Rethinking  Multimedia Instructional Material Design  for an Equitable and Critical Pedagogy

Kristina Schneider Centre for Instructional Technology John Molson School of Business Concordia University Montreal, Canada Spring 2004

Presentation Objectives
Recognizing the need to integrate instructional  packages that engage learners in research, critical  thinking, awareness of their biases,  communication,  and allow them to build connections to diverse  ways of understanding Learning to construct and integrate engaging  activities requiring basic, creative, critical and  complex thinking skills, using goal‐oriented and  problem‐based activities

Presentation Outline
Presenting Concordia, JMSB and demographics Identifying needs and problems Addressing Needs via Instructional Design Designing with a Constructivist Approach Using Democratic and Equitable Activities Presenting JMSB’s current direction

Centre for Instructional Technology (CIT) 
Works in partnership with the staff and faculty of  the John Molson School of Business Offers a variety of services:
Desktop & audio‐visual support Technical support (network, Web & database) Media support (document formatting & graphic  design) – Educational technology support (course &  curriculum) – – –

John Molson School of Business (JMSB)
Is the business faculty of Concordia University  Offers a wide variety of programs:
– Undergraduate degrees
E.g.: Accounting, Marketing, Management, Commerce 

– MBA programs
With an Executive MBA & an Aviation MBA

– PhD courses & research

Concordia University
Is one of 4 Montreal Universities Is one of 2 Anglophone Montreal Universities Has 4 major faculties:
– – – – Arts and Sciences John Molson School of Business Engineering and Computer Sciences Fine Arts

Demographics
In November 2003: 30,801 students were  enrolled in academic  courses at Concordia  University Of these, 3,139 (over 10%)  were international students.

5,532 students (30% of  Concordia’s student  population) were enrolled  at the JMSB Of these international  students, 779 (30%) students  were studying in the JMSB

Demographics

JMSB International Students
307

118

109

82

63

51

34
USA

10
Antilles

4
Other

1
Oceania

China

Europe

Middle East

Asia (ex China)

Africa

Latin America

Demographics
JMSB and Concordia’s student population and  faculty is quite ethnically diverse. Other factors to  consider:
– There are many students who’s parents are  immigrants (2nd generation) – There is a large francophone population attending  both JMSB and Concordia – Race and ethnicity is not the only issue: every learner  has various needs and views the world differently

Addressing Our Diverse Population
There is a need for teaching and learning  environments to be: 
– – – inclusive equitable multicultural 

These environments are equally crucial in the  development of rich learning environments

Are Efforts Made?
There is a great amount of efforts made by  Concordia faculty and administration
– In the classroom, faculty makes students aware of  business practices in other cultures – The CIT works with JMSB faculty in developing  pedagogical resources – The administration offers international students  resources and help – Via special events and extra‐curricular activities   (E.g.: The JMSB Chinese New Year party) 

Are the Efforts Working?
Professors are willing to be more inclusive in their  teaching though often do not have the necessary  resources Professors are of various ethnic origins and various  backgrounds, yet most completed graduate studies  in traditional North American learning institutions Students still have a very North American view of  business and business culture

Identifying the Real Problem
Banks addressed the need for a change in the way   knowledge is processed:
“We must engage students in a process of attaining  knowledge in which they are required to critically analyse  conflicting paradigms and explanations and the values and  assumptions of different knowledge systems, forms and  categories.”
Banks, James (1992) A Curriculum for Empowerment, Action and Change

Identifying the Real Problem
Bennett identifies the main contributing deficits in  the teaching and learning process:
“There is a lack of conceptual clarity, a lack of agreement on  the goals of multicultural and global education, and the  lack of theoretical framework to guide teachers”
Bennett, Christine (1992) Strengthening Multicultural and Global Perspectives in the Curriculum

Identifying the Real Needs
A need for a a radical change in the way knowledge  is being transferred to learners A need for a set of frameworks for and approaches  to developing inclusive, equitable material A need for resources that enable students to  personalise their learning experience and cater to  multiple intelligences

The Teacher’s Burden
Grant and Zeichner propose teachers take it upon  themselves to become reflective teachers and make  changes from within, on a micro level:
“The reflective teacher is wholehearted in accepting all  students and is willing to learn about and affirm the  uniqueness of each student for whom he or she accepts  responsibility.”
Grant, G. & Zeichner K. (2000). “On Becoming A Reflective Teacher”. In Iseke‐Barnes J. & Wane.  N. (Eds), Equity in schools and society.

The Teacher’s Burden
Many teachers are not equipped with the time and  resources to accomplish such an onerous objective There is a desire to instil social change, but  between aspiration and accomplishment, there  must be a feasible plan The development and integration of instructional  packages has the potential provide teachers with a  methodology and resources

Addressing Needs via Instructional Design
Moore and Shattuck define Instructional Design as:
“[a] system of developing well‐structured instructional  materials using objectives, related teaching strategies,  systematic feedback and evaluation.”

Moore, M. G. & Shattuck, K. (July 2001). Glossary of Distance Education Terms.  https://courses.worldcampus.psu.edu/public/faculty/DEGlossary.shtml

We must go beyond this… We must go beyond this…

Rethinking Instructional Design
In order to contribute to an equitable curriculum  and a democratic classroom, an instructional design  package must contain additional criteria. These  include:
– – – – activities that require complex thinking skills democratic and equitable instructional materials student‐centered activities and materials accessible materials

Choosing Multimedia Learning Materials
Can be used in:
– traditional in‐class settings – a distance education program – a hybrid model

Can empower:
– teachers/facilitators as they strive to address the  myriad needs of their students – students as they can benefit from self‐paced and self‐ directed learning activities

Choosing Multimedia Learning Materials
Multimedia learning materials can enable the  integration of constructivist learning principles ‐‐ such as:
– multi‐goal oriented activities – problem‐based activities 

These activities require learners to consider a variety  of domains and perspectives, which is essential for  meaningful learning and building awareness

Reverting to Behaviorist Patterns
Multimedia learning materials have too often been  developed using a purely behaviorist pattern,  emphasizing:
a large text‐based content push geared towards  memorization of facts drill & practice type basic interactivities

Such approaches have neglected:
– subjective and critical thinking skills – learners who need to learn in other ways (audio‐ visual, etc.)

Reverting to Behaviorist Patterns
One of the main (perceived) reasons for building  simple multimedia learning materials is due to the  complexity of their development process  Some of the requirements can be:
– the time to design and develop – technical resources – required skills and expertise for the design

Designing with a Constructivist Approach
Jonassen suggests a “learner as designer” approach  where students use computers as cognitive tools in  order to access diverse information, interpret and  organize it and presenting their knowledge to  others.

Designing with a Constructivist Approach
Jonassen proposes an environment where students  take ownership of their learning with the help of  learning technologies:
“technologies should be used to keep students active,  constructive, collaborative, intentional, complex,  contextual, conversational, and reflective.”
Jonassen, D. H. (1999). Designing Constructivist Learning Environments (CLEs).  http://tiger.coe.missouri.edu/~jonassen/courses/CLE/index.html

Designing with a Constructivist Approach
Jonassen’s rhizome  diagram contains the  various requirements  for constructivist  learning  environments. 

Designing with a Constructivist Approach
Multimedia applications developed with a  constructivist approach can foster:
– – – – Research Critical thinking Communication Connection building

Not only to old ways of thinking, but more  importantly to new and enlightened ways of  understanding.

Developing a Complex Thinking  Framework
Is designed to contain:
– content/basic thinking skills – critical thinking skills – creative thinking skills

Is an action‐oriented thinking process, which:
– fosters multidisciplinary ways of understanding a  topic – engages a student’s awareness of their prior  knowledge and ways of knowing to develop a  broader and more inclusive perspective

Jonassen, D. H. (2002). Computers as Mindtools for Schools: Engaging Critical Thinking. 

Using Democratic and Equitable Activities
Greene and Zimmer study on the impact of adding  an Internet research component to a University‐level  business class found that:
“[S]tudents improved significantly in seven business skills  and interests, including increased proficiency with foreign  market research based on electronic information sources  and improved knowledge of doing business in a foreign  market.”
Greene, C. S. & Zimmer, R. (2003). An international internet research assignment‐assessment of value added.  Journal of Education for Business

Using Democratic and Equitable Activities
Via this activity, learners: developed cultural consciousness and global  perspective developed a better understanding of their own  worldview via self‐reflection reduced their ethnocentrism via awareness of the  other will potentially become business professionals with  a more democratic and inclusive approach

Using Democratic and Equitable Activities
Robertson and Alexander report on the success of  their “Critical Thinking Curriculum Model” (CTCM)  that integrated computer technology and solid  teaching practices in their instructional design  package.  The students were required to:
– do online research to compile data related to their  task – consider scientific, political, social/cultural and  economic aspects of the global issues 

Using Democratic and Equitable Activities
By researching information online, students had  access to a wider variety of resources and  perspectives from other regions and countries This activity also engaged students in creative  thinking, as they were required to summarize their  findings in a multimedia presentation
Robertson, B. & Alexander, R. (2003). Critical Thinking Curriculum Model, from  http://techknowlogia.org/TKL_active_pages2/CurrentArticles/main.asp?IssueNumber=19& FileType=HTML&ArticleID=461

Using Democratic and Equitable Activities
WebQuest:
– Was developed at the Bernie Dodge at San Diego  State University – Has principles which are similar to the last 2  examples – Engage learners in an online treasure hunt to gather  the information required to meet their learning  objectives

Example of a WebQuest

Accessible Materials
Accessibility:
– can be defined as:
ease of use ease of access affordability availability

– is about the democratic quality that a resource can  have – requires careful planning and attention to the design

Accessible Materials
To be truly accessible, instructional packages  should:
be designed to foster complex thinking be democratic and unbiased promote student‐centered activities offer a variety of options to meet the diversity of  student needs – facilitate connection building – – – –

JMSB Past Initiatives
Via Learning Objects
– Curriculum‐aligned, supporting in‐class teaching
Financial Accounting  Linear Programming

Via Global Distance Education Programs
– Programs delivered to students located  internationally using Web technologies
Global Aviation MBA Program Aviation Security Management Training Course  (in partnership with ICAO)

JMSB’s Current Direction
Is replacing the more rigid technology with more  supple and flexible technologies Is focusing on making it’s distance education  programs completely electronic Is working with the professors to find alternative  ways of communicating with students and meet  their diverse needs

JMSB’s Current Direction
The Global Aviation MBA program 
– Case study:
learners compare and contrast the situations with situations  in their environment learners post their thoughts to a threaded discussion board learners read each other’s posts, respond to their classmates’ views and opinions electronically

– Truly interactive objects:
Editable text documents and/or with annotation features Editable spreadsheets Flexible databases

Discussion
Suggestions:
– Deconstruction of past initiatives (yours or others) – On other ways of including more equitable practices

Questions & Comments kschneider@jmsb.concordia.ca