Md.
Vassar College, A.B., 1895; Columbia University, A.M., 1902, andPh.D., 19og
FLETCHERNICHOLs ROBINSON, Instructor in Latin, Phillips Exeter Academy,
Exeter, N. H.
HarvardUniversity, A.B., lgog
GEORGE LEROYSHELLEY. . . Principal Dearborn-Morgan School, Orange, N.J.
Union University, A.B., 1901, andA.M., lgog
EDGARHOWARD STURTEVANT, Assistant Professor of Classical Philology, Columbia
University
Universityof Indiana, A.B., 1898; Universityof Chicago, Ph.D., 1go1
ELIZABETH McjimsEY
TYNG, Teacher of Latin, Packer Collegiate Institute, Brooklyn,
N.Y.
Cornell University, A.B., 1903; Columbia University, A.M., 1904
IRVINJOHNUHRICH, Teacher of Latin and Greek, Browning School, NewYork,
N.Y.
HarvardUniversity, A.B., 1goo, andA.M., igol
JOHNWILLIAMHENRYWALDEN. . . . . . . . . . Reader for Harvard University
HarvardUniversity, A.B., 1888, A.M., 1889, andPh.D., 1891
ALICE WALTON, Associate Professor of Latin and Archaeology, Wellesley College
SmithCollege, A.B., 1887; Cornell University, Ph.D., 1892
MONROE NICHOLS WETMORE . . . . . . . . . Professor of Latin, Williams College
Yale University, B.A.. 1888, M.A., 1goo, andPh.D., 1904
81
LATIN 1-GRAMMAR
1
9
1
4
Wednesday
Do not write a translation of the following passage, but answer the questions in order.
3-
4-
5-
7-
9
.
z z . 115 a.m.-i p.m.
Quaeres a nobis, Grati, cur tanto opere hoc homine delectemur.

Quia
suppeditat nobis ubi et animus ex hoc forensi strepitu reficiatur et aures con
vicio defessae conquiescant.

An to existimas ant suppetere nobis posse quod
cottidie dicamus in tanta varietate rerum, nisi animos nostros doctrina
excolamus, ant ferre animos tantum posse contentionem, nisi eos doctrina
eadem relaxemus ?

Ego vero fateor me his studiis esse deditum.

Ceteros
pudeat, si qui ita se litteris abdiderunt ut nihil possint ex its neque ad com
-,

7
munem adferre fructum neque in aspectum lucemque proferre; me autem.

8
quid pudeat, qui tot annos ita vivo, indices, ut a nullius umquamme tempore
ant commodo ant otium meum abstraxerit ant voluptas avocarit ant denique
somnus retardarit ?

Qua re quis tandem me reprehendat, ant quis mihi iure
suscenseat, si, quantum ceteris ad suas res obeundas, quantum ad festos dies
ludorum celebrandos, quantum ad alias voluptates et ad ipsamrequiem animi
et corporis conceditur temporum, quantum alii tribuunt tempestivis convi-
viis, quantum denique alveolo, quantum pil'ae, tantum mihi egomet ad haec
studia recolenda sumpsero ?-Cicero, Pro Archia, 112,
13.
' i. Decline in full nobis (lined), rerum (line 4), eos (line 5), litteris (line 7), fruc-
tum (line 8), ludorum (line
13)-
2. Conjugate quaeres (line z ) in the pluperfect subjunctive active,, reficiatur
(line z ) in the imperfect subjunctive passive, conquiescant (line 3) in the
present imperative active, abdiderunt (line 7) in the future indicative
active, abstraxerit (line io) in the imperfect subjunctive active.
Write all the infinitives of reficiatur (line a), naming each.
Write the accusative' singular of opere (line i), the nominative singular neuter
of eadem (line 6), the nominative plural neuter of communem (lines 7, 8). .
Write the principal parts of excolamus (line 5), proferre (line 8), vivo (line.9),
avocarit (line io).
6. Tell in what case each of the following words is, and why this case i s used:
nobis (line z ), convicio (lines z , 3), quod (line 3), annos (line 9), commodo
(line io), temporum (line r4), mihi (line 115):
Tell in what mood each of the following verbs is, and why this mood is used:
delectemur (line i), reficiatur (line a), excolamus (line 5), pudeat (line 7),
possint (line 7).
8. Tell in what tense each of the following verbs is, and why this tense i s used:
dicamus (line 4), esse deditum (line 6), possint (line 7), vivo (line 9), abstrax-
exit (line io):
Explain the derivation of forensi (line a), reficiatur (line z),,conviviis (lines
114, z 5)-
z o. What is the gerundive?

Explain its use in ad suas res obeundas (line z a).
ii. Divide the following words into their syllables, mark the quantity of their
penults and final syllables, and indicate the accent: forensi (line a), ab-
diderunt (line 7), nullius (line 9), requiem (line 113), temporum (line 114 ).
R,
z
3.
4'
5'
6
Thursday .
3-
4-
5-
11914
LATIN 2-ELEMENTARY PROSE COMPOSITION
ii. i5 a.m.-i p.m.
Translate into Latin:
i. Do you ask me, fellow-citiz ens, what Lucullus did in Asia?
a. In the year in which he was put in charge of this dangerous war, messengers
had come to Rome from our allies.
These men had been sent to ask us for help.
The knights also thought that we ought to protect them.
Although Mithridates had often been defeated by Roman generals, he was
then threatening the whole province.
He hoped within a short time to conquer the Roman forces on land and sea.
But Lucullus arrived in Asia before the king could accomplish this.
The latter, despairing of his fortunes, fled as swiftly as possible to Tigranes.
He left behind much gold and silver and very many most beautiful objects.
If our soldiers had not begun to collect this booty, they would have captured
their enemy.
8
3
4•
6.
LATIN 3-SECOND YEAR LATIN
Wednesday

9-11 a.m.
Translate the following passage, and answer the questions. Read the passage
through several times before beginning to write. The translation should be exact, but
in clearand natural English.
[A storm causes serious inconvenience to Caesar's forces.]
Tanta enim tempestas cooritur ut numquam illis locis maiores agqas

1
fuisse constaret

Tumautem ek omnibus montibus hives= proluit' ac siimmas

2
ripas flumiriis superavit pontisque ambos3 quos C. Fabius fecerat uno die
interrupit 4

Quae res magnas difficultates exercitui Caesaris attulit.

Cas-
tra enim, ut supra demonstratum est, cum essent inter flumina duo, Sicorim
et Cingam, spatio milium
xxx,
neutrumhorum'transiri poterat, necessarioque
omnes his angustiis continebantur. Neque civitates quae ad Caesaris
amicitiam accesserant frumentum supportare neque ii qui pabulatums longius
progressi erant intexclusi fluminibus reverti neque maximi commeatus q u i

9
ex Italia Galliaque venigbant in casts perverure poterant. Tempus erat

io
autem difficillimum, quo neque frumenta in hibernis erant neque multum a

I i
maturitate
6
aberant, et civitates exinanitae,7 quod Afranius paene omne 12
frumentum ante Caesaris adventum Ilerdam convexerat,
8
reliqui si. quid 13
fuerat, Caesar superioribus diebus consumpserat.-De Bello Civili, i, 48.

14
= hives, ` snow.' 2proluit, ` washed away.' 3ambos, ` both.' <interrupit, ` broke down.'
s pabulatum, from pabulari, ` to forage.'

6
maturitate, ` ripeness.'

7exinanitae, supply erant,
` were stripped.'

s convexerat, ` had conveyed.'
1. Tell in what case each of the following words is, and why this case is used:
aquas (line 1), fluminibus (line 9), quo (line 11), Ilerdam (line 13), reliqui
(line 13).
2. Tell in what mood each of the following verbs is, and why this mood is used:
constaret (line 2), essent (line 5).
3. Tell in what tense each of the following verbs is, and why this tense is used:
cooritur (line i), fuissto~(line 2), constaret (line 2), fecerat.(line 3).
What form of the verb is pabulatum (line 8) ?

What idea does this form
express ?
Write out the Latin words for which C. (line 3) and xx~ (line 6) stand.
Decline in fu~ l lod(line i), maiores (line i), montibus (line 2), milium (line 6);
decline dalo (line 5) in the feminine plural and qud (line 13) in the mascu-
line singular.
7.
Compare longius~(line 8), difcillimum (line ii).
8. Conjugate attuM (line 4) in the present indicative active, transiri (line 6)
in the i mperfect, subjunctive active, veniebant (line Io) in the perfect
indicative active, consumpserY (line 14) in the future indicative passive;
write all the infinitives
,,
of progressi (line 9), and name each.
9. Translate into Latin:
a) It was reported to the enemy that the supplies that were being brought
to Caesar were approaching the river.
b) When they received that news, they sent horsemen, that the river might
not be crossed.

,
c) The danger was so great that our men did not dare to resist them.
1914
3
4
5
6
7
S
19314
LATIN 4-CICERO (MANILIAN LAW AND ARCHIAS)
AND SIGHT TRANSLATION OF PROSE
Thursday

9-11 a. m.
Translate the following passages, and answer the questions.

The translation should
be exact, but in clear and natural English.

It is important that enough time -be given to
II to deal with it satisfactorily.
Cnidum aut Colophonem aut Samum, nobilissimas urbis, innumerabilis-
que alias captas esse commemorem, cum vestros portus, atque eos portus
quibus vitam ac spiritum ducitis, in praedonum fuisse potestate sciatis?
An vero ignoratis portum Caietae celeberrimum ac plenissimum navium
inspectante praetore a praedonibus esse direptum; ex Miseno autem eius
ipsius liberos qui cum praedonibus antea ibi bellum gesserat a praedonibus
esse sublatos ? Nam quid ego Ostiense incommodum atque illam labem
atque ignominiam rei-publicae querar, cum prope inspectantibus vobis classis
ea cui consul populi Romani praepositus esset a praedonibus capta atque
oppressa est ?

Pro di immortales, tantamne unius hominis incredibilis ac

10
divina virtus tam brevi tempore lucem adferre rei publicae potuit ut vos
qui modo ante ostium Tiberinum classem hostium videbatis, ii nunc nullam
intra Oceani ostium praedonum navem esse audiatis ?-Pro Lege Manilia, 33.
1. What four things does Cicero enumerate in this speech as the chief qualifica-
tions of an imperator ? Which of these qualifications is he illustrating in
the passage above?
5
2. By what law was Pompey put in command of the war with the pirates?

In
what year? Describe his previous military achievements.
3. Where were the places referred to in Samum (line 1), Miseno (line 5), Ostiense
(line 7) ?

What is meant by Oceani ostium (line 13) ?
4. What is the point of the contrast between Cnidum aut Colophonem aut Samum
(line 1) and vestros portus (line 2) ?

Explain the meaning of quibus vitam
ac spiritum ducitis (line 3).

Of what facts is Cicero thinking when he says
tam brevi tempore (line 131) ?
5.
What force does an vero (line 4) give to a question?

What part of speech is
pro (line 1o) ?

Explain the use of ii (line 12).
8
5
Read the passage through several times before beginning
to write the translation.
[ Metellus takes steps to entrap Jugurtha.]
Metellus postquam
videt neque oppidumcapi, neque Iugurthamnisi ex in-
sidiis aut suo loco pugnamfacere, et iamaestatemexactamesse, ab Zama discedit
et in its urbibus quae ad se defecerant= satisque munitae loco aut moenibus erant
praesidia imponit; ceterumexercitumin provinciamquae proxima est Numidiae
hiemandi gratiaa conlocat. Neque id tempus ex~liorummore quieti aut luxuriae
concedit, sed quondamarmis bellpmp_arum., procedebat, insidias regi per amicos
tendere3 et eorumperfidia pro armis uti parat.

Igitur Bomilcarem, qui Romae
cumlugurtha fuerat et inde vadibus4 datis de Massivae neces iudiciumfugerat,
quod ei per maximam
amicitiammaxima copia fallendi erat, multis pollicitatio-
nibus adgreditur, ac primo efficit ut ad se conloquendi gratia
occultus
6
veniat;
deinde fide data, si Iugurtham
vivumaut necatumsibi tradidisset, fore ut illi
senatus impunitatemet sua omnia concederet, facile
Numidae7 persuadet, cum$
ingenio
9
infido tummetuen#ne, si pax cum$omanis fieret, ipse per condiciones
ad supplieiumtraderetur

Sallust, De Bello Iugurthino, 61. "
=defecerant , ` had gone over.'
2
hiemandi grat ia, equivalent to hiemandi causa. 3t endere,
'lay.'

4 vadibus, 'bail.'

a nece, ` murder.'

6
occult us, . ` secretly.'

7 Numidae, ` the Numidian';
Bomilcar is meant.

'Cum . . . t um, 'both . . . and'

9ingenio infido,'of a faithless disposi-
tion.'
86
2.
1914
LATIN 5-VERGIL (AENEID, I, II, AND IV OR VI)
AND SIGHT TRANSLATION OF POETRY
Thursday

2-4 P. m.
Under I, translate either -z or 2 , and answer the questions on the passage translated.
Translate also II.

It is important that enough time be given to II tc deal with it satis-
factorily.

The translation should be exact, but in clear and natural English.
i.

"Quae quibus anteferam?

lamiamnee maxuma Iuno,
nee Saturnius haec oculis pater aspicit aequis.
Nusquamtuta fides.

Eiectumlitore, egentem
excepi et regni demens in parte locavi;
amissamclassem, socios a mortereduxi.
Heu furiis incensa feror!

Nunc augur Apollo,
nunc Lyciae sortes, nunc et love missus ab ipso
• interpres divomfert horrida iussa per auras.
Scilicet is superis labor est, ea cura quietos
sollicitat.

Neque to teneo, neque dicta refello;

380
i, sequere Italiamventis, pete regna per undas.
Spero equidemmediis, si quid pia numina possunt,
supplicia hausurumscopulis, et nomine Dido
saepe vocaturum.

Sequar atris ignibus absens,
et, cumfrigida mors anima seduxerit artus,

385
omnibus umbra locis adero.

Dabis, improbe, poenas.
Audiam, et haec Manis veniet mihi fama sub imos."
iv, 371
-
387.
a) Under what circumstances were these words spoken?
b) State two reasons why it is natural for Dido to thin

first of Juno (verse
37.1).

Howdoes the goddess showher pity at the close of Book IV?
c) Explain the reference in Saturnius (verse 372), Lyciae sortes (verse 377),
interpres divom(verse 378).

Where was Lycia?
d) Describe the scene in Book I to which the words socios a morte reduxi (verse
375) refer.

To what does amissamrefer?
e) What part does the guidance of Apollo (verse 376) play in the life of Aeneas ?
What is meant by is (verse 379) ?
f) Explain the meaning of pia in connection with numina (verse 382) ?

Give a
literal translation of°hausurum(verse 383) and explain the metaphor.
g) Copy verse 373 and 383, and indicate the quantity of each syllable, the
division into feet, and the principal caesuras.
" Hic vir, hic est, tibi quempromitti saepius audis,
Augustus Caesar, divi genus, aurea condet
saecula qui rursus Latio regnata per arva
Saturno quondam; super et Garamantas et Indos
proferet imperium(facet extra sidera tellus,
extra anni solisque vias, ubi caelifer Atlas
axemumero torquet stellis ardentibus aptum).
Huius in adventumiamn;incet Caspia regna
responsis horrent divomet Maeotia tellus,
87
375
795
et septemgemini turbant trepida ostia Nili.

800
Nec vero Alcides tantum telluris obivit,
fixerit aeripedem cervam licet, aut Erymanthi
pacarit nemora, et Lernam tremefecerit arcu,
nec, qui pampineis victor iuga flectit habenis,
Liber, agens celso Nysae de vertice tigris.

805
Et dubitamus adhuc virtutem extendere factis,
aut metus Ausonia prohibet consistere terra ? "
vi,
791
-
807.
a) Under what circumstances were these words spoken?
b) Explain the reference in divi (verse 792), Saturno (verse 794), Atlas (verse
79
6
).
c) What and where were Latio (verse 793), Caspia regna (verse 798), Ausonia
terra (verse 807) ?
d) In what respect is the order of the words aurea condet saecula qui rursus
(verses 792-793) poetical? Name and explain the figure of speech
used in verse 799.

Explain the form divom (verse 799).
e) Account for Vergil's attitude toward Augustus as indicated in this passage.
What is the poet's conception of the mission of Rome? What revelation
of the future was granted to Aeneas in the lower world?
f )
How is the thought expressed in verses 8o6-807 related to the verses that
precede ?
g) Copy verses 796and 797, and indicate the quantity of each syllable, the
division into feet, and the principal caesuras.
Read the passagethrough several times before beginning to write the translation.
[The Trojans mourn Hector. King Priam begs Achilles to give him the body
of his son.]
Flent miseri amissum Phryges Hectora, totaque maesto
Troia sonat planctu.I

Fundit miseranda querelas'
infelix Hecube
3
saevisque arat unguibus4 ora,
Andromacheque suas scindit de pectore vestes,
heu tanto spoliata virol

Ruit omnis in uno
Hectore causa Phrygum; ruit et defessa senectus
adflicti miseranda patris, quem nec sua coniunx
turbaque natorum nec'magni gloria regni
oblitum tenuit vitae, quin iret inermis
et solum invicti castris se redderet hostis.
Mirantur Danaurn proceres, miratur et ipse
Aeacides animum miseri senis.

Ille trementes,
adfususs genibus, tendens ad sidera palmas
haec ait: "O Graiae gentis fortissime Achilles,
O regnis inimice meis, to Dardana solum
vitaa tremit pubes, to sensit nostra senectus
crudelem nimium.

Nunc sis mitissimus,b oro,
et patris adflicti genibus miserere precantis
donaque quae porto miseri pro corpore nati
accipias."-Ilias Latina, 1015-1034.
' planctu, 'lamentation.'

2querelas, 'complaints.'

;
Hecube, equivalent to Hecuba.
guibus, 'nails.'

5adfusus, 'casting himself down.'

6
mitissimus, equivalent to lenissimus.
88
4un-,
1914
LATIN 6-ADVANCED PROSE COMPOSITION
Friday

11.15 a. m.-i p. m.
Translate intoLatin:
¢2KT
-
ne
T%iil

r.

.
Do you remember what Cicero said in the last part oGthe speech which he
delivered= for the Manilian Law when he was praetor?
He promised Manilius
that he would use all the ability that he had to defend the honor of the state and
the safety of its allies.

There were some to whom Cicero seemed to be putting'
his own interests above' the' Weare of his country.

These men thought that he
was praising Pompey because the latter had so much influence,with the people.
Cicero himself, however, was afr id~~l[~

in urging the Romans to put all their
hopes in Pompey alone, he had incur the hatred of many powerful citizens.
But although this was so, he did not hesitate to say that no one could prevent
him from advocating
3
the plan which he believed to be the best for the republic.
If he had not done this, would he now be worthy of our praise?
,
'deliver,' Were.

2 ` put above,' praeferre.

3'advocate,' suadere.
89
3-
LATIN B-CAESAR
1
9
1
4
Wednesday
g-r r a. m.
Translate three of the following passages, and answer the questions on the passages
chosen.

The translation should be exact, but in clear and natural English.
z. Ubi vero turrim moveri et appropinquare moenibus viderunt, nova atque
inusitata specie commoti legatos ad Caesarem de pace miserunt, qui ad
hunc modum
locuti: non se existimare Romanos sine ope divina bellum
gerere, qui tantae altitudinis machinationes tanta celeritate promovere
possent; se suaque omnia eorum potestati permittere dixerunt. Unum
petere ac deprecari: si forte pro sua clementia ac mansuetudine, quam
ipsi ab aliis audirent, statuisset Aduatucos esse conservandos, ne se armis
despoliaret.
Sibi omnes fere finitimos esse inimicos ac suae virtuti
invidere; a quibus se defendere traditis armis non possent.-ii, 31.
a) Change to the direct form se suaque omnia eorum potestati permittere
(line
5)-
e) Conjugate noceri (line 3)
in the present subjunctive active.
Germanico bello confecto, multis de causis Caesar statuit sibi
Rhenumesse
transeundum; quarum illa
fuit iustissima, quod, cum videret Ger-
manos tam facile impelli ut in Galliam venirent, suis quoque rebus
eos timore voluit, cum intellegerent et posse et audere populi Romani
exercitum Rhenum transire. Accessit etiam quod illa pars equitatus
Usipetum et
Tencterorum, quam supra commemoravi praedandi
frumentandique causa
Mosam transisse neque proelio interfuisse,
post fugam suorum se trans Rhenum in finis Sugambrorum receperat
seque cum its coniunxerat.-iv, 16.
9o
5
5
b)
Tell in what case each of the following words is, and why this case is
used: altitudinis (line 4), celeritate (line 4), potestati (line 5).
c) Write the principal parts of miserunt (line 2), locuti (line 3), invidere
(line 9).
d) Decline moenibus (line i), ope (line 3).
e) Tell in what mood each of the following verbs is, and why this mood is
used: possent (line 5), audirent (line q), despoliaret (line 8). Tell in
what tense possent
(line 5) is, and why this tense is used.
2. Compluribus expugnatis oppidis Caesar, ubi intellexit frustra tantum
laborem sumi neque hostium fugam coatis oppidis reprimi neque his
noceri posse, statuit exspectandam classem.
Quae ubi convenit ac
primum ab hostibus visa est, circiter ecxx naves eorum paratissimae
atque omni genere armorum omatissimae profectae ex portu nostris
adversae constiterunt; neque satis Bruto, qui classi praeerat, vel
tribunis militum centurionibusque, quibus singulae naves erant
attributae, constabat
quid agerent aut quam rationem pugnae
insisterent.-iii,
14.
a) Write the first person singular, present indicative of intellexit (line r),
visa est (line 4), profectae (line 5).
b)
Tell in what case each of the following words is, and why this case is
used: oppidis (line r), classi (line 6), quibus (line q).
c) Explain the derivation of praeerat (line 6).
d) Tell in what mood and tense each of the following verbs is, and why this
mood and tense are used: intellexit (line r), exspectandam (line
insisterent (line 9).
5
4-
S.
a) Tell in what case each of the following words is, and why this case is
used: rebus (line 3), equitatus (line 5), praedandi (line 6), proelio (line q).
b) Write the principal parts of confecto (line i), impelli (line 3), interfuisse
(line
7).
c) Tell in what mood and tense each of the following verbs is, and why this
mood and tense are used: transeundum (line 2), venirent (line 3), transisse
(line q).
d) Conjugate confecto (line i) in the pluperfect subjunctive active, voluit
(line 4) in the imperfect subjunctive.
e) What is the force of the prefix in confecto (line i).
f) Comparefacile (line 3).
Mittuntur ad Caesarem confestim ab Cicerone litterae, magnis propositis
praemiis si pertulissent; obsessis omnibus viis missi. intercipiuntur.
Noctu ex materia quam munitionis causa comportaverant turres
admodum exx excitantur incredibili celeritate; quae deesse operi
videbantur perficiuntur. Hostes postero die multo maioribus coactis
copiis castra oppugnant, fossam complent. Ab nostris eadem
ratione qua pridie resistitur. Hoc idem reliquis deinceps fit diebus.
Nulla pars nocturni temporis ad laborem intermittitur; non aegris,
non vulneratis facultas quietis datur. Quaecumque ad proximi diei
oppugnationem opus sunt noctu comparantur.-v, 40. io
a) Explain the derivation of obsessis (line 2), coactis (line 5), facultas (line 9),
and tell what the suffix denotes in the last word.
b) Tell in what case each of the following words is, and why this case is
used: praemiis (line 2), operi (line 4), die (line 5), qua (line q).
c) Tell in what mood and tense each of the following verbs is, and why this
mood and tense are used: pertulissent (line 2), comportaverant (line 3).
d) Conjugate videbantur (line 5) in the present subjunctive active, complent
(line 6) in the future indicative active.
e) Compare postero (line 5), maioribus (line 5).
Civitatibus maxima laus est quam latissime circum se vastatis finibus soli-
tudines habere. Hoc proprium virtutis existimant, expulsos agris
finitimos cedere neque quemquam prope audere consistere; simul
hoc se fore tutiores arbitrantur repentinae incursionis timore sublato.
Cum bellum civitas aut inlatum defendit aut infect, magistratus qui
ei bello praesint, ut vitae necisque habeant potestatem deliguntur.
In pace nullus est communis magistratus, sed principas regionum
atque pagorum inter suos ius dicunt controversiasque minuunt.
Latrocinia nullam habent infamiam, quae extra finis cuiusque civi-
tatis fiunt, atque ea iuventutis exercendae ac desidiae minuendae io
causa fieri praedicant.-vi, 23.
a) Compare latissime (line z), tutiores (line 4).
b) Decline hoc (line 4) in the neuter, necis (line 6), ius (line 8).
c) Conjugate expulsos (line 2) in the pluperfect indicative active.
d) Tell' in what case each of the following words is, and why this case is
used: infamiam (line 9), desidiae (line io).
e) Tell in what mood and tense each of the following verbs is, and why
this mood and tense are used: praesint (line 6), fceri
-
(line ii).
91
5
5
3.
LATIN C-CICERO
Thursday
9-11 a. m.
Translate any three of the following passages, and answer the questions on the pas-
sages chosen.

The translation should be exact, but in clear and natural English.
i. Cnidum
aut Colophonem aut Samum, nobilissimas urbis, innumerabilisque
alias captas esse commemorem, cum vestros portus, atque eos portus
quibus vitam ac spiritum ducitis, in praedonum fuisse potestate sciatis ?
An vero ignoratis portum Caietae celeberrimum ac plenissimum navium
inspectante praetore a praedonibus esse
direptum; ex Miseno autem
eius ipsius liberos qui cum praedonibus antea ibi bellum gesserat a
praedonibus esse sublatos ?
Nam quid ego Ostiense incommodum
atque illam labem atque ignominiam rei publicaje querar, cum prope
inspectantibus vobis classis ea cui consul populi
Romani praepositus
esset a praedonibus capta atque oppressa, est
?-Pro Lege Manilia, 33.

to
a) By
what law was Pompey put in command of the war with the pirates?
In what year ?

Describe his previous military achievements.
b) Where were the places referred to in
Samum (line r), Miseno (line 5),
Ostiense (line 7) ?
c) What is the point of the contrast between
Cnidum aut Colophonem aut
Samum (line r) and vestros portus (line a) ? Explain the meaning of
quibus vitam ac spiritum ducitis (line 3).
d) What force does an vero (line 4) give to a question ?
Z. Introducti autem Galli ius iurandum sibi et litteras ab Lentul _, t,etnego,
Statilio ad suamgentem data esse dixerunt, atque ita sibi ab his et a T.
Cassio esse praescriptum, ut
equitatum in Italiam quam primum
mitterent; pedestris sibi copias non defuturas.
Lentulum autem sibi
confirmasse afatis Sibyllinis haruspicumque responsis se esse
tertium
illum Cornelium ad quem regnum huius urbis atque imperium pervenire
esset necesse; Cinnam ante se et Sullam fuisse; eundemque dixisse
fatalem hunc annum esse ad interitum huius urbis atqb ` imperi, qui
esset annus decimus post virginum absolutionem, post Capitoli autem
incensionem vicesimus.In Catilinam, iii; 9.

ro
a) Who were the Galli mentioned in line r ?

Give an account of their con-
nection with the conspiracy.

To what meeting does introducti (line r)
refer ?
b) Who were Lentulo (line i), Cinnam (line 7), Sullam (line 7) ?
c) What is meant by tertium illum Cornelium
(lines 5, 6) ?
d) What were the fatis Sibyllinis (line 5), the Capitoli (line 9) ?

Who
were the virginum (line 9) ?
Census nostros requiris.

Scilicet; est enim obscurum proximis censoribus
hunc cum clarissimo imperatore L. Lucullo apud exercitum fuisse;
superioribus, cum eodem quaestore fuisse in Asia; primis, Iulio et
Crasso, nullam populi partem esse censam.

Sed quoniam census non
ius civitatis confirmat ac tantum modo indicat eum qui sit census ita se
iam turn gessisse pro Give, its temporibus quern to criminaris ne ipsius
quidem iudicio in civium Romanorum iure esse versatum, et testamen-
tum saepe fecit nostris legibus et adiit hereditates civium Romanorum et
in beneficiis ad aerarium delatus est a L. Lucullo pro consule.

Quaere
argumenta, si quae potes; numquam enim hic neque suo neque amico-

ro
rum iudicio revincetur. Pro Archia, ii.
92
1
9
1
4
5
5
5
4. Neque enim posset aut Ahala ille Servilius aut P. Nasica aut L. Opimius
aut C. Marius aut me consule senatus non nefarius haberi, si sceleratos
civis interfici nefas esset. Itaque hoc, iudices, non sine causa etiam
fictis fabulis doctissimi homines memoriae prodiderunt, eum qui patris
ulciscendi causa matrem necavisset variatis hominum sententtis non

5
solum divina sed etiam sapientissimae deae sententia liberatum.

Quod
si duodecim tabulae nocturnum furem quoquo modo, diurnuzn autem si
se telo defenderet, interfici impune voluerunt, quis est qui, quoquo modo
quis interfectus sit, puniendum putet, cum videat aliquando gladium
nobis ad hominem occidendum ab ipsis porrigi legibus ?

ro
Pro Milone, 8, 9.
5-
a) What was the object of the Roman census (line i) ?

How often was one
made?

In what sense is primis (line 3) used?
b) What force does scilicet (line i) give to the sentence?
c) What war was being fought at the time indicated by quaestore (line 3) ?
Who was the Roman commander in this war? In what capacity was
Archias apud exercitum (line a) ?
d) What is the point of Cicero's argument in the sentence beginning sed
quoniam (line 4) ? Explain the meaning of in beneficiis ad aerarium
delatus est (line 9).
a) Explain the reference to Ahala (line i), Nasica (line i), Opimius (line r),
Marius (line z), senatus (line a).

! '
b) Tell the story to which allusion is made in the sentence beginning itaque
hoc (line 3), giving the names of eum (line 4), patris (line 4), and deae
(line 6).
c) Put Cicero's argument in the sentence beginning quod si (lines 6, 7) in
the fewest and simplest words.
d) What were the duodecim tabulae (line 7) ?
Neque enim ego illa nec ulla umquam secutus sum arma civilia; semper-
que mea consilia pacis et togae socia, non belli atque armorum fuerunt.
Hominem sum secutus privato consilio, non publico; tantumque apud
me grati animi fidelis memoria valuit ut nulla non modo cupiditate sed
ne spe quidem, prudens et sciens tamquam ad interitum rdPrem volun-
tarium. Quod quidem meum consilium minime obscurum fuit. Nam
et in hoc ordine integra re multa de pace dixi et in ipso bello eadem etiam
cum capitis mei periculo sensi., Ex quo nemo iarn erit tam iniustus
existimator serum qui dubitet quae Caesaris de bello voluntas fuerit,
cum pacis auctores conservandos statim censucrit, ceteris fuerit iratior. i o
Pro Marcello, 14, 15.
5
a) What is meant by hoc ordine (line 7), ipso belo (line 7) ?

Who is meant
by hominem (line 3) ?
b) Explain the significance of togae (line a).

What was the periculo (line 8) ?
c) Explain what Cicero meant in the sentence beginning hominem sum
secutus (line 3), and'in the sentence beginning ex quo nemo (line 8).
d) In whaf year was this speech delivered?

To whom was it addressed?
What was the occasion?
93
Thursday

2-4 p. m.
Translate the following passages, and answer the questions on them.

The translation
should be exact, but in clear and natural English.
f)
g)
"Hanc pro Palladio moniti, pro numine laeso
efigiem statuere, nefas quae triste piaret.
Hanc tamen immensam Calchas attollere molem

185
roboribus textis caeloque educere iussit,
De recipi portis aut duci in moenia possit,
neu populum antiqua sub religione tueri.
Nam si vestra manus violasset dona Minervae,
turn magnum exitium (quod di prius omen in ipsum

I9o
convertant') Priami imperio Phrygibusque futurum;
sin manibus vestris vestram ascendisset in urbem,
ultro Asiam magno Pelopea ad moenia bello
venturam, et nostros ea fata manere nepotes."-ii, 183-194.
a) Under what circumstances were these words spoken ?
b) Explain fully the reference in Palladio (verse
183)-
c) What poetical construction is used in verse 186 ?

Change it to the
corresponding prose construction.
d) Make clear the meaning of verse 188.

Explain the allusion in Pelopea
(verse
193)-
e) To whom does ipsum (verse I9o) refer?

What reason had the speaker
given for hating this man?
How is Book II of the Aeneid related to Books I and III?
Copy verses 19o and rgr, and indicate the quantity of each syllable, the
division into feet, and the principal caesuras.
e)
f)
g)
LATIN D-VERGIL'S AENEID, BOOKS I-VI

1 1 91 4
Agnovit prolem ambiguam geminosque parentes,
seque novo veterum deceptum errore locorum.
Turn memorat: "Nate, Iliacis exercite fatis,
sola mihi talis casus Cassandra canebat.
Nunc repeto haec generi portendere debita nostro,
et saepe Hesperiam, saepe Itala regna vocare.
Sed quis ad Hesperiae venturos litora Teucros
crederet ? Aut quern turn vates Cassandra moveret ?
Cedamus Phoebo et moniti meliora sequamur."-iii, 18o-188.
a) Under what circumstances were the words in verses 182-188 spoken?
b) Write the principal parts of canebat (verse 183).
c) Why was Italy called Hesperiam (verse 185) ?
d) What is the literal meaning of canebat (verse 183) ?

Why is it an
appropriate word in this place?
-
Who was Cassandra?

To what misfortune of hers does verse 187 refer?
Name in order the places mentioned in Book III at which Aeneas landed.
What part did Phoebus (verse 188) play in the wanderings of Aeneas ?
18o
185
f)
g)
"Huius in adventum iam nunc et Caspia regna
responsis horrent divom et Maeotia tellus,
et septemgemini turbant trepida ostia Nili.
Nec vero Alcides tantum telluris obivit,
fixerit aeripedem cervam licet, aut Erymanthi
pacarit nemora, et Lernam tremefecerit arcu,
nec, qui pampineis victor iuga flectit habenis,
Liber, agens celso Nysae de vertice tigris.

8o5
Et dubitamus adhuc virtutem extendere factis,
aut metus Ausonia prohibet consistere terra? "-vi, 798-807.
a) Under what circumstances were these words spoken?
b) What and where were Caspiaregna(verse 798), Ausonia terra (verse 807) ?
c) Explain the three allusions in verses 802 and 803.
d) Explain the form divom (verse 799).

Write the longer form of pacarit
(verse
803)-
e) Account for Vergil's attitude toward Augustus as indicated in this
passage.
How is the thought expressed in verses 8o6 and 807 related to the verses
that precede ?
What revelation of the future was granted to Aeneas in the lower world?
QK
[ Cicero praises Pompey in order to justify the course adopted by Deiotarus.]
Ignosce, ignosce, Caesar, si eius viri auctoritati rex Deiotarus cessit, quem
nos omnes secuti sumus; ad quem cum di atque homines omnia ornamenta con-
gessissent, tum to ipse plurima et maxima.

Neque enim, s i tuae res gestae cete
rorum laudibus obscuritatemattulerunt, idcirco Cn. Pompey memoriam amisimus.
Quantum nomen illius fuerit, quantae opes, quanta in omni genere bellorum gloria,
quanti honores populi Romani, quanti senatus, quanti tui, quis ignorat ?

Tanto
ille superiores vicerat gloria quanto to omnibus praestitisti.

Itaque Cn. Pompey
bella, victorias, triumphos, consulatus'admirantes numerab~amus; tuos enumerare
non possumus. Ad eum igitur rex Deiotarus venit hoc misero fatalique bello,
quem antea iustis hostilibusque bellis'adiuverat, quocum erat non hospitio solum,
Nn y
verum etiam familiaritate coniunctus; et venit vel rogatus ut amicus, vel arcessi-
tus ut socius, vel evocatus ut is qui senatui parere didicisset

postremo lenit ut ad
fugientem, non ut ad insequentem, id est ad periculi, non ad victoriae societatem,
Cicero, Pro Rege Deiotaro, 12, 13.
1914
LATIN M-ELEMENTARY SIGHT TRANSLATION
OF PROSE
Thursday

r 1.15 a. m.-1 p. m.
Read the passage through several times before beginning to write the translation.
The translation should be exact, but in clear and
-
natural English.
96
LATIN P-ADVANCED SIGHT TRANSLATION
OF PROSE
1914
Thursday

9-11 a. m.
Read the passage through several times before beginning to write the translation.
The translation should be exact, but in clear and natural English.
[ Hannibal's Italian allies reproach him for his failure to come to their assistance.]
Eadem aestate Marcellus ab Nola
,
, quam praesidio obtinebat, crebras excur-
siones in agrum Hirpinum et Samnites fecit, adeoque omnia ferro atque igni
vastavit ut antiquarum cladium
2
memoriam renovaret. Itaque legati ad
Hannibalem missi simul ex utraque gente ita Poenum adlocuti sunt: "Hostes
populi Romani, Hannibal, fuimus primum per nos ipsi, quoad nostra arma,
nostrae vires nos tutari poterant. Postquam its parum fidebamus, Pyrrho regi
nos adiunximus; a quo relicti pacem necessariam accepimus, fuimusque in ea per
annos prope quinquaginta ad id tempus quo tip in Italiam venisti.

Tua nos non
magis virtus fortunaque quam unica
3
comitas4 ac benignitas erga cives nostros,
quos captos nobis remisisti, ita conciliavit tibi ut to salvo atque incolumi amico
non modo populum Romanum sed ne deos quidem iratos, si fass est dici,
timeremus.' At hercule non solum incolumi et victore sed praesente te, cum
ploratumb prope coniugum ac liberorum nostrorum exaudire et flagrantia tecta
posses conspicere, ita sumus aliquotiens hac aestate devastati ut M. Marcellus,
non Hannibal vicisse ad Cannas videatur.

Causa autem haec est, quod neque to
defendis et rostra iuventus, quae, si domi esset, tutaretur, omnis sub signis militat
tuis. Nec to nec exercitum tuum norim, nisi, a quo tot alies Romanas fusas
stratasque
7
esse sciam, ei facile esse ducam opprimere populatores nostros vagose
sine signis palatos
9
quo quemque trahit quamvis vana praedae spes. - Numi-
darum paucorum illi quidem praeda erunt, praesidiumque miseris simul nobis et
Nolae ademeris, si modo quos, ut socios haberes, dignos duxisti, haud=° indignos
iudicas quos in fidem receptos tuearis."-Livy, xxiii, 41,
4r
' Nola, a city in Campania.

2 stadium, ' disasters.'

3 unica, ' singular.'

+ comitas, `courtesy.'
s
fas, ' right.'

6
ploratum, ' wailing.'
.
7 fusas stratasque, ' routed and overthrown.'

8
vagos, equiva-
lent to vagantes.

9palatos, from palari, ' to wander.'

iohaud, ' not'
97
Thursday
LATIN Q-SIGHT TRANSLATION OF POETRY
98
1
9
1
4
2
-
4 P.
m.
Read the passage through several times before beginning to write the translation.
The translation should be exact, but in clear and natural English.
[ The Trojans mourn Hector.

King Priam begs Achilles to give him the body of
his son.

The funeral is described.]
Flent miseri amissum Phryges Hectora, totaque maesto
Troia sonat planctui.

Fundit miseranda querelas
2
infelix Hecube
3
saevisque arat unguibus4 ora,
Andromacheque suas scindit de pectore vestes,
heu tanto spoliata viro ! Ruit omnis in uno
Hectore causa Phrygum; ruit et defessa senectus
adflicti miseranda patris, quem nec sua comunx
tubbaque natorum nec magni gloria regni
oblitum tenuit vitae, quin iret inermis
et solum invicti castris se redderet hostis.
Mirantur Danaum proceres, miratur et ipse
Aeacides animum miseri senis.

Ille trementes,
adfususs genibus, tendens ad sidera palmas
haec ait: "O Graiae gentis fortissime Achilles,
O regnis inimice meis, to Dardana solum
vitaa tremit pubes, to sensit nostra senectus
crudelem nimium.

Nunc sis mitissimus,b oro,
et patris adflicti genibus miserere pacantis
donaque quae porto miseri pro corpore nati
accipiasesi nec precibus nec flecteris auro,
in senis extremis tua dextera saeviat annis;
saltem scaevar pater comitabor funera nati.
Non vitam mihi nec magnos concede favores,
sea funus crudele mei.

Miserere parentis
et pater esse meo mitis de vulnere disce.
Hectoris interitu vicisti Dardana regna,
vicisti Priamum; sortis reminisceres victor
humanae variosque ducum to respice casus."
His tandem precibus grandaevum motus Achilles
adlevat a terra corpusque exsangue parenti
reddidit Hectoreum, post haec sua dona reportat.
It patriam Priamus tristisque ex more suorum
comparat exsequias
9
supremaque funera ducit.
Turn pyra construitur, quo bis sex corpora Graium
quadrupedesque adduntur equi currusque tubaeque
et clipei galeaeque ocreaeque=° Argivaque tela.
Haec super ingenti
r
g
,
~ -,I mitu componitur Hector.
Ilias Latina, 1015-1051.
I planclu, `lamentation.'

2 querelas, `complaints.'

3 Hecube, equivalent to Hecuba._ 4 ungui-
bus, ` nails.

5 adfusus, ` casting himself down.'

6
Milissimus, equivalent to lenissimus.

7scaeva,
,
mournful.'

areminiscere, `remember.'

9exsequias, `obsequies.'

I°ocreae, ` greaves.'
MATHEMATICS
99
Algebra

EXAMINERS
3
;
914
FREDERICKSHENSTONE WOODS, Professor of Mathematics, Massachusetts Institute
of Technology
Wesleyan University, A.B., 1885, and A.M., 1888; University of Gottingen, Ph.D., 1894

Williams College, A.B., 1902
CHARLES RANALDMACINNES, Assistant Professor, Preceptor in Mathematics,
Princeton University
Queen's University, M.A., 1896; Johns Hopkins University, Ph.D., rgoo
WILLIAMALLEN FRANCIS, Wentworth Professor of Mathematics, Phillips Exeter
Academy, Exeter, N.H.
Brown University, A.B., 1882, and A.M., 1885
READERS
1914
CHARLES RANALDMACINNES, Assistant Professor, Preceptor in Mathematics,
Princeton University
Queen's University, M.A., 1896; Johns Hopkins University, Ph.D., rgoo
EDWARDBLANCHARDCHAMBERLAIN, Teacher of Mathematics, Franklin School,
NewYork, N.Y.
BowdoinCollege, A.B., 1899; Brown University, A.M., lgor
ELIZABETHBUCHANAN COWLEY, Assistant Professor of Mathematics, Vassar College
Vassar College, A.B., igo1, and A.M., 1902; Columbia University, Ph.D.,
19o8
Roy
DE MILLE FULLERTON . . . . . Lecturer in Mathematics, McGill University
Mount Allison University, A.B., 1903 ;
Harvard University, A.M., lgog
ISLAYFRANCIS MCCORMICK, Master in Mathematics, Albany Academy, Albany,
N.Y.
BowdoinCollege, A.B., rgoo; Harvard University, A.B., 1902
100
LEWIS PARKER SICELOFF, Assistant Professor of Mathematics, Columbia University
Central College, A.B., igoo ; Columbia University, Ph.D., 1912
WILLIAMSPENCER, Master in Mathematics, Lawrenceville School, Lawrenceville,
N. J.
lot
Monday
No extra credit will be given for more than six questions.
1. a) Factor
4. a) Solve
1
9
1
4
MATHEMATICS A-ELEMENTARY ALGEBRA
COMPLETE
7. a) Graph

y=1+3x
2
.
tains A
GROUP A.

(Answer both questions of this group.)
2mx+6ny-my-12nx,
6x
2
+11x-10,
x
4
-a
1
x+bx
3
-a
1
b.
c
3 +y
3

c
4 +c2y2+y4

(c
-
fy)
2
b) Simplify

1-

(c-
y ) 2
=L

c3 -y3

X
e2-y2]
2. a) Simplify and combine

3
-1$1/3-61/108+121+31+53 .
b) Rationalize the denominator and simplify
GROUP B.

(Answer both questions of this group.)
3. a) Solve

2x+y= -2 ,
2xy-y
2
+6x+g=0.
Associate properly the values of x and y.
b) Solve

2x+1.+2

2xx1 -3,
x +y=4c
2
+d
2
,
xy
. 2cd
Associate properly the values of x and y.
b) If

b : c=5 : 3

in the equation
.
x
2
+bx+c
2
=0, are the roots of the equa-
tion real?

Give the reason for your answer.
GROUP C.

(Omit one question of this group.)
5. At his usual rate a man can row 15 miles downstream in 5 hours less time than
it takes him to return. Could he double his rate, his time downstream
would be only one hour less than his time up. What is his usual rate in
still water and what is the rate of the current?
6. The second term of an arithmetic progression is j of the 8th and the sum of
20 terms is 63 .

Find the progression.
b) In the expansion of
O x - 3 x . 1 1 /
find the term which, when simplified, con-
102
1. a) Factor
b) Simplify
2. a) Solve
b) Solve
Verify your answers.
b) Simplify and combine:
4. a) Solve
1
9
1
4
MATHEMATICS AI-ALGEBRA TO QUADRATICS
Monday

9-11 a. m.
No extra credit will be given for more than six questions.
GROUP A.

(Answer both questions of this group.)
2mx+6ny-my-12nx,
6x
2
+11x-10,
X4_
a3 x+bx3 -a3 b.
C
3
+y
3 c4 +c2..2+„A
(C+y)
1-

(c
-
y )
2 -
L

C
1-
Y
3

X
c
z
-y
2
I ~ -
s x
-
3 (x Fl) +4(4x
-
5)=4
-
s(x +1 ) .
7a-x 3 x-5a
b-3 a+4 _ 3 b-a
GROUP B.

(Answer both questions of this group.)
3. a) Solve for x and y
1.6x-2.05y=0.3 9,
5.2x+4.ly =3 .42.
1/3 -181/3-61 108-}-121+31+53 .
1/x+1

1
+
1 x
-0.
b) ' Rationalize the denominator and simplify
1~3 -1/2
1/2+7
3 .
GROUP C.

(Omit one question of this group.)
5. A mixture of alcohol and water contains 10gals.

A certain amount of water is
added and the alcohol is then 30per cent of the total.

Had double the
amount of water been added, the alcohol would have been 20'per cent of
the whole.

How much water was actually added and how much alcohol
is there ?
6. Two points move at constant rates along the circumference of a circle whose
length is 150 ft. When they move in opposite directions, they meet every
5seconds, and when they move in the same direction, they are together
every 25 seconds. What are their. rates ?
7. 146francs are worth as much as 117 shillings.

A dollar and 4 francs are
together worth 32 cents more than 6shillings.

Find the values in cents of
a franc and a shilling.
103
b) Solve
is 4 : 1.

Find x.
1 _2__ 5
6x-5aaa-6x
2x+y-2=0,
2. a) Solve

I
¢x2+6xy+2x-6y+1=0.
Associate properlythe values of x and y.
b) Solve

xi-12x
-
I=-1.
Do both answers satisfythe equation?
GROUP B.

(Omit one question of this group.)
3. A man walked 12 miles at acertain rate and then 6miles farther at arate
z mile an hour faster.

Had he walked the whole distance at the faster rate,
his time would have been 20minutes less.

Find his rate.
4. The circumference of the rear wheel of acarriage is 2 feet greater than the
circumference of the front wheel.

The front wheel makes 64 more revolu
tions than the rear wheel in traveling 3,496feet.

What is the circumference
of each wheel?
5. Three men A, B, and C can do apiece of work together in 1 hour and 20min-
utes.

To do the work alone C would take twice as long as A and 2 hours
longer than B.

How long would it take each to do the work alone?
GROUP C.

(Omit one question of this group.)
a
6. In the expansion of ~ V x-} -2) the ratio of the 4th term to the 5th term
7. Find two numbers x and ysuch that x, y, and xyare in geometric progression,
and x, y, and 4x-} -3 are in arithmetic progression.
8. Plot 2x-3y=6and 2y+1=4x-4x
2
, using the same axes, and estimate from
the graphs the solutions of the equations.
yi
y2
y3
-7 -5 3
9 1 7
6 4 -2
X1
-
X2 y1-y2
X2
-
x3 y2
-
y3
3. Solve the following equations bythe use of determinants:
x-3y=1,
y+4z=2,
2x ~ z=3.
4. a) Find the value of
(2+3i)
2
where i=

-1.
1+2i
b) Find the sum of the reciprocals of the roots of 5x
3
-3x
2
-2x-{-7=0.
5. a) Bystudying the signs of
xa-2x
3
-5x
2
+6x-1=0, what can you sayabout
the signs and the realityof its roots?
b) Graph y=x
3
-4x-} -2 and determine between what consecutive integers
lie the roots of the equation x
3
-4x+2=0.
6. Find to two decimal places the root of x
4
-x
3
-9x'+4x-} -6=0 which lies
between 3 and 4.

4
7. Find all the roots, real and complex, of 8x
4
+24x
3
-x-3=0. Plot the
complex roots.
MATHEMATICS AZ-QUADRATICS AND BEYOND
Monday 11.15 a. m.-1 p.
No extra credit will be given for more than six questions.
1914
m.
1
9=4
MATHEMATICS B-ADV ANCED ALGEBRA
Friday 4.15-6p. m.
Six questions required. No extra credit will be given for more than six questions.
1. a) How manytriangles can be drawn with each vertex in one of twentygiven
GROUP A. (Answer both questions of this group.)
1
points, no three of which are in the same straight line?
1. a) Approximate to two decimal places the roots of b) How manysuch triangles can be drawn if four of the given points lie in a
2 4
straight line ?
3x-3
+1+
2x-3
-0
. 2. Without expanding the determinants, prove the following relations:
Geometry EXAMINERS
1
9
1
4
VIRGILSNYDER ........... Professor of Mathematics, Cornell University
IowaState College, B.Sc., 1889 ; University of Gottingen, Ph.D., 1894
JAMEs GRAHAM HARDY. . . . . . . . Professor of Mathematics, Williams College
Lafayette College, A.B., 1894, and A.M., 1897; JohnHopkinsUniversity, Ph.D., 1898
JONATHAN TAYLOR RORER, Head of Department of Mathematics, WilliamPenn
HighSchool, Philadelphia, Pa.
Colorado College, A.B., 1895; University of Pennsylvania, Ph.D., 19oi
READERS
1914
VIRGILSNYDER ........... Professor of Mathematics, Cornell University
IowaState College, B.Sc., 1889; University of Gottingen, Ph.D., 1894
GEORGE MACFEELYCONWELL . . . . . Instructor inMathematics, Yale University
PrincetonUniversity, A.B., 19o5, A.M., 19o6, and Ph.D., 19o8
HARVEYNATHANIELDAVIS . . Assistant Professor of Physics, Harvard University
BrownUniversity, A.B., 19o1, and A.M., 1902; Harvard University, Ph.D., 19o6
Louis SERLE DEDERICK. . . . . Instructor inMathematics, PrincetonUniversity
KenyonCollege, A.B., 19o5; Harvard University, A.M., 1907, and Ph.D., 19o9
ELEANOR CATHERINE DOAK, Associate Professor of Mathematics, Mount Holyoke
College
CoatesCollege, A.B., 1892; University ofChicago, Ph.B., 19o1
JOE GARNER ESTILL, Master inMathematics, Hotchkiss School, Lakeville, Conn.
Yale University, B.A., 1891, and M.A., 1897
CECIL. ANDREWEWING, Teacher of Mathematics, Tome School for Boys, Port
Deposit, Md.
DickinsonCollege, A.B., 1898
JOHN R. GARDNER, Teacher of Mathematics, Allen-StevensonSchool, New York,
N.Y.
Upper IowaUniversity, B.S., 189o; State University of Iowa, C.E., 1894; Upper IowaUni-
versity, bI.S., igoo
io6
JAMES GRAHAM HARDY. . . . . . . . Professor of Mathematics, Williams College
Lafayette College, A.B., 1894, and A.M., 1897; JohnsHopkinsUniversity, Ph.D., 1898
ARTHUR DUNN PITCHER, Assistant Professor of Mathematics, DartmouthCollege
University of Kansas, A.B., 19o6, and A.M., 1907; University of Chicago, Ph.D., 191o
HARRYWILFREDREDDICK. . . Instructor inMathematics, Columbia University
University of Indiana, A.B., 1904; University of Illinois, A.M., 19o6; ColumbiaUniversity,
Ph.D., 191o

,
HENRYLEWIS SWEET, Instructor inMathematics, Phillips Exeter Academy, Exeter,
N.H.
Amherst College, A.B., 1907
CHARLES BURTON WALSH, Teacher of Mathematics, Ethical Culture HighSchool,
New York, N.Y.
Harvard University, A.B., 19o6
Louis LINCOLN WHITNEY, Teacher of Mathematics, Collegiate School, New York,
N.Y.
Harvard University, A.B., 1898, and A.M., 1899
107
1
4
3.
4-
MATHEMATICS C-PLANE GEOMETRY
Tuesday

9-11 a. m.
The candidate is requested to state on the cover of the answer-book what textbook
of Geometry was used in preparation.
5 -
GROUP A.

(Answer four questions from this groin.)
1914
1. Complete this theorem and prove: If two sides of . a triangle are unequal, the
angles opposite are unequal, and the greater . . . . .
State the hypothesis of the above theorem.

.
Point out where it is needed and used in your proof.
State the converse of the theorem.
2. a) In the triangle ABC, AB =3 inches, A =&P, B=45
*
.

Accurately construct
the triangle and its altitudes AD, BE, CF; show all necessary construction
lines and arcs.
b) Which of the angles of the figure thus drawn are equal to the angles A, B,
C, of the original triangle?

Prove one such equality.
Complete and prove: The angle between two secants intersecting without
the circle is measured by . . . . .
Prove: If three sides of a trapezoid are equal, the diagonals mutually divide
each other into segments which are in the ratio of one of the equal sides to
the fourth side of the trapezoid.
Prove: If two triangles have their sides respectively proportional, they are
similar.
6. a) Construct the locus of the center of a circle, radius one-half inch, which
rolls around an equilateral triangle, altitude two inches.
b) Compute to two decimals the area inclosed by the locus and the perimeter
of the locus.
GROUP B.

(Answer two questions from this group.)
7. Show how to construct an equilateral triangle equivalent to a given square.
(Actual construction not required.)
8. A sloping embankment rises from a level field.

One end of a prop, 20feet long,
rests on the ground 16 feet from the foot of the embankment, and the other
end rests 9feet up the embankment, measured along its sloping side.
How high is the upper end of the prop above the level field?

(Result in
feet to one decimal.)
g. It is desired to construct a half-mile track.

The _ start and finish are to be
straight-ways intersecting at right angles at the goal. ' The rest of the track
is to be an arc of a circle tangent to the two straight-ways.

Find the radius
of the arc and the length of the arc in feet; also the area inclosed by the
track in acres.

(Results to be correct to two decimals.)
108
3-
4-
5 .
7•
MATHEMATICS D-SOLID GEOMETRY
1914
Tuesday

11.15 a. m. to 1 p. m.
Six questions are required.

No extra credit will be given for more than six questions.
The candidate is requested to state on the cover of the answer-book what textbook
of Geometry was used in preparation.
1. The segments intercepted by three parallel planes on all straight lines meeting
them are in the same proportion.
2. If a plane contains one element of a cylinder and meets the cylinder in one
other point, then it contains another element also, and the section is a
parallelogram.
Complete and prove the theorem: The sum of the angles of a spherical triangle
is greater than ....... and is less than .......
The area of a spherical triangle is loo square inches, and its angles are 100
°
,
64
°
, 20CP.

What is the radius of the sphere on which the triangle lies?
A glass vessel made in the form of a right circular cylinder contains a certain
amount of water.

The diameter of the base of the vessel is 5 inches.

When
an irregular mass of gold is dropped into the vessel it is entirely covered
by the water and the level of the water rises 3 inches.

What is the weight
in ounces of the lump of gold if gold weighs r 1 ounces per cubic inch?
6. The stone cap of a gate post is in the form of a regular square pyramid Whose
base measures 4 inches on a side and whose altitude is 15 inches. If the
top of the cap is cut off by a plane parallel to its base and 5 inches above
it, what is the volume of the piece cut off ?
Define prism, pyramid, parallelopiped, conical surface, spherical triangle, lune.
Give mensuration formulas for the volume o£ a prism, cylinder, cone,
pyramid, sphere; and for the lateral area of a prism, regular pyramid,
cone of revolution, surface of a sphere.
log
MATHEMATICS E-TRIGONOMETRY (PLANE AND
SPHERICAL)
Saturday
GROUP A.

(Omit one question from this group.)
I . a) Express the six functions of (186
°
-}-x) in terms of functions of the acute
angle x.

Prove one of these relations.
b) Describe the variation in cos x as x varies from 90
°
to 27o°. Illustrate
by means of figures.
2. a) Find the value of x, given
b) Prove tan
-
' -I'F +tan-
I
*=45'.
cos x=
V
43.2Xo.074
17.234
3. Find all the values of x between o and 360
°
that satisfy the equation
sin x+sin 2x =I.
GROUP B.

(Omit one question from this group.)
4. In a right spherical triangle, prove
cot A cot B =cos c.
5.
a) Define polar triangles; quadrantal triangles; spherical excess.
7.
1914
2
-
4 P.
m.
b) In a right spherical triangle, not biquadrantal, the side opposite the right
angle is nearer a right angle than is either oblique side.
6. Write the formulas necessary to solve the quadrantal triangle given
GROUP C.

(Answer both questions.)
Each of two ships A and B, 415 yards apart, measures the horizontal
. angle
subtended by a cliff and the other ship; the angles are 48
°
17' and I io
p
I o'
respectively. If the angle of elevation of the cliff from A is I5°24' what is
the height of the cliff ?
8. Solve the spherical triangle, given
a=9o, b=66, C=7o
°
.
a=55
0
, b=65
0
, C=9o
°
.
Saturday
1. a) Express the six functions of (18cP+x) in terms of functions of the acute
angle x.

Prove one of these relations.
2 . a) By means of the ruler and compasses show how to construct the angles
x and y, given:
cos
x=3;

tan y=-3.
3-
5-
7.
MATHEMATICS F-PLANE TRIGONOMETRY
GROUP A.

(Omit one question from this group.)
b) Describe the variation in cos x as x varies from 90
°
to 2 qo
°
. Illustrate
by means of figures.
b) Assuming the formula for the cosine of the sum of two angles, prove:
cos 3x=cos x (1-4sine x),
and verify for

x=3o
°
, 45
°
, 60
°
.
a) Find the value of x, given
b) Prove tan
-
' I+tan-
1
*=450.
Prove the following theorem:
In any plane triangle
cos x-

43.2X6.074
17.234
4. Find all the values of x between c and 360
°
that will satisfy the,,iquation
sin x+sin 2x=I.
GROUP B.

(Omit one question from this group.)
a+b

tan
_

z (A+B)
a-b

tan z (A -B)
6. The sides of a triangle are 3, 4,
V
/
39; show, without solving, that the largest
angle is greater than 120
°
.
In the oblique plane triangle ABC, given a=91.12, b=72.43, C=4i 10',
find the remaining parts.
8. Each of two ships A and B, 415 yards apart, measures the horizontal angle
subtended by a cliff and the other ship; the angles are 48°17' and IIO Io'
respectively. If the angle of elevation of the cliff fromA is 15
°
24' what is
the height of the cliff ?
1914
2
-
4 P.
m.
MUSIC
Music
CLARENCE GRANT HAMILTON. . Associate Professor of Music, Wellesley College
Brown University, A.B., 1888, and A.M., igoo
EXAMINERS
1914
LEO RICH LEWIS . . . . . Professor of Theory and History of Music, Tufts College
Tufts College, A.B., 1887; Harvard University, A.B., 1888, and A.M., 1889
RALPHLYMAN BALDWIN, Supervisor of Music, Hartford Public Schools, Hartford,
Conn.
READERS
1914
FRANKEDWIN WARD . . . . . . . . . . Associate in Music, Columbia University
EDWIN S. TRACEY . . . Teacher of Music, Morris High School, New York, N.Y.
Saturday
MUSIC A-APPRECIATION
1
9
1
4
4.15-6 p.m.
1.
What are the chief features of the Rondo Form?

Name one or more works
written in this form.
a.
Name three composers who were living in the year 1840.

Give the approxi-
mate age of each at that time.

Name three of the principal compositions
of each composer; also name the towns or cities in which he did important
work.
3-
4-
5-
The Bach Gavotte from the Sixth English Suite is said to be a
classic work;
the Chopin Polonaise, Opus 26, No. I, is said to be a romantic work. Explain
the terms classic and romantic as applied to these works.
Write concerning each movement of Schubert's Unfinished Symphony.
Matters of mere form-outline need not be mentioned.
The following topics
are suggested:
a) The several themes, their treatment and development.
b) Matters of style, manner, mood, feeling.
c) Details concerning one or more passages which have specially interested
you.
Give reasons for the continued fame and popularity of the Hallelujah Chorus.
Mention characteristics of the work which you personally like or dislike.
6.
Give your reasons for doubting the following statements:
a)
The Scherzo from Mozart's G Minor Symphony was rendered in a digni-
fied manner.
b)
The piano part in Haydn's Emperor Quartet was expressively given.
c) The use of the cornet by Beethoven in his symphonies is very limited.
d) Schumann cleverly introduces astrain from "The Watch on the Rhine"
in his Faschingsschwank.
e) The soprano soloist sang as an encore a Chopin Ballade.
2. Complete the setting of the following text, effecting a cadence in the original
key:
Praise to God,

im - mor - tal

praise For the love that crowns our days.
3. Harmonize in four vocal parts, making the Soprano melodious:
ir6
4. Of the following alternative passages indicate, in each case, the better, and
give reasons for your preference.

The passages need not be copied:
( A)

or
5. Analyze the numbered portions of the following passage.

Use the numbers
( which refer to chords or notes directly beneath them) as a guide to your
comments.

No portion of the passage need be copied:
1 2 3 4 5

6 7 8

9
r
-
M
--)
_ -#-~-~ -4--~-
j7- =RNIQ
1
9
1
4
MUSIC B-HARMONY
Saturday 9-1 1 a. m.
i. Harmonize in four vocal parts:
1
94

9.
Analyze the numbered portions of the following fragment, indicating keys
MUSIC-D, E, F, PIANOFORTE, VOICE, VIOLIN

and chords. Use the numbers as a guide to your comments.
No portion
4:r5-6:oo p. m.
of the passage need be copied.
1

2 3 4 5. 6 7 8

9

10
r. Give four pairs of Italian terms of tempo or expression, each pair indicating

~

~

H
~ -_
-
01
,
Saturday
contrast; for example, f orte, piano.
2. Write and fully name the inversion of each of the following intervals:
( A)
( B )
( C) ( D ) ( ] E~ )
3. The following are portions of scales.

Complete each of these, upward and
downward, to its key-note ( tonic)
4. Write the following passage, prefixing the proper key-signature.

Omit any
superfluous characters and add any that become requisite.
5.
Copy the following fragment, adding time-signature and bars:
R
~ --R
r -r r-r
for four voices.

Inversions may be used.
8. H armonize:
6. Choose ( A) or ( B ) .
( A) Write an original four-measure phrase, concluding as follows:
( B ) Write at least four measures of a theme from a composition you have
studied.

Name the composition and its composer.
7. Write the D ominant Triads of the major keys of D , F, A-flat, each arranged
PHYSICS
Physics

EXAMINERS
1
914
FRANKALLAN WATERMAN . . . . . . . . . . Professor of Physics, Smith College
Princeton University, A.B., 1888, and Ph.D., 1896
ARTHUR LALANNE KIMBALL . . . . . . . . Professor of Physics, Amherst College
Princeton University, A.B., 1881; Johns Hopkins University, Ph.D., 1884
DANIEL EDWARD OWEN, Master in Science, William Penn Charter School, Phila-
delphia, Pa.
Bowdoin College, A.B., 1889, and A.M., 1892; University of Pennsylvania, Ph.D., 1903
READERS
1
9
1
4
FRANKALLAN WATERMAN . . . . . . . . . . Professor of Physics, Smith College
Princeton University, A.B., 1888, and Ph.D., 1896
JOSEPH MELVILLE ARTHUR, Master in Science, Tome School for Boys, Port
Deposit, Md.
Dickinson College, Ph.B., 19o2
SYDNEY AYLMER-SMALL, Teacher of Physics and Chemistry, Trinity School, New
York, N.Y.
Columbia University, E.E., 1899
LEIGHTON B. MORSE . . . . . . . . . . Instructor in Physics, Columbia University
Iowa College, Ph:B., 1903; Columbia University, Ph.D., 19o8
FRANKHATHAWAY TOWSLEY, Instructor in Mathematics and Science, Hackley School,
Tarrytown, N.Y.
Tufts College, A.B., 1913
122
PHYSICS
Monday

2-4 P. m.
A teacher's certificate covering the laboratory instruction must be presented as part
of the examination.
Answer ten questions as indicated below. No extra credit will be given for more
than ten questions.
GROUP A .

(Omit one question f rom this group.)
1914
i. Why is it easier to roll a barrel up a long board into a wagon than to lift it
vertically ?
How does the work done against gravity when the barrel is rolled up the
board compare in amount with the work required to lift it vertically?
2. At what depth in a lake will a bubble of air have one-half the volume that
it has on reaching the surface when the barometric height at the surface
is
73
centimeters?

(The density of mercury is 13.6.)
3-
4.
A ball is thrown up and 5 seconds later is caught.
a) stow high did it rise?
b) With what velocity did it return to the hand?
A 5-lb. weight is hung from one end of a uniform bar of wood 4 ft. long and
weighing 61bs. At what point must the bar be supported to balance in a
horizontal position ?
GROup B .

(Omit one question f rom this group.)
Describe an experiment, preferably one which you have personally per-
formed, by which the pitch of a musical tone may be determined.
6. An observer sets his watch by the report of a signal gun one mile away.
Find, to one-tenth. of a second, the allowance that he should make on
account of the distance of the gun, the temperature of the air being 20
°
C.
GROup C.

(Omit one question f rom this group.)
q.
Explain the construction and operation of some form of refrigerating appa-
ratus as used for making artificial ice or for cooling rooms.
8. What is meant by the specific heat of a substance?
A piece of nickel weighing 200 grams at temperature 98
°
C. was dropped
into 500 grams of water at temperature 18
°
C.

The resulting tempera
ture was 21.4
°
C.

Find the specific heat of nickel.
9. The volume of a body of gas d( 27
0
C. is loo cubic centimeters.

If the pres-
sure on the gas is doubled to what temperature must it be heated in order
to maintain the volume constant?
123
ro. How is the bending of a ray of light passing from air into water explained
by the wave theory of light?

Illustrate by means of a diagram.
ii i.Describe a method by which the velocity of light has been determined.

The
distance from the earth to the sun is approximately 93,000,000 miles.
How long a time is required for light to traverse this distance?
12. At what distance from a 4o-candle-power mantle burner would a newspaper
receive the same illumination as it would receive from an 8-candle-power
incandescent lamp z feet distant from it?
13. How does a charge of electricity distribute itself on an insulated conducting
body such as a metal pail or cup? How is the distribution tested experi-
mentally ?
r4•
Group D.

(Omit one question from this group.)
Group E.

(Omit one question from this group.)
An electric motor, found, by a brake test, to develop a horse-power, requires
8.25 amperes at an electromotive force of 220 volts. What is the efficiency
of the motor, expressed in per cent?
15. A galvanometer has a resistance of

17 1 ohms.

With what resistance should
it be shunted in order that only one-tenth of the current in the main circuit
may pass through it?
124
Spanish

EXAMINERS
1914
jEREMIAH DENIS MATHIAS FORD, Smith Professor of the French and Spanish Lan-
guages, Harvard University
Harvard University, A.B., 1894, A.M., 1895, and Ph.D., 1897
WILLIAM WISTARCOMFORT, Professor of Romance Languages and Literatures,
Cornell University
Haverford College, A.B., 1894; Harvard University, A.B., 1895, A.M., 1896, and Ph.D., 1902
LAWRENCE A. WILKINS, Instructor in Spanish, De Witt Clinton High-School, New
York, N.Y.
Syracuse University, Ph.B., 1904; Columbia University, A.M., 1907
READERS
19
1
4
ALBERT BUSHNELL JOHNSON, Associate Professor of the Romance Languages, Brown
University
Brown University, A.B., 1891, and A.M., 1892
LAWRENCE A. WILKINS, Instructor in Spanish, De Witt Clinton High School, New
York, N.Y.
Syracuse University, Ph.B., 1904; Columbia University, A.M., 1907
12 6
ELEMENTARY SPANISH
Wednesday

4.15-6 p.m.
The use of clear and idiomatic English is required.
1914
Translate into English:
Al mismo tiempo que los Reyes Catolicos ensanchaban el territorio castellano
con todo to perteneciente al reino de Granada, el genio, la perseverancia y la
suerte de un marino extranjero incorporaban a la Corona un continente descono
cido hasta entonces y muy superior en extensi6n y en recursos naturales a la
Europa entera. El marino llamabase Crist6bal Colon, y el continente descubierto
recibi6, aiios despu6s, el nombre de America.
Era Colfin natural de G6nova, o de un pueblecito proximo a esta ciudad y,
si no dedicado a la vida del mar desde joven, de familia de marinos, que figuran
durante el siglo xv al servicio del rey de Francia.

Establecido en Lisboa poco
despu6s, hall6se Colfin en el centro de las grandes expediciones marinas de la
6poca, y al mismo tiempo en el principal foco cientffico en Orden a la geograffa,
representado por la escuela de Sagres. Los Portugueses habian tomado con
empeho el explorar la costa occidental de Africa y doblarla en su extremo Sur,
para it derechamente a ift Indias, uno de los mercados mas importantes, entonces,
del comercio europeo. Viaj6 mucho Colon en navfos portugueses, adquiriendo,
no solo la practica de la navegacion, mas tambi6n una vasta cultura cosmo-
grafica. Sus conversaciones con diferentes navegantes le procuraron noticias
acerca de la existencia de tierras situadas al Oeste del mar AtUntico, a las cuales
aluden varios testimonios de aquel tiempo, incluso mapas de comienzos y mediados
del siglo xv, que suponen 14. existencia de islas a las que pretendfan haber llegado
algunos navegantes.

Unido esto a la convicci6n que Colfin tenfa de la esfericidad
de la tierra, le hizo concebir el proyecto de llegar a las Indias (es decir, al Asia)
por un camino enteramente opuesto al de los Portugueses, o sea, navegando dere-
cho al Oeste, en vez de bajar hasta el Cabo de Buena Esperanza.

Vino a Espafia
para proponer a los soberanos de Castilla su trascendental viaje.

El primer sitio
en que Colon residi6 fu6 la ciudad de Sevilla, donde el banquero italiano Berardi
le protegi6y le puso en relaci6n con muchos sefiores de la corte, quienes le acogieron
con desprecio o con frialdad.

Pero un oficial de la corte, Quintanilla, se interes6
por 61 y le presento
,
al cardenal Mendoza, quien, a su vez, le llev6 ante los Reyes.
Doiia Isabel no quiso decidirse sin ofr a personas doctas, y someti6 los planes de
Colfin a una junta, la cual los-tuvo por imposibles.

No se desalent6 por esto
Colfin, y, ayudado por Quintanilla y otros personajes
r
,obtuvo la reuni6n de una
nueva junta en Salamanca, la cumdi6 dictamen favorable.

La escuadrilla de
Colfin, compuesta de tres carabelas, se hizo a la vela en la maiiana del 3 de agosto
de 1492 y, despu6s de una navegacion feliz que dur6 69 dias, cuando ya su tripula-
ci6n, desalentada por no hallar tierra o por otro motivo, amenazaba con .suble-
varse, arrib6 el 12 de octubre a la isla de Guanahani en las Antillas, creyendo siem-
pre Colon y sus compaiieros que estaban en Asia.
Translate into Spanish:
I. It must be ten o'clock now.

Imust go at once.
a. Iam sorry that you do not believe what Ihave just said.
3 . My dear brother, tell it to us; do not tell it to them.
4. On opening the door, we saw our father coming toward us.
5 . Two years ago Ispent six months in Spain, in order to learn the language of
that country.
6. When the train starts, please open the window.
7 . If Ihad nothing to do this afternoon, Ishould take a walk in the country.
8. This pen is mine; that one is yours; the one over yonder is John's.
9. What a pity that your (formal) cousin did not arrive before we left the house.
i o. We do not wish to write the letter; we wish her to write it.
Mr. John White, Havana, Cuba.

1VEw YORK, June Iq,
194
DEARSIR: We have your letter of the 8th of the present month and we
take pleasure in sending you the goods ordered.
We are glad to have
relations with your house.
Yours truly,
WM. BLACK & CO.
I. Write the following verb forms:
. a) The present subjunctive, first person singular, of sacar, rezar, distinguir,
reir, Pagar, morir.
b) The future indicative, third person singular, of
querer, venir, hacer, salir.
c) The imperfect subjunctive, third person plural, of caer, traer, ser, saber.
d) The imperative singular and plural of oir, hacer, pedir.
a. State and illustrate the chief rules for the sequence of tenses in Spanish.
3 . a) When does the conjunctive object pronoun (me, te, etc.) stand before its
verb ?
b) When must it follow its verb ?
c) When may it, according to choice, precede or follow its verb ?
4. Illustrate at least two different ways of rendering than in Spanish.
Zo6logy

EXAMINERS
1
914
GEORGE HOWARD PARKER . . . . . . . . Professor of Zoology, Harvard University
Harvard University, S.B., 1887, and S.D., 1891
CORNELIA MARIA CLAPP . . . . . Professor of Zo6logy, Mount Holyoke College
Syracuse University, Ph.B., 1889; University of Chicago, Ph.D., 1896
PAUL BLAKESLEE Mann, Head of Department of Biology, Evander Childs High
School, New York, N.Y.
Cornell University, A.B., 1902, and A.M., 1903
READERS
1
9
1
4
TAMES HOWARD McGREGOR . . Assistant Professor of Zo6logy, Columbia University
Ohio State University, B.S., 1894; Columbia University, A.M., 1896, and Ph.D., 1899
PAUL BLAKESLEE MANN, Head of Department of Biology, Evander Childs High
School, New York, N.Y.
Cornell University, A.B., 1902, and A.M., 1903
1
30
ZOOLOGY
Monday

2-4 p. In.
A teacher's certificate covering the laboratory instruction must be presented as part
of the examination.
Answer any eight questions. No extra credit will be given for more than eight
questions.
i. Give an account of the life history of any reptile.
1
9
1
4
2. Name and describe briefly a representative of each of six different animal
groups (phyla or classes) found in a fresh-water pond.
3-
Contrast invertebrates with vertebrates. Name three phyla of inverte-
brates and give their distinguishing characteristics.
4. Describe the structure of any annelid that you have studied.
5. Name the classes of arthropods and describe fully the external structure of
a representative of one of these classes.
6. Describe reflex action and give two examples.
7.
8.
9-
110.
Compare the process of breathing in a crayfish with that in an insect.
Describe the egg of a frog and give an account of the animal that hatches
from it.
Describe three examples of the adaptation of animals to their surroundings.
Name three important discoveries in zoology, giving a brief account of the
persons concerned in them.
SCHEDULE OF EXAMINATIONS
1
3 3
Coi[eoe Entrance Examination :Board
Schedule of Examinations
June 15- 20, 1 9 1 4
Monday, June zs
Latin f7(elementary sight translation of prose) .

.

11.15- 1
Latin S (Vergil -1 Eneid I, II, and IV or VI, and sight trans-
1
35
Greek CH (Homer's Iliad, Books I-1 1 I, and sight translation of
lation of poetry) .
- , 2-4
Latin D(Vergil)
, 2-4
Latin Q (sight translation of poetry) . ,
2
-
4
French B(intermediate) . ,
4 .1 5-6
French BC(intermediate and advanced)
4 .1 5-6
Friday, June zg
English A (reading and practice)
9-1 1
Latin 6 (advanced prose composition)
1 1 .1 5-1
English B (study and practice) . 2-4
Drawing . ,
4 .1 5-6
Greek B (Xenophon's Anabasis)
4 .1 5-6
Mathematics B(advanced algebra)
4 .1 5-6
Saturday, June 20
Chemistry , 9-1 1
Geography
9-1 1
Greek C (Homer's Iliad, Books I-III) . 9-1 1
Greek H (sight translation of Homer) , 9-1 1
Homer)
9-1 1
Music B(harmony) . . 9-1 1
Greek A z (grammar)
, 1 1 ,1 5-1 2,1 5
Greek A 2 (elementary prose composition) . 1 2.1 5-1
Greek G (sight translation of prose) .
2
-
4
Mathematics E(trigonometry) . , 2-4
Mathematics F (plane trigonometry only) .
2
-
4
Greek F (prose composition) . ,
4 .1 5-6
Music A (appreciation) . ,
4 .1 5-6
Music D(pianoforte) ; E(voice) ; F (violin) 4 .1 5-6
Mathematics A (elementary algebra complete) 9-1 1
Mathematics A z (algebra to quadratics) 9-1 1
Mathematics A 2 (quadratics and beyond) 1 1 .1 5-1
Physics 2-4
Biology
2
-
4
Botany
2
-
4
Zo6logy
2
-
4
History B(mediaeval and modern history) 4 .1 5-6
History D(American history) 4 .1 5-6
Tuesday, June 1 6
Mathematics C (plane geometry) 9-1 1
Mathematics D(solid geometry) 11.15- 1
German A (elementary) 2-4
History A (ancient history) 4 .1 5-6
History C (English history) 4 .1 5-6
Wednesday, June zq
Latin 3 (second year Latin) . 9-1 1
Latin B (Cxsar) 9-1 1
Latin z (grammar) 1 1 .1 5-1
French A (elementary) 2-4
German B (intermediate) 4 .1 5-6
German BC(intermediate and advanced) 4 .1 5-6
Spanish 4 .1 5-6
Thursday, June z8
Latin 4 (Cicero - Manilian Law and Arehias, and sight
translation of prose) . 9-1 1
Latin C (Cicero) 9-1 1
Latin P (advanced sight translation of prose) 9-1 1
Latin 2 (elementary prose composition) . , 1 1 .1 5-1
1 3 4
COPYRIGHTS I9I4
BYTHE
COLLEGE ENTRANCE EXAMINATIONBOARD
ALL RIGHTS RES ERVED
9U-,
Zbe atbenaeum Vre-
GINNAND COMPANY• PRO.
PRIETORS • BOS TON• U.S .A.
CONTENTS
EXAMI-'~ _ 1T10NI
J 29
1 33
PREFACE
PACE
.
, 5
7
WrTANY
II
CHEMISTRY .
15
. . . AWING
I
9
ENGLISH . .
25
33
i:Fo~tvRAPHY
43
KNIAN
47
GitF.°EtC . .
5 7
69
79
THEMATICS
99
11
3
121
125
COPYRIGHT, 1914
BYTHE
COLLEGE ENTRANCE EXAMINATIONBOARD
ALLRIGHTS RESERVED
9173
tbbe otbeneeum Vress
GINNANDCOMPANY- PRO-
PRIETORS . BOSTON• U.S.A.
EkJTANY
CHEMISTRY

.
UXAWING
ENGLISH .
E.•CH
Lie:{N:RAPHY

.
tse RMAN
HMTORY
LATIx
' .-5 r s
-
, KXIWLE OF EXAMINATIONS
CONTENTS
UATHE.MATICS .

.
-NISH .
7
PAGE
.5
7
II
I5
19
25
33
43
47
5 7
69
79
99
113
121
125
1 29
133
COPYRIGHT, 1914
BYTHE
COLLEGE ENTRANCE EXAMINATION BOARD
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
9
1
73
Zbe otbenteum Vrevs
GINNANDCOMPANY• PRO-
PRIETORS . BOSTON• U.S.A.
CONTENTS
PAGE
• _5
BI+4)L.oGY

, .

7
BOTANY
. . II
'CHEMISTRY

15
DRAWING
. . 1 9
. 25
FRENCH
.
33
t:=.0,RAL'HY .

43
MAN
.
47
GRF:FK
. 57
Rt TORti
. . 69
. . .

79
99
PREFACE
+I£
. . . .

113
iSLCS
. . . 121
hLt
. . 125
. . . 1 29
k S EDUL-E OFEXAMINATIONS

.

133
COPYRIGHTS 1914
BV THE
COLLEGE ENTRANCE EXAMINATIONBOARD
ALLRIGHTS RES ERVED
917•3
abe otbenaeamOTess
GINN ANDCOMPANY• PRO.
PRIETORS . BOS TON• U.S .A.
OCl'r'
LE OF
EXAMINATIONS
CONTENTS

CONTENTS
PAGE

PRHFACE BIOLOGY ANY CHEMISTRY
COPYRIGHT S 1914 BY THE COLLEGE ENTRANCE EXAMINATION BOARD

. .

,5 7
II

. . . . . .

15 19 25 33 43 47 57

DRAWING ENGLISH . FRENCH

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED 9 17•3

CJFOGRAPHY X-MAN

Hx<TORY LAID; MATHEMATICS .

69 79 99
11

W, sic sicS St A\I II .

3

121 125 129

EDt LE OF EXAMINATIONS

133

lt:be 1Rtbenacum dress
GINN AND COMPANY • PRO • PRIETORS . BOSTON • U.S.A. 7

College Entrance Examination Voara
COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES
Aa,-?phi College: Professor HENDERSON - teerst College: Dean OLDS .own University: Dean RANDALL r Mawr College: President THOMAS School of Applied Science: President HOWE gate University: Dean CRAWSHAW , lumbia College: Dean KEPPEL Princeton University: Dean MCCLENAHAN Rutgers College: Dean BEVIER Smith College: President BURTON Stevens Institute of Technology: President HUMPHREYS Swarthmore College: Dean ALEXANDER Tufts College: Dean WREN Union College: Dean RIPTON University of Pennsylvania: Dean FRAZER Vassar College: Dean MCCALEB Wellesley College: President PENDLETON Wells College: President MACMILLAN Wesleyan University: Professor NICOLSON Western Reserve University: President THwtNG Williams College: Dean FERRY Yale University: Professor CORWIN

Cornell

University: President SCHURMAN

Dartmouth College: Dean LAYCOCK Gcsucher College: President GUTH Harvard University: Dean HURLBUT, Chairman Johns Hopkins University: Dean GRIFFIN Nfassachusetts Institute of Technology : ProfessorTYLER Mount Holyoke College: President WOOLLEY New York University: Chancellor BROWN

REPRESENTATIVES OF THE SECONDARY SCHOOLS
`. HENRY BLACK, Boston, Mass. H. (. BUEHLER, Lakeville, Conn. HV H. DENBIGH, New York, N.Y. WiLsoN FARRAND, Newark, N. J. WILLIAM GALLAGHER, South Braintree, Mass. SECRETARY: THOMAS S. FISKE, PH. D. POST OFFICE SUB-STATION 84, New York, N.Y.
,

EDWARD L. HARRIS, Cleveland, Ohio WILLIAM

C.

HILL, Springfield, Mass.

JAMES L. PATTERSON, Philadelphia, Pa. STANLEY R. YARNALL, Philadelphia, Pa.

The College Entrance Examination Board consists of the president or an authorized representative of each participating college or university and of representatives of the secondary schools. Representatives of the secondary schools are appointed, in such manner as the association choosing them may direct, by The New England Association of Colleges and Preparatory Schools The Association of Colleges and Preparatory Schools of the Middle States and Maryland The Association of Colleges and Preparatory Schools of the Southern States The North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools Each association may appoint one secondary-school representative for every three colleges and universities that are members of the Board and represented in such association, provided, however, that one representative may be appointed on the admission to the Board of one such college or university, and provided further, that the number of secondary-school representatives appointed by any one association shall in no case exceed five. Representatives of secondary schools may also be appointed directly by the Board to the number of five. The certificates issued by the Board are accepted by almost every college and university in the United States. No college which accepts these certificates in lieu of separate admission exami nations surrenders its right to enforce such standards of excellence as it pleases, 5

N. That they represent the cooperative effort of a group of colleges. New York. Each college determines for itself what subjects it will require for admission and what minimum rating it will accept as satisfactory. and the rules governing the conduct of the examinations will be furnished by the secretary upon request. That they represent the cooperation of colleges and secondary schools in respect to a matter of vital importance to both. 1915. The certificate merely states that the holder was examined at a stated time and place in specified subjects and. The pamphlet containing the definitions of the several requirements will be sent to any address on receipt of ten cents in stamps. in order to receive proper consideration. 5. 6 . 4. That they are uniformly administered. That they are held at many points. The manifest advantages of the examinations held by the Board are 1. That they are uniform in subject-matter. at one and the same time. All correspondence relating to the work of the Board should be addressed College Entrance Examination Board Post Office Sub-Station 8¢. The uniform entrance examinations of 1915 will be held during the week beginning June 1 4. to meet the convenience of students. Full information in regard to examination fees. z. and effort in administering college admission requirements. Requests that the examinations be held at particular points. dates at which applications for examination must be filed. no one of which thereby surrenders its individuality. Y. 6. should be received by the secretary not later than February 1. That by reason of their uniformity they aid greatly the work of the secondary schools.or to make such allowance as it wishes for character and capacity on the part of students applying for admission. as a result of such examinations. received the ratings entered upon the certificate. A list of places at which the examinations are to be held will be published about March 1. That they tend to effect a marked saving of time. money. 3. 7.

A. .) (a) Compare the bean seed and corn kernel as to (I) number of seed leaves (cotyledons).. .. . Columbia University. (c) the sources of the materials used. N. and Ph. 1899 GEORGE C. . . Describe the life history of any insect whose development proceeds through a series of stages (metamorphosis). Cornell University. Name two important functions performed by any vertebrate and show how the animal selected is enabled by its structure to perform these functions. and S. (a) Name three substances used by man which are found in seeds. (b) Which one of these foods must be changed before being used by the young plant? (c) Why must this change occur? (d) How is this change accomplished ? Discuss photosynthesis.M. (a) Name and define three functions common to plants and animals.D. . 1903 Cornell University. 1888. and A.Y. . WOOD . . I. rgoo of Biology. Boys High School.Y. Boys High School. i o.. Teacher of Biology. B. manila-hemp. . 1896.. 19o2. PAUL BLAKESLEE MANN. z. N. A. . r8g1 WILLARD WINFIELD ROWLEE . Describe three examples of the adaptation of animals to their surroundings.. Evander Childs High School. . Syracuse University.) II. S.B.L. rgoo Name and describe briefly a representative of each of four different animal groups found in a fresh water pond. (b) How would you detect the presence of any two of these substances? (c) What part of a plant furnishes: flour. (a) State briefly the common agencies of seed dispersal. Professor of Botany. N. Name five animals or plants which are economically important and state in what way each is beneficial or injurious. Harvard University i. (a) kinds of stored food. Professor Harvard University.Sc.. GEORGE C. (3) position of stored food in each. Biology EXAMINERS I9I4 GEORGE HOWARD PARKER . (Answer any three questions. (b) the kinds of material used in the process..Y. Columbia University Ohio State University.. JAMES HOWARD MCGREGOR. (Answer both questions. New York. 8 9 . 1894.D. Brooklyn. WOOD . (b) Make a drawing of some cell you have studied and label the various parts. ...) of Zoology. . A. castor oil? III. Brooklyn. (b) Describe three ways in which seeds and fruits are structurally adapted to use these agencies. telling: (a) the conditions necessary for carrying on the process. .B.B.B.1 BIOLOGY 9 14 A teacher's certificate covering the laboratory instruction must be presented as part of the examination. (Answer any three questions. B. and D. Assistant Professor of Zoology. . Cornell University 1893 Head of Department of Biology. A. Teacher Syracuse University. 1887. . linen.S.. .M. .

BOTANY .

Answer ten questions. 9.Y. 18gg. The Plant in Germination. . 1893 MARGARET CLAY FERGUSON . (Answer two questions from this of Biology. State briefly the common agencies of seed dispersal. . . (Answer three questions from this group. B. Instructor in Botany. WOOD . castor oil? 13 .. A. WOOD . m. Describe and illustrate by labeled drawings a typical cell. . The remaining four questions may be selected as desired by the student. Life Processes of the Mature Plant. . . Boys High School. READERS 1 914 University BERNARD OGILVIE DODGE .Y. (Answer one question from this group. 16. Columbia University. and D. Describe an experiment to show that oxidation is carried on in green plants. . . q.) 6. No extra credit will be given for more than ten questions. The Plant in Relation to Its Environment. Boys High School.. A.B. N. .B. . Name a fungus and describe its life history. igog. N. 12 rr. .) 15.B. Teacher Syracuse University. A. Brooklyn. linen.. Discuss reproduction in the algae as illustrated by a type plant studied in class. . outlining in detail (i) the conditions necessary for carrying on the process together with (2) the nature and (3) the sources of the materials used. . Name and give the chief characteristics of five families of Angiosperms. Plant Groups. What part of a plant furnishes: flour.Sc. D. Compare the process of germination in a seed with endosperm and in a seed without endosperm. . In what ways is the quantity of water in the environment of a plant of importance to its growth ? 12. By carefully labeled drawings.D.) 3. Brooklyn. . Cornell University WILLARD WINFIELD ROWLEE . (Answer one question from this group. What in general are the characteristics of wind-pollinated flowers? 14. 2. . .) i. Explain why a test for the presence of sugar in a wheat seedling shows a marked reaction. 2-4 Botany EXAMINERS 1 94 of Botany. Professor of Botany. 8. Name two important functions of roots and give the characteristics of the root which adapt it to perform these functions. group. Describe some modifications adapting the plant to a limited water supply.1 94 BOTANY P. E. 1go1 GEORGE C. Ph. 1912 GEORGE C. The Plant Cell.. 1 3. C. . 18. Discuss photosynthesis.. cotton. igoo of Biology. . Describe an experiment to prove that one of these functions is performed by the root. illustrate three stages in the germination of a monocotyledonous and of a dicotyledonous plant. manila-hemp.. Iq. Columbia University of Wisconsin. and describe the general structural modifications by which the plant makes use of these agencies. . Wellesley College Cornell University. . At least two questions must be selected from Group E and one from each of the other groups. Professor Cornell University. igoo A. . 5. Why is the cell called the "unit of plant structure" ? B.B. . A teacher's certificate covering the entire laboratory instruction must be presented as a part of the examination. Teacher Syracuse University. ig. and Ph. ..L.. y.. .D. 1S88. Ph. How would you prove that the result of this process is the same as that produced by burning a match or by the respiration of an animal? ro. while the test for the same substance in a wheat kernel shows no reaction. Give the principal similarities and differences in the life history of the fern and of the moss. (Answer three questions from this group.

CHEMISTRY .

. "the atomic weight of sodium is 23"? (c) Why does an iron wire burn rapidly in pure oxygen but not in the air? State the principle involved.B.L. Write equations for six of the following reactions. (c) sulphur dioxide. University of Gottingen. (4) mechanical energy. and tell how each compound may be identified: (a) ammonia. Instructor in Chemistry. Mass.. Answer nine questions as indicated below. . (c) Yale University.M. A. and A. using formulae throughout. New Haven.D.M. Conn.) = (g) Ferrous sulphide -{. N. Find the result to three significant figures..D.A.Y. Dartmouth College Calculate the percentage of oxygen in the substance whose formula is Ca(N0.silver nitrate = (f) Copper -}. . in each case. 1889. (a) Give specific examples of chemical changes each of which results in the production of one of the following forms of energy: (i) heat.D. Assistant Professor of Chemistry. A.. . Assistant Professor of Chemistry. m.. Head of Department of Chemistry.E.) What weight of silver chloride may be precipitated by silver nitrate from one kilogram of sea-water containing 2. 19o5. 1904.) Assistant Principal and Head of Department of Science. . A Each question counts t2. B. Describe the method used by you in the laboratory in the preparation of two of the following substances. University of Munich. 1889 LEON BURR RICHARDSON.5. a.nitric acid (dil. . 17 Amherst College.. (b) hydrogen sulphide.. Conn. (a) Harvard University.carbon dioxide = (c) Manganese dioxide -{.. 19oo. Na 23. New York University. . . Princeton University 3. Columbia University University of Edinburgh.. (Atomic weights: Ca 40. Williams College. and Ph. Yonkers High School.B. C. C1 35.. 19oo BOYNTON WELLS MCFARLAND. New Haven High School. Assistant Professor of Chemistry. Ph.) Dartmouth College.L. Atomic weight: C r2.. 1902 BOYNTON WELLS McFARLAND. B. 9-11 Assistant Professor of Chemistry...hydrochloric acid = (b) Calcium hydroxide -}. 1902 ALFRED EDWARD ROBERTS. 1895 READERS 1 9 14 GEORGE SHANNON FORBES. 4.S.5 per cent of sodium chloride? (Atomic weights: Ag 108 .hydrochloric acid = 2. (Answer all questions in this group. 1905 SAMUEL WILSON HICKS. 1891.B. Williston Seminary.. 19oo. A. write the equation for the reaction.S. B.. 1889. B. (One liter of oxygen weighs :< . 0 16. (d) Define catalysis and give an example of catalytic action. Ph. and Ph. 1891. C. Equations must be absolutely correct to receive credit: (a) Zinc -}.Sc. the number and letter used in the printed paper. Harvard University i. (3) electricity.B. 1902.) How many liters of oxygen would be necessary to burn twelve grams of carbon to carbon dioxide? The volume of oxygen is to be estimated at standard conditions. Ph. (2) light.water = (e) Calcium chloride -}. and A.D. Dartmouth College GROUP Dartmouth College. Ph. 1914 DONALD PRITCHARD SMITH..) _ (d) Quicklime -}.4x9 grams. Attach to the answer.1914 CHEMISTRY Chemistry EXAMINERS 1 Saturday 94 ALEXANDER SMITH .. New York University. N 14. Yonkers. B.E. 1907 16 . Assistant Principal and Head of Department of Science.. 1902.) z . and Ph.. New Haven. M. . Professor of Chemistry. New Haven High School.M. . A teacher's certificate covering the laboratory instruction must be presented as a part of the examination. No extra credit will be given for more than nine questions.. x886. (b) What is meant by the statement. Yale University.hydrochloric acid (cone.D. Easthamp(b) ton. 1895 LEON BURR RICHARDSON.

(3) bessemerizing cast iron. (c) Why does an aqueous solution of sodium carbonate give an alkaline reaction ? ro. and state the relative amount of each. and explain its specific action in each case: (r) chlorine. ir. (a) How many liters of hydrogen and how many of nitrogen are necessary to form ten liters of ammonia gas ? State the law illustrated. N Z Mg. (b) moist air and dry air. (d) calcium carbonate and calcium phosphate. Al. (z) sulphuric acid. (b) How are two of the following compounds prepared: (r) bleaching powder. (a) What change takes place in the molecular condition of copper sulphate when it is dissolved in water? (b) Describe the chemical changes which occur when the electric current is passed through such a solution. (a) adding soap to hard water. 8. Write one equation illustrating each. (a) Mention one common use of each of six of the following substances and in each case define the use specifically: (i) carbon monoxide. (4) silver chloride. How does the air exhaled from the human body differ in composition from the normal atmosphere? (b) How may sea-water be made suitable for drinking purposes? how may well-water which has been contaminated by sewage? Explain the principle in each case. (5) zinc. (4) striking a match. ? q. (z) sodium nitrate. (c) pure water and water containing a soluble chloride. (7) sulphuric acid. (a) Name four important constituents of the atmosphere.) 6. GROUP B (Omit two of the following questions. Describe experiments involving chemical change sufficient to distinguish between the following: (a) chlorine and hydrogen chloride. . (a) What is the objection to putting fresh coal on a hot fire and closing the damper in the flue. (6) lead. (z) carbon dioxide.5. especially if the lid of the stove is left off ? (b) Why is calcium chloride sometimes used to keep road surfaces dustless ? (c) State the chemical reactions taking place in three of the following processes: (r) boiling water containing temporary hardness. (3) sulphuric acid. Each question counts ro. (3) nitrous oxide ? 7. (e) freshly prepared mortar and mortar from an old building. (a) Give three different general methods for preparing salts. (b) In connection with two of the following substances describe two instances in which each has been used in your laboratory work.(SO4 ) 3 . (b) What are the valences of the metallic elements in OsO. (3) sodium carbonate.

Bushwick High School. with a light touch. No more than forty-five minutes should be devoted to the first drawing. Wall and door are to be conceived as without thickness.Y. Leave all construction lines which indicate the position of vanishing points.. .15-6 p. In the wall to the right is a partly open door. 1889 RUTH MERINGTON. 1 20 i. Assistant Professor of Fine Arts. Bushwick High School. 191o. Columbia University THOMAS HENRY Columbia University.. 1913 FIG. Use a soft pencil. it should be left unfinished and work should be begun on the second drawing. 191o. Drawing EXAMINERS 1914 ARTHUR POPE .E.. Make a line drawing in perspective of the corner of a square room as seen ham the center of the room... Candidates must do either exercise r or a and exercise 3. Teacher of Drawing. .B. B. N..M. All work must be strictly free-hand work without assistance from measuring slips. .1914 DRAWING Friday 4. and A. C. An incomplete drawing. Accuracy of form is of more account than finished execution. If this should be finished before 6 p. .m.. The door and the window are to be drawn indicated in the accompanying cut (Fig. Harvard University Harvard University. or artificial aids of any kind. Students are advised not to erase completely the construction lines.. instruments. m. Brooklyn. Brooklyn. A. and A. Assistant Professor of Drawing.S. . Ifake the line of intersection of the two walls about 3 inches long. and in the other wall a window. B. C. Assistant Professor of Drawing. . Teacher of Drawing. is better evidence of proficiency than a completed drawing incorrect in construction and slovenly in execution. 1913 READERS 1914 THOMAS HENRY HARRINGTON. the candidate is at liberty to devote the remaining time to the completion of the first exercise. 1889 RUTH MERINGTON. correctly laid out and executed by correct method. i). .E.Y.. New York University.m. New York University. Columbia University Columbia University.S. N. 19oi HARRINGTON. .M. If this drawing is not completed by g p.

3 B 3. In 3B draw only the foreground plane without regard to the buildings seen the distance. z z. FIG. z3 . a). but with parts of all the legs visible. Make the total width of the drawing about 5 inches. Make the drawing the same size as the figure. 3A or Fig. without regard to color value. of . 3B. as seen some distance below the eye. Make a drawing in light and shade. Leave in all construction lines. Draw in oblique perspective the table shown in plan and elevation (Fig. lightly drawn.FIG.

ENGLISH .

. Mass. Yale University FiLANCiS BEACH WHITE.B. Md. ..B. Columbia University. Teacher of English. 1912 Head Master. A. West Virginia University.. Vassar College Head of Department of English.B.. 1885. St.. Gilman Country School. Paul's School. rgol CLARK SUTHERLAND NORTHUP. Boston. A. and Ph. 1902.. .B. .. A.M. 1898.. Harvard University. 1903. and Ph. tgol HARRISON Columbia University. . Andover. Harvard University. . BIRD WILLIAMS STAIR . and A....1897 .. . . Rayen High School. Teacher of English. . 1889. A. Instructor in English.1896. and Ph. A. NARY YOST . and A.. 1903. Princeton 26 27 University of Indiana. A. New York University. . N.D. . N. .A.. 1913 ETHEL VAN ZANDT SULLIVAN.B. .M. 1889..M.English EXAMINERS ARTHUR 1 WILLIS LEONARD. . Exeter. B. 1896.. Haverford College. A. Mass. and A. College of the City of New York Instructor in English. and Ph. Assistant Principal. . 1904. New York. .. 1895. Pa. .M.B. Hill School.D. 1898 READERS FRANK WOODWORTH PINE. A. West Roxbury High School. A. . B.M. 1905 Upper Iowa University. and A. . Head of Department of English. Western Reserve University. A. .. and A.B. Aberdeen University.Y. 1894 FRANK WILLIAM CUSHWA. A.. 9 4 1 Andover. . 1906 . . Harvard University. 1906 WILLIAM ECHARD. . CHARLES SEARS BALDWIN. A.S.. B. . Pottstown. Preceptor in English. GOLDEN. Ph. Princeton University. Ohio Assistant Professor. . Chicago Latin School for Girls.M.D. and Ph. . N. .B. x9oi Professor of Rhetoric and English Composition..M.. 1896. 18go FRANCIS FLORIAN HERR. Chicago. . 1894.A.B. . Mass... ..B. . Yale University JOHN ASHBY LESTER . 1897 WILBUR Lucius CROSS . Cornell University Assistant Professor of English. . MAY ORME MACKENZIE. Vassar College.Y.. Phillips Academy.M. Columbia University Odlin Professor of English. M. University of Wisconsin Wellesley College. . Yale University. Princeton University. 1904. Ph. . . DUNCAN... 1888...B. Columbia University. . . . . 1894 ARTHUR WILLIS LEONARD.. 1897. Cornell University.H. . . . . Harvard University. .H.B. . and M. Assistant Professor of English. 1 Headmaster. .. Columbia University Head of Department of English.. Columbia University.M. A.B...A. Princeton University. .D... Teacher of English. . ..B.D.. Wellesley College Instructor in English. Brooklyn. A. 1897. Youngstown. and Ph. Instructor in English. 18 9 4 1 University of Michigan. B.B. Phillips Academy. 1904. 1901. 1905 B. 1904 DANIEL Instructor in English Composition.. N.M. . Professor of Rhetoric and English Composition. A. Ross STEEVES . . A. Cornell University Cornell University. University Columbia University. and Ph. Ill..B. Head of Department of English.M.M. and A. .. . A..D. A. A. 1888. A. 1893. . A. . Concord. Instructor in English. WARIER TAYLOR .. Roland Park. 1904. .M. and Ph. . 1890 WILLARD HIGLEY DURHAM . 1888. 1899. .D... 1go5.B.S. Columbia University Purdue University. Riverdale Country School. . Yale University. .. 1907 OSCAR CHARLES GALLAGHER. .D. A. and A. 1889 CHARLES SEARS BALDWIN.. 94.M.D. 1902. Phillips Exeter Academy. Professor of English.M.A. 1903 CHARLES WILLIAM KENNEDY. and Ph.B. Polytechnic Preparatory School. A. 1897 BENTON SULLIVAN MONROE . A.

Traits of Cassius seen in. a) b) 2s z9 . we must not forget what we owe the world as champions of international conciliation. Correct and revise it before you hand it in. Only one subject may be taken from a single group. e. r. Lincoln. The character of Malvolio. m. on subjects selected from the following groups. as the case may be." State the relation of the clauses to one another in the foregoing sentence. ~~ Mr. II. GROUP IV (Bunyan. b) Sir Roger's way of living. What makes As You Like It a gay and lively play. "Though we may owe it to ourselves to continue a while longer the policy of increasing the navy. Macaulay. Write three (and only three) compositions. of one of the followinga storm. Contrasts between ancient battles and modern. g) Esmond breaks his sword. GROUP II (Shakespeare) a) Life conceived as a pilgrimage. Thackeray's opinion of Swift. The but by Walden Pond. The ways in which A Midsummer-Night's Dream fulfils its title.) A camp. write it. How Robinson Crusoe solved the problem of living on a desert island. Micawber exposes Uriah Heep. What brings about the happy ending of the Vicar of Wakefield. d) A crisis in the career of Quentin Durward. for example. a scene at school. . Friday Plan each composition before you Read the whole paper before you begin to write. Traveling for pleasure and traveling for knowledge. Huxley's Liberal Education applied to my outlook on college. k) A description. GROUP III (Novels) #'.. Helen watching the combat between Menelaus and Paris. The character of the speaker in My Last Duchess. The slaying of the suitors. Poetic ideals of womanhood. a. a journey at night. Stevenson) c) d) e) f) The last day of Samson. The village schoolmaster. A letter describing (or discussing) the performance of one of Shakespeare's plays. Puritan life as seen in The Courtship of Miles Standish. f) A gentleman (or a country parson) of the eighteenth century. GROUP I (Classics in Translation) a) b) e) The decay of the Pyncheon family. g) Some qualities or characteristics of lyric poetry seen in specific poems of Wordsworth (or of any other poet). Poetic ideals of knighthood. Allow about a half-hour for the first question and for each of the compositions. Huxley. an escape.. z.} d) e) J) he legend of the Holy Grail. t) What England got from India and what she gave. g) The last words of Lincoln's Gettysburg Address applied to present political conditions.) e. IV. The ancient idea of a hero. GROUP V (Narrative and Lyric Poems) a) b) c) d) e) f) g) The life of young people in Venice. modern politicians.1 94 . based on either reading or experience. Addison. ENGLISH A-READING AND PRACTICE 9-11 a. Joseph's disclosure of himself to his brethren. each of 150 words or more. Thackeray. Tell of each italicized word what part of speech it is and what its relation is to other words. (For the following three topics the material may be drawn either from reading or from experience. The battle of Agincourt. d) Westminster Abbey. Thoreau. Number each of your compositions according to its group. h) A person who might have lived in Cranford. The prison of Chillon. Franklin. t) A letter advising the reading of Franklin's Autobiography. Parkman. c) The character and customs of the Normans contrasted with those of the Saxons. s'} What life was worth to Silas Marner.

ENGLISH B-STUDY AND PRACTICE Friday 4 P. reserve about forty-five minutes for Part II. 31 . and to do honor to the distinguished dead. io." Macaulay says of the poetry of Milton: "Its effect is produced not so much by what it expresses as by what it suggests. religion. 6. An important public event of the year. in your own words. The significance of some event which occurred between the Battle of Bunker Hill and the dedication of the Bunker Hill Monument. And we'll not fail. 7." Select from the foregoing quotation any two phrases which seem to you to illustrate Macaulay's statement. What cannot you and I perform upon The unguarded Duncan? what not put upon His spongy officers. The man (or woman) in public life who is most interesting to me. 2. 8. and the existence of slavery are causes operating to produce the fierce spirit of liberty which characterizes the Americans. sentence by sentence. Of Camball. but must depend largely upon the intelligence and the national spirit of its citizens. 9. When in swinish sleep Their drenched natures lie as in a death. 4. for example." How is the underlying theme of Comus finally emphasized in this scene ? b) 30 Write a composition of three or more paragraphs on one of the following subjects: i. what use does he make of it in his subsequent argument? b) If you were attempting to maintain that a government cannot succeed by virtue of its constitution and laws alone." How does Webster carry out in his oration the particular purpose declared in the italicized words? PART II "Or bid the soul of Orpheus sing Such notes as. we are assembled to commemorate the establishment of great principles of liberty. Plan your answers before you write them.1914 2. When Duncan is asleepWhereto the rather shall his day's hard journey Soundly invite him-his two chamberlains Will I with wine and wassail so convince. and look them over for corrections before you hand in your book. Answer a. c) Discuss the characteristic aspects of a typical masque as they appear in the last scene of Comus. What is Macbeth's reply to this speech? What motives revealed in this scene seem to have been strongest in restraining Macbeth from his first crime? What change of attitude does he show in approaching his second crime? a) a) Explain definitely what Burke means in each case when he says that descent. When he has completed his exposition of the temper and character of the Americans. m. warbled to the string. The principle and construction of a gasoline engine (or an engine of some other type). the opening of the Panama Canal. That memory. Some valuable uses of electricity. Dr. 3. And who had Canace to wife. Or call up him that left half-told The story of Cambuscan bold. turning obscure or figurative expressions into simpler or more literal language. the warder of the brain. education. But screw your courage to the sticking-place. "presenting Ludlow Town and the President's Castle. S. and the receipt of reason A limbeck only. What the high school does for the education of the boy or the girl who is not going to college. And made Hell grant what love did seek. Johnson's ability as a writer of literary biography. Of the two hours allotted to this examination. An Elizabethan playhouse. and of Algarsife. who shall bear the guilt Of our great quell? Give the substance of this passage. and explain what these phrases suggest. PART I 2 - r. The influence of Burns's songs. what could you find in Washington's Farewell Address to support your case? c) "Sir. Drew iron tears down Pluto's cheek. Read the whole paper before you begin to write. and either b or c. My opinion of a present-day author. Shall be a fume. Answer a or b or c.

FRENCH .

Y.D.. A.. 1912 LAWRENCE WHITTIER NEWELL. 1904 FRAN~oIS Louis GAUTHEY. . and Ph. . College of the City of New York College of the City of New York.A. . Yale University Amherst College. Professor of French. bs L. .D. . Columbia University... 1894 JOSEPH SERONDE . Associate Professor of Romance Languages. .M. Teacher Cornell University.Y. Master in French and Latin.B. Instructor in the Romance Languages and Literatures.B... Horace Mann School.B.. bs L. New York. . Bach.A. 1890 University of Paris. Teacher of French.B.A. 1903. bs L... and A. Lic. . A. of French. . Horace Mann School. Columbia Grammar School. . Harvard University.. ALFRED N. George Washington University. Teacher of French. Columbia University. Amherst College. 1913 FREDERICK MORRIS WARREN.. ERNEST Roy GREENE. 1890 MAGDELEINE CARRET .B. and A. B.. 1910 DONALD CLIVE STUART. B..French EXAMINERS 1 9 4 ALBERT MARIAN COHN MCMASTER. 19o4. Street Professor of Modern Languages. Dartmouth College Harvard University. . L. 1894. New York.Y. A. New York University. Yale University Yale University.. Columbia University 1 PHILIP MESERVE HAYDEN .B. A. A.... Hackley School. EDWARD JOSEPH FORTIER.D. 1912 HENRI FRANgOIS MULLER..Y. . 1906 THATCHER CLARK. A. and A. Columbia University Tulane University.M. . Ph. G. New York. Instructor in French. 1903. . A. 1910. Ph.. . College of French. . Wellesley College of the City of New York University of Paris. Williams College Hamilton College.. 1902 Louis DELAMARRE..M. . Ph. Johns Hopkins University. Newark.. B. A. N. Miss Rayson's School. Instructor in French. Columbia University. B. . and A.B. 1898. Head of Department of French. N. Tarrytown. Brown University. . New York. . Tufts College Tufts College. Brown University Brown University. Teacher of French. and M. .. . . Professor of Romance Languages. .B.M. PANARONI. Bach..D. N.S. A.. . Assistant Professor of Romance Languages.. . . Ph. 1905.. Assistant Professor of French. 1901 ROBERT LONGLEY TAYLOR . . N.D. 1901. Instructor in Romance Languages and Literatures.M. New York. b s L.. Instructor in Romance Languages. 1887. Ph. Preceptor in Modern Languages. and Lic.Y. 1902 READERS 1 9 4 1 Louis ALEXANDRE Roux.. A. Ethical Culture School. . Associate Professor University of Paris. 1905 LOUISE FONJALLEZ . N.. Newark Academy.. 1897. Assistant Professor.D. 1882.D. . Cornell University. A. Yale University. 1880. 1907 34 35 . A.H. Princeton University University of Michigan.J. Dartmouth College Columbia University.M. 1892 FRANK ELBERT BROOKS.B. 19oo FRANK ELBERT BROOKS. Teacher of French. 1899. 1881. .A.Y. 1910 ALBERT BUSHNELL JOHNSON. 1891.B. N..

Give the various forms." in English or phonetic spelling. courut a lui: "Vous ici. Le general fut le premier qui rompit le silence. If it is cold you will need some gloves. pale. resta debout pres de la cheminee. frappee de surprise et d'indignation. voulait et n'osait parler. a ne pas vous quitter. appuye sur le bras de son aide. je les re. the present subjunctive of vouloir.-"Eh bien! mesdames. C'etait bien. When is the article in the French partitive phrase." I Translate into English: La porte s'ouvrit. Explain the use (syntax) of lui. en apercevant le jeune medecin. . He remained there for half an hour. conduire. 2-4 P. . in nous 3. singular and plural. partons (line r4). of the adjectives doux. etablir. et moi. pour un mois. 5. Then looking at me. c'est done demain que nous partons pour les Pyrenees. Give the five principal parts of appuyer. m. Puis. and my family has gone away for a week. docteur!" s'ecria-t-il en lui prenant la main. parut le general. c'est que nous etions decidees a vous accompagner. chacun garda le silence. connaissons (line 21). mais maintenant nos 25 soins ne vous sont plus necessaires. y installer (line 21). he said: "Won't you go with me to my house in the country? I have just bought it. c'est celui qui m'a gueri de ma blessure 1 Nest-il pas vrai ? " 5 Le docteur balbutia quelques mots et prit conge de nous . Henri. Translate into French (based chiefly on 1): They told us that the doctor had come to see the ladies whom he had found so ill on Monday. car son maladel'attendait. general. Le general s'assit tranquillement dans son grand fauteuil." "Et de me laisser aller seul a Pau! . 2. of the nouns ami.1 94 1 FRENCH A-ELEMENTARY FRENCH Wednesday The use of clear and idiomatic English is required. notre intention etait de nous y installer jusqu'& votre retour. . c'eiut ete mal. et attendant avec inquietude la fin qu'elle allait prendre. . rompre. oix vous avez une terre et un chateau magnifiques que nous ne 20 connaissons pas. Now don't tell me you cannot come. reflechissait en silence. We can start at two o'clock. Pau?" 115 Point de reponse. trouvant la scene tres belle. monsieur. meaning "some" or "any. monsieur. Cecile. the imperfect subjunctive of guerir. nous etablir a. ma mere et moi voulions d'abord vous conduire jusqu'a Tarbes. complet. One is never too warm when traveling. la tete appuyee sur sa main. and the pluperfect indicative of se jeter." "Non. Henri. . Conjugate the present indicative of prendre. of y. the future of courir. "notre intention etait de nous y installer jusqu'a votre retour. in en lui prenant la main (line 3). le sourire sur les levres. i. et que nous allons. eilt ete (line 24) of I. la vicom tesse. of the plural in magnifiques (line 20)." omitted? Give examples. Indicate the approximate sound of the sentence." II Conjugate in their respective tenses. nous le presentant: "Mesdames et messieurs. 36 37 . Et le general encore une fois: "Comment? Est-ce que nous ne partons pas tous ensemble?" -"Non. . et la preuve.io gardais tous. and of the third personal pronoun in both genders. 4. They were better and he decided he would not give them any medicine.

"-Savine. Tison ne tarda pas a offrir a Turgy de lui donner des nouvelles et des journaux. une parole. "Calcu. sous. TAchez de savoir si 1'on ne veut pas rejeter cela sur ma compagne (la reine). Turgy en avertit aussitbt Mme Elizabeth. Ne vous a-t-on pas d6fendu de parler a Tison ? Calculez encore cela. I am an unhappy woman. hier. tant. Give rules for the agreement of the past participle of reflexive verbs. mais confuses. qu'on ne peut traduire en paroles. line ro). line 8). On seeing the queen she threw herself at her feet. lui await d6plu. des que. m. fasse (I. avant de. i) Although the alarm. viendrait diner a Mon-D6sir. tdcher de. fut la premiere a dire que M. par exception. dans un conciliabule de famille. Use these expressions in sentences and translate the sentences: avant. she alone had remained calm.1 94 I-(Continued) FRENCH B-INTERMEDIATE FRENCH Thursday The use of clear and idiomatic English is required. et a Mme de Morane.-Cherbuliez. Cette ques. e2tt. deplaire. Son silence inaccoutum6 me rendit pensif et m'inqui6ta plus encore qu'il ne m'6tonna. a. "Que votre zele ne vous fasse rien hasarder qui puisse vous nuire. je lui demandai si le beau Ludovic 6tait un jeune homme qui etit du brillant. Illustrate by two examples. The Tison woman after accusing the queen and Madame Elizabeth of carrying on a correspondence with Turgy went up into the queen's apartment. Le lendemain. a. Mme B. qu'on lui demandAt son avis." she said to her sobbing. Give the principal parts of the verbs: Jut. Je voulus m'en 6claircir. and if she had I would pardon her. Translate into English: i." She was carried into another room where she became more quiet after some moments. "Madam.zo lez bien la demande de Tison. on s'entretint du diner de la veille. elle 6tait prompte a juger les gens et les choses et n'attendait pas. They tried to calm her but did not succeed. avoir fair. et cc fut au bout de quelques jours seulement que la reine. faute de les avoir assez dig6r6es." The guards were present at this scene. Cependant le mari et la femme. de T. D'habitude. Madame Elizabeth et ses amies. 5 lo 15 i. convinrent qu'on ne pouvait se dispenser de rendre leur politesse a M. "Pardon her Turgy. et si vous c6dez que cc ne soft qu'apres avoir fait promettre le plus grand secret. craignis.15 tion n'est pas press6e. Give a synonym in French for each of these expressions: s'entretenir. Monique avait 6cout6 cette conversation sans souffier mot. line rz). rel6gu6 au second 6tage de la grosse tour sous la surveillance de Simon et de sa femme. pour en parler. L'alerte avait 6t6 vive. C'est Toulon qui nous a donn6 le journal dont j'ai par16 hier. Explain the use of each of the following subjunctives: voul-at (I. demanddt (I. Give the opposite in French of each of these expressions: la veille. Le secret du precepteur. Translate into English: a." r6pondit-elle. "she has not offended me. 4. une de ces impressions vives. La maniere dont vous nous servez fait notre consolation.15-6 p. avant que. I am the cause of your death and Madame Elizabeth's. compliqu6e de la separation du dauphin. de T. 38 39 . "I beg your Majesty's pardon. qui. i. lui fit passer un papier sur lequel elle await trac6 ces questions: "Que crie-t-on sous nos barreaux ? La femme 5 Tison est-elle aussi folle qu'on le dit? Est-elle bien soign6e?" Soit qu'il eut 6t6 touch6 de 1'attitude de la reine a 1'6gard de sa femme. la politesse. soit plut6t qu'il voulut avoir le coeur net de 1'attitude de Turgy. et des que je fus seul avec elle. that the royal family had received. 1." said Madame Elizabeth. et on fixa le jour ou le vicomte de T. se trouvaient d'accord. en donnant sa serviette a Turgy. one where it is invariable. convinrent. que dans le fond il n'6tait qu'un cynique. autant. Je craignis qu'elle n'eiut rapport6 de sa premiere rencontre avec M. Translate into French (based chiefly on I. se croient. had frightened Madame Elizabeth. one where the past participle is variable. qu'elle n'avait pas 6t6 dupe de son enthousiasme pour Wagner.

recevoir de ses nouvelles. quand met"me. s. twenty-one years before. bien qu'il dOt renoncer peut-etre a d'autres vues qu'il avait sur eux. b) La devotion de Melanie en fut augmentee. je crains qu'elle ne Hit attiedie. 41 . Translate the following sentences and account for the subjunctives: a) Les choses s'arrangeaient sans qu'il s'en melat. mais la mienne. b) I had my brother read a book. s'effarant. par certaines de ses. and had lived there ever since.-Hawthorne. La besogne ne serait pas moins malaisee de le demonter assise par assise que de le renverser d'un bloc: car le ciment qui lie les pierres est plus resistant que les pierres memes. Use the following expressions correctly in French sentences and translate each sentence into English: A moins que. who told us that she had come to that house when first married. Balzac est le litterateur moderne. et les outils de fer s'y briseraient comme aux joints des indestructibles ruines romaines. je veux dire un homme d'affaires et d'argent. Ainsi donc. qui peuvent etre h 1'oppose des n6tres. Longtemps leur pauvrete naive. qui est tres haut. The address was to some public rooms where I was to ask for the Count. parce qu'il a ecrit la comedie aux cent actes divers des affaires et de dargent. pure et fiere.15-6 p. mais il tient debout par sa cohesion et par son poids. I Translate into English: 1. but cheerful and good-natured woman. English Note- FRENCH BC-INTERMEDIATE AND ADVANCED FRENCH Thursday The use of clear and idiomatic English is required. En plein champ. Et il s'etait prepare a jouer cc role dans la litterature en le jouant d'abord dans la realite de sa vie. Book. ttre d meme de. 1. Then in the midst of all this. Daniel Deronda. Emigrants. ou il fut un homme moderne. Essais de Critique. Et la fille emportant sur son dos la vaisselle. qui sont bizarres. I found him. m. who came home again that very evening. d) Il ne songeait pas a les contrarier. s'accrochant aux jupons. qui sont douteuses ou surannees. ces braves gens ? Pourquoi S'en vont-ils par 1'Europe et vers le Nouveau Monde. et ne nous laissons pas effaroucher par ses methodes. s. and he had sent for me. replagons Balzac a son rang de penseur. -Frangois Coppee. and that she felt as if she had been buried through the best years of her life. 40 4. -Abel Hermant.1914 II Translate into French: 1. and beg him to come to my father. Heureux ceux qui n'ont pas quelque vieux qui chancelle Et qui gronde et qu'on a. Etonnes de montrer leur douce paleur blonde Et la calme candeur de leurs tristes yeux bleus Sur les chemins de fer bruyants et populeux ? C'est que parfois la vie est inhospitaliere. and he promised to go immediately to my father. n'arrachant que de maigres epis A la terre trop vieille et devenue avare. messieurs. to see a Count who would be able to get him released.-George Eliot. croyances ou de ses hypotheses. apres soi! Pourquoi donc partent-ils. avoir beau. bringing the Count with him. A lutte. fatigue. but he ordered me to go to an address he gave me. pres du pot de gres et du pain his. c) I had him read a book. L'edifice d'idees que cc romancier presente a la critique est harmonieux. He did not tell me the reason why he was there. massif et stable. Le fils avec le sac au pain et les jambons. c) L'histoire des paiens ne lui disait rien qui vaille. Voila de bien longs jours dejk qu'ils sont partis: Le pere tout charge de paquets et d'outils. La mere avec 1'enfant qui pend a la mamelle Et quelque autre marmot qui traine la semelle Et la suit. qui que ce soit. ni par certaines conclusions. At one of the doors stood a pale-looking. Il peut contrarier nos gouts d'architecture et nos theories de la construction. the news came to me one morning that my father had been taken to prison. a. Translate into French: a) I had my brother read.

GEOGRAPHY .

1901 .A. water table. A teacher's certificate covering the laboratory instruction must be presented at the time of the examination. Columbia University. zo.. Make a contour map and longitudinal profile of a hill 480 feet high.GEOGRAPHY 1914 Saturday 9-11 a. B. (a) in summer.) 914 of Geology.M.Explain changes of temperature with increasing depth in (a) the Mediterranean Sea. 45 . how then can July be a summer month? Explain the causes of seasons.) Teacher of Physiography. Harvard University. Define ten of the following terms: block mountain. equinox. weathering. GROUP A. Wadleigh High School. and M. Illustrate by sketch map. Name three ways in which glaciers aid in forming lakes... 1903 WILLIAM WALLACE CLENDENIN. B. base level. Use diagram. No extra credit will be given for more than the required number of questions.Sc. and Boston. THE OCEAN (Answer one question from this group. GROUP C. Associate Professor of Physiography. what is the day and hour at Manila. . Use diagrams. 1891 5. moraine. 1896. (b) the Atlantic Ocean. . if the direction of the earth's rotation were reversed. 1901 .) 914 DOUGLAS WILSON JOHNSON.Y.Y.S. on the other the winds and ocean currents for July. When it is 12 o'clock. N... manufacturing. Wadleigh High School. having the time of 126' east longitude? 2.Sc.Sc. October 8. relative humidity. i. and M. pot hole. . 18gr 3. GROUP DOUGLAS Associate Professor of Physiography. Yale University HERBERT E. 1889. (b) in winter. New York. Use diagram. having the time of 1zo west longitude. 7. and show how these contrasted features affect transportation. GROUP D.D. m. 1889.Describe the usual path of a cyclonic storm in the United States. contour interval 5o feet. . Harvard University.Draw two sketch maps of the northern Indian Ocean. Missouri State University.. Teacher of Physiography. B. The sun is farthest from the earth in July. it. Columbia University. and agriculture.. fiord. THE ATMOSPHERE READERS 1 (Answer two questions from this group. Silliman Professor Yale University.. showing the position of the equator. Columbia University University of New Mexico. Contrast the characteristics of young and mature streams. . A. 1886. noon. St.D.. 1886. 4.Sc. six miles long and two miles wide. Indicate on a sketch map of the United States the extent of the continental glacier. Ph. and precipitation. THE LANDS (Answer three questions from this group. Give horizontal and vertical scales used. playa.M. Describe the distribution of forested areas and deserts which would prevail along the Pacific Coast of North and South America. Describe a belted coastal plain and explain in detail its physiographic development. wind. at San Francisco. 1899 WILSON JOHNSON. Paul. GREGORY . Columbia University University of New Mexico. A... fault. stating and explaining the attendant conditions of temperature.S. THE EARTH AS A GLOBE Geography EXAMINERS 1 (Answer one question from this group. and Ph. New York. N. Ph. 1903 WILLIAM WALLACE CLENDENIN. B. cliffed at one end by ocean waves.) 44 8. On one map indicate the winds and ocean currents for January. atoll..D. Missouri State University. B. B. 6. Compare the weather elements of temperature and precipitation of: Seattle.

GERMAN .

Cornell University. Instructor in German.. and A. Garden City. 1903. Teacher of Modern Languages. A. 1903.German EXAMINERS 1 AUGUST PREHN. . .B. Barnard School for Girls. Cornell University 1912 Baldwin Wallace College.. 1906 College of the City of New York. 1902 WILLIAM KILBORNE STEWART.M. FRANK VOGEL. .Y. 1911 HENRY CLEVELAND BLAKE.. 1884. 1903. New York. 9 4 1 Instructor in German. x883 94 M9LANIE CONSTANZE RICHARDT. READERS 1 University of Toronto. A. Washington College. Dartmouth College Tufts College. Litt.. Wellesley College Harvard University. 1909 THOMAS ANDREW HAMMERSLEY MAWHINNEY.. Teacher of German.. Andover. Harvard University. N. Ph. N. Columbia Grammar School. Columbia University.. 1907 FLORENCE EMILY HASTINGS .. Southern High 49 Yale University. Harvard University. 1896. . N..M.M.B. A. Pa.B. A.. Massachusetts Institute of Technology Professor of German. . Instructor in German. KUSCHKE . Massachusetts Institute of Technology A.M. A. Exeter. . B. Lehigh University.M. . Philadelphia. and A. .Y. M. Paul's School. . x909 ROBERT PORTER KEEP. Head of Department of Modern Languages. Mass. Professor of German.B. N.. .. . . Instructor in German. University of Munster. Yonkers. Columbia University 1905 School. University of Miinster. Instructor in Germanic Languages and Literatures.. A.M.D. St. ... 1887.D.B. A. . 1892 GUSTAV GRUENER . New York. B. 1909 FREDERICK WILLIAM CHARLES LIEDER . Dartmouth College..D. 1885 HENRY HERMANN LOUIS SCHULZE.. 1903 JOHN L.B. .. 1897. HENRY MARTIN SHUTE. Instructor in German.B. Wellesley College.B. . Southern High New York.. A. Ph. 1897.D. .D. Ph.Y. and Ph. BERNKOPF..Y.Y. .D. Phillips Exeter Academy.B. New York. Cornell University. x898 WESLEY DANIEL ZINNECKER . and A. A. Ph. 1907 THOMAS ANDREW HAMMERSLEY MAWHINNEY.B... Yale University.. . Ph. N. School.B. Harvard University. Yonkers High School. FRANK VOGEL. 1902. Lehigh University. A. and A. and A.H. Associate Professor of German.. N. Pa. 1892 MARGARETE Columbia University. Assistant Professor of German. A. Teacher of German. . Phillips Academy.M. Master in the German Language and Literature.. . 1906 48 . A. Cutler School. Cornell University.Y. Professor of German.A. Harvard University Instructor in German.B.A. Head of Department of Modern Languages. Yale University Instructor in German. .. A. A. 1887. N.M. OTTO SCHMITZ. Teacher of German.. . Collegiate School. Philadelphia.

beborftanb (line 16).. three. Unb fror (line 5).. WO man fefjen fonne. into the passive construction. unb unb bon Seit gu Seit gum Vaufen unb epringen ermunterte. d) Change the clauses in indirect discourse in the sentence 50b roir ni t . bad jet bah I~errficfte. roedte er unb am fingft= f onntag bor ZagOanbru~ unb fitljrte unb an ben CStabtmaff fjinauf. 1914. Unb fror nub mir gitterten an ber I~anb be6 guten Panne6. making all the necessary changes. bergeffen (line 12). fefjen fbnne (lines 2-4) into direct discourse. 'Derrfid)fte (line 3). 12). bad fei . a) Decline in the singular unfere groten ftinberaugen (line 12). tuorauf mir benn rote groei junge Ndlein ein paarmaf auf unb nieber ijiipften. auf ber bie S6nigin in tfjrem golbernen Sleibe nun bjera0treten foffte. if you had really wanted to. ber unb angeigte. Sleibe (line 13). in full. . .d) He is going to stay all day tomorrow. @ejd)t~ten (line 6). . a) Write the synopsis of bjera0treten (line 13). Wud) auf ben Oefang ber Mgef fie5 er un6 laufchen. for you promised to do so. mod)ten (line 2). but she had forgotten to put on the plates. roaff bjinauf (lines 4-5). Name and give the reason for the word order in each of the following clauses: s.1914 GERMAN A-ELEMENTARY GERMAN Tuesday The use of clear and idiomatic English is required. the German for the following: October 31st. c) The maid said that the table was set. ben CStabt. bergeffen (lines 11. roarm (line ii). 4Write the principal parts together with the third person singular present indicative of aufge~en (line 2). and gern. Translate into English: Unfer I~aw3biener. Translate into German: a) Can anybody tell me where his older brother is and what he is doing? b) You could have done this as easily as I. half-past eight (o'clock). bad roir nid)t bie eingigen arilfjaufftefjer roaren. ber unb mit fetnem ~eftfuden nod) beborftanb. and will probably not leave until late at night. c) Compare flecner (line i). geigte (line 14 ). b) Write the nominative and genitive singular and nominative plural (with the definite article) of areunb (line i). CSdhornftecnen (line 14). ber unb mir afferfei Oef c~id ten gu unterbaften unb gu errodrmen fud)te. . f) Write. the dative.m.. the same little child. U6 (line 9). erfjoben (line io). and three.. Ser affe6 bad madjte unb nic~t roarm. b) Change the clauses in the sentence Unb ba bie Putter . e) Write the nominative and genitive singular in all three genders of the interrogative adjective roelc~. fror (line 5). unterljaften (line 7). e) You ought to write to your father this morning. bie nac~ unb nab iljre CStimmen ertjoben unb ben Zag einfangen.. erft ber 9fnruf . in the second person singular of the indicative active. . an. i. 5. einfangen (line io). ftieg (line 14 ). erft ber 9fnruf: „3e~t! 3ett fommt fie!" fief unb affo bergef f en unb ri~tete unfere groten Rinberaugen auf bie 'Dimm&tiir.. unb unb gugfeid) an ben Morgenfaffee erinnerte.Jb . erroarmen (line 7). twelve minutes past one (o'clock).. freunblider Mann. I~anb (line 6).. 5 0 51 . d) Write in German the nominative and genitive singular of the following phrases: such a good friend. gro~en (line 12). f ragte er einO ZagN mid) nub meinett um ein aabr jiingeren !Bruber. _~D6 mir nid)t einmal bie (25onne auf gebjen f efjen mbcljten. SDier unb ba ftieg fd)on ein Taud) auf3 ben (ad)ornfteinen.. quarter of eleven (o'clock). either the dative or the accusative case. making all necessary changes. in the plural junge &dlein (line 8). 2. roar ein grocer &eunb ber Tatur. . 2-4 P. e) Write three prepositions (with their meanings) governing the genitive. Unb ba bie Putter a erfaubte. ber unb an. ein fleiner. this one and that one (masculine gender). 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 3. 9onigin (line 13). c) Write the present indicative in full and the first person singular only of the present and the preterite (past) subjunctive of the verb mricfjten (line 2). .

" f agte to. unb bie f e (53iiter finb mebr inert. mfr finb freifid arm geroorben." "Oh. 2116 am 18. . He was walking behind his father very tired and thirsty when he saw a cherry lying on the ground. morauf ber aub feiebt au6gletten tonne. CSein 2fuge trinft fid) boff bon fprilb'nbem @o1be. Zftober bie Racbt bah toette CScb1ad tfefb bebecfte. and therefore he could get nothing to drink. Translate into English: Van rourbe exit lent auf bie Zunfelbett aufmerffam. man babe itcb f cbon mand)mal bamtt geboffen. "there lies a horseshoe! Pick it up and take it home." Za6 OeTiibbeI ber 9Rtfftonen. .01ume unb erbleicben. bad er f ragen foffte. Oneifenau icbrteb: „Za6 bocbfte 011id ift bie Tacbe an einem ifermtitigen j5einb. Translate into English: 91ur in ! ed)on prangt im CSilbertau bie lunge 82ofe. bie ficb brau~en tngtnifcbeu d marj nub unburd bringfid au6gebrettet batte. af6 bie unermetfidften Tetcbtumer bet frember 1~errfdaft. Quickly he picked it up and put it in his mouth." said the son. When they came to the next village he sold it to the blacksmith and bought some cherries with the money. a16 ob tie ate berblilben moffte. Cb er bah Saupt nicbt an bie GofbungI ftofle. (Y6 mar bie recbte ungefucf)te Siege6feter biefe6 boben %diferfriegec (Etne folcbe gugfeid lubelnbe nab ttef ernite Zanfbarfeit burcbmogte bie 'Dergen Zeutfcbfanb6. ftimmten anbacbt6DOft3 mit ein. aucb atircbten ift ibr felig. While he was walking along he saw a horseshoe lying on the ground. bie tat aebruar ben letten 2ftemgug an bie &freiung be6 5iaterfanbe6 gu f even ber fprod en. aber iutr finb lent reid an friegertfcbem Tubm nab ftoli auf bie rotebererrungene Unabbt<ngtglett. toobin bie ficbte 58otfebaft ber areibeit tam. 4. A little farther he saw another cherry which he likewise picked up and ate. bie bier bereinigt maren. "Look there. 9Sber um un6. i. barf tie nicbt bem ?Xbler gleicben? Zocb fiircbtet tie. Zenn aft ibr 0fild. And so it went on until all the cherries were eaten up. (Yr i ft ber Zor'niebt. ." said he to his son. Zen Or ber Morgen in ben fufen roffte. But no houses were in sight. jNan fiebt la obne 2icbt btel betferl" „qtr ift recbt. ' spontaneously." I vow. 2 vault GERMAN B-INTERMEDIATE GERMAN Wednesday The use of clear and idiomatic English is required. ~C)bne Vicbt mare freifid) ber Wbitieg fitr arembe nicbt gang ungefabrltd. 931ag benn ber 3ugeub .15-6 p. Ver miff an fritb f o fiibem Trug entfagen? Unb 2iebe. fieten rttf ftf cbe 2 1~eerbaufea unmifffur1tcb ein refigiof e6 Zanffieb erf d affen. (of heaven). unb mfr baben tie genommen. 52 53 . Zer 9-fbfer firebt binan ins Orengenlofe. nab Zaufenbe bon Rriegern after CStamme. fotoett nicbt ber ffeine 2iebtfrM ber 2ampe fief. it is only an old horseshoe. Translate into German: On a hot summer day a peasant rode to a distant village to sell some horses.1 91 4 3. Rein 2fftden regte fid. Tocb gfdnaet tie unb reggt unroiberfteblicb. roar fdparae Tacbt. „2ofdt boob bie 2ampe aa!" rief man. He had taken his little son with him. nub Intr macbten unb auf ben Ueg. SSte bfilbt. After they had walked a few miles the son became very thirsty. "that is not worth while. „Za bin td) einer Gorge Tebtg. mar in etuem Zrtumpbe fiber 4e6 &marten ge= 5 1o ft. ma6 tit' 0-ein enblo6 Vagen. Translate into English: 91acb ber CScbfacbt bon &tpjig 4. ." =round stones. nub fo tonne man bie Zifdfampe mtt btnunternebmen. aber e6 fei la gdnalicb tninbitiff. Zie CScbroeftern toubten bie reforgten an berubigen. ma6 man obne einrebe getcbeben fteb. bon ber bie Oef ebicbte fein 58eifptef tennt. ad) nabm f ofort bie 2ampe. 3 reverently. 2. ba ber Ueg and Tauter nicbt tmmer gan3 regelmabigen CStufen beftdnbe nub and) jettmeifig Oer6ffl mtt lid) filbre.m." Then the father picked it up himself. you need not have picked up all the cherries. Ste abnet nicbt6 bom lebten Numenlofe. After he had sold the horses he went home on foot. Then the father said to his son: "If you had picked up the horseshoe. in einer Getfe. faitm bat etn paar SSterne Rein nub tote f in unenblicber aerne mit f cbroaebem ~fimmern auffeucbteten.

. bie bief en bon jenem unterfd eibet. in einer Geife. Unb an bem bief ber -sbabn ftebt man ein anbrer. at least loo words in German on one of the following topics: a) A visit to a large city. .19 1 4 i. $. ad) bebaupte. Zer Zidter unb ber atom= pontft. Unb bem 53ertuft ber 21d)tung biefer Geft aebft nod) ber ecna'ge Zroft. Dier radt bah 9Zed)t etn Daar unb bort ein @ran. its silken folds will be an honorable shroud3 for him. ~d) babe nicb0 getan. . WM ber man mar. bie ecgne 2fdtung. d) The German book I like best. getraebtet. 2 bie Mg6tterei. at8 unter feiner ~eitung 1876 gum erftenmat in !8greutb f ein .am 18. c~m Sabre 1813 f6rteb @. bie t m ~ebruar ben letten Wtemgug an bie Tefreiung bed ~iaterfanbe6 in feten berfprod)en. Do not take away his flag.I5-6 p. & mar bie recbte ungef ucbte Siege6feier biefe3 boben Mlferfriege6. unb bat auf biefen !8ebingungen bah Mufifbrama als bah Vert beo geniaten in . fie~en ruffifcbe SDeerbauf en unmifffiirfid ein religibfe6 Zanffieb erf cbaffen. (lne fofcbe gugfeid) zubelnbe unb lief ern fte Zanfbarfeit burcbmogte bie Deraen Zeutf dfanbi3. Cftober bie %ad)t bad meite ecbla~tfetb bebedte. beugen. mir finb freilid) arm geruorben. Write in the form of a letter to a friend.' Bury this young man at once with all military honors.Ting be6 Mbefungen" auf geftbrt murbe. @neifenau febrieb: „Zap bocbfte @fiicf tft bie Tad)e an einem iibermtitigen aetnb. xa be- grengen an (etlb 0). 91fi3 . 3 ba6 Vei~entueb. bon ber bie @efdbiebte Fein !betfptef feunt. Translate into German: On seeing a young Prussian soldier who was pressing his flag to his bosom in the agonies of death. . Unb zett fteb' id). mobin bie ficbte -0ot= fcbaft ber ~reibeit tam." f 54 55 . Zab feften brin ber 9Nenfcb fish rein bemabrt. idolatry. Translate into English: Jason. mie anbre taten. gemoebt. unb Zaufenbe bon trcegern after Stamme. bat bie Vufif notmenbig unmittelbar auf ber Ztebtung entfpringen milffe. f ate. unb 0 tft nur bad beutticbe 58etouf)tfein beftimmter Velobien. mar bereit6 bon 9Ztd)arb Gagner a0gef procben morben unb trat ilberrvattigeub grog in bie @rf ebeinung. bab Ubef fid) ergeuge. GERMAN BC-INTERMEDIATE AND ADVANCED GERMAN Wednesday The use of clear and idiomatic English is required." 4. bie bier beretntgt maren. unb biefe @filter finb mebr inert. bab bie romantifd)e Zper bie einaig mabrbafte fei. Doffmanit ben fuffat ." = 2. unb mir baben tie genommen. boob gugegriffen Unb nidt bebaebt." in bent er bie Ubergeugung a0fprad. mad fdfimm an ficb. bu triffft ben g3unft! & ift bed Ungfild~ eigentfid)fte6 Ungtfd. b) A visit in the country. born UnbeUmeer umbranbet. ftimmten anbad)tf3boff mil ein. mil einem Gorte: bie bequeme Derv d)aft fiber bad innere Reid ber done. Zocb bief gemofft." beiftt unb mabrbaft romantifcfjen Zicbte0 berborgeben mtiffe. Dier Lib W nicbt geroofft. aft bie unermetttcbften Teicbtilmer bei frember Derrfcbaft. „ber Cpernbiebter mud) ebenf ogut gleid after im annern fomponieren bent !ffuf mie ber 9Zufifer. Zb. mar in einem Zriumpbe uber affa C~rmarten ge= loft. you see that a soldier has for his flag a sentiment almost approaching . a Unb fann nid)t fagen: acb bab'6 nicbt getan! 4. c) Why I am going to college. Translate into English: Zer @runbgebanfe. etiff gugefeben. bad affe Rttuffe gur 19ratefung ber bbd)ften Girfung bed Zramag im Zienfte be6 Zicbte0 gufammenaumirfen baben.m. ba man ben Vauf begann. Napoleon said to his officers: "Gentlemen. gemunfcbt. a ftimmter Z6ne ber mitroirfenben anftrumente. aber rbir finb xett reid an friegerifdem Tubm unb ftofg auf bie votebererrungene Unabbdngtgfeit. 3a. bort gu biegen. I. Dier gift'6 gu fenfen. Translate into English: Racb ber (acbfacbt bon Veipgig Zaig @efilbbe ber Viffionen.

Columbia University Columbia University. 7raX£v 0' 0 Kvpoc. OVOfV (line 9).) Inflect the plural of the optative aorist active of o~aL (line 6).I.L. 6.qKOOV (line 3).1.. Instructor in Latin and Greek.ol (line 3). (line 4). and the nominative singular of the par­ ticiple in all genders.B. ~l " r \ ~. 18')0 3 TOVTOVt· TOVTOV 'Yap 7rPWTOV J.OfAepOO (line 4). give the second plural.qO{K"1lTa (line 7). adding the infinitive.uEI\'I'0v .Y. Vassar College Radcliffe College.T}.LWV 6 €7rotT}CTa TOV 7rP0C. 10 T~V €J. 1888. Associate Professor of Greek. av8pcfJ7rwv. A. vuas.1T'f)lCoOV Elva£ EJLO(' 1To. N. ip. Columbia University Union University. in the singular. MVCTOVC. of lUTl (line 2) in the several moods. in the several moods. present tense. 0 on (line 10).lCc. .t" / .. A. University of Bonn. €J. . g) Account for the mood of -rrp~w (line 2).. I..lCpcS1ToALV Ka. 1Jpc1JTa' "OVKOVV VCTTEPOV. Boys High School. T£ VJ." J.L0X0'YE'ic. h) How is a conditional sentence of the so-called more vivid future type expressed in Greek? State the chief constructions in which the participle may occur. Princeton University 2 '.L~V x/fJpav IS TL €OVVW.S Eic.LOC. . lCo. lCTTLV 8 T£ CTE i)S(lCllCTa. '90' (/. ~ ".PEICa.Le CJCTTE SO~o. A.. Mass.TO. Ph. the singular imperfect middle of . in all genders.X 8d <.. n "o.M.RBERT REUTER. CTU 9 0J. Anabasis.Xe ( roc. . of 8o~a£ (line 6). 6-7.B.-rrfKp{vaTo (line 8).oV (line 6). of d.. in the indicative and optative moods.. of EXWV of lp. Harvard University. . ". but answer the questions in order. Instructor in Classical Philology.B. . A.M.. CTVV .)S E7rotE£'. First Assistant in Classical Languages. r '" ' 4 E7r € £ \ 01: To. ~. A. 'Op6VTa. 1887. m." 8 a. Johns Hopkins University.o 7rEpl 'Op6vTa ° YARD ROBBINS Princeton University.. 8{Katov b) Compare KaKw.LEVOC. .TItP lSWI&EV ..) " . in this tense and voice. 1888. A. O'li8EV V7r' €J. 1890 ARRIET MACURDY .. OUTOC. Columbia University. 58 59 "'.0£. E'Y@ aVTov 7rPOCT7rOXEJ." . and A.Y. EXAMINERS 19 1 Do not translate the following passage. A. A. m.B. compare (line 9)' KNAPP • • • • • • • Professor of Classical Philology.D. in all genders. (line 9) in this tense. Columbia University. 1903 FoSS. SE~£av 7 lAo..B. -Xenophon.o( (line 5). TOVTO 1TPa. roc.pov Kal. . 5T£ oil. V7rO TOV EJ. and Ph.dpOECT{v a. 1896.LETa TaVTa eq.. Boston.LW {. '904 n Account for the case of iI-rr. 1888. 4 Professor of Greek.LEVOC. .~c. .1TOlTTa<. of -rravuau(}aL (line 6). 15 p..1TElCp(Vo. Brooklyn.~K. I :h i L:.~ 'A. a...1TO<TTd.I\ECTa. 18')0 c) Give the second singular of ~ WILLARD GLEASON. adding the infinitive. Associate Professor of Greek. .B.. iUERNSEY . Roxbury Latin School.' f07rroc. aVopEC... New York.D. . i.LOV E<TTL Ka£ 7rpOC.. 'I" ".M.. ARRIET MACURDY . . of d. "cr. N. 1903 e) Give the principal parts of 1TapfKMfO'a (line I). and A.L TOVTrp 1TOAEJLOU 1To. and Ph. Tax(}ds (line 4). .EV0J.D. {. 1888.L0V o. Master in Greek and Latin.~ :\1 Saturday IS a. dKp6-rrOAlY (line 5). E7rO"'EJ.OV". 1889. r ~ "\l .ov T~V €V I. and the participle in the nominative masculine only." [CPT} <> 'OpovTac.. a) Decline READERS 19 1 4 in the plural -rra~p (line 3).GKt. Vassar College Radcliffe College. Cutler School.B. Al-liKAMMAK II.LeV 0 €J.M.u9o. 8EWV Ka£ 7rpOC.VCTo. A. .LT}CTE 5 EJLol 4fXc.D. Ta. . S(lCo.. of 1TOAfp. of (line 5). giving contracted forms only. 1889 ZAa{3ov (line 7). Harvard University...D.> (line 2) in the nominative singular. inflect d. Ph. Ph. E S..L0V aO£KOVJ.€owKa. E'I"T} aVTOC.-I2. I&a.

and illustrate by a similar idiom in English. 11-13. 2.. 8 7T'E£ oe Ta TWV 8EWV "aAw~ f!XfV. \.. Friday 'ranslate into Greek: The translation should be exact.LVO~TO Toi~ "EAATJUt OEtVa el~ T7]V sropetav. the mood of tlq.-III.IU) the soldiers because they were going to flee. of aq. . (line 5). (J""VE1TEV~a.wv AE'Y0VTClW olwvo~ TOU ~tO~ TOU € 4 uwri7po~ €epdvTJ..GREEK A2-ELEMENTARY PROSE COMPOSITION .cjl~l(cOILEea. "at ETaxe . of 7TA~P€I<..~.(J"ea. . Translate into English: r Kal €vTav8' ~v KAia. ~ avopE~.tv.€IKEval (line II). (line 8).~.T€1 (line 1). €V TV OEgU[. but clear and idiomatic English is required.. c) Account for the mood of 80KO{y/ (line 3). m. of 7TPO<j>a1voITo (lines 9. Kydnos by name. The general himself led the hoplites to the top of the mountain. " " " oe "a£ KA€ap € 7T'OAV lI-aAAoV 0 KA€apxO~ €U7T'EVOEV. _..'OVOT€<. the case b) What is Xenophon's general attitude toward the gods and signs from c) heaven? Cite another instance from the Anabasis. "at )f a) Account for the use of the participle A€. Number 12.15-6 p. 7T'pOUEAap." "at t . .. 4. What is the force of the prepositions in l1lIV€7T€~a(T041 (line 5) ? 60 61 -. TOVTOV €VE"a {3auIA€ " ... Comment on the case of the word KAfaPXOV (line I). naa» P. E" TOVTOV 0 TJVsaVTO "at ett auu/urau..lcf 0PILU 7T'pOUf"VVT/uaV TOV 8EOV..a "'VT~ 7T'pOUEAap.. ..TEL. a_•• .TJ ov UVU7T'OVoa'1'ecv.pxov "aTall-a8fiv oo~ E1TECTTQ. . .~ Of "a£ TOt~ l1.n (line 2).aturday """a'. "I t:r\" . your answers.EV ff . These villages were not far from a river. u7T'oVOa~OvTa. The Greek soldiers are better than those whom the great king is sending against them. \' ~.'€. 7T'Et 7T'Ept UWTTJpta~ ~p.a"EVEtv. . 7 XEtpa..€Oa of &pp.. They marched forward quickly on this day that they might arrive at a city and get provisions. 7T'TdpvVTa t -ns.15-1 p.eVO~ TOV" E7T'tTTJ­ 4 oewv ~7T'atfV av. "a£ lhcp OO"Et TaUTa... ~PXETO 7T'dAtV wOf. .~ 9 iJoaTo~' ov rydp ~v l1>pa oLa TO 7T'eOLOV apOEtV' aAA' iva ~O'1 7T'OAAa 1TpO­ 10 cjla..AAOt~ eEo'i~ 6 8VUEW "aTa ovvap.{3avov "a£ 6 7 8 7T'PO~ av. If you would give more money to the men.. " ... ••• ~. "al /lp..'OVTWV (line 3). b) Where is .9. t: ". €V p. {3a"TTJptav' "a£ ef n~ aimp .ucwp.Tovnt' 8WEtV uWT~pta.." eepTJ.singular present indica­ (line 6) made? Give the first tive of (7T€(TT/J. I.'t'ELl(EVa. he blamed (al'l'&4op. . ' 5 WUTE 7T'auw atUXvVT/v eu/at p. A messenger told him that the enemy were near and that the Greeks ought to attack them. into English: 2.ev TV 2 apUTTfPcf Xftp£ TO oopv E!XEV.. they would follow you. E"AEryOp.~ ''''' XI V7T'W7rTEVE E7T'£ TO 7T'fOIOV TO VOwp a. When the captain had come..a"ovuavT~ 0' ot UTpanWTat 0 SEVOepWV et7T'E' "~o"Ei 3 II-Ot.II . oe a) Account for the case of ET'1 (line 6). ' aVETEtVaV a7T'aVTf~.{3avEv el~ TOV 7T'TJAOV € ~ ' ..... ' 3 50KOLT\ TOW 7T'p~ TOVTO TfTaryp. af£ oiJTW 1TATJpELS elvat TIts Td¢pov~ V7T'07T'TEVwV p. m. ()7T'OV clv 7T'pWTOV EiJgau8at Trj> 8Eip 5 els eptAtav xropav ci. "avaTELVaTW T7]V ....10).EVWV fJ". Translate I TOUTO oe AEryOVTO~ aVTou. € 2 7T'dVT~ P.ro O£ -rpuieovra ETT\ 'YE'YOVOTES' 7T'E£ € ol 7T'pEU{3VrEpOt.3.

OL CTll\Lcjlpa.E'i{. . Oto...epill(J)v. Translate into English: a) Account for the case of 7TOU'.AoOO-a (line 374). m. € r yall. "at AoXaryov./E..lV(I)V· €"/w 0' ~PXov El"'U 71"OT' "/E p.XEOVTa. 'TL EilIaL 'TqJ SEIIO<f>WII'TL.. of YWrrraL (line 341).w P. /Cat ol 071"LuBo<f>v'Aa.A. ovo 7) atoll.p. all'p~~O\l~ (line 376).. €71"eEULII. a.eB' EtllE"a "OVPTJI. ~ " 9H p. TOLOU'TOL U"a P. ZEW UA"/E' €O(J)((EV. O'TOV O~ 71"apEryryv~Ua!I'To<. 62 63 -If­ . lp. OLe 71"apa "'lllCTt ' \La. 'TOU t'a.. (line 2).E P..ov£'> (line 372)./E /COVP7)11 "at U<f>WLII 00<. €OO"EL O~ P. alla'Aa{JwlI 71"apE{Jo~BEL.. of /J:Y£LV (line 338). UOOL a) Give the Attic prose equivalents for iJp.vlIaL 'TOL<.. IIpLap.. p./ap..EII. 'E71"Et 0' a<f>t"oll'TO 71"allTE<. /Cat "lap €.AE1Ta.rp €71"t "at 1TOAAce p.AoilCTa.£.. "/' OAOLnCTL <f>PEut BVeL.-1-1----II-.8\LoVES E'lE1I 'AXaLwlI' 'TqJ "E 'Tax' "i\LVCTELE 71"O':\L<. of . aAAoL<. Kpoll(07)<. 71"Po<.. "at 'Ta V71"O~vryLa 7]'AavIIE'TO /Cat ol £71"71"OL.." ~ " . . ~ {Jo~ Ourp oq 71"'Adov<./EpOIl.a/CapwlI 71"p0<./Oll ap.. tJAo~UUL (line 342)../ap.OIl €<f>' £71"71"011 "at Av"toll "at 'TOW t71"71"ea<. ~ " . .~ --~pP Saturday 9-11 a. "at €~a71"tll7)<. . b) What was the reason for the great joy of the Greeks upon this occasion? "Xa{pETE.' aAA' a...oL (line 335). "at 'Taxa O~ a"ovoVUL {30WlI'TWV 'TWII CTTpa:n(l)T<oV " <8>a'Aa'T7'a.I . 'TE 71"EpBop. dVd.. "at alla{Ja<. . 375 9<. €rytryIlOIl'TO. auuoll t'T" o~ 'T{ \LOL V\L\LES €71"a{noL.Va. ­ IT . 1.w (line 5). 7. 'TW 0' au.'." "€>aAa'TTa./WII 'AXL'AEW 'TE p.oLO ctlla. but clear and idiomatic English is required. "at 'TOw U'TpaTrnOV<..€VUOP. the use of the participle XfLA£7Ta{vwv (line 378). Give first singular present indicative of d. aryryEAoL 7]0€ /Cat allopwlI.~.'\LETEPllCTLV ci.wlI €rytryIlE'TO 'TOW {JoWII'Ta<.CTLI\1]OS a71""1VEO<.d{. ·o~ 7rEpLe{3a'AAoll OU/CpVOIl'TE<.~AYJUL'> (line 380). YrJvul (line 344). ~ .2 5. €71"t'TO /J.1TPTJKTOllS epLoa<. '" 071"71"(J)<.'TO<.q.."axtovTaL (line 344).. EL 71"O'TE 07) aUTE 340 XP€LW E\LELO 'YEV1]Ta..vum (line 373).p' ?J!J.Xa.. /Cat IId"Ea {Ja'A'AEL. c) What part has Achilles played in preceding events that Agamemnon now takes away his prize? Who was the prophet concerned? b) Explain the syntax of 2.L aEL/Cea AOL. ov"h' €71"EL'Ta .370-3 8o. " :I. b) Explain the mood and tense of ~p.. 335 8 u<f>WL 71"pO{EL BpL(7)t'OO<. "at 71"OLOUULlI "OAWIIOIl p. ZEfJ 'TE 71"a'TEp "at' A(7)va{7) ((at "A 71"OAAOV. EIIBa O~ [Beoll 71"all'TE<. toLol.-IV./ap .L 'A X aLOL: .t'I\"lCTLS «axou EUUETaL. c) Write the Attic prose construction for x£pu~v v. 'A X aLwv• at . a.pdop.> (line 335). of UTpaTLWT{. 370 XEpCTtV ilcjl . ot' UTpa'TLW'Ta£ <f>epovuLlI A{Bou<. 'TE BII7)'TwlI avBpw71"(iJv . Number your answers. ~ R '\ " ./{ox0<. allnf){oL<.-r-. N'f) '" T p(J)ULII .lio (line 341)."Xa P.£'TEPTJCm (line 374).. 1 a) State the composition and derivation of uvp." "at 71"apEryryvW!I'T(J)II. 'TE BEWII p. VLa<. "~PU"E<. 334-344..--. P. CtAA' 'A..{av f)oVA. R'\ e. ovoe -ri oioE 1I017UaL ap.E'T' Q.ell7J 'TE. '" 1:" ~ «a:. explain the frequent use of the imperfect tense in the passage.dpropoL €U'TWII 71"p0<.OL al. €11'TauBa aAA~AOV<. The translation should be exact. {3auL>':ijO'> (line 340). a:yEW.all aUT aryop?J VL"qJ.. .a 71"pouu(J) "at 071"{uuw../EII~ IIa'Tpo"AELI. Translate into English: ' . 23. E£IIE"a "OVP7)<. [BEOIl OpOp..aX7Juap. €~a."POIl.

P.. Translate into English: ~ avn<:. Te J-LLV €t\.LV €~I\. Eloo<:.S... Ila8' OP. tit S' UVEXWP7)rT€V... a7reITT'r] The translation should be exact.. 30-40. TO.€TO IC17P a"'€€tVOOV.#E 7via. atTn.">. VYJlJO'{ (line 344).aL~:i1os a7r7)veo<:."-III. . the quantity .7rep07rfiUTa. 1T00t tLa.tJ.. expressing the meaning without the use of Toi<:. € a't8' OepEAES a:yov6s T' EtLEVa. ictus and chief 07r7roo<:. 0' aUTO. TOV S' "EilTOOp V€{Il€ITIT€V lowv alaXpo'i<:....0 ­ . of d')loJlOs H:al. im6 . T€ opalCoVTa lowv 71'a">. a">. of j.--. tJAoLfjO'L (line 342)..' BPLIT7)i'8o<:. OeoEt8~<. ol 7rapa VIlual.r .<.a 7rPOITITOO Ilal 07rUrITOO.a#€ EV {3~l1'rT'!J<:.------. 10' 7rOT€ 07] aVTE 340 (line 40). b) Account for the case of ~TOP (line 31). ICat IT¢OOW 00<:. OVEt. Scan lines 34 and 40..-_. ~. lCaT€7r"'7)717 'l"LII. --_. wxpo<:. TE TP0J-L0<:. &ptIT7€.---. a7rel1'TrJ oiJp€o<:. . €7re€rTw' MITOV 'tT'· ov T{ tL0L iitLtLES €7ra{TLoL.~O'> (line 340). TE 7'poJ-L0<:.OV eou Tpwoov u'ry€ptfJxoov &tlTa<:.lvoplTo<:.pELa. €ISo<:. division into feet... 'ATpeo<:.P. v. 8€O€LS~<:." T"\ • aT 0 av€xooPTJIT€V.OL<:./" ""'/''' 'I' €V 7rp0p. lp. 70V 0' "EIC'TWp velseaae» lowv a.C: 1Ta. Translate into English: Tov 0' w<:.pELa. T. '. aro' l5.VIT7rapt.lio (line 341). ~uO'v. e~a7€ IlOVP7JV. Toil ~a. of dYfLJ/ (line 338).">. eOvo<:. marking quantities. ..axotlTt 'l"avezrra. .1" ~. • . O€O€t07]<:. . 335 8 1T¢01£ 7rPO{€L IlOVP7J<:. °tPfAfS..€ 35 I. IlaO' gp. "IvutuuaV€<.S. of 1ruPfuI. 64 65 '. OW7Vfc.L aeLilea ">.L 'Axaw{. IC~PUIC€<:.-. ooxpo<:. . J-LdpTVpOt ~1TT6}lJ Explain the tense used in the main verbs of the simile. 30-40 . 7rpO<:. T€ P. €lv€Ila "AvlT7rapL. T' a7roAeITBat.jU €V 7rPOI.---_.. . 7rpck T€ O€6JlJ 7'10 OV7J7'WV avOprInroov J-Lalldpoov 7rp0<:. m.OV eov Tpwoov a7€pWxoov "Xa{pETE.------.ov 'AXe~avopo<. but clear and idiomatic English is required. ouoe -ri 01010 V0TtlTaL tip. (1pLITT€. ~ "lap. €A. 334-344.. €xaf. exa."-I. 10 vo<:.A' a7€. TRANSLATION tit S' JTapOOV El<:. a) Give the Attic prose equivalents for t._ •• -.fVCU (line 40 ) ..t">. c) What part has Achilles played in preceding events that Agamemnon now takes away his prize? Who was the prophet concerned? 2.TOp. Account for the quantity of Tf (line 34). 35 &c...oL70V ap.L">. Account for the case of ~TOP (line 31). b) Explain the syntax of p. oW €VOy/IT€V 'AXe~avSpo<:. w<:. ".fS (line 335). viov 'AAe~avSpo<:._---. 0' 8TE TI<:. S' aT€ T{<:.epEAES CL'YOVOS T' EtLEVa. T€ Spdllozrra lSwv 7ra">. ALo<:..... of dyovos (line 40)."-III. 7' OAOL]aL ¢perTl.. r ~ ·/~ of the final syllable of lP.ULXOLtn ¢avezrra. ~7r€p07r€lJTd. Saturday 9-u a.Ot ~Sf Ilat avop6w.ep. &">.">.lITOaL.. inrc5 € the sight passage through several times before beginning to write the translation. brlelTlTtlJ· ". metrical pauses.€TO "TtP' aA€€lvoov.A' 'A7ap.{voplTo<:..ICTXP0'ic.voov... a">.0<:.-----­ . W<:. aT 0 €TapOOV t€ <:. of 7i'apfu1S (line 35).r" ~" . 7uvaLp.ilvat Write line 40 in Attic prose. (line 35). A... SdlTac. IlaT€7r">. XP€LW itLE~O 'YeVT)Ta.. a) Explain the tense used in the main verbs of the simile..OV ". Read oiJp€o<:. 1Ta.. a77€">. IIaTpdICA€t<:.L &7aP. 'ATpeo<:. of YfVYJTUL (line 341). T' a7ro">.oL (line 335).£aX€OJl7'aL (line 344)..av€c. 30 .a.XEOVTQ./via. €V #~rTlTn<:.L (17UJ-L0c. '''0 "i' ~.lrt7J ¢lAov ~TOP. CL'YELV..

" Clearchus replied that they would not have attacked the king had they not been persuaded by Cyrus. Tpwa<. j ""u:pl.€{}'.e Ota/Cp{vl/. 4TCXE(/(I=js h. Translate into Greek: While the Greeks were encamped here.ev 'IT'avCTrf.ere. marking quantities. . 7o!XIC(cTI7l'E1I'XOIlS= with trailing robes.I:. vVV p. eCTCl't.aXTJCTop. and we plotted together to kill Cyrus. Tprpdoa<. ev¢paveCJ> /Cal.ECT{}a p.p.CTTV ~a ITpldp.5 'IT'dVTa<. !6</lpllol. ha{pov<.VTO.y.V 'Axatow. I am friendly to you and I asked him to allow me to lead you safely back to Greece. 6 tns = kinsmen..ETpllolr. 5 /CE Sa{fl-CJ>v 11p. 'IT'apo' VTJVCTI.epoV'~ VCTT€POV aVr€ p. . ictus and chief metrical pauses.oto avalCTo<. T€ p. l1ight has come on and Hector asks Ajax to postpone their combat to another day. T( (line 34)..".~ r-rl'(V~~ \"V1YlrV~111UN d) Scan lines 34 and 40. I advise you to answer moderately. Although I did this.' so that I may be able to save you. UKI:. TE f3trjll TE /Cal. He bade me ask you why you marched against him. the quantity Saturday 4· 15-6 p..3 06>'0 S' hepolCT( 'Y€ V{ICTJV' vv~ 0' ~S7J T€Ai{}€l·4 arya{}ov /Cal VV/CT! 'IT'lBeCTBal' cd<.] II A!av. ~MECTl'lT'brAOV".dXTJ" /Cal. = decide between. Tissaphemes came to them and said: "I was the first to report to the king that Cyrus was marching against him. 7T'LVUT~V. hrEt TOt SWICE tho" fl-e-yd)o<. STJto'T'flTO<. • fJ. TOl eaCTtv' aVTo'p e'Yw "aTo' (J.".=toda. €l<. CTOV<.."-VII.7 owpa S' 11'Y' aAA~AolCTl 'IT'EPllC).p.' 'IT'€pl. 66 67 - .aAlCTTa eTa<. cn7p. S6>ofl-ev ap. In.¢o>. 'Q'1\~po. 288-299. and that they wished to return home without injuring anyone.. = delight. S' ~'YXEl 'Axalwv tf>lpTaTo<. Account for the quantity of of the final syllable of Zp.""~I""~. CTV T' ev¢p~V'!J.. Translate into English.' division into feet.1J7'~=wisdom.6 /Cat.(VIU (line 40).. or J "'1.

ota.. avopl ry€vI.".u8a£.iryav 7T'Ot?]­ a aiueu.7T'€Ta£ e" KaXX77oovO~ <ppovpo~' ou ryap . m. 7T'". w 'd. cb. EX€t~ Tpt~P€£<. but clear and idiomatic English is required. uti T€ f]p.as ov7jua£~4 "al f]p.ryoVUt· "Nvv UOt ~~€UTW.. The translation Read the passage through several times before beginning to write. " '''"\ . at Of aUTol v<p' eavToov TaTTop.~e<p' ap7T'ary~v Tpa7T'OtTO TO UTpCLTwp.pa~ e"dT€pOV 7T'ap€o€opap.=launched.€VO~ aVTOV~ €U 6 TaVTa /Cal TOV<. Tax£uTa' "-f'JOVIWp.€Ta7T'fp.)7rXa.ryopas.18-23. o€{ua~ p.€VOt T€ 07rX'iTa£ ev Oh{rytp xpovtp €l~ O"TW eryfvovTo /Cal ol 7r€XTauTal €7rl TO "I. W~ eaXw­ "vta~ Tfj~ 7T'Oh€W~.ry€T€ /Cal 7rO£?}UW TaUTa' el Of .= 68 69 -. 1.€Va. 7T'dVT~ r'pOVTO a7T'OXWXfVa£. Saturday {j-~lurt 1 1 KAl"~LA I l v n VI" A I 11'-' r I\..V.€£ 00<.tuat·5 "al aVTo~ T€ 7rap77ryryva ryvav "al T{8€uBa£ Ta ...w.u1 tw =: calm. l8€£ "al UVV€£U7T't7T'T€£ €rUW TOOV 7T'vXOOV UUV Tf> 0XXffJ' ol Se Bv~dvnO£ &>~ €loov TO UTpaT€vp.aTa.. lX€t~ xp~p. &>~ ev Ta'i~ TPt~P€Ut UrjJ~OtVTO.jKeerTol=irremediable. leal €VeV~ p. <> Of 'Ava~{/3to~ "amopap.€V '1:" t:)"\. llXXov<.I. should be exact. €l /3ouXow. VII." 0 0' a7T'€/CptvaTo' .f..€uav. <> Of 'ET€OV£/CO~ els T~V ll"pav Q. "I: " " ~~ .. 8' 8e -ra 07rN.€£~ uE p. lX€£~ 7T'o?. . 'aXCflfTCK6f=fishing (adj.7T'o<p€vry€£. €X€t~ llvopa~ TOUOVrOV<. 2 Ke>8ei'XKo. '0 oE S€vo<poov oe HISTORY or I help." flOW' Ot' DE sa 8:'"\ €£". 7T'POU7T'{7T'TOVU£ 7T'oXXol airrcfJ "at XI.). rD 8€vo<poov. I KaT1/pe. Anabasis.ev €l~ Ta ~" '' w " OUOt O€' " ' ' " €VOOV €TVryXavov OVT~.avol eSd"ovv €lva£ ol EV TV a"po7T'oX€£ UX€£V TOV<.L ' Ta\. llvopa<..:lL 2-4 p. .ljKt.' AXX' €v ry€ XI.7}. oi' 'O€ oucaoe..a /3tCf €£U7T'£7T'TOV.wv €7T'1 8aXaTTav ev aXt€VTt/Cep3 7T'XotffJ 7T'€ptrn-X€£ el~ T~V a/Cpo7T'oX£V."oJl' Ta~ TPt~P€t~.! " TOVTWV eire8VP.' VUV &v..t. e/CeX€V€ 7T'ap€ry· tcaT77p€p. 6 r apE'Y OYllci = pass the word along. ol p.. Translate into English: [Xenophon calms the soldiers at Byzantium] &>~ €!O€ Ta "!"'lvop.a /Cal (h~/C€UTa' /Ca/Ca ryEvo£To TV 7T'oX€£ /Cal eavTf> "al TO£~ uTpanw­ Tat~. <P€VryOVUW e/C Tfj~ Q.".-Xenophon.' ot Of uTpaTtOOTa£ W~ €loov S€V0<poovTa..€tT€.

1913 DAVID SAVILLE MUZZEY . Columbia University.. Hunter College Davidson College. 1gog.. N.M. Vassar College Vassar College. Dartmouth College. Associate Professor of History. rgog.. A.B. A. Columbia University. and A..D. Ph. .M. . 1897. A.M. STILLMAN PERCY ROBERTS Instructor in History. 1912 Yale University.D. . . . 1888.D. Teacher of History. A. 1904 CLARENCE EUGENE MINER. 1902 ARCHIBALD FREEMAN.Y. B. Harvard University. 1905 ARCHIBALD FREEMAN . Dartmouth College N. Harvard University.Y. 1897. ... . Franklin School. New York. . 19o8 EVERETT KIMBALL ..Y. B. . Brooklyn. Brown University. . 1go1. Brooklyn Heights Seminary. B. Professor of Political Science. .D.A.D. Professor of Political Science. A. A. New York University. Ph. .History EXAMINERS 1 EDWARD F. ..D. .B. 1902 ELOISE ELLERY . Ph.. B. Columbia University University of Minnesota. 1899. Instructor in History... B.D.M. Associate Professor of History. Vassar College Associate Professor of History. Phillips Academy. . Columbia University. Harvard University.B. Johns Hopkins University. N..B. 1goo. and Ph. ... Harvard University. Ph... Cornell University... 19o6. . Instructor in History. . University of Leipsic. 1897.A. .A. Hyde Park High School. HUMPHREY . 1903. . A.. . . Ph. and Ph.M. . . . 1899. BALD. 1897. A... Simmons College Bowdoin College. .M. Exeter. 1893.. Cornell University. .. A. Andover.. 1895. A. . A. 1897. 1907 HARRY MAXWELL VARRELL . 1891 CHADWICK. Columbia University University of Chicago. .H. Teacher of History.. Andover. B. Conn.M. Harvard University.. Teacher of History. Mass. 19o5 MAACHAH BELL. . Poughkeepsie.M. . and M.Y. A.D. Instructor in History. Phillips Academy.. .B. Horace Mann School. .B. .A. Professor of History and Political Science. .. Riverview Academy. N.B.. . 1889.. . A. 1896. Professor of History. 18go JOHN HAYNES. and Ph..B. Ph. Litt.. .. 1899 EDGAR DAWSON . New Haven High School. Cornell University. M.. 1885.M.B. 1895 70 . University of Virginia. N. A.B. 1892. University of Geneva. Columbia University.B. Cornell University. Harvard University.B.. .A. . . and A. 1892. . . READERS I9I4 EMERSON DAVID FITE . .. Ph. A. 1912 ELIZABETH BRIGGS . Harvard University. . Phillips Exeter Academy. Boston. and A. A.A. A. Harvard Annex.. .D. Amherst College.M. Cornell University...M. Brown University. 1887. A. . Mass. 71 Williams College. New Haven. 1912 94 EDWARD ARTHUR JESSER. . A. Mass. rgog EMERSON DAVID FITE . 1904 HARRIETTE PARNAL MARSH. HERBERT DARLING FOSTER ... New York. Head of Department of History. Smith College Yale University. . A.. Toronto University. 1888. Instructor in History. . .M. .D. 1889.A. College of the City of New York. 18go Head of Department of History. Vassar College Assistant Professor of History.D. 1888 .

11. Hohenzollern. (Answer three questions only.c. Indicate the nature or content of one book other than your textbook and point out how the book has helped you. (Answer one question only. 1. 6. (Answer one question only. (c) subjects taught and methods of study. 8. Crimea. On map 46a mark as.e. Distinguish clearly the territory gained during the Punic Wars.15-6 p.) 3. 2.Describe the career (a) of Themistocles. In your answer to the question selected. Stuart.) 7. and (c) compare these men as to statesmanship and character. (d) student life. 1.1914 1914 HISTORY A-ANCIENT HISTORY Tuesday In each answer give dates. From what country did the founders of Carthage come ? famous? What were the elements of strength and what the elements of weakness among the Carthaginians? GROUP II. (Answer three questions only. include results of your reading outside the textbook. m. (Answer one question only. Give a careful account of the magistrates in the Roman Republic. and what 4were its effects upon Greece? Show how the supremacy came to an end. GROUP III.Describe fully the reign of Francis I of France. GROUP II. . (Answer one question only. 9. and Trajan play in the territorial development of the Roman Empire? GROUP IV. cism. the main routes of trade. What did the Greeks mean by the following terms: tyrant. 73 . What were the causes of the Crimean War? What principles of international 9 law were asserted in the treaty which closed the war? 1o. (b) of Aristides. and the chief grain-exporting lands in the ancient world. Name in order and briefly describe the different forms of government which France has had since 1815. Balkan Mountains.15-6 p. Indicate the nature or content of one book other than your textbook and point out how the book has helped you. Claudius. and give the terms of at least one treaty.) On map 46a mark as definitely as possible the principal seaports. What was the nature of the Spartan supremacy after 404 B. on the general subject referred to in the question or on some phase of that subject. in addition to your textbook.What problems were before the Council of Trent and how did the Council attempt to solve them? Explain why Philip II of Spain delayed for thirty years his attack on England 5in the reign of Elizabeth. m. In your answer to at least one question mention authors and titles of any books which. (Answer two questions only. Bourbon? Mention the name of one ruler in each of the families and indicate briefly for what he was famous.) 3. GROUP III. Show influences of sea power on the history of Greece. GROUP IV. oligarchy. autonomy? 6. What contributions to civilization were made by one of these nations? For what were they 2. Constantinople. on the general subject referred to in the question or on some phase of that subject. On map 46 mark as definitely as possible five of the following: Adrianople. HISTORY B-MEDIAEVAL AND MODERN EUROPEAN HISTORY 4.) 10. you have used. In what respects was the reign of Marcus Aurelius important? Comment upon the statement that "Rome's greatest contribution to civilization was her law"? What men were famous in the history of Roman law? GROUP V. Romanoff. Monday In each answer give dates. 72 11. Mark on map 81b the names and boundaries of the leading German colonial possessions throughout the world. Augustus. 12. GROUP I. giving concrete illustrations.. GROUP I. indicating the time or period for which your description holds good. 8. Pompey. (Answer one question only. 4.) In your answer to at least one question mention authors and titles of any books which you have used. Suez Canal.) 7. What part did Caesar. Tripoli. about 133 B. Describe fully the policy and work of Innocent III. Give a brief history of the Boers in South Africa.) Give an account of the mediaeval universities under the following heads: (a) origin. democracy. in addition to your textbook. definitely as possible the territory under Roman control 12. In your answer to the question selected. Name the most important battles and treaties of the "Second Hundred Years' War between England and France. (Answer one question only. include results of your reading outside the textbook. 4." 1689-1815.) Name in succession the great nations in the Euphrates valley to the time of Alexander the Great. See that you have followed the directions at the head of the paper regarding dates and collateral reading. ostra5. See that you have followed the directions at the head of the paper regarding dates and collateral reading.Over what countries and when have the following families ruled: Hapsburg.. (b) famous universities.

and the Bill of Rights are the complements or the reassertions of the Magna Charta. the Habeas Corpus Act. (Answer three questions only. Joan of Arc. Indicate the nature or content of one book other than your textbook and point out how the book has helped you. 13. 4. GROUP II.15-6 p. "The Petition of Right." Give the main provisions of each of these documents and then explain what the quotation means. State the provisions of the important measures for Ireland's relief advocated by Gladstone. It has been said that "the defeat of the British at Yorktown had a profound effect upon the constitutional development of Great Britain herself.) 4. (Answer one question only. _ 8. Indicate briefly the nature or content of one of these works which you have read. Write fully on one of the following: Duke of Marlborough. include results of your reading outside the textbook." Explain this statement. Curia Regis. On map 81b indicate with names. Give an account of its pro- HISTORY C-ENGLISH HISTORY Tuesday In each answer give dates. Wars of the Roses. Lollard. What is included in the Australian Commonwealth? What are the main features of its constitution ? GROUP V. m. In your answer to at least one question mention authors and titles of any books which you have used. the possessions which England gained in the eighteenth century. What was Burke's attitude toward the American Revolution? What "source" have you for your knowledge? What was Burke's attitude toward the French Revolution? 74 75 . Indicate briefly how England got control of Australia. On map 81b indicate with names. who were also great statesmen. Show that you have a definite knowledge of five of the following. In your answer to the question selected.) 5. 6. and locations or boundaries. Robert Peel. In what respects is England's present treatment of her colonies different from that of the period 1763-1775 ? GROUP IV. 2. Name three great churchmen of England living before 1215. on the general subject referred to in the question or on some phase of that subject. See that you have followed the directions at the head of the paper regarding dates and collateral reading. 11. Cade's rebellion.) 3. 1o. i.1914 9. writing not less than four or five lines on each: Constitutions of Clarendon. GROUP I. John Bright. Statute of Praemunire. Name four prominent literary men in the Age of Elizabeth and the most famous works of each. GROUP III. (Answer one question only.) 12. Describe carefully the work of one of them.) 7. (Answer one question only. in addition to your textbook. (Answer one question only.. the possessions of Great Britain on the way from England to India. and boundaries or locations. Why was the Reform Bill of 1832 necessary? visions.

Douglas. Mention several important changes in the government of the United States which have been prominently discussed since lgoo? What are the argumeints for and against two of these? What changes have been adopted? 11.) i. . site of the earliest American college. (c) Dartmouth College Case.) What colleges were founded before the Revolution ? What were the causes. (Answer two questions only. In what documents is the theory set forth ? State concisely the arguments in its favor. provisions. 1o. 76 77 . you may confine your account to that state.Give a careful account of education in the colonies. Mention other ways in which the United States has shown interest in arbitration.15-6 p.~ 13. Describe briefly three events since 1890 that have emphasized the position of the United States as a world power. indicating the question at stake.) Describe 9. In your answer to at least one question mention authors and titles of any books which you have used. . Yorktown. 7.-'2. What were the causes of the impeachment of President Johnson? his trial. (If you have done special 3. 12. (Answer two questions only. Indicate the nature or content of one book other than your textbook and point out how the book has helped you. 8. Describe and explain the part played by the Dutch in the history of early America. (b) McCulloch vs. on the general subject referred to in the question or on some phase of that subject. and the result.Explain what is meant by the "compact theory" of the constitution. Gadsden Purchase. ~ 6. In what cases in the nineteenth century has the United States resorted to arbitration ? Give an account of one of these cases. GROUP II. in addition to your textbook. 4. In your answer to the question selected. Maryland. Describe the causes of discontent which culminated in Bacon's rebellion. What was the nature of two of the following decisions of the United States Supreme Court ? What is the constitutional importance of one decision ? (a) Dred Scott Case. See that you have followed the directions at the head of the paper regarding dates and collateral reading. (Answer two questions only. GROUP III. reading outside the textbook on the development in a single colony or state. and results of the Stamp Act? Give the 4arguments in its favor. . both Kansas and Nebraska as outlined by the Kansas-Nebraska act of 1854. include results of your reading outside the textbook. In your answer book indicate how the northern boundary was determined.) Name 5. giving the author and title of books used. m.1914 GROUP IV. three prominent advocates of the theory before 1840. On map 88b mark as definitely as possible four of the following: Gettysburg. GROUP I. On map 88b mark as definitely as possible the boundaries of the Oregon terri- tory in 1850. (Answer one question only.) HISTORY D-AMERICAN HISTORY AND CIVIL GOVERNMENT Monday In each answer give dates. Trace the public career of Stephen A. its importance.

LATIN .

. New York.M. A..D. Hotchkiss School. 1895. Anthon Professor JOHN COPELAND KIRTLAND. New York. 1897.. Mass. . A. Browning School. Hunter College Vassar College. . Barnard School for Girls. .B. Morison Professor of Latin.M. 1888 BERNARD MELZAR ALLEN. Lakeville. New York. 1891 . sgol .M. and Ph.J.. Ph.A. and A.Latin EXAMINERS 1 914 CAROLINE MORRIS GALT. 1906 CHARLES JOSEPH DEGHUEE .. Andover. lgog SUSAN BRALEY FRANKLIN.D. . Phillips Exeter Academy.A. Teacher of Latin and Greek. A.. N. Mass. Johns Hopkins University. J. lgog JOHN LEWIS PHILLIPS . H.M. B.B. Associate Professor of Archaeology. .... 1902. Preceptor in Classics. . . Instructor in Latin. College of the City of New York College of the City of New York. Ph. . . . Phillips Academy.H.D.. 1889. Trinity School. Instructor in Latin. 1894 KATHARINE CAMPBELL REILEY. Head of Latin and Greek. Wellesley College. N. 1885. 1888. .M. lgog GEORGE LEROY SHELLEY ... and L. . . Instructor in Latin. A. Ph. . 1904.M. N. 1884. Baltimore. 1902. Teacher Cincinnati. . Exeter. University of Chicago.B..B. B. 1893 BARCLAY WHITE BRADLEY. . . A.B..D. A. 1901. . .. Teacher of Latin. Yale University Yale University..D.M.Y. A.. Instructor in Latin. 1885. Associate Professor of Latin. . Harvard University. and Ph.B. Wellesley College Smith College. and M. 19og. . 1gio MA Rio EMILIO COSENZA.. Exeter.D. 1913 LEO AUGUSTINE HANIGAN.M.Y. B.. A.. A. and A..... igo1 DANIEL HIGGINS FENTON ... 1889. N. 1892 CHARLES RAYMOND AUSTIN.D. and Ph. and A. N. Andover.A.. Dartmouth. Assistant Professor of Latin. 1905.M. A. Principal Dearborn-Morgan School.. . Trenton.. 1885. .. N.B. Assistant Professor of Classical Philology. 1go1 ELIZABETH McjimsEY TYNG.. A.. . Brown University. 1894. Ethical Culture School.B.Y. Teacher of Greek and Latin.A. Bryn Mawr School. . .. 1899. . Columbia University.M.. A.. Md. Columbia University.B. A. Exeter. N.. .M.. 1908 ELLA CATHERINE GREENE. Professor Yale University. N. . A.B.D. A. and A. Columbia University Columbia University. Instructor in Latin.A. 1912 JOHN EDMUND BARSS . Teacher of Latin. 1gio ALBERTA MILDRED FRANKLIN. Princeton University. . A. Brooklyn.. 1898. Conn.. Ph. . . . Instructor in Latin. 1goo..B.. . Instructor in Latin and Greek. A. and Ph. A. Union University. lgog EDGAR HOWARD STURTEVANT.D. N.. Master in Latin.D.D. A.. A.Y. Dartmouth College. . A.A. 1903. 1893 of Latin. A.. . N. and Ph. igol JOHN WILLIAM HENRY WALDEN . New Jersey State Normal and Model School.B. Teacher of Classics. Harvard University. M.B.. Smith College Radcliffe College. Packer Collegiate Institute. Phillips Exeter Academy. . Cornell University..Y. . New York. .B. 1886. Orange. 18go. Princeton University Dalhousie University.. Ph. . A..M. A. A. 1888 WILLIAM LYMAN COWLES. Columbia University. Harvard University.D. .. Associate Professor of Latin and Archaeology. Moore Professor of the Latin Language and Literature. 1878. New York.. . Yale University.B. B. N. . 1904 81 for Harvard University of Department of Classics. 1888. Acadia University. 18go. .B. A. Franklin School... .. Princeton University.B.. B. A. Teacher of Latin. 1899.A.. N. . Union University. and A. . A. Columbia University. . 19og FLETCHER NICHOLs ROBINSON. ..B.Y. University School. ELIZABETH HAZELTON HAIGHT . and Ph.. Phillips Exeter Academy. 1895 8o of Latin. Anthon Professor of the Latin Language and Literature. Ph. Hobart College. Columbia University University of Indiana. Assistant Professor..H. 1881 JOHN COPELAND KIRTLAND.B. Ethical Culture School. 1887.B..D. 1893 WILLIAM STUART MESSER. 1895.B. . Columbia University Columbia University. New York. A..M. A.. Cornell University... A. A. .A. . A. A. 1903. Mount Holyoke College Bryn Mawr College. . A.M.A. . A. 1904. Instructor in Classical Philology. College University of Pennsylvania. 1897 FLORENCE ALLEN GRAGG . Morison Professor of Latin. 1886. Amherst College Amherst College.M. . A. 1911. Reader Harvard University. Columbia University. and M. A. . . 1912 ALLAN CHESTER JOHNSON. Cornell University. Columbia University. 1887 NELSON GLENN MCCREA. Williams College .B.. 1892 MONROE NICHOLS WETMORE .B. Phillips Academy.B. .D. Bryn Mawr College.B. and Ph. Instructor in Latin and Greek.B. .. Tutor in Latin. 1891 ALICE WALTON. Ohio University of Pennsylvania. 19oo of the City of New York CLIFFORD PEASE CLARK .... Hobart College. 1906. and Ph. Columbia University Columbia University. and Ph.. 1goo. .. 1886 HOWARD HUSTED DOWLIN . College Wesleyan University. B. Vassar College. . Vassar College Vassar College.B. lgog READERS 1 914 of the Latin Language and Literature. and A.M..H. 1892.B.M. 1904 IRVIN JOHN UHRICH. Teacher Vassar College.Y. 19og HELEN IVES HAIGHT .. A.M. A..D. .D. 1898. NELSON GLENN MCCREA.B. and A. .

3. R. reficiatur (line z) in the imperfect subjunctive passive. but answer the questions in order. esse deditum (line 6). 8 3 . temporum (line r4). Conjugate quaeres (line z) in the pluperfect subjunctive active. 7 munem adferre fructum neque in aspectum lucemque proferre. 4. cur tanto opere hoc homine delectemur. LATIN 2-ELEMENTARY PROSE COMPOSITION Thursday .-i p. 5avocarit (line io). Tell in what tense each of the following verbs is. Quaeres a nobis. and why this tense is used: dicamus (line 4). 3). messengers had come to Rome from our allies. 34. 8 quid pudeat. rerum (line 4). What is the gerundive? Explain its use in ad suas res obeundas (line za). quantum denique alveolo. eos (line 5). vivo (line 9). litteris (line 7).Write the accusative' singular of opere (line i). reficiatur (line z). what Lucullus did in Asia? a. temporum (line 114 ). Write all the infinitives of reficiatur (line a). ludorum (line 13)2. mihi (line 115): Tell in what mood each of the following verbs is.. they would have captured their enemy.m. nisi eos doctrina 5' eadem relaxemus ? Ego vero fateor me his studiis esse deditum. despairing of his fortunes.1 LATIN 1-GRAMMAR 914 11914 Wednesday z z . annos (line 9).m. Decline in full nobis (lined). the nominative plural neuter of communem (lines 7. ii. qui tot annos ita vivo. z5)zo. ant ferre animos tantum posse contentionem. 115 a. Tell in what case each of the following words is. the nominative singular neuter of eadem (line 6). excolamus (line 5). Do you ask me. He left behind much gold and silver and very many most beautiful objects. 5. Grati. 8. Ceteros 6 pudeat. tantum mihi egomet ad haec studia recolenda sumpsero ?-Cicero. si qui ita se litteris abdiderunt ut nihil possint ex its neque ad com -. 112. In the year in which he was put in charge of this dangerous war.-i p. he was then threatening the whole province. Translate into Latin: i. ut a nullius umquam me tempore ant commodo ant otium meum abstraxerit ant voluptas avocarit ant denique somnus retardarit ? Qua re quis tandem me reprehendat. naming each. possint (line 7). abstraxerit (line io) in the imperfect subjunctive active.These men had been sent to ask us for help. requiem (line 113). nisi animos nostros doctrina 4' excolamus. indices. abstraxexit (line io): . me autem . and indicate the accent: forensi (line a). fled as swiftly as possible to Tigranes. Do not write a translation of the following passage. fructum (line 8). An to existimas ant suppetere nobis posse quod 3. Write the principal parts of excolamus (line 5). cottidie dicamus in tanta varietate rerum. nullius (line 9). The latter. . abdiderunt (line 7). i5 a. Pro Archia. reficiatur (line a). quantum ad alias voluptates et ad ipsam requiem animi et corporis conceditur temporum.9). possint (line 7). But Lucullus arrived in Asia before the king could accomplish this. 13.m. and why this case is used: nobis (line z). 8).m.The knights also thought that we ought to protect them.Although Mithridates had often been defeated by Roman generals. vivo (line. ' i. Explain the derivation of forensi (line a). Quia suppeditat nobis ubi et animus ex hoc forensi strepitu reficiatur et aures con z vicio defessae conquiescant. mark the quantity of their penults and final syllables. abdiderunt (line 7) in the future indicative active. quantum pil'ae. conquiescant (line 3) in the present imperative active. and why this mood is used: 7delectemur (line i). convicio (lines z. ii. Divide the following words into their syllables..conviviis (lines 9 114. He hoped within a short time to conquer the Roman forces on land and sea. ant quis mihi iure suscenseat. quod (line 3). quantum alii tribuunt tempestivis conviviis. si. quantum ad festos dies ludorum celebrandos. fellow-citizens. If our soldiers had not begun to collect this booty. proferre (line 8). pudeat (line 7). commodo (line io). quantum ceteris ad suas res obeundas. 6.

48. Read the passage through several times before beginning to write. Of what facts is Cicero thinking when he says tam brevi tempore (line 131) ? 5. transiri (line 6) in the i mperfect. maiores (line i).of progressi (line 9). fluminibus (line 9). from pabulari. ut supra demonstratum est. The translation should be exact. Translate into Latin: a) It was reported to the enemy that the supplies that were being brought to Caesar were approaching the river. Sicorim 5 et Cingam. What is the point of the contrast between Cnidum aut Colophonem aut Samum (line 1) and vestros portus (line 2) ? Explain the meaning of quibus vitam ac spiritum ducitis (line 3).' <interrupit. Tell in what mood each of the following verbs is. Ostiense (line 7) ? What is meant by Oceani ostium (line 13) ? 4. cum vestros portus. What force does an vero (line 4) give to a question? pro (line 1o) ? Explain the use of ii (line 12). ` ripeness.' s convexerat. difcillimum (line ii). cum prope inspectantibus vobis classis ea cui consul populi Romani praepositus esset a praedonibus capta atque oppressa est ? Pro di immortales. `were stripped. 1. neutrum horum'transiri poterat. It is important that enough time -be given to II to deal with it satisfactorily. atque eos portus quibus vitam ac spiritum ducitis. write all the infinitives . et civitates exinanitae. consumpserY (line 14) in the future indicative passive. that the river might not be crossed. Translate the following passage. ex Miseno autem eius 5 ipsius liberos qui cum praedonibus antea ibi bellum gesserat a praedonibus esse sublatos ? Nam quid ego Ostiense incommodum atque illam labem atque ignominiam rei-publicae querar. 4• 6. 3. `washed away.m. and answer the questions. 2. decline dalo (line 5) in the feminine plural and qud (line 13) in the masculine singular. Tell in what case each of the following words is.19314 LATIN 3-SECOND YEAR LATIN 1914 Wednesday 9-11 a. 7. Fabius fecerat uno die 3 interrupit 4 Quae res magnas difficultates exercitui Caesaris attulit. `both. necessarioque 6 omnes his angustiis continebantur. essent (line 5).' 1. Miseno (line 5). fuissto~(line 2). quo neque frumenta in hibernis erant neque multum a I i maturitate6 aberant. 9. nobilissimas urbis. By what law was Pompey put in command of the war with the pirates? Describe his previous military achievements. Compare longius~(line 8). quo (line 11). 8 reliqui si. Neque civitates quae ad Caesaris 7 amicitiam accesserant frumentum supportare neque ii qui pabulatums longius S progressi erant intexclusi fluminibus reverti neque maximi commeatus qui 9 ex Italia Galliaque venigbant in casts perverure poterant. tantamne unius hominis incredibilis ac 10 divina virtus tam brevi tempore lucem adferre rei publicae potuit ut vos qui modo ante ostium Tiberinum classem hostium videbatis. spatio milium xxx. veniebant (line Io) in the perfect indicative active.] Tanta enim tempestas cooritur ut numquam illis locis maiores agqas 1 fuisse constaret Tum autem ek omnibus montibus hives= proluit' ac siimmas 2 ripas flumiriis superavit pontisque ambos3 quos C. 33. What four things does Cicero enumerate in this speech as the chief qualifica- tions of an imperator ? the passage above? what year? Which of these qualifications is he illustrating in In 3. innumerabilisque alias captas esse commemorem.' 6 maturitate. 8. and why this mood is used: constaret (line 2).-De Bello Civili. LATIN 4-CICERO (MANILIAN LAW AND ARCHIAS) AND SIGHT TRANSLATION OF PROSE Thursday 9-11 a. i. quid 13 fuerat. 14 = hives. reliqui 2. m. What form of the verb is pabulatum (line 8) ? What idea does this form express ? Write out the Latin words for which C. Translate the following passages. b) When they received that news. What part of speech is 8 5 . supply erant.' 2proluit.7 quod Afranius paene omne 12 frumentum ante Caesaris adventum Ilerdam convexerat.' s pabulatum. subjunctive active. Caesar superioribus diebus consumpserat. Cnidum aut Colophonem aut Samum. but in clear and natural English. Cas4 tra enim.(line 3). Tell in what tense each of the following verbs is. Decline in fu~ l lod (line i). and why this case is used: aquas (line 1). constaret (line 2). in praedonum fuisse potestate sciatis? An vero ignoratis portum Caietae celeberrimum ac plenissimum navium inspectante praetore a praedonibus esse direptum. montibus (line 2). fecerat. ii nunc nullam intra Oceani ostium praedonum navem esse audiatis ?-Pro Lege Manilia. (line 3) and xx~ (line 6) stand. ` to forage. Tempus erat io autem difficillimum.. Where were the places referred to in Samum (line 1). `had conveyed. cum essent inter flumina duo. and name each. `snow.' 7 exinanitae. milium (line 6). c) The danger was so great that our men did not dare to resist them. they sent horsemen.' 3ambos. (line 13). [A storm causes serious inconvenience to Caesar's forces. . The translation should be exact. but in clearand natural English. `broke down. and why this tense is used: cooritur (line i). Ilerdam (line 13). Conjugate attuM (line 4) in the present indicative active. and answer the questions.

equivalent to hiemandi causa. ac primo efficit ut ad se conloquendi gratia occultus6 veniat. How does the goddess show her pity at the close of Book IV? c) Explain the reference in Saturnius (verse 372). Eiectum litore. but in clear and natural English. " =defecerant. Huius in adventum iam n. Augustus Caesar. egentem excepi et regni demens in parte locavi. 'bail. si Iugurtham vivum aut necatum sibi tradidisset. `the Numidian'. pete regna per undas. Scilicet is superis labor est. It is important that enough time be given to II tc deal with it satisfactorily. omnibus umbra locis adero. `secretly. . cum frigida mors anima seduxerit artus.' 6 occultus. Dabis.inc et Caspia regna responsis horrent divomet Maeotia tellus. multis pollicitationibus adgreditur.'of a faithless disposition. 'Cum . extra anni solisque vias. nee Saturnius haec oculis pater aspicit aequis. ubi caelifer Atlas axem umero torquet stellis ardentibus aptum). g) Copy verse 373 and 383. I. Nusquam tuta fides. Igitur Bomilcarem. et haec Manis veniet mihi fama sub imos. quod ei per maximam amicitiam maxima copia fallendi erat. super et Garamantas et Indos proferet imperium (facet extra sidera tellus. Bomilcar is meant. aurea condet saecula qui rursus Latio regnata per arva Saturno quondam. divi genus. AND IV OR VI) AND SIGHT TRANSLATION OF POETRY Thursday 2-4 P. nunc Lyciae sortes. qui Romae cum lugurtha fuerat et inde vadibus4 datis de Massivae neces iudicium fugerat. sequere Italiam ventis. Neque to teneo. ea cura quietos sollicitat. Under I. . [Metellus takes steps to entrap Jugurtha. improbe. ipse per condiciones ad supplieium traderetur Sallust. ab Zama discedit et in its urbibus quae ad se defecerant= satisque munitae loco aut moenibus erant praesidia imponit. si pax cum $omanis fieret. m. 371 -387. supplicia hausurum scopulis. 87 795 86 . 3tendere. poenas. the division into feet. amissam classem.' 2 hiemandi gratia. et. si quid pia numina possunt. cum$ 9 ingenio infido tum metuen# ne. Sequar atris ignibus absens. . Spero equidem mediis. Lyciae sortes (verse 377). et nomine Dido saepe vocaturum.1). and answer the questions on the passage translated.' 7 Numidae." iv. " Hic vir. Translate also II. i. 'both . sed quondam armis bellpm p_arum. The translation should be exact.' LATIN 5-VERGIL (AENEID. tibi quem promitti saepius audis. Neque id tempus ex ~liorum more quieti aut luxuriae concedit. neque dicta refello. De Bello Iugurthino.. facile Numidae7 persuadet. tum. `murder. . and' 9ingenio infido.' 4 vadibus. nunc et love missus ab ipso • interpres divom fert horrida iussa per auras. deinde fide data.' a nece. Heu furiis incensa feror! Nunc augur Apollo. 61. fore ut illi senatus impunitatem et sua omnia concederet. 'lay. socios a morte reduxi. i. . `had gone over. II. neque Iugurtham nisi ex insidiis aut suo loco pugnam facere. interpres divom (verse 378). ceterum exercitum in provinciam quae proxima est Numidiae hiemandi gratiaa conlocat. Where was Lycia? d) Describe the scene in Book I to which the words socios a morte reduxi (verse 375) refer. translate either -z or 2. hic est. and indicate the quantity of each syllable. and the principal caesuras. 2. et iam aestatem exactam esse. insidias regi per amicos tendere3 et eorum perfidia pro armis uti parat. To what does amissam refer? e) What part does the guidance of Apollo (verse 376) play in the life of Aeneas ? What is meant by is (verse 379) ? f) Explain the meaning of pia in connection with numina (verse 382) ? Give a literal translation of°hausurum (verse 383) and explain the metaphor. 375 380 385 a) Under what circumstances were these words spoken? b) State two reasons why it is natural for Dido to thin first of Juno (verse 37. Audiam. "Quae quibus anteferam ? lam iam nee maxuma Iuno. procedebat.1914 Read the passage through several times before beginning to write the translation.] Metellus postquam videt neque oppidum capi.

to Dardana solum vitaa tremit pubes. What is the poet's conception of the mission of Rome? What revelation of the future was granted to Aeneas in the lower world? How is the thought expressed in verses 8o6-807 related to the verses that f) precede ? g) Copy verses 796 and 797. Explain the form divom (verse 799). [The Trojans mourn Hector. 'deliver. Mirantur Danaurn proceres. Read the passage through several times before beginning to write the translation. c) What and where were Latio (verse 793). Friday 805 Translate into Latin: a) Under what circumstances were these words spoken? b) Explain the reference in divi (verse 792). 2querelas. would he now be worthy of our praise? . 'casting himself down. 800 1914 LATIN 6-ADVANCED PROSE COMPOSITION 11. Nec vero Alcides tantum telluris obivit. Liber. 'nails. m. 'complaints.I Fundit miseranda querelas' infelix Hecube3 saevisque arat unguibus4 ora. ruit et defessa senectus adflicti miseranda patris.' mitissimus.' Were. Do you remember what Cicero said in the last part oGthe speech which he delivered= for the Manilian Law when he was praetor? He promised Manilius that he would use all the ability that he had to defend the honor of the state and the safety of its allies. qui pampineis victor iuga flectit habenis. 3'advocate. 88 4un-. Saturno (verse 794). and indicate the quantity of each syllable. miratur et ipse Aeacides animum miseri senis.' . Ausonia terra (verse 807) ? d) In what respect is the order of the words aurea condet saecula qui rursus (verses 792-793) poetical? Name and explain the figure of speech used in verse 799. But although this was so. aut Erymanthi pacarit nemora. et Lernam tremefecerit arcu.15 a. heu tanto spoliata virol Ruit omnis in uno Hectore causa Phrygum. Et dubitamus adhuc virtutem extendere factis. he did not hesitate to say that no one could prevent him from advocating3 the plan which he believed to be the best for the republic.' praeferre. agens celso Nysae de vertice tigris. 'lamentation. Andromacheque suas scindit de pectore vestes. ¢2 KT n e T%iil - r. et patris adflicti genibus miserere precantis donaque quae porto miseri pro corpore nati accipias. quem nec sua coniunx turbaque natorum nec'magni gloria regni oblitum tenuit vitae. to sensit nostra senectus crudelem nimium. Atlas (verse 79 6). Hecube. 2 `put above."-Ilias Latina. totaque maesto Troia sonat planctu. quin iret inermis et solum invicti castris se redderet hostis.' . Nunc sis mitissimus. e) Account for Vergil's attitude toward Augustus as indicated in this passage. 6 5 adfusus.with the people. tendens ad sidera palmas haec ait: "O Graiae gentis fortissime Achilles. 1015-1034. aut metus Ausonia prohibet consistere terra ? " vi. the division into feet.-i p.] Flent miseri amissum Phryges Hectora. nec. 89 ' planctu. King Priam begs Achilles to give him the body of his son.' guibus. fixerit aeripedem cervam licet. Cicero himself. O regnis inimice meis. however. . 791-807. m.' suadere.et septemgemini turbant trepida ostia Nili. equivalent to Hecuba. There were some to whom Cicero seemed to be putting' his own interests above' the' Weare of his country. Ille trementes. and the principal caesuras. If he had not done this. adfususs genibus. These men thought that he was praising Pompey because the latter had so much influence. was afr id~~l[~ in urging the Romans to put all their hopes in Pompey alone.b oro. equivalent to lenissimus. Caspia regna (verse 798). he had incur the hatred of many powerful citizens.

qui ad hunc modum locuti: non se existimare Romanos sine ope divina bellum gerere. despoliaret (line 8). multis de causis Caesar statuit sibi Rhenum esse transeundum. Cum bellum civitas aut inlatum defendit aut infect. Quae ubi convenit ac primum ab hostibus visa est.(line ii). and why this case is used: oppidis (line r). transisse (line q). z. Quaecumque ad proximi diei oppugnationem opus sunt noctu comparantur. 91 . c) Tell in what mood and tense each of the following verbs is. interfuisse (line 7). Sibi omnes fere finitimos esse inimicos ac suae virtuti invidere. ope (line 3). Ubi vero turrim moveri et appropinquare moenibus viderunt. c) Write the principal parts of miserunt (line 2).-v. necis (line 6). Noctu ex materia quam munitionis causa comportaverant turres admodum exx excitantur incredibili celeritate. quarum illa fuit iustissima.-vi. non aegris. expulsos agris finitimos cedere neque quemquam prope audere consistere. magnis propositis praemiis si pertulissent. post fugam suorum se trans Rhenum in finis Sugambrorum receperat seque cum its coniunxerat. m. exspectandam (line insisterent (line 9). Tell in what mood and tense each of the following verbs is. Tell in what tense possent (line 5) is. b) Decline hoc (line 4) in the neuter. maioribus (line 5). classi (line 6). statuit exspectandam classem. 2. ubi intellexit frustra tantum laborem sumi neque hostium fugam coatis oppidis reprimi neque his noceri posse. 9o a) Tell in what case each of the following words is. c) Conjugate expulsos (line 2) in the pluperfect indicative active. Hostes postero die multo maioribus coactis 5 copiis castra oppugnant. statuisset Aduatucos esse conservandos. suis quoque rebus eos timore voluit. S. operi (line 4). invidere (line 9). and tell what the suffix denotes in the last word. die (line 5). profectae (line 5). quae deesse operi videbantur perficiuntur. d) Tell' in what case each of the following words is. Unum 5 petere ac deprecari: si forte pro sua clementia ac mansuetudine. Translate three of the following passages. impelli (line 3). fossam complent. se suaque omnia eorum potestati permittere dixerunt. 16. coactis (line 5). Nulla pars nocturni temporis ad laborem intermittitur.1 LATIN B-CAESAR Wednesday 914 g-r r a. and why this case is used: rebus (line 3). and why this mood and tense are used: transeundum (line 2). comportaverant (line 3). a) Compare latissime (line z). ne se armis despoliaret. proelio (line q). d) Conjugate confecto (line i) in the pluperfect subjunctive active. e) Compare postero (line 5). and why this mood and tense are used: praesint (line 6). non vulneratis facultas quietis datur. quibus (line q). circiter ecxx naves eorum paratissimae atque omni genere armorum omatissimae profectae ex portu nostris 5 adversae constiterunt. c) Explain the derivation of praeerat (line 6). quam supra commemoravi praedandi frumentandique causa Mosam transisse neque proelio interfuisse. d) Conjugate videbantur (line 5) in the present subjunctive active. qua (line q). constabat quid agerent aut quam rationem pugnae insisterent.-ii.-iv. 14.Germanico bello confecto. visa est (line 4).Mittuntur ad Caesarem confestim ab Cicerone litterae. locuti (line 3). e) What is the force of the prefix in confecto (line i). 3. a quibus se defendere traditis armis non possent. but in clear and natural English. and why this mood is used: possent (line 5). venirent (line 3). and why this tense is used. facultas (line 9). vel tribunis militum centurionibusque. qui tantae altitudinis machinationes tanta celeritate promovere possent. Civitatibus maxima laus est quam latissime circum se vastatis finibus solitudines habere. Hoc proprium virtutis existimant. obsessis omnibus viis missi. voluit (line 4) in the imperfect subjunctive. d) Decline moenibus (line i).-iii. and why this case is used: infamiam (line 9). quam ipsi ab aliis audirent. b) Tell in what case each of the following words is. quod. Latrocinia nullam habent infamiam. tutiores (line 4). magistratus qui 5 ei bello praesint. f) Compare facile (line 3). intercipiuntur. cum intellegerent et posse et audere populi Romani exercitum Rhenum transire. 4. ut vitae necisque habeant potestatem deliguntur. Accessit etiam quod illa pars equitatus 5 Usipetum et Tencterorum. io a) Explain the derivation of obsessis (line 2). e) Conjugate noceri (line 3) in the present subjunctive active. quibus singulae naves erant attributae. and why this c) mood and tense are used: pertulissent (line 2). and why this case is used: praemiis (line 2). d) Tell in what mood and tense each of the following verbs is. complent (line 6) in the future indicative active. b) Write the principal parts of confecto (line i). Hoc idem reliquis deinceps fit diebus. simul hoc se fore tutiores arbitrantur repentinae incursionis timore sublato. qui classi praeerat. fceri . desidiae (line io). ius (line 8). 40. The translation should be exact. present indicative of intellexit (line r). audirent (line q). cum videret Germanos tam facile impelli ut in Galliam venirent. equitatus (line 5). and answer the questions on the passages chosen. neque satis Bruto. celeritate (line 4). nova atque inusitata specie commoti legatos ad Caesarem de pace miserunt. and why this case is used: altitudinis (line 4). 23. potestati (line 5). quae extra finis cuiusque civitatis fiunt. e) Tell in what mood each of the following verbs is. Ab nostris eadem ratione qua pridie resistitur. Compluribus expugnatis oppidis Caesar. a) Write the first person singular. a) Change to the direct form se suaque omnia eorum potestati permittere (line 5)b) Tell in what case each of the following words is. 31. sed principas regionum atque pagorum inter suos ius dicunt controversiasque minuunt. In pace nullus est communis magistratus. e) Tell in what mood and tense each of the following verbs is. praedandi (line 6). and why this mood and tense are used: intellexit (line r). atque ea iuventutis exercendae ac desidiae minuendae io causa fieri praedicant. b) Tell in what case each of the following words is.

Opimius (line r). qui esset annus decimus post virginum absolutionem. iudices. 6) ? d) What were the fatis Sibyllinis (line 5). Census nostros requiris. To what meeting does introducti (line r) refer ? b) Who were Lentulo (line i). Cinnam (line 7). Opimius aut C. Lucullo pro consule. Neque enim posset aut Ahala ille Servilius aut P. ii. Marius aut me consule senatus non nefarius haberi. Hominem sum secutus privato consilio. to a) By what law was Pompey put in command of the war with the pirates? In what year ? Describe his previous military achievements. a) What is meant by hoc ordine (line 7). ipso belo (line 7) ? Who is meant by hominem (line 3) ? b) Explain the significance of togae (line a). tantumque apud me grati animi fidelis memoria valuit ut nulla non modo cupiditate sed ne spe quidem. cum eodem quaestore fuisse in Asia. ex Miseno autem 5 eius ipsius liberos qui cum praedonibus antea ibi bellum gesserat a praedonibus esse sublatos ? Nam quid ego Ostiense incommodum atque illam labem atque ignominiam rei publicaje querar. nullam populi partem esse censam. Iulio et Crasso. c) Put Cicero's argument in the sentence beginning quod si (lines 6. 15. Cnidum aut Colophonem aut Samum. semperque mea consilia pacis et togae socia. Quod si duodecim tabulae nocturnum furem quoquo modo. Cassio esse praescriptum. 4. innumerabilisque alias captas esse commemorem. est enim obscurum proximis censoribus hunc cum clarissimo imperatore L. post Capitoli autem incensionem vicesimus. atque eos portus quibus vitam ac spiritum ducitis. ut equitatum in Italiam quam primum mitterent. 9. cum videat aliquando gladium nobis ad hominem occidendum ab ipsis porrigi legibus ? ro Pro Milone.1 a. In Catilinam. quoquo modo quis interfectus sit.ro rum iudicio revincetur. What was the periculo (line 8) ? c) Explain what Cicero meant in the sentence beginning hominem sum secutus (line 3). 9-11 92 Thursday LATIN C-CICERO 914 a) What was the object of the Roman census (line i) ? How often was one made? In what sense is primis (line 3) used? b) What force does scilicet (line i) give to the sentence? c) What war was being fought at the time indicated by quaestore (line 3) ? Who was the Roman commander in this war? In what capacity was Archias apud exercitum (line a) ? d) What is the point of Cicero's argument in the sentence beginning sed quoniam (line 4) ? Explain the meaning of in beneficiis ad aerarium delatus est (line 9). si quae potes. pedestris sibi copias non defuturas. est ?-Pro Lege Manilia. numquam enim hic neque suo neque amico. 14. 8. in praedonum fuisse potestate sciatis ? An vero ignoratis portum Caietae celeberrimum ac plenissimum navium inspectante praetore a praedonibus esse direptum. its temporibus quern to criminaris ne ipsius quidem iudicio in civium Romanorum iure esse versatum. non belli atque armorum fuerunt. and deae (line 6). Scilicet. t. but in clear and natural English. prudens et sciens tamquam ad interitum rdPrem volun. primis. Itaque hoc. the Capitoli (line 9) ? Who were the virginum (line 9) ? 3. Quod quidem meum consilium minime obscurum fuit. Introducti autem Galli ius iurandum sibi et litteras ab Lentul _. Pro Archia. and answer the questions on the passages chosen. superioribus.etnego. quis est qui. Nasica aut L. Lentulum autem sibi confirmasse a fatis Sibyllinis haruspicumque responsis se esse tertium 5 illum Cornelium ad quem regnum huius urbis atque imperium pervenire esset necesse. si sceleratos civis interfici nefas esset. iii. Ex quo nemo iarn erit tam iniustus existimator serum qui dubitet quae Caesaris de bello voluntas fuerit.. cum prope inspectantibus vobis classis ea cui consul populi Romani praepositus esset a praedonibus capta atque oppressa. Ostiense (line 7) ? c) What is the point of the contrast between Cnidum aut Colophonem aut Samum (line r) and vestros portus (line a) ? Explain the meaning of quibus vitam ac spiritum ducitis (line 3).Neque enim ego illa nec ulla umquam secutus sum arma civilia. nobilissimas urbis. Marius (line z). interfici impune voluerunt. ceteris fuerit iratior. non publico. diurnuzn autem si se telo defenderet. d) What were the duodecim tabulae (line 7) ? 5. Cinnam ante se et Sullam fuisse. senatus (line a). m. puniendum putet. eum qui patris ulciscendi causa matrem necavisset variatis hominum sententtis non 5 solum divina sed etiam sapientissimae deae sententia liberatum. d) What force does an vero (line 4) give to a question ? Z. i. The translation should be exact. Miseno (line 5). Sullam (line 7) ? c) What is meant by tertium illum Cornelium (lines 5. i o Pro Marcello. cum pacis auctores conservandos statim censucrit. Lucullo apud exercitum fuisse. patris (line 4). Sed quoniam census non ius civitatis confirmat ac tantum modo indicat eum qui sit census ita se 5 iam turn gessisse pro Give. and'in the sentence beginning ex quo nemo (line 8). Nasica (line i). d) In whaf year was this speech delivered? To whom was it addressed? What was the occasion? 93 . !' b) Tell the story to which allusion is made in the sentence beginning itaque hoc (line 3).5 tarium. b) Where were the places referred to in Samum (line r). a) Explain the reference to Ahala (line i). Quaere argumenta. ro a) Who were the Galli mentioned in line r ? Give an account of their connection with the conspiracy. atque ita sibi ab his et a T. non sine causa etiam fictis fabulis doctissimi homines memoriae prodiderunt. Translate any three of the following passages. eundemque dixisse fatalem hunc annum esse ad interitum huius urbis atqb `imperi. giving the names of eum (line 4). Statilio ad suam gentem data esse dixerunt. Nam et in hoc ordine integra re multa de pace dixi et in ipso bello eadem etiam cum capitis mei periculo sensi. 9. 7) in the fewest and simplest words. et testamentum saepe fecit nostris legibus et adiit hereditates civium Romanorum et in beneficiis ad aerarium delatus est a L. 33. cum vestros portus.

Why was Italy called Hesperiam (verse 185) ? What is the literal meaning of canebat (verse 183) ? Why is it an appropriate word in this place? Who was Cassandra? To what misfortune of hers does verse 187 refer? Name in order the places mentioned in Book III at which Aeneas landed. sin manibus vestris vestram ascendisset in urbem. sola mihi talis casus Cassandra canebat. Nec vero Alcides tantum telluris obivit. Write the longer form of pacarit (verse 803)e) Account for Vergil's attitude toward Augustus as indicated in this passage. should be exact. 185 Sed quis ad Hesperiae venturos litora Teucros crederet ? Aut quern turn vates Cassandra moveret ? Cedamus Phoebo et moniti meliora sequamur. agens celso Nysae de vertice tigris. BOOKS I-VI Thursday Translate the following passages. Explain the allusion in Pelopea (verse 193)e) To whom does ipsum (verse I9o) refer? What reason had the speaker given for hating this man? f) How is Book II of the Aeneid related to Books I and III? g) Copy verses 19o and rgr. 18o seque novo veterum deceptum errore locorum. 8o5 Et dubitamus adhuc virtutem extendere factis. fixerit aeripedem cervam licet. et septemgemini turbant trepida ostia Nili. a) Under what circumstances were these words spoken ? b) Explain fully the reference in Palladio (verse 183)- "Huius in adventum iam nunc et Caspia regna responsis horrent divom et Maeotia tellus. qui pampineis victor iuga flectit habenis. and answer the questions on them. Liber. 18o-188. nec."-iii. ultro Asiam magno Pelopea ad moenia bello venturam. 11 914 2-4 p. saepe Itala regna vocare. Iliacis exercite fatis. Turn memorat: "Nate. turn magnum exitium (quod di prius omen in ipsum I9o convertant') Priami imperio Phrygibusque futurum. but in clear and natural English. and indicate the quantity of each syllable. d) Explain the form divom (verse 799). et nostros ea fata manere nepotes. et saepe Hesperiam.LATIN D-VERGIL'S AENEID. m. 798-807. 183-194. d) Make clear the meaning of verse 188. and the principal caesuras. the division into feet. Nam si vestra manus violasset dona Minervae."-ii. aut metus Ausonia prohibet consistere terra? "-vi. Ausonia terra (verse 807) ? c) Explain the three allusions in verses 802 and 803. Under what circumstances were the words in verses 182-188 spoken? Write the principal parts of canebat (verse 183). De recipi portis aut duci in moenia possit. Nunc repeto haec generi portendere debita nostro. a) Under what circumstances were these words spoken? b) What and where were Caspia regna (verse 798). What part did Phoebus (verse 188) play in the wanderings of Aeneas ? a) b) c) d) e) f) g) QK . Hanc tamen immensam Calchas attollere molem 185 roboribus textis caeloque educere iussit. pro numine laeso efigiem statuere. et Lernam tremefecerit arcu. The translation "Hanc pro Palladio moniti. f) How is the thought expressed in verses 8o6 and 807 related to the verses that precede ? g) What revelation of the future was granted to Aeneas in the lower world? c) What poetical construction is used in verse 186 ? Change it to the corresponding prose construction. aut Erymanthi pacarit nemora. neu populum antiqua sub religione tueri. nefas quae triste piaret. Agnovit prolem ambiguam geminosque parentes.

The translation should be exact. a city in Campania. but in clear and. 7fusas stratasque. non ut ad insequentem.] Ignosce. vel evocatus ut is qui senatui parere didicisset postremo lenit ut ad fugientem. quos captos nobis remisisti. ut socios haberes.' + comitas. ad quem cum di atque homines omnia ornamenta congessissent. Neque enim. m.' At hercule non solum incolumi et victore sed praesente te. Read the passage through several times before beginning to write the translation. Read the passage through several times before beginning to write the translation. 13. ' disasters. praesidiumque miseris simul nobis et Nolae ademeris. equivalent to vagantes. ei facile esse ducam opprimere populatores nostros vagose sine signis palatos9 quo quemque trahit quamvis vana praedae spes. [ Hannibal's Italian allies reproach him for his failure to come to their assistance. cum ploratumb prope coniugum ac liberorum nostrorum exaudire et flagrantia tecta posses conspicere.. ignosce. Postquam its parum fidebamus. quanta in omni genere bellorum gloria. Pompey bella. The translation should be exact. tum to ipse plurima et maxima. 'routed and overthrown. Pompey memoriam amisimus. 'right. tuos enumerare non possumus. vel arcessitus ut socius. 41.] r 1. Nn verum etiam familiaritate coniunctus. non Hannibal vicisse ad Cannas videatur. id est ad periculi.LATIN M-ELEMENTARY SIGHT TRANSLATION OF PROSE Thursday 1914 1914 LATIN P-ADVANCED SIGHT TRANSLATION OF PROSE Thursday 9-11 a. Itaque legati ad Hannibalem missi simul ex utraque gente ita Poenum adlocuti sunt: "Hostes populi Romani. but in clear and natural English.15 a. quae. xxiii. Ad eum igitur rex Deiotarus venit hoc misero fatalique bello. ' not' 96 97 . Pyrrho regi nos adiunximus.' . si fass est dici. non ad victoriae societatem. idcirco Cn. Tua nos non magis virtus fortunaque quam unica3 comitas4 ac benignitas erga cives nostros.' 3 unica. Marcellus. nisi."-Livy. 'singular. nostrae vires nos tutari poterant. si eius viri auctoritati rex Deiotarus cessit. y Eadem aestate Marcellus ab Nola . ita conciliavit tibi ut to salvo atque incolumi amico non modo populum Romanum sed ne deos quidem iratos. Quantum nomen illius fuerit. m. ita sumus aliquotiens hac aestate devastati ut M. consulatus'admirantes numerab~amus. victorias.' s fas. Causa autem haec est. Hannibal. ' wailing. fuimusque in ea per annos prope quinquaginta ad id tempus quo tip in Italiam venisti. quocum erat non hospitio solum. si modo quos. quanti honores populi Romani. Cicero.' 6 ploratum. 9 palatos. 4r 'Nola. 'to wander. et venit vel rogatus ut amicus.' iohaud. quis ignorat ? Tanto ille superiores vicerat gloria quanto to omnibus praestitisti. fuimus primum per nos ipsi. triumphos.' 8 vagos. quem antea iustis hostilibusque bellis'adiuverat. omnis sub signis militat tuis.Numidarum paucorum illi quidem praeda erunt. 12. adeoque omnia ferro atque igni vastavit ut antiquarum cladium2 memoriam renovaret. si domi esset. timeremus. Pro Rege Deiotaro.natural English. crebras excursiones in agrum Hirpinum et Samnites fecit. quanti senatus. m. a quo relicti pacem necessariam accepimus. . quoad nostra arma. si tuae res gestae cete rorum laudibus obscuritatem attulerunt. tutaretur. `courtesy. quem nos omnes secuti sumus. Caesar. dignos duxisti. haud=° indignos iudicas quos in fidem receptos tuearis. 2 stadium.-1 p. from palari. [Cicero praises Pompey in order to justify the course adopted by Deiotarus. Itaque Cn. a quo tot alies Romanas fusas stratasque7 esse sciam. quanti tui. quantae opes. quod neque to defendis et rostra iuventus. quam praesidio obtinebat. Nec to nec exercitum tuum norim.

1

LATIN Q-SIGHT TRANSLATION OF POETRY

914

Thursday 2-4 P. m. Read the passage through several times before beginning to write the translation. The translation should be exact, but in clear and natural English. [ The Trojans mourn Hector. King Priam begs Achilles to give him the body of his son. The funeral is described.] Flent miseri amissum Phryges Hectora, totaque maesto Troia sonat planctui. Fundit miseranda querelas2 infelix Hecube 3 saevisque arat unguibus4 ora, Andromacheque suas scindit de pectore vestes, heu tanto spoliata viro ! Ruit omnis in uno Hectore causa Phrygum; ruit et defessa senectus adflicti miseranda patris, quem nec sua comunx tubbaque natorum nec magni gloria regni oblitum tenuit vitae, quin iret inermis et solum invicti castris se redderet hostis. Mirantur Danaum proceres, miratur et ipse Aeacides animum miseri senis. Ille trementes, adfususs genibus, tendens ad sidera palmas haec ait: "O Graiae gentis fortissime Achilles, O regnis inimice meis, to Dardana solum vitaa tremit pubes, to sensit nostra senectus crudelem nimium. Nunc sis mitissimus,b oro, et patris adflicti genibus miserere pacantis donaque quae porto miseri pro corpore nati accipiasesi nec precibus nec flecteris auro, in senis extremis tua dextera saeviat annis; saltem scaevar pater comitabor funera nati. Non vitam mihi nec magnos concede favores, sea funus crudele mei. Miserere parentis et pater esse meo mitis de vulnere disce. Hectoris interitu vicisti Dardana regna, vicisti Priamum; sortis reminisceres victor humanae variosque ducum to respice casus." His tandem precibus grandaevum motus Achilles adlevat a terra corpusque exsangue parenti reddidit Hectoreum, post haec sua dona reportat. It patriam Priamus tristisque ex more suorum comparat exsequias 9 supremaque funera ducit. Turn pyra construitur, quo bis sex corpora Graium quadrupedesque adduntur equi currusque tubaeque et clipei galeaeque ocreaeque=° Argivaque tela. Haec super ingenti r ,~-,I mitu componitur Hector. g Ilias Latina, 1015-1051. 3 Hecube, equivalent to Hecuba._ 4 ungui2 querelas, `complaints.' I planclu, `lamentation.' bus, ` nails. 5 adfusus, ` casting himself down.' 6 Milissimus, equivalent to lenissimus. 7scaeva, , mournful.' areminiscere, `remember.' 9exsequias, `obsequies.' I°ocreae, ` greaves.' 98

MATHEMATICS

99

Algebra

EXAMINERS
3; 914

LEWIS

PARKER SICELOFF, Assistant Professor of Mathematics, Columbia University Central College, A.B., igoo ; Columbia University, Ph.D., 1912

FREDERICK SHENSTONE WOODS, Professor of Mathematics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Wesleyan University, A.B., 1885, and A.M., 1888; University of Gottingen, Ph.D., 1894

WILLIAM SPENCER, Master in Mathematics, Lawrenceville School, Lawrenceville, N. J. Williams College, A.B., 1902

CHARLES RANALD MACINNES, Assistant Professor, Preceptor in Mathematics, Princeton University Queen's University, M.A., 1896; Johns Hopkins University, Ph.D., rgoo

WILLIAM ALLEN FRANCIS, Wentworth Professor of Mathematics, Phillips Exeter Academy, Exeter, N.H. Brown University, A.B., 1882, and A.M., 1885

READERS 1914
CHARLES RANALD MACINNES, Assistant Professor, Preceptor in Mathematics, Princeton University Queen's University, M.A., 1896; Johns Hopkins University, Ph.D., rgoo

EDWARD BLANCHARD CHAMBERLAIN, Teacher of Mathematics, Franklin School, New York, N.Y. Bowdoin College, A.B., 1899; Brown University, A.M., lgor

ELIZABETH BUCHANAN COWLEY, Assistant Professor of Mathematics, Vassar College 19o8 Vassar College, A.B., igo1, and A.M., 1902; Columbia University, Ph.D.,

Roy

DE MILLE FULLERTON . . . . . Lecturer in Mathematics, McGill University Mount Allison University, A.B., 1903; Harvard University, A.M., lgog

ISLAY FRANCIS MCCORMICK, Master in Mathematics, Albany Academy, Albany,

N.Y.
Bowdoin College, A.B., rgoo; Harvard University, A.B., 1902 100 lot

1

914

1

914

MATHEMATICS A-ELEMENTARY ALGEBRA COMPLETE
Monday No extra credit will be given for more than six questions.
GROUP

MATHEMATICS AI-ALGEBRA TO QUADRATICS
Monday No extra credit will be given for more than six questions.
GROUP A.

9-11 a. m.

A.

(Answer both questions of this group.) 2mx+6ny-my-12nx, 6x2 +11x-10, x4 -a1x+bx 3 -a 1b. c3+ y3 c4 +c2y2+y4 (c -fy) 2 (c- y)2 =L c3-y3 X e2-y2] -1$1/3-61/108+121+31+5 3.
3

(Answer both questions of this group.) 2mx+6ny-my-12nx, 6x2 +11x-10, X4_ a3x+bx3-a3b. c4+c2..2+„A C3+y3 (C+y)

1. a) Factor

1. a) Factor

b) Simplify

1-

b) Simplify

1-

(c - y)2 - L
-

1- 3

C

Y

X

c -y

z

2

I~

-

2. a) Simplify and combine

2.

a) Solve b) Solve

s

x

3(xFl)

+4(4x 5)=4 - s(x+1).

-

b) Rationalize the denominator and simplify

7a-x 3x-5a b-3a+4 _ 3b-a
GROUP

B.

(Answer both questions of this group.) 1.6x-2.05y=0.39, 5.2x+4.ly =3.42.

GROUP

B.

3. a) Solve

(Answer both questions of this group.) 2x+y = -2 , 2 2xy-y +6x+g=0.

3. a) Solve for x and y
Verify your answers. b) Simplify and combine: 1/ -181/3-61 108-}-121+31+ 5 3 3. 4. a) Solve
-0.

Associate properly the values of x and y. 2x+1.+2 2xx 1 -3 , b) Solve

x +y =4c +d
2

2

, 1/x+1 1 +1 x 1~3-1/2 3. 1/2+7 (Omit one question of this group.) 5. A mixture of alcohol and water contains 10 gals. A certain amount of water is added and the alcohol is then 30 per cent of the total. Had double the amount of water been added, the alcohol would have been 20'per cent of the whole. How much water was actually added and how much alcohol is there ? 6. Two points move at constant rates along the circumference of a circle whose length is 150 ft. When they move in opposite directions, they meet every 5 seconds, and when they move in the same direction, they are together every 25 seconds. What are their. rates ? 7. 146 francs are worth as much as 117 shillings. A dollar and 4 francs are together worth 32 cents more than 6 shillings. Find the values in cents of a franc and a shilling.
GROUP C. 103

4. a) Solve . 2cd Associate properly the values of x and y. . 2 2 b) If b : c=5 : 3 in the equation x +bx+c =0, are the roots of the equation real? Give the reason for your answer. (Omit one question of this group.) 5. At his usual rate a man can row 15 miles downstream in 5 hours less time than it takes him to return. Could he double his rate, his time downstream would be only one hour less than his time up. What is his usual rate in still water and what is the rate of the current? 6. The second term of an arithmetic progression is j of the 8th and the sum of 20 terms is 63. Find the progression. 7. a) Graph y=1+3x2 .
GROUP C.

xy

b) ' Rationalize the denominator and simplify

b) In the expansion of tains

Ox - 3x.11/

find the term which, when simplified, con-

A
102

) a b) Find the sum of the reciprocals of the roots of 5x -3x -2x-{-7=0. 8. a) Solve ¢x2+6xy+2x-6y+1=0. . m. Find to two decimal places the root of x4 -x 3 -9x'+4x-}-6=0 which lies between 3 and 4.) 3. Three men A. what can you say about the signs and the reality of its roots? 3 b) Graph y=x -4x-}-2 and determine between what consecutive integers lie the roots of the equation x3 -4x+2=0. m. (Answer both questions of this group.15 a. -7 -5 3 1 7 9 4 -2 6 3. y.496 feet. and 4x-}-3 are in arithmetic progression. 5. 2x ~ z=3. yi y2 y3 X1 X2 - 1 _2__ 5 6x-5a a a-6x X2 x3 y1-y2 y2 - y3 2x+y-2=0. In the expansion of is 4 : 1. of 8x4 +24x3 -x-3=0. using the same axes. B. a) Approximate to two decimal places the roots of 2 4 -0 3x-3 +1+ 2x-3 . and estimate from the graphs the solutions of the equations. 2 4.) 1 1.-1 p. 2. a) How many triangles can be drawn with each vertex in one of twenty given points. (Omit one question of this group. and C can do a piece of work together in 1 hour and 20 minutes. his time would have been 20 minutes less. ~Vx-}-2) the ratio of the 4th term to the 5th term 7. How long would it take each to do the work alone? GROUP C. A man walked 12 miles at a certain rate and then 6 miles farther at a rate z mile an hour faster. a) Find the value of (2+3i) where i= 1+2i -1. Plot 2x-3y=6 and 2y+1=4x-4x 2. What is the circumference of each wheel? 5. y+4z = 2. Plot the 6. b) Solve 1. complex roots. Find x. Find two numbers x and y such that x. Had he walked the whole distance at the faster rate. The front wheel makes 64 more revolu tions than the rear wheel in traveling 3. Find all the roots. and x. GROUP A. (Omit one question of this group. 6. m. real and complex.1914 1 MATHEMATICS AZ-QUADRATICS AND BEYOND Monday No extra credit will be given for more than six questions. Six questions required. Friday 4. prove the following relations: 2. No extra credit will be given for more than six questions. The circumference of the rear wheel of a carriage is 2 feet greater than the circumference of the front wheel. To do the work alone C would take twice as long as A and 2 hours longer than B.15-6 p.I=-1. Find his rate. I b) Solve xi-12x . a) By studying the signs of xa-2x3 -5x2+6x-1=0. and xy are in geometric progression. Solve the following equations by the use of determinants: x-3y=1. Associate properly the values of x and y. 3 2 Do both answers satisfy the equation? GROUP B. no three of which are in the same straight line? b) How many such triangles can be drawn if four of the given points lie in a straight line ? Without expanding the determinants. y. MATHEMATICS B-ADVANCED ALGEBRA 9=4 11. 4. 4 7.

Ph. A. and Ph. 19o6 Louis SERLE DEDERICK . .B. 1899 Princeton University.. 1898 9 4 1 ARTHUR DUNN PITCHER. Ph. A. 19o6. University of Chicago. Md. Ph... Professor of Mathematics. 1898 JOHN 1 4 Boys.. New York. Head of Department of Mathematics. Teacher New York. . 1889.. Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 19o6. Yale University. Ph. 1904. of Mathematics.B.Y. University of Gottingen. C.D. B. . A.A. Associate Professor of Mathematics. 19o1. GARDNER.A.. 1898. Ph.B. . Instructor in Mathematics. A. 191o HARRY WILFRED REDDICK . A.M. 1894.E.B. .B... Mount Holyoke College Coates College. 19o5.B... Colorado College. 1891.M... igoo io6 107 .D. Princeton University Kenyon College..Sc. 1897.D. Instructor in Mathematics. ... Allen-Stevenson School.. 191o .Y. Professor of Mathematics.. Ph. State University of Iowa. ..M. 19o1 JOE GARNER ESTILL. 1892..M.M.. Amherst College.B. Master in Mathematics.M.D.. N. Hotchkiss School... . A...M.. William Penn High School. Harvard University.. and A. Assistant Professor of Physics... Teacher of Mathematics. A. and A. 1898 JONATHAN TAYLOR RORER.B.. and Ph. 1894. Tome School for Deposit. 19o8 HARVEY NATHANIEL DAVIS . . John Hopkins University. University of Gottingen. 1894.. . Philadelphia. Cornell University Iowa State College. A. and A..B. Columbia University. . Upper Iowa University. Dartmouth College University of Kansas.Geometry EXAMINERS 1 JAMES GRAHAM HARDY . 1894 JAMEs GRAHAM HARDY .. VIRGIL SNYDER . Lakeville.. A.D. 1907.M. University of Chicago. 1894 GEORGE MACFEELY CONWELL .B.. University of Illinois..S. Exeter. Teacher of Mathematics. Professor of Mathematics. Professor of Mathematics. Yale University Louis LINCOLN WHITNEY. ...B.Y. Ph. . Williams College Lafayette College. B. Instructor in Mathematics. . 189o. 19o9 ELEANOR CATHERINE DOAK. Teacher Mathematics. 19o5. New York. bI. and A. University of Pennsylvania.... Harvard University.H. .Sc. and M. Harvard University. Upper Iowa University. A. Pa. . . Ethical Culture High School.. HENRY LEWIS SWEET.. . .B. A. Dickinson College..B.... A. 1897. Johns Hopkins University.. .D.. . 19oi N. of Harvard University. Port R.. N.. Phillips Exeter Academy.B... . ANDREW EWING.. Ph.. Collegiate School.. A. A. B. 1895. A. 19o6 READERS 1914 VIRGIL SNYDER . 1897 CECIL.. 1889 . Ph. 1907. Cornell University Iowa State College. 19o6. and A. N. . 1902. 1907 CHARLES BURTON WALSH.S.D. A.. Columbia University University of Indiana. Williams College Lafayette College. Conn. .D. . Instructor in Mathematics.D.. Harvard University Brown University.D. B.

cylinder.. conical surface. How high is the upper end of the prop above the level field? (Result in feet to one decimal. b) Which of the angles of the figure thus drawn are equal to the angles A. Find the radius of the arc and the length of the arc in feet. cone of revolution. a) In the triangle ABC. . (Results to be correct to two decimals. and for the lateral area of a prism. 20CP. also the area inclosed by the track in acres.15 a.. The diameter of the base of the vessel is 5 inches. 4.) 108 log . Complete this theorem and prove: If two sides of . Show how to construct an equilateral triangle equivalent to a given square. The candidate is requested to state on the cover of the answer-book what textbook of Geometry was used in preparation. . which rolls around an equilateral triangle.. b) Compute to two decimals the area inclosed by the locus and the perimeter of the locus. . surface of a sphere. 4.) 1. pyramid. what is the volume of the piece cut off ? 7• Define prism. It is desired to construct a half-mile track. CF. What is the weight in ounces of the lump of gold if gold weighs r 1 ounces per cubic inch? 6. No extra credit will be given for more than six questions. and its angles are 100 .. (Answer four questions from this groin. parallelopiped. the diagonals mutually divide each other into segments which are in the ratio of one of the equal sides to the fourth side of the trapezoid. pyramid. m.. area of a spherical triangle is loo square inches.1914 1914 MATHEMATICS C-PLANE GEOMETRY Tuesday 9-11 a. and is less than . Accurately construct the triangle and its altitudes AD.Prove: If three sides of a trapezoid are equal. regular pyramid. What is the radius of the sphere on which the triangle lies? 5. MATHEMATICS D-SOLID GEOMETRY 11. rests on the ground 16 feet from the foot of the embankment. the angles opposite are unequal. they are similar. Give mensuration formulas for the volume o£ a prism. of the original triangle? Prove one such equality. B=45*. 6. A. AB = 3 inches.. m.. lune. Tuesday Six questions are required. The _start and finish are to be straight-ways intersecting at right angles at the goal. . measured along its sloping side. ' The rest of the track is to be an arc of a circle tangent to the two straight-ways. The segments intercepted by three parallel planes on all straight lines meeting 2. Point out where it is needed and used in your proof. Complete and prove: The angle between two secants intersecting without the circle is measured by ..) g. C. (Answer two questions from this group.The ° 64 . BE. A sloping embankment rises from a level field. State the hypothesis of the above theorem. If the top of the cap is cut off by a plane parallel to its base and 5 inches above it. radius one-half inch. . 3.. 2. A =&P. GROUP B. A glass vessel made in the form of a right circular cylinder contains a certain amount of water. and the greater . GROUP 1. to 1 p. If a plane contains one element of a cylinder and meets the cylinder in one other point.. The candidate is requested to state on the cover of the answer-book what textbook of Geometry was used in preparation. State the converse of the theorem. and the other end rests 9 feet up the embankment. 20 feet long. then it contains another element also. m. 5. ° 3. One end of a prop. . cone. The stone cap of a gate post is in the form of a regular square pyramid Whose base measures 4 inches on a side and whose altitude is 15 inches. show all necessary construction lines and arcs. them are in the same proportion..) 8. a) Construct the locus of the center of a circle. When an irregular mass of gold is dropped into the vessel it is entirely covered by the water and the level of the water rises 3 inches. sphere. and the section is a parallelogram. altitude two inches. a triangle are unequal. .Prove: If two triangles have their sides respectively proportional.Complete and prove the theorem: The sum of the angles of a spherical triangle is greater than . .. B. spherical triangle.) 7. (Actual construction not required. .

(Omit one question from this group. b=72. C=4i 10'.234 b) By means of the ruler and compasses show how to construct the angles x and y. (Omit one question from this group. Prove one of these relations. angle subtended by a cliff and the other ship. Find the value of x.) b) In a right spherical triangle. (Answer both questions. In the oblique plane triangle ABC.) Express the six functions of (186°-}-x) in terms of functions of the acute angle x. GROUP C. (Omit one question from this group. 4.) Prove the following theorem: In any plane triangle a+b _ tan a-b tan z (A +B) z (A -B) Each of two ships A and B. (Omit one question from this group. Illustrate by means of figures.234 B. 4. 5GROUP B. sin x+sin 2x=I. m. b) Illustrate b) 2. without solving. quadrantal triangles. b) 3. 7. Prove tan .. GROUP 4. Describe the variation in cos x as x varies from 90° to 27o°. m.2X6. the side opposite the right angle is nearer a right angle than is either oblique side.074 17. a) MATHEMATICS F-PLANE TRIGONOMETRY Saturday GROUP 1. b=650. 45° . given: cos x=3. 60° . measures the horizontal . a) 2. a) b) Define polar triangles. spherical excess. b=66. Each of two ships A and B. Assuming the formula for the cosine of the sum of two angles. prove: and verify for cos 3x= cos x (1-4 sine x). find the remaining parts. prove cot A cot B = cos c. V/39. Prove one of these relations.12. 8. Prove tan ' -I'F +tan- I *=45'. The sides of a triangle are 3. Find all the values of x between c and 360 ° that will satisfy the. a) Find the value of x. If the angle of elevation of the cliff from A is 15° 24' what is the height of the cliff ? 7. If the angle of elevation of the cliff from A is I5° 24' what is the height of the cliff ? Solve the spherical triangle. tan y=-3.' I+tan. given cos x43. 2 4 P.2Xo. the angles are 48° 17' and IIO Io' respectively. 415 yards apart. given a=550 . x=3o° .) 6. C=9o°. given a=91. 2qo° . 6. the angles are 48° 17' and Iiop Io' respectively. show. measures the horizontal angle subtended by a cliff and the other ship. 8. C=7o ° . 415 yards apart. not biquadrantal. Describe the variation in cos x as x varies from 90° to by means of figures.43.074 17. Write the formulas necessary to solve the quadrantal triangle given a=9o. .) A. - A.iquation 5. Find all the values of x between o and 360 ° that satisfy the equation 3. In a right spherical triangle. given cos x= V 43.1 *=450.1914 1914 MATHEMATICS E-TRIGONOMETRY (PLANE AND SPHERICAL) Saturday GROUP I. a) 2 -4 P. that the largest angle is greater than 120° .a) sin x+sin 2x =I. Express the six functions of (18cP+x) in terms of functions of the acute angle x.

MUSIC .

Harvard University. Music EXAMINERS 1914 LEO 3. c) The use of the cornet by Beethoven in his symphonies is very limited.1 914 MUSIC A-APPRECIATION Saturday 4. Name three composers who were living in the year 1840.B. 1888. What are the chief features of the Rondo Form? Name one or more works written in this form. .. Supervisor of Music. b) The piano part in Haydn's Emperor Quartet was expressively given. . manner. . Hartford. b) Matters of style. . TRACEY . Columbia University S. RICH LEWIS . Teacher of Music. Professor of Theory and History of Music. . EDWIN Associate in Music.Y. Wellesley College Tufts College.Give reasons for the continued fame and popularity of the Hallelujah Chorus. Opus 26. Brown University. their treatment and development. A. 1889 CLARENCE GRANT HAMILTON . 4.. . a. ... and A. Matters of mere form-outline need not be mentioned. Explain the terms classic and romantic as applied to these works. is said to be a romantic work. . Tufts College Associate Professor of Music. .B.The Bach Gavotte from the Sixth English Suite is said to be a classic work.M. The following topics are suggested: a) The several themes. e) The soprano soloist sang as an encore a Chopin Ballade. . . N. . Mention characteristics of the work which you personally like or dislike. 1888. Give the approximate age of each at that time.Write concerning each movement of Schubert's Unfinished Symphony. Give your reasons for doubting the following statements: a) The Scherzo from Mozart's G Minor Symphony was rendered in a dignified manner. . the Chopin Polonaise. igoo RALPH LYMAN BALDWIN.15-6 p. Conn.M. No. New York. d) Schumann cleverly introduces astrain from "The Watch on the Rhine" in his Faschingsschwank. Morris High School. . READERS 1914 FRANK EDWIN WARD . . feeling. . 1. 1887. c) Details concerning one or more passages which have specially interested you. mood.m.B. I. . A.. Hartford Public Schools. A. and A. Name three of the principal compositions of each composer. 5. 6. also name the towns or cities in which he did important work.

Harmonize in four vocal parts: 9-11 a.mor . The passages need not be copied: (A) or r - M --) _ -#-~-~ -4--~- j7- =RNIQ ir6 .tal praise For the love that crowns our days. Use the numbers (which refer to chords or notes directly beneath them) as a guide to your comments. Analyze the numbered portions of the following passage. Harmonize in four vocal parts. and give reasons for your preference. im . No portion of the passage need be copied: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 2. the better. making the Soprano melodious: 4. Complete the setting of the following text. in each case.1 914 MUSIC B-HARMONY Saturday i. effecting a cadence in the original key: Praise to God. Of the following alternative passages indicate. 5. m. 3.

E. (A) Write an original four-measure phrase. each arranged for four voices. Inversions may be used. prefixing the proper key-signature. 2. r. piano. to its key-note (tonic) 4. adding time-signature and bars: R ~--R r-r r-r 6. VOICE. Choose (A) or (B). 7. 6 ~ ~ H 7 8 9 ~-_ 0 1 10 Write and fully name the inversion of each of the following intervals: (A) (C) (D) (]E~) (B) 3. Omit any 5. Write the Dominant Triads of the major keys of D. A-flat. upward and downward.1 94 MUSIC-D. 9. m. Write the following passage. Give four pairs of Italian terms of tempo or expression. Copy the following fragment. for example. . No portion of the passage need be copied. each pair indicating contrast. Harmonize: . PIANOFORTE. 8. Use the numbers as a guide to your comments. Name the composition and its composer. concluding as follows: (B) Write at least four measures of a theme from a composition you have studied. forte. F. The following are portions of scales. indicating keys and chords. 1 2 3 4 5. F. Analyze the numbered portions of the following fragment. Complete each of these. VIOLIN Saturday 4:r5-6:oo p. superfluous characters and add any that become requisite.

PHYSICS .

1892. . . Phila- i.B.. B. Find. Johns Hopkins University. A. A. the allowance that he should make on account of the distance of the gun. Trinity School. delphia.. . Ph. William Penn Charter School.D. . The resulting tempera ture was 21..D.. . long and weighing 61bs. GROup York. Port Deposit. 1896 JOSEPH MELVILLE ARTHUR... Instructor in Physics. Md. Tufts College. 1903. 1896 A. .D.. (Omit one question from this group.Y. is loo cubic centimeters.B. (Omit one question from this group.) READERS 1 1 3. to one-tenth. An observer sets his watch by the report of a signal gun one mile away. 9. A. Columbia University. Amherst College Princeton University. 1903 At what depth in a lake will a bubble of air have one-half the volume that it has on reaching the surface when the barometric height at the surface is 73 centimeters? (The density of mercury is 13. Ph. Tome School for Boys. the temperature of the air being 20° C. Smith College GROUP FRANK ALLAN WATERMAN . (Omit one question from this group. . 6. . MORSE . . Professor Princeton University.Y. . No extra credit will be given for more than ten questions. 1899 LEIGHTON B. m. 1888. .B. .A 5-lb. was dropped into 500 grams of water at temperature 18° C. Explain the construction and operation of some form of refrigerating apparatus as used for making artificial ice or for cooling rooms. Master in Science.M. .) Teacher of Physics and Chemistry. Why is it easier to roll a barrel up a long board into a wagon than to lift it vertically ? How does the work done against gravity when the barrel is rolled up the board compare in amount with the work required to lift it vertically? 2. q. Columbia University. . Hackley School. Answer ten questions as indicated below. . A ball is thrown up and 5 seconds later is caught.B. N. Ph. 1884 DANIEL EDWARD OWEN. 1881.. A teacher's certificate covering the laboratory instruction must be presented as part of the examination. of Physics. 19o8 Tarrytown. .) FRANK HATHAWAY TOWSLEY.B. 8. Master in Science. University of Pennsylvania. Find the specific heat of nickel. . . Instructor in Mathematics and Science.. 1913 Columbia University C. preferably one which you have personally performed. 1888. Smith College 4. . The volume of a body of gas d( 27 0 C. of a second. . . If the pressure on the gas is doubled to what temperature must it be heated in order to maintain the volume constant? 122 123 . Ph. and Ph. .. A. a) stow high did it rise? b) With what velocity did it return to the hand? GROup 9 4 FRANK ALLAN WATERMAN . . . A. by which the pitch of a musical tone may be determined.. Pa.D. At what point must the bar be supported to balance in a horizontal position ? of Physics.B. Professor Princeton University.. Bowdoin College. New Describe an experiment. ..) ARTHUR LALANNE KIMBALL .6. Dickinson College. Professor of Physics. . .4° C. weight is hung from one end of a uniform bar of wood 4 ft.E.. .1914 PHYSICS Physics EXAMINERS 1 914 Monday 2-4 P. 19o2 SYDNEY AYLMER-SMALL. N. and Ph. . Iowa College. . E. and A. Ph:B. . . What is meant by the specific heat of a substance? A piece of nickel weighing 200 grams at temperature 98 ° C. . 1889. .D.

With what resistance should it be shunted in order that only one-tenth of the current in the main circuit may pass through it? 124 . How is the bending of a ray of light passing from air into water explained by the wave theory of light? Illustrate by means of a diagram. found. A galvanometer has a resistance of 171 ohms. (Omit one question from this group. to develop a horse-power.Group D. expressed in per cent? 15. How does a charge of electricity distribute itself on an insulated conducting body such as a metal pail or cup? How is the distribution tested experimentally ? r4• An electric motor. (Omit one question from this group.000 miles. 13. ii i. What is the efficiency of the motor. The distance from the earth to the sun is approximately 93.) ro. How long a time is required for light to traverse this distance? At what distance from a 4o-candle-power mantle burner would a newspaper receive the same illumination as it would receive from an 8-candle-power incandescent lamp z feet distant from it? Group E. requires 8.000.25 amperes at an electromotive force of 220 volts. by a brake test.) 12. Describe a method by which the velocity of light has been determined.

despu6s de una navegacion feliz que dur6 69 dias.. y al mismo tiempo en el principal foco cientffico en Orden a la geograffa. Haverford College. existencia de islas a las que pretendfan haber llegado algunos navegantes. le llev6 ante los Reyes. A.M. o de un pueblecito proximo a esta ciudad y.Y. and Ph. 1904. Era Colfin natural de G6nova. Syracuse University. 1896..B.B. Harvard University Professor of Romance Languages and Literatures.. Cornell University Harvard University. Columbia University. 1894. La escuadrilla de Colfin. Brown University Brown University. o sea.m. la cum di6 dictamen favorable. donde el banquero italiano Berardi le protegi6 y le puso en relaci6n con muchos sefiores de la corte. y someti6 los planes de Colfin a una junta.B. 1892 LAWRENCE A. Instructor in Spanish. A. 1891. A. al Asia) por un camino enteramente opuesto al de los Portugueses. mas tambi6n una vasta cultura cosmografica. el genio. adquiriendo. A. Pero un oficial de la corte. 1895. Sus conversaciones con diferentes navegantes le procuraron noticias acerca de la existencia de tierras situadas al Oeste del mar AtUntico. creyendo siempre Colon y sus compaiieros que estaban en Asia. amenazaba con .Y.15-6 p.B. A. 1907 READERS 19 4 ALBERT BUSHNELL JOHNSON. compuesta de tres carabelas. Instructor in Spanish. 1902 LAWRENCE A.B. uno de los mercados mas importantes. and Ph. Viaj6 mucho Colon en navfos portugueses.. a su vez. del comercio europeo.sublevarse. Unido esto a la convicci6n que Colfin tenfa de la esfericidad de la tierra. desalentada por no hallar tierra o por otro motivo. Spanish EXAMINERS 1914 j EREMIAH DENIS MATHIAS FORD. aiios despu6s. A. 1895.M. Doiia Isabel no quiso decidirse sin ofr a personas doctas. A. y el continente descubierto recibi6. Vino a Espafia para proponer a los soberanos de Castilla su trascendental viaje. hall6se Colfin en el centro de las grandes expediciones marinas de la 6poca.. N. Establecido en Lisboa poco despu6s. a las cuales aluden varios testimonios de aquel tiempo. Ph. y.... No se desalent6 por esto Colfin. Los Portugueses habian tomado con empeho el explorar la costa occidental de Africa y doblarla en su extremo Sur. se interes6 por 61 y le presento. 1907 Translate into English: Al mismo tiempo que los Reyes Catolicos ensanchaban el territorio castellano con todo to perteneciente al reino de Granada. en vez de bajar hasta el Cabo de Buena Esperanza. 1 Associate Professor of the Romance Languages. al cardenal Mendoza.D.B. 1904. entonces.M. de familia de marinos. que figuran durante el siglo xv al servicio del rey de Francia.M. para it derechamente a ift Indias. 1897 WILLIAM WISTAR COMFORT. navegando derecho al Oeste. New York. New York.. el nombre de America. El primer sitio en que Colon residi6 fu6 la ciudad de Sevilla. Syracuse University. 4. WILKINS. De Witt Clinton High School. 12 6 . cuando ya su tripulaci6n. la perseverancia y la suerte de un marino extranjero incorporaban a la Corona un continente descono cido hasta entonces y muy superior en extensi6n y en recursos naturales a la Europa entera. and A. N. Smith Professor of the French and Spanish Languages. si no dedicado a la vida del mar desde joven. la cual los-tuvo por imposibles. Ph. quien. que suponen 14. ayudado por Quintanilla y otros personajes r.1914 ELEMENTARY SPANISH Wednesday The use of clear and idiomatic English is required. 1894.. no solo la practica de la navegacion. Quintanilla..D. incluso mapas de comienzos y mediados del siglo xv. De Witt Clinton High-School.obtuvo la reuni6n de una nueva junta en Salamanca. quienes le acogieron con desprecio o con frialdad. El marino llamabase Crist6bal Colon. Harvard University. A. arrib6 el 12 de octubre a la isla de Guanahani en las Antillas. se hizo a la vela en la maiiana del 3 de agosto de 1492 y.. le hizo concebir el proyecto de llegar a las Indias (es decir. representado por la escuela de Sagres. WILKINS..M. Columbia University.

hacer. 9. te. John White. a) The present subjunctive. I. This pen is mine. 3. If I had nothing to do this afternoon. We are glad to have relations with your house. 1VEw YORK. Two years ago I spent six months in Spain. distinguir. traer. the one over yonder is John's. pedir. Havana. of caer. 8. third person singular. c) The imperfect subjunctive. do not tell it to them. 7. b) The future indicative. we wish her to write it. .I. What a pity that your (formal) cousin did not arrive before we left the house. according to choice. I am sorry that you do not believe what I have just said. salir. BLACK & CO. Write the following verb forms: . Illustrate at least two different ways of rendering than in Spanish. My dear brother. Cuba. We do not wish to write the letter. ser. d) The imperative singular and plural of oir. saber. of querer. 194 Mr. rezar. reir. Translate into Spanish: It must be ten o'clock now. io. tell it to us. DEAR SIR: We have your letter of the 8th of the present month and we take pleasure in sending you the goods ordered. morir. etc. a. On opening the door. WM. 6. of sacar. in order to learn the language of that country. 3. I should take a walk in the country. Yours truly. I must go at once. a) When does the conjunctive object pronoun (me. State and illustrate the chief rules for the sequence of tenses in Spanish. 4. precede or follow its verb ? 4. venir. Pagar. When the train starts. June Iq. first person singular. we saw our father coming toward us. third person plural.) stand before its verb ? b) When must it follow its verb ? c) When may it. a. please open the window. that one is yours. hacer. 5.

.. and A. B. Give an account of the life history of any reptile.D. Describe the structure of any annelid that you have studied.B.B.. Ph. 1902.. Name three important discoveries in zoology. N. 1899 PAUL BLAKESLEE MANN.1 914 ZOOLOGY Monday 2-4 p. Describe reflex action and give two examples. Cornell University. A. A teacher's certificate covering the laboratory instruction must be presented as part of the examination. Evander Childs High School. 1889. . . Columbia University. Compare the process of breathing in a crayfish with that in an insect. . 1894. 2. 1896. . and Ph. giving a brief account of the persons concerned in them... 4. N. Professor of Zo6logy. 7.. Mann.. 6. ..Describe three examples of the adaptation of animals to their surroundings.D. 1902. Name the classes of arthropods and describe fully the external structure of a representative of one of these classes. . 5.Y. Answer any eight questions.S. Mount Syracuse University. 1903 1 30 . Cornell University. A..Contrast invertebrates with vertebrates. . and A.D.M. Evander Childs High School. Assistant Professor of Zo6logy. Head of Department of Biology.B. 8. University of Chicago. 9. No extra credit will be given for more than eight questions. Harvard University Holyoke College Name and describe briefly a representative of each of six different animal groups (phyla or classes) found in a fresh-water pond. 1903 READERS 1 914 TAMES HOWARD McGREGOR . . S.M. 1896 PAUL BLAKESLEE 3. 110. Describe the egg of a frog and give an account of the animal that hatches from it.. A. GEORGE HOWARD PARKER . 1887.M.. New York. Ph. Zo6logy EXAMINERS 1 i. . Columbia University Ohio State University. In.Y. Name three phyla of invertebrates and give their distinguishing characteristics. Head of Department of Biology. 914 of Zoology. 1891 CORNELIA MARIA CLAPP . .B. Professor Harvard University. . New York. and S.

SCHEDULE OF EXAMINATIONS 1 33 .

15-6 Friday. 2 -4 2-4 2 -4 4. Books I-11 I. 9-11 Greek A z (grammar) . 134 9-11 11.15-1 2-4 2. 2-4 French B (intermediate) .4 2 -4 2 -4 4. . .15-6 9-11 9-11 9-11 11. 2-4 Latin Q (sight translation of poetry) .15-6 4.15-1 Latin S (V ergil -1Eneid I.15-1 2-4 4. Latin C (Cicero) Latin P (advanced sight translation of prose) Latin 2 (elementary prose composition) .15-6 4.15-6 Mathematics A (elementary algebra complete) Mathematics A z (algebra to quadratics) Mathematics A 2 (quadratics and beyond) Physics Biology Botany Zo6logy History B (mediaeval and modern history) History D (American history) Tuesday.15-6 4.15-12.15-1 2-4 4.15-6 9-11 9-11 11.15-6 4. . 1914 Monday. June z8 Latin 4 (Cicero . Greek B (Xenophon's Anabasis) Mathematics B (advanced algebra) 15-20. 9-11 Greek H (sight translation of Homer) . Music A (appreciation) .15-6 4. Latin B (Cxsar) Latin z (grammar) French A (elementary) German B (intermediate) German BC (intermediate and advanced) Spanish Thursday.15-6 Saturday. Greek F (prose composition) . F (violin) .15-6 4. Mathematics E (trigonometry) . 2-4 Latin D (Vergil) .15-6 4. . 4. 9-11 Greek CH (Homer's Iliad. and IV or VI. . 11. June zq Latin 3 (second year Latin) . Drawing . and sight translation of Homer) 9-11 Music B (harmony) . and sight translation of poetry) . E (voice) . Books I-III) . and sight translation of prose) .15-6 French BC (intermediate and advanced) 4.15-1 Greek G (sight translation of prose) .15 Greek A 2 (elementary prose composition) .15-1 2-4 4.15-6 4. June 16 Mathematics C (plane geometry) Mathematics D (solid geometry) German A (elementary) History A (ancient history) History C (English history) Wednesday. 9-11 Geography 9-11 Greek C (Homer's Iliad. II.15-6 9-11 11. June 20 Chemistry .Coi[eoe Entrance Examination :Board Schedule of Examinations June Latin f7 (elementary sight translation of prose) . Mathematics F (plane trigonometry only) . June zs 9-11 9-11 11. . .15-1 1 35 . 12. June zg English A (reading and practice) Latin 6 (advanced prose composition) English B (study and practice) .Manilian Law and Arehias. Music D (pianoforte) . . 11. .

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KXIWLE OF EXAMINATIONS - 133 tbbe otbeneeum Vress GINN AND COMPANY. 1914 BY THE COLLEGE ENTRANCE EXAMINATION BOARD II . BOSTON • U. 125 1 29 '. I5 19 25 33 UXAWING ENGLISH . 7 . 69 79 99 113 121 -NISH .PROPRIETORS . 43 47 57 9173 tse RMAN H MTOR Y LATIx UATHE.-5rs . E. .MATICS .S.•CH ALL RIGHTS RESERVED Lie:{N:RAPHY .A.5 7 EkJTANY CHEMISTRY COPYRIGHT.CONTENTS PAGE .

S. DRAWING . . . 33 43 MAN . 113 iSLCS hLt . . . . Zbe otbenteum Vrevs GINN AND COMPANY • PROPRIETORS . 1 29 133 kSEDUL-E OF EXAMINATIONS . .CONTENTS PAGE PREFACE • . . . . . . . . 1914 BY THE COLLEGE ENTRANCE EXAMINATION BOARD FRENCH ALL RIGHTS RESERVED 9 173 t:=. BOSTON • U. 19 25 .A.0. Rt TORti 69 79 99 +I£ . .oGY BOTANY 'CHEMISTRY COPYRIGHT. 47 57 GRF:FK . . . . _5 7 II 15 BI+4)L. . . 121 125 . .RAL'HY .

PRIETORS .S. .CONTENTS COPYRIGHT S 1914 BV THE COLLEGE ENTRANCE EXAMINATION BOARD ALL RIGHTS RESERVED 917•3 OCl'r' LE OF EXAMINATIONS abe otbenaeam OTess GINN AND COMPANY • PRO. BOSTON • U.A.

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